WorldWideScience

Sample records for threshold gradient underlies

  1. Consolidation by Prefabricated Vertical Drains with a Threshold Gradient

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao Guo; Kang-He Xie; Yue-Bao Deng

    2014-01-01

    This paper shows the development of an approximate analytical solution of radial consolidation by prefabricated vertical drains with a threshold gradient. To understand the effect of the threshold gradient on consolidation, a parametric analysis was performed using the present solution. The applicability of the present solution was demonstrated in two cases, wherein the comparisons with Hansbo’s results and observed data were conducted. It was found that (1) the flow with the threshold gradie...

  2. Consolidation by Prefabricated Vertical Drains with a Threshold Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Guo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper shows the development of an approximate analytical solution of radial consolidation by prefabricated vertical drains with a threshold gradient. To understand the effect of the threshold gradient on consolidation, a parametric analysis was performed using the present solution. The applicability of the present solution was demonstrated in two cases, wherein the comparisons with Hansbo’s results and observed data were conducted. It was found that (1 the flow with the threshold gradient would not occur instantaneously throughout the whole unit cell. Rather, it gradually occurs from the vertical drain to the outside; (2 the moving boundary would never reach the outer radius of influence if R+1threshold gradient is, the greater the long-term excess pore pressure will be; and (5 the present solution could predict the consolidation behavior in soft clay better than previous methods.

  3. Threshold temperature gradient effect on migration of brine inclusions in salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pigford, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    Theories of the migration of brine inclusions in salt were interpreted as simple physical processes, and theories by Russian and US workers were shown to yield the same results. The migration theory was used to predict threshold temperature gradients below which migration of brine inclusions should not occur. The predicted threshold gradients were compared with the temperature gradients expected at the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. The theory of threshold gradients helps explain the existence of brine inclusions in natural salt deposits

  4. Stability of gradient semigroups under perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragão-Costa, E. R.; Caraballo, T.; Carvalho, A. N.; Langa, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this paper we prove that gradient-like semigroups (in the sense of Carvalho and Langa (2009 J. Diff. Eqns 246 2646-68)) are gradient semigroups (possess a Lyapunov function). This is primarily done to provide conditions under which gradient semigroups, in a general metric space, are stable under perturbation exploiting the known fact (see Carvalho and Langa (2009 J. Diff. Eqns 246 2646-68)) that gradient-like semigroups are stable under perturbation. The results presented here were motivated by the work carried out in Conley (1978 Isolated Invariant Sets and the Morse Index (CBMS Regional Conference Series in Mathematics vol 38) (RI: American Mathematical Society Providence)) for groups in compact metric spaces (see also Rybakowski (1987 The Homotopy Index and Partial Differential Equations (Universitext) (Berlin: Springer)) for the Morse decomposition of an invariant set for a semigroup on a compact metric space).

  5. Gradient-driven flux-tube simulations of ion temperature gradient turbulence close to the non-linear threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peeters, A. G.; Rath, F.; Buchholz, R.; Grosshauser, S. R.; Strintzi, D.; Weikl, A. [Physics Department, University of Bayreuth, Universitätsstrasse 30, Bayreuth (Germany); Camenen, Y. [Aix Marseille Univ, CNRS, PIIM, UMR 7345, Marseille (France); Candy, J. [General Atomics, PO Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Casson, F. J. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB, Oxon (United Kingdom); Hornsby, W. A. [Max Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, Boltzmannstrasse 2 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    It is shown that Ion Temperature Gradient turbulence close to the threshold exhibits a long time behaviour, with smaller heat fluxes at later times. This reduction is connected with the slow growth of long wave length zonal flows, and consequently, the numerical dissipation on these flows must be sufficiently small. Close to the nonlinear threshold for turbulence generation, a relatively small dissipation can maintain a turbulent state with a sizeable heat flux, through the damping of the zonal flow. Lowering the dissipation causes the turbulence, for temperature gradients close to the threshold, to be subdued. The heat flux then does not go smoothly to zero when the threshold is approached from above. Rather, a finite minimum heat flux is obtained below which no fully developed turbulent state exists. The threshold value of the temperature gradient length at which this finite heat flux is obtained is up to 30% larger compared with the threshold value obtained by extrapolating the heat flux to zero, and the cyclone base case is found to be nonlinearly stable. Transport is subdued when a fully developed staircase structure in the E × B shearing rate forms. Just above the threshold, an incomplete staircase develops, and transport is mediated by avalanche structures which propagate through the marginally stable regions.

  6. Segmentasi Pembuluh Darah Retina Pada Citra Fundus Menggunakan Gradient Based Adaptive Thresholding Dan Region Growing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deni Sutaji

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakSegmentasi pembuluh darah pada citra fundus retina menjadi hal yang substansial dalam dunia kedokteran, karena dapat digunakan untuk mendeteksi penyakit, seperti: diabetic retinopathy, hypertension, dan cardiovascular. Dokter membutuhkan waktu sekitar dua jam untuk mendeteksi pembuluh darah retina, sehingga diperlukan metode yang dapat membantu screening agar lebih cepat.Penelitian sebelumnya mampu melakukan segmentasi pembuluh darah yang sensitif terhadap variasi ukuran lebar pembuluh darah namun masih terjadi over-segmentasi pada area patologi. Oleh karena itu, penelitian ini bertujuan untuk mengembangkan metode segmentasi pembuluh darah pada citra fundus retina yang dapat mengurangi over-segmentasi pada area patologi menggunakan Gradient Based Adaptive Thresholding dan Region Growing.Metode yang diusulkan terdiri dari 3 tahap, yaitu segmentasi pembuluh darah utama, deteksi area patologi dan segmentasi pembuluh darah tipis. Tahap segmentasi pembuluh darah utama menggunakan high-pass filtering dan tophat reconstruction pada kanal hijau citra yang sudah diperbaiki kontrasnya sehingga lebih jelas perbedaan antara pembuluh darah dan background. Tahap deteksi area patologi menggunakan metode Gradient Based Adaptive Thresholding. Tahap segmentasi pembuluh darah tipis menggunakan Region Growing berdasarkan informasi label pembuluh darah utama dan label area patologi. Hasil segmentasi pembuluh darah utama dan pembuluh darah tipis kemudian digabungkan sehingga menjadi keluaran sistem berupa citra biner pembuluh darah. Berdasarkan hasil uji coba, metode ini mampu melakukan segmentasi pembuluh darah retina dengan baik pada citra fundus DRIVE, yaitu dengan akurasi rata-rata 95.25% dan nilai Area Under Curve (AUC pada kurva Relative Operating Characteristic (ROC sebesar 74.28%.                           Kata Kunci: citra fundus retina, gradient based adaptive thresholding, patologi, pembuluh darah retina, region growing

  7. Variational infrared image enhancement based on adaptive dual-threshold gradient field equalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wenda; Xu, Zhijun; Zhao, Jian; Zhao, Fan; Han, Xizhen

    2014-09-01

    Infrared images are characterized by low signal to noise ratio (SNR) and fuzzy texture edges. This article introduces the variational infrared image enhancement algorithm based on gradient field equalization with adaptive dual thresholds. Firstly, we transform the image into gradient domain and get the gradient histogram. Then, we do the gradient histogram equalization. By setting adaptive dual thresholds to qualify the gradients, the image is prevented from over enhancement. The total variation (TV) model is adopted in the reconstruction of the enhanced image to suppress noise. It is shown from experimental results that the image edge details are significantly enhanced, and therefore the algorithm is qualified for enhancement of infrared images in different applications.

  8. Threshold for the destabilisation of the ion-temperature-gradient mode in magnetically confined toroidal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zocco, A.; Xanthopoulos, P.; Doerk, H.; Connor, J. W.; Helander, P.

    2018-02-01

    The threshold for the resonant destabilisation of ion-temperature-gradient (ITG) driven instabilities that render the modes ubiquitous in both tokamaks and stellarators is investigated. We discover remarkably similar results for both confinement concepts if care is taken in the analysis of the effect of the global shear . We revisit, analytically and by means of gyrokinetic simulations, accepted tokamak results and discover inadequacies of some aspects of their theoretical interpretation. In particular, for standard tokamak configurations, we find that global shear effects on the critical gradient cannot be attributed to the wave-particle resonance destabilising mechanism of Hahm & Tang (Phys. Plasmas, vol. 1, 1989, pp. 1185-1192), but are consistent with a stabilising contribution predicted by Biglari et al. (Phys. Plasmas, vol. 1, 1989, pp. 109-118). Extensive analytical and numerical investigations show that virtually no previous tokamak theoretical predictions capture the temperature dependence of the mode frequency at marginality, thus leading to incorrect instability thresholds. In the asymptotic limit , where is the rotational transform, and such a threshold should be solely determined by the resonant toroidal branch of the ITG mode, we discover a family of unstable solutions below the previously known threshold of instability. This is true for a tokamak case described by a local local equilibrium, and for the stellarator Wendelstein 7-X, where these unstable solutions are present even for configurations with a small trapped-particle population. We conjecture they are of the Floquet type and derive their properties from the Fourier analysis of toroidal drift modes of Connor & Taylor (Phys. Fluids, vol. 30, 1987, pp. 3180-3185), and to Hill's theory of the motion of the lunar perigee (Acta Math., vol. 8, 1886, pp. 1-36). The temperature dependence of the newly determined threshold is given for both confinement concepts. In the first case, the new temperature-gradient

  9. Empirical gradient threshold technique for automated segmentation across image modalities and cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfoun, J; Majurski, M; Peskin, A; Breen, C; Bajcsy, P; Brady, M

    2015-10-01

    New microscopy technologies are enabling image acquisition of terabyte-sized data sets consisting of hundreds of thousands of images. In order to retrieve and analyze the biological information in these large data sets, segmentation is needed to detect the regions containing cells or cell colonies. Our work with hundreds of large images (each 21,000×21,000 pixels) requires a segmentation method that: (1) yields high segmentation accuracy, (2) is applicable to multiple cell lines with various densities of cells and cell colonies, and several imaging modalities, (3) can process large data sets in a timely manner, (4) has a low memory footprint and (5) has a small number of user-set parameters that do not require adjustment during the segmentation of large image sets. None of the currently available segmentation methods meet all these requirements. Segmentation based on image gradient thresholding is fast and has a low memory footprint. However, existing techniques that automate the selection of the gradient image threshold do not work across image modalities, multiple cell lines, and a wide range of foreground/background densities (requirement 2) and all failed the requirement for robust parameters that do not require re-adjustment with time (requirement 5). We present a novel and empirically derived image gradient threshold selection method for separating foreground and background pixels in an image that meets all the requirements listed above. We quantify the difference between our approach and existing ones in terms of accuracy, execution speed, memory usage and number of adjustable parameters on a reference data set. This reference data set consists of 501 validation images with manually determined segmentations and image sizes ranging from 0.36 Megapixels to 850 Megapixels. It includes four different cell lines and two image modalities: phase contrast and fluorescent. Our new technique, called Empirical Gradient Threshold (EGT), is derived from this reference

  10. Evolution acts on enhancer organization to fine-tune gradient threshold readouts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Crocker

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The elucidation of principles governing evolution of gene regulatory sequence is critical to the study of metazoan diversification. We are therefore exploring the structure and organizational constraints of regulatory sequences by studying functionally equivalent cis-regulatory modules (CRMs that have been evolving in parallel across several loci. Such an independent dataset allows a multi-locus study that is not hampered by nonfunctional or constrained homology. The neurogenic ectoderm enhancers (NEEs of Drosophila melanogaster are one such class of coordinately regulated CRMs. The NEEs share a common organization of binding sites and as a set would be useful to study the relationship between CRM organization and CRM activity across evolving lineages. We used the D. melanogaster transgenic system to screen for functional adaptations in the NEEs from divergent drosophilid species. We show that the individual NEE modules across a genome in any one lineage have independently evolved adaptations to compensate for lineage-specific developmental and/or genomic changes. Specifically, we show that both the site composition and the site organization of NEEs have been finely tuned by distinct, lineage-specific selection pressures in each of the three divergent species that we have examined: D. melanogaster, D. pseudoobscura, and D. virilis. Furthermore, by precisely altering the organization of NEEs with different morphogen gradient threshold readouts, we show that CRM organizational evolution is sufficient for explaining changes in enhancer activity. Thus, evolution can act on CRM organization to fine-tune morphogen gradient threshold readouts over a wide dynamic range. Our study demonstrates that equivalence classes of CRMs are powerful tools for detecting lineage-specific adaptations by gene regulatory sequences.

  11. Optimal Investment Under Transaction Costs: A Threshold Rebalanced Portfolio Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Sait; Donmez, Mehmet Ali; Kozat, Suleyman Serdar

    2013-06-01

    We study optimal investment in a financial market having a finite number of assets from a signal processing perspective. We investigate how an investor should distribute capital over these assets and when he should reallocate the distribution of the funds over these assets to maximize the cumulative wealth over any investment period. In particular, we introduce a portfolio selection algorithm that maximizes the expected cumulative wealth in i.i.d. two-asset discrete-time markets where the market levies proportional transaction costs in buying and selling stocks. We achieve this using "threshold rebalanced portfolios", where trading occurs only if the portfolio breaches certain thresholds. Under the assumption that the relative price sequences have log-normal distribution from the Black-Scholes model, we evaluate the expected wealth under proportional transaction costs and find the threshold rebalanced portfolio that achieves the maximal expected cumulative wealth over any investment period. Our derivations can be readily extended to markets having more than two stocks, where these extensions are pointed out in the paper. As predicted from our derivations, we significantly improve the achieved wealth over portfolio selection algorithms from the literature on historical data sets.

  12. Determining the precipitable water vapor thresholds under different rainfall strengths in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Ta-Kang; Shih, Hsuan-Chang; Wang, Chuan-Sheng; Choy, Suelynn; Chen, Chieh-Hung; Hong, Jing-Shan

    2018-02-01

    Precipitable Water Vapor (PWV) plays an important role for weather forecasting. It is helpful in evaluating the changes of the weather system via observing the distribution of water vapor. The ability of calculating PWV from Global Positioning System (GPS) signals is useful to understand the special weather phenomenon. In this study, 95 ground-based GPS and rainfall stations in Taiwan were utilized from 2006 to 2012 to analyze the relationship between PWV and rainfall. The PWV data were classified into four classes (no, light, moderate and heavy rainfall), and the vertical gradients of the PWV were obtained and the variations of the PWV were analyzed. The results indicated that as the GPS elevation increased every 100 m, the PWV values decreased by 9.5 mm, 11.0 mm, 12.2 mm and 12.3 mm during the no, light, moderate and heavy rainfall conditions, respectively. After applying correction using the vertical gradients mentioned above, the average PWV thresholds were 41.8 mm, 52.9 mm, 62.5 mm and 64.4 mm under the no, light, moderate and heavy rainfall conditions, respectively. This study offers another type of empirical threshold to assist the rainfall prediction and can be used to distinguish the rainfall features between different areas in Taiwan.

  13. Predicting Escherichia coli's chemotactic drift under exponential gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanta, Sibendu; Layek, Ritwik; Kar, Shantimoy; Raj, M. Kiran; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta; Chakraborty, Suman

    2017-09-01

    Bacterial species are known to show chemotaxis, i.e., the directed motions in the presence of certain chemicals, whereas the motion is random in the absence of those chemicals. The bacteria modulate their run time to induce chemotactic drift towards the attractant chemicals and away from the repellent chemicals. However, the existing theoretical knowledge does not exhibit a proper match with experimental validation, and hence there is a need for developing alternate models and validating experimentally. In this paper a more robust theoretical model is proposed to investigate chemotactic drift of peritrichous Escherichia coli under an exponential nutrient gradient. An exponential gradient is used to understand the steady state behavior of drift because of the logarithmic functionality of the chemosensory receptors. Our theoretical estimations are validated through the experimentation and simulation results. Thus, the developed model successfully delineates the run time, run trajectory, and drift velocity as measured from the experiments.

  14. Measuring canopy loss and climatic thresholds from an extreme drought along a fivefold precipitation gradient across Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwantes, Amanda M; Swenson, Jennifer J; González-Roglich, Mariano; Johnson, Daniel M; Domec, Jean-Christophe; Jackson, Robert B

    2017-12-01

    Globally, trees are increasingly dying from extreme drought, a trend that is expected to increase with climate change. Loss of trees has significant ecological, biophysical, and biogeochemical consequences. In 2011, a record drought caused widespread tree mortality in Texas. Using remotely sensed imagery, we quantified canopy loss during and after the drought across the state at 30-m spatial resolution, from the eastern pine/hardwood forests to the western shrublands, a region that includes the boundaries of many species ranges. Canopy loss observations in ~200 multitemporal fine-scale orthophotos (1-m) were used to train coarser Landsat imagery (30-m) to create 30-m binary statewide canopy loss maps. We found that canopy loss occurred across all major ecoregions of Texas, with an average loss of 9.5%. The drought had the highest impact in post oak woodlands, pinyon-juniper shrublands and Ashe juniper woodlands. Focusing on a 100-km by ~1,000-km transect spanning the State's fivefold east-west precipitation gradient (~1,500 to ~300 mm), we compared spatially explicit 2011 climatic anomalies to our canopy loss maps. Much of the canopy loss occurred in areas that passed specific climatic thresholds: warm season anomalies in mean temperature (+1.6°C) and vapor pressure deficit (VPD, +0.66 kPa), annual percent deviation in precipitation (-38%), and 2011 difference between precipitation and potential evapotranspiration (-1,206 mm). Although similarly low precipitation occurred during the landmark 1950s drought, the VPD and temperature anomalies observed in 2011 were even greater. Furthermore, future climate data under the representative concentration pathway 8.5 trajectory project that average values will surpass the 2011 VPD anomaly during the 2070-2099 period and the temperature anomaly during the 2040-2099 period. Identifying vulnerable ecological systems to drought stress and climate thresholds associated with canopy loss will aid in predicting how forests will

  15. Europe's Other Poverty Measures: Absolute Thresholds Underlying Social Assistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavier, Richard

    2009-01-01

    The first thing many learn about international poverty measurement is that European nations apply a "relative" poverty threshold and that they also do a better job of reducing poverty. Unlike the European model, the "absolute" U.S. poverty threshold does not increase in real value when the nation's standard of living rises,…

  16. Factors limiting the operation of structures under high gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schriber, S.O.

    1986-01-01

    Factors limiting the operation of rf structures under high-gradient conditions are described. Included are recent rf measurements at laboratories in Europe, Asia, and North America and how these measurements relate to earlier data as exemplified by the use of the Kilpatrick criterion (Kp). Operation limitations will cover mechanical, geometry, thermal, and surface constraints and the associated impact on structure design, fabrication, and material selection. Generally, structures operating continuous wave (100% duty factor) appear to be limited to peak surface fields at about twice the Kilpatrick limit, whereas pulsed structures operating with pulse lengths less than a millisecond can attain peak surface fields five times the Kilpatrick limit

  17. The distortion of the level set gradient under advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trujillo, Mario F.; Anumolu, Lakshman; Ryddner, Doug

    2017-04-01

    The practice of periodically reinitializing the level set function is well established in two-phase flow applications as a way of controlling the growth of anomalies and/or numerical errors. In the present work, the underlying roots of this anomalous growth are studied, where it is established that the augmentation of the magnitude of the level set gradient (| ∇ϕ |) is directly connected to the nature of the flow field; hence, it is not necessarily the result of some type of numerical error. More specifically, for a general flow field advecting the level set function, it is shown that the eigenpairs of the strain rate tensor are responsible for the rate of change of | ∇ϕ | along a fluid particle trajectory. This straining action not only affects the magnitude of | ∇ϕ |, but the general character of ϕ, and consequently contributes to the growth in numerical error. These numerical consequences are examined by adopting the Gradient Augmented Level Set method. Specifically, it is shown that the local error for ϕ is directly connected to the size of | ∇ϕ | and to the magnitude of the second and fourth order derivatives of ϕ. These analytical findings are subsequently supported by various examples. The role of reinitialization is discussed, where it is shown that in cases where the zero level set contour has a local radius of curvature that is below the local grid resolution, reinitialization exacerbates rather than diminishes the degree of error. For other cases, where the interface is well resolved, reinitialization helps stabilize the error as intended.

  18. BLOOD VESSELS SEGMENTATION BY RADIAL GRADIENT SYMMETRY METHOD VIA DIFFERENT THRESHOLD VALUES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Parasuraman

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A Key identifier for some diseases such as arteriosclerosis, hypertension, macular edema, diabetes mellitus, and the recognition qualities of geometrical changes in retinal veins and supply routes are recognized by Retinal Vein morphology and might be connected to a mixed carrier of clinical studies. Extraction of the retinal veins is a help to see all the more about its morphology and will give a superior wellspring of data for contemplating the different related diseases. Two of the significant issues in the extraction of retinal veins are the vicinity of a wide assortment of vessel widths and inhomogeneous foundation of the retina. Machine based dissection for computerized extraction of veins in retinal images will help eye mind pro's screen bigger populaces for vessel variations from the norm. In this extend a technique for robotized extraction of fundus pictures of the retinal vein is introduced. This paper displays another strategy for vein recognition in computerized retinal pictures. In this system first separating is carried out utilizing reciprocal channel to uproot the commotions in the picture and second, differentiates the fundus picture into red, green and blue channels. Third, Kirsch's format with spatial separating is utilized to discover the beginning and bearing of the veins and for smoothing the limits. Fourth, the veins are fragmented by applying threshold values and by utilizing outspread radial symmetry strategy. These segmentations are looked at against manual estimations and between imaging strategies. Its adequacy and strength with distinctive picture conditions, together with its smoothness and quick usage, make this vein division proposal suitable for retinal picture workstation examination, for example, computerized screening for right on time diabetic retinopathy discovery.

  19. Brain dynamics underlying the nonlinear threshold for access to consciousness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Cul, Antoine; Baillet, Sylvain; Dehaene, Stanislas

    2007-10-01

    When a flashed stimulus is followed by a backward mask, subjects fail to perceive it unless the target-mask interval exceeds a threshold duration of about 50 ms. Models of conscious access postulate that this threshold is associated with the time needed to establish sustained activity in recurrent cortical loops, but the brain areas involved and their timing remain debated. We used high-density recordings of event-related potentials (ERPs) and cortical source reconstruction to assess the time course of human brain activity evoked by masked stimuli and to determine neural events during which brain activity correlates with conscious reports. Target-mask stimulus onset asynchrony (SOA) was varied in small steps, allowing us to ask which ERP events show the characteristic nonlinear dependence with SOA seen in subjective and objective reports. The results separate distinct stages in mask-target interactions, indicating that a considerable amount of subliminal processing can occur early on in the occipito-temporal pathway (270 ms) and highly distributed fronto-parieto-temporal activation as a correlate of conscious reportability.

  20. Modeling chemical gradients in sediments under losing and gaining flow conditions: The GRADIENT code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boano, Fulvio; De Falco, Natalie; Arnon, Shai

    2018-02-01

    Interfaces between sediments and water bodies often represent biochemical hotspots for nutrient reactions and are characterized by steep concentration gradients of different reactive solutes. Vertical profiles of these concentrations are routinely collected to obtain information on nutrient dynamics, and simple codes have been developed to analyze these profiles and determine the magnitude and distribution of reaction rates within sediments. However, existing publicly available codes do not consider the potential contribution of water flow in the sediments to nutrient transport, and their applications to field sites with significant water-borne nutrient fluxes may lead to large errors in the estimated reaction rates. To fill this gap, the present work presents GRADIENT, a novel algorithm to evaluate distributions of reaction rates from observed concentration profiles. GRADIENT is a Matlab code that extends a previously published framework to include the role of nutrient advection, and provides robust estimates of reaction rates in sediments with significant water flow. This work discusses the theoretical basis of the method and shows its performance by comparing the results to a series of synthetic data and to laboratory experiments. The results clearly show that in systems with losing or gaining fluxes, the inclusion of such fluxes is critical for estimating local and overall reaction rates in sediments.

  1. Relationship between Critical Flicker Fusion (CFF) Thresholds and Personality under Three Auditory Stimulus Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, M. R.; Amir, T.

    1988-01-01

    Investigated relationship between critical flicker fusion (CFF) thresholds and five personality characteristics (alienation; social nonconformity; discomfort, expression, and defensiveness) under three auditory stimulus conditions (quiet, noise, meaningful verbal stimuli). Results from 60 college students revealed that auditory stimulation and…

  2. An experimental assessment of hysteresis in near-threshold fatigue crack propagation regime of a low alloy ferritic steel under closure-free testing conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaidya, W.V.

    1991-01-01

    Near-threshold fatigue crack propagation behavior of a high strength steel was investigated in laboratory air under closure-free testing conditions at R = 0.7 (= R eff ), and at two different K-gradients. Depending on the criterion assumed, the threshold value differed; the criterion of non-propagation gave a lower threshold value than that assumed by the propagation criterion. Nevertheless, the subsequent propagation following a load increase was discontinuous in both the cases, and da/dN vs ΔK curves obtained on the same specimen during the K-decreasing and the K-increasing test were not necessarily identical in the threshold regime. This behavior, hysteresis, is analyzed mainly from the experimental viewpoint, and it is shown that hysteresis is not an artifact. (orig.) With 13 figs., 3 appendices [de

  3. A new conjugate gradient method and its global convergence under the exact line search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Osman; Rivaie, Mohd; Mamat, Mustafa; Abdalla, Awad

    2014-12-01

    The conjugate gradient methods are numerously used for solving nonlinear unconstrained optimization problems, especially of large scale. Their wide applications are due to their simplicity and low memory requirement. To analyze conjugate gradient methods, two types of line searches are used; exact and inexact. In this paper, we present a new method of nonlinear conjugate gradient methods under the exact line search. The theoretical analysis shows that the new method generates a descent direction in each iteration and globally convergent under the exact line search. Moreover, numerical experiments based on comparing the new method with other well known conjugate gradient methods show that the new is efficient for some unconstrained optimization problems.

  4. In search of 'low health literacy': threshold vs. gradient effect of literacy on health status and mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Michael S; Feinglass, Joseph; Thompson, Jason; Baker, David W

    2010-05-01

    Studies have demonstrated significant associations between limited literacy and health outcomes. Yet differences in literacy measurement and the cutoffs used for analysis have made it difficult to fully understand the relationship between literacy and health across the entire spectrum of literacy (i.e., whether the relationship is continuous and graded or whether a threshold exists below which literacy is independently associated with health). To analyze this question, we re-examined the relationship between literacy, baseline physical functioning and mental health, and all-cause mortality for a cohort of 3260 US community-dwelling elderly who were interviewed in 1997 to determine demographics, socioeconomic status, chronic conditions, self-reported physical and mental health (SF-36 subscales), health behaviors, and literacy based upon the Short Test of Functional Health Literacy in Adults (S-TOFHLA). All-cause mortality was determined using data from the US National Death Index through 2003. Seven categories of S-TOFHLA literacy scores were created and used in this analysis instead of the existing three categories identified with the measure. In multivariate analyses, a continuous, graded relationship between literacy and baseline physical functioning was identified. However, participants scoring below the third literacy category had significantly worse mental health compared to the highest literacy category, displaying a notable threshold. Finally, all six literacy categories were significantly associated with greater all-cause mortality risk compared to the highest literacy category, but again there was a marked threshold below the third category at which the adjusted mortality rate significantly increased compared to all other categories. We conclude that the nature of the relationship between literacy and health may vary depending upon the outcome under examination. Copyright 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. Feedback of threshold via estimating sources and composition of sedimentary organic matter across trophic gradients in freshwater lakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoguang; Li, Wei; Fujibayashi, Megumu; Nomura, Munehiro; Sakamaki, Takashi; Nishimura, Osamu; Li, Xianning

    2014-12-01

    The quantity and quality of sedimentary organic matter (SOM) in relation to material and energy flows are crucial for understanding the current state and future development of lake systems, yet, characterization of organic matter sources and assessment of their relative contributions in different trophic-state lakes caused by anthropogenic impacts are scarcely known. In this study, for obtaining information concerning the source of SOM and its compositional diversity along different trophic gradients, a total of thirty-one sampling sites from four freshwater lakes located in China and Japan were performed by the molecular level analysis using source-specific fatty acid biomarkers. Results indicated that SOM in these lakes was composed of microalgae-, aquatic plant-, terrestrial plant- and bacteria-derived organic matters based on their fatty acid profiles. The scatter plot matrix exhibited correlations between these sources, however, only terrestrial plant-derived organic carbon was a well predictor for sediment TOC with strong, spatiotemporal dynamics. The source and composition of SOM were evidently influenced by lake trophic state with redundancy analysis. Moreover, increase of lake trophic state led to the relatively higher contribution of aquatic organic matter sources to SOM pool compared with terrigenous sources, as evidenced by significant correlations between the trophic state index [TSI (TP)] and the ratio of terrigenous to aquatic fatty acids (TARFA ratio). Yet, this changing trend became more gradual with higher trophic state and prevented the occurrence of regime shift from allochthonous to autochthonous dominant state by a threshold (0.683) of TARFA ratio. Together, a conceptual diagram was proposed, which highlighted the prevailing state of allochthonous source and implicated sedimentary organics in biogeochemistry cycle within freshwater lakes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Thermoelectric properties of high electron concentration materials under large temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulat, L.P.; Stefansky, V.A.

    1994-01-01

    Theoretical methods of investigating of transport properties in solids under large temperature gradients are grounded. The nonlinear and non-local expressions for current density and heat flow are obtained with degenerated of current carriers gas. A number of new effects with large temperature gradients have been tested. Use of large temperature gradients leads to the increasing of the thermoelectric figure of merit. copyright 1995 American Institute of Physics

  7. Computational analysis of frp composite under different temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekar, P.; Manigandan, S.

    2017-05-01

    Composite material strength depends on the stiffness of fiber and the resin which is used for reinforcement. The strength of the laminate can be increased by applying good manufacturing practices. The strength is directly depending on the property of resin. The property of the any compound subjected to changed when they exposed to the temperature. This paper investigates the strength of laminate when they subjected to different temperature gradient of resin while manufacturing. The resin is preheated before adding hardener with them. These types of laminate reinforced with resin at different levels of temperature 20c, 40c, and 60c. These different temperature resin are used for reinforcement and the specimen tested. The comparative results are made to find how the stiffness of laminate changes with respect to the thermal property of resin. The results are helpful to obtain high strength laminate.

  8. Clay behaviour under thermal gradients elastic and plastic strains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pintado, Xavier; Autio, Jorma; Punkkinen, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. The nuclear waste repositories will generate strong temperature gradients at the clay barrier. The heat and water transport generate volume change in the clay. An experimental work is proposed here. The clay reference is the MX-80. The test device imposes a fixed heat flow in one side of the sample and maintains constant the temperature on the other side. Two samples are tested for symmetry. The samples are unconfined and the total mass of water remains constant. This situation creates a strong thermal gradient in the samples. The final radial strains in some places of the sample, the total vertical strain and the water content distribution will be measured just at the end of the test and some weeks later in order to distinguish the elastic strains from the plastic strains. The test period mustn't be longer than two weeks because a large quantity of water loses through the rubber membrane and the heads of the sample. The maximum temperature reached in the cooper is 90 degrees because with higher temperature, the rubber membrane is damaged. This test is already simulated by a numerical code. Thermal, thermo-hydraulic and thermo-hydro-mechanical analyses are being done. These analyses allow studying the different fluxes inside the sample and its quantification. Water content distribution is compared with the water content calculated from the reference parameters in the clay. The water distribution and the change of diameter after the test will also be studied. This experimental work will allow to know what is the percentage of the strains elastic or plastic and check the mechanical model. The experimental diameter change is compared with the diameter change calculated from the reference parameters of the clay. (authors)

  9. A new convergent conjugate gradient method under the exact line search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Osman; Mamat, Mustafa; Rivaie, Mohd

    2015-05-01

    Conjugate gradient methods are widely used for unconstrained optimization problems, especially large scale problems. That is, for its simplicity, low memory requirement, and global convergence properties. In this paper, we study the global convergence properties of a new conjugate gradient method under the exact line search. Under some assumptions, the proofs of the sufficient descent property and the global convergence are given. The numerical results show that our new method is efficient for some unconstrained optimization problems.

  10. Self-Adaptive Gradient-Based Thresholding Method for Coal Fire Detection Using ASTER Thermal Infrared Data, Part I: Methodology and Decadal Change Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomin Du

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Coal fires that are induced by natural spontaneous combustion or result from human activities occurring on the surface and in underground coal seams destroy coal resources and cause serious environmental degradation. Thermal infrared image data, which directly measure surface temperature, can be an important tool to map coal fires over large areas. As the first of two parts introducing our coal fire detection method, this paper proposes a self-adaptive threshold-based approach for coal fire detection using ASTER thermal infrared data: the self-adaptive gradient-based thresholding method (SAGBT. This method is based on an assumption that the attenuation of temperature along the coal fire’s boundaries generates considerable numbers of spots with extremely high gradient values. The SAGBT method applied mathematical morphology thinning to skeletonize the potential high gradient buffers into the extremely high gradient lines, which provides a self-adaptive mechanism to generate thresholds according to the thermal spatial patterns of the images. The final threshold was defined as an average temperature value reading from the high temperature buffers (segmented by 1.0 σ from the mean and along a sequence of extremely high gradient lines (thinned from the potential high gradient buffers and segmented within the lower bounds, ranging from 0.5 σ to 1.5 σ and with an upper bound of 3.2 σ, where σ is the standard deviation, marking the coal fire areas. The SAGBT method used the basic outer boundary of the coal-bearing strata to simply exclude false alarms. The intermediate thresholds reduced the coupling with the temperature and converged by changing the potential high gradient buffers. This simple approach can be economical and accurate in identifying coal fire areas. In addition, it allows for the identification of thresholds using multiple ASTER TIR scenes in a consistent and uniform manner, and supports long-term coal fire change analyses using

  11. Developmental Mechanisms Underlying Improved Contrast Thresholds for Discriminations of Orientation Signals Embedded in Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seong Taek eJeon

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available We combined an external noise paradigm with an efficient procedure for obtaining contrast thresholds (Lesmes et al., 2006 in order to model developmental changes during childhood. Specifically, we measured the contrast thresholds of 5-, 7-, 9-year-olds and adults (n = 20/age in a two alternative forced-choice orientation discrimination task over a wide range of external noise levels and at three levels of accuracy. Overall, as age increased, contrast thresholds decreased over the entire range of external noise levels tested. The decrease was greatest between 5 and 7 years of age. The reduction in threshold after age 5 was greater in the high than the low external noise region, a pattern implying greater tolerance to the irrelevant background noise as children became older. To model the mechanisms underlying these developmental changes in terms of internal noise components, we adapted the original perceptual template model (Lu and Dosher, 1998 and normalized the magnitude of performance changes against the performance of 5-year-olds. The resulting model provided an excellent fit (r2 = 0.985 to the contrast thresholds at multiple levels of accuracy (60, 75, and 90% across a wide range of external noise levels. The improvements in contrast thresholds with age were best modelled by a combination of reductions in internal additive noise, reductions in internal multiplicative noise, and improvements in excluding external noise by template retuning. In line with the data, the improvement was greatest between 5 and 7 years of age, accompanied by a 39% reduction in additive noise, 71% reduction in multiplicative noise, and 45% improvement in external noise exclusion. The modelled improvements likely reflect developmental changes at the cortical level, rather than changes in front-end structural properties (Kiorpes et al., 2003.

  12. Performance comparison of a new hybrid conjugate gradient method under exact and inexact line searches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghani, N. H. A.; Mohamed, N. S.; Zull, N.; Shoid, S.; Rivaie, M.; Mamat, M.

    2017-09-01

    Conjugate gradient (CG) method is one of iterative techniques prominently used in solving unconstrained optimization problems due to its simplicity, low memory storage, and good convergence analysis. This paper presents a new hybrid conjugate gradient method, named NRM1 method. The method is analyzed under the exact and inexact line searches in given conditions. Theoretically, proofs show that the NRM1 method satisfies the sufficient descent condition with both line searches. The computational result indicates that NRM1 method is capable in solving the standard unconstrained optimization problems used. On the other hand, the NRM1 method performs better under inexact line search compared with exact line search.

  13. Range-wide latitudinal and elevational temperature gradients for the world's terrestrial birds: implications under global climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sorte, Frank A; Butchart, Stuart H M; Jetz, Walter; Böhning-Gaese, Katrin

    2014-01-01

    Species' geographical distributions are tracking latitudinal and elevational surface temperature gradients under global climate change. To evaluate the opportunities to track these gradients across space, we provide a first baseline assessment of the steepness of these gradients for the world's terrestrial birds. Within the breeding ranges of 9,014 bird species, we characterized the spatial gradients in temperature along latitude and elevation for all and a subset of bird species, respectively. We summarized these temperature gradients globally for threatened and non-threatened species and determined how their steepness varied based on species' geography (range size, shape, and orientation) and projected changes in temperature under climate change. Elevational temperature gradients were steepest for species in Africa, western North and South America, and central Asia and shallowest in Australasia, insular IndoMalaya, and the Neotropical lowlands. Latitudinal temperature gradients were steepest for extratropical species, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Threatened species had shallower elevational gradients whereas latitudinal gradients differed little between threatened and non-threatened species. The strength of elevational gradients was positively correlated with projected changes in temperature. For latitudinal gradients, this relationship only held for extratropical species. The strength of latitudinal gradients was better predicted by species' geography, but primarily for extratropical species. Our findings suggest threatened species are associated with shallower elevational temperature gradients, whereas steep latitudinal gradients are most prevalent outside the tropics where fewer bird species occur year-round. Future modeling and mitigation efforts would benefit from the development of finer grain distributional data to ascertain how these gradients are structured within species' ranges, how and why these gradients vary among species, and the capacity

  14. Range-wide latitudinal and elevational temperature gradients for the world's terrestrial birds: implications under global climate change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank A La Sorte

    Full Text Available Species' geographical distributions are tracking latitudinal and elevational surface temperature gradients under global climate change. To evaluate the opportunities to track these gradients across space, we provide a first baseline assessment of the steepness of these gradients for the world's terrestrial birds. Within the breeding ranges of 9,014 bird species, we characterized the spatial gradients in temperature along latitude and elevation for all and a subset of bird species, respectively. We summarized these temperature gradients globally for threatened and non-threatened species and determined how their steepness varied based on species' geography (range size, shape, and orientation and projected changes in temperature under climate change. Elevational temperature gradients were steepest for species in Africa, western North and South America, and central Asia and shallowest in Australasia, insular IndoMalaya, and the Neotropical lowlands. Latitudinal temperature gradients were steepest for extratropical species, especially in the Northern Hemisphere. Threatened species had shallower elevational gradients whereas latitudinal gradients differed little between threatened and non-threatened species. The strength of elevational gradients was positively correlated with projected changes in temperature. For latitudinal gradients, this relationship only held for extratropical species. The strength of latitudinal gradients was better predicted by species' geography, but primarily for extratropical species. Our findings suggest threatened species are associated with shallower elevational temperature gradients, whereas steep latitudinal gradients are most prevalent outside the tropics where fewer bird species occur year-round. Future modeling and mitigation efforts would benefit from the development of finer grain distributional data to ascertain how these gradients are structured within species' ranges, how and why these gradients vary among

  15. Threshold Research on Highway Length under Typical Landscape Patterns Based on Drivers’ Physiological Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Zhao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The appropriately landscaped highway scenes may not only help improve road safety and comfort but also help protect ecological environment. Yet there is very little research data on highway length threshold with consideration of distinctive landscape patterns. Against this backdrop, the paper aims to quantitatively analyze highway landscape’s effect on driving behavior based on drivers’ physiological performance and quantify highway length thresholds under three typical landscape patterns, namely, “open,” “semiopen,” and “vertical” ones. The statistical analysis was based on data collected in a driving simulator and electrocardiograph. Specifically, vehicle-related data, ECG data, and supplemental subjective stress perception were collected. The study extracted two characteristic indices, lane deviation and LF/HF, and extrapolated the drivers’ U-shaped physiological response to landscape patterns. Models on highway length were built based on LF/HF’s variation trend with highway length. The results revealed that the theoretical highway length threshold tended to increase when the landscape pattern was switched to open, semiopen, and vertical ones. And the reliability and accuracy of the results were validated by questionnaires and field operational tests. Findings from this research will assist practitioners in taking active environmental countermeasures pertaining to different roadside landscape patterns.

  16. Effect of sport massage on pressure pain threshold and tolerance in athletes under eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Selim KAPLAN

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Extensive line of evidence suggest that pain threshold and tolerance alters following exercise, although the mechanisms have not been elucidated yet. In this st udy, we investigated the role of sport massage on pressure pain threshold and tolerance in athletes under eccentric exercise. Ten male athletes aged 23 ± 1 years with 9.67 ± 3.04 years of athletic training were recruited for this study . Following baseline measurements of pressure pain threshold and tolerance from m. biceps brachii and m. triceps brachii muscle and myofascial regions of the dominant upper extremity by using a digital algometer, subjects were underwent an acute bout of eccentric exercise. Par ticipants were completed 4 sets of eccentric exercise each comprising 20 repetitions of lifting 80% of their 1 RM by using a dumbbell. Pressure pain threshold and tolerance tests were repeated 10, 20 and 30 minutes, and 24 and 48 hours following exercise. One week after eccentric exercise, sport massage protocol for 10 minutes was manually administered to the dominant arm immediately after exercise, and all measurements were repeated at the same timeline as eccentric exercise. Results are presented as mean + standart deviation. Data of the same timeline were analyzed by using t test. A level of p<0.05 was accepted statistical significant. Eccentric exercise resulted to increase the pain tolerance from muscle and myofascia regions of m. biceps and triceps br achii, and sport massage was found to decrease the pain tolerance at 10 minutes from muscle regions of m. biceps and triceps brachii, 10, 20 and 30 minutes from myofascial region of biceps brachii, and 20 minutes, 24 and 48 hours from myofascial region of m. triceps brachii following acute bout of eccentric exercise in athletes. We concluded that sport massage reduces the hypoalgesic response during acute and delayed period of recovery after eccentric exercise.

  17. Retention prediction and separation optimization under multilinear gradient elution in liquid chromatography with Microsoft Excel macros.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasoula, S; Zisi, Ch; Gika, H; Pappa-Louisi, A; Nikitas, P

    2015-05-22

    A package of Excel VBA macros have been developed for modeling multilinear gradient retention data obtained in single or double gradient elution mode by changing organic modifier(s) content and/or eluent pH. For this purpose, ten chromatographic models were used and four methods were adopted for their application. The methods were based on (a) the analytical expression of the retention time, provided that this expression is available, (b) the retention times estimated using the Nikitas-Pappa approach, (c) the stepwise approximation, and (d) a simple numerical approximation involving the trapezoid rule for integration of the fundamental equation for gradient elution. For all these methods, Excel VBA macros have been written and implemented using two different platforms; the fitting and the optimization platform. The fitting platform calculates not only the adjustable parameters of the chromatographic models, but also the significance of these parameters and furthermore predicts the analyte elution times. The optimization platform determines the gradient conditions that lead to the optimum separation of a mixture of analytes by using the Solver evolutionary mode, provided that proper constraints are set in order to obtain the optimum gradient profile in the minimum gradient time. The performance of the two platforms was tested using experimental and artificial data. It was found that using the proposed spreadsheets, fitting, prediction, and optimization can be performed easily and effectively under all conditions. Overall, the best performance is exhibited by the analytical and Nikitas-Pappa's methods, although the former cannot be used under all circumstances. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of transcutaneous electromyostimulation on pressure pain threshold and tolerance in athletes under eccentric exercise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selman Burak UĞURLU

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Exercise - induced hypoalgesia typically reported during and / or follow ing exercise. In this study, we investigated the role of transcutaneous electromyostimulation (EMS on pressure pain threshold and tolerance in athletes under eccentric exercise. Eleven male athletes aged 23,125 ± 0,99 years with 10,25 ± 2,66 years of athl etic training were recruited for this study . Following baseline measurements of pressure pain threshold and tolerance from m. biceps brachii and m. triceps brachii muscle and myofascial regions of the dominant upper extremity by using a digital algometer, subjects were underwent an acute bout of eccentric exercise. Participants were completed 4 sets of eccentric exercise each comprising 20 repetitions of lifting 80% of their 1 RM by using a dumbbell. Pressure pain threshold and tolerance tests were repeated 10, 20 and 30 minutes, and 24 and 48 hours following exercise. One week after acute exercise protocol, EMS protocol was applied to the participants immediately following eccentric exercise, and all measurements were repeated at the same timeline as eccent ric exercise. Standard EMS protocol at active recovery mode for 10 minutes was applied to the m. biceps brachii muscle by using surface electrodes. Results are presented as mean + standarts deviation. Data of the same timeline were analyzed by using repeat ed measures of ANOVA followed by Tukey’s post hoc test . A level of p<0.05 was accepted statistical significant. Eccentric exercise resulted to increase the pain tolerence in athletes, and EMS was found to decrease the pain tolerence 10 and 20 minutes at th e muscle region, and 10 and 30 minutes, and 24 hours at the myofascial region of m. biceps brachii, 10 min and 24 hr from muscle region, 10 and 30 min and 24 hr from myofascial region of M. triceps brachii following acute bout of eccentric exercise. We con cluded that EMS at active recovery phase mitigates the the hypoalgesic response following single bout of

  19. Large diffusion anisotropy and orientation sorting of phosphorene nanoflakes under a temperature gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Gang; Zhang, Yingyan; Chang, Tienchong; Pei, Qing-Xiang; Cai, Yongqing; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2018-01-25

    We perform molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the motion of phosphorene nanoflakes on a large graphene substrate under a thermal gradient. It is found that the atomic interaction between the graphene substrate and the phosphorene nanoflake generates distinct rates of motion for phosphorene nanoflakes with different orientations. Remarkably, for square phosphorene nanoflakes, the motion of zigzag-oriented nanoflakes is 2-fold faster than those of armchair-oriented and randomly-oriented nanoflakes. This large diffusion anisotropy suggests that sorting of phosphorene nanoflakes into specific orientations can be realized by a temperature gradient. The findings here provide interesting insights into strong molecular diffusion anisotropy and offer a novel route for manipulating two-dimensional materials.

  20. Experimental study of thermo-mechanical behavior of SiC composite tubing under high temperature gradient using solid surrogate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alva, Luis; Shapovalov, Kirill [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department (United States); Jacobsen, George M.; Back, Christina A. [General Atomics (United States); Huang, Xinyu, E-mail: huangxin@mailbox.sc.edu [University of South Carolina, Mechanical Engineering Department (United States)

    2015-11-15

    Nuclear grade silicon carbide fiber (SiC{sub f}) reinforced silicon carbide matrix (SiC{sub m}) composite is a promising candidate material for accident tolerance fuel (ATF) cladding. A major challenge is ensuring the mechanical robustness of the ceramic cladding under accident conditions. In this work the high temperature mechanical response of a SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} composite tubing is studied using a novel thermo-mechanical test method. A solid surrogate tube is placed within and bonded to the SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} sample tube using a ceramic adhesive. The bonded tube pair is heated from the center using a ceramic glower. During testing, the outer surface temperature of the SiC sample tube rises up to 1274 K, and a steep temperature gradient develops through the thickness of the tube pair. Due to CTE mismatch and the temperature gradient, the solid surrogate tube induces high tensile stress in the SiC sample. During testing, 3D digital image correlation (DIC) method is used to map the strains on the outer surface of the SiC-composite, and acoustic emissions (AE) are monitored to detect the onset and progress of material damage. The thermo-mechanical behavior of SiC-composite sample is compared with that of monolithic SiC samples. Finite element models are developed to estimate stress–strain distribution within the tube assembly. Model predicted surface strain matches the measured surface strain using the DIC method. AE activities indicated a progressive damage process for SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} composite samples. For the composites tested in this study, the threshold mechanical hoop strain for matrix micro-cracking to initiate in SiC{sub f}–SiC{sub m} sample is found to be ∼300 microstrain.

  1. Elevation gradient of successful plant traits for colonizing alpine summits under climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matteodo, Magalì; Wipf, Sonja; Stöckli, Veronika; Rixen, Christian; Vittoz, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Upward migration of plant species due to climate change has become evident in several European mountain ranges. It is still, however, unclear whether certain plant traits increase the probability that a species will colonize mountain summits or vanish, and whether these traits differ with elevation. Here, we used data from a repeat survey of the occurrence of plant species on 120 summits, ranging from 2449 to 3418 m asl, in south-eastern Switzerland to identify plant traits that increase the probability of colonization or extinction in the 20th century. Species numbers increased across all plant traits considered. With some traits, however, numbers increased proportionally more. The most successful colonizers seemed to prefer warmer temperatures and well-developed soils. They produced achene fruits and/or seeds with pappus appendages. Conversely, cushion plants and species with capsule fruits were less efficient as colonizers. Observed changes in traits along the elevation gradient mainly corresponded to the natural distribution of traits. Extinctions did not seem to be clearly related to any trait. Our study showed that plant traits varied along both temporal and elevational gradients. While seeds with pappus seemed to be advantageous for colonization, most of the trait changes also mirrored previous gradients of traits along elevation and hence illustrated the general upward migration of plant species. An understanding of the trait characteristics of colonizing species is crucial for predicting future changes in mountain vegetation under climate change. (letter)

  2. Study on the properties of infrared wavefront coding athermal system under several typical temperature gradient distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Huai-yu; Dong, Xiao-tong; Zhu, Meng; Huang, Zhan-hua

    2018-01-01

    Wavefront coding for athermal technique can effectively ensure the stability of the optical system imaging in large temperature range, as well as the advantages of compact structure and low cost. Using simulation method to analyze the properties such as PSF and MTF of wavefront coding athermal system under several typical temperature gradient distributions has directive function to characterize the working state of non-ideal temperature environment, and can effectively realize the system design indicators as well. In this paper, we utilize the interoperability of data between Solidworks and ZEMAX to simplify the traditional process of structure/thermal/optical integrated analysis. Besides, we design and build the optical model and corresponding mechanical model of the infrared imaging wavefront coding athermal system. The axial and radial temperature gradients of different degrees are applied to the whole system by using SolidWorks software, thus the changes of curvature, refractive index and the distance between the lenses are obtained. Then, we import the deformation model to ZEMAX for ray tracing, and obtain the changes of PSF and MTF in optical system. Finally, we discuss and evaluate the consistency of the PSF (MTF) of the wavefront coding athermal system and the image restorability, which provides the basis and reference for the optimal design of the wavefront coding athermal system. The results show that the adaptability of single material infrared wavefront coding athermal system to axial temperature gradient can reach the upper limit of temperature fluctuation of 60°C, which is much higher than that of radial temperature gradient.

  3. Neutron diffraction in a quartz single crystal under the action of acoustic oscillations or a temperature gradient

    CERN Document Server

    Mkrtchyan, A R; Hunanyan, H A; Beglaryan, A G

    1986-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of neutron diffraction in a quartz single crystal under the action of acoustic oscillations or a temperature gradient in the Laue geometry. Theoretical conclusions were compared with experimental results.

  4. The growth of single crystals of Ni-W alloy under conditions of high temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azhazha, V.M.; Gorbenko, Yu.V.; Kovtun, G.P.; Ladygin, A.N.; Malykhin, D.G.; Rudycheva, T.Yu.; Sverdlov, V.Ya.; Shcherban', A.P.; Zhemanyuk, P.D.; Klochikhin, V.V.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of single crystals of the NV-4 nickel alloy containing 32-36 wt % W is investigated. The temperature gradient at the crystallization front and the velocity of the crystallization front are the variable parameters of directional crystallization. The degrees of structural perfection of the single crystals grown under different conditions are compared. The crystallization parameters providing growth of single crystals that have high structural perfection and can be successfully used as seeds for the growth of single-crystal blades are determined. Typical defects formed upon directional crystallization of single crystals of the Ni-W (35 wt %) alloy are examined. The studied defects are classified, and the factors responsible for the disturbance of the single-crystal structure are analyzed

  5. Molecular dynamics simulation of Cu/Au thin films under temperature gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Qibin, E-mail: qibinli@cqu.edu.cn [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Heterogeneous Material Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Peng, Xianghe [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Peng, Tiefeng, E-mail: pengtiefeng@cqu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Coal Mine Disaster Dynamics and Control, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Tang, Qizhong [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Zhang, Xiaomin [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Chongqing Key Laboratory of Heterogeneous Material Mechanics, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China); Huang, Cheng [College of Aerospace Engineering, Chongqing University, Chongqing 400030 (China)

    2015-12-01

    Graphical abstract: Heat transportation in the thin films. - Highlights: • The coherent lattice interface is found at thin films after annealing. • The vacancies are observed clearly in the deposit thin films. • The defect and component will influence the energy transportation in the coatings. • The vacancies and lattice mismatch can enlarge the mobility of atoms. • The phonon transportation in thin films has no apparent rule. - Abstract: Three modulation period thin films, 1.8 nm Cu/3.6 nm Au, 2.7 nm Cu/2.7 nm Au and 3.6 nm Cu/1.8 nm Au, are obtained from deposition method and ideal modeling based on lattice constant, to examine their structures and thermophysical characteristics under temperature gradient. The coherent lattice interface is found both at deposit and ideal thin films after annealing. Also, the vacancies are observed clearly in the deposit thin films. The defect and component of thin films will influence the energy transportation in the coatings. The vacancies and lattice mismatch can enlarge the mobility of atoms and result in the failure of coating under the thermal stress. The power spectrum of atoms’ movement has no apparent rule for phonon transportation in thin films. The results are helpful to reveal the micro-mechanism and provide reasonable basis for the failure of metallic coatings.

  6. Correlations of stock price fluctuations under multi-scale and multi-threshold scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Guo; Li, Huajiao; Feng, Sida; Liu, Xueyong; Jiang, Meihui

    2018-01-01

    The multi-scale method is widely used in analyzing time series of financial markets and it can provide market information for different economic entities who focus on different periods. Through constructing multi-scale networks of price fluctuation correlation in the stock market, we can detect the topological relationship between each time series. Previous research has not addressed the problem that the original fluctuation correlation networks are fully connected networks and more information exists within these networks that is currently being utilized. Here we use listed coal companies as a case study. First, we decompose the original stock price fluctuation series into different time scales. Second, we construct the stock price fluctuation correlation networks at different time scales. Third, we delete the edges of the network based on thresholds and analyze the network indicators. Through combining the multi-scale method with the multi-threshold method, we bring to light the implicit information of fully connected networks.

  7. Leishmania amazonensis chemotaxis under glucose gradient studied by the strength and directionality of forces measured with optical tweezers

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Ysasa Pozzo, Liliana; Fontes, Adriana; de Thomaz, André A.; Barbosa, Luiz Carlos; Ayres, Diana Copi; Giorgio, Selma; Cesar, Carlos Lenz

    2007-02-01

    Chemotaxis is the mechanism microorganisms use to sense the environment surrounding them and to direct their movement towards attractive, or away from the repellent, chemicals. The biochemical sensing is almost the only way for communication between unicellular organisms. Prokaryote and Eukaryote chemotaxis has been mechanically studied mainly by observing the directionality and timing of the microorganisms movements subjected to a chemical gradient, but not through the directionality and strength of the forces it generates. To observe the vector force of microorganisms under a chemical gradient we developed a system composed of two large chambers connected by a tiny duct capable to keep the chemical gradient constant for more than ten hours. We also used the displacements of a microsphere trapped in an Optical Tweezers as the force transducer to measure the direction and the strength of the propulsion forces of flagellum of the microorganism under several gradient conditions. A 9μm diameter microsphere particle was trapped with a Nd:YAG laser and its movement was measured through the light scattered focused on a quadrant detector. We observed the behavior of the protozoa Leishmania amazonensis (eukaryote) under several glucose gradients. This protozoa senses the gradient around it by swimming in circles for three to five times following by tumbling, and not by the typical straight swimming/tumbling of bacteria. Our results also suggest that force direction and strength are also used to control its movement, not only the timing of swimming/tumbling, because we observed a higher force strength clearly directed towards the glucose gradient.

  8. Percolation and transport in a sandy soil under a natural hydraulic gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, C.T.; Stonestrom, David A.; Bekins, B.A.; Akstin, K.C.; Schulz, M.S.

    2005-01-01

    [1] Unsaturated flow and transport under a natural hydraulic gradient in a Mediterranean climate were investigated with a field tracer experiment combined with laboratory analyses and numerical modeling. Bromide was applied to the surface of a sandy soil during the dry season. During the subsequent rainy season, repeated sediment sampling tracked the movement of bromide through the profile. Analysis of data on moisture content, matric pressure, unsaturated hydraulic conductivity, bulk density, and soil texture and structure provides insights into parameterization and use of the advective-dispersive modeling approach. Capturing the gross features of tracer and moisture movement with model simulations required an order-of-magnitude increase in laboratory-measured hydraulic conductivity. Wetting curve characteristics better represented field results, calling into question the routine estimation of hydraulic characteristics based only on drying conditions. Measured increases in profile moisture exceeded cumulative precipitation in early winter, indicating that gains from dew drip can exceed losses from evapotranspiration during periods of heavy ("Tule") fog. A single-continuum advective-dispersive modeling approach could not reproduce a peak of bromide that was retained near the soil surface for over 3 years. Modeling of this feature required slow exchange of solute at a transfer rate of 0.5-1 ?? 10-4 d-1 with an immobile volume approaching the residual moisture content.

  9. Elastic stockings effect on leg volume variability in healthy workers under prolonged gravitational gradient exposure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko Tessari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the elastic stockings effect on healthy workers (HW who are exposed to a prolonged hydrostatic pressure overload for professional reasons. The cohort was composed by 20 HW who voluntarily underwent a water plethysmography test before and after eight hour of standing up in an operating room, wearing elastic stockings. After 8 h of gravity exposure, we demonstrated the absence of leg volume increase in case of elastic stockings use. In the morning measurement we found that the lower limb volume was 1967.5 mL±224, while in the evening it was 1962.5 mL±227 (P<0.0828. The decreased volume is significantly correlated with the time that was spent under gravity forces for working purpose wearing elastic stockings (R2=0.99, P<0.0001. Our experiment demonstrates that elastic stockings may effectively counteract the increased leg volume over time in workers who are exposed to prolonged gravitational gradient. Further longitudinal studies are needed to determine if the above effect could correct one of the major risk factors for the development of chronic venous insufficiency.

  10. Habitat and landscape characteristics underlying anuran community structure along an urban-rural gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillsbury, Finn C; Miller, James R

    2008-07-01

    Urbanization has been cited as an important factor in worldwide amphibian declines, and although recent work has illustrated the important influence of broad-scale ecological patterns and processes on amphibian populations, little is known about the factors structuring amphibian communities in urban landscapes. We therefore examined amphibian community responses to wetland habitat availability and landscape characteristics along an urban-rural gradient in central Iowa, USA, a region experiencing rapid suburban growth. We conducted call surveys at 61 wetlands to estimate anuran calling activity, and quantified wetland habitat structure and landscape context. We used canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) to examine patterns in anuran community structure and identify the most important variables associated with those patterns. Urban density at the landscape scale had a significant negative influence on overall anuran abundance and diversity. While every species exhibited a decrease in abundance with increasing urban density, this pattern was especially pronounced for species requiring post-breeding upland habitats. Anurans most affected by urbanization were those associated with short hydroperiods, early breeding activity, and substantial upland habitat use. We suggest that broad-scale landscape fragmentation is an important factor underlying anuran community structure in this region, possibly due to limitations on the accessibility of otherwise suitable habitat in fragmented urban landscapes. This study underscores the importance of a regional approach to amphibian conservation in urban and urbanizing areas; in fragmented landscapes, a network of interconnected wetland and upland habitats may be more likely to support a successful, diverse anuran community than will isolated sites.

  11. Damage Characterization of EBC-SiCSiC Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Imposed Thermal Gradient Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew P.; Morscher, Gregory N.; Zhu, Dongming

    2014-01-01

    Due to their high temperature capabilities, Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) components are being developed for use in hot-section aerospace engine applications. Harsh engine environments have led to the development of Environmental Barrier Coatings (EBCs) for silicon-based CMCs to further increase thermal and environmental capabilities. This study aims at understanding the damage mechanisms associated with these materials under simulated operating conditions. A high heat-flux laser testing rig capable of imposing large through-thickness thermal gradients by means of controlled laser beam heating and back-side air cooling is used. Tests are performed on uncoated composites, as well as CMC substrates that have been coated with state-of-the-art ceramic EBC systems. Results show that the use of the EBCs may help increase temperature capability and creep resistance by reducing the effects of stressed oxidation and environmental degradation. Also, the ability of electrical resistance (ER) and acoustic emission (AE) measurements to monitor material condition and damage state during high temperature testing is shown; suggesting their usefulness as a valuable health monitoring technique. Micromechanics models are used to describe the localized stress state of the composite system, which is utilized along with ER modeling concepts to develop an electromechanical model capable of characterizing material behavior.

  12. Stronger tests of mechanisms underlying geographic gradients of biodiversity: insights from the dimensionality of biodiversity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard D Stevens

    Full Text Available Inference involving diversity gradients typically is gathered by mechanistic tests involving single dimensions of biodiversity such as species richness. Nonetheless, because traits such as geographic range size, trophic status or phenotypic characteristics are tied to a particular species, mechanistic effects driving broad diversity patterns should manifest across numerous dimensions of biodiversity. We develop an approach of stronger inference based on numerous dimensions of biodiversity and apply it to evaluate one such putative mechanism: the mid-domain effect (MDE. Species composition of 10,000-km(2 grid cells was determined by overlaying geographic range maps of 133 noctilionoid bat taxa. We determined empirical diversity gradients in the Neotropics by calculating species richness and three indices each of phylogenetic, functional and phenetic diversity for each grid cell. We also created 1,000 simulated gradients of each examined metric of biodiversity based on a MDE model to estimate patterns expected if species distributions were randomly placed within the Neotropics. For each simulation run, we regressed the observed gradient onto the MDE-expected gradient. If a MDE drives empirical gradients, then coefficients of determination from such an analysis should be high, the intercept no different from zero and the slope no different than unity. Species richness gradients predicted by the MDE fit empirical patterns. The MDE produced strong spatially structured gradients of taxonomic, phylogenetic, functional and phenetic diversity. Nonetheless, expected values generated from the MDE for most dimensions of biodiversity exhibited poor fit to most empirical patterns. The MDE cannot account for most empirical patterns of biodiversity. Fuller understanding of latitudinal gradients will come from simultaneous examination of relative effects of random, environmental and historical mechanisms to better understand distribution and abundance of the

  13. Cross-matching: A modified cross-correlation underlying threshold energy model and match-based depth perception

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro eDoi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional visual perception requires correct matching of images projected to the left and right eyes. The matching process is faced with an ambiguity: part of one eye’s image can be matched to multiple parts of the other eye’s image. This stereo correspondence problem is complicated for random-dot stereograms (RDSs, because dots with an identical appearance produce numerous potential matches. Despite such complexity, human subjects can perceive a coherent depth structure. A coherent solution to the correspondence problem does not exist for anticorrelated RDSs (aRDSs, in which luminance contrast is reversed in one eye. Neurons in the visual cortex reduce disparity selectivity for aRDSs progressively along the visual processing hierarchy. A disparity-energy model followed by threshold nonlinearity (threshold energy model can account for this reduction, providing a possible mechanism for the neural matching process. However, the essential computation underlying the threshold energy model is not clear. Here, we propose that a nonlinear modification of cross-correlation, which we term ‘cross-matching’, represents the essence of the threshold energy model. We placed half-wave rectification within the cross-correlation of the left-eye and right-eye images. The disparity tuning derived from cross-matching was attenuated for aRDSs. We simulated a psychometric curve as a function of graded anticorrelation (graded mixture of aRDS and normal RDS; this simulated curve reproduced the match-based psychometric function observed in human near/far discrimination. The dot density was 25% for both simulation and observation. We predicted that as the dot density increased, the performance for aRDSs should decrease below chance (i.e., reversed depth, and the level of anticorrelation that nullifies depth perception should also decrease. We suggest that cross-matching serves as a simple computation underlying the match-based disparity signals in

  14. Crack propagation under thermal cycling loading inducing a thermal gradient in the specimen thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.N.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to figure out the crack growth phenomenon by thermal fatigue induced by thermal gradient through thickness of specimen. Firstly, an experimental facility has been developed: a rectangular parallelepiped specimen is subjected to thermal cycling between 350 C and 100 C; the specimen is freed to expand and contract. Two semi-circular notches (0,1 mm depth and 4 mm length) have been machined on the surface of the specimen. A series of interrupted tests has been carried out to characterize and quantify the crack growth in depth and surface of the pre-existing crack. Next, a three-dimensional crack growth simulation has been implemented in ABAQUS. Automation using Python was used to simulate the propagation of a crack under thermal cycling, with re-meshing at crack front after each calculation step. No assumption has been taken on the crack front during the crack propagation. A comparison with test results showed very good agreement on the evolution of crack front shape and on the kinetics of propagation on the edge and the heart of pre-existing crack. An analytical approach was also developed based on the calculation of stress intensity factors (SIC). A two-dimensional approach was first introduced enabling us to better understand the influence of various thermal and geometric parameters. Finally, a three dimensional approach, with an elliptical assumption crack shape during the propagation, leading to a prediction of crack growth on the surface and in depth which is very similar to that obtained numerically, but with computational time much lower. (author)

  15. On the underlying assumptions of threshold Boolean networks as a model for genetic regulatory network behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Van; McCall, Matthew N; McMurray, Helene R; Almudevar, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Boolean networks (BoN) are relatively simple and interpretable models of gene regulatory networks. Specifying these models with fewer parameters while retaining their ability to describe complex regulatory relationships is an ongoing methodological challenge. Additionally, extending these models to incorporate variable gene decay rates, asynchronous gene response, and synergistic regulation while maintaining their Markovian nature increases the applicability of these models to genetic regulatory networks (GRN). We explore a previously-proposed class of BoNs characterized by linear threshold functions, which we refer to as threshold Boolean networks (TBN). Compared to traditional BoNs with unconstrained transition functions, these models require far fewer parameters and offer a more direct interpretation. However, the functional form of a TBN does result in a reduction in the regulatory relationships which can be modeled. We show that TBNs can be readily extended to permit self-degradation, with explicitly modeled degradation rates. We note that the introduction of variable degradation compromises the Markovian property fundamental to BoN models but show that a simple state augmentation procedure restores their Markovian nature. Next, we study the effect of assumptions regarding self-degradation on the set of possible steady states. Our findings are captured in two theorems relating self-degradation and regulatory feedback to the steady state behavior of a TBN. Finally, we explore assumptions of synchronous gene response and asynergistic regulation and show that TBNs can be easily extended to relax these assumptions. Applying our methods to the budding yeast cell-cycle network revealed that although the network is complex, its steady state is simplified by the presence of self-degradation and lack of purely positive regulatory cycles.

  16. Experimental and numerical analysis of sodium-carbonate salt gradient solar-pond performance under simulated solar-radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurt, Hueseyin; Ozkaymak, Mehmet; Binark, A. Korhan

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally and theoretically whether sodium carbonate (Na 2 CO 3 ) salt is suitable for establishing a salinity gradient in a salt-gradient solar-pond (SGSP). For this purpose, a small-scale prismatic solar-pond was constructed. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory under the incident radiation from two halogen-lamps acting as a solar simulator. Furthermore, a one-dimensional transient mathematical model that describes the heat and mass transfer behaviour of the SGSP was developed. The differential equations obtained were solved numerically using a finite-difference method. It was found from the experiments that the density gradient, achieved using sodium carbonate salt, can suppress convection from the bottom to the surface of the pond

  17. Experimental and numerical analysis of sodium-carbonate salt gradient solar-pond performance under simulated solar-radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurt, Hueseyin; Ozkaymak, Mehmet [Zonguldak Karaelmas University, Technical Education Faculty, 78200 Karabuk (Turkey); Binark, A. Korhan [Marmara University, Technical Education Faculty, 34722 Kuyubasi-Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-04-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate experimentally and theoretically whether sodium carbonate (Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}) salt is suitable for establishing a salinity gradient in a salt-gradient solar-pond (SGSP). For this purpose, a small-scale prismatic solar-pond was constructed. Experiments were conducted in the laboratory under the incident radiation from two halogen-lamps acting as a solar simulator. Furthermore, a one-dimensional transient mathematical model that describes the heat and mass transfer behaviour of the SGSP was developed. The differential equations obtained were solved numerically using a finite-difference method. It was found from the experiments that the density gradient, achieved using sodium carbonate salt, can suppress convection from the bottom to the surface of the pond. (author)

  18. Accurate evaluation of fast threshold voltage shift for SiC MOS devices under various gate bias stress conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sometani, Mitsuru; Okamoto, Mitsuo; Hatakeyama, Tetsuo; Iwahashi, Yohei; Hayashi, Mariko; Okamoto, Dai; Yano, Hiroshi; Harada, Shinsuke; Yonezawa, Yoshiyuki; Okumura, Hajime

    2018-04-01

    We investigated methods of measuring the threshold voltage (V th) shift of 4H-silicon carbide (SiC) metal–oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) under positive DC, negative DC, and AC gate bias stresses. A fast measurement method for V th shift under both positive and negative DC stresses revealed the existence of an extremely large V th shift in the short-stress-time region. We then examined the effect of fast V th shifts on drain current (I d) changes within a pulse under AC operation. The fast V th shifts were suppressed by nitridation. However, the I d change within one pulse occurred even in commercially available SiC MOSFETs. The correlation between I d changes within one pulse and V th shifts measured by a conventional method is weak. Thus, a fast and in situ measurement method is indispensable for the accurate evaluation of I d changes under AC operation.

  19. Elevational gradients in bird diversity in the Eastern Himalaya: an evaluation of distribution patterns and their underlying mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhoj Kumar Acharya

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Understanding diversity patterns and the mechanisms underlying those patterns along elevational gradients is critically important for conservation efforts in montane ecosystems, especially those that are biodiversity hotspots. Despite recent advances, consensus on the underlying causes, or even the relative influence of a suite of factors on elevational diversity patterns has remained elusive. METHODS AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined patterns of species richness, density and range size distribution of birds, and the suite of biotic and abiotic factors (primary productivity, habitat variables, climatic factors and geometric constraints that governs diversity along a 4500-m elevational gradient in the Eastern Himalayan region, a biodiversity hotspot within the world's tallest mountains. We used point count methods for sampling birds and quadrats for estimating vegetation at 22 sites along the elevational gradient. We found that species richness increased to approximately 2000 m, then declined. We found no evidence that geometric constraints influenced this pattern, whereas actual evapotranspiration (a surrogate for primary productivity and various habitat variables (plant species richness, shrub density and basal area of trees accounted for most of the variation in bird species richness. We also observed that ranges of most bird species were narrow along the elevation gradient. We find little evidence to support Rapoport's rule for the birds of Sikkim region of the Himalaya. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This study in the Eastern Himalaya indicates that species richness of birds is highest at intermediate elevations along one of the most extensive elevational gradients ever examined. Additionally, primary productivity and factors associated with habitat accounted for most of the variation in avian species richness. The diversity peak at intermediate elevations and the narrow elevational ranges of most species suggest important

  20. Elevational gradients in bird diversity in the Eastern Himalaya: an evaluation of distribution patterns and their underlying mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bhoj Kumar; Sanders, Nathan J; Vijayan, Lalitha; Chettri, Basundhara

    2011-01-01

    Understanding diversity patterns and the mechanisms underlying those patterns along elevational gradients is critically important for conservation efforts in montane ecosystems, especially those that are biodiversity hotspots. Despite recent advances, consensus on the underlying causes, or even the relative influence of a suite of factors on elevational diversity patterns has remained elusive. We examined patterns of species richness, density and range size distribution of birds, and the suite of biotic and abiotic factors (primary productivity, habitat variables, climatic factors and geometric constraints) that governs diversity along a 4500-m elevational gradient in the Eastern Himalayan region, a biodiversity hotspot within the world's tallest mountains. We used point count methods for sampling birds and quadrats for estimating vegetation at 22 sites along the elevational gradient. We found that species richness increased to approximately 2000 m, then declined. We found no evidence that geometric constraints influenced this pattern, whereas actual evapotranspiration (a surrogate for primary productivity) and various habitat variables (plant species richness, shrub density and basal area of trees) accounted for most of the variation in bird species richness. We also observed that ranges of most bird species were narrow along the elevation gradient. We find little evidence to support Rapoport's rule for the birds of Sikkim region of the Himalaya. This study in the Eastern Himalaya indicates that species richness of birds is highest at intermediate elevations along one of the most extensive elevational gradients ever examined. Additionally, primary productivity and factors associated with habitat accounted for most of the variation in avian species richness. The diversity peak at intermediate elevations and the narrow elevational ranges of most species suggest important conservation implications: not only should mid-elevation areas be conserved, but the entire

  1. Elevational Gradients in Bird Diversity in the Eastern Himalaya: An Evaluation of Distribution Patterns and Their Underlying Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Bhoj Kumar; Sanders, Nathan J.; Vijayan, Lalitha; Chettri, Basundhara

    2011-01-01

    Background Understanding diversity patterns and the mechanisms underlying those patterns along elevational gradients is critically important for conservation efforts in montane ecosystems, especially those that are biodiversity hotspots. Despite recent advances, consensus on the underlying causes, or even the relative influence of a suite of factors on elevational diversity patterns has remained elusive. Methods and Principal Findings We examined patterns of species richness, density and range size distribution of birds, and the suite of biotic and abiotic factors (primary productivity, habitat variables, climatic factors and geometric constraints) that governs diversity along a 4500-m elevational gradient in the Eastern Himalayan region, a biodiversity hotspot within the world's tallest mountains. We used point count methods for sampling birds and quadrats for estimating vegetation at 22 sites along the elevational gradient. We found that species richness increased to approximately 2000 m, then declined. We found no evidence that geometric constraints influenced this pattern, whereas actual evapotranspiration (a surrogate for primary productivity) and various habitat variables (plant species richness, shrub density and basal area of trees) accounted for most of the variation in bird species richness. We also observed that ranges of most bird species were narrow along the elevation gradient. We find little evidence to support Rapoport's rule for the birds of Sikkim region of the Himalaya. Conclusions and Significance This study in the Eastern Himalaya indicates that species richness of birds is highest at intermediate elevations along one of the most extensive elevational gradients ever examined. Additionally, primary productivity and factors associated with habitat accounted for most of the variation in avian species richness. The diversity peak at intermediate elevations and the narrow elevational ranges of most species suggest important conservation implications

  2. A thermalization energy analysis of the threshold voltage shift in amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide thin film transistors under positive gate bias stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niang, K.M.; Barquinha, P.M.C.; Martins, R.F.P.; Cobb, B.; Powell, M.J.; Flewitt, A.J.

    2016-01-01

    Thin film transistors (TFTs) employing an amorphous indium gallium zinc oxide (a-IGZO) channel layer exhibit a positive shift in the threshold voltage under the application of positive gate bias stress (PBS). The time and temperature dependence of the threshold voltage shift was measured and

  3. Parieto-frontal gradients and domains underlying eye and hand operations in the action space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia-Mayer, Alexandra; Babicola, Lucy; Satta, Eleonora

    2016-10-15

    In monkeys, motor intention in its different forms emerges from a parietal-frontal gradient of visual, eye and hand signals, containing discrete dominant domains. These are formed by areas sharing cortical connections and functional properties. Within this gradient, the combination of different inputs determines the tuning properties of neurons, while local and long cortico-cortical connections shape the structure and temporal delays of the network. The pathways linking similar functional domains in parietal and frontal cortex sculpt information processing systems related to different functions, all requiring eye-hand coordination. fMRI experiments show that similar gradients lay at the core of cognitive-motor control in humans as well. This eye-hand matrix provides a framework to address, within a unitary frame, not only basic forms of motor behavior, such as reaching and grasping, but also actions of increasing complexity, such as interception of moving targets, tool use, construction of complex objects, maze analysis and solution, among others. The organization of the cerebral cortex into functional gradients and domains, beyond frontal and parietal cortices, is common to other brain regions, such as prefrontal cortex and hippocampus, and does not support views of the parieto-frontal operations based on specific and strictly segregated eye and hand modules. These can only be found at the eye and hand motor output domains in the frontal cortex, that is in the frontal eye fields and in the primary motor cortex, respectively. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Forest composition in Mediterranean mountains is projected to shift along the entire elevational gradient under climate change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruiz-Labourdette, Diego; Nogues, David Bravo; Ollero, Helios Sáinz

    2012-01-01

    significantly under climate warming. Large changes in species ranges and forest communities might occur, not only at high elevations within Mediterranean mountains but also along the entire elevational gradient throughout this region, particularly at low and mid-elevations. Mediterranean mountains might lose...... potential changes in the distribution and community composition of tree species in two mountainous regions of Spain under specific scenarios of climate change using data with a high spatial resolution. We also describe potential changes in species distributions and tree communities along the entire...... elevational gradient. Location  Two mountain ranges in southern Europe: the Central Mountain Range (central west of the Iberian Peninsula), and the Iberian Mountain Range (central east). Methods  We modelled current and future distributions of 15 tree species (Eurosiberian, sub-Mediterranean and Mediterranean...

  5. Functional traits reveal the expansion and packing of ecological niche space underlying an elevational diversity gradient in passerine birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pigot, Alex L; Trisos, Christopher H; Tobias, Joseph A

    2016-01-13

    Variation in species richness across environmental gradients may be associated with an expanded volume or increased packing of ecological niche space. However, the relative importance of these alternative scenarios remains unknown, largely because standardized information on functional traits and their ecological relevance is lacking for major diversity gradients. Here, we combine data on morphological and ecological traits for 523 species of passerine birds distributed across an Andes-to-Amazon elevation gradient. We show that morphological traits capture substantial variation in species dietary (75%) and foraging niches (60%) when multiple independent trait dimensions are considered. Having established these relationships, we show that the 14-fold increase in species richness towards the lowlands is associated with both an increased volume and density of functional trait space. However, we find that increases in volume contribute little to changes in richness, with most (78%) lowland species occurring within the range of trait space occupied at high elevations. Taken together, our results suggest that high species richness is mainly associated with a denser occupation of functional trait space, implying an increased specialization or overlap of ecological niches, and supporting the view that niche packing is the dominant trend underlying gradients of increasing biodiversity towards the lowland tropics. © 2016 The Author(s).

  6. Disaggregation and separation dynamics of magnetic particles in a microfluidic flow under an alternating gradient magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Quanliang; Li, Zhenhao; Wang, Zhen; Qi, Fan; Han, Xiaotao

    2018-05-01

    How to prevent particle aggregation in the magnetic separation process is of great importance for high-purity separation, while it is a challenging issue in practice. In this work, we report a novel method to solve this problem for improving the selectivity of size-based separation by use of a gradient alternating magnetic field. The specially designed magnetic field is capable of dynamically adjusting the magnetic field direction without changing the direction of magnetic gradient force acting on the particles. Using direct numerical simulations, we show that particles within a certain center-to-center distance are inseparable under a gradient static magnetic field since they are easy aggregated and then start moving together. By contrast, it has been demonstrated that alternating repulsive and attractive interaction forces between particles can be generated to avoid the formation of aggregations when the alternating gradient magnetic field with a given alternating frequency is applied, enabling these particles to be continuously separated based on size-dependent properties. The proposed magnetic separation method and simulation results have the significance for fundamental understanding of particle dynamic behavior and improving the separation efficiency.

  7. Energy harvesting from vibration of Timoshenko nanobeam under base excitation considering flexoelectric and elastic strain gradient effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Managheb, S. A. M.; Ziaei-Rad, S.; Tikani, R.

    2018-05-01

    The coupling between polarization and strain gradients is called flexoelectricity. This phenomenon exists in all dielectrics with any symmetry. In this paper, energy harvesting from a Timoshenko beam is studied by considering the flexoelectric and strain gradient effects. General governing equations and related boundary conditions are derived using Hamilton's principle. The flexoelectric effects are defined by gradients of normal and shear strains which lead to a more general model. The developed model also covers the classical Timoshenko beam theory by ignoring the flexoelectric effect. Based on the developed model, flexoelectricity effect on dielectric beams and energy harvesting from cantilever beam under harmonic base excitation is investigated. A parametric study was conducted to evaluate the effects of flexoelectric coefficients, strain gradient constants, base acceleration and the attaching tip mass on the energy harvested from a cantilever Timoshenko beam. Results show that the flexoelectricity has a significant effect on the energy harvester performance, especially in submicron and nano scales. In addition, this effect makes the beam to behave softer than before and also it changes the harvester first resonance frequency. The present study provides guidance for flexoelectric nano-beam analysis and a method to evaluate the performance of energy harvester in nano-dielectric devices.

  8. The discordant pleasures of everyday eating: Reflections on the social gradient in obesity under neo-liberalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Paul; Peacock, Marian; Blackburn, Joanna; Smith, Christine

    2016-06-01

    Despite widespread epidemiological evidence of a social gradient in obesity, there has been less attention focused on understanding this from a sociological perspective. Furthermore, whilst pleasure is an obvious feature of contemporary cultural representations of food and eating, this has not figured prominently in sociological understandings of the social gradient. Using qualitative data from biographical interviews conducted with adults living in materially deprived parts of South Yorkshire (UK) we introduce the idea of discordant pleasure in relation to everyday eating as a way of shedding light on the social gradient in obesity. We highlight in particular, the ways in which materially deprived individuals who were defined as obese described the tensions between the pleasures of eating and the struggles for bodily control, alongside the affective dimensions - frustration and shame - that this process engendered. We draw on Berlant's work on lateral and interruptive agency to make sense of these accounts, suggesting that classed agency and discordant pleasure are important dimensions in understanding the social gradient in obesity under neoliberalism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Low dimensional homeochaos in coevolving host-parasitoid dimorphic populations: Extinction thresholds under local noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardanyés, Josep

    2011-10-01

    A discrete time model describing the population dynamics of coevolution between host and parasitoid haploid populations with a dimorphic matching allele coupling is investigated under both determinism and stochastic population disturbances. The role of the properties of the attractors governing the survival of both populations is analyzed considering equal mutation rates and focusing on host and parasitoid growth rates involving chaos. The purely deterministic model reveals a wide range of ordered and chaotic Red Queen dynamics causing cyclic and aperiodic fluctuations of haplotypes within each species. A Ruelle-Takens-Newhouse route to chaos is identified by increasing both host and parasitoid growth rates. From the bifurcation diagram structure and from numerical stability analysis, two different types of chaotic sets are roughly differentiated according to their size in phase space and to their largest Lyapunov exponent: the Confined and Expanded attractors. Under the presence of local population noise, these two types of attractors have a crucial role in the survival of both coevolving populations. The chaotic confined attractors, which have a low largest positive Lyapunov exponent, are shown to involve a very low extinction probability under the influence of local population noise. On the contrary, the expanded chaotic sets (with a higher largest positive Lyapunov exponent) involve higher host and parasitoid extinction probabilities under the presence of noise. The asynchronies between haplotypes in the chaotic regime combined with low dimensional homeochaos tied to the confined attractors is suggested to reinforce the long-term persistence of these coevolving populations under the influence of stochastic disturbances. These ideas are also discussed in the framework of spatially-distributed host-parasitoid populations.

  10. Atomistic simulations of void migration under thermal gradient in UO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Tapan G.; Millett, Paul; Tonks, Michael; Wolf, Dieter

    2010-01-01

    It is well known that within a few hours after startup of a nuclear reactor, the temperature gradient within a fuel element causes migration of voids/bubbles radially inwards to form a central hole. To understand the atomic processes that control this migration of voids, we performed molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on single crystal UO 2 with voids of diameter 2.2 nm. An external temperature gradient was applied across the simulation cell. At the end of the simulation run, it was observed that the voids had moved towards the hot end of the simulation cell. The void migration velocity obtained from the simulations was compared with the available phenomenological equations for void migration due to different transport mechanisms. Surface diffusion of the slowest moving specie, i.e. uranium, was found to be the dominant mechanism for void migration. The contribution from lattice diffusion and the thermal stress gradient to the void migration was analyzed and found to be negligible. By extrapolation, a crossover from the surface-diffusion-controlled mechanism to the lattice-diffusion-controlled mechanism was found to occur for voids with sizes in the μm range.

  11. Synchrotron X-ray measurement techniques for thermal barrier coated cylindrical samples under thermal gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Sanna F; Knipe, Kevin; Manero, Albert; Meid, Carla; Wischek, Janine; Okasinski, John; Almer, Jonathan; Karlsson, Anette M; Bartsch, Marion; Raghavan, Seetha

    2013-08-01

    Measurement techniques to obtain accurate in situ synchrotron strain measurements of thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) applied to hollow cylindrical specimens are presented in this work. The Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition coated specimens with internal cooling were designed to achieve realistic temperature gradients over the TBC coated material such as that occurring in the turbine blades of aeroengines. Effects of the circular cross section on the x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements in the various layers, including the thermally grown oxide, are investigated using high-energy synchrotron x-rays. Multiple approaches for beam penetration including collection, tangential, and normal to the layers, along with variations in collection parameters are compared for their ability to attain high-resolution XRD data from the internal layers. This study displays the ability to monitor in situ, the response of the internal layers within the TBC, while implementing a thermal gradient across the thickness of the coated sample. The thermal setup maintained coating surface temperatures in the range of operating conditions, while monitoring the substrate cooling, for a controlled thermal gradient. Through variation in measurement location and beam parameters, sufficient intensities are obtained from the internal layers which can be used for depth resolved strain measurements. Results are used to establish the various techniques for obtaining XRD measurements through multi-layered coating systems and their outcomes will pave the way towards goals in achieving realistic in situ testing of these coatings.

  12. Explaining geographic gradients in winter selection of landscapes by boreal caribou with implications under global changes in Eastern Canada.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Beguin

    Full Text Available Many animal species exhibit broad-scale latitudinal or longitudinal gradients in their response to biotic and abiotic components of their habitat. Although knowing the underlying mechanism of these patterns can be critical to the development of sound measures for the preservation or recovery of endangered species, few studies have yet identified which processes drive the existence of geographical gradients in habitat selection. Using extensive spatial data of broad latitudinal and longitudinal extent, we tested three hypotheses that could explain the presence of geographical gradients in landscape selection of the endangered boreal woodland caribou (Rangifer tarandus caribou during winter in Eastern Canadian boreal forests: 1 climate-driven selection, which postulates that geographic gradients are surrogates for climatic gradients; 2 road-driven selection, which proposes that boreal caribou adjust their selection for certain habitat classes as a function of proximity to roads; and 3 an additive effect of both roads and climate. Our data strongly supported road-driven selection over climate influences. Thus, direct human alteration of landscapes drives boreal caribou distribution and should likely remain so until the climate changes sufficiently from present conditions. Boreal caribou avoided logged areas two-fold more strongly than burnt areas. Limiting the spread of road networks and accounting for the uneven impact of logging compared to wildfire should therefore be integral parts of any habitat management plan and conservation measures within the range of the endangered boreal caribou. The use of hierarchical spatial models allowed us to explore the distribution of spatially-structured errors in our models, which in turn provided valuable insights for generating alternative hypotheses about processes responsible for boreal caribou distribution.

  13. Numerical modeling of solute transport in a sand tank physical model under varying hydraulic gradient and hydrological stresses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atlabachew, Abunu; Shu, Longcang; Wu, Peipeng; Zhang, Yongjie; Xu, Yang

    2018-03-01

    This laboratory study improves the understanding of the impacts of horizontal hydraulic gradient, artificial recharge, and groundwater pumping on solute transport through aquifers. Nine experiments and numerical simulations were carried out using a sand tank. The variable-density groundwater flow and sodium chloride transport were simulated using the three-dimensional numerical model SEAWAT. Numerical modelling results successfully reproduced heads and concentrations observed in the sand tank. A higher horizontal hydraulic gradient enhanced the migration of sodium chloride, particularly in the groundwater flow direction. The application of constant artificial recharge increased the spread of the sodium chloride plume in both the longitudinal and lateral directions. In addition, groundwater pumping accelerated spreading of the sodium chloride plume towards the pumping well. Both higher hydraulic gradient and pumping rate generated oval-shaped plumes in the horizontal plane. However, the artificial recharge process produced stretched plumes. These effects of artificial recharge and groundwater pumping were greater under higher hydraulic gradient. The concentration breakthrough curves indicated that emerging solutions never attained the concentration of the originally injected solution. This is probably because of sorption of sodium chloride onto the silica sand and/or the exchange of sodium chloride between the mobile and immobile liquid domains. The fingering and protruding plume shapes in the numerical models constitute instability zones produced by buoyancy-driven flow. Overall, the results have substantiated the influences of hydraulic gradient, boundary condition, artificial recharge, pumping rate and density differences on solute transport through a homogeneous unconfined aquifer. The implications of these findings are important for managing liquid wastes.

  14. Very high cycle fatigue crack initiation in electroplated Ni films under extreme stress gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumert, E.K.; Pierron, O.N.

    2012-01-01

    A characterization technique based on kilohertz micro-resonators is presented to investigate the very high cycle fatigue behavior of 20 μm thick electroplated Ni films with a columnar microstructure (grain diameter less than 2 μm). The films exhibit superior fatigue resistance due to the extreme stress gradients at the surface. The effects of stress amplitude and environment on the formation of fatigue extrusions and micro-cracks are discussed based on scanning electron microscopy and the tracking of the specimens’ resonant frequency.

  15. Thermomechanical and Environmental Durability of Environmental Barrier Coated Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Harder, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the developments of thermo-mechanical testing approaches and durability performance of environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) and EBC coated SiCSiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs). Critical testing aspects of the CMCs will be described, including state of the art instrumentations such as temperature, thermal gradient, and full field strain measurements; materials thermal conductivity evolutions and thermal stress resistance; NDE methods; thermo-mechanical stress and environment interactions associated damage accumulations. Examples are also given for testing ceramic matrix composite sub-elements and small airfoils to help better understand the critical and complex CMC and EBC properties in engine relevant testing environments.

  16. A spectral KRMI conjugate gradient method under the strong-Wolfe line search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadijah, Wan; Rivaie, Mohd.; Mamat, Mustafa; Jusoh, Ibrahim

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a modification of spectral conjugate gradient (CG) method is proposed which combines the advantages of the spectral CG method and the RMIL method namely as spectral Khadijah-Rivaie-Mustafa-Ibrahim (SKRMI) to solve unconstrained optimization problems. Based on inexact line searches, the objective function generates a sufficient descent direction and the global convergence property for the proposed method has been proved. Moreover, the method reduces to the standard RMIL method if exact line search is applied. Numerical results are also presented to examine the efficiency of the proposed method.

  17. Ion slip effect on unsteady Hartmann flow with heat transfer under exponential decaying pressure gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazem A. Attia

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The unsteady Hartmann flow of an electrically conducting, viscous, incompressible fluid bounded by two parallel nonconducting porous plates is studied with heat transfer taking the ion slip into consideration. An external uniform magnetic field and a uniform suction and injection are applied perpendicular to the plates, while the fluid motion is subjected to an exponential decaying pressure gradient. The two plates are kept at different but constant temperatures while the Joule and viscous dissipations are included in the energy equation. The effect of the ion slip and the uniform suction and injection on both the velocity and temperature distributions is examined.

  18. Determining the Threshold Value of Basil Yield Reduction and Evaluation of Water Uptake Models under Salinity Stress Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sarai Tabrizi

    2016-10-01

    by calculating statistical indices such as maximum error (ME, normalized root mean square error (nRMSE, modeling efficiency (EF, and coefficient of residual mass (CRM. At the end of the experiment, dry matter yield at the different treatments was measured and relative yield was calculated by dividing dry matter yield of treatments on dry matter yield at no stress treatment (control treatment. Leaching requirement in experimental treatments was calculated by Ayarset al., (2012 equation. Results and Discussion: The results indicated that Basil threshold value based on soil salinity was 2.25 dSm-1 with the yield reduction of 7.2% per dSm-1. The mathematical model of van Genuchten and Hoffman (1984 had a higher precision than other models in simulating Basil yield reduction function based on saturated soil extract salinity. The overall observations revealed that van Genuchten and Hoffman (1984, Steppuhnet al., (2005 and Homaeeet al., (2002 models were accurate for simulating Basil root water uptake and yield response to saturated soil extract salinity. Considering the presented results, it seems that among math-empirical models for salinity stress conditions, model of van Genuchten and Hoffman (1984 is more accurate than Maas and Hoffman (1977, Dirksen and Augustijn (1988 and Homaeeet al., (2002a models. The works of Green et al., (2006 and Skaggs et al., (2006 came to the same conclusion. Our work indicated that mostly statistical models have lower precision than math-empirical models. Steppuhn et al., (2005a reported that statistical models had the higher accuracy than math-empirical model of Maas and Hoffman (1977 and among statistical models, the modified Weibull model had the best fit on measured data which is in good agreement with the results of this study. Conclusion: The goals of this research were to evaluate Basil response to saturated soil extract salinity, to estimate threshold value of Basil crop coefficients, to obtain yield reduction gradient, and also to

  19. Numerical simulation of bubble behavior in subcooled flow boiling under velocity and temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahreini, Mohammad; Ramiar, Abas; Ranjbar, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Condensing bubble is numerically investigated using VOF model in OpenFOAM package. • Bubble mass reduces as it goes through condensation and achieves higher velocities. • At a certain time the slope of changing bubble diameter with time, varies suddenly. • Larger bubbles experience more lateral migration to higher velocity regions. • Bubbles migrate back to a lower velocity region for higher liquid subcooling rates. - Abstract: In this paper, numerical simulation of the bubble condensation in the subcooled boiling flow is performed. The interface between two-phase is tracked via the volume of fluid (VOF) method with continuous surface force (CSF) model, implemented in the open source OpenFOAM CFD package. In order to simulate the condensing bubble with the OpenFOAM code, the original energy equation and mass transfer model for phase change have been modified and a new solver is developed. The Newtonian flow is solved using the finite volume scheme based on the pressure implicit with splitting of operators (PISO) algorithm. Comparison of the simulation results with previous experimental data revealed that the model predicted well the behavior of the actual condensing bubble. The bubble lifetime is almost proportional to bubble initial size and is prolonged by increasing the system pressure. In addition, the initial bubble size, subcooling of liquid and velocity gradient play an important role in the bubble deformation behavior. Velocity gradient makes the bubble move to the higher velocity region and the subcooling rate makes it to move back to the lower velocity region.

  20. Volume based vs. time based chromatograms: reproducibility of data for gradient separations under high and low pressure conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovich, Joseph J; Gritti, Fabrice; Stevenson, Paul G; Vajda, Péter; Beaver, Lois Ann; Guiochon, Georges

    2014-05-23

    A critical aspect in fast gradient separations carried out under constant pressure, in the very high pressure liquid chromatography (VHPLC) mode is that time-based chromatograms may not yield highly reproducible separations. A proposed solution to improve the reproducibility of these separations involves plotting the chromatograms as functions of the volume eluted vs. UV absorbance instead of time vs. UV. To study the consequences of using the volume-based rather than the time-based chromatograms, separations were first performed under low pressures that do not generate significant amounts of heat and for which the variations of the eluent density along the columns are negligible. Secondly, they were performed under very high pressures that do generate heat and measurable variations of the local retention factor and eluent density along the column. Comparison of the results provides estimates of the improvements obtained when volume based chromatograms are used in gradient analyses. Using a column packed with fully porous particles, four different types of methods and several sets for each method were used to perform the gradient elution runs: two sets of constant flow rate operations, four sets of constant pressure operations, two sets of constant pressure operations with programmed flow rate, and one set using the constant heat loss approach. The differences between time-based and volume-based chromatograms are demonstrated by using eight replicates of early, middle, and last eluting peaks. The results show that volume-based chromatograms improve the retention time reproducibility of the four constant pressure methods by a factor of 3.7 on average. If the column is not thermally conditioned prior to performing a long series of separations, flow controlled methods (constant flow rate, programmed constant pressure, and constant wall heat approaches) are more precise. If one gradient run is used to bring the column to a relatively stable temperature, constant

  1. arXiv Topology in the 2d Heisenberg Model under Gradient Flow

    CERN Document Server

    Sandoval, Ilya O.; de Forcrand, Philippe; Gerber, Urs; Mejía-Díaz, Héctor

    2017-10-28

    The 2d Heisenberg model — or 2d O(3) model — is popular in condensed matter physics, and in particle physics as a toy model for QCD. Along with other analogies, it shares with 4d Yang-Mills theories, and with QCD, the property that the configurations are divided in topological sectors. In the lattice regularisation the topological charge Q can still be defined such that $Q\\in \\mathbb{Z}$. It has generally been observed, however, that the topological susceptibility ${{\\chi }_{t}}=\\langle {{Q}^{2}}\\rangle /V$ does not scale properly in the continuum limit, i.e. that the quantity ${{\\chi }_{t}}{{\\xi }^{2}}$ diverges for ξ → ∞ (where ξ is the correlation length in lattice units). Here we address the question whether or not this divergence persists after the application of the Gradient Flow.

  2. A new nonlinear conjugate gradient coefficient under strong Wolfe-Powell line search

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Nur Syarafina; Mamat, Mustafa; Rivaie, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    A nonlinear conjugate gradient method (CG) plays an important role in solving a large-scale unconstrained optimization problem. This method is widely used due to its simplicity. The method is known to possess sufficient descend condition and global convergence properties. In this paper, a new nonlinear of CG coefficient βk is presented by employing the Strong Wolfe-Powell inexact line search. The new βk performance is tested based on number of iterations and central processing unit (CPU) time by using MATLAB software with Intel Core i7-3470 CPU processor. Numerical experimental results show that the new βk converge rapidly compared to other classical CG method.

  3. Sintering Characteristics of Multilayered Thermal Barrier Coatings Under Thermal Gradient and Isothermal High Temperature Annealing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Amarendra K.; Schmitt, Michael P.; Bhattacharya, Rabi; Zhu, Dongming; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2014-01-01

    Pyrochlore oxides have most of the relevant attributes for use as next generation thermal barrier coatings such as phase stability, low sintering kinetics and low thermal conductivity. One of the issues with the pyrochlore oxides is their lower toughness and therefore higher erosion rate compared to the current state-of-the-art TBC material, yttria (6 to 8 wt%) stabilized zirconia (YSZ). In this work, sintering characteristics were investigated for novel multilayered coating consisted of alternating layers of pyrochlore oxide viz Gd2Zr2O7 and t' low k (rare earth oxide doped YSZ). Thermal gradient and isothermal high temperature (1316 C) annealing conditions were used to investigate sintering and cracking in these coatings. The results are then compared with that of relevant monolayered coatings and a baseline YSZ coating.

  4. Migration of ThO2 kernels under the influence of a temperature gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, C.L.

    1976-11-01

    BISO coated ThO 2 fertile fuel kernels will migrate up the thermal gradients imposed across coated particles during HTGR operation. Thorium dioxide kernel migration has been studied as a function of temperature (1300 to 1700 0 C) and ThO 2 kernel burnup (0.9 to 5.8 percent FIMA) in out-of-pile, postirradiation thermal gradient heating experiments. The studies were conducted to obtain descriptions of migration rates that will be used in core design studies to evaluate the impact of ThO 2 migration on fertile fuel performance in an operating HTGR and to define characteristics needed by any comprehensive model describing ThO 2 kernel migration. The kinetics data generated in these postirradiation studies are consistent with in-pile data collected by investigators at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, which supports use of the more precise postirradiation heating results in HTGR core design studies. Observations of intergranular carbon deposits on the cool side of migrating kernels support the assumption that the kinetics of kernel migration are controlled by solid state diffusion within irradiated ThO 2 kernels. The migration is characterized by a period of no migration (incubation period) followed by migration at the equilibrium rate for ThO 2 . The incubation period decreases with increasing temperature and kernel burnup. The improved understanding of the kinetics of ThO 2 kernel migration provided by this work will contribute to an optimization of HTGR core design and an increased confidence in fuel performance predictions

  5. Mass Dependency of Isotope Fractionation of Gases Under Thermal Gradient and Its Possible Implications for Planetary Atmosphere Escaping Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Tao; Niles, Paul; Bao, Huiming; Socki, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Physical processes that unmix elements/isotopes of gas molecules involve phase changes, diffusion (chemical or thermal), effusion and gravitational settling. Some of those play significant roles for the evolution of chemical and isotopic compositions of gases in planetary bodies which lead to better understanding of surface paleoclimatic conditions, e.g. gas bubbles in Antarctic ice, and planetary evolution, e.g. the solar-wind erosion induced gas escaping from exosphere on terrestrial planets.. A mass dependent relationship is always expected for the kinetic isotope fractionations during these simple physical processes, according to the kinetic theory of gases by Chapman, Enskog and others [3-5]. For O-bearing (O16, -O17, -O18) molecules the alpha O-17/ alpha O-18 is expected at 0.5 to 0.515, and for S-bearing (S32,-S33. -S34, -S36) molecules, the alpha S-33/ alpha S-34 is expected at 0.5 to 0.508, where alpha is the isotope fractionation factor associated with unmixing processes. Thus, one isotope pair is generally proxied to yield all the information for the physical history of the gases. However, we recently] reported the violation of mass law for isotope fractionation among isotope pairs of multiple isotope system during gas diffusion or convection under thermal gradient (Thermal Gradient Induced Non-Mass Dependent effect, TGI-NMD). The mechanism(s) that is responsible to such striking observation remains unanswered. In our past studies, we investigated polyatomic molecules, O2 and SF6, and we suggested that nuclear spin effect could be responsible to the observed NMD effect in a way of changing diffusion coefficients of certain molecules, owing to the fact of negligible delta S-36 anomaly for SF6.. On the other hand, our results also showed that for both diffusion and convection under thermal gradient, this NMD effect is increased by lower gas pressure, bigger temperature gradient and lower average temperature, which indicate that the nuclear spin effect may

  6. Near-field radiative heat transfer under temperature gradients and conductive transfer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Weiliang; Rodriguez, Alejandro W. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering; Messina, Riccardo [CNRS-Univ. de Montpellier (France). Lab. Charles Coulomb

    2017-05-01

    We describe a recently developed formulation of coupled conductive and radiative heat transfer (RHT) between objects separated by nanometric, vacuum gaps. Our results rely on analytical formulas of RHT between planar slabs (based on the scattering-matrix method) as well as a general formulation of RHT between arbitrarily shaped bodies (based on the fluctuating-volume current method), which fully captures the existence of temperature inhomogeneities. In particular, the impact of RHT on conduction, and vice versa, is obtained via self-consistent solutions of the Fourier heat equation and Maxwell's equations. We show that in materials with low thermal conductivities (e.g. zinc oxides and glasses), the interplay of conduction and RHT can strongly modify heat exchange, exemplified for instance by the presence of large temperature gradients and saturating flux rates at short (nanometric) distances. More generally, we show that the ability to tailor the temperature distribution of an object can modify the behaviour of RHT with respect to gap separations, e.g. qualitatively changing the asymptotic scaling at short separations from quadratic to linear or logarithmic. Our results could be relevant to the interpretation of both past and future experimental measurements of RHT at nanometric distances.

  7. Crack growth threshold under hold time conditions in DA Inconel 718 – A transition in the crack growth mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Fessler

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Aeroengine manufacturers have to demonstrate that critical components such as turbine disks, made of DA Inconel 718, meet the certification requirements in term of fatigue crack growth. In order to be more representative of the in service loading conditions, crack growth under hold time conditions is studied. Modelling crack growth under these conditions is challenging due to the combined effect of fatigue, creep and environment. Under these conditions, established models are often conservative but the degree of conservatism can be reduced by introducing the crack growth threshold in models. Here, the emphasis is laid on the characterization of crack growth rates in the low ΔK regime under hold time conditions and in particular, on the involved crack growth mechanism. Crack growth tests were carried out at high temperature (550 °C to 650 °C under hold time conditions (up to 1200 s in the low ΔK regime using a K-decreasing procedure. Scanning electron microscopy was used to identify the fracture mode involved in the low ΔK regime. EBSD analyses and BSE imaging were also carried out along the crack path for a more accurate identification of the fracture mode. A transition from intergranular to transgranular fracture was evidenced in the low ΔK regime and slip bands have also been observed at the tip of an arrested crack at low ΔK. Transgranular fracture and slip bands are usually observed under pure fatigue loading conditions. At low ΔK, hold time cycles are believed to act as equivalent pure fatigue cycles. This change in the crack growth mechanism under hold time conditions at low ΔK is discussed regarding results related to intergranular crack tip oxidation and its effect on the crack growth behaviour of Inconel 718 alloy. A concept based on an “effective oxygen partial pressure” at the crack tip is proposed to explain the transition from transgranular to intergranular fracture in the low ΔK regime.

  8. A switch from a gradient to a threshold mode in the regulation of a transcriptional cascade promotes robust execution of meiosis in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vyacheslav Gurevich

    Full Text Available Tight regulation of developmental pathways is of critical importance to all organisms, and is achieved by a transcriptional cascade ensuring the coordinated expression of sets of genes. We aimed to explore whether a strong signal is required to enter and complete a developmental pathway, by using meiosis in budding yeast as a model. We demonstrate that meiosis in budding yeast is insensitive to drastic changes in the levels of its consecutive positive regulators (Ime1, Ime2, and Ndt80. Entry into DNA replication is not correlated with the time of transcription of the early genes that regulate this event. Entry into nuclear division is directly regulated by the time of transcription of the middle genes, as premature transcription of their activator NDT80, leads to a premature entry into the first meiotic division, and loss of coordination between DNA replication and nuclear division. We demonstrate that Cdk1/Cln3 functions as a negative regulator of Ime2, and that ectopic expression of Cln3 delays entry into nuclear division as well as NDT80 transcription. Because Ime2 functions as a positive regulator for premeiotic DNA replication and NDT80 transcription, as well as a negative regulator of Cdk/Cln, we suggest that a double negative feedback loop between Ime2 and Cdk1/Cln3 promotes a bistable switch from the cell cycle to meiosis. Moreover, our results suggest a regulatory mode switch that ensures robust meiosis as the transcription of the early meiosis-specific genes responds in a graded mode to Ime1 levels, whereas that of the middle and late genes as well as initiation of DNA replication, are regulated in a threshold mode.

  9. Clinical Factors Underlying the Inter-individual Variability of the Resting Motor Threshold in Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Motor Mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sollmann, Nico; Tanigawa, Noriko; Bulubas, Lucia; Sabih, Jamil; Zimmer, Claus; Ringel, Florian; Meyer, Bernhard; Krieg, Sandro M

    2017-01-01

    Correctly determining individual's resting motor threshold (rMT) is crucial for accurate and reliable mapping by navigated transcranial magnetic stimulation (nTMS), which is especially true for preoperative motor mapping in brain tumor patients. However, systematic data analysis on clinical factors underlying inter-individual rMT variability in neurosurgical motor mapping is sparse. The present study examined 14 preselected clinical factors that may underlie inter-individual rMT variability by performing multiple regression analysis (backward, followed by forward model comparisons) on the nTMS motor mapping data of 100 brain tumor patients. Data were collected from preoperative motor mapping of abductor pollicis brevis (APB), abductor digiti minimi (ADM), and flexor carpi radialis (FCR) muscle representations among these patients. While edema and age at exam in the ADM model only jointly reduced the unexplained variance significantly, the other factors kept in the ADM model (gender, antiepileptic drug intake, and motor deficit) and each of the factors kept in the APB and FCR models independently significantly reduced the unexplained variance. Hence, several clinical parameters contribute to inter-individual rMT variability and should be taken into account during initial and follow-up motor mappings. Thus, the present study adds basic evidence on inter-individual rMT variability, whereby some of the parameters are specific to brain tumor patients.

  10. Development of a threshold model to predict germination of Populus tomentosa seeds after harvest and storage under ambient condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Song, Song-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Effects of temperature, storage time and their combination on germination of aspen (Populus tomentosa) seeds were investigated. Aspen seeds were germinated at 5 to 30°C at 5°C intervals after storage for a period of time under 28°C and 75% relative humidity. The effect of temperature on aspen seed germination could not be effectively described by the thermal time (TT) model, which underestimated the germination rate at 5°C and poorly predicted the time courses of germination at 10, 20, 25 and 30°C. A modified TT model (MTT) which assumed a two-phased linear relationship between germination rate and temperature was more accurate in predicting the germination rate and percentage and had a higher likelihood of being correct than the TT model. The maximum lifetime threshold (MLT) model accurately described the effect of storage time on seed germination across all the germination temperatures. An aging thermal time (ATT) model combining both the TT and MLT models was developed to describe the effect of both temperature and storage time on seed germination. When the ATT model was applied to germination data across all the temperatures and storage times, it produced a relatively poor fit. Adjusting the ATT model to separately fit germination data at low and high temperatures in the suboptimal range increased the models accuracy for predicting seed germination. Both the MLT and ATT models indicate that germination of aspen seeds have distinct physiological responses to temperature within a suboptimal range.

  11. Subduction factory in an ampoule: Experiments on sediment-peridotite interaction under temperature gradient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodland, A. B.; Bulatov, V. K.; Brey, G. P.; Girnis, A. V.; Höfer, H. E.; Gerdes, A.

    2018-02-01

    To better understand processes above subducted oceanic slabs, we have undertaken experiments with juxtaposed sediment and peridotite layers at pressures of 7.5 and 10.5 GPa at a controlled temperature gradient from ∼100 to ∼500 °C per a sample length of ∼3 mm. The sediment starting material contains H2O (6.9 wt%) and CO2 (5.9 wt%) and has a major-element composition similar to GLOSS (Plank and Langmuir, 1998) doped with trace elements at 10-100 ppm levels. Several experiments were conducted with ∼0.5 wt% Cl or F. The peridotite layer is composed of natural olivine (66 wt%), orthopyroxene (27 wt%) and garnet (7 wt%) mixed with ∼15 wt% graphite. Several experimental configurations were investigated, but the "basic" setup has the sediment layer at the bottom in the cold zone (400-1200 °C) overlain by peridotite at 900-1500 °C. The temperature distribution was determined by two thermocouples and orthopyroxene-garnet thermometry. Features common to many experiments are (1) the development of multiple layers of various lithologies and a pool of hydrous silicate or carbonate-silicate melt in the hottest part of the capsule; (2) replacement of olivine by orthopyroxene in the metaperidotite; (3) preservation and growth of garnet and local development of magnesite in the metaperidotite layer; (4) enrichment in garnet within the metasediment layer at the contact with the metaperidotite; (5) formation of a clinopyroxene-garnet assemblage at the bottom (the coldest part); (6) presence of K-bearing phases (phlogopite or phengite) and carbonates in the metasediment layer only at temperatures variable SiO2, MgO, FeO and CaO contents and low Al2O3. The addition of Cl has almost no effect on element distribution, whereas the addition of F results in the appearance of humite-group minerals containing significant amounts of Ti. Trace-element distribution is controlled by pressure, temperature and mineral assemblages. At low temperatures in the sediment layer (<700 °C) Ba

  12. Hygrothermal wave propagation in viscoelastic graphene under in-plane magnetic field based on nonlocal strain gradient theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karami, Behrouz; Shahsavari, Davood; Li, Li

    2018-03-01

    A size-dependent model is developed for the hygrothermal wave propagation analysis of an embedded viscoelastic single layer graphene sheet (SLGS) under the influence of in-plane magnetic field. The bi-Helmholtz nonlocal strain gradient theory involving three small scale parameters is introduced to account for the size-dependent effects. The size-dependent model is deduced based on Hamilton's principle. The closed-form solution of eigenfrequency relation between wave number and phase velocity is achieved. By studying the size-dependent effects on the flexural wave of SLGS, the dispersion relation predicted by the developed size-dependent model can show a good match with experimental data. The influence of in-plane magnetic field, temperature and moisture of environs, structural damping, damped substrate, lower and higher order nonlocal parameters and the material characteristic parameter on the phase velocity of SLGS is explored.

  13. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy of mixed conductors under a chemical potential gradient: a case study of Pt|SDC|BSCF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wei; Haile, Sossina M

    2008-02-14

    The AC impedance response of mixed ionic and electronic conductors (MIECs) exposed to a chemical potential gradient is derived from first principles. In such a system, the chemical potential gradient induces a gradient in the carrier concentration. For the particular system considered, 15% samarium doped ceria (SDC15) with Ba(0.5)Sr(0.5)Co(0.8)Fe(0.2)O(3-delta) (BSCF) and Pt electrodes, the oxygen vacancy concentration is a constant under the experimental conditions and it is the electron concentration that varies. The resulting equations are mapped to an equivalent circuit that bears some resemblance to recently discussed equivalent circuit models for MIECs under uniform chemical potential conditions, but differs in that active elements, specifically, voltage-controlled current sources, occur. It is shown that from a combination of open circuit voltage measurements and AC impedance spectroscopy, it is possible to use this model to determine the oxygen partial pressure drop that occurs between the gas phase in the electrode chambers and the electrode|electrolyte interface, as well as the interfacial polarization resistance. As discussed in detail, this resistance corresponds to the slope of the interfacial polarization curve. Measurements were carried out at temperatures between 550 and 650 degrees C and oxygen partial pressure at the Pt anode ranging from 10(-29) to 10(-24) atm (attained using H(2)/H(2)O/Ar mixtures), while the cathode was exposed to either synthetic air or neat oxygen. The oxygen partial pressure drop at the anode was typically about five orders of magnitude, whereas that at the cathode was about 0.1 atm for measurements using air. Accordingly, the poor activity of the anode is responsible for a loss in open circuit voltage of about 0.22 V, whereas the cathode is responsible for only about 0.01 V, reflecting the high activity of BSCF for oxygen electro-reduction. The interfacial polarization resistance at the anode displayed dependences on oxygen

  14. Extension of SMAC scheme for variable density flows under strong temperature gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwer, S. F.; Khan, H. Naushad; Sanghi, S.; Ahmad, A.; Yahya, S. M.

    2012-06-01

    An extension of SMAC scheme is proposed for variable density flows under low Mach number approximation. The algorithm is based on a predictor-corrector time integration scheme that employs a projection method for the momentum equation. A constant-coefficient Poisson equation is solved for the pressure following both the predictor and corrector steps to satisfy the continuity equation at each time step. Spatial discretization is performed on a collocated grid system that offers computational simplicity and straight forward extension to curvilinear coordinate systems. To avoid the pressure odd-even decoupling that is typically encountered in such grids, a flux interpolation technique is introduced for the equations governing variable density flows. An important characteristic of the proposed algorithm is that it can be applied to flows in both open and closed domains. Its robustness and accuracy are illustrated with a non-isothermal, turbulent channel flow at temperature ratio of 1.01 and 2.

  15. Development of a Threshold Model to Predict Germination of Populus tomentosa Seeds after Harvest and Storage under Ambient Condition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei-Qing; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Song, Song-Quan

    2013-01-01

    Effects of temperature, storage time and their combination on germination of aspen (Populus tomentosa) seeds were investigated. Aspen seeds were germinated at 5 to 30°C at 5°C intervals after storage for a period of time under 28°C and 75% relative humidity. The effect of temperature on aspen seed germination could not be effectively described by the thermal time (TT) model, which underestimated the germination rate at 5°C and poorly predicted the time courses of germination at 10, 20, 25 and 30°C. A modified TT model (MTT) which assumed a two-phased linear relationship between germination rate and temperature was more accurate in predicting the germination rate and percentage and had a higher likelihood of being correct than the TT model. The maximum lifetime threshold (MLT) model accurately described the effect of storage time on seed germination across all the germination temperatures. An aging thermal time (ATT) model combining both the TT and MLT models was developed to describe the effect of both temperature and storage time on seed germination. When the ATT model was applied to germination data across all the temperatures and storage times, it produced a relatively poor fit. Adjusting the ATT model to separately fit germination data at low and high temperatures in the suboptimal range increased the models accuracy for predicting seed germination. Both the MLT and ATT models indicate that germination of aspen seeds have distinct physiological responses to temperature within a suboptimal range. PMID:23658654

  16. Profiling of a microbial community under confined conditions in a fed-batch garbage decomposer by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horisawa, Sakae; Sakuma, Yoh; Nakamura, Yasunori; Doi, Shuichi

    2008-05-01

    In order to determine the conditions for the maximum performance of a fed-batch composting (FBC) reactor, polymerase chain reaction-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) was used to analyze the microbial communities established under the confined conditions of moisture content and environmental temperature. To evaluate the effects of microbial community structures on the performance of FBC reactors, degradation experiments using small-scale reactors and model waste were conducted under confined environmental conditions. A high degradation rate was observed under a wide range of MC conditions (30-60%) and at higher than usual temperatures (30-50 degrees C). The microbial communities that formed in the experimental FBC reactors were analyzed by DGGE of PCR-amplified 16S rRNA genes. The DGGE banding patterns at the same level as the degradation rates were similar even if the environmental conditions were different. Sequence analysis of the DGGE bands revealed the primary microbes which act in the reactor.

  17. Establishment Success of Coexisting Native and Exotic Trees Under an Experimental Gradient of Irradiance and Soil Moisture

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Muñoz, Noelia; Castro-Díez, Pilar; Fierro-Brunnenmeister, Natalia

    2011-10-01

    The exotic trees Ailanthus altissima, Robinia pseudoacacia, Acer negundo and Elaeagnus angustifolia coexist with the native trees Fraxinus angustifolia and Ulmus minor in river banks of central Spain. Similarly, the exotic trees Acacia dealbata and Eucalyptus globulus co-occur with the natives Quercus pyrenaica and Pinus pinaster in Northwest Spain. We aimed to identify the environmental conditions that favour or hamper the establishment success of these species. In spring 2008, seeds of the studied species were sown under an experimental gradient of light (100, 65, 35, 7% of full sunlight) combined with three levels of soil moisture (mean soil water potential = -0.97, -1.52 and -1.77 MPa.). During the first growing season we monitored seed emergence and seedling survival. We found that the effect of light on the establishment success was stronger than the effect of soil moisture. Both exotic and native species of central Spain showed a good performance under high light, A. negundo being the most shade tolerant . Water shortage diminished E. angustifolia and A. altissima success. Among NW Spain species, A. dealbata and P. pinaster were found to be potential competitors for colonizing high-irradiance scenarios, while Q. pyrenaica and E. globulus were more successful under moderate shade. High soil moisture favoured E. globulus but not A. dealbata establishment. These results contribute to understand some of the factors controlling for spatial segregation between coexisting native and exotic tree species, and can help to take decisions orientated to the control and management of these exotic species.

  18. A stochastic, evolutionary model for range shifts and richness on tropical elevational gradients under Quaternary glacial cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colwell, Robert K; Rangel, Thiago F

    2010-11-27

    Quaternary glacial-interglacial cycles repeatedly forced thermal zones up and down the slopes of mountains, at all latitudes. Although no one doubts that these temperature cycles have left their signature on contemporary patterns of geography and phylogeny, the relative roles of ecology and evolution are not well understood, especially for the tropics. To explore key mechanisms and their interactions in the context of chance events, we constructed a geographical range-based, stochastic simulation model that incorporates speciation, anagenetic evolution, niche conservatism, range shifts and extinctions under late Quaternary temperature cycles along tropical elevational gradients. In the model, elevational patterns of species richness arise from the differential survival of founder lineages, consolidated by speciation and the inheritance of thermal niche characteristics. The model yields a surprisingly rich variety of realistic patterns of phylogeny and biogeography, including close matches to a variety of contemporary elevational richness profiles from an elevational transect in Costa Rica. Mountaintop extinctions during interglacials and lowland extinctions at glacial maxima favour mid-elevation lineages, especially under the constraints of niche conservatism. Asymmetry in temperature (greater duration of glacial than of interglacial episodes) and in lateral area (greater land area at low than at high elevations) have opposing effects on lowland extinctions and the elevational pattern of species richness in the model--and perhaps in nature, as well.

  19. Untangling human development and natural gradients: implications of underlying correlation structure for linking landscapes and riverine ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasmin Lucero; E. Ashley Steel; Kelly M. Burnett; Kelly. Christiansen

    2011-01-01

    Increasingly, ecologists seek to identify and quantify relationships between landscape gradients and aquatic ecosystems. Considerable statistical challenges emerge in this effort, some of which are attributable to multicollinearity between human development and landscape gradients. In this paper, we measure the covariation between human development—such as agriculture...

  20. Formation of compositional gradient profiles by using shear-induced polymer migration phenomenon under Couette flow field

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Sang Hyuk; Lee, Su Jin [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Duck Jong; Park, O Ok [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST), Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kwon, Moo Hyun [Woosuk University, Wanju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    We investigated whether a graded-index profile, specified by the polymer compositional gradient, could be formed using shear-induced polymer migration phenomenon in a polymer solution. For the presented model system, we generated a shear flow by rotating a glass rod at the center of a polystyrene/methylmethacrylate (PS/MMA) solution and measured the degree of polymer migration by the shear flow field by examining the concentration of polymer solution along the radial direction from the rotating axis to the periphery. Through model experiments, we formed a compositional gradient and controlled its profile in the solution by varying the concentration of polymer solution, molecular weight of polymer, and shear rate. Finally, we solidified the gradient profiles by the polymerization of the PS/MMA solution and confirmed that the gradient profiles were maintained with a compositional gradient twice larger than the mother PS/MMA solution.

  1. DC Model Cable under Polarity Inversion and Thermal Gradient: Build-Up of Design-Related Space Charge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nugroho Adi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available In the field of energy transport, High-Voltage DC (HVDC technologies are booming at present due to the more flexible power converter solutions along with needs to bring electrical energy from distributed production areas to consumption sites and to strengthen large-scale energy networks. These developments go with challenges in qualifying insulating materials embedded in those systems and in the design of insulations relying on stress distribution. Our purpose in this communication is to illustrate how far the field distribution in DC insulation systems can be anticipated based on conductivity data gathered as a function of temperature and electric field. Transient currents and conductivity estimates as a function of temperature and field were recorded on miniaturized HVDC power cables with construction of 1.5 mm thick crosslinked polyethylene (XLPE insulation. Outputs of the conductivity model are compared to measured field distributions using space charge measurements techniques. It is shown that some features of the field distribution on model cables put under thermal gradient can be anticipated based on conductivity data. However, space charge build-up can induce substantial electric field strengthening when materials are not well controlled.

  2. Experimental observation of transient δ18O interaction between snow and advective airflow under various temperature gradient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. P. Ebner

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Stable water isotopes (δ18O obtained from snow and ice samples of polar regions are used to reconstruct past climate variability, but heat and mass transport processes can affect the isotopic composition. Here we present an experimental study on the effect of airflow on the snow isotopic composition through a snow pack in controlled laboratory conditions. The influence of isothermal and controlled temperature gradient conditions on the δ18O content in the snow and interstitial water vapour is elucidated. The observed disequilibrium between snow and vapour isotopes led to the exchange of isotopes between snow and vapour under non-equilibrium processes, significantly changing the δ18O content of the snow. The type of metamorphism of the snow had a significant influence on this process. These findings are pertinent to the interpretation of the records of stable isotopes of water from ice cores. These laboratory measurements suggest that a highly resolved climate history is relevant for the interpretation of the snow isotopic composition in the field.

  3. An over-nonlocal implicit gradient-enhanced damage-plastic model for trabecular bone under large compressive strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosseini, Hadi S; Horák, Martin; Zysset, Philippe K; Jirásek, Milan

    2015-11-01

    Investigation of trabecular bone strength and compaction is important for fracture risk prediction. At 1-2% compressive strain, trabecular bone undergoes strain softening, which may lead to numerical instabilities and mesh dependency in classical local damage-plastic models. The aim of this work is to improve our continuum damage-plastic model of bone by reducing the influence of finite element mesh size under large compression. This spurious numerical phenomenon may be circumvented by incorporating the nonlocal effect of cumulated plastic strain into the constitutive law. To this end, an over-nonlocal implicit gradient model of bone is developed and implemented into the finite element software ABAQUS using a user element subroutine. The ability of the model to detect the regions of bone failure is tested against experimental stepwise loading data of 16 human trabecular bone biopsies. The numerical outcomes of the nonlocal model revealed reduction of finite element mesh dependency compared with the local damage-plastic model. Furthermore, it helped reduce the computational costs of large-strain compression simulations. To the best of our knowledge, the proposed model is the first to predict the failure and densification of trabecular bone up to large compression independently of finite element mesh size. The current development enables the analysis of trabecular bone compaction as in osteoporotic fractures and implant migration, where large deformation of bone plays a key role. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Determining the Threshold Value of Basil Yield Reduction and Evaluation of Water Uptake Models under Salinity Stress Condition

    OpenAIRE

    M. Sarai Tabrizi; H. Babazadeh; M. Homaee; F. Kaveh Kaveh; M. Parsinejad

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Several mathematical models are being used for assessing the plant response to the salinity of the root zone. The salinity of the soil and water resources is a major challenge for agricultural sector in Iran. Several mathematical models have been developed for plant responses to the salinity stress. However, these models are often applicable in particular conditions. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the threshold value of Basil yield reduction, modeling Basil respon...

  5. Functional traits reveal the expansion and packing of ecological niche space underlying an elevational diversity gradient in passerine birds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pigot, Alex L.; Trisos, Christopher H.; Tobias, Joseph A.

    2016-01-01

    Variation in species richness across environmental gradients may be associated with an expanded volume or increased packing of ecological niche space. However, the relative importance of these alternative scenarios remains unknown, largely because standardized information on functional traits and

  6. Wavelength dependence of the damage threshold of inorganic materials under extreme-ultraviolet free-electron-laser irradiation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hau-Riege, S.P.; London, R.A.; Bionta, R.M.; Ryutov, D.; Soufli, R.; Bajt, S.; McKernan, M.A.; Baker, S. L.; Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Nietubyc, R.; Klinger, D.; Pelka, J. B.; Jurek, M.; Juha, Libor; Chalupský, Jaromír; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Hájková, Věra; Velyhan, Andriy; Krása, Josef; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Wabnitz, H.; Bergh, M.; Caleman, C.; Timneanu, N.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 95, č. 11 (2009), 111104/1-111104/3 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100702; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA MŠk LA08024; GA AV ČR IAA400100701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523 Keywords : damage threshold * silicon carbide * boron carbide * soft X- ray free-electron laser Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.554, year: 2009

  7. Research on critical groundwater level under the threshold value of land subsidence in the typical region of Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Jiang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Groundwater in Beijing has been excessively exploited in a long time, causing the groundwater level continued to declining and land subsidence areas expanding, which restrained the economic and social sustainable development. Long years of study show good time-space corresponding relationship between groundwater level and land subsidence. To providing scientific basis for the following land subsidence prevention and treatment, quantitative research between groundwater level and settlement is necessary. Multi-linear regression models are set up by long series factual monitoring data about layered water table and settlement in the Tianzhu monitoring station. The results show that: layered settlement is closely related to water table, water level variation and amplitude, especially the water table. Finally, according to the threshold value in the land subsidence prevention and control plan of China (45, 30, 25 mm, the minimum allowable layered water level in this region while settlement achieving the threshold value is calculated between −18.448 and −10.082 m. The results provide a reasonable and operable control target of groundwater level for rational adjustment of groundwater exploited horizon in the future.

  8. Vitamin profiles in two free-living passerine birds under a metal pollution gradient - A calcium supplementation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, Sandra R; Espín, Silvia; Sánchez-Virosta, Pablo; Salminen, Juha-Pekka; Lilley, Thomas M; Eeva, Tapio

    2017-04-01

    Vitamin and carotenoid deficiency may impair development in free-living vertebrates, because of the importance of these micronutrients to growth, antioxidant defense and calcium regulation. Micronutrient and calcium insufficiency can be intensified by metal pollution which can interfere with nutrient homeostasis or indirectly reduce food availability. Furthermore, absorption of dietary heavy metals is dependent on food calcium and vitamin levels. We investigated the effect of calcium on plasma vitamin and carotenoid profiles and how these affected growth and survival in two passerine birds with different calcium turnover living along a metal pollution gradient. Vitamins (A, D 3 and E) and carotenoids were quantified from blood plasma of great tit (Parus major) and pied flycatcher (Ficedula hypoleuca) nestlings. Metal concentrations in soil and in feces from the same nestlings were used to assess the exposure to air pollution. Additionally, we examined the vitamin level variation between developmental stages (eggs and nestlings within the same brood). Our results showed that generally higher concentrations of vitamins and carotenoids circulate in blood of great tits than in pied flycatchers. In general, birds inhabiting the polluted zone presented lower concentrations of the studied micronutrients. Calcium supplementation and metal pollution decreased vitamin A concentration in pied flycatcher, but not in great tit, while vitamin A affected growth and survival in great tit and pied flycatcher respectively. Our results suggest that populations under exposure to metal pollution may experience increased vitamin A deficiency, and that the two passerine species, while obtaining similar micronutrients in food, respond differently to environmental disturbance of nutrients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effects of slope gradient on hydro-erosional processes on an aeolian sand-covered loess slope under simulated rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F. B.; Yang, M. Y.; Li, B. B.; Li, Z. B.; Shi, W. Y.

    2017-10-01

    The aeolian sand-covered loess slope of the Wind-Water Erosion Crisscross Region of the Loess Plateau in China may play a key role in contributing excessive sediment to the Yellow River. Understanding its hydro-erosional processes is crucial to assessing, controlling and predicting soil and water losses in this region and maintaining the ecological sustainability of the Yellow River. Simulated rainfall (intensity 90 mm h-1) was used to investigate the runoff and soil loss from loess slopes with different slope gradients (18%, 27%, 36%, 47%, and 58%) and overlying sand layer thicknesses (0, 5 and 10 cm). As compared with uncovered loess slopes, an overlying sand layer delayed runoff production, reduced cumulative runoff and increased cumulative soil loss, as well as enhancing variations among slope gradients. Cumulative runoff and soil loss from the sand-covered loess slopes increased with increasing slope gradients and then slightly decreased, with a peak at about 47% gradient; they both were greater from the 10-cm sand-covered loess slope than from the 5-cm except for with 18% slope gradient. In general, differences in cumulative runoff between sand layer thicknesses became smaller, while those in cumulative soil loss became larger, with increasing slope gradient. Runoff and soil loss rates on the sand-covered loess slopes exhibited unimodal distributions during the rainstorms. Maximum values tended to occur at the same rain duration, and increased considerably with increasing slope gradient and sand layer thickness on slopes that were less than 47%. Liquefaction process might occur on the lower loess slopes covered with thinner sand layers but failures similar to shallow landslides might occur when the sand layer was thicker on steeper slopes. The presence of an overlying sand layer changed the relationship between runoff and soil loss rates during intense rainstorms and this change varied with different slope gradients. Our results demonstrated that the effects

  10. Damage threshold of inorganic solids under free-electron-laser irradiation at 32.5 nm wavelength

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hau-Riege, S.P.; London, R.A.; Bionta, R.M.; McKernan, M.A.; Baker, S. L.; Krzywinski, J.; Sobierajski, R.; Nietubyc, R.; Pelka, J. B.; Jurek, M.; Juha, Libor; Chalupský, Jaromír; Cihelka, Jaroslav; Hájková, Věra; Velyhan, Andriy; Krása, Josef; Kuba, J.; Tiedtke, K.; Toleikis, S.; Tschentscher, T.; Wabnitz, H.; Bergh, M.; Caleman, C.; Sokolowski-Tinten, K.; Stojanovic, N.; Zastrau, U.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 17 (2007), 173128/1-173128/3 ISSN 0003-6951 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1P04LA235; GA MŠk LC510; GA MŠk(CZ) LC528; GA AV ČR KAN300100702 Grant - others:European Commission(XE) RII-CT-2004-506008, IA-SFS; GA MŠk(CZ) 1K05026 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100523; CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : free-electron laser, * soft X-rays * damage threshold, * laser-matter interaction * ablation Subject RIV: BH - Optics, Masers, Lasers Impact factor: 3.596, year: 2007

  11. Ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex under sub-threshold laser exposure at wavelengths of 0.81 and 0.532 μm (experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Fedoruk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To reveal ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex and their possible reversibility under sub-threshold laser exposure at wavelengths of 0.81 and 0.532 μm in 1, 8 and 30 days. Methods: Experimental study was performed on 16 chinchilla rabbits (32 eyes using laser at wavelengths of 0.532 and 0.81 μm in CW, micropulse, and transpupillary thermotherapy modes. Transmission electron microscope EM-10C (Opton, Oberkochen, Germany was used to perform ultrastructural study of retina following laser exposure. Results: In a day after sub-threshold laser exposure, ultrastructural changes were mainly detected in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, choriocapillaries, and photoreceptors. In 8 days, intracellular regeneration of RPE and partial restoration of choriocapillary blood flow and RPE macrophages were observed. In 30 days, RPE morphology, the number and the structure of photoreceptor outer segments were re-established. Mitochondria of photoreceptor inner segments regenerated as well. Conclusion: Ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex following sub-threshold laser radiation were reversible. Intracellular regeneration provided almost complete recovery of chorioretinal complex structure by day 30.

  12. Ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex under sub-threshold laser exposure at wavelengths of 0.81 and 0.532 μm (experimental study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. A. Fedoruk

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To reveal ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex and their possible reversibility under sub-threshold laser exposure at wavelengths of 0.81 and 0.532 μm in 1, 8 and 30 days. Methods: Experimental study was performed on 16 chinchilla rabbits (32 eyes using laser at wavelengths of 0.532 and 0.81 μm in CW, micropulse, and transpupillary thermotherapy modes. Transmission electron microscope EM-10C (Opton, Oberkochen, Germany was used to perform ultrastructural study of retina following laser exposure. Results: In a day after sub-threshold laser exposure, ultrastructural changes were mainly detected in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE, choriocapillaries, and photoreceptors. In 8 days, intracellular regeneration of RPE and partial restoration of choriocapillary blood flow and RPE macrophages were observed. In 30 days, RPE morphology, the number and the structure of photoreceptor outer segments were re-established. Mitochondria of photoreceptor inner segments regenerated as well. Conclusion: Ultrastructural changes of chorioretinal complex following sub-threshold laser radiation were reversible. Intracellular regeneration provided almost complete recovery of chorioretinal complex structure by day 30.

  13. States and Properties of Metallic Systems at a Threshold Breakdown of the Through Holes Under Power Laser Action. Threshold Breakdown of Through Holes in Metal Foils by Powerful Laser Radiation (Part 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalashnikov E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy of threshold breakdown of through holes in metal foils of different thicknesses by powerful laser radiation is investigated experimentally. Properties of foil matter at “liquid metalgas” phase transition are revealed. One of controlled parameters of the threshold breakdown is the outlet on the shady side of the target. The threshold breakdown hole is outlet of hole for a given foil thickness when further decrease of energy is not able to create.

  14. Crystallization of nuclear glass under a thermal gradient: application to the self-crucible produced in the skull melting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Delattre, O.

    2013-01-01

    In the context of the vitrification of high level nuclear waste, a new industrial process has been launched in 2010 at the La Hague factory: The skull melting process. This setup applies thermal gradients to the melt, which leads to the formation of a solid layer of glass: the 'self-crucible'. The question would be to know whether these thermal gradients have an impact or not on the crystallization behaviour of the considered glasses in the self crucible. In order to answer that question, the crystallization of two glass compositions of nuclear interest has been investigated with an image analysis based method in isothermal and thermal gradient heat treatments conditions. The isothermal experiments allow for the quantification (growth speed, nucleation, crystallized fraction) of the crystallization of apatites (660 C-900 C) and powellites (630 C-900 C). The comparison of the results obtained through these two types of experimentations allows us to conclude that there is no impact of the thermal gradient on the crystallization of the studied glass compositions. In order to complete the image analysis study (based on surfaces), in and ex situ microtomography experiments have been performed at ESRF (Grenoble) on the ID19 beamline. This study allowed us to follow the crystallization of apatites in a simplified glass and to confirm the reliability of the image analysis method based on the analysis of surfaces. (author) [fr

  15. Numerical exploration of Kaldorian interregional macrodynamics: stability and the trade threshold for business cycles under fixed exchange rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asada, Toichiro; Douskos, Christos; Markellos, Panagiotis

    2011-01-01

    The stability of equilibrium and the possibility of generation of business cycles in a discrete interregional Kaldorian macrodynamic model with fixed exchange rates are explored using numerical methods. One of the aims is to illustrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the numerical approach for dynamical systems of moderately high dimensionality and several parameters. The model considered is five-dimensional with four parameters, the speeds of adjustment of the goods markets and the degrees of economic interactions between the regions through trade and capital movement. Using a grid search method for the determination of the region of stability of equilibrium in two-dimensional parameter subspaces, and coefficient criteria for the flip bifurcation - and Hopf bifurcation - curve, we determine the stability region in several parameter ranges and identify Hopf bifurcation curves when they exist. It is found that interregional cycles emerge only for sufficient interregional trade. The relevant threshold is predicted by the model at 14 - 16 % of trade transactions. By contrast, no minimum level of capital mobility exists in a global sense as a requirement for the emergence of interregional cycles; the main conclusion being, therefore, that cycles may occur for very low levels of capital mobility if trade is sufficient. Examples of bifurcation and Lyapunov exponent diagrams illustrating the occurrence of cycles or period doubling, and examples of the development of the occurring cycles, are given. Both supercritical and subcritical bifurcations are found to occur, the latter type indicating coexistence of a point and a cyclical attractor.

  16. Landau levels from neutral Bogoliubov particles in two-dimensional nodal superconductors under strain and doping gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nica, Emilian M.; Franz, Marcel

    2018-02-01

    Motivated by recent work on strain-induced pseudomagnetic fields in Dirac and Weyl semimetals, we analyze the possibility of analogous fields in two-dimensional nodal superconductors. We consider the prototypical case of a d -wave superconductor, a representative of the cuprate family, and find that the presence of weak, spatially varying strain leads to pseudomagnetic fields and Landau quantization of Bogoliubov quasiparticles in the low-energy sector. A similar effect is induced by the presence of generic, weak doping gradients. In contrast to genuine magnetic fields in superconductors, the strain- and doping-gradient-induced pseudomagnetic fields couple in a way that preserves time-reversal symmetry and is not subject to the screening associated with the Meissner effect. These effects can be probed by tuning weak applied supercurrents which lead to shifts in the energies of the Landau levels and hence to quantum oscillations in thermodynamic and transport quantities.

  17. Assembly processes under severe abiotic filtering: adaptation mechanisms of weed vegetation to the gradient of soil constraints.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Nikolic

    Full Text Available Effects of soil on vegetation patterns are commonly obscured by other environmental factors; clear and general relationships are difficult to find. How would community assembly processes be affected by a substantial change in soil characteristics when all other relevant factors are held constant? In particular, can we identify some functional adaptations which would underpin such soil-induced vegetation response?Eastern Serbia: fields partially damaged by long-term and large-scale fluvial deposition of sulphidic waste from a Cu mine; subcontinental/submediterranean climate.We analysed the multivariate response of cereal weed assemblages (including biomass and foliar analyses to a strong man-made soil gradient (from highly calcareous to highly acidic, nutrient-poor soils over short distances (field scale.The soil gradient favoured a substitution of calcicoles by calcifuges, and an increase in abundance of pseudometallophytes, with preferences for Atlantic climate, broad geographical distribution, hemicryptophytic life form, adapted to low-nutrient and acidic soils, with lower concentrations of Ca, and very narrow range of Cu concentrations in leaves. The trends of abundance of the different ecological groups of indicator species along the soil gradient were systematically reflected in the maintenance of leaf P concentrations, and strong homeostasis in biomass N:P ratio.Using annual weed vegetation at the field scale as a fairly simple model, we demonstrated links between gradients in soil properties (pH, nutrient availability and floristic composition that are normally encountered over large geographic distances. We showed that leaf nutrient status, in particular the maintenance of leaf P concentrations and strong homeostasis of biomass N:P ratio, underpinned a clear functional response of vegetation to mineral stress. These findings can help to understand assembly processes leading to unusual, novel combinations of species which are typically

  18. Indicators for the Sea-floor Integrity of the Hellenic Seas under the European Marine Strategy Framework Directive: establishing the thresholds and standards for Good Environmental Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. SIMBOURA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A data set of 625 samples of benthic macroinvertebrates collected from the Hellenic Seas (Ionian and Aegean was used to establish thresholds and reference standards for two of the indicators addressing the descriptors of Sea-floor Integrity under the Marine Strategy Framework Directive (MSFD: species diversity and richness and the ratio of sensitive species to tolerant species. The dataset was categorised according to the baseline ecological status assessment of the respective water bodies under the Water Framework Directive (WFD. Species diversity and richness were characterised using the Shannon diversity and species richness indices, respectively, and were analysed for three pre-defined substrate types, three depth zones and three sample-size categories, and the significant categories were statistically validated. Good Environmental Status (GEnS threshold and reference values were established for the valid combinations of categories denoted as ‘ecotypes’ through the use of a boxplot and an analysis of variance. The limitations and specifications for an overall GEnS assessment using the above indices are highlighted based on the WFD experience. For the ratio of sensitive species to tolerant species, the BENTIX index classification scale is proposed for GEnS assessment, and an integrated approach to the assessment of diversity and species richness is suggested. Finally, the regionality of the tested indices in relation to the two Mediterranean sub-regions, including the Hellenic area, was tested.

  19. Retention modeling under organic modifier gradient conditions in ion-pair reversed-phase chromatography. Application to the separation of a set of underivatized amino acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappa-Louisi, A; Agrafiotou, P; Papachristos, K

    2010-07-01

    The combined effect of the ion-pairing reagent concentration, C(ipr), and organic modifier content, phi, on the retention under phi-gradient conditions at different constant C(ipr) was treated in this study by using two approaches. In the first approach, the prediction of the retention time of a sample solute is based on a direct fitting procedure of a proper retention model to 3-D phi-gradient retention data obtained under the same phi-linear variation but with different slope and time duration of the initial isocratic part and in the presence of various constant C(ipr) values in the eluent. The second approach is based on a retention model describing the combined effect of C(ipr) and phi on the retention of solutes in isocratic mode and consequently analyzes isocratic data obtained in mobile phases containing different C(ipr) values. The effectiveness of the above approaches was tested in the retention prediction of a mixture of 16 underivatized amino acids using mobile phases containing acetonitrile as organic modifier and sodium dodecyl sulfate as ion-pairing reagent. From these approaches, only the first one gives satisfactory predictions and can be successfully used in optimization of ion-pair chromatographic separations under gradient conditions. The failure of the second approach to predict the retention of solutes in the gradient elution mode in the presence of different C(ipr) values was attributed to slow changes in the distribution equilibrium of ion-pairing reagents caused by phi-variation.

  20. Effect of pre- and post-column band broadening on the performance of high-speed chromatography columns under isocratic and gradient conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Kim; Broeckhoven, Ken; Vanderheyden, Yoachim; Desmet, Gert

    2016-04-15

    We report on the results of an experimental and theoretical study of the effect of the extra-column band broadening (ECBB) on the performance of narrow-bore columns filled with the smallest particles that are currently commercially available. Emphasis is on the difference between the effect of ECBB under gradient and isocratic conditions, as well as on the ability to model and predict the ECBB effects using well-established band broadening expressions available from the theory of chromatography. The fine details and assumptions that need to be taken into account when using these expressions are discussed. The experiments showed that, the steeper the gradient, the more pronounced the extra-column band broadening losses become. Whereas the pre-column band broadening can in both isocratic and gradient elution be avoided by playing on the possibilities to focus the analytes on top of the column (e.g. by using the POISe injection method when running isocratic separations), the post-column extra-column band broadening is inescapable in both cases. Inducing extra-column band broadening by changing the inner diameter of the post-column tubing from 65 to 250 μm, we found that all peaks in the chromatogram are strongly affected (around a factor of 1.9 increase in relative peak width) when running steep gradients, while usually only the first eluting peak was affected in the isocratic mode or when running shallow gradients (factor 1.6-1.8 increase in relative peak width for the first eluting analyte). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Rulemaking Petition to lower the threshold that qualifies animal feeding operations (“AFOs”) as concentrated animal feeding operations (“CAFOs”) and thereby “point sources” under section 402 of the Clean Water Act (“CWA”)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rulemaking Petition submitted September 20, 2015 to lower the threshold that qualifies animal feeding operations (AFOs) as concentrated animal feeding operations (CAFOs) and thereby point sources under§ 402 of the Clean Water Act (CWA).

  2. Resistive switching phenomena of extended defects in Nb-doped SrTiO3 under influence of external gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodenbuecher, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Redox-based memristive materials have attracted much attention in the last decade owing to their ability to change the resistance upon application of an electric field making them promising candidates for future non-volatile memories. However, a fundamental understanding of the nature of the resistive switching effect, which is indispensable for designing future technological applications,is still lacking. As a prototype material of a memristive oxide, strontium titanate (SrTiO 3 ) has been investigated intensively and it was revealed that the valence change of a Ti ''d'' electron plays an important role during resistive switching related to insulator-to-metal transition. Such a transition can be induced by electrical gradients, by chemical gradients, by a combination of these gradients or by donor doping. Hence, SrTiO 3 doped with the donor Nb should have metallic properties and is used commonly as a conducting substrate for the growth of functional oxide thin films. Nevertheless,the resistive switching effect has also be observed in Nb-doped SrTiO 3 . This paradoxical situation offers a unique opportunity to gain an insight into the processes during the insulator-to metal transition. In this thesis, a comprehensive study of the influence of external gradients on SrTiO 3 :Nb single crystals is presented. The focus is especially set on the investigation of the crystallographic structure, the chemical composition, the electronic structure, the lattice dynamics and the electronic transport phenomena using surface-sensitive methods on the macro- and nanoscale. On the as-received epi-polished single crystals, the evolution of a surface layer having a slight excess of strontium and - in contrast to the bulk of the material - semiconducting properties are observed. Hence, the key for understanding of the resistive switching effect is the knowledge of the nature of the surface layer. On the basis of systematic studies of the influence of external

  3. Vapor flux and recrystallization during dry snow metamorphism under a steady temperature gradient as observed by time-lapse micro-tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. R. Pinzer

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Dry snow metamorphism under an external temperature gradient is the most common type of recrystallization of snow on the ground. The changes in snow microstructure modify the physical properties of snow, and therefore an understanding of this process is essential for many disciplines, from modeling the effects of snow on climate to assessing avalanche risk. We directly imaged the microstructural changes in snow during temperature gradient metamorphism (TGM under a constant gradient of 50 K m−1, using in situ time-lapse X-ray micro-tomography. This novel and non-destructive technique directly reveals the amount of ice that sublimates and is deposited during metamorphism, in addition to the exact locations of these phase changes. We calculated the average time that an ice volume stayed in place before it sublimated and found a characteristic residence time of 2–3 days. This means that most of the ice changes its phase from solid to vapor and back many times in a seasonal snowpack where similar temperature conditions can be found. Consistent with such a short timescale, we observed a mass turnover of up to 60% of the total ice mass per day. The concept of hand-to-hand transport for the water vapor flux describes the observed changes very well. However, we did not find evidence for a macroscopic vapor diffusion enhancement. The picture of {temperature gradient metamorphism} produced by directly observing the changing microstructure sheds light on the micro-physical processes and could help to improve models that predict the physical properties of snow.

  4. Effect of a temperature gradient on Sphagnum fallax and its associated living microbial communities: a study under controlled conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jassey, Vincent E J; Gilbert, Daniel; Binet, Philippe; Toussaint, Marie-Laure; Chiapusio, Geneviève

    2011-03-01

    Microbial communities living in Sphagnum are known to constitute early indicators of ecosystem disturbances, but little is known about their response (including their trophic relationships) to climate change. A microcosm experiment was designed to test the effects of a temperature gradient (15, 20, and 25°C) on microbial communities including different trophic groups (primary producers, decomposers, and unicellular predators) in Sphagnum segments (0-3 cm and 3-6 cm of the capitulum). Relationships between microbial communities and abiotic factors (pH, conductivity, temperature, and polyphenols) were also studied. The density and the biomass of testate amoebae in Sphagnum upper segments increased and their community structure changed in heated treatments. The biomass of testate amoebae was linked to the biomass of bacteria and to the total biomass of other groups added and, thus, suggests that indirect effects on the food web structure occurred. Redundancy analysis revealed that microbial assemblages differed strongly in Sphagnum upper segments along a temperature gradient in relation to abiotic factors. The sensitivity of these assemblages made them interesting indicators of climate change. Phenolic compounds represented an important explicative factor in microbial assemblages and outlined the potential direct and (or) indirect effects of phenolics on microbial communities.

  5. Hydrodynamics of sediment threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Sk Zeeshan; Dey, Subhasish

    2016-07-01

    A novel hydrodynamic model for the threshold of cohesionless sediment particle motion under a steady unidirectional streamflow is presented. The hydrodynamic forces (drag and lift) acting on a solitary sediment particle resting over a closely packed bed formed by the identical sediment particles are the primary motivating forces. The drag force comprises of the form drag and form induced drag. The lift force includes the Saffman lift, Magnus lift, centrifugal lift, and turbulent lift. The points of action of the force system are appropriately obtained, for the first time, from the basics of micro-mechanics. The sediment threshold is envisioned as the rolling mode, which is the plausible mode to initiate a particle motion on the bed. The moment balance of the force system on the solitary particle about the pivoting point of rolling yields the governing equation. The conditions of sediment threshold under the hydraulically smooth, transitional, and rough flow regimes are examined. The effects of velocity fluctuations are addressed by applying the statistical theory of turbulence. This study shows that for a hindrance coefficient of 0.3, the threshold curve (threshold Shields parameter versus shear Reynolds number) has an excellent agreement with the experimental data of uniform sediments. However, most of the experimental data are bounded by the upper and lower limiting threshold curves, corresponding to the hindrance coefficients of 0.2 and 0.4, respectively. The threshold curve of this study is compared with those of previous researchers. The present model also agrees satisfactorily with the experimental data of nonuniform sediments.

  6. A study of numerical methods of solution of the equations of motion of a controlled satellite under the influence of gravity gradient torque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, J. F.; Mcwhorter, J. C.; Siddiqi, S. A.; Shanks, S. P.

    1973-01-01

    Numerical methods of integration of the equations of motion of a controlled satellite under the influence of gravity-gradient torque are considered. The results of computer experimentation using a number of Runge-Kutta, multi-step, and extrapolation methods for the numerical integration of this differential system are presented, and particularly efficient methods are noted. A large bibliography of numerical methods for initial value problems for ordinary differential equations is presented, and a compilation of Runge-Kutta and multistep formulas is given. Less common numerical integration techniques from the literature are noted for further consideration.

  7. Threshold Levels of Infant and Under-Five Mortality for Crossover between Life Expectancies at Ages Zero, One and Five in India: A Decomposition Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Manisha; Ram, Usha; Ram, Faujdar

    2015-01-01

    Under the prevailing conditions of imbalanced life table and historic gender discrimination in India, our study examines crossover between life expectancies at ages zero, one and five years for India and quantifies the relative share of infant and under-five mortality towards this crossover. We estimate threshold levels of infant and under-five mortality required for crossover using age specific death rates during 1981-2009 for 16 Indian states by sex (comprising of India's 90% population in 2011). Kitagawa decomposition equations were used to analyse relative share of infant and under-five mortality towards crossover. India experienced crossover between life expectancies at ages zero and five in 2004 for menand in 2009 for women; eleven and nine Indian states have experienced this crossover for men and women, respectively. Men usually experienced crossover four years earlier than the women. Improvements in mortality below ages five have mostly contributed towards this crossover. Life expectancy at age one exceeds that at age zero for both men and women in India except for Kerala (the only state to experience this crossover in 2000 for men and 1999 for women). For India, using life expectancy at age zero and under-five mortality rate together may be more meaningful to measure overall health of its people until the crossover. Delayed crossover for women, despite higher life expectancy at birth than for men reiterates that Indian women are still disadvantaged and hence use of life expectancies at ages zero, one and five become important for India. Greater programmatic efforts to control leading causes of death during the first month and 1-59 months in high child mortality areas can help India to attain this crossover early.

  8. Threshold Levels of Infant and Under-Five Mortality for Crossover between Life Expectancies at Ages Zero, One and Five in India: A Decomposition Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manisha Dubey

    Full Text Available Under the prevailing conditions of imbalanced life table and historic gender discrimination in India, our study examines crossover between life expectancies at ages zero, one and five years for India and quantifies the relative share of infant and under-five mortality towards this crossover.We estimate threshold levels of infant and under-five mortality required for crossover using age specific death rates during 1981-2009 for 16 Indian states by sex (comprising of India's 90% population in 2011. Kitagawa decomposition equations were used to analyse relative share of infant and under-five mortality towards crossover.India experienced crossover between life expectancies at ages zero and five in 2004 for menand in 2009 for women; eleven and nine Indian states have experienced this crossover for men and women, respectively. Men usually experienced crossover four years earlier than the women. Improvements in mortality below ages five have mostly contributed towards this crossover. Life expectancy at age one exceeds that at age zero for both men and women in India except for Kerala (the only state to experience this crossover in 2000 for men and 1999 for women.For India, using life expectancy at age zero and under-five mortality rate together may be more meaningful to measure overall health of its people until the crossover. Delayed crossover for women, despite higher life expectancy at birth than for men reiterates that Indian women are still disadvantaged and hence use of life expectancies at ages zero, one and five become important for India. Greater programmatic efforts to control leading causes of death during the first month and 1-59 months in high child mortality areas can help India to attain this crossover early.

  9. Iris pigmentation and AC thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, A F; Mukherjee, D; Chumlea, W C; Siervogel, R M

    1983-03-01

    Data from 160 White children were used to analyze possible associations between iris pigmentation and AC pure-tone thresholds. Iris pigmentation was graded from iris color using glass models of eyes, and AC thresholds were obtained under carefully controlled conditions. Analyses of variance using two groupings of iris color grades showed no evidence of an association between iris color grade and AC thresholds. Furthermore, inspection of arrays of the actual glass eye models, in conjunction with the order of mean thresholds at each test frequency, did not indicate the presence of an association between iris color grades and thresholds. It was concluded that while iris pigmentation may be related to some aspects of hearing ability, it does not appear to be related to AC thresholds in children.

  10. Simulation of elution profiles in liquid chromatography - II: Investigation of injection volume overload under gradient elution conditions applied to second dimension separations in two-dimensional liquid chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoll, Dwight R; Sajulga, Ray W; Voigt, Bryan N; Larson, Eli J; Jeong, Lena N; Rutan, Sarah C

    2017-11-10

    An important research direction in the continued development of two-dimensional liquid chromatography (2D-LC) is to improve the detection sensitivity of the method. This is especially important in applications where injection of large volumes of effluent from the first dimension ( 1 D) column into the second dimension ( 2 D) column leads to severe 2 D peak broadening and peak shape distortion. For example, this is common when coupling two reversed-phase columns and the organic solvent content of the 1 D mobile phase overwhelms the 2 D column with each injection of 1 D effluent, leading to low resolution in the second dimension. In a previous study we validated a simulation approach based on the Craig distribution model and adapted from the work of Czok and Guiochon [1] that enabled accurate simulation of simple isocratic and gradient separations with very small injection volumes, and isocratic separations with mismatched injection and mobile phase solvents [2]. In the present study we have extended this simulation approach to simulate separations relevant to 2D-LC. Specifically, we have focused on simulating 2 D separations where gradient elution conditions are used, there is mismatch between the sample solvent and the starting point in the gradient elution program, injection volumes approach or even exceed the dead volume of the 2 D column, and the extent of sample loop filling is varied. To validate this simulation we have compared results from simulations and experiments for 101 different conditions, including variation in injection volume (0.4-80μL), loop filling level (25-100%), and degree of mismatch between sample organic solvent and the starting point in the gradient elution program (-20 to +20% ACN). We find that that the simulation is accurate enough (median errors in retention time and peak width of -1.0 and -4.9%, without corrections for extra-column dispersion) to be useful in guiding optimization of 2D-LC separations. However, this requires that real

  11. Crack propagation under thermal cycling loading inducing a thermal gradient in the specimen thickness; Etude de la propagation d'une fissure sous chargement thermique cyclique induisant un gradient de temperature dans l'epaisseur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, H.N.

    2009-05-15

    This study aims to figure out the crack growth phenomenon by thermal fatigue induced by thermal gradient through thickness of specimen. Firstly, an experimental facility has been developed: a rectangular parallelepiped specimen is subjected to thermal cycling between 350 C and 100 C; the specimen is freed to expand and contract. Two semi-circular notches (0,1 mm depth and 4 mm length) have been machined on the surface of the specimen. A series of interrupted tests has been carried out to characterize and quantify the crack growth in depth and surface of the pre-existing crack. Next, a three-dimensional crack growth simulation has been implemented in ABAQUS. Automation using Python was used to simulate the propagation of a crack under thermal cycling, with re-meshing at crack front after each calculation step. No assumption has been taken on the crack front during the crack propagation. A comparison with test results showed very good agreement on the evolution of crack front shape and on the kinetics of propagation on the edge and the heart of pre-existing crack. An analytical approach was also developed based on the calculation of stress intensity factors (SIC). A two-dimensional approach was first introduced enabling us to better understand the influence of various thermal and geometric parameters. Finally, a three dimensional approach, with an elliptical assumption crack shape during the propagation, leading to a prediction of crack growth on the surface and in depth which is very similar to that obtained numerically, but with computational time much lower. (author)

  12. Growth, Flowering and Dry Matter Partitioning Response of Mid-Flowering Snapdragon Cultivar Liberty White Grown Under Different Light Gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alhajhoj, M. R.; Munir, M.

    2016-01-01

    The rationale of the present study was to quantify the effects of different shade levels (30 percent, 40 percent, 50 percent and 60 percent) and a control (no shade) on growth, flowering and dry matter partitioning traits of Snapdragon cultivar Liberty Wight. A linear relationship was observed between different shade levels and flowering time, rate of progress to flowering, leaf numbers, leaf area, plant height, plant spread, plant fresh weight, plant dry weight, leaf fresh weight and lead dry weight. These growth and development traits increased linearly from 30 percent to 60 percent shade levels, however, the rate of progress to flowering was inverse to flowering time when plants were kept under shades. A polynomial hyperbolic relationship was observed in specific leaf area, specific leaf weight, leaf weight ratio, leaf area ratio, relative growth rate and net assimilation rate. It is concluded that different shade levels significantly (P<=0.05) prolonged various growth and development phases of Snapdragon cultivar Liberty White. These finding can be applied to enhance crop quality and to delay growth and flowering time for steadily supply of plants to the market. (author)

  13. Seedling performance within eight different seed-size alpine forbs under experimentation with irradiance and nutrient gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong, W.; Jun, Z.Y.; Lin, W.G.; Jin, F.

    2014-01-01

    Relative performance of seedlings of species with different seed sizes may vary in response to resource availability, and may affect seedling growth. The objective was to test this hypothesis from alpine forbs species in the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau. We examined the relative growth rate, allocation and performances of eight native forbs species covering a wide range of seed size in response to four light and three nutrient regimes. Light availability had a significant effect on seedling emergence time, but not on other seedling morphological performances. Seedling emergence time and seed size were negatively correlated with each other for three species within Asteraceae family, i.e. heaviest seeds emerged earlier. Seed size, nutrient availability and their interaction affected most of studied morphological and growth traits of seedlings. Fertilisation modified the relationship between seed size and seedling biomass. Our study showed that seed size and nutrient availability had significant effects on seedling performance in alpine meadows. Seedlings from the larger-seed species presented stronger advantage in initial seedling mass and height under most of resources conditions. (author)

  14. [Effects of irrigation threshold on soil temperature in blossom and fruit-set periods of muskmelon under mulching-drip irrigation in greenhouse].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xue-Wen; Liu, Hao; Sun, Jing-Sheng; Zhang, Hao; Li, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Cui, Jia-Xin

    2014-10-01

    It is very significant for muskmelon growth and production to maintain optimal conditions of soil moisture and temperature, especially during blossom and fruit-bearing periods. The object of this study was to analyze the effects of different soil water thresholds (T1: 55% of the field capacity, T2: 65% of the field capacity, T3: 75% of the field capacity, CK: 85% of the field capacity) on soil temperature under mulching-drip irrigation in greenhouse. Moreover, effects of the ratio of soil moisture to heat in the plough layer (0-20 cm) on muskmelon growth and fruit setting were investigated. Results indicated that during the flowering and fruit bearing periods, the order of mean soil temperature in the plough layer for the different treatments was T1 > T2 > T3 > CK. There was an inverse correlation between soil temperature in the plough layer and moisture. The maximum one-day variations for soil temperature on sunny day, rainy day and after irrigation were observed in the soil surface under the plastic film mulch, while the minimum happened in the soil layer of 20 cm outside the mulch. The soil temperature extreme was closely related with soil depth, and the difference in the extreme soil temperature between the soil surface and the soil layers of 10 and 20 cm was significant. The treatment T3, with the fastest plant growth rate, the minimum duration of fruit bearing and the maximum fruit setting rate, could be selected as the optimal treatment, and the ratio of soil moisture to heat in T3 was 1.62 mm · °C(-1). Therefore, taking into consideration the relationship between soil moisture and temperature during flowering and fruit bearing periods of muskmelon under mulching-drip irrigation, the ratio of soil water to heat in the plough layer should be kept at 1.62 mm · C(-1). The result would be very meaningful for drip-irrigated muskmelon production and management in greenhouse in North China.

  15. Separation Optimization of a Mixture of Ionized and Non-Ionized Solutes under Isocratic and Gradient Conditions in Reversed-Phase HPLC by Means of Microsoft Excel Spreadsheets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrysostomi Zisi

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Τhe crucial role of mobile phase pH for optimizing the separation of a mixture of ionized and non-ionized compounds on a Phenomenex extended pH-range reversed-phase column (Kinetex 5 µm EVO C18 was examined. A previously developed Excel-spreadsheet-based software was used for the whole separation optimization procedure of the sample of interest under isocratic conditions as well as under single linear organic modifier-gradients in different eluent pHs. The importance and the advantages of performing a computer-aided separation optimization compared with a trial-and-error optimization method were realized. Additionally, this study showed that the optimized separation conditions for a given stationary phase may be used to achieve successful separations on new columns of the same type and size. In general, the results of this work could give chromatographers a feel of confidence to establish desired separations of a mixture of ionizable and neutral compounds in reversed-phase columns.

  16. Voting on Thresholds for Public Goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauchdobler, Julian; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    Introducing a threshold in the sense of a minimal project size transforms a public goods game with an inefficient equilibrium into a coordination game with a set of Pareto-superior equilibria. Thresholds may therefore improve efficiency in the voluntary provision of public goods. In our one......-shot experiment, we find that coordination often fails and exogenously imposed thresholds are ineffective at best and often counter-productive. This holds under a range of threshold levels and refund rates. We test if thresholds perform better if they are endogenously chosen, i.e. if a threshold is approved...

  17. Tracking of nociceptive thresholds using adaptive psychophysical methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Doll, Robert; Buitenweg, Jan R.; Meijer, Hil Gaétan Ellart; Veltink, Petrus H.

    Psychophysical thresholds reflect the state of the underlying nociceptive mechanisms. For example, noxious events can activate endogenous analgesic mechanisms that increase the nociceptive threshold. Therefore, tracking thresholds over time facilitates the investigation of the dynamics of these

  18. Irradiance gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, G.J.; Heckbert, P.S.; Technische Hogeschool Delft

    1992-04-01

    A new method for improving the accuracy of a diffuse interreflection calculation is introduced in a ray tracing context. The information from a hemispherical sampling of the luminous environment is interpreted in a new way to predict the change in irradiance as a function of position and surface orientation. The additional computation involved is modest and the benefit is substantial. An improved interpolation of irradiance resulting from the gradient calculation produces smoother, more accurate renderings. This result is achieved through better utilization of ray samples rather than additional samples or alternate sampling strategies. Thus, the technique is applicable to a variety of global illumination algorithms that use hemicubes or Monte Carlo sampling techniques

  19. Characterization of gradient control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortés, Jorge; van der Schaft, Arjan; Crouch, Peter E.

    2005-01-01

    Given a general nonlinear affine control system with outputs and a torsion-free affine connection defined on its state space, we investigate the gradient realization problem: we give necessary and sufficient conditions under which the control system can be written as a gradient control system

  20. Optimization of gradient coil technology for human magnetic resonance imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chronik, Blaine Alexander

    with and without water cooling to characterize the thermal response. Gradient uniformity was verifed by imaging a grid phantom. Eddy current measurements were made with all axes and compensated for There is a large Bo eddy current field produced by the z-axis of the coil. Preliminary imaging results in phantoms, animals, and humans were successfully carried out and results are shown. A simple linear model of gradient coil magnetostimulation is derived and the relative stimulation potential is introduced as an important quantity in comparing very different gradient coil designs. Three regimes of gradient coil operation are defined as a consequence of the linear stimulation model. A twenty subject experimental trial was conducted to directly measure stimulation thresholds for both a whole body gradient coil and the head/neck gradient coil described above. The results of the experiment support the linear models derived. The data were used in combination with numerical calculations of induced electric fields to extract the underlying tissue parameters of rheobase and chronaxie for the first time in a head specific gradient coil experiment. This data will allow the prediction of stimulation thresholds for future gradient coils at the design stage.

  1. States and properties of metallic systems at a threshold breakdown of the through holes under power laser action (part 2. Susceptibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalashnikov E.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Threshold breakdown of the through holes by power laser radiation of metallic foils is considered as response of metallic system to laser radiation. Binding experimentally determined response to the absolute temperature scale allows to determine the value of the imaginary part of the generalized susceptibility depending on temperature, the critical temperature of the transition “liquid metal - gas”, states of the electronic subsystems at this temperature, and the reflectance coefficient values.

  2. Microbial mediated soil structure formation under wetting and drying cycles along a climate gradient (arid to humid) on hillslopes in Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhard, Nadine; Moskwa, Lisa-Marie; Kühn, Peter; Mueller, Carsten W.; Wagner, Dirk; Scholten, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    It is well-known that the land surface resistance against erosion is largely controlled by the structure stability of the soil given by its inherent properties. Microbial activity plays a vital role in soil structure development, and thus affecting soil physical parameters. Accordingly the influence of biota shaping the earth's surface has been described through mechanisms such as mineral weathering, formation of ions and biofilms controlling land surface resistance against erosion. However the role of microorganisms for the development of soil stabilizing properties is still unclear and a precise quantitative understanding of the mechanisms under different climate conditions is widely missing. The objectives of our study are to examine to which extend microbiological processes control soil structure formation and stability and whether this is influenced by climate and topographic position. Soil samples were taken along a climate gradient and from different topographic positions of hillslopes in the Chilean Coastal Cordillera in austral autumn 2016. The variables of lithology, human disturbances and relief were held as far as possible constant whereas climate varies along the transect. We implemented 10 wet-dry cycles on air dried and sieved natural and sterile samples to enhance particle aggregation and increase structure stability. Throughout the entire experiment temperature is held constant at 20 °C to avoid changes in microbial activity. Samples are moistened and dried and each kept at the same respective pF-values for the same duration to add the same stress to each sample. Aggregate stability will be measured using wet sieving, ultrasonic dispersion and simulated rainfall. The results will be compared with on-site rainfall simulation experiments on hillslopes in the Chilean Coastal Cordillera to link laboratory results with natural field conditions. The experiment gives first insight into the aggregate formation process over time with and without

  3. Threshold quantum cryptography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tokunaga, Yuuki; Okamoto, Tatsuaki; Imoto, Nobuyuki

    2005-01-01

    We present the concept of threshold collaborative unitary transformation or threshold quantum cryptography, which is a kind of quantum version of threshold cryptography. Threshold quantum cryptography states that classical shared secrets are distributed to several parties and a subset of them, whose number is greater than a threshold, collaborates to compute a quantum cryptographic function, while keeping each share secretly inside each party. The shared secrets are reusable if no cheating is detected. As a concrete example of this concept, we show a distributed protocol (with threshold) of conjugate coding

  4. Elevational gradient in species richness pattern of epigaeic beetles and underlying mechanisms at east slope of Balang Mountain in southwestern China.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Dong Yu

    Full Text Available We report on the species richness patterns of epigaeic beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae and Staphylinidae along a subtropical elevational gradient of Balang Mountain, southwestern China. We tested the roles of environmental factors (e.g. temperature, area and litter cover and direct biotic interactions (e.g. foods and antagonists that shape elevational diversity gradients. Beetles were sampled at 19 sites using pitfall traps along the studied elevational gradient ranging from 1500 m-4000 m during the 2004 growing season. A total of 74416 specimens representing 260 species were recorded. Species richness of epigaeic beetles and two families showed unimodal patterns along the elevational gradient, peaking at mid-elevations (c. 2535 m, and the ranges of most beetle species were narrow along the gradient. The potential correlates of both species richness and environmental variables were examined using linear and second order polynomial regressions. The results showed that temperature, area and litter cover had strong explanatory power of beetle species richness for nearly all richness patterns, of beetles as a whole and of Carabidae and Staphylinidae, but the density of antagonists was associated with species richness of Carabidae only. Multiple regression analyses suggested that the three environmental factors combined contributed most to richness patterns for most taxa. The results suggest that environmental factors associated with temperature, area and habitat heterogeneity could account for most variation in richness pattern of epigaeic beetles. Additionally, the mid-elevation peaks and the small range size of most species indicate that conservation efforts should give attention to the entire gradient rather than just mid-elevations.

  5. Elevational gradient in species richness pattern of epigaeic beetles and underlying mechanisms at east slope of Balang Mountain in southwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Dong; Lü, Liang; Luo, Tian-Hong; Zhou, Hong-Zhang

    2013-01-01

    We report on the species richness patterns of epigaeic beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae and Staphylinidae) along a subtropical elevational gradient of Balang Mountain, southwestern China. We tested the roles of environmental factors (e.g. temperature, area and litter cover) and direct biotic interactions (e.g. foods and antagonists) that shape elevational diversity gradients. Beetles were sampled at 19 sites using pitfall traps along the studied elevational gradient ranging from 1500 m-4000 m during the 2004 growing season. A total of 74416 specimens representing 260 species were recorded. Species richness of epigaeic beetles and two families showed unimodal patterns along the elevational gradient, peaking at mid-elevations (c. 2535 m), and the ranges of most beetle species were narrow along the gradient. The potential correlates of both species richness and environmental variables were examined using linear and second order polynomial regressions. The results showed that temperature, area and litter cover had strong explanatory power of beetle species richness for nearly all richness patterns, of beetles as a whole and of Carabidae and Staphylinidae, but the density of antagonists was associated with species richness of Carabidae only. Multiple regression analyses suggested that the three environmental factors combined contributed most to richness patterns for most taxa. The results suggest that environmental factors associated with temperature, area and habitat heterogeneity could account for most variation in richness pattern of epigaeic beetles. Additionally, the mid-elevation peaks and the small range size of most species indicate that conservation efforts should give attention to the entire gradient rather than just mid-elevations.

  6. Greenhouse gas flux under warm-season perennial C4 grasses across different soil and climate gradients on the Islands of Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlowski, M. N.; Crow, S. E.; Sumiyoshi, Y.; Wells, J.; Kikkawa, H. R.

    2011-12-01

    Agricultural soils can serve as either a sink or a source for atmospheric carbon (C) and other greenhouse gases (GHG). This is particularly true for tropical soils where influences from climate and soil gradients are wide ranging. Current estimates of GHG flux from soil are often under or overestimated due to high variability in sample sites and inconsistencies in land use and vegetation type, making extrapolation to new study systems difficult. This work aimed to identify patterns of trace fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2), nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4) across two soil types and three species of warm season perennial C4 grasses: Pennisetum purpureum (Napier grass), Panicum maximum (Guinea grass) and Saccharum officinarum (sugar cane) on the islands of Oahu and Maui in Hawaii. Multiple static vented chambers were installed into replicate plots for each species; flux measurements were made during the growth, fertilization and harvest cycles at set time intervals for one hour and analyzed by gas chromatography. Initial results from Oahu indicate no significant differences in CO2 flux between the P. maximum and P. purpureum species after fertilization or at full growth. We observed an average flux of 143 mg m-2 h-1 and 155 mg m-2 h-1 for P. maximum and P. purpureum respectively at full growth for CO2 and 1.7 μg m-2 h-1and 0.3 μg m-2 h-1 for N2O. Additionally, N2O rates sampled after a typical fertilizer application were significantly greater than at full growth (p=0.0005) with flux rates of 25.2 μg m2h-1 and 30.3 μg m2h-1 for P. maximum and P. purpureum respectively. With a global warming potential of 310 for N2O, even short-term spikes following fertilizer application can cause long lasting effects of GHG emission from agricultural soils. CH4 flux was negligible for all species on the Oahu plots during these sample periods. Globally, water limitation is a major factor influencing the potential productivity of agricultural crops and the sustainability of

  7. Theory of threshold phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel

    2002-01-01

    Theory of Threshold Phenomena in Quantum Scattering is developed in terms of Reduced Scattering Matrix. Relationships of different types of threshold anomalies both to nuclear reaction mechanisms and to nuclear reaction models are established. Magnitude of threshold effect is related to spectroscopic factor of zero-energy neutron state. The Theory of Threshold Phenomena, based on Reduced Scattering Matrix, does establish relationships between different types of threshold effects and nuclear reaction mechanisms: the cusp and non-resonant potential scattering, s-wave threshold anomaly and compound nucleus resonant scattering, p-wave anomaly and quasi-resonant scattering. A threshold anomaly related to resonant or quasi resonant scattering is enhanced provided the neutron threshold state has large spectroscopic amplitude. The Theory contains, as limit cases, Cusp Theories and also results of different nuclear reactions models as Charge Exchange, Weak Coupling, Bohr and Hauser-Feshbach models. (author)

  8. Threshold behaviour in hydrological systems as (human geo-ecosystems: manifestations, controls, implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sivapalan

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we review threshold behaviour in environmental systems, which are often associated with the onset of floods, contamination and erosion events, and other degenerative processes. Key objectives of this review are to a suggest indicators for detecting threshold behavior, b discuss their implications for predictability, c distinguish different forms of threshold behavior and their underlying controls, and d hypothesise on possible reasons for why threshold behaviour might occur. Threshold behaviour involves a fast qualitative change of either a single process or the response of a system. For elementary phenomena this switch occurs when boundary conditions (e.g., energy inputs or system states as expressed by dimensionless quantities (e.g. the Reynolds number exceed threshold values. Mixing, water movement or depletion of thermodynamic gradients becomes much more efficient as a result. Intermittency is a very good indicator for detecting event scale threshold behavior in hydrological systems. Predictability of intermittent processes/system responses is inherently low for combinations of systems states and/or boundary conditions that push the system close to a threshold. Post hoc identification of "cause-effect relations" to explain when the system became critical is inherently difficult because of our limited ability to perform observations under controlled identical experimental conditions. In this review, we distinguish three forms of threshold behavior. The first one is threshold behavior at the process level that is controlled by the interplay of local soil characteristics and states, vegetation and the rainfall forcing. Overland flow formation, particle detachment and preferential flow are examples of this. The second form of threshold behaviour is the response of systems of intermediate complexity – e.g., catchment runoff response and sediment yield – governed by the redistribution of water and sediments in space and time

  9. Instabilities in power law gradient hardening materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Tvergaard, Viggo

    2005-01-01

    Tension and compression instabilities are investigated for specimens with dimensions in the micron range. A finite strain generalization of a higher order strain gradient plasticity theory is implemented in a finite element scheme capable of modeling power law hardening materials. Effects...... of gradient hardening are found to delay the onset of localization under plane strain tension, and significantly reduce strain gradients in the localized zone. For plane strain compression gradient hardening is found to increase the load-carrying capacity significantly....

  10. Sobolev gradients and differential equations

    CERN Document Server

    Neuberger, J W

    2010-01-01

    A Sobolev gradient of a real-valued functional on a Hilbert space is a gradient of that functional taken relative to an underlying Sobolev norm. This book shows how descent methods using such gradients allow a unified treatment of a wide variety of problems in differential equations. For discrete versions of partial differential equations, corresponding Sobolev gradients are seen to be vastly more efficient than ordinary gradients. In fact, descent methods with these gradients generally scale linearly with the number of grid points, in sharp contrast with the use of ordinary gradients. Aside from the first edition of this work, this is the only known account of Sobolev gradients in book form. Most of the applications in this book have emerged since the first edition was published some twelve years ago. What remains of the first edition has been extensively revised. There are a number of plots of results from calculations and a sample MatLab code is included for a simple problem. Those working through a fair p...

  11. [Translaminar Gradient and Glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Čmelo, J

    2017-01-01

    The cribriform plate is a threshold of the intraocular pressure (VOT) and of the intracranial pressure (IKT). The difference between the VOT and IKT is referred to as translaminar gradient (TLG). The goal was to evaluate the Glaucoma progression (visual field, fundus examination, HRT) with / without topical anti-glaucomatous therapy) in relation to the TLG. the significance of TLG has been studied in two groups. I. Group: 57 patients diagnosed and treatment of Primary Open-Angle Glaucoma (PGOU), 10 patients with Ocular hypertension (OH), 7 patients with Normal-Tension Glaucoma (NTG), and 75 healthy without glaucoma. The examinations of TLG were carried out once and retrospectively. In II. group there were prospectively studied 14 patients with OH and 24 patients with newly detected PGOU without local therapy. The examinations were performed 4 times at intervals of 10 to 11 months. All tests included a basic eye examination, ORA tonometry, HRT examination, gonioscopy, Color Doppler sonography of blood vessels of the eye and orbit. Venous pulsation pressure (VPT) has been recorded by the Ophthalmodynamometer Meditron (D-ODM). In case of spontaneous retinal venous pulsation, VPT was considered as the same pressure as the VOT. The TLG was calculated with formula of Querfurth: ICT = 0.29 + 0.74 (VOT / PI (AO)). [PI(AO) - Pulsatility index of the Ophthalmic artery (AO)]. I. group: TLG was in the control group without Glaucoma: 12.2 ± 2.0 torr. The NTG group: 9.0 ± 1.70 mm Hg. PGOU: 11.1 ± 1.91 mm Hg. OH: 12.6 ± 0.85 mm Hg. IKT alone does not show a significant relationship to the presence of glaucoma, ocular hypertension. II. Group: The average TLG in Ocular Hypertension (14 patients) has been 3.8 ± 1.2 torr. 2 patients (OH) had TLG 10 torr. and 15 torr. After 4 years in one of them (TLG = 15 torr.) there was recorded Glaucoma progression. In the PGOU group before antiglaucoma therapy, TLG was 15.0 ± 4.8 torr for all patients. After setting up local anti

  12. The influence of dynamical change of optical properties on the thermomechanical response and damage threshold of noble metals under femtosecond laser irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibidis, George D.

    2018-02-01

    We present a theoretical investigation of the dynamics of the dielectric constant of noble metals following heating with ultrashort pulsed laser beams and the influence of the temporal variation of the associated optical properties on the thermomechanical response of the material. The effect of the electron relaxation time on the optical properties based on the use of a critical point model is thoroughly explored for various pulse duration values (i.e., from 110 fs to 8 ps). The proposed theoretical framework correlates the dynamical change in optical parameters, relaxation processes and induced strains-stresses. Simulations are presented by choosing gold as a test material, and we demonstrate that the consideration of the aforementioned factors leads to significant thermal effect changes compared to results when static parameters are assumed. The proposed model predicts a substantially smaller damage threshold and a large increase of the stress which firstly underlines the significant role of the temporal variation of the optical properties and secondly enhances its importance with respect to the precise determination of laser specifications in material micromachining techniques.

  13. The Cannabis Abuse Screening Test and the DSM-5 in the general population: Optimal thresholds and underlying common structure using multiple factor analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legleye, Stéphane

    2017-11-10

    The Cannabis Abuse Screening Test (CAST) aims at screening the problematic use of cannabis. It has never been validated against the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM)-5 and its relationships with this latter have never been studied. We used a probabilistic telephone survey collected in 2014 (1351 past-year cannabis users aged 15-64) implementing the CAST and a DSM-5 adaptation of the Munich Composite International Diagnostic Interview assessing cannabis use disorders. Data were weighted, and CAST items were considered categorical. Factorial structures were assessed with confirmatory factor analyses; the relationships between the instruments were studied with multiple factor analysis (MFA). One factor for the DSM-5 and two correlated factors for the CAST were the best confirmatory factor analyses solutions. The CAST thresholds for screening moderate/severe and severe cannabis use disorders were 5 (sensitivity = 78.2% and specificity = 79.6%) and 8 (sensitivity = 86.0% and specificity = 86.7%), respectively. The MFA identified two orthogonal dimensions: The first was equally shared by both instruments; the second was the second CAST dimension (extreme frequencies of use before midday and alone, memory problems, and reproaches from friends/family). The CAST structure and screening properties were confirmed. The MFA explains its screening performances by its first dimension and identified the problematic patterns (the second dimension) that are not captured by the DSM-5. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Temperature-gradient-induced

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Cheol; Glaser, Matt; Maclennan, Joe; Clark, Noel; Trittel, Torsten; Stannarius, Ralf

    Freely-suspended smectic films of sub-micrometer thickness and lateral extensions of several millimeters were used to study thermally driven migration and convection in the film plane. Film experiments were performed during the 6 minute microgravity phase of a TEXUS suborbital rocket flight (Texus 52, launched April 27, 2015). We have found an attraction of the smectic material towards the cold edge of the film in a temperature gradient, similar to the Soret effect. This process is reversed when this edge is heated up again. Thermal convection driven by two thermocontacts in the film is practically absent, even at temperature gradients up to 10 K/mm, with thermally driven convection only setting in when the hot post reaches the transition temperature to the nematic phase. The Observation and Analysis of Smectic Islands in Space (OASIS) flight hardware was launched on SpaceX-6 in April 2015 and experiments on smectic bubbles were carried out on the International Space Station using four different smectic A and C liquid crystal materials in separate sample chambers. We observed that smectic islands on the surface of the bubbles migrated towards the colder part of the bubble in a temperature gradient. This work was supported by NASA Grant No. NNX-13AQ81G, by the Soft Materials Research Center under NSF MRSEC Grants No. DMR-0820579 and No. DMR-1420736, and by DLR Grants 50WM1127 and 50WM1430.

  15. Resistive Threshold Logic

    OpenAIRE

    James, A. P.; Francis, L. R. V. J.; Kumar, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report a resistance based threshold logic family useful for mimicking brain like large variable logic functions in VLSI. A universal Boolean logic cell based on an analog resistive divider and threshold logic circuit is presented. The resistive divider is implemented using memristors and provides output voltage as a summation of weighted product of input voltages. The output of resistive divider is converted into a binary value by a threshold operation implemented by CMOS inverter and/or O...

  16. Threshold Signature Schemes Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Victorovna Beresneva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to an investigation of threshold signature schemes. The systematization of the threshold signature schemes was done, cryptographic constructions based on interpolation Lagrange polynomial, elliptic curves and bilinear pairings were examined. Different methods of generation and verification of threshold signatures were explored, the availability of practical usage of threshold schemes in mobile agents, Internet banking and e-currency was shown. The topics of further investigation were given and it could reduce a level of counterfeit electronic documents signed by a group of users.

  17. Link between convection and meridional gradient of sea surface ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A sensitivity analysis showed that the corresponding threshold for was 29°C. We hypothesise that the excess heating (∼1° C above the threshold for deep convection)required in the northern bay to trigger convection is because this excess in SST is what is required to establish the critical SST gradient.

  18. Cyclic Fatigue Durability of Uncoated and EBC Coated 3D SiC/SiC Composites Under Thermal Gradient Conditions at 2700F in Air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Craig; Harder, Bryan; Zhu, Dongming; Bhatt, Ramakrishna; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    2017-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) such as SiCSiC are currently being designed and implemented in high temperature sections of aerospace turbine engines. Such components will be subject to through-thickness thermal gradients, which may affect the durability. In this study, SiCSiC CMCs with a hybrid chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP) matrix were loaded in tension while one surface was heated with a laser and the opposite surface was cooled. The samples were each coated with an environmental barrier coating (EBC), which was produced by electron beam physical deposition (EBPVD). Results for CMCs tested with and without the EBC be discussed.

  19. Strain gradient effects on cyclic plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Legarth, Brian Nyvang

    2010-01-01

    Size effects on the cyclic shear response are studied numerically using a recent higher order strain gradient visco-plasticity theory accounting for both dissipative and energetic gradient hardening. Numerical investigations of the response under cyclic pure shear and shear of a finite slab between...... rigid platens have been carried out, using the finite element method. It is shown for elastic–perfectly plastic solids how dissipative gradient effects lead to increased yield strength, whereas energetic gradient contributions lead to increased hardening as well as a Bauschinger effect. For linearly...... hardening materials it is quantified how dissipative and energetic gradient effects promote hardening above that of conventional predictions. Usually, increased hardening is attributed to energetic gradient effects, but here it is found that also dissipative gradient effects lead to additional hardening...

  20. Threshold concepts in prosthetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Sophie

    2017-12-01

    Curriculum documents identify key concepts within learning prosthetics. Threshold concepts provide an alternative way of viewing the curriculum, focussing on the ways of thinking and practicing within prosthetics. Threshold concepts can be described as an opening to a different way of viewing a concept. This article forms part of a larger study exploring what students and staff experience as difficult in learning about prosthetics. To explore possible threshold concepts within prosthetics. Qualitative, interpretative phenomenological analysis. Data from 18 students and 8 staff at two universities with undergraduate prosthetics and orthotics programmes were generated through interviews and questionnaires. The data were analysed using an interpretative phenomenological analysis approach. Three possible threshold concepts arose from the data: 'how we walk', 'learning to talk' and 'considering the person'. Three potential threshold concepts in prosthetics are suggested with possible implications for prosthetics education. These possible threshold concepts involve changes in both conceptual and ontological knowledge, integrating into the persona of the individual. This integration occurs through the development of memories associated with procedural concepts that combine with disciplinary concepts. Considering the prosthetics curriculum through the lens of threshold concepts enables a focus on how students learn to become prosthetists. Clinical relevance This study provides new insights into how prosthetists learn. This has implications for curriculum design in prosthetics education.

  1. Two-stage unified stretched-exponential model for time-dependence of threshold voltage shift under positive-bias-stresses in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide thin-film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Chan-Yong; Kim, Hee-Joong; Hong, Sae-Young; Song, Sang-Hun; Kwon, Hyuck-In

    2017-08-01

    In this study, we show that the two-stage unified stretched-exponential model can more exactly describe the time-dependence of threshold voltage shift (ΔV TH) under long-term positive-bias-stresses compared to the traditional stretched-exponential model in amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (a-IGZO) thin-film transistors (TFTs). ΔV TH is mainly dominated by electron trapping at short stress times, and the contribution of trap state generation becomes significant with an increase in the stress time. The two-stage unified stretched-exponential model can provide useful information not only for evaluating the long-term electrical stability and lifetime of the a-IGZO TFT but also for understanding the stress-induced degradation mechanism in a-IGZO TFTs.

  2. Regional Seismic Threshold Monitoring

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kvaerna, Tormod

    2006-01-01

    ... model to be used for predicting the travel times of regional phases. We have applied these attenuation relations to develop and assess a regional threshold monitoring scheme for selected subregions of the European Arctic...

  3. Image Segmentation using a Refined Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimizer for Maximum Tsallis Entropy Thresholding

    OpenAIRE

    L. Jubair Ahmed; A. Ebenezer Jeyakumar

    2013-01-01

    Thresholding is one of the most important techniques for performing image segmentation. In this paper to compute optimum thresholds for Maximum Tsallis entropy thresholding (MTET) model, a new hybrid algorithm is proposed by integrating the Comprehensive Learning Particle Swarm Optimizer (CPSO) with the Powell’s Conjugate Gradient (PCG) method. Here the CPSO will act as the main optimizer for searching the near-optimal thresholds while the PCG method will be used to fine tune the best solutio...

  4. Buckling and free vibration of shallow curved micro/nano-beam based on strain gradient theory under thermal loading with temperature-dependent properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, O.; Hosseini, S. A. H.; Ghoytasi, I.; Golmohammadi, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, influences of a uniform thermomechanical loading in buckling and free vibration of a curved FG microbeam have been investigated, based on strain gradient theory (SGT) theory and Timoshenko beam model. Distribution of structural materials varies continuously in thickness direction due to power-law exponent. Unlike classical models, this novel model employs three length scale parameters which can capture the size effect. This work is based on SGT theory and Timoshenko beam model. Governing equation of motion and associated boundary condition have been developed based on Hamilton's principle, which is the specified case of virtual work theorem. In continuance, final differential equations were solved by Navier's solution method and the results have been presented. Moreover, influences of dimensionless length-to-thickness ratio (aspect ratio), dimensionless length scale parameter, power-law exponent, temperature difference and arc angle for various values of mode numbers on natural frequency and critical temperature by considering temperature-dependent material properties have been investigated. In order to validate accomplished study, some of the results were compared with those of previous works. It has been concluded that applying a thermomechanical loading on a FG microbeam causes the natural frequency to become more sensitive about variations of geometrical, physical and mechanical properties and characteristics.

  5. High throughput analysis at microscale: performance of ionKey/MS with Xevo G2-XS QTof under rapid gradient conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun Wang Alelyunas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, high throughput analysis with 3 minute, rapid gradient conditions is described using the ionKey/MS™ System with an integrated ACQUITY UPLC® M-Class System and the Xevo® G2-XS QTof Mass Spectrometer. Extensive testing of representative small molecules and a peptide shows that the system is well-tolerated and exhibits excellent reproducibility and linear response. The iKey™ HSS T3 Separation Device used is robust, withstanding ~2200 injections of prepared human plasma with excellent peak shape and system pressure profile. A 99% solvent savings was realized when compared with an analytical system using a 2.1 mm column with flow rate ranging from 0.6 mL/min to 1.5 mL/min. These data, coupled with examples from the literature, illustrate that the ionKey/MS System with Xevo G2-XS QTof can be used as a full service platform for high throughput analysis and high sensitivity analysis to support all phases of drug discovery and development.

  6. Computational Strain Gradient Crystal Plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Kysar, Jeffrey W.

    2011-01-01

    element solution method is presented, which delivers the slip-rate field and the velocity-field based on two minimum principles. Some plane deformation problems relevant for certain specific orientations of a face centered cubic crystal under plane loading conditions are studied, and effective in......A model for strain gradient crystal visco-plasticity is formulated along the lines proposed by Fleck andWillis (2009) for isotropic plasticity. Size-effects are included in the model due to the addition of gradient terms in both the free energy as well as through a dissipation potential. A finite...

  7. Analysis of Fusarium populations in a soybean field under different fertilization management by real-time quantitative PCR and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    The abundance and population structure of Fusarium spp. in field soils were assessed to determine the effect of different fertilization treatments on soil microbial community and potential role in disease management. The field was under soybean-wheat-corn rotation located in the black soil (Udic Mo...

  8. Limiares térmicos para a germinação de conídios de Cercospora sojina em dois regimes luminosos Temperature threshold for Cercospora sojina conidium germination under two light regimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliane Nicolodi Camera

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo desse trabalho foi avaliar a germinação de conídios horas, verificou-se que a maior germinação ocorreu na temperatura de Cercospora sojina em diferentes temperaturas com luz contínua de 23,8 ºC, para 6 horas foi de 24,3 ºC, para 9 horas foi de 22,9 ºC e no escuro, visando a determinar os limiares térmicos inferior e e para 12 horas foi de 22,4ºC. Quando as placas foram incubadas superior e a temperatura ótima. Os conídios foram depositados na no escuro, verificou-se que a maior germinação dos conídios para superfície das placas de petri contendo substrato ágar-água. Em o tempo de exposição de 3 horas foi na temperatura de 23,8 ºC, seguida foram incubadas em DBO com luz contínua e no escuro para 6 horas foi de 23,4 ºC, para 9 horas foi de 22,9 ºC e para 12 nas temperaturas (0; 5; 10; 15; 20; 25; 30; 35 e 40 ºC e retiradas horas 22,7 ºC. A temperatura ótima para a germinação de conídios nos tempos de exposição (3, 6, 9 e 12 horas. Para os conídios de na luz contínua foi de 22,4 ºC e no escuro de 23 ºC, sendo o limiar C. sojina submetidos à luz contínua no tempo de exposição de 3 térmico inferior de 0 ºC e o superior de 40 ºC.The aim of this study was to evaluate the germination of exposure time of 3 hours, the best germination occurred at a Cercospora sojina conidia at different temperatures under continuous temperature of 23.8 ºC, for 6 hours at 24.3 ºC, for 9 hours at 22.9 ºC light and in the dark in order to determine the lower and the upper and for 12 hours at 22.4 ºC. When the plates were incubated in the temperature threshold, as well as the optimum temperature. Conidia dark, conidium germination was greater when exposure time was 3 were deposited on the surface of Petri plates containing agar-water hours at a temperature of 23.8 ºC 6 hours at 23.4 ºC, 9 hours at 22.9 substrate. They were then incubated in BOD under continuous light ºC and 12 hours at 22.7 ºC. The optimum

  9. Image Segmentation Method Using Thresholds Automatically Determined from Picture Contents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Been Chen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Image segmentation has become an indispensable task in many image and video applications. This work develops an image segmentation method based on the modified edge-following scheme where different thresholds are automatically determined according to areas with varied contents in a picture, thus yielding suitable segmentation results in different areas. First, the iterative threshold selection technique is modified to calculate the initial-point threshold of the whole image or a particular block. Second, the quad-tree decomposition that starts from the whole image employs gray-level gradient characteristics of the currently-processed block to decide further decomposition or not. After the quad-tree decomposition, the initial-point threshold in each decomposed block is adopted to determine initial points. Additionally, the contour threshold is determined based on the histogram of gradients in each decomposed block. Particularly, contour thresholds could eliminate inappropriate contours to increase the accuracy of the search and minimize the required searching time. Finally, the edge-following method is modified and then conducted based on initial points and contour thresholds to find contours precisely and rapidly. By using the Berkeley segmentation data set with realistic images, the proposed method is demonstrated to take the least computational time for achieving fairly good segmentation performance in various image types.

  10. Effects of pulse duration on magnetostimulation thresholds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saritas, Emine U., E-mail: saritas@ee.bilkent.edu.tr [Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1762 (United States); Department of Electrical and Electronics Engineering, Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); National Magnetic Resonance Research Center (UMRAM), Bilkent University, Bilkent, Ankara 06800 (Turkey); Goodwill, Patrick W. [Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1762 (United States); Conolly, Steven M. [Department of Bioengineering, University of California, Berkeley, Berkeley, California 94720-1762 (United States); Department of EECS, University of California, Berkeley, California 94720-1762 (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Medical imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic particle imaging (MPI) utilize time-varying magnetic fields that are subject to magnetostimulation limits, which often limit the speed of the imaging process. Various human-subject experiments have studied the amplitude and frequency dependence of these thresholds for gradient or homogeneous magnetic fields. Another contributing factor was shown to be number of cycles in a magnetic pulse, where the thresholds decreased with longer pulses. The latter result was demonstrated on two subjects only, at a single frequency of 1.27 kHz. Hence, whether the observed effect was due to the number of cycles or due to the pulse duration was not specified. In addition, a gradient-type field was utilized; hence, whether the same phenomenon applies to homogeneous magnetic fields remained unknown. Here, the authors investigate the pulse duration dependence of magnetostimulation limits for a 20-fold range of frequencies using homogeneous magnetic fields, such as the ones used for the drive field in MPI. Methods: Magnetostimulation thresholds were measured in the arms of six healthy subjects (age: 27 ± 5 yr). Each experiment comprised testing the thresholds at eight different pulse durations between 2 and 125 ms at a single frequency, which took approximately 30–40 min/subject. A total of 34 experiments were performed at three different frequencies: 1.2, 5.7, and 25.5 kHz. A solenoid coil providing homogeneous magnetic field was used to induce stimulation, and the field amplitude was measured in real time. A pre-emphasis based pulse shaping method was employed to accurately control the pulse durations. Subjects reported stimulation via a mouse click whenever they felt a twitching/tingling sensation. A sigmoid function was fitted to the subject responses to find the threshold at a specific frequency and duration, and the whole procedure was repeated at all relevant frequencies and pulse durations

  11. Hadron production near threshold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Final state interaction effects in → + and → 3He reactions are explored near threshold to study the sensitivity of the cross-sections to the potential and the scattering matrix. The final state scattering wave functions between and and and 3He are described rigorously. The production is ...

  12. Elaborating on Threshold Concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rountree, Janet; Robins, Anthony; Rountree, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    We propose an expanded definition of Threshold Concepts (TCs) that requires the successful acquisition and internalisation not only of knowledge, but also its practical elaboration in the domains of applied strategies and mental models. This richer definition allows us to clarify the relationship between TCs and Fundamental Ideas, and to account…

  13. Boundaries, Thresholds, and Consequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Carl R.

    1997-01-01

    Highlights issues in the debate concerning Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) special education legislation as it relates to student discipline and incarcerated juveniles. Focuses on assessment issues and thresholds for diagnosable conditions. Looks at debates surrounding IDEA and some of the consequences of new legislation. (RJM)

  14. Hyper-arousal decreases human visual thresholds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam J Woods

    Full Text Available Arousal has long been known to influence behavior and serves as an underlying component of cognition and consciousness. However, the consequences of hyper-arousal for visual perception remain unclear. The present study evaluates the impact of hyper-arousal on two aspects of visual sensitivity: visual stereoacuity and contrast thresholds. Sixty-eight participants participated in two experiments. Thirty-four participants were randomly divided into two groups in each experiment: Arousal Stimulation or Sham Control. The Arousal Stimulation group underwent a 50-second cold pressor stimulation (immersing the foot in 0-2° C water, a technique known to increase arousal. In contrast, the Sham Control group immersed their foot in room temperature water. Stereoacuity thresholds (Experiment 1 and contrast thresholds (Experiment 2 were measured before and after stimulation. The Arousal Stimulation groups demonstrated significantly lower stereoacuity and contrast thresholds following cold pressor stimulation, whereas the Sham Control groups showed no difference in thresholds. These results provide the first evidence that hyper-arousal from sensory stimulation can lower visual thresholds. Hyper-arousal's ability to decrease visual thresholds has important implications for survival, sports, and everyday life.

  15. Vegetation patterns and environmental gradients in Benin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Adomou, A.

    2005-01-01

    Key words: West Africa, Benin, vegetation patterns, floristic areas, phytogeography, chorology, floristic gradients, climatic factors, water availability, Dahomey Gap, threatened plants, biodiversity, conservation.Understanding plant species distribution patterns and the underlying factors is a

  16. Numerical simulation of kinetic demixing and decomposition in a LaCoO3-δ oxygen membrane under an oxygen potential gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ta, Na; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Lijun

    2018-01-01

    A composition- and temperature-dependent mobility database of all ionic species in the LaCoO3-δ phase was developed and combined with a La-Co-O thermodynamic database to simulate kinetic demixing and partial decomposition in LaCoO3-δ oxygen membranes operated under a 0.0001/0.21 bar oxygen partia...... by the mobility of oxygen ions, and the latter is determined by the higher mobility of Co ions as compared to the La ion in the ABO3-type perovskite. A drift motion of both oxide surfaces towards the high PO2 side occurs with the movement of cations....

  17. Effects of oxygen on responses to heating in two lizard species sampled along an elevational gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DuBois, P Mason; Shea, Tanner K; Claunch, Natalie M; Taylor, Emily N

    2017-08-01

    Thermal tolerance is an important variable in predictive models about the effects of global climate change on species distributions, yet the physiological mechanisms responsible for reduced performance at high temperatures in air-breathing vertebrates are not clear. We conducted an experiment to examine how oxygen affects three variables exhibited by ectotherms as they heat-gaping threshold, panting threshold, and loss of righting response (the latter indicating the critical thermal maximum)-in two lizard species along an elevational (and therefore environmental oxygen partial pressure) gradient. Oxygen partial pressure did not impact these variables in either species. We also exposed lizards at each elevation to severely hypoxic gas to evaluate their responses to hypoxia. Severely low oxygen partial pressure treatments significantly reduced the gaping threshold, panting threshold, and critical thermal maximum. Further, under these extreme hypoxic conditions, these variables were strongly and positively related to partial pressure of oxygen. In an elevation where both species overlapped, the thermal tolerance of the high elevation species was less affected by hypoxia than that of the low elevation species, suggesting the high elevation species may be adapted to lower oxygen partial pressures. In the high elevation species, female lizards had higher thermal tolerance than males. Our data suggest that oxygen impacts the thermal tolerance of lizards, but only under severely hypoxic conditions, possibly as a result of hypoxia-induced anapyrexia. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Testing the limits of gradient sensing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinal Lakhani

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ability to detect a chemical gradient is fundamental to many cellular processes. In multicellular organisms gradient sensing plays an important role in many physiological processes such as wound healing and development. Unicellular organisms use gradient sensing to move (chemotaxis or grow (chemotropism towards a favorable environment. Some cells are capable of detecting extremely shallow gradients, even in the presence of significant molecular-level noise. For example, yeast have been reported to detect pheromone gradients as shallow as 0.1 nM/μm. Noise reduction mechanisms, such as time-averaging and the internalization of pheromone molecules, have been proposed to explain how yeast cells filter fluctuations and detect shallow gradients. Here, we use a Particle-Based Reaction-Diffusion model of ligand-receptor dynamics to test the effectiveness of these mechanisms and to determine the limits of gradient sensing. In particular, we develop novel simulation methods for establishing chemical gradients that not only allow us to study gradient sensing under steady-state conditions, but also take into account transient effects as the gradient forms. Based on reported measurements of reaction rates, our results indicate neither time-averaging nor receptor endocytosis significantly improves the cell's accuracy in detecting gradients over time scales associated with the initiation of polarized growth. Additionally, our results demonstrate the physical barrier of the cell membrane sharpens chemical gradients across the cell. While our studies are motivated by the mating response of yeast, we believe our results and simulation methods will find applications in many different contexts.

  19. Color difference thresholds in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paravina, Rade D; Ghinea, Razvan; Herrera, Luis J; Bona, Alvaro D; Igiel, Christopher; Linninger, Mercedes; Sakai, Maiko; Takahashi, Hidekazu; Tashkandi, Esam; Perez, Maria del Mar

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this prospective multicenter study was to determine 50:50% perceptibility threshold (PT) and 50:50% acceptability threshold (AT) of dental ceramic under simulated clinical settings. The spectral radiance of 63 monochromatic ceramic specimens was determined using a non-contact spectroradiometer. A total of 60 specimen pairs, divided into 3 sets of 20 specimen pairs (medium to light shades, medium to dark shades, and dark shades), were selected for psychophysical experiment. The coordinating center and seven research sites obtained the Institutional Review Board (IRB) approvals prior the beginning of the experiment. Each research site had 25 observers, divided into five groups of five observers: dentists-D, dental students-S, dental auxiliaries-A, dental technicians-T, and lay persons-L. There were 35 observers per group (five observers per group at each site ×7 sites), for a total of 175 observers. Visual color comparisons were performed using a viewing booth. Takagi-Sugeno-Kang (TSK) fuzzy approximation was used for fitting the data points. The 50:50% PT and 50:50% AT were determined in CIELAB and CIEDE2000. The t-test was used to evaluate the statistical significance in thresholds differences. The CIELAB 50:50% PT was ΔEab  = 1.2, whereas 50:50% AT was ΔEab  = 2.7. Corresponding CIEDE2000 (ΔE00 ) values were 0.8 and 1.8, respectively. 50:50% PT by the observer group revealed differences among groups D, A, T, and L as compared with 50:50% PT for all observers. The 50:50% AT for all observers was statistically different than 50:50% AT in groups T and L. A 50:50% perceptibility and ATs were significantly different. The same is true for differences between two color difference formulas ΔE00 /ΔEab . Observer groups and sites showed high level of statistical difference in all thresholds. Visual color difference thresholds can serve as a quality control tool to guide the selection of esthetic dental materials, evaluate clinical performance, and

  20. Differential threshold effects of habitat fragmentation on gene flow in two widespread species of bush crickets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Rebecca; Durka, Walter; Holzhauer, Stephanie I J; Wolters, Volkmar; Diekötter, Tim

    2010-11-01

    Effects of habitat fragmentation on genetic diversity vary among species. This may be attributed to the interacting effects of species traits and landscape structure. While widely distributed and abundant species are often considered less susceptible to fragmentation, this may be different if they are small sized and show limited dispersal. Under intensive land use, habitat fragmentation may reach thresholds at which gene flow among populations of small-sized and dispersal-limited species becomes disrupted. Here, we studied the genetic diversity of two abundant and widespread bush crickets along a gradient of habitat fragmentation in an agricultural landscape. We applied traditional (G(ST), θ) and recently developed (G'ST', D) estimators of genetic differentiation on microsatellite data from each of twelve populations of the grassland species Metrioptera roeselii and the forest-edge species Pholidoptera griseoaptera to identify thresholds of habitat fragmentation below which genetic population structure is affected. Whereas the grassland species exhibited a uniform genetic structuring (G(ST) = 0.020-0.033; D = 0.085-0.149) along the whole fragmentation gradient, the forest-edge species' genetic differentiation increased significantly from D habitat dropped below a threshold of 20% and its proximity decreased substantially at the landscape scale. The influence of fragmentation on genetic differentiation was qualitatively unaffected by the choice of estimators of genetic differentiation but quantitatively underestimated by the traditional estimators. These results indicate that even for widespread species in modern agricultural landscapes fragmentation thresholds exist at which gene flow among suitable habitat patches becomes restricted. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Mechanical Properties and Real-Time Damage Evaluations of Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC CMCs Subjected to Tensile Loading Under Thermal Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleby, Matthew; Zhu, Dongming; Morscher, Gregory

    2015-01-01

    SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) require new state-of-the art environmental barrier coatings (EBCs) to withstand increased temperature requirements and high velocity combustion corrosive combustion gasses. The present work compares the response of coated and uncoated SiC/SiC CMC substrates subjected to simulated engine environments followed by high temperature mechanical testing to asses retained properties and damage mechanisms. Our focus is to explore the capabilities of electrical resistance (ER) measurements as an NDE technique for testing of retained properties under combined high heat-flux and mechanical loading conditions. Furthermore, Acoustic Emission (AE) measurements and Digital Image Correlation (DIC) were performed to determine material damage onset and accumulation.

  2. Is splash erosion potential species specific? Measuring of splash erosion potential under forest in different succession stages along a biodiversity gradient in the humid subtropics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geißler, C.; Kühn, P.; Scholten, T.

    2009-04-01

    It is widely accepted that (forest) vegetation is a key control for the type and intensity of soil erosion. The current paradigm is that natural or quasi-natural vegetation protects the soil from erosion and that agricultural vegetation or land use generally enhances erosion. The latter was in focus of most research during the last decades and less interest was paid on natural systems, which are more difficult to study. Nevertheless, afforestation is widely used as a measure of soil protection against soil erosion. Rainfall can be highly erosive particularly in the humid subtropics. Regarding climate change, also precipitation regime may change in direction to even more severe storms and higher rainfall intensities; it is a research field of growing importance. Key mechanisms of a vegetation cover in reducing or enhancing erosion are modifications of drop-size distribution, retention of raindrop impact on the soil and changes in amount and spatial distribution of rainfall at the ground surface. Controlling determinants are rainfall intensity, drop size distribution, drop fall velocity, height of the canopy as well as density of the canopy, crown and leaf traits, LAI and coverage by a litter layer. Large drops are supposed to be significant sources of splash detachment in forests (Brandt 1989; Vis 1986). However, the mechanisms of reducing (or enhancing?) splash detachment under forest in relation to species richness and species composition are not well understood. Some studies indicate that raindrop impact is species specific (Calder 2001; Nanko et al. 2006) and some neglect the effects of species specific impacts (Foot & Morgan 2005). Our research uses different methods of rainfall characterization (splash cups, tipping-bucket rain gauge, laser distrometer) to reveal the described mechanisms from the canopy through different vegetation layers to the ground. First results of splash cup measurements (revised after Ellison 1947) show that sand loss under vegetation

  3. Drop casting of stiffness gradients for chip integration into stretchable substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naserifar, Naser; LeDuc, Philip R; Fedder, Gary K

    2017-01-01

    Stretchable electronics have demonstrated promise within unobtrusive wearable systems in areas such as health monitoring and medical therapy. One significant question is whether it is more advantageous to develop holistic stretchable electronics or to integrate mature CMOS into stretchable electronic substrates where the CMOS process is separated from the mechanical processing steps. A major limitation with integrating CMOS is the dissimilar interface between the soft stretchable and hard CMOS materials. To address this, we developed an approach to pattern an elastomeric polymer layer with spatially varying mechanical properties around CMOS electronics to create a controllable material stiffness gradient. Our experimental approach reveals that modifying the interfaces can increase the strain failure threshold up to 30% and subsequently decreases delamination. The stiffness gradient in the polymer layer provides a safe region for electronic chips to function under a substrate tensile strain up to 150%. These results will have impacts in diverse applications including skin sensors and wearable health monitoring systems. (paper)

  4. Hadron production near threshold

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Final state interaction effects in pp → pΛK+ and pd → 3He η reactions are explored near threshold to study the sensitivity of the cross-sections to the pΛ potential and the ηN scattering matrix. The final state scattering wave functions between Λ and p and η and 3He are described rigorously. The Λ production is ...

  5. Thresholds in Xeric Hydrology and Biogeochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meixner, T.; Brooks, P. D.; Simpson, S. C.; Soto, C. D.; Yuan, F.; Turner, D.; Richter, H.

    2011-12-01

    Due to water limitation, thresholds in hydrologic and biogeochemical processes are common in arid and semi-arid systems. Some of these thresholds such as those focused on rainfall runoff relationships have been well studied. However to gain a full picture of the role that thresholds play in driving the hydrology and biogeochemistry of xeric systems a full view of the entire array of processes at work is needed. Here a walk through the landscape of xeric systems will be conducted illustrating the powerful role of hydrologic thresholds on xeric system biogeochemistry. To understand xeric hydro-biogeochemistry two key ideas need to be focused on. First, it is important to start from a framework of reaction and transport. Second an understanding of the temporal and spatial components of thresholds that have a large impact on hydrologic and biogeochemical fluxes needs to be offered. In the uplands themselves episodic rewetting and drying of soils permits accelerated biogeochemical processing but also more gradual drainage of water through the subsurface than expected in simple conceptions of biogeochemical processes. Hydrologic thresholds (water content above hygroscopic) results in a stop start nutrient spiral of material across the landscape since runoff connecting uplands to xeric perennial riparian is episodic and often only transports materials a short distance (100's of m). This episodic movement results in important and counter-intuitive nutrient inputs to riparian zones but also significant processing and uptake of nutrients. The floods that transport these biogeochemicals also result in significant input to riparian groundwater and may be key to sustaining these critical ecosystems. Importantly the flood driven recharge process itself is a threshold process dependent on flood characteristics (floods greater than 100 cubic meters per second) and antecedent conditions (losing to near neutral gradients). Floods also appear to influence where arid and semi

  6. Pacing failure caused by automatic pacing threshold adjustment system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Kishihara

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular capture management is an automatic pacing threshold adjustment algorithm that automatically measures pacing threshold through detection of the evoked response after a pacing stimulus. Although it is principally designed to save device battery under the maintenance of the patient׳s safety, we experienced a rare case with serious pacing failure due to a weakness of this algorithm. This pacing failure might be explained by a large variation in the ventricular pacing threshold depending on the atrioventricular interval and daily variation of pacing threshold and concomitant steroid use in this patient. Keywords: Automatic pacing threshold adjustment algorithm, Pacing failure

  7. Dynamic properties of polydisperse colloidal particles in the presence of thermal gradient studied by a modified Brownian dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dongxing; Jin, Hui; Jing, Dengwei; Wang, Xin

    2018-03-01

    Aggregation and migration of colloidal particles under the thermal gradient widely exists in nature and many industrial processes. In this study, dynamic properties of polydisperse colloidal particles in the presence of thermal gradient were studied by a modified Brownian dynamic model. Other than the traditional forces on colloidal particles, including Brownian force, hydrodynamic force, and electrostatic force from other particles, the electrostatic force from the asymmetric ionic diffusion layer under a thermal gradient has been considered and introduced into the Brownian dynamic model. The aggregation ratio of particles (R A), the balance time (t B) indicating the time threshold when {{R}A} becomes constant, the porosity ({{P}BA} ), fractal dimension (D f) and distributions of concentration (DISC) and aggregation (DISA) for the aggregated particles were discussed based on this model. The aggregated structures formed by polydisperse particles are less dense and the particles therein are loosely bonded. Also it showed a quite large compressibility as the increases of concentration and interparticle potential can significantly increase the fractal dimension. The thermal gradient can induce two competitive factors leading to a two-stage migration of particles. When t{{t}B} , the thermophoresis becomes dominant thus the migrations of particles are against the thermal gradient. The effect of thermophoresis on the aggregate structures was found to be similar to the effect of increasing particle concentration. This study demonstrates how the thermal gradient affects the aggregation of monodisperse and polydisperse particles and can be a guide for the biomimetics and precise control of colloid system under the thermal gradient. Moreover, our model can be easily extended to other more complex colloidal systems considering shear, temperature fluctuation, surfactant, etc.

  8. Experimental and environmental factors affect spurious detection of ecological thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daily, Jonathan P.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Smith, David; Snyder, Craig D.

    2012-01-01

    Threshold detection methods are increasingly popular for assessing nonlinear responses to environmental change, but their statistical performance remains poorly understood. We simulated linear change in stream benthic macroinvertebrate communities and evaluated the performance of commonly used threshold detection methods based on model fitting (piecewise quantile regression [PQR]), data partitioning (nonparametric change point analysis [NCPA]), and a hybrid approach (significant zero crossings [SiZer]). We demonstrated that false detection of ecological thresholds (type I errors) and inferences on threshold locations are influenced by sample size, rate of linear change, and frequency of observations across the environmental gradient (i.e., sample-environment distribution, SED). However, the relative importance of these factors varied among statistical methods and between inference types. False detection rates were influenced primarily by user-selected parameters for PQR (τ) and SiZer (bandwidth) and secondarily by sample size (for PQR) and SED (for SiZer). In contrast, the location of reported thresholds was influenced primarily by SED. Bootstrapped confidence intervals for NCPA threshold locations revealed strong correspondence to SED. We conclude that the choice of statistical methods for threshold detection should be matched to experimental and environmental constraints to minimize false detection rates and avoid spurious inferences regarding threshold location.

  9. Conducta alimentaria de Daphnia ambigua Scourfield 1947, Moina micrura Kurz 1874 y Ceriodaphnia dubia Richard 1895 (Cladocera frente a un gradiente de concentración de alimento Feeding behaviour of Daphnia ambigua Scourfield 1947, Moina micrura Kurz 1874 and Ceriodaphnia dubia Richard 1895 (Cladocera under a food concentration gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GINGER MARTINEZ

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available Debido a que Cladocera es el grupo de microfiltradores más abundante del zooplancton límnico y cuyas poblaciones se encuentran usualmente limitadas por alimento, la respuesta de los individuos frente a un gradiente de concentración de recursos tendría significativas implicancias sobre los patrones poblacionales y comunitarios. Se comparó la conducta alimentaria de Moina micrura, Ceriodaphnia dubia y Daphnia ambigua (Cladocera frente a las microalgas Chlorella sp. y Oocystis sp. (Chlorophyceae mediante los siguientes parámetros: Tasa de Ingesta Máxima (Imax, Concentración Limitante Incipiente (CLI y Eficiencia de Consumo (b, los cuales fueron obtenidos a través de un modelo de respuesta funcional. Los resultados mostraron que D. ambigua presentó las mayores Imax y CLI sobre ambos recursos, sin embargo, esta especie presentó la menor b. Mientras que D. ambigua no presentó diferencias en b sobre Chlorella sp. y Oocystis sp., M. micrura presentó una mayor b sobre Chlorella sp. y C. dubia sobre Oocystis sp. Estos resultados revelan significativas diferencias interespecíficas en la respuesta alimentaria de Cladocera, grupo que presentó un complejo comportamiento frente a variaciones en la disponibilidad de recursos alimentariosBecause Cladocera is the most abundant group of filter-feeders in the freshwater zooplankton and their populations are usually found under limited resources conditions, the individual response under a resources concentration gradient has important consequences on the population and community patterns. Feeding behavior of Moina micrura, Ceriodaphnia dubia and Daphnia ambigua (Cladocera on the microalgae Chlorella sp. and Oocystis sp. (Chlorophyceae was compared by using the following parameters: Maximum Ingestion Rate (Imax, Incipient Limiting Concentration (ILC and Consumption Efficiency (b, which were obtained through a model of functional response. Results indicated that D. ambigua showed the highest Imax and

  10. Generalized Gradient Approximation Made Simple

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perdew, J.P.; Burke, K.; Ernzerhof, M.

    1996-01-01

    Generalized gradient approximations (GGA close-quote s) for the exchange-correlation energy improve upon the local spin density (LSD) description of atoms, molecules, and solids. We present a simple derivation of a simple GGA, in which all parameters (other than those in LSD) are fundamental constants. Only general features of the detailed construction underlying the Perdew-Wang 1991 (PW91) GGA are invoked. Improvements over PW91 include an accurate description of the linear response of the uniform electron gas, correct behavior under uniform scaling, and a smoother potential. copyright 1996 The American Physical Society

  11. Travelling gradient thermocouple calibration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broomfield, G.H.

    1975-01-01

    A short discussion of the origins of the thermocouple EMF is used to re-introduce the idea that the Peltier and Thompson effects are indistinguishable from one another. Thermocouples may be viewed as devices which generate an EMF at junctions or as integrators of EMF's developed in thermal gradients. The thermal gradient view is considered the more appropriate, because of its better accord with theory and behaviour, the correct approach to calibration, and investigation of service effects is immediately obvious. Inhomogeneities arise in thermocouples during manufacture and in service. The results of travelling gradient measurements are used to show that such effects are revealed with a resolution which depends on the length of the gradient although they may be masked during simple immersion calibration. Proposed tests on thermocouples irradiated in a nuclear reactor are discussed

  12. A low-threshold erbium glass minilaser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gapontsev, V. P.; Gromov, A. K.; Izyneev, A. A.; Sadovskii, P. I.; Stavrov, A. A.

    1989-04-01

    Minilasers emitting in the 1.54-micron region with an emission threshold less than 5 J and efficiency up to 1.7 percent have been constructed using a Cr-Y-Er laser glass, LGS-Kh. Under repetitively-pulsed operation, an average lasing power of 0.7 W and a pulse repetition rate of 7 Hz have been achieved.

  13. The acoustic reflex threshold in aging ears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, C A; Silman, S; Miller, M H

    1983-01-01

    This study investigates the controversy regarding the influence of age on the acoustic reflex threshold for broadband noise, 500-, 1000-, 2000-, and 4000-Hz activators between Jerger et al. [Mono. Contemp. Audiol. 1 (1978)] and Jerger [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66 (1979)] on the one hand and Silman [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 66 (1979)] and others on the other. The acoustic reflex thresholds for broadband noise, 500-, 1000-, 2000-, and 4000-Hz activators were evaluated under two measurement conditions. Seventy-two normal-hearing ears were drawn from 72 subjects ranging in age from 20-69 years. The results revealed that age was correlated with the acoustic reflex threshold for BBN activator but not for any of the tonal activators; the correlation was stronger under the 1-dB than under the 5-dB measurement condition. Also, the mean acoustic reflex thresholds for broadband noise activator were essentially similar to those reported by Jerger et al. (1978) but differed from those obtained in this study under the 1-dB measurement condition.

  14. Physico-chemical thresholds in the distribution of fish species among French lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roubeix Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The management of lakes requires the definition of physico-chemical thresholds to be used for ecosystem preservation or restoration. According to the European Water Framework Directive, the limits between physico-chemical quality classes must be set consistently with biological quality elements. One way to do this consists in analyzing the response of aquatic communities to environmental gradients across monitoring sites and in identifying ecological community thresholds, i.e. zones in the gradients where the species turnover is the highest. In this study, fish data from 196 lakes in France were considered to derive ecological thresholds using the multivariate method of gradient forest. The analysis was performed on 25 species and 36 environmental parameters. The results revealed the highest importance of maximal water temperature in the distribution of fish species. Other important parameters included geographical factors, dissolved organic carbon concentration and water transparency, while nutrients appeared to have low influence. In spite of the diversity of species responses to the gradients, community thresholds were detected in the gradients of the most important physico-chemical parameters and of total phosphorus and nitrate concentrations as well. The thresholds identified in such macroecological study may highlight new patterns of species natural distribution and improve niche characterization. Moreover, when factors that may be influenced by human activities are involved, the thresholds could be used to set environmental standards for lake preservation.

  15. Climatic conditions cause spatially dynamic polygyny thresholds in a large mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Jeffrey A; McLoughlin, Philip D

    2017-03-01

    The polygyny threshold (PT) is a critical transition point in the sexual selection process for many organisms in natural populations, characterizing when females choose to mate with an already mated male over an unmated one to improve fitness. Understanding its causes and consequences is therefore of high interest. While both theoretical and empirical work suggest that the degree of polygyny within a species is plastic and a function of male inequality, the functional relationship between underlying availability of resources occupied by breeding males under variable climatic conditions and the dynamics of PTs across space and time has received less attention. Here, we use a standardized measure of male mating inequality as the culmination of female mate choices to analyse how spatially dynamic PTs in a naturally regulated feral horse (Equus ferus caballus) population emerge along a geographic gradient in a known, limiting resource (freshwater) each year from variable climatic conditions. Polygyny threshold distance from permanent freshwater increased with increasing precipitation during the breeding season of each year, suggesting a relationship between annual resource availability and female mate choice. The mechanism by which climatic conditions underpin the spatial dynamics of PTs was likely through precipitation providing ephemeral freshwater sources across the study area that effectively weakened the gradient in availability of permanent freshwater, thereby providing mating males that occupied home ranges far from permanent water with access to this limiting resource and enabling them to attract and retain females. Increased precipitation also coincided with a decreased proportion of males in the population that experienced sexual selection pressure attributed to female mate choice in relation to the acquisition and/or defence of freshwater sources. Climatic conditions caused spatial shifts in PTs annually along the geographic gradient in resource availability

  16. Gradient Alloy for Optical Packaging

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Advances in additive manufacturing, such as Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS), enables the fabrication of compositionally gradient microstructures, i.e. gradient...

  17. Responses of photosynthetic capacity to soil moisture gradient in perennial rhizome grass and perennial bunchgrass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Guangsheng

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Changing water condition represents a dramatic impact on global terrestrial ecosystem productivity, mainly by limiting plant functions, including growth and photosynthesis, particularly in arid and semiarid areas. However, responses of the potential photosynthetic capacity to soil water status in a wide range of soil moisture levels, and determination of their thresholds are poorly understood. This study examined the response patterns of plant photosynthetic capacity and their thresholds to a soil moisture gradient in a perennial rhizome grass, Leymus chinensis, and a perennial bunchgrass, Stipa grandis, both dominant in the Eurasian Steppe. Results Severe water deficit produced negative effects on light-saturated net CO2 assimilation rate (Asat, stomatal conductance (gs, mesophyll conductance (gm, maximum carboxylation velocity (Vc,max, and maximal efficiency of PSII photochemistry (Fv/Fm. Photosynthetic activity was enhanced under moderate soil moisture with reductions under both severe water deficit and excessive water conditions, which may represent the response patterns of plant growth and photosynthetic capacity to the soil water gradient. Our results also showed that S. grandis had lower productivity and photosynthetic potentials under moderate water status, although it demonstrated generally similar relationship patterns between photosynthetic potentials and water status relative to L. chinensis. Conclusions The experiments tested and confirmed the hypothesis that responsive threshold points appear when plants are exposed to a broad water status range, with different responses between the two key species. It is suggested that vegetation structure and function may be shifted when a turning point of soil moisture occurs, which translates to terms of future climatic change prediction in semiarid grasslands.

  18. Oscillatory Threshold Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borresen, Jon; Lynch, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    In the 1940s, the first generation of modern computers used vacuum tube oscillators as their principle components, however, with the development of the transistor, such oscillator based computers quickly became obsolete. As the demand for faster and lower power computers continues, transistors are themselves approaching their theoretical limit and emerging technologies must eventually supersede them. With the development of optical oscillators and Josephson junction technology, we are again presented with the possibility of using oscillators as the basic components of computers, and it is possible that the next generation of computers will be composed almost entirely of oscillatory devices. Here, we demonstrate how coupled threshold oscillators may be used to perform binary logic in a manner entirely consistent with modern computer architectures. We describe a variety of computational circuitry and demonstrate working oscillator models of both computation and memory. PMID:23173034

  19. Self-organization of intracellular gradients during mitosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuller Brian G

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Gradients are used in a number of biological systems to transmit spatial information over a range of distances. The best studied are morphogen gradients where information is transmitted over many cell lengths. Smaller mitotic gradients reflect the need to organize several distinct events along the length of the mitotic spindle. The intracellular gradients that characterize mitosis are emerging as important regulatory paradigms. Intracellular gradients utilize intrinsic auto-regulatory feedback loops and diffusion to establish stable regions of activity within the mitotic cytosol. We review three recently described intracellular mitotic gradients. The Ran GTP gradient with its elaborate cascade of nuclear transport receptors and cargoes is the best characterized, yet the dynamics underlying the robust gradient of Ran-GTP have received little attention. Gradients of phosphorylation have been observed on Aurora B kinase substrates both before and after anaphase onset. In both instances the phosphorylation gradient appears to result from a soluble gradient of Aurora B kinase activity. Regulatory properties that support gradient formation are highlighted. Intracellular activity gradients that regulate localized mitotic events bare several hallmarks of self-organizing biologic systems that designate spatial information during pattern formation. Intracellular pattern formation represents a new paradigm in mitotic regulation.

  20. Satellite gravity gradient grids for geophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, Johannes; Ebbing, Jörg; Fuchs, Martin; Sebera, Josef; Lieb, Verena; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Haagmans, Roger; Novak, Pavel

    2016-02-11

    The Gravity field and steady-state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite aimed at determining the Earth's mean gravity field. GOCE delivered gravity gradients containing directional information, which are complicated to use because of their error characteristics and because they are given in a rotating instrument frame indirectly related to the Earth. We compute gravity gradients in grids at 225 km and 255 km altitude above the reference ellipsoid corresponding to the GOCE nominal and lower orbit phases respectively, and find that the grids may contain additional high-frequency content compared with GOCE-based global models. We discuss the gradient sensitivity for crustal depth slices using a 3D lithospheric model of the North-East Atlantic region, which shows that the depth sensitivity differs from gradient to gradient. In addition, the relative signal power for the individual gradient component changes comparing the 225 km and 255 km grids, implying that using all components at different heights reduces parameter uncertainties in geophysical modelling. Furthermore, since gravity gradients contain complementary information to gravity, we foresee the use of the grids in a wide range of applications from lithospheric modelling to studies on dynamic topography, and glacial isostatic adjustment, to bedrock geometry determination under ice sheets.

  1. Uniform gradient expansions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Giovannini

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  2. Uniform gradient expansions

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Cosmological singularities are often discussed by means of a gradient expansion that can also describe, during a quasi-de Sitter phase, the progressive suppression of curvature inhomogeneities. While the inflationary event horizon is being formed the two mentioned regimes coexist and a uniform expansion can be conceived and applied to the evolution of spatial gradients across the protoinflationary boundary. It is argued that conventional arguments addressing the preinflationary initial conditions are necessary but generally not sufficient to guarantee a homogeneous onset of the conventional inflationary stage.

  3. High gradient superconducting quadrupoles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lundy, R.A.; Brown, B.C.; Carson, J.A.; Fisk, H.E.; Hanft, R.H.; Mantsch, P.M.; McInturff, A.D.; Remsbottom, R.H.

    1987-07-01

    Prototype superconducting quadrupoles with a 5 cm aperture and gradient of 16 kG/cm have been built and tested as candidate magnets for the final focus at SLC. The magnets are made from NbTi Tevatron style cable with 10 inner and 14 outer turns per quadrant. Quench performance and multipole data are presented. Design and data for a low current, high gradient quadrupole, similar in cross section but wound with a cable consisting of five insulated conductors are also discussed

  4. Crossing the threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, John; Tambasco, Lucas

    2017-11-01

    First, we summarize the circumstances in which chaotic pilot-wave dynamics gives rise to quantum-like statistical behavior. For ``closed'' systems, in which the droplet is confined to a finite domain either by boundaries or applied forces, quantum-like features arise when the persistence time of the waves exceeds the time required for the droplet to cross its domain. Second, motivated by the similarities between this hydrodynamic system and stochastic electrodynamics, we examine the behavior of a bouncing droplet above the Faraday threshold, where a stochastic element is introduced into the drop dynamics by virtue of its interaction with a background Faraday wave field. With a view to extending the dynamical range of pilot-wave systems to capture more quantum-like features, we consider a generalized theoretical framework for stochastic pilot-wave dynamics in which the relative magnitudes of the drop-generated pilot-wave field and a stochastic background field may be varied continuously. We gratefully acknowledge the financial support of the NSF through their CMMI and DMS divisions.

  5. Asynchronous updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We study a network of chaotic model neurons incorporating threshold- activated coupling. We obtain a wide range of spatiotemporal patterns under varying degrees of asynchronicity in the evolution of the neuronal components. For instance, we find that sequential updating of threshold-coupled chaotic neurons ...

  6. 78 FR 80379 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Trade Agreements Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-31

    ..., Sequence No. 1] RIN 9000-AM67 Federal Acquisition Regulation; Trade Agreements Thresholds AGENCIES... Organization Government Procurement Agreement and the Free Trade Agreements, as determined by the United States... trade agreements thresholds are adjusted according to a pre-determined formula under the agreements...

  7. Albania - Thresholds I and II

    Data.gov (United States)

    Millennium Challenge Corporation — From 2006 to 2011, the government of Albania (GOA) received two Millennium Challenge Corporation (MCC) Threshold Programs totaling $29.6 million. Albania received...

  8. Olfactory threshold in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, N P; Rossor, M N; Marsden, C D

    1987-01-01

    Olfactory threshold to differing concentrations of amyl acetate was determined in 78 subjects with idiopathic Parkinson's disease and 40 age-matched controls. Impaired olfactory threshold (previously reported by others) was confirmed in Parkinsonian subjects compared with controls. There was no significant correlation between olfactory threshold and age, sex, duration of disease, or current therapy with levodopa or anticholinergic drugs. In a sub-group of 14 levodopa-treated patients with severe "on-off" fluctuations, no change in olfactory threshold between the two states was demonstrable. Olfactory impairment in Parkinson's disease may involve mechanisms that are not influenced by pharmacologic manipulation of dopaminergic or cholinergic status. PMID:3819760

  9. Learning foraging thresholds for lizards

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goldberg, L.A. [Univ. of Warwick, Coventry (United Kingdom). Dept. of Computer Science; Hart, W.E. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Wilson, D.B. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1996-01-12

    This work gives a proof of convergence for a randomized learning algorithm that describes how anoles (lizards found in the Carribean) learn a foraging threshold distance. This model assumes that an anole will pursue a prey if and only if it is within this threshold of the anole`s perch. This learning algorithm was proposed by the biologist Roughgarden and his colleagues. They experimentally confirmed that this algorithm quickly converges to the foraging threshold that is predicted by optimal foraging theory our analysis provides an analytic confirmation that the learning algorithm converses to this optimal foraging threshold with high probability.

  10. Determination of the measurement threshold in gamma-ray spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korun, M; Vodenik, B; Zorko, B

    2017-03-01

    In gamma-ray spectrometry the measurement threshold describes the lover boundary of the interval of peak areas originating in the response of the spectrometer to gamma-rays from the sample measured. In this sense it presents a generalization of the net indication corresponding to the decision threshold, which is the measurement threshold at the quantity value zero for a predetermined probability for making errors of the first kind. Measurement thresholds were determined for peaks appearing in the spectra of radon daughters 214 Pb and 214 Bi by measuring the spectrum 35 times under repeatable conditions. For the calculation of the measurement threshold the probability for detection of the peaks and the mean relative uncertainty of the peak area were used. The relative measurement thresholds, the ratios between the measurement threshold and the mean peak area uncertainty, were determined for 54 peaks where the probability for detection varied between some percent and about 95% and the relative peak area uncertainty between 30% and 80%. The relative measurement thresholds vary considerably from peak to peak, although the nominal value of the sensitivity parameter defining the sensitivity for locating peaks was equal for all peaks. At the value of the sensitivity parameter used, the peak analysis does not locate peaks corresponding to the decision threshold with the probability in excess of 50%. This implies that peaks in the spectrum may not be located, although the true value of the measurand exceeds the decision threshold. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Threshold Concepts and Information Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Lori; Brunetti, Korey; Hofer, Amy R.

    2011-01-01

    What do we teach when we teach information literacy in higher education? This paper describes a pedagogical approach to information literacy that helps instructors focus content around transformative learning thresholds. The threshold concept framework holds promise for librarians because it grounds the instructor in the big ideas and underlying…

  12. Second threshold in weak interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, M.J.G.

    1977-01-01

    The point of view that weak interactions must have a second threshold below 300 – 600 GeV is developed. Above this threshold new physics must come in. This new physics may be the Higgs system, or some other nonperturbative system possibly having some similarities to the Higgs system. The limit of

  13. The Nature of Psychological Thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouder, Jeffrey N.; Morey, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    Following G. T. Fechner (1966), thresholds have been conceptualized as the amount of intensity needed to transition between mental states, such as between a states of unconsciousness and consciousness. With the advent of the theory of signal detection, however, discrete-state theory and the corresponding notion of threshold have been discounted.…

  14. Fire drives functional thresholds on the savanna-forest transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dantas, Vinícius de L; Batalha, Marco A; Pausas, Juli G

    2013-11-01

    In tropical landscapes, vegetation patches with contrasting tree densities are distributed as mosaics. However, the locations of patches and densities of trees within them cannot be predicted by climate models alone. It has been proposed that plant-fire feedbacks drive functional thresholds at a landscape scale, thereby maintaining open (savanna) and closed (forest) communities as two distinct stable states. However, there is little rigorous field evidence for this threshold model. Here we aim to provide support for such a model from a field perspective and to analyze the functional and phylogenetic consequences of fire in a Brazilian savanna landscape (Cerrado). We hypothesize that, in tropical landscapes, savanna and forest are two stable states maintained by plant-fire feedbacks. If so, their functional and diversity attributes should change abruptly along a community closure gradient. We set 98 plots along a gradient from open savanna to closed forest in the Brazilian Cerrado and tested for a threshold pattern in nine functional traits, five soil features, and seven diversity indicators. We then tested whether the threshold pattern was associated with different fire regimes. Most community attributes presented a threshold pattern on the savanna-forest transition with coinciding breakpoints. The thresholds separated two community states: (1) open environments with low-diversity communities growing in poor soils and dominated by plants that are highly resistant to high-intensity fires; and (2) closed environments with highly diverse plant communities growing in more fertile soils and dominated by shade-tolerant species that efficiently prevent light from reaching the understory. In addition, each state was associated with contrasting fire regimes. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that forests and savannas are two coexisting stable states with contrasting patterns of function and diversity that are regulated by fire-plant feedbacks; our results also

  15. Gradient realization of nonlinear control systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortes monforte, J.; Cortés, J.; Crouch, P.E.; Astolfi, A.; van der Schaft, Arjan; Gordillo, F.

    2003-01-01

    We investigate necessary and su?cient conditions under which a nonlinear afine control system with outputs can be written as a gradient control system corresponding to some pseudo-Riemannian metric defined on the state space. The results rely on a suitable notion of compatibility of the system with

  16. Photoproduction of Charm Near Threshold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2000-10-31

    Charm and bottom production near threshold is sensitive to the multi-quark, gluonic, and hidden-color correlations of hadronic and nuclear wavefunctions in QCD since all of the target's constituents must act coherently within the small interaction volume of the heavy quark production subprocess. Although such multi-parton subprocess cross sections are suppressed by powers of 1=m{sub Q}{sup 2}, they have less phase-space suppression and can dominate the contributions of the leading-twist single-gluon subprocesses in the threshold regime. The small rates for open and hidden charm photoproduction at threshold call for a dedicated facility.

  17. Parton distributions with threshold resummation

    CERN Document Server

    Bonvini, Marco; Rojo, Juan; Rottoli, Luca; Ubiali, Maria; Ball, Richard D.; Bertone, Valerio; Carrazza, Stefano; Hartland, Nathan P.

    2015-01-01

    We construct a set of parton distribution functions (PDFs) in which fixed-order NLO and NNLO calculations are supplemented with soft-gluon (threshold) resummation up to NLL and NNLL accuracy respectively, suitable for use in conjunction with any QCD calculation in which threshold resummation is included at the level of partonic cross sections. These resummed PDF sets, based on the NNPDF3.0 analysis, are extracted from deep-inelastic scattering, Drell-Yan, and top quark pair production data, for which resummed calculations can be consistently used. We find that, close to threshold, the inclusion of resummed PDFs can partially compensate the enhancement in resummed matrix elements, leading to resummed hadronic cross-sections closer to the fixed-order calculation. On the other hand, far from threshold, resummed PDFs reduce to their fixed-order counterparts. Our results demonstrate the need for a consistent use of resummed PDFs in resummed calculations.

  18. Conceptions of nuclear threshold status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quester, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reviews some alternative definitions of nuclear threshold status. Each of them is important, and major analytical confusions would result if one sense of the term is mistaken for another. The motives for nations entering into such threshold status are a blend of civilian and military gains, and of national interests versus parochial or bureaucratic interests. A portion of the rationale for threshold status emerges inevitably from the pursuit of economic goals, and another portion is made more attraction by the derives of the domestic political process. Yet the impact on international security cannot be dismissed, especially where conflicts among the states remain real. Among the military or national security motives are basic deterrence, psychological warfare, war-fighting and, more generally, national prestige. In the end, as the threshold phenomenon is assayed for lessons concerning the role of nuclear weapons more generally in international relations and security, one might conclude that threshold status and outright proliferation coverage to a degree in the motives for all of the states involved and in the advantages attained. As this paper has illustrated, nuclear threshold status is more subtle and more ambiguous than outright proliferation, and it takes considerable time to sort out the complexities. Yet the world has now had a substantial amount of time to deal with this ambiguous status, and this may tempt more states to exploit it

  19. Threshold models in radiation carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoel, D.G.; Li, P.

    1998-01-01

    Cancer incidence and mortality data from the atomic bomb survivors cohort has been analyzed to allow for the possibility of a threshold dose response. The same dose-response models as used in the original papers were fit to the data. The estimated cancer incidence from the fitted models over-predicted the observed cancer incidence in the lowest exposure group. This is consistent with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response at low-doses. Thresholds were added to the dose-response models and the range of possible thresholds is shown for both solid tumor cancers as well as the different leukemia types. This analysis suggests that the A-bomb cancer incidence data agree more with a threshold or nonlinear dose-response model than a purely linear model although the linear model is statistically equivalent. This observation is not found with the mortality data. For both the incidence data and the mortality data the addition of a threshold term significantly improves the fit to the linear or linear-quadratic dose response for both total leukemias and also for the leukemia subtypes of ALL, AML, and CML

  20. Tactile thresholds in healthy subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metka Moharić

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The assessment of sensory thresholds provides a method of examining the function of peripheral nerve fibers and their central connections. Quantitative sensory testing is a variant of conventional sensory testing wherein the goal is the quantification of the level of stimulation needed to produce a particular sensation. While thermal and vibratory testing are established methods in assessment of sensory thresholds, assessment of tactile thresholds with monofilaments is not used routinely. The purpose of this study was to assess the tactile thresholds in normal healthy population.Methods: In 39 healthy volunteers (19 men aged 21 to 71 years, tactile thresholds were assessed with von Frey’s hair in 7 parts of the body bilaterally.Results: We found touch sensitivity not to be dependent on age or gender. The right side was significantly more sensitive in the lateral part of the leg (p=0.011 and the left side in the medial part of the arm (p=0.022. There were also significant differences between sites (p<0.001, whereby distal parts of the body were more sensitive.Conclusions: Von Frey filaments allow the estimation of tactile thresholds without the need for complicated instrumentation.

  1. The Galactic metallicity gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolleston, W. R. J.; Smartt, S. J.; Dufton, P. L.; Ryans, R. S. I.

    2000-11-01

    We have previously published intermediate to high resolution spectroscopic observations of approximately 80 early B-type main-sequence stars situated in 19 Galactic open clusters/associations with Galactocentric distances distributed over 6Twarog et al. \\cite{twa97}). However, there is no evidence to suggest that our data would be better fitted with a two-zone model. Moreover, we observe a N/O gradient of -0.04+/-0.02 dex kpc-1 which is consistent with that found for other spiral galaxies (Vila-Costas & Edmunds \\cite{vil93}).

  2. Adaptive microfluidic gradient generator for quantitative chemotaxis experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anielski, Alexander; Pfannes, Eva K. B.; Beta, Carsten

    2017-03-01

    Chemotactic motion in a chemical gradient is an essential cellular function that controls many processes in the living world. For a better understanding and more detailed modelling of the underlying mechanisms of chemotaxis, quantitative investigations in controlled environments are needed. We developed a setup that allows us to separately address the dependencies of the chemotactic motion on the average background concentration and on the gradient steepness of the chemoattractant. In particular, both the background concentration and the gradient steepness can be kept constant at the position of the cell while it moves along in the gradient direction. This is achieved by generating a well-defined chemoattractant gradient using flow photolysis. In this approach, the chemoattractant is released by a light-induced reaction from a caged precursor in a microfluidic flow chamber upstream of the cell. The flow photolysis approach is combined with an automated real-time cell tracker that determines changes in the cell position and triggers movement of the microscope stage such that the cell motion is compensated and the cell remains at the same position in the gradient profile. The gradient profile can be either determined experimentally using a caged fluorescent dye or may be alternatively determined by numerical solutions of the corresponding physical model. To demonstrate the function of this adaptive microfluidic gradient generator, we compare the chemotactic motion of Dictyostelium discoideum cells in a static gradient and in a gradient that adapts to the position of the moving cell.

  3. Evaluation of the threshold trimming method for micro inertial fluidic switch based on electrowetting technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingting Liu

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The switch based on electrowetting technology has the advantages of no moving part, low contact resistance, long life and adjustable acceleration threshold. The acceleration threshold of switch can be fine-tuned by adjusting the applied voltage. This paper is focused on the electrowetting properties of switch and the influence of microchannel structural parameters, applied voltage and droplet volume on acceleration threshold. In the presence of process errors of micro inertial fluidic switch and measuring errors of droplet volume, there is a deviation between test acceleration threshold and target acceleration threshold. Considering the process errors and measuring errors, worst-case analysis is used to analyze the influence of parameter tolerance on the acceleration threshold. Under worst-case condition the total acceleration threshold tolerance caused by various errors is 9.95%. The target acceleration threshold can be achieved by fine-tuning the applied voltage. The acceleration threshold trimming method of micro inertial fluidic switch is verified.

  4. Identification of ecological thresholds from variations in phytoplankton communities among lakes: contribution to the definition of environmental standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roubeix, Vincent; Danis, Pierre-Alain; Feret, Thibaut; Baudoin, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    In aquatic ecosystems, the identification of ecological thresholds may be useful for managers as it can help to diagnose ecosystem health and to identify key levers to enable the success of preservation and restoration measures. A recent statistical method, gradient forest, based on random forests, was used to detect thresholds of phytoplankton community change in lakes along different environmental gradients. It performs exploratory analyses of multivariate biological and environmental data to estimate the location and importance of community thresholds along gradients. The method was applied to a data set of 224 French lakes which were characterized by 29 environmental variables and the mean abundances of 196 phytoplankton species. Results showed the high importance of geographic variables for the prediction of species abundances at the scale of the study. A second analysis was performed on a subset of lakes defined by geographic thresholds and presenting a higher biological homogeneity. Community thresholds were identified for the most important physico-chemical variables including water transparency, total phosphorus, ammonia, nitrates, and dissolved organic carbon. Gradient forest appeared as a powerful method at a first exploratory step, to detect ecological thresholds at large spatial scale. The thresholds that were identified here must be reinforced by the separate analysis of other aquatic communities and may be used then to set protective environmental standards after consideration of natural variability among lakes.

  5. Interaction strength between different grazers and macroalgae mediated by ocean acidification over warming gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampaio, E; Rodil, I F; Vaz-Pinto, F; Fernández, A; Arenas, F

    2017-04-01

    Since the past century, rising CO 2 levels have led to global changes (ocean warming and acidification) with subsequent effects on marine ecosystems and organisms. Macroalgae-herbivore interactions have a main role in the regulation of marine community structure (top-down control). Gradients of warming prompt complex non-linear effects on organism metabolism, cascading into altered trophic interactions and community dynamics. However, not much is known on how will acidification and grazer assemblage composition shape these effects. Within this context, we aimed to assess the combined effects of warming gradients and acidification on macroalgae-herbivore interactions, using three cosmopolitan species, abundant in the Iberian Peninsula and closely associated in nature: the amphipod Melita palmata, the gastropod Gibbula umbilicalis, and the green macroalga Ulva rigida. Under two CO 2 treatments (ΔCO 2 ≃ 450 μatm) across a temperature gradient (13.5, 16.6, 19.9 and 22.1 °C), two mesocosm experiments were performed to assess grazer consumption rates and macroalgae-herbivore interaction, respectively. Warming (Experiment I and II) and acidification (Experiment II) prompted negative effects in grazer's survival and species-specific differences in consumption rates. M. palmata was shown to be the stronger grazer per biomass (but not per capita), and also the most affected by climate stressors. Macroalgae-herbivore interaction strength was markedly shaped by the temperature gradient, while simultaneous acidification lowered thermal optimal threshold. In the near future, warming and acidification are likely to strengthen top-down control, but further increases in disturbances may lead to bottom-up regulated communities. Finally, our results suggest that grazer assemblage composition may modulate future macroalgae-herbivore interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Measuring Input Thresholds on an Existing Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuperman, Igor; Gutrich, Daniel G.; Berkun, Andrew C.

    2011-01-01

    temperatures to show that the interface had voltage margin under all worst case conditions. Gate input thresholds are normally measured at the manufacturer when the device is on a chip tester. A key function of this machine was duplicated on an existing flight board with no modifications to the nets to be tested, with the exception of changes in the FPGA program.

  7. Generalized conjugate gradient squared

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fokkema, D.R.; Sleijpen, G.L.G. [Utrecht Univ. (Netherlands)

    1994-12-31

    In order to solve non-symmetric linear systems of equations, the Conjugate Gradient Squared (CGS) is a well-known and widely used iterative method. In practice the method converges fast, often twice as fast as the Bi-Conjugate Gradient method. This is what you may expect, since CGS uses the square of the BiCG polynomial. However, CGS may suffer from its erratic convergence behavior. The method may diverge or the approximate solution may be inaccurate. BiCGSTAB uses the BiCG polynomial and a product of linear factors in an attempt to smoothen the convergence. In many cases, this has proven to be very effective. Unfortunately, the convergence of BiCGSTAB may stall when a linear factor (nearly) degenerates. BiCGstab({ell}) is designed to overcome this degeneration of linear factors. It generalizes BiCGSTAB and uses both the BiCG polynomial and a product of higher order factors. Still, CGS may converge faster than BiCGSTAB or BiCGstab({ell}). So instead of using a product of linear or higher order factors, it may be worthwhile to look for other polynomials. Since the BiCG polynomial is based on a three term recursion, a natural choice would be a polynomial based on another three term recursion. Possibly, a suitable choice of recursion coefficients would result in method that converges faster or as fast as CGS, but less erratic. It turns out that an algorithm for such a method can easily be formulated. One particular choice for the recursion coefficients leads to CGS. Therefore one could call this algorithm generalized CGS. Another choice for the recursion coefficients leads to BiCGSTAB. It is therefore possible to mix linear factors and some polynomial based on a three term recursion. This way one may get the best of both worlds. The authors will report on their findings.

  8. Treatment of threshold retinopathy of prematurity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deshpande Dhanashree

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available This report deals with our experience in the management of threshold retinopathy of prematurity (ROP. A total of 45 eyes of 23 infants were subjected to treatment of threshold ROP. 26.1% of these infants had a birth weight of >l,500 gm. The preferred modality of treatment was laser indirect photocoagulation, which was facilitated by scleral depression. Cryopexy was done in cases with nondilating pupils or medial haze and was always under general anaesthesia. Retreatment with either modality was needed in 42.2% eyes; in this the skip areas were covered. Total regression of diseases was achieved in 91.1% eyes with no sequelae. All the 4 eyes that progressed to stage 5 despite treatment had zone 1 disease. Major treatment-induced complications did not occur in this series. This study underscores the importance of routine screening of infants upto 2,000 gm birth weight for ROP and the excellent response that is achieved with laser photocoagulation in inducing regression of threshold ROP. Laser is the preferred method of treatment in view of the absence of treatment-related morbidity to the premature infants.

  9. DOE approach to threshold quantities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickham, L.E.; Kluk, A.F.; Department of Energy, Washington, DC)

    1985-01-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is developing the concept of threshold quantities for use in determining which waste materials must be handled as radioactive waste and which may be disposed of as nonradioactive waste at its sites. Waste above this concentration level would be managed as radioactive or mixed waste (if hazardous chemicals are present); waste below this level would be handled as sanitary waste. Ideally, the threshold must be set high enough to significantly reduce the amount of waste requiring special handling. It must also be low enough so that waste at the threshold quantity poses a very small health risk and multiple exposures to such waste would still constitute a small health risk. It should also be practical to segregate waste above or below the threshold quantity using available instrumentation. Guidance is being prepared to aid DOE sites in establishing threshold quantity values based on pathways analysis using site-specific parameters (waste stream characteristics, maximum exposed individual, population considerations, and site specific parameters such as rainfall, etc.). A guidance dose of between 0.001 to 1.0 mSv/y (0.1 to 100 mrem/y) was recommended with 0.3 mSv/y (30 mrem/y) selected as the guidance dose upon which to base calculations. Several tasks were identified, beginning with the selection of a suitable pathway model for relating dose to the concentration of radioactivity in the waste. Threshold concentrations corresponding to the guidance dose were determined for waste disposal sites at a selected humid and arid site. Finally, cost-benefit considerations at the example sites were addressed. The results of the various tasks are summarized and the relationship of this effort with related developments at other agencies discussed

  10. Thresholds in chemical respiratory sensitisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Stella A; Arts, Josje H E; Ehnes, Colin; Hindle, Stuart; Hollnagel, Heli M; Poole, Alan; Suto, Hidenori; Kimber, Ian

    2015-07-03

    There is a continuing interest in determining whether it is possible to identify thresholds for chemical allergy. Here allergic sensitisation of the respiratory tract by chemicals is considered in this context. This is an important occupational health problem, being associated with rhinitis and asthma, and in addition provides toxicologists and risk assessors with a number of challenges. In common with all forms of allergic disease chemical respiratory allergy develops in two phases. In the first (induction) phase exposure to a chemical allergen (by an appropriate route of exposure) causes immunological priming and sensitisation of the respiratory tract. The second (elicitation) phase is triggered if a sensitised subject is exposed subsequently to the same chemical allergen via inhalation. A secondary immune response will be provoked in the respiratory tract resulting in inflammation and the signs and symptoms of a respiratory hypersensitivity reaction. In this article attention has focused on the identification of threshold values during the acquisition of sensitisation. Current mechanistic understanding of allergy is such that it can be assumed that the development of sensitisation (and also the elicitation of an allergic reaction) is a threshold phenomenon; there will be levels of exposure below which sensitisation will not be acquired. That is, all immune responses, including allergic sensitisation, have threshold requirement for the availability of antigen/allergen, below which a response will fail to develop. The issue addressed here is whether there are methods available or clinical/epidemiological data that permit the identification of such thresholds. This document reviews briefly relevant human studies of occupational asthma, and experimental models that have been developed (or are being developed) for the identification and characterisation of chemical respiratory allergens. The main conclusion drawn is that although there is evidence that the

  11. On computational Gestalt detection thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grompone von Gioi, Rafael; Jakubowicz, Jérémie

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to show some recent developments of computational Gestalt theory, as pioneered by Desolneux, Moisan and Morel. The new results allow to predict much more accurately the detection thresholds. This step is unavoidable if one wants to analyze visual detection thresholds in the light of computational Gestalt theory. The paper first recalls the main elements of computational Gestalt theory. It points out a precision issue in this theory, essentially due to the use of discrete probability distributions. It then proposes to overcome this issue by using continuous probability distributions and illustrates it on the meaningful alignment detector of Desolneux et al.

  12. Nuclear threshold effects and neutron strength function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hategan, Cornel; Comisel, Horia

    2003-01-01

    One proves that a Nuclear Threshold Effect is dependent, via Neutron Strength Function, on Spectroscopy of Ancestral Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the Nuclear Threshold Effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function. Evidence for relation of Nuclear Threshold Effects to Neutron Strength Functions is obtained from Isotopic Threshold Effect and Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly. The empirical and computational analysis of the Isotopic Threshold Effect and of the Deuteron Stripping Threshold Anomaly demonstrate their close relationship to Neutron Strength Functions. It was established that the Nuclear Threshold Effects depend, in addition to genuine Nuclear Reaction Mechanisms, on Spectroscopy of (Ancestral) Neutron Threshold State. The magnitude of the effect is proportional to the Neutron Strength Function, in their dependence on mass number. This result constitutes also a proof that the origins of these threshold effects are Neutron Single Particle States at zero energy. (author)

  13. Review of new shapes for higher gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    High-gradient superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are needed for energy frontier superconducting accelerators. Progress has been made over the past decades and the accelerating gradient E acc has been increased from a few MV/m to ∼42 MV/m in SRF niobium cavities. The corresponding peak RF magnetic field H pk on the niobium cavity surface is approaching the intrinsic RF critical magnetic field H crit,RF , a hard physical limit at which superconductivity breaks down. Pushing the gradient envelope further by adopting new cavity shapes with a lower ratio of H pk /E acc has been recently proposed. For a reduced H pk /E acc , a higher ultimate E acc is sustained when H pk finally strikes H crit,RF . The new cavity geometry include the re-entrant shape conceived at Cornell University and the so-called 'Low-loss' shape proposed by a DESY/JLAB/KEK collaboration. Experimental work is being pursued at Cornell, KEK and JLAB. Results of single-cell cavities are encouraging. A record gradient of 47 MV/m was first demonstrated in a 1.3 GHz re-entrant niobium cavity at Cornell University. At the time of writing, a new record of 52 MV/m has been realized with another 1.3 GHz re-entrant cavity, designed and built at Cornell and processed and tested at KEK. Single-cell low-loss cavities have reached equally high gradients in the range of 45-51 MV/m at KEK and JLAB. Owing to their higher gradient potential and the encouraging single-cell cavity results, the new cavity shapes are becoming attractive for their possible use in the international linear collider (ILC). Experimental work on multi-cell niobium cavities of new shapes is currently under active exploration

  14. Gradient Boosting Machines, A Tutorial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey eNatekin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Gradient boosting machines are a family of powerful machine-learning techniques that have shown considerable success in a wide range of practical applications. They are highly customizable to the particular needs of the application, like being learned with respect to different loss functions. This article gives a tutorial introduction into the methodology of gradient boosting methods. A theoretical information is complemented with many descriptive examples and illustrations which cover all the stages of the gradient boosting model design. Considerations on handling the model complexity are discussed. A set of practical examples of gradient boosting applications are presented and comprehensively analyzed.

  15. Thresholds models of technological transitions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeppini, P.; Frenken, K.; Kupers, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a systematic review of seven threshold models of technological transitions from physics, biology, economics and sociology. The very same phenomenon of a technological transition can be explained by very different logics, ranging from economic explanations based on price, performance and

  16. Risk thresholds for alcohol consumption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Angela M; Kaptoge, Stephen; Butterworth, Adam S

    2018-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low-risk limits recommended for alcohol consumption vary substantially across different national guidelines. To define thresholds associated with lowest risk for all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease, we studied individual-participant data from 599 912 current drinkers withou...

  17. Weights of Exact Threshold Functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babai, László; Hansen, Kristoffer Arnsfelt; Podolskii, Vladimir V.

    2010-01-01

    We consider Boolean exact threshold functions defined by linear equations, and in general degree d polynomials. We give upper and lower bounds on the maximum magnitude (absolute value) of the coefficients required to represent such functions. These bounds are very close and in the linear case in ...... leave a substantial gap, a challenge for future work....

  18. Threshold quantities for helminth infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heesterbeek, J.A.P.; Roberts, M.G.

    1995-01-01

    For parasites with a clearly defined life-cycle we give threshold quantities that determine the stability of the parasite-free steady state for autonomous and periodic deterministic systems formulated in terms of mean parasite burdens. We discuss the biological interpretations of the quantities, how

  19. Percolation Threshold Parameters of Fluids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Škvor, J.; Nezbeda, Ivo

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 79, č. 4 (2009), 041141-041147 ISSN 1539-3755 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40720504 Keywords : percolation threshold * universality * infinite cluster Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.400, year: 2009

  20. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoife Bharucha

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We revisit a mechanism to enhance the decay width of (pseudo-scalar resonances to photon pairs when the process is mediated by loops of charged fermions produced near threshold. Motivated by the recent LHC data, indicating the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum at approximately 750 GeV, we illustrate this threshold enhancement mechanism in the case of a 750 GeV pseudoscalar boson A with a two-photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the 12MA threshold and a small decay width, <1 MeV. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the A state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through loops of charginos with masses close to 12MA and ii a two Higgs doublet model in which A is again produced by gluon fusion but decays into photons through loops of vector-like charged heavy leptons. In both these scenarios, while the mass of the charged fermion has to be adjusted to be extremely close to half of the A resonance mass, the small total widths are naturally obtained if only suppressed three-body decay channels occur. Finally, the implications of some of these scenarios for dark matter are discussed.

  1. Crossing Thresholds in Academic Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Rob

    2013-01-01

    This paper looks at the conceptual thresholds in relation to academic reading which might be crossed by undergraduate English Literature students. It is part of a wider study following 16 students through three years of undergraduate study. It uses theoretical ideas from Bakhtin and Foucault to analyse interviews with English lecturers. It…

  2. Substrate-Bound Protein Gradients to Study Haptotaxis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastien G. Ricoult

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cells navigate in response to inhomogeneous distributions of extracellular guidance cues. The cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying migration in response to gradients of chemical cues have been investigated for over a century. Following the introduction of micropipettes and more recently microfluidics for gradient generation, much attention and effort was devoted to study cellular chemotaxis, which is defined as guidance by gradients of chemical cues in solution. Haptotaxis, directional migration in response to gradients of substrate-bound cues, has received comparatively less attention; however it is increasingly clear that in vivo many physiologically relevant guidance proteins – including many secreted cues – are bound to cellular surfaces or incorporated into extracellular matrix and likely function via a haptotactic mechanism. Here, we review the history of haptotaxis. We examine the importance of the reference surface, the surface in contact with the cell that is not covered by the cue, which forms a gradient opposing the gradient of the protein cue and must be considered in experimental designs and interpretation of results. We review and compare microfluidics, contact-printing, light patterning and 3D fabrication to pattern substrate-bound protein gradients in vitro, and focus on their application to study axon guidance. The range of methods to create substrate-bound gradients discussed herein make possible systematic analyses of haptotactic mechanisms. Furthermore, understanding the fundamental mechanisms underlying cell motility will inform bioengineering approaches to program cell navigation and recover lost function.

  3. Quantifying ecological thresholds from response surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather E. Lintz; Bruce McCune; Andrew N. Gray; Katherine A. McCulloh

    2011-01-01

    Ecological thresholds are abrupt changes of ecological state. While an ecological threshold is a widely accepted concept, most empirical methods detect them in time or across geographic space. Although useful, these approaches do not quantify the direct drivers of threshold response. Causal understanding of thresholds detected empirically requires their investigation...

  4. Optimizing sampling approaches along ecological gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, Andreas; Irl, Severin D. H.; Steinbauer, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    1. Natural scientists and especially ecologists use manipulative experiments or field observations along gradients to differentiate patterns driven by processes from those caused by random noise. A well-conceived sampling design is essential for identifying, analysing and reporting underlying...... patterns in a statistically solid and reproducible manner, given the normal restrictions in labour, time and money. However, a technical guideline about an adequate sampling design to maximize prediction success under restricted resources is lacking. This study aims at developing such a solid...... and reproducible guideline for sampling along gradients in all fields of ecology and science in general. 2. We conducted simulations with artificial data for five common response types known in ecology, each represented by a simple function (no response, linear, exponential, symmetric unimodal and asymmetric...

  5. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocherginskaya, S.A.; Cann, I.K.O.; Mackie, R.I.

    2005-01-01

    It is worthwhile considering that only some 30 species make up the bulk of the bacterial population in human faeces at any one time based on the classical cultivation-based approach. The situation in the rumen is similar. Thus, it is practical to focus on specific groups of interest within the complex community. These may be the predominant or the most active species, specific physiological groups or readily identifiable (genetic) clusters of phylogenetically related organisms. Several 16S rDNA fingerprinting techniques can be invaluable for selecting and monitoring sequences or phylogenetic groups of interest and are described below. Over the past few decades, considerable attention was focussed on the identification of pure cultures of microbes on the basis of genetic polymorphisms of DNA encoding rRNA such as ribotyping, amplified fragment length polymorphism and randomly amplified polymorphic DNA. However, many of these methods require prior cultivation and are less suitable for use in analysis of complex mixed populations although important in describing cultivated microbial diversity in molecular terms. Much less attention was given to molecular characterization of complex communities. In particular, research into diversity and community structure over time has been revolutionized by the advent of molecular fingerprinting techniques for complex communities. Denaturing or temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE/TGGE) methods have been successfully applied to the analysis of human, pig, cattle, dog and rodent intestinal populations

  6. Air temperature gradient in large industrial hall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpuk, Michał; Pełech, Aleksander; Przydróżny, Edward; Walaszczyk, Juliusz; Szczęśniak, Sylwia

    2017-11-01

    In the rooms with dominant sensible heat load, volume airflow depends on many factors incl. pre-established temperature difference between exhaust and supply airflow. As the temperature difference is getting higher, airflow volume drops down, consequently, the cost of AHU is reduced. In high industrial halls with air exhaust grids located under the ceiling additional temperature gradient above working zone should be taken into consideration. In this regard, experimental research of the vertical air temperature gradient in high industrial halls were carried out for the case of mixing ventilation system The paper presents the results of air temperature distribution measurements in high technological hall (mechanically ventilated) under significant sensible heat load conditions. The supply airflow was delivered to the hall with the help of the swirl diffusers while exhaust grids were located under the hall ceiling. Basing on the air temperature distribution measurements performed on the seven pre-established levels, air temperature gradient in the area between 2.0 and 7.0 m above the floor was calculated and analysed.

  7. The geomagnetic field gradient tensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotsiaros, Stavros; Olsen, Nils

    2012-01-01

    We develop the general mathematical basis for space magnetic gradiometry in spherical coordinates. The magnetic gradient tensor is a second rank tensor consisting of 3 × 3 = 9 spatial derivatives. Since the geomagnetic field vector B is always solenoidal (∇ · B = 0) there are only eight independent...... tensor elements. Furthermore, in current free regions the magnetic gradient tensor becomes symmetric, further reducing the number of independent elements to five. In that case B is a Laplacian potential field and the gradient tensor can be expressed in series of spherical harmonics. We present properties...... of the magnetic gradient tensor and provide explicit expressions of its elements in terms of spherical harmonics. Finally we discuss the benefit of using gradient measurements for exploring the Earth’s magnetic field from space, in particular the advantage of the various tensor elements for a better determination...

  8. Biocrust spatial distribution at landscape scale is strongly controlled by terrain attributes: Topographic thresholds for colonization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raúl Román Fernández, José; Rodríguez-Caballero, Emilio; Chamizo de la Piedra, Sonia; Roncero Ramos, Bea; Cantón Castilla, Yolanda

    2017-04-01

    radiation, was mostly controlled by incoming solar radiation, being mostly located on areas with high incoming solar radiation and low slope, showing a threshold at 48 degrees from which they are not found. Lichen-dominated biocrust, on the other hand, colonize the uppermost and steepest part of north aspect hillslopes where incoming solar radiation and ETP are low, as consequence of their lower capacity to survive under extreme temperatures and drought conditions. With higher capacity of the soil to retain run-on (WI), surface is mostly cover by plants instead of lichens. Bare soil distribution is controlled by the combination of two factors, slope and solar radiation, covering the south aspect hillslopes, where slope gradient is high and there is high incoming solar radiation and ETP for lichen colonization.

  9. The abundance threshold for plague as a critical percolation phenomenon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, S; Trapman, P; Leirs, H; Begon, M; Heesterbeek, J A P

    2008-07-31

    Percolation theory is most commonly associated with the slow flow of liquid through a porous medium, with applications to the physical sciences. Epidemiological applications have been anticipated for disease systems where the host is a plant or volume of soil, and hence is fixed in space. However, no natural examples have been reported. The central question of interest in percolation theory, the possibility of an infinite connected cluster, corresponds in infectious disease to a positive probability of an epidemic. Archived records of plague (infection with Yersinia pestis) in populations of great gerbils (Rhombomys opimus) in Kazakhstan have been used to show that epizootics only occur when more than about 0.33 of the burrow systems built by the host are occupied by family groups. The underlying mechanism for this abundance threshold is unknown. Here we present evidence that it is a percolation threshold, which arises from the difference in scale between the movements that transport infectious fleas between family groups and the vast size of contiguous landscapes colonized by gerbils. Conventional theory predicts that abundance thresholds for the spread of infectious disease arise when transmission between hosts is density dependent such that the basic reproduction number (R(0)) increases with abundance, attaining 1 at the threshold. Percolation thresholds, however, are separate, spatially explicit thresholds that indicate long-range connectivity in a system and do not coincide with R(0) = 1. Abundance thresholds are the theoretical basis for attempts to manage infectious disease by reducing the abundance of susceptibles, including vaccination and the culling of wildlife. This first natural example of a percolation threshold in a disease system invites a re-appraisal of other invasion thresholds, such as those for epidemic viral infections in African lions (Panthera leo), and of other disease systems such as bovine tuberculosis (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) in

  10. Systemic inflammation decreases pain threshold in humans in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Goeij, Moniek; van Eijk, Lucas T; Vanelderen, Pascal; Wilder-Smith, Oliver H; Vissers, Kris C; van der Hoeven, Johannes G; Kox, Matthijs; Scheffer, Gert Jan; Pickkers, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hyperalgesia is a well recognized hallmark of disease. Pro-inflammatory cytokines have been suggested to be mainly responsible, but human data are scarce. Changes in pain threshold during systemic inflammation evoked by human endotoxemia, were evaluated with three quantitative sensory testing methods. Pressure pain thresholds, electrical pain thresholds and tolerance to the cold pressor test were measured before and 2 hours after the intravenous administration of 2 ng/kg purified E. coli endotoxin in 27 healthy volunteers. Another 20 subjects not exposed to endotoxemia served as controls. Endotoxemia led to a rise in body temperature and inflammatory symptom scores and a rise in plasma TNF-α, IL-6, IL-10 and IL-1RA. During endotoxemia, pressure pain thresholds and electrical pain thresholds were reduced with 20 ± 4 % and 13 ± 3 %, respectively. In controls only a minor decrease in pressure pain thresholds (7 ± 3 %) and no change in electrical pain thresholds occurred. Endotoxin-treated subjects experienced more pain during the cold pressor test, and fewer subjects were able to complete the cold pressor test measurement, while in controls the cold pressor test results were not altered. Peak levels and area under curves of each individual cytokine did not correlate to a change in pain threshold measured by one of the applied quantitative sensory testing techniques. In conclusion, this study shows that systemic inflammation elicited by the administration of endotoxin to humans, results in lowering of the pain threshold measured by 3 quantitative sensory testing techniques. The current work provides additional evidence that systemic inflammation is accompanied by changes in pain perception.

  11. Velocity gradient as a tool to characterise the link between mixing and biogas production in anaerobic waste digesters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindall, R; Bridgeman, J; Carliell-Marquet, C

    2013-01-01

    Whilst the importance of mixing in anaerobic digesters to enhance process performance and gas production is well recognised, the specific effects of mixing regime on biogas production are not clear. Here, the velocity gradient is used to demonstrate the importance of minimally mixed zones in a digester, with computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models indicating that 20-85% of a laboratory-scale digester experiences local velocity gradients of less than 10 s⁻¹, dependent on mixing speed. Experimental results indicate that there is a threshold above which increased mixing speed (and hence velocity gradient) becomes counter-productive and biogas production falls. The effects of minimal mixing on digester microbiology are considered with the creation or destruction of localised pockets of high acetate concentration providing a possible explanation for the velocity gradient threshold. The identification of this threshold represents a valuable contribution to the understanding of the effects of mixing on gas production in anaerobic digesters.

  12. Magnetoelectric Transverse Gradient Sensor with High Detection Sensitivity and Low Gradient Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingji Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report, theoretically and experimentally, the realization of a high detection performance in a novel magnetoelectric (ME transverse gradient sensor based on the large ME effect and the magnetic field gradient (MFG technique in a pair of magnetically-biased, electrically-shielded, and mechanically-enclosed ME composites having a transverse orientation and an axial separation. The output voltage of the gradient sensor is directly obtained from the transverse MFG-induced difference in ME voltage between the two ME composites and is calibrated against transverse MFGs to give a high detection sensitivity of 0.4–30.6 V/(T/m, a strong common-mode magnetic field noise rejection rate of <−14.5 dB, a small input-output nonlinearity of <10 ppm, and a low gradient noise of 0.16–620 nT/m/ Hz in a broad frequency range of 1 Hz–170 kHz under a small baseline of 35 mm. An analysis of experimental gradient noise spectra obtained in a magnetically-unshielded laboratory environment reveals the domination of the pink (1/f noise, dielectric loss noise, and power-frequency noise below 3 kHz, in addition to the circuit noise above 3 kHz, in the gradient sensor. The high detection performance, together with the added merit of passive and direct ME conversion by the large ME effect in the ME composites, makes the gradient sensor suitable for the passive, direct, and broadband detection of transverse MFGs.

  13. Gradient zone boundary control in salt gradient solar ponds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hull, John R. (Downers Grove, IL)

    1984-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing zone boundary migration in a salt gradient solar pond includes extending perforated membranes across the pond at the boundaries, between the convective and non-convective zones, the perforations being small enough in size to prevent individual turbulence disturbances from penetrating the hole, but being large enough to allow easy molecular diffusion of salt thereby preventing the formation of convective zones in the gradient layer. The total area of the perforations is a sizable fraction of the membrane area to allow sufficient salt diffusion while preventing turbulent entrainment into the gradient zone.

  14. Elicitation threshold of cobalt chloride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise A; Johansen, Jeanne D; Voelund, Aage

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cobalt is a strong skin sensitizer (grade 5 of 5 in the guinea-pig maximization test) that is used in various industrial and consumer applications. To prevent sensitization to cobalt and elicitation of allergic cobalt dermatitis, information about the elicitation threshold level...... of cobalt is important. OBJECTIVE: To identify the dermatitis elicitation threshold levels in cobalt-allergic individuals. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Published patch test dose-response studies were reviewed to determine the elicitation dose (ED) levels in dermatitis patients with a previous positive patch test...... reaction to cobalt. A logistic dose-response model was applied to data collected from the published literature to estimate ED values. The 95% confidence interval (CI) for the ratio of mean doses that can elicit a reaction in 10% (ED(10)) of a population was calculated with Fieller's method. RESULTS...

  15. Scaling behavior of threshold epidemics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2012-05-01

    We study the classic Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR) model for the spread of an infectious disease. In this stochastic process, there are two competing mechanism: infection and recovery. Susceptible individuals may contract the disease from infected individuals, while infected ones recover from the disease at a constant rate and are never infected again. Our focus is the behavior at the epidemic threshold where the rates of the infection and recovery processes balance. In the infinite population limit, we establish analytically scaling rules for the time-dependent distribution functions that characterize the sizes of the infected and the recovered sub-populations. Using heuristic arguments, we also obtain scaling laws for the size and duration of the epidemic outbreaks as a function of the total population. We perform numerical simulations to verify the scaling predictions and discuss the consequences of these scaling laws for near-threshold epidemic outbreaks.

  16. Roots at the Percolation Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, E.; Ahmed, M. A.; Kaestner, A.; Vontobel, P.; Zarebanadkouki, M.; Carminati, A.

    2014-12-01

    Much of the carbon assimilated by plants during photosynthesis is lost to the soil via rhizodepositions. One component of rhizopdeposition is mucilage, a hydrogel that dramatically alters the soil physical properties. Mucilage was assumed to explain unexpectedly low rhizosphere rewetting rates during irrigation (Carminati et al. 2010) and temporarily water repellency in the rhizosphere after severe drying (Moradi et al. 2012).Here, we present an experimental and theoretical study for the rewetting behaviour of a soil mixed with mucilage, which was used as an analogue of the rhizosphere. Our samples were made of two layers of untreated soils separated by a thin layer (ca. 1 mm) of soil treated with mucilage. We prepared soil columns of varying particle size, mucilage concentration and height of the middle layer above the water table. The dry soil columns were re-wetted by capillary rise from the bottom.The rewetting of the middle layer showed a distinct dual behavior. For mucilage concentrations lower than a certain threshold, water could cross the thin layer almost immediately after rewetting of bulk soil. At slightly higher mucilage concentrations, the thin layer was almost impermeable. The mucilage concentration at the threshold strongly depended on particle size: the smaller the particle size the larger the soil specific surface and the more mucilage was needed to cover the entire particle surface and to induce water repellency.We applied a classic pore network model to simulate the experimental observations. In the model a certain fraction of nodes were randomly disconnected to reproduce the effect of mucilage in temporarily blocking the flow. The percolation model could qualitatively reproduce well the threshold characteristics of the experiments. Our experiments, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively

  17. Realistic Realizations Of Threshold Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razavi, Hassan M.

    1987-08-01

    Threshold logic, in which each input is weighted, has many theoretical advantages over the standard gate realization, such as reducing the number of gates, interconnections, and power dissipation. However, because of the difficult synthesis procedure and complicated circuit implementation, their use in the design of digital systems is almost nonexistant. In this study, three methods of NMOS realizations are discussed, and their advantages and shortcomings are explored. Also, the possibility of using the methods to realize multi-valued logic is examined.

  18. Root finding with threshold circuits

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jeřábek, Emil

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 462, Nov 30 (2012), s. 59-69 ISSN 0304-3975 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100190902; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional support: RVO:67985840 Keywords : root finding * threshold circuit * power series Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics Impact factor: 0.489, year: 2012 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0304397512008006#

  19. A refractive index gradient (RING) diagnostic for transient discharges or expansions of vapor or plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuneo, M.E.; Lockner, T.R.; Tisone, G.C.

    1991-01-01

    The Refractive Index Gradient (RING) diagnostic described in this paper uses a fast, silicon, photodiode quadrant detector with a differential amplifier to temporally detect the refraction of a CW laser by transient discharges or expansions of vapor, gas, or plasma. The method is a local, one-dimensional, time-resolved, quantitative, species-discriminating (i.e., atoms or electrons) Schlieren technique. The diagnostic is easy to field, sensitive (minimum deflection angles detectable ∼ 0.3 μrad), and fast (risetime = 11 ± 1 ns). Circuit design, performance, and diagnostic theory will be discussed. The RING diagnostic has been applied to measurements on several ion sources under development at Sandia National Laboratory for use on intense applied-B ion diodes in the light ion-beam fusion program. Sources studied include different types of flashboards, a thermal evaporation lithium ion source, and a laser-produced ion source. Measurements have been made both in labs and directly on large pulsed power accelerators. In this paper to illustrate the utility of this technique, examples of measurements on LEVIS (Laser Evaporation Ion Source), a laser-produced, active, lithium ion source are given. Measured properties include vapor/plasma production thresholds, expansion velocities, and time-resolved gradient and density spatial profiles. Comparisons of the RING results with measurement using a Faraday cup and a double-floating Langmuir probe are presented

  20. What Is the Best Way to Contour Lung Tumors on PET Scans? Multiobserver Validation of a Gradient-Based Method Using a NSCLC Digital PET Phantom

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werner-Wasik, Maria; Nelson, Arden D.; Choi, Walter; Arai, Yoshio; Faulhaber, Peter F.; Kang, Patrick; Almeida, Fabio D.; Xiao, Ying; Ohri, Nitin; Brockway, Kristin D.; Piper, Jonathan W.; Nelson, Aaron S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the accuracy and consistency of a gradient-based positron emission tomography (PET) segmentation method, GRADIENT, compared with manual (MANUAL) and constant threshold (THRESHOLD) methods. Methods and Materials: Contouring accuracy was evaluated with sphere phantoms and clinically realistic Monte Carlo PET phantoms of the thorax. The sphere phantoms were 10–37 mm in diameter and were acquired at five institutions emulating clinical conditions. One institution also acquired a sphere phantom with multiple source-to-background ratios of 2:1, 5:1, 10:1, 20:1, and 70:1. One observer segmented (contoured) each sphere with GRADIENT and THRESHOLD from 25% to 50% at 5% increments. Subsequently, seven physicians segmented 31 lesions (7–264 mL) from 25 digital thorax phantoms using GRADIENT, THRESHOLD, and MANUAL. Results: For spheres 20 mm (p < 0.065) and <20 mm (p < 0.015). For digital thorax phantoms, GRADIENT was the most accurate (p < 0.01), with a mean absolute % error in volume of 10.99% (11.9% SD), followed by 25% THRESHOLD at 17.5% (29.4% SD), and MANUAL at 19.5% (17.2% SD). GRADIENT had the least systematic bias, with a mean % error in volume of –0.05% (16.2% SD) compared with 25% THRESHOLD at –2.1% (34.2% SD) and MANUAL at –16.3% (20.2% SD; p value <0.01). Interobserver variability was reduced using GRADIENT compared with both 25% THRESHOLD and MANUAL (p value <0.01, Levene’s test). Conclusion: GRADIENT was the most accurate and consistent technique for target volume contouring. GRADIENT was also the most robust for varying imaging conditions. GRADIENT has the potential to play an important role for tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning and response assessment.

  1. Stroke rehabilitation reaches a threshold.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheol E Han

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Motor training with the upper limb affected by stroke partially reverses the loss of cortical representation after lesion and has been proposed to increase spontaneous arm use. Moreover, repeated attempts to use the affected hand in daily activities create a form of practice that can potentially lead to further improvement in motor performance. We thus hypothesized that if motor retraining after stroke increases spontaneous arm use sufficiently, then the patient will enter a virtuous circle in which spontaneous arm use and motor performance reinforce each other. In contrast, if the dose of therapy is not sufficient to bring spontaneous use above threshold, then performance will not increase and the patient will further develop compensatory strategies with the less affected hand. To refine this hypothesis, we developed a computational model of bilateral hand use in arm reaching to study the interactions between adaptive decision making and motor relearning after motor cortex lesion. The model contains a left and a right motor cortex, each controlling the opposite arm, and a single action choice module. The action choice module learns, via reinforcement learning, the value of using each arm for reaching in specific directions. Each motor cortex uses a neural population code to specify the initial direction along which the contralateral hand moves towards a target. The motor cortex learns to minimize directional errors and to maximize neuronal activity for each movement. The derived learning rule accounts for the reversal of the loss of cortical representation after rehabilitation and the increase of this loss after stroke with insufficient rehabilitation. Further, our model exhibits nonlinear and bistable behavior: if natural recovery, motor training, or both, brings performance above a certain threshold, then training can be stopped, as the repeated spontaneous arm use provides a form of motor learning that further bootstraps performance and

  2. Dynamic multiple thresholding breast boundary detection algorithm for mammograms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Yi-Ta; Zhou Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Paramagul, Chintana; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Daly, Caroline Plowden; Douglas, Julie A.; Zhang Yiheng; Sahiner, Berkman; Shi Jiazheng; Wei Jun

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Automated detection of breast boundary is one of the fundamental steps for computer-aided analysis of mammograms. In this study, the authors developed a new dynamic multiple thresholding based breast boundary (MTBB) detection method for digitized mammograms. Methods: A large data set of 716 screen-film mammograms (442 CC view and 274 MLO view) obtained from consecutive cases of an Institutional Review Board approved project were used. An experienced breast radiologist manually traced the breast boundary on each digitized image using a graphical interface to provide a reference standard. The initial breast boundary (MTBB-Initial) was obtained by dynamically adapting the threshold to the gray level range in local regions of the breast periphery. The initial breast boundary was then refined by using gradient information from horizontal and vertical Sobel filtering to obtain the final breast boundary (MTBB-Final). The accuracy of the breast boundary detection algorithm was evaluated by comparison with the reference standard using three performance metrics: The Hausdorff distance (HDist), the average minimum Euclidean distance (AMinDist), and the area overlap measure (AOM). Results: In comparison with the authors' previously developed gradient-based breast boundary (GBB) algorithm, it was found that 68%, 85%, and 94% of images had HDist errors less than 6 pixels (4.8 mm) for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. 89%, 90%, and 96% of images had AMinDist errors less than 1.5 pixels (1.2 mm) for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. 96%, 98%, and 99% of images had AOM values larger than 0.9 for GBB, MTBB-Initial, and MTBB-Final, respectively. The improvement by the MTBB-Final method was statistically significant for all the evaluation measures by the Wilcoxon signed rank test (p<0.0001). Conclusions: The MTBB approach that combined dynamic multiple thresholding and gradient information provided better performance than the breast boundary

  3. Rainbow refractometry on particles with radial refractive index gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saengkaew, Sawitree [CNRS/Universite et INSA de Rouen, UMR 6614/CORIA, BP12, 76 800, Saint Etienne du Rouvray CEDEX (France); Chulalongkorn University, Center of Excellence in Particle Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand); Charinpanitkul, Tawatchai; Vanisri, Hathaichanok; Tanthapanichakoon, Wiwut [Chulalongkorn University, Center of Excellence in Particle Technology, Faculty of Engineering, Bangkok (Thailand); Biscos, Yves; Garcia, Nicolas; Lavergne, Gerard [ONERA/DMAE, Toulouse (France); Mees, Loic; Gouesbet, Gerard; Grehan, Gerard [CNRS/Universite et INSA de Rouen, UMR 6614/CORIA, BP12, 76 800, Saint Etienne du Rouvray CEDEX (France)

    2007-10-15

    The rainbow refractrometry, under its different configurations (classical and global), is an attractive technique to extract information from droplets in evaporation such as diameter and temperature. Recently a new processing strategy has been developed which increases dramatically the size and refractive index measurements accuracy for homogeneous droplets. Nevertheless, for mono component as well as for multicomponent droplets, the presence of temperature and/or of concentration gradients induce the presence of a gradient of refractive index which affects the interpretation of the recorded signals. In this publication, the effect of radial gradient on rainbow measurements with a high accuracy never reached previously is quantified. (orig.)

  4. Strain gradients in epitaxial ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catalan, G.; Noheda, B.; McAneney, J.; Sinnamon, L.J.; Gregg, J.M.

    2005-01-01

    X-ray analysis of ferroelectric thin layers of Ba 1/2 Sr 1/2 TiO 3 with different thicknesses reveals the presence of strain gradients across the films and allows us to propose a functional form for the internal strain profile. We use this to calculate the influence of strain gradient, through flexoelectric coupling, on the degradation of the ferroelectric properties of films with decreasing thickness, in excellent agreement with the observed behavior. This paper shows that strain relaxation can lead to smooth, continuous gradients across hundreds of nanometers, and it highlights the pressing need to avoid such strain gradients in order to obtain ferroelectric films with bulklike properties

  5. Gradient Index Optics at DARPA

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    sodium, is submerged into a bath of molten salt containing a different ion, such as lithium bromide. Ions from the salt bath diffuse into the glass...molecules, creating a gradient of index of refraction (Mohr et al. 1979). • Crystal growing. From a silver- chloride /sodium- chloride bath, starting with a...sodium chloride seed, a crystal is pulled that begins to deplete the sodium in the bath and starts to pull silver, forming a gradient (Houde-Walter

  6. Stochastic Gradient Monomial Gamma Sampler

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yizhe; Chen, Changyou; Gan, Zhe; Henao, Ricardo; Carin, Lawrence

    2017-01-01

    Recent advances in stochastic gradient techniques have made it possible to estimate posterior distributions from large datasets via Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC). However, when the target posterior is multimodal, mixing performance is often poor. This results in inadequate exploration of the posterior distribution. A framework is proposed to improve the sampling efficiency of stochastic gradient MCMC, based on Hamiltonian Monte Carlo. A generalized kinetic function is leveraged, delivering ...

  7. Granular motions near the threshold of entrainment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valyrakis, Manousos; Alexakis, athanasios-Theodosios

    2016-04-01

    Our society is continuously impacted by significant weather events many times resulting in catastrophes that interrupt our normal way of life. In the context of climate change and increasing urbanisation these "extreme" hydrologic events are intensified both in magnitude and frequency, inducing costs of the order of billions of pounds. The vast majority of such costs and impacts (even more to developed societies) are due to water related catastrophes such as the geomorphic action of flowing water (including scouring of critical infrastructure, bed and bank destabilisation) and flooding. New tools and radically novel concepts are in need, to enable our society becoming more resilient. This presentation, emphasises the utility of inertial sensors in gaining new insights on the interaction of flow hydrodynamics with the granular surface at the particle scale and for near threshold flow conditions. In particular, new designs of the "smart-sphere" device are discussed with focus on the purpose specific sets of flume experiments, designed to identify the exact response of the particle resting at the bed surface for various below, near and above threshold flow conditions. New sets of measurements are presented for particle entrainment from a Lagrangian viewpoint. Further to finding direct application in addressing real world challenges in the water sector, it is shown that such novel sensor systems can also help the research community (both experimentalists and computational modellers) gain a better insight on the underlying processes governing granular dynamics.

  8. Colour thresholding and objective quantification in bioimaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermin, C. D.; Gerber, M. A.; Torre-Bueno, J. R.

    1992-01-01

    Computer imaging is rapidly becoming an indispensable tool for the quantification of variables in research and medicine. Whilst its use in medicine has largely been limited to qualitative observations, imaging in applied basic sciences, medical research and biotechnology demands objective quantification of the variables in question. In black and white densitometry (0-256 levels of intensity) the separation of subtle differences between closely related hues from stains is sometimes very difficult. True-colour and real-time video microscopy analysis offer choices not previously available with monochrome systems. In this paper we demonstrate the usefulness of colour thresholding, which has so far proven indispensable for proper objective quantification of the products of histochemical reactions and/or subtle differences in tissue and cells. In addition, we provide interested, but untrained readers with basic information that may assist decisions regarding the most suitable set-up for a project under consideration. Data from projects in progress at Tulane are shown to illustrate the advantage of colour thresholding over monochrome densitometry and for objective quantification of subtle colour differences between experimental and control samples.

  9. Optimizing Systems of Threshold Detection Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Banschbach, David C

    2008-01-01

    .... Below the threshold all signals are ignored. We develop a mathematical model for setting individual sensor thresholds to obtain optimal probability of detecting a significant event, given a limit on the total number of false positives allowed...

  10. Nuclear thermodynamics below particle threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, A.; Agvaanluvsan, U.; Algin, E.; Bagheri, A.; Chankova, R.; Guttormsen, M.; Hjorth-Jensen, M.; Rekstad, J.; Siem, S.; Sunde, A. C.; Voinov, A.

    2005-01-01

    From a starting point of experimentally measured nuclear level densities, we discuss thermodynamical properties of nuclei below the particle emission threshold. Since nuclei are essentially mesoscopic systems, a straightforward generalization of macroscopic ensemble theory often yields unphysical results. A careful critique of traditional thermodynamical concepts reveals problems commonly encountered in mesoscopic systems. One of which is the fact that microcanonical and canonical ensemble theory yield different results, another concerns the introduction of temperature for small, closed systems. Finally, the concept of phase transitions is investigated for mesoscopic systems

  11. Formation of large-scale structures with sharp density gradient through Rayleigh-Taylor growth in a two-dimensional slab under the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, R.; Hatori, T.; Miura, H.; Ito, A.; Sato, M.

    2015-01-01

    Two-fluid and the finite Larmor effects on linear and nonlinear growth of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability in a two-dimensional slab are studied numerically with special attention to high-wave-number dynamics and nonlinear structure formation at a low β-value. The two effects stabilize the unstable high wave number modes for a certain range of the β-value. In nonlinear simulations, the absence of the high wave number modes in the linear stage leads to the formation of the density field structure much larger than that in the single-fluid magnetohydrodynamic simulation, together with a sharp density gradient as well as a large velocity difference. The formation of the sharp velocity difference leads to a subsequent Kelvin-Helmholtz-type instability only when both the two-fluid and finite Larmor radius terms are incorporated, whereas it is not observed otherwise. It is shown that the emergence of the secondary instability can modify the outline of the turbulent structures associated with the primary Rayleigh-Taylor instability

  12. Gradients estimation from random points with volumetric tensor in turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tomoaki; Nagata, Koji

    2017-12-01

    We present an estimation method of fully-resolved/coarse-grained gradients from randomly distributed points in turbulence. The method is based on a linear approximation of spatial gradients expressed with the volumetric tensor, which is a 3 × 3 matrix determined by a geometric distribution of the points. The coarse grained gradient can be considered as a low pass filtered gradient, whose cutoff is estimated with the eigenvalues of the volumetric tensor. The present method, the volumetric tensor approximation, is tested for velocity and passive scalar gradients in incompressible planar jet and mixing layer. Comparison with a finite difference approximation on a Cartesian grid shows that the volumetric tensor approximation computes the coarse grained gradients fairly well at a moderate computational cost under various conditions of spatial distributions of points. We also show that imposing the solenoidal condition improves the accuracy of the present method for solenoidal vectors, such as a velocity vector in incompressible flows, especially when the number of the points is not large. The volumetric tensor approximation with 4 points poorly estimates the gradient because of anisotropic distribution of the points. Increasing the number of points from 4 significantly improves the accuracy. Although the coarse grained gradient changes with the cutoff length, the volumetric tensor approximation yields the coarse grained gradient whose magnitude is close to the one obtained by the finite difference. We also show that the velocity gradient estimated with the present method well captures the turbulence characteristics such as local flow topology, amplification of enstrophy and strain, and energy transfer across scales.

  13. Setting conservation management thresholds using a novel participatory modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, P F E; de Bie, K; Rumpff, L

    2015-10-01

    We devised a participatory modeling approach for setting management thresholds that show when management intervention is required to address undesirable ecosystem changes. This approach was designed to be used when management thresholds: must be set for environmental indicators in the face of multiple competing objectives; need to incorporate scientific understanding and value judgments; and will be set by participants with limited modeling experience. We applied our approach to a case study where management thresholds were set for a mat-forming brown alga, Hormosira banksii, in a protected area management context. Participants, including management staff and scientists, were involved in a workshop to test the approach, and set management thresholds to address the threat of trampling by visitors to an intertidal rocky reef. The approach involved trading off the environmental objective, to maintain the condition of intertidal reef communities, with social and economic objectives to ensure management intervention was cost-effective. Ecological scenarios, developed using scenario planning, were a key feature that provided the foundation for where to set management thresholds. The scenarios developed represented declines in percent cover of H. banksii that may occur under increased threatening processes. Participants defined 4 discrete management alternatives to address the threat of trampling and estimated the effect of these alternatives on the objectives under each ecological scenario. A weighted additive model was used to aggregate participants' consequence estimates. Model outputs (decision scores) clearly expressed uncertainty, which can be considered by decision makers and used to inform where to set management thresholds. This approach encourages a proactive form of conservation, where management thresholds and associated actions are defined a priori for ecological indicators, rather than reacting to unexpected ecosystem changes in the future. © 2015 The

  14. Use of Ground Penetrating Radar to Study Gradient Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titov, A.

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) is often used to solve different problems of applied geophysics including the hydrological ones. This work was motivated by detection of weak reflections in the body of water observed during the surveys on the freshwater lakes using GPR. The same reflections were first analyzed by John Bradford in 2007. These reflections can arise from the thermal gradient layer or thermocline due to different dielectric permittivity of cold and warm water. We employed physical and mathematical modeling to identify the properties of such thermoclines. We have constructed a special GPR stand to study the gradient media in our laboratory. The stand consists of a water-filled plastic tank and plastic tubes, which gather the cold water under the warm water. Our stand allows for changing parameters of the gradient layer, such as limits of dielectric permittivity and the thickness of the gradient layer. GPR antenna was placed slightly under the water surface to remove the parasitic reflections. To visualize the thermal distribution, an infrared camera and thermal sensors were used. Analysis of the GPR traces after physical modeling, performed in the MATLAB environment, allows us to locate the weak reflection from the gradient layer. We observed that (i) the change of the gradient boundary values alters the amplitude of the signal, (ii) the arrival time of the impulse reflected from the gradient layer corresponds to the arrival time of the impulse reflected from the top boundary of this layer, and (iii) the shape of the signal reflected from the gradient layer coincides with the shape of the signal reflected from the non-gradient boundary between two bodies. The quantitative properties of thermocline can be determined using amplitude analysis of GPR signals. Finally, the developed methods were successfully applied to real field data.

  15. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Student Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Kyng, Tim; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.

    2015-01-01

    Finance threshold concepts are the essential conceptual knowledge that underpin well-developed financial capabilities and are central to the mastery of finance. In this paper we investigate threshold concepts in finance from the point of view of students, by establishing the extent to which students are aware of threshold concepts identified by…

  16. Development of a wave-induced forcing threshold for nearshore impact of Wave Energy Converter arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dea, A.; Haller, M. C.; Ozkan-Haller, H. T.

    2016-02-01

    Wave-induced forcing is a function of spatial gradients in the wave radiation stresses and is the main driver of alongshore currents, rip currents, and nearshore sediment transport. The installation of nearshore Wave Energy Converter (WEC) arrays may cause significant changes in the surf zone radiation stresses and could therefore impact nearshore littoral processes. In the first part of this study, a new threshold for nearshore hydrodynamic impact due to the presence of WEC devices is established based on changes in the alongshore radiation stress gradients shoreward of WEC arrays. The threshold is defined based on the relationship between nearshore radiation stresses and alongshore currents as observed in field data. Next, we perform a parametric study of the nearshore impact of WEC arrays using the SWAN wave model. Trials are conducted on an idealized, alongshore-uniform beach with a range of WEC array configurations, locations, and incident wave conditions, and conditions that generate radiation stress gradients above the impact threshold are identified. Finally, the same methodology is applied to two wave energy test sites off the coast of Newport, OR with more complicated bathymetries. Although the trends at the field sites are similar to those seen in the parametric study, the location and extent of the changes in the alongshore radiation stress gradients appear to be heavily influenced by the local bathymetry.

  17. Threshold enhancement of diphoton resonances

    CERN Document Server

    Bharucha, Aoife; Goudelis, Andreas

    2016-10-10

    The data collected by the LHC collaborations at an energy of 13 TeV indicates the presence of an excess in the diphoton spectrum that would correspond to a resonance of a 750 GeV mass. The apparently large production cross section is nevertheless very difficult to explain in minimal models. We consider the possibility that the resonance is a pseudoscalar boson $A$ with a two--photon decay mediated by a charged and uncolored fermion having a mass at the $\\frac12 M_A$ threshold and a very small decay width, $\\ll 1$ MeV; one can then generate a large enhancement of the $A\\gamma\\gamma$ amplitude which explains the excess without invoking a large multiplicity of particles propagating in the loop, large electric charges and/or very strong Yukawa couplings. The implications of such a threshold enhancement are discussed in two explicit scenarios: i) the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model in which the $A$ state is produced via the top quark mediated gluon fusion process and decays into photons predominantly through...

  18. Self-pulsation threshold of Raman amplified Brillouin fiber cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, Johan Raunkjær; Pedersen, Martin Erland Vestergaard; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    An implicit equation for the oscillation threshold of stimulated Brillouin scattering from Raman amplified signals in fibers with external feedback is derived under the assumption of no depletion. This is compared to numerical investigations of Raman amplification schemes showing good agreement...

  19. THRESHOLD OF SIGNIFICANCE IN STRESS MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena RUSE

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Stress management is the individual's ability to handle any situation, external conditions, to match the demands of the external environment. The researchers revealed several stages in the stress response. A first phase was called ‘‘alert reaction'' or ‘‘immediate reaction to stress‘‘, phase in which there are physiological modifications and manifestations that occur under psychological aspect. Adaptation phase is the phase in which the reactions from the first phase diminishes or disappears. Exhaustion phase is related to the diversity of stress factors and time and may exceed the resources of the human body to adapt. Influencing factors may be: limited, cognitive, perceptual, and a priori. But there is a threshold of significance in stress management. Once the reaction to external stimuli occurs, awareness is needed. The capability effect occurs, any side effect goes away and comes out the ''I AM'' effect.

  20. Diffusiophoresis in one-dimensional solute gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ault, Jesse T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Warren, Patrick B. [Unilever R& D Port Sunlight, Bebington (United Kingdom); Shin, Sangwoo [Univ. of Hawaii at Manoa, Honolulu, HI (United States); Stone, Howard A. [Princeton Univ., Princeton, NJ (United States)

    2017-11-06

    Here, the diffusiophoretic motion of suspended colloidal particles under one-dimensional solute gradients is solved using numerical and analytical techniques. Similarity solutions are developed for the injection and withdrawal dynamics of particles into semi-infinite pores. Furthermore, a method of characteristics formulation of the diffusion-free particle transport model is presented and integrated to realize particle trajectories. Analytical solutions are presented for the limit of small particle diffusiophoretic mobility Γp relative to the solute diffusivity Ds for particle motions in both semi-infinite and finite domains. Results confirm the build up of local maxima and minima in the propagating particle front dynamics. The method of characteristics is shown to successfully predict particle motions and the position of the particle front, although it fails to accurately predict suspended particle concentrations in the vicinity of sharp gradients, such as at the particle front peak seen in some injection cases, where particle diffusion inevitably plays an important role. Results inform the design of applications in which the use of applied solute gradients can greatly enhance particle injection into and withdrawal from pores.

  1. CERN/KEK: Very high accelerating gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    Full text: A world-wide effort is under way to develop linear electron-positron colliders so that physics experiments can be extended into a range of energies where circular machines (necessarily much larger than CERN's 27-kilometre LEP machine) would be crippled by synchrotron radiation. CERN is studying the feasibility of building a 2 TeV machine called CLIC powered not by individual klystrons, but by a high intensity electron 'drive' linac running parallel to the main linac (November 1990, page 7). This drive linac will itself be powered by similar superconducting cavities to those developed for LEP. A high gradient is an obvious design aim for any future high energy linear collider because it makes it shorter and therefore cheaper - the design figure for the CLIC machine is 80 MV/m. The CLIC study group has taken a significant step forward in demonstrating the technical feasibility of their machine by achieving peak and average accelerating gradients of 137 MV/m and 84 MV/m respectively in a short section of accelerating structure during high gradient tests at the Japanese KEK Laboratory last year. This result obtained within the framework of a CERN/KEK collaboration on linear colliders was obtained using a 20-cell accelerating section built at CERN using state-of the- art technology which served both as a model for CLIC studies as well as a prototype for the Japanese Linear Collider studies. The operating frequency of the model accelerating section is 2.6 times lower than the CLIC frequency but was chosen because a high power r.f. source and pulse compression scheme has been developed for this frequency at KEK. Testing CLIC models at 11.4 GHz is however more stringent than at 30 GHz because the chance of electrical breakdown increases as the frequency is lowered. This recent result clearly demonstrates that a gradient of 80 MV/m is feasible

  2. PET/MR Synchronization by Detection of Switching Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissler, Bjoern; Gebhardt, Pierre; Lerche, Christoph W.; Soultanidis, Georgios M.; Wehner, Jakob; Heberling, Dirk; Schulz, Volkmar

    2015-06-01

    The full potential of simultaneous Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) acquisition, such as dynamic studies or motion compensation, can only be explored if the data of both modalities is temporally synchronized. As such hybrid imaging systems are commonly realized as custom-made PET inserts for commercially available MRI scanner, a synchronization solution has to be implemented (depending on the vendor of the MRI system). In contrast, we demonstrate a simple method for temporal synchronization, which does not require a connection to the MRI. It uses the normally undesired effect of induced voltages on the PET electronics from switching MRI gradients. The electronic circuit needs very few components and the gradient pick-up coils are made from PCB traces and vias on the PET detector boards. Neither programming the MRI nor any physical connection to the MR scanner is needed, thus avoiding electromagnetic compatibility problems. This method works inherently with most MRI sequences and is a vendor- independent solution. A characterization of the sensors in an MRI scanner showed that the MRI gradients are detected with a precision of 120 μs (with the current implementation). Using different trigger thresholds, it is possible to trigger selectively on certain MRI sequences, depending on their gradient slew rate settings. Timings and pulse diagrams of MRI sequences can be recognized from the generated data. The method was successfully used for temporal alignment between PET and MRI in an MRI-based PET-motion-compensation application.

  3. An integrative perspective of the anaerobic threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Marcelo Magalhães; Sousa, Caio Victor; da Silva Aguiar, Samuel; Knechtle, Beat; Nikolaidis, Pantelis Theodoros; Alves, Polissandro Mortoza; Simões, Herbert Gustavo

    2017-12-14

    The concept of anaerobic threshold (AT) was introduced during the nineteen sixties. Since then, several methods to identify the anaerobic threshold (AT) have been studied and suggested as novel 'thresholds' based upon the variable used for its detection (i.e. lactate threshold, ventilatory threshold, glucose threshold). These different techniques have brought some confusion about how we should name this parameter, for instance, anaerobic threshold or the physiological measure used (i.e. lactate, ventilation). On the other hand, the modernization of scientific methods and apparatus to detect AT, as well as the body of literature formed in the past decades, could provide a more cohesive understanding over the AT and the multiple physiological systems involved. Thus, the purpose of this review was to provide an integrative perspective of the methods to determine AT. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Epidemic thresholds for bipartite networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, D. G.; Risau-Gusman, S.

    2013-11-01

    It is well known that sexually transmitted diseases (STD) spread across a network of human sexual contacts. This network is most often bipartite, as most STD are transmitted between men and women. Even though network models in epidemiology have quite a long history now, there are few general results about bipartite networks. One of them is the simple dependence, predicted using the mean field approximation, between the epidemic threshold and the average and variance of the degree distribution of the network. Here we show that going beyond this approximation can lead to qualitatively different results that are supported by numerical simulations. One of the new features, that can be relevant for applications, is the existence of a critical value for the infectivity of each population, below which no epidemics can arise, regardless of the value of the infectivity of the other population.

  5. Detection thresholds of macaque otolith afferents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiong-Jie; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2012-06-13

    The vestibular system is our sixth sense and is important for spatial perception functions, yet the sensory detection and discrimination properties of vestibular neurons remain relatively unexplored. Here we have used signal detection theory to measure detection thresholds of otolith afferents using 1 Hz linear accelerations delivered along three cardinal axes. Direction detection thresholds were measured by comparing mean firing rates centered on response peak and trough (full-cycle thresholds) or by comparing peak/trough firing rates with spontaneous activity (half-cycle thresholds). Thresholds were similar for utricular and saccular afferents, as well as for lateral, fore/aft, and vertical motion directions. When computed along the preferred direction, full-cycle direction detection thresholds were 7.54 and 3.01 cm/s(2) for regular and irregular firing otolith afferents, respectively. Half-cycle thresholds were approximately double, with excitatory thresholds being half as large as inhibitory thresholds. The variability in threshold among afferents was directly related to neuronal gain and did not depend on spike count variance. The exact threshold values depended on both the time window used for spike count analysis and the filtering method used to calculate mean firing rate, although differences between regular and irregular afferent thresholds were independent of analysis parameters. The fact that minimum thresholds measured in macaque otolith afferents are of the same order of magnitude as human behavioral thresholds suggests that the vestibular periphery might determine the limit on our ability to detect or discriminate small differences in head movement, with little noise added during downstream processing.

  6. Temporal and contextual orchestration of cardiac fate by WNT-BMP synergy and threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Mahesh K; Lenka, Nibedita

    2010-08-01

    Cardiomyogenic development proceeds with a cascade of intricate signalling events that operate in a temporo-spatial fashion to specify cardiac cell fate during early embryogenesis. In fact, conflicting reports exist regarding the role of Wnt/β-catenin signalling during cardiomyogenesis. Here, we describe a dose-dependent and temporal effect of Wnt/β-catenin signalling on in vitro cardiomyogenesis using embryonic stem cells (ESCs) as a model system. We could demonstrate that canonical Wnt activation during early stage of differentiation either through ligand or by GSK3β inhibition helped in maintaining Oct4 and Nanog expressions, and in parallel, it promoted mesoderm and endoderm inductions. In contrast, it led to attenuation in cardiomyogenesis that was reversed by moderate concentration of DKK1, but not soluble Fz8. However, higher DKK1 could also block cardiomyogenesis, suggesting thereby governance of a particular signalling threshold underlying this developmental event. Interestingly, Wnt signalling activation at early stage modulated BMP4 expression in a stage-specific manner. Wnt activation, synchronized with BMP4 and brachyury up-regulation at early stage, correlated well with mesoderm induction. Conversely, Wnt activation led to BMP4 and Wnt5a down-regulation at late stage culminating in cardiomyogenic attenuation. Our findings suggested the existence of precise regulatory machinery with context-dependent role of Wnt for fine tuning mesoderm induction and its derivatives, through establishment of Wnt gradient during ESCs' differentiation. Moreover, contrary to mere activation/inhibition, a specific threshold of Wnt and BMP and their synergy seemed necessary for providing the guiding cues in orchestrating mesoderm induction and subsequent cardiomyogenesis. © 2009 The Authors Journal compilation © 2010 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. Polyacrylamide temperature gradient gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viglasky, Viktor

    2013-01-01

    Temperature Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (TGGE) is a form of electrophoresis in which temperature gradient is used to denature molecules as they move through either acrylamide or agarose gel. TGGE can be applied to analyze DNA, RNA, protein-DNA complexes, and, less commonly, proteins. Separation of double-stranded DNA molecules during TGGE relies on temperature-dependent melting of the DNA duplex into two single-stranded DNA molecules. Therefore, the mobility of DNA reflects not only the size of the molecule but also its nucleotide composition, thereby allowing separation of DNA molecules of similar size with different sequences. Depending on the relative orientation of electric field and temperature gradient, TGGE can be performed in either a parallel or a perpendicular mode. The former is used to analyze multiple samples in the same gel, whereas the later allows detailed analysis of a single sample. This chapter is focused on analysis of DNA by polyacrylamide TGGE using the perpendicular mode.

  8. Temperature gradient-induced magnetization reversal of single ferromagnetic nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Ann-Kathrin; Corinna Niemann, Anna; Boehnert, Tim; Martens, Stephan; Montero Moreno, Josep M.; Goerlitz, Detlef; Zierold, Robert; Reith, Heiko; Vega, Victor; Prida, Victor M.; Thomas, Andy; Gooth, Johannes; Nielsch, Kornelius

    2017-12-01

    In this study, we investigate the temperature- and temperature gradient-dependent magnetization reversal process of individual, single-domain Co39Ni61 and Fe15Ni85 ferromagnetic nanowires via the magneto-optical Kerr effect and magnetoresistance measurements. While the coercive fields (H C) and therefore the magnetic switching fields (H SW) generally decrease under isothermal conditions at elevated base temperatures (T base), temperature gradients (ΔT) along the nanowires lead to an increased switching field of up to 15% for ΔT  = 300 K in Co39Ni61 nanowires. This enhancement is attributed to a stress-induced, magneto-elastic anisotropy term due to an applied temperature gradient along the nanowire that counteracts the thermally assisted magnetization reversal process. Our results demonstrate that a careful distinction between locally elevated temperatures and temperature gradients has to be made in future heat-assisted magnetic recording devices.

  9. The educational gradient of childbearing within cohabitation in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perelli-Harris, Brienna; Sigle-Rushton, Wendy; Kreyenfeld, Michaela; Lappegård, Trude; Keizer, Renske; Berghammer, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    Nearly every European Country has experienced some increase in nonmarital childbearing, largely due to increasing births within cohabitation. Relatively few studies in Europe, however, investigate the educational gradient of childbearing within cohabitation or how it changed over time. Using retrospective union and fertility histories, we employ competing risk hazard models to examine the educational gradient of childbearing in cohabitation in eight countries across europe. In all countries studied, birth risks within cohabitation demonstrated a negative educational gradient. When directly comparing cohabiting fertility with marital fertility, the negative educational gradient persists in all countries except Italy, although differences were not significant in Austria, France, and West Germany. To explain these findings, we present an alternative explanation for the increase in childbearing within cohabitation that goes beyond the explanation of the Second Demographic Transition and provides a new interpretation of the underlying mechanisms that may influence childbearing within cohabitation.

  10. Quasi Gradient Projection Algorithm for Sparse Reconstruction in Compressed Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin Meng

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Compressed sensing is a novel signal sampling theory under the condition that the signal is sparse or compressible. The existing recovery algorithms based on the gradient projection can either need prior knowledge or recovery the signal poorly. In this paper, a new algorithm based on gradient projection is proposed, which is referred as Quasi Gradient Projection. The algorithm presented quasi gradient direction and two step sizes schemes along this direction. The algorithm doesn’t need any prior knowledge of the original signal. Simulation results demonstrate that the presented algorithm cans recovery the signal more correctly than GPSR which also don’t need prior knowledge. Meanwhile, the algorithm has a lower computation complexity.

  11. Comparative Studies of High-Gradient Rf and Dc Breakdowns

    CERN Document Server

    Kovermann, Jan Wilhelm; Wuensch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC project is based on normal-conducting high-gradient accelerating structures with an average accelerating gradient of 100 MV/m. The maximum achievable gradient in these structures is limited by the breakdown phenomenon. The physics of breakdowns is not yet fully understood quantitatively. A full knowledge could have strong impact on the design, material choice and construction of rf structures. Therefore, understanding breakdowns has great importance to reaching a gradient of 100MV/m with an acceptable breakdown probability. This thesis addresses the physics underlying the breakdown effect, focusing on a comparison of breakdowns in rf structures and in a dc spark setup. The dc system is simpler, easier to benchmark against simulations, with a faster turnaround time, but the relationship to rf breakdown must be established. To do so, an experimental approach based on optical diagnostics and electrical measurements methods was made. Following an introduction into the CLIC project, a general theoretical ...

  12. Deletion of Proton Gradient Regulation 5 (PGR5) and PGR5-Like 1 (PGRL1) proteins promote sustainable light-driven hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii due to increased PSII activity under sulfur deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbeck, Janina; Nikolova, Denitsa; Weingarten, Robert; Johnson, Xenie; Richaud, Pierre; Peltier, Gilles; Hermann, Marita; Magneschi, Leonardo; Hippler, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Continuous hydrogen photo-production under sulfur deprivation was studied in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pgr5 pgrl1 double mutant and respective single mutants. Under medium light conditions, the pgr5 exhibited the highest performance and produced about eight times more hydrogen than the wild type, making pgr5 one of the most efficient hydrogen producer reported so far. The pgr5 pgrl1 double mutant showed an increased hydrogen burst at the beginning of sulfur deprivation under high light conditions, but in this case the overall amount of hydrogen produced by pgr5 pgrl1 as well as pgr5 was diminished due to photo-inhibition and increased degradation of PSI. In contrast, the pgrl1 was effective in hydrogen production in both high and low light. Blocking photosynthetic electron transfer by DCMU stopped hydrogen production almost completely in the mutant strains, indicating that the main pathway of electrons toward enhanced hydrogen production is via linear electron transport. Indeed, PSII remained more active and stable in the pgr mutant strains as compared to the wild type. Since transition to anaerobiosis was faster and could be maintained due to an increased oxygen consumption capacity, this likely preserves PSII from photo-oxidative damage in the pgr mutants. Hence, we conclude that increased hydrogen production under sulfur deprivation in the pgr5 and pgrl1 mutants is caused by an increased stability of PSII permitting sustainable light-driven hydrogen production in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

  13. Relation of the runaway avalanche threshold to momentum space topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDevitt, Christopher J.; Guo, Zehua; Tang, Xian-Zhu

    2018-02-01

    The underlying physics responsible for the formation of an avalanche instability due to the generation of secondary electrons is studied. A careful examination of the momentum space topology of the runaway electron population is carried out with an eye toward identifying how qualitative changes in the momentum space of the runaway electrons is correlated with the avalanche threshold. It is found that the avalanche threshold is tied to the merger of an O and X point in the momentum space of the primary runaway electron population. Such a change of the momentum space topology is shown to be accurately described by a simple analytic model, thus providing a powerful means of determining the avalanche threshold for a range of model assumptions.

  14. Comparison of memory thresholds for planar qudit geometries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Jacob; Jochym-O'Connor, Tomas; Gheorghiu, Vlad

    2017-11-01

    We introduce and analyze a new type of decoding algorithm called general color clustering, based on renormalization group methods, to be used in qudit color codes. The performance of this decoder is analyzed under a generalized bit-flip error model, and is used to obtain the first memory threshold estimates for qudit 6-6-6 color codes. The proposed decoder is compared with similar decoding schemes for qudit surface codes as well as the current leading qubit decoders for both sets of codes. We find that, as with surface codes, clustering performs sub-optimally for qubit color codes, giving a threshold of 5.6 % compared to the 8.0 % obtained through surface projection decoding methods. However, the threshold rate increases by up to 112% for large qudit dimensions, plateauing around 11.9 % . All the analysis is performed using QTop, a new open-source software for simulating and visualizing topological quantum error correcting codes.

  15. Optimal threshold estimation for binary classifiers using game theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Ignacio Enrique

    2016-01-01

    Many bioinformatics algorithms can be understood as binary classifiers. They are usually compared using the area under the receiver operating characteristic ( ROC ) curve. On the other hand, choosing the best threshold for practical use is a complex task, due to uncertain and context-dependent skews in the abundance of positives in nature and in the yields/costs for correct/incorrect classification. We argue that considering a classifier as a player in a zero-sum game allows us to use the minimax principle from game theory to determine the optimal operating point. The proposed classifier threshold corresponds to the intersection between the ROC curve and the descending diagonal in ROC space and yields a minimax accuracy of 1-FPR. Our proposal can be readily implemented in practice, and reveals that the empirical condition for threshold estimation of "specificity equals sensitivity" maximizes robustness against uncertainties in the abundance of positives in nature and classification costs.

  16. Effect of raised plasma β endorphin concentrations on peripheral pain and angina thresholds in patients with stable angina

    OpenAIRE

    Jarmukli, N; Ahn, J; Iranmanesh, A; Russell, D

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To determine whether changes in plasma concentrations of β endorphins alter angina threshold and peripheral pain threshold in patients with stable angina.
DESIGN—Latin square design comparison of angina thresholds by exercise treadmill test and peripheral pain thresholds using a radiant heat source in eight patients with stable angina under control conditions, after stimulation of pituitary β endorphin release by ketoconazole, after suppression of pituitary β endorphin release by de...

  17. An examination of neuromuscular and metabolic fatigue thresholds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergstrom, Haley C; Housh, Terry J; Cochrane, Kristen C; Jenkins, Nathaniel D M; Lewis, Robert W Jr; Traylor, Daniel A; Schmidt, Richard J; Johnson, Glen O; Cramer, Joel T; Zuniga, Jorge M

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the relationships among the physical working capacity at the fatigue threshold (PWC FT ), the power outputs associated with the gas exchange threshold (PGET) and the respiratory compensation point (PRCP), and critical power (CP) to identify possible physiological mechanisms underlying the onset of neuromuscular fatigue. Ten participants (mean ± SD age: 20 ± 1 years) performed a maximal incremental cycle ergometer test to determine the PWC FT , PGET, and PRCP. CP was determined from the 3 min all-out test. The PWC FT (197 ± 55 W), PRCP (212 ± 50 W), and CP (208 ± 63 W) were significantly greater than the PGET (168 ± 40 W), but there were no significant differences among the PWC FT , PRCP, and CP. All thresholds were significantly inter-4 (r = 0.794–0.958). The 17% greater estimates for the PWC FT than PGET were likely related to differences in the physiological mechanisms that underlie these fatigue thresholds, while the non-significant difference and high correlation between the PWC FT and the PRCP suggested that hyperkalemia may underlie both thresholds. Furthermore, it is possible that the 5% lower estimate of the PWC FT than CP could more accurately reflect the demarcation of the heavy from severe exercise intensity domains. (paper)

  18. Climate change and critical thresholds in China's food security

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, Wei; Lin, Erda; Ju, Hui; Xu, Yinlong

    2007-01-01

    Identification of 'critical thresholds' of temperature increase is an essential task for inform policy decisions on establishing greenhouse gas (GHG) emission targets. We use the A2 (medium-high GHG emission pathway) and B2 (medium-low) climate change scenarios produced by the Regional Climate Model PRECIS, the crop model - CERES, and socio-economic scenarios described by IPCC SRES, to simulate the average yield changes per hectare of three main grain crops (rice, wheat, and maize) at 50 km x 50 km scale. The threshold of food production to temperature increases was analyzed based on the relationship between yield changes and temperature rise, and then food security was discussed corresponding to each IPCC SRES scenario. The results show that without the CO2 fertilization effect in the analysis, the yield per hectare for the three crops would fall consistently as temperature rises beyond 2.5C; when the CO2 fertilization effect was included in the simulation, there were no adverse impacts on China's food production under the projected range of temperature rise (0.9-3.9C). A critical threshold of temperature increase was not found for food production. When the socio-economic scenarios, agricultural technology development and international trade were incorporated in the analysis, China's internal food production would meet a critical threshold of basic demand (300 kg/capita) while it would not under A2 (no CO2 fertilization); whereas basic food demand would be satisfied under both A2 and B2, and would even meet a higher food demand threshold required to sustain economic growth (400 kg/capita) under B2, when CO2 fertilization was considered

  19. Growth rate and surface morphology of 4H-SiC crystals grown from Si-Cr-C and Si-Cr-Al-C solutions under various temperature gradient conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitani, Takeshi; Komatsu, Naoyoshi; Takahashi, Tetsuo; Kato, Tomohisa; Fujii, Kuniharu; Ujihara, Toru; Matsumoto, Yuji; Kurashige, Kazuhisa; Okumura, Hajime

    2014-09-01

    The growth rate and surface morphology of 4H-SiC crystals prepared by solution growth with Si1-xCrx and Si1-x-yCrxAly (x=0.4, 0.5 and 0.6; y=0.04) solvents were investigated under various temperature conditions. The growth rate was examined as functions of the temperature difference between the growth surface and C source, the amount of supersaturated C and supersaturation at the growth surface. We found that generation of trench-like surface defects in 4H-SiC crystals was suppressed using Si1-x-yCrxAly solvents even under highly supersaturated conditions where the growth rate exceeded 760 μm/h. Conversely, trench-like defects were observed in crystals grown with Si1-xCrx solvents under all experimental conditions. Statistical observation of the macrostep structure showed that the macrostep height in crystals grown with Si1-x-yCrxAly solvents was maintained at lower levels than that obtained using Si1-xCrx solvents. Addition of Al prevents the macrosteps from developing into large steps, which are responsible for the generation of trench-like surface defects.

  20. A gradient-based method for segmenting FDG-PET images: methodology and validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geets, Xavier; Lee, John A.; Gregoire, Vincent; Bol, Anne; Lonneux, Max

    2007-01-01

    A new gradient-based method for segmenting FDG-PET images is described and validated. The proposed method relies on the watershed transform and hierarchical cluster analysis. To allow a better estimation of the gradient intensity, iteratively reconstructed images were first denoised and deblurred with an edge-preserving filter and a constrained iterative deconvolution algorithm. Validation was first performed on computer-generated 3D phantoms containing spheres, then on a real cylindrical Lucite phantom containing spheres of different volumes ranging from 2.1 to 92.9 ml. Moreover, laryngeal tumours from seven patients were segmented on PET images acquired before laryngectomy by the gradient-based method and the thresholding method based on the source-to-background ratio developed by Daisne (Radiother Oncol 2003;69:247-50). For the spheres, the calculated volumes and radii were compared with the known values; for laryngeal tumours, the volumes were compared with the macroscopic specimens. Volume mismatches were also analysed. On computer-generated phantoms, the deconvolution algorithm decreased the mis-estimate of volumes and radii. For the Lucite phantom, the gradient-based method led to a slight underestimation of sphere volumes (by 10-20%), corresponding to negligible radius differences (0.5-1.1 mm); for laryngeal tumours, the segmented volumes by the gradient-based method agreed with those delineated on the macroscopic specimens, whereas the threshold-based method overestimated the true volume by 68% (p = 0.014). Lastly, macroscopic laryngeal specimens were totally encompassed by neither the threshold-based nor the gradient-based volumes. The gradient-based segmentation method applied on denoised and deblurred images proved to be more accurate than the source-to-background ratio method. (orig.)

  1. Compositional gradients in Gramineae genes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Wang, Jun; Tao, Lin

    2002-01-01

    In this study, we describe a property of Gramineae genes, and perhaps all monocot genes, that is not observed in eudicot genes. Along the direction of transcription, beginning at the junction of the 5'-UTR and the coding region, there are gradients in GC content, codon usage, and amino-acid usage...

  2. Integration of community structure data reveals observable effects below sediment guideline thresholds in a large estuary

    KAUST Repository

    Tremblay, Louis A.

    2017-04-07

    The sustainable management of estuarine and coastal ecosystems requires robust frameworks due to the presence of multiple physical and chemical stressors. In this study, we assessed whether ecological health decline, based on community structure composition changes along a pollution gradient, occurred at levels below guideline threshold values for copper, zinc and lead. Canonical analysis of principal coordinates (CAP) was used to characterise benthic communities along a metal contamination gradient. The analysis revealed changes in benthic community distribution at levels below the individual guideline values for the three metals. These results suggest that field-based measures of ecological health analysed with multivariate tools can provide additional information to single metal guideline threshold values to monitor large systems exposed to multiple stressors.

  3. Threshold behavior in electron-atom scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sadeghpour, H.R.; Greene, C.H.

    1996-01-01

    Ever since the classic work of Wannier in 1953, the process of treating two threshold electrons in the continuum of a positively charged ion has been an active field of study. The authors have developed a treatment motivated by the physics below the double ionization threshold. By modeling the double ionization as a series of Landau-Zener transitions, they obtain an analytical formulation of the absolute threshold probability which has a leading power law behavior, akin to Wannier's law. Some of the noteworthy aspects of this derivation are that the derivation can be conveniently continued below threshold giving rise to a open-quotes cuspclose quotes at threshold, and that on both sides of the threshold, absolute values of the cross sections are obtained

  4. Temperate and Tropical Forest Canopies are Already Functioning beyond Their Thermal Thresholds for Photosynthesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alida C. Mau

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical tree species have evolved under very narrow temperature ranges compared to temperate forest species. Studies suggest that tropical trees may be more vulnerable to continued warming compared to temperate species, as tropical trees have shown declines in growth and photosynthesis at elevated temperatures. However, regional and global vegetation models lack the data needed to accurately represent such physiological responses to increased temperatures, especially for tropical forests. To address this need, we compared instantaneous photosynthetic temperature responses of mature canopy foliage, leaf temperatures, and air temperatures across vertical canopy gradients in three forest types: tropical wet, tropical moist, and temperate deciduous. Temperatures at which maximum photosynthesis occurred were greater in the tropical forests canopies than the temperate canopy (30 ± 0.3 °C vs. 27 ± 0.4 °C. However, contrary to expectations that tropical species would be functioning closer to threshold temperatures, photosynthetic temperature optima was exceeded by maximum daily leaf temperatures, resulting in sub-optimal rates of carbon assimilation for much of the day, especially in upper canopy foliage (>10 m. If trees are unable to thermally acclimate to projected elevated temperatures, these forests may shift from net carbon sinks to sources, with potentially dire implications to climate feedbacks and forest community composition.

  5. The asymmetry of U.S. monetary policy: Evidence from a threshold Taylor rule with time-varying threshold values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanli; Chen, Haiqiang

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we revisit the issue whether U.S. monetary policy is asymmetric by estimating a forward-looking threshold Taylor rule with quarterly data from 1955 to 2015. In order to capture the potential heterogeneity for regime shift mechanism under different economic conditions, we modify the threshold model by assuming the threshold value as a latent variable following an autoregressive (AR) dynamic process. We use the unemployment rate as the threshold variable and separate the sample into two periods: expansion periods and recession periods. Our findings support that the U.S. monetary policy operations are asymmetric in these two regimes. More precisely, the monetary authority tends to implement an active Taylor rule with a weaker response to the inflation gap (the deviation of inflation from its target) and a stronger response to the output gap (the deviation of output from its potential level) in recession periods. The threshold value, interpreted as the targeted unemployment rate of monetary authorities, exhibits significant time-varying properties, confirming the conjecture that policy makers may adjust their reference point for the unemployment rate accordingly to reflect their attitude on the health of general economy.

  6. Iran: the next nuclear threshold state?

    OpenAIRE

    Maurer, Christopher L.

    2014-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited A nuclear threshold state is one that could quickly operationalize its peaceful nuclear program into one capable of producing a nuclear weapon. This thesis compares two known threshold states, Japan and Brazil, with Iran to determine if the Islamic Republic could also be labeled a threshold state. Furthermore, it highlights the implications such a status could have on U.S. nonproliferation policy. Although Iran's nuclear program is mir...

  7. Roots at the percolation threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroener, Eva; Ahmed, Mutez Ali; Carminati, Andrea

    2015-04-01

    The rhizosphere is the layer of soil around the roots where complex and dynamic interactions between plants and soil affect the capacity of plants to take up water. The physical properties of the rhizosphere are affected by mucilage, a gel exuded by roots. Mucilage can absorb large volumes of water, but it becomes hydrophobic after drying. We use a percolation model to describe the rewetting of dry rhizosphere. We find that at a critical mucilage concentration the rhizosphere becomes impermeable. The critical mucilage concentration depends on the radius of the soil particle size. Capillary rise experiments with neutron radiography prove that for concentrations below the critical mucilage concentration water could easily cross the rhizosphere, while above the critical concentration water could no longer percolate through it. Our studies, together with former observations of water dynamics in the rhizosphere, suggest that the rhizosphere is near the percolation threshold, where small variations in mucilage concentration sensitively alter the soil hydraulic conductivity. Is mucilage exudation a plant mechanism to efficiently control the rhizosphere conductivity and the access to water?

  8. Percolation Threshold in Polycarbonate Nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahuja, Suresh

    2014-03-01

    Nanocomposites have unique mechanical, electrical, magnetic, optical and thermal properties. Many methods could be applied to prepare polymer-inorganic nanocomposites, such as sol-gel processing, in-situ polymerization, particle in-situ formation, blending, and radiation synthesis. The analytical composite models that have been put forth include Voigt and Reuss bounds, Polymer nanocomposites offer the possibility of substantial improvements in material properties such as shear and bulk modulus, yield strength, toughness, film scratch resistance, optical properties, electrical conductivity, gas and solvent transport, with only very small amounts of nanoparticles Experimental results are compared against composite models of Hashin and Shtrikman bounds, Halpin-Tsai model, Cox model, and various Mori and Tanaka models. Examples of numerical modeling are molecular dynamics modeling and finite element modeling of reduced modulus and hardness that takes into account the modulus of the components and the effect of the interface between the hard filler and relatively soft polymer, polycarbonate. Higher nanoparticle concentration results in poor dispersion and adhesion to polymer matrix which results in lower modulus and hardness and departure from the existing composite models. As the level of silica increases beyond a threshold level, aggregates form which results in weakening of the structure. Polymer silica interface is found to be weak as silica is non-interacting promoting interfacial slip at silica-matrix junctions. Our experimental results compare favorably with those of nanocomposites of polyesters where the effect of nanoclay on composite hardness and modulus depended on dispersion of nanoclay in polyester.

  9. Dynamical thresholds for complete fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davies, K.T.R.; Sierk, A.J.; Nix, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    It is our purpose here to study the effect of nuclear dissipation and shape parametrization on dynamical thresholds for compound-nucleus formation in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. This is done by solving numerically classical equations of motion for head-on collisions to determine whether the dynamical trajectory in a multidimensional deformation space passes inside the fission saddle point and forms a compound nucleus, or whether it passes outside the fission saddle point and reseparates in a fast-fission or deep-inelastic reaction. Specifying the nuclear shape in terms of smoothly joined portions of three quadratic surfaces of revolution, we take into account three symmetric deformation coordinates. However, in some cases we reduce the number of coordinates to two by requiring the ends of the fusing system to be spherical in shape. The nuclear potential energy of deformation is determined in terms of a Coulomb energy and a double volume energy of a Yukawa-plus-exponential folding function. The collective kinetic energy is calculated for incompressible, nearly irrotational flow by means of the Werner-Wheeler approximation. Four possibilities are studied for the transfer of collective kinetic energy into internal single-particle excitation energy: zero dissipation, ordinary two body viscosity, one-body wall-formula dissipation, and one-body wall-and-window dissipation

  10. Efficient threshold for volumetric segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdescu, Dumitru D.; Brezovan, Marius; Stanescu, Liana; Stoica Spahiu, Cosmin; Ebanca, Daniel

    2015-07-01

    Image segmentation plays a crucial role in effective understanding of digital images. However, the research on the existence of general purpose segmentation algorithm that suits for variety of applications is still very much active. Among the many approaches in performing image segmentation, graph based approach is gaining popularity primarily due to its ability in reflecting global image properties. Volumetric image segmentation can simply result an image partition composed by relevant regions, but the most fundamental challenge in segmentation algorithm is to precisely define the volumetric extent of some object, which may be represented by the union of multiple regions. The aim in this paper is to present a new method to detect visual objects from color volumetric images and efficient threshold. We present a unified framework for volumetric image segmentation and contour extraction that uses a virtual tree-hexagonal structure defined on the set of the image voxels. The advantage of using a virtual tree-hexagonal network superposed over the initial image voxels is that it reduces the execution time and the memory space used, without losing the initial resolution of the image.

  11. 76 FR 41371 - Impact of Reducing the Mixture Concentration Threshold for Commercial Schedule 3 Chemical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-13

    ... Reducing the Mixture Concentration Threshold for Commercial Schedule 3 Chemical Activities Under the... CFR Part 714 Impact of Reducing the Mixture Concentration Threshold for Commercial Schedule 3 Chemical... concentration level at which the CWCR exempt certain mixtures containing Schedule 3 chemicals from the...

  12. Extracting dynamics from threshold-crossing interspike intervals: Possibilities and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, A. N.; Sosnovtseva, O. V.; Mosekilde, Erik

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we estimate dynamical characteristics of chaotic attractors from sequences of threshold-crossing interspike intervals, and study how the choice of the threshold level (which sets the equation of a secant plane) influences the results of the numerical computations. Under quite genera...

  13. Extracting dynamics from threshold-crossing interspike intervals: possibilities and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pavlov, A N; Sosnovtseva, Olga; Mosekilde, Erik

    2000-01-01

    In this paper we estimate dynamical characteristics of chaotic attractors from sequences of threshold-crossing interspike intervals, and study how the choice of the threshold level (which sets the equation of a secant plane) influences the results of the numerical computations. Under quite genera...

  14. Error Thresholds on Dynamic Fittness-Landscapes

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Martin; Snoad, Nigel

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we investigate error-thresholds on dynamics fitness-landscapes. We show that there exists both lower and an upper threshold, representing limits to the copying fidelity of simple replicators. The lower bound can be expressed as a correction term to the error-threshold present on a static landscape. The upper error-threshold is a new limit that only exists on dynamic fitness-landscapes. We also show that for long genomes on highly dynamic fitness-landscapes there exists a lower b...

  15. Elemental gradients in macrophytes from a reactor effluent gradient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grace, J.B.; Tilly, L.J.

    1978-01-01

    The tissues of submersed macrophtes from along the thermal gradient were analyzed for phosphorus to determine whether any pattern correspondent to standing crop distributions could be detected. Although water concentrations of phosphorus showed no detectable relationship to the thermal effluent, tissue concentrations of this element in submersed macrophytes declined with distance from the effluent entry point. The occurrence of this concentration pattern suggests that phosphorus availability is greater near the discharge. Because phosphorus is the element most often determined to limit aquatic productivity, its greater availability may partially account for the apparent enhancement of macrophte growth near the thermal discharge. A patter of macrophyte abundance which indicated enchancement related to the discharge gradient in the reactor-cooling reservoir, Par Pond is reported. Correlative data tended to implicate light and temperature as important in influencing the differential abundance pattern

  16. Automatic Threshold Setting and Its Uncertainty Quantification in Wind Turbine Condition Monitoring System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marhadi, Kun Saptohartyadi; Skrimpas, Georgios Alexandros

    2015-01-01

    Setting optimal alarm thresholds in vibration based condition monitoring system is inherently difficult. There are no established thresholds for many vibration based measurements. Most of the time, the thresholds are set based on statistics of the collected data available. Often times the underly......Setting optimal alarm thresholds in vibration based condition monitoring system is inherently difficult. There are no established thresholds for many vibration based measurements. Most of the time, the thresholds are set based on statistics of the collected data available. Often times...... the underlying probability distribution that describes the data is not known. Choosing an incorrect distribution to describe the data and then setting up thresholds based on the chosen distribution could result in sub-optimal thresholds. Moreover, in wind turbine applications the collected data available may...... not represent the whole operating conditions of a turbine, which results in uncertainty in the parameters of the fitted probability distribution and the thresholds calculated. In this study, Johnson, Normal, and Weibull distributions are investigated; which distribution can best fit vibration data collected...

  17. How extreme is enough to cause a threshold response of ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, S.; Zhang, F.; Yang, Q.; Song, B.; Sun, J.

    2017-12-01

    Precipitation is a primary determinant of terrestrial ecosystem productivity over much of the globe. Recent studies have shown asymmetric or threshold responses of ecosystem productivity to precipitation gradient. However, it's not clear how extreme is enough to cause a threshold response of ecosystem. We conducted a global meta-analysis of precipitation experiments, a site level precipitation gradient experiment, and a remote sensing data mining on the relationship between precipitation extreme vs NDVI extreme. The meta-analysis shows that ANPP, BNPP, NEE, and other carbon cycle variables, showed similar response magnitudes to either precipitation increase or decrease when precipitation levels were normalized to the medium value of treatments (40%) across all the studies. Overall, the response ratios of these variables were linearly correlated with changes in precipitation amounts and soil water content. In the field gradient study with treatments of 1/12, 1/8. 1/4, 1/2, control, and 5/4 of ambient precipitation, the threshold of NPP, SR, NEE occurred when precipitation was reduced to the level of 1/8-1/12 of ambient precipitation. This means that only extreme drought can induce a threshold response of ecosystem. The regional remote sensing data showed that climate extremes with yearly low precipitation from 1982 to 2013 rarely cause extreme responses of vegetation, further suggesting that it is very difficult to detect threshold responses to natural climatic fluctuation. Our three studies together indicate that asymmetrical responses of vegetation to precipitation are likely detected, but only in very extreme precipitation events.

  18. The Glare Effect Test and the Impact of Age on Luminosity Thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Facchin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The glare effect (GE is an illusion in which a white region appears self-luminous when surrounded by linearly decreasing luminance ramps. It has been shown that the magnitude of the luminosity effect can be modulated by manipulating the luminance range of the gradients. In the present study we tested the thresholds for the GE on two groups of adults: young (20–30 years old and elderly (60–75 years old. Purpose of our perspective study was to test the possibility of transforming the GE into a test that could easily measure thresholds for luminosity and discomfort glare. The Glare Effect Test (GET consisted in 101 printed cards that differed from each other for the range of luminance ramps. Participants were assessed with GET and a battery of visual tests: visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, illusion of length perception, and Ishihara test. Specifically in the GET, participants were required to classify cards on the basis of two reference cards (solid black-no gradient; full range black to white gradient. PSEs of the GE show no correlation with the other visual tests, revealing a divergent validity. A significant difference between young and elderly was found: contrary to our original expectations, luminosity thresholds of GE for elderly were higher than those for young, suggesting a non-direct relationship between luminosity perception and discomfort glare.

  19. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S., E-mail: w.price@uws.edu.au [Nanoscale Organisation and Dynamics Group, University of Western Sydney, Penrith, NSW 2751 (Australia)

    2014-03-28

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  20. A magnetic gradient induced force in NMR restricted diffusion experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghadirian, Bahman; Stait-Gardner, Tim; Castillo, Reynaldo; Price, William S.

    2014-03-01

    We predict that the phase cancellation of a precessing magnetisation field carried by a diffusing species in a bounded geometry under certain nuclear magnetic resonance pulsed magnetic field gradient sequences results in a small force over typically micrometre length scales. Our calculations reveal that the total magnetisation energy in a pore under the influence of a pulsed gradient will be distance-dependent thus resulting in a force acting on the boundary. It is shown that this effect of the magnetisation of diffusing particles will appear as either an attractive or repulsive force depending on the geometry of the pore and magnetic properties of the material. A detailed analysis is performed for the case of a pulsed gradient spin-echo experiment on parallel planes. It is shown that the force decays exponentially in terms of the spin-spin relaxation. The proof is based on classical electrodynamics. An application of this effect to soft matter is suggested.

  1. Threshold resummation and higher order effects in QCD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringer, Felix Maximilian

    2015-01-01

    Quantum chromodynamics (QCD) is a quantum field theory that describes the strong interactions between quarks and gluons, the building blocks of all hadrons. Thanks to the experimental progress over the past decades, there has been an ever-growing need for QCD precision calculations for scattering processes involving hadrons. For processes at large momentum transfer, perturbative QCD offers a systematic approach for obtaining precise predictions. This approach relies on two key concepts: the asymptotic freedom of QCD and factorization. In a perturbative calculation at higher orders, the infrared cancellation between virtual and real emission diagrams generally leaves behind logarithmic contributions. In many observables relevant for hadronic scattering these logarithms are associated with a kinematic threshold and are hence known as ''threshold logarithms''. They become large when the available phase space for real gluon emission shrinks. In order to obtain a reliable prediction from QCD, the threshold logarithms need to be taken into account to all orders in the strong coupling constant, a procedure known as ''threshold resummation''. The main focus of my PhD thesis is on studies of QCD threshold resummation effects beyond the next-to-leading logarithmic order. Here we primarily consider the production of hadron pairs in hadronic collisions as an example. In addition, we also consider hadronic jet production, which is particularly interesting for the phenomenology at the LHC. For both processes, we fully take into account the non-trivial QCD color structure of the underlying partonic hard- scattering cross sections. We find that threshold resummation leads to sizable numerical effects in the kinematic regimes relevant for comparisons to experimental data.

  2. Vertebrate pressure-gradient receivers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2011-01-01

    The eardrums of all terrestrial vertebrates (tetrapods) are connected through Eustachian tubes or interaural canals. In some of the animals, these connections create pressure-gradient directionality, an enhanced directionality by interaction of sound arriving at both sides of the eardrum and stro......The eardrums of all terrestrial vertebrates (tetrapods) are connected through Eustachian tubes or interaural canals. In some of the animals, these connections create pressure-gradient directionality, an enhanced directionality by interaction of sound arriving at both sides of the eardrum....... Recent vertebrates form a continuum from perfect interaural transmission (0 dB in a certain frequency band) and pronounced eardrum directionality (30-40 dB) in the lizards, over somewhat attenuated transmission and limited directionality in birds and frogs, to the strongly attenuated interaural...

  3. Time-efficient multidimensional threshold tracking method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Kowalewski, Borys; Dau, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, adaptive methods have been used to reduce the time it takes to estimate psychoacoustic thresholds. However, even with adaptive methods, there are many cases where the testing time is too long to be clinically feasible, particularly when estimating thresholds as a function of anothe...

  4. Applying Threshold Concepts to Finance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Wood, Leigh N.; Tickle, Leonie; Kyng, Tim

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate and identify threshold concepts that are the essential conceptual content of finance programmes. Design/Methodology/Approach: Conducted in three stages with finance academics and students, the study uses threshold concepts as both a theoretical framework and a research methodology. Findings: The…

  5. Voting on Thresholds for Public Goods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rauchdobler, Julian; Sausgruber, Rupert; Tyran, Jean-Robert

    2010-01-01

    Introducing a threshold in the sense of a minimal project size transforms a public-good game with an inefficient equilibrium into a coordination game with a set of Pareto-superior equilibria. Thresholds may therefore improve efficiency in the voluntary provision of public goods. In our one-shot e...

  6. Intelligence and Creativity: Over the Threshold Together?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welter, Marisete Maria; Jaarsveld, Saskia; van Leeuwen, Cees; Lachmann, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Threshold theory predicts a positive correlation between IQ and creativity scores up to an IQ level of 120 and no correlation above this threshold. Primary school children were tested at beginning (N = 98) and ending (N = 70) of the school year. Participants performed the standard progressive matrices (SPM) and the Test of Creative…

  7. Threshold Concepts, Systems and Learning for Sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Orana Jade

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for understanding the role that systems theory might play in education for sustainability (EfS). It offers a sketch and critique of Land and Meyer's notion of a "threshold concept", to argue that seeing systems as a threshold concept for sustainability is useful for understanding the processes of…

  8. Evaluation of the Detection Threshold of Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mean count of 39 pigments per microlitre was obtained for these five patients. Both HEXAGON MALARIA and SD-BIOLINE had a detection threshold of 4 pigments per microlitre, while ACCU-STAT MALARIA had 20 pigments per microlitre. This suggests that these three kits have good detection thresholds and could ...

  9. Log canonical thresholds of smooth Fano threefolds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheltsov, Ivan A; Shramov, Konstantin A

    2008-01-01

    The complex singularity exponent is a local invariant of a holomorphic function determined by the integrability of fractional powers of the function. The log canonical thresholds of effective Q-divisors on normal algebraic varieties are algebraic counterparts of complex singularity exponents. For a Fano variety, these invariants have global analogues. In the former case, it is the so-called α-invariant of Tian; in the latter case, it is the global log canonical threshold of the Fano variety, which is the infimum of log canonical thresholds of all effective Q-divisors numerically equivalent to the anticanonical divisor. An appendix to this paper contains a proof that the global log canonical threshold of a smooth Fano variety coincides with its α-invariant of Tian. The purpose of the paper is to compute the global log canonical thresholds of smooth Fano threefolds (altogether, there are 105 deformation families of such threefolds). The global log canonical thresholds are computed for every smooth threefold in 64 deformation families, and the global log canonical thresholds are computed for a general threefold in 20 deformation families. Some bounds for the global log canonical thresholds are computed for 14 deformation families. Appendix A is due to J.-P. Demailly.

  10. Underestimation of pacing threshold as determined by an automatic ventricular threshold testing algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sauer, William H; Cooper, Joshua M; Lai, Rebecca W; Verdino, Ralph J

    2006-09-01

    In this case report, we describe markedly different pacing thresholds determined by a manual threshold test and the automatic Ventricular Capture Management algorithm. The discrepancy in pacing threshold values reported was due to the difference in the AV intervals used with the different testing methods. We propose that the differences in right ventricular dimensions with altered diastolic filling periods affected the threshold in this patient with a new passive fixation lead in the right ventricular apex.

  11. Primordial vorticity and gradient expansion

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    The evolution equations of the vorticities of the electrons, ions and photons in a pre-decoupling plasma are derived, in a fully inhomogeneous geometry, by combining the general relativistic gradient expansion and the drift approximation within the Adler-Misner-Deser decomposition. The vorticity transfer between the different species is discussed in this novel framework and a set of general conservation laws, connecting the vorticities of the three-component plasma with the magnetic field intensity, is derived. After demonstrating that a source of large-scale vorticity resides in the spatial gradients of the geometry and of the electromagnetic sources, the total vorticity is estimated to lowest order in the spatial gradients and by enforcing the validity of the momentum constraint. By acknowledging the current bounds on the tensor to scalar ratio in the (minimal) tensor extension of the $\\Lambda$CDM paradigm the maximal comoving magnetic field induced by the total vorticity turns out to be, at most, of the or...

  12. A Threshold Continuum for Aeolian Sand Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swann, C.; Ewing, R. C.; Sherman, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    The threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport marks the initial entrainment of sand particles by the force of the wind. This is typically defined and modeled as a singular wind speed for a given grain size and is based on field and laboratory experimental data. However, the definition of threshold varies significantly between these empirical models, largely because the definition is based on visual-observations of initial grain movement. For example, in his seminal experiments, Bagnold defined threshold of motion when he observed that 100% of the bed was in motion. Others have used 50% and lesser values. Differences in threshold models, in turn, result is large errors in predicting the fluxes associated with sand and dust transport. Here we use a wind tunnel and novel sediment trap to capture the fractions of sand in creep, reptation and saltation at Earth and Mars pressures and show that the threshold of motion for aeolian sand transport is best defined as a continuum in which grains progress through stages defined by the proportion of grains in creep and saltation. We propose the use of scale dependent thresholds modeled by distinct probability distribution functions that differentiate the threshold based on micro to macro scale applications. For example, a geologic timescale application corresponds to a threshold when 100% of the bed in motion whereas a sub-second application corresponds to a threshold when a single particle is set in motion. We provide quantitative measurements (number and mode of particle movement) corresponding to visual observations, percent of bed in motion and degrees of transport intermittency for Earth and Mars. Understanding transport as a continuum provides a basis for revaluating sand transport thresholds on Earth, Mars and Titan.

  13. Bone Conduction Thresholds without Bone Vibrator Application Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geal-Dor, Miriam; Chordekar, Shai; Adelman, Cahtia; Sohmer, Haim

    2015-01-01

    have induced vibrations of the underlying or nearby bone, inducing osseous BC, the relatively low thresholds in the absence of any application force, together with the small differences between the thresholds with 0 N (gel/soft tissue, nonosseous) and 5 N force (osseous BC) lead to the suggestion that in most situations, the BC thresholds actually represent the nonosseous (soft tissue conduction) thresholds at the stimulation site. American Academy of Audiology.

  14. Impact of Ozone Gradient on Grapevine Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alebic-Juretic, Ana; Bokan-Vucelic, Itana; Mifka, Boris; Zatezalo, Marija; Zubak, Velimir

    2017-04-01

    Due to complex orography and air mass circulation, the Rijeka Bay area is characterized by O3 gradient, with concentrations risen with the altitude (1). Therefore AOT40 values were often exceeded and should result in harmful effects on vegetation. Based on previous controlled experiments (2), we examined the possible effect of atmospheric ozone on grape leaves under natural O3 gradient. Grapevine leaves (2-5) were collected from May to September 2016 at two sampling points in the proximity of two AQM stations: Site 1 in the city centre (20m asl) and Site 2 (186m asl) in the suburban settlement. Subsequent to weighing and determination of surface area, the leaves (0,5 g) were extracted in 95% ethanol and analysed on chlorophyl a (Chla), chlorophyl b (Chlb) and carotene (Car) content by UV-VIS spectrometry on 3 wavelengths (664, 649, 470 nm) (3) In summer 2016 O3 gradient was not that pronounced as usual (1), but stil the concentrations differed by approx. 20%, exceeding national AOT40 value at both sites (22.360 and 28.061 μg m-3 h, respectively, at Sites 1 and 2). The concentrations of other pollutants were bellow limit values (LV). The Cha and Chb in a sample leaves collected at the end of May at Site 2 are equal to that with filtered O3 in control experiment (2), i.e. without damage caused by ozone, while the Car content is lower approx. 50% and is kept at the same level. The con-centrations of pigments obtained in July prooved the possible damage by O3, while in subsequent months could speed up natural ageing. This is the first evidence of O3 damage on plants in the Rijeka Bay area, in spite of weaker O3 gradient and lacking visible signs of damage. Preliminary results indicate the need for more frequent sampling, particularly in the period included in AOT40 (May-July). References: 1. Alebić-Juretić A (2012) Int J Remote Sensing, 33(2): 335-345 2. Britvec M, Reichenauer T, Soja G., Ljubešić N, Pećina M (2001) Biologia (Bratislava),56/4: 417-424 3. Sumanata

  15. Synergistic effects in threshold models on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juul, Jonas S.; Porter, Mason A.

    2018-01-01

    Network structure can have a significant impact on the propagation of diseases, memes, and information on social networks. Different types of spreading processes (and other dynamical processes) are affected by network architecture in different ways, and it is important to develop tractable models of spreading processes on networks to explore such issues. In this paper, we incorporate the idea of synergy into a two-state ("active" or "passive") threshold model of social influence on networks. Our model's update rule is deterministic, and the influence of each meme-carrying (i.e., active) neighbor can—depending on a parameter—either be enhanced or inhibited by an amount that depends on the number of active neighbors of a node. Such a synergistic system models social behavior in which the willingness to adopt either accelerates or saturates in a way that depends on the number of neighbors who have adopted that behavior. We illustrate that our model's synergy parameter has a crucial effect on system dynamics, as it determines whether degree-k nodes are possible or impossible to activate. We simulate synergistic meme spreading on both random-graph models and networks constructed from empirical data. Using a heterogeneous mean-field approximation, which we derive under the assumption that a network is locally tree-like, we are able to determine which synergy-parameter values allow degree-k nodes to be activated for many networks and for a broad family of synergistic models.

  16. Microplastic Effect Thresholds for Freshwater Benthic Macroinvertebrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Now that microplastics have been detected in lakes, rivers, and estuaries all over the globe, evaluating their effects on biota has become an urgent research priority. This is the first study that aims at determining the effect thresholds for a battery of six freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates with different species traits, using a wide range of microplastic concentrations. Standardized 28 days single species bioassays were performed under environmentally relevant exposure conditions using polystyrene microplastics (20–500 μm) mixed with sediment at concentrations ranging from 0 to 40% sediment dry weight (dw). Microplastics caused no effects on the survival of Gammarus pulex, Hyalella azteca, Asellus aquaticus, Sphaerium corneum, and Tubifex spp. and no effects were found on the reproduction of Lumbriculus variegatus. No significant differences in growth were found for H. azteca, A. aquaticus, S. corneum, L. variegatus, and Tubifex spp. However, G. pulex showed a significant reduction in growth (EC10 = 1.07% sediment dw) and microplastic uptake was proportional with microplastic concentrations in sediment. These results indicate that although the risks of environmentally realistic concentrations of microplastics may be low, they still may affect the biodiversity and the functioning of aquatic communities which after all also depend on the sensitive species. PMID:29337537

  17. Impact of Gradient Number and Voxel Size on Diffusion Tensor Imaging Tractography for Resective Brain Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoefnagels, Friso W A; de Witt Hamer, Philip C; Pouwels, Petra J W; Barkhof, Frederik; Vandertop, W Peter

    2017-09-01

    To explore quantitatively and qualitatively how the number of gradient directions (NGD) and spatial resolution (SR) affect diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tractography in patients planned for brain tumor surgery, using routine clinical magnetic resonance imaging protocols. Of 67 patients with intracerebral lesions who had 2 different DTI scans, 3 DTI series were reconstructed to compare the effects of NGD and SR. Tractographies for 4 clinically relevant tracts (corticospinal tract, superior longitudinal fasciculus, optic radiation, and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus) were constructed with a probabilistic tracking algorithm and automated region of interest placement and compared for 3 quantitative measurements: tract volume, median fiber density, and mean fractional anisotropy, using linear mixed-effects models. The mean tractography volume and intersubject reliability were visually compared across scanning protocols, to assess the clinical relevance of the quantitative differences. Both NGD and SR significantly influenced tract volume, median fiber density, and mean fractional anisotropy, but not to the same extent. In particular, higher NGD increased tract volume and median fiber density. More importantly, these effects further increased when tracts were affected by disease. The effects were tract specific, but not dependent on threshold. The superior longitudinal fasciculus and inferior fronto-occipital fasciculus showed the most significant differences. Qualitative assessment showed larger tract volumes given a fixed confidence level, and better intersubject reliability for the higher NGD protocol. SR in the range we considered seemed less relevant than NGD. This study indicates that, under time constraints of clinical imaging, a higher number of diffusion gradients is more important than spatial resolution for superior DTI probabilistic tractography in patients undergoing brain tumor surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Freshwater availability and coastal wetland foundation species: ecological transitions along a rainfall gradient

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J.; Enwright, Nicholas M.; Stagg, Camille L.

    2014-01-01

    Climate gradient-focused ecological research can provide a foundation for better understanding critical ecological transition points and nonlinear climate-ecological relationships, which is information that can be used to better understand, predict, and manage ecological responses to climate change. In this study, we examined the influence of freshwater availability upon the coverage of foundation plant species in coastal wetlands along a northwestern Gulf of Mexico rainfall gradient. Our research addresses the following three questions: (1) what are the region-scale relationships between measures of freshwater availability (e.g., rainfall, aridity, freshwater inflow, salinity) and the relative abundance of foundation plant species in tidal wetlands; (2) How vulnerable are foundation plant species in tidal wetlands to future changes in freshwater availability; and (3) What is the potential future relative abundance of tidal wetland foundation plant species under alternative climate change scenarios? We developed simple freshwater availability-based models to predict the relative abundance (i.e., coverage) of tidal wetland foundation plant species using climate data (1970-2000), estuarine freshwater inflow-focused data, and coastal wetland habitat data. Our results identify regional ecological thresholds and nonlinear relationships between measures of freshwater availability and the relative abundance of foundation plant species in tidal wetlands. In drier coastal zones, relatively small changes in rainfall could produce comparatively large landscape-scale changes in foundation plant species abundance which would affect some ecosystem good and services. Whereas a drier future would result in a decrease in the coverage of foundation plant species, a wetter future would result in an increase in foundation plant species coverage. In many ways, the freshwater-dependent coastal wetland ecological transitions we observed are analogous to those present in dryland

  19. Cell cycle arrest by a gradient of Dpp signaling during Drosophila eye development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharya Abhishek

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The secreted morphogen Dpp plays important roles in spatial regulation of gene expression and cell cycle progression in the developing Drosophila eye. Dpp signaling is required for timely cell cycle arrest ahead of the morphogenetic furrow as a prelude to differentiation, and is also important for eye disc growth. The dpp gene is expressed at multiple locations in the eye imaginal disc, including the morphogenetic furrow that sweeps across the eye disc as differentiation initiates. Results Studies of Brinker and Dad expression, and of Mad phosphorylation, establish that there is a gradient of Dpp signaling in the eye imaginal disc anterior to the morphogenetic furrow, predominantly in the anterior-posterior axis, and also Dpp signaling at the margins of the disc epithelium and in the dorsal peripodial membrane. Almost all signaling activity seems to spread through the plane of the epithelia, although peripodial epithelium cells can also respond to underlying disc cells. There is a graded requirement for Dpp signaling components for G1 arrest in the eye disc, with more stringent requirements further anteriorly where signaling is lower. The signaling level defines the cell cycle response, because elevated signaling through expression of an activated Thickveins receptor molecule arrested cells at more anterior locations. Very anterior regions of the eye disc were not arrested in response to activated receptor, however, and evidence is presented that expression of the Homothorax protein may contribute to this protection. By contrast to activated Thickveins, ectopic expression of processed Dpp leads to very high levels of Mad phosphorylation which appear to have non-physiological consequences. Conclusions G1 arrest occurs at a threshold level of Dpp signaling within a morphogen gradient in the anterior eye. G1 arrest is specific for one competent domain in the eye disc, allowing Dpp signaling to promote growth at earlier

  20. Extremal Regions Detection Guided by Maxima of Gradient Magnitude

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faraji, Mehdi; Shambezadeh, Jamshid; Nasrollahi, Kamal

    2015-01-01

    A problem of computer vision applications is to detect regions of interest under different imaging conditions. The state-of-the-art Maximally Stable Extremal Regions (MSER) detects affine covariant regions by applying all possible thresholds on the input image, and through three main steps includ...

  1. Visual evoked potential and psychophysical contrast thresholds in glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullah, Siti Nurliyana; Sanderson, Gordon F; James, Andrew C; Vaegan; Maddess, Ted

    2014-04-01

    We compared the diagnostic power of electrophysiologically and psychophysically measured contrast thresholds for the diagnosis of glaucoma. Additionally, we investigated whether combining results from the two methods improved diagnostic power. Seven-eight subjects between 40 and 88 years formed the main study group: 21 normal controls (9 males) and 57 glaucoma patients (30 males) were tested. Twenty-two younger control subjects were also tested. Contrast thresholds were determined for a 1 cpd sinusoidal grating, subtending 41° × 52° modulated at 14.3 rps. The thresholds were based on the same staircase method applied to visual evoked potential (VEP) and psychophysical responses (Psyc). Diagnostic power was assessed by the percent area under the curve (%AUC) of receiver operating characteristic plots. Psyc showed significant age dependence, -0.10 ± 0.02 dB, while VEPs did not. Diagnostic performance for moderate and severe eyes combined was modest: Psyc 74 ± 9.0 % and VEP 72 ± 9.1 %, but improved significantly (p Psyc thresholds appeared to improve diagnostic power. Canonical correlation analysis indicated that they measured statistically independent aspects of glaucoma possibly related to disease severity. Adding the 20-s psychophysical test to a VEP test produced a significant benefit for a small time cost.

  2. Gradient remediability in linear distributed parabolic systems ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this paper is the introduction of a new concept that concerned the analysis of a large class of distributed parabolic systems. It is the general concept of gradient remediability. More precisely, we study with respect to the gradient observation, the existence of an input operator (gradient efficient actuators) ensuring ...

  3. Estimation of gradients from scattered data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stead, S.E.

    1984-01-01

    Many techniques for producing a surface from scattered data require gradients at the data points. Since only positional data are usually known, the gradients must be estimated before the surface can be computed. The quality of the surface depends on the estimated gradients; so it is important to compute accurate estimates.

  4. An education gradient in health, a health gradient in education, or a confounded gradient in both?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Jamie L; von Hippel, Paul T

    2016-04-01

    There is a positive gradient associating educational attainment with health, yet the explanation for this gradient is not clear. Does higher education improve health (causation)? Do the healthy become highly educated (selection)? Or do good health and high educational attainment both result from advantages established early in the life course (confounding)? This study evaluates these competing explanations by tracking changes in educational attainment and Self-rated Health (SRH) from age 15 to age 31 in the National Longitudinal Study of Youth, 1997 cohort. Ordinal logistic regression confirms that high-SRH adolescents are more likely to become highly educated. This is partly because adolescent SRH is associated with early advantages including adolescents' academic performance, college plans, and family background (confounding); however, net of these confounders adolescent SRH still predicts adult educational attainment (selection). Fixed-effects longitudinal regression shows that educational attainment has little causal effect on SRH at age 31. Completion of a high school diploma or associate's degree has no effect on SRH, while completion of a bachelor's or graduate degree have effects that, though significant, are quite small (less than 0.1 points on a 5-point scale). While it is possible that educational attainment would have greater effect on health at older ages, at age 31 what we see is a health gradient in education, shaped primarily by selection and confounding rather than by a causal effect of education on health. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental and numerical determination of temperature gradients for a single tube alkali metal thermal-to-electric converter cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, S.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents the results from the experimental and numerical determination of shell temperature gradients for a single tube AMTEC cell evaluated under simulated deep space operating conditions.

  6. A Fast Method for Measuring Psychophysical Thresholds Across the Cochlear Implant Array

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie A. Bierer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A rapid threshold measurement procedure, based on Bekesy tracking, is proposed and evaluated for use with cochlear implants (CIs. Fifteen postlingually deafened adult CI users participated. Absolute thresholds for 200-ms trains of biphasic pulses were measured using the new tracking procedure and were compared with thresholds obtained with a traditional forced-choice adaptive procedure under both monopolar and quadrupolar stimulation. Virtual spectral sweeps across the electrode array were implemented in the tracking procedure via current steering, which divides the current between two adjacent electrodes and varies the proportion of current directed to each electrode. Overall, no systematic differences were found between threshold estimates with the new channel sweep procedure and estimates using the adaptive forced-choice procedure. Test–retest reliability for the thresholds from the sweep procedure was somewhat poorer than for thresholds from the forced-choice procedure. However, the new method was about 4 times faster for the same number of repetitions. Overall the reliability and speed of the new tracking procedure provides it with the potential to estimate thresholds in a clinical setting. Rapid methods for estimating thresholds could be of particular clinical importance in combination with focused stimulation techniques that result in larger threshold variations between electrodes.

  7. The electromyographic threshold in boys and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Brynlynn; Dotan, Raffy; Millar, Jordan; Long, Devon; Tokuno, Craig; O'Brien, Thomas; Falk, Bareket

    2015-06-01

    Children have been shown to have higher lactate (LaTh) and ventilatory (VeTh) thresholds than adults, which might be explained by lower levels of type-II motor-unit (MU) recruitment. However, the electromyographic threshold (EMGTh), regarded as indicating the onset of accelerated type-II MU recruitment, has been investigated only in adults. To compare the relative exercise intensity at which the EMGTh occurs in boys versus men. Participants were 21 men (23.4 ± 4.1 years) and 23 boys (11.1 ± 1.1 years), with similar habitual physical activity and peak oxygen consumption (VO2pk) (49.7 ± 5.5 vs. 50.1 ± 7.4 ml kg(-1) min(-1), respectively). Ramped cycle ergometry was conducted to volitional exhaustion with surface EMG recorded from the right and left vastus lateralis muscles throughout the test (~10 min). The composite right-left EMG root mean square (EMGRMS) was then calculated per pedal revolution. The EMGTh was then determined as the exercise intensity at the point of least residual sum of squares for any two regression line divisions of the EMGRMS plot. EMGTh was detected in 20/21 of the men (95.2 %) and only in 18/23 of the boys (78.3 %). The boys' EMGTh was significantly higher than the men's (86.4 ± 9.6 vs. 79.7 ± 10.0 % of peak power output at exhaustion; p boys' higher EMGTh suggests delayed and hence lesser utilization of type-II MUs in progressive exercise, compared with men. The boys-men EMGTh differences were of similar magnitude as those shown for LaTh and VeTh, further suggesting a common underlying factor.

  8. A feasible DY conjugate gradient method for linear equality constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    LI, Can

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we propose a feasible conjugate gradient method for solving linear equality constrained optimization problem. The method is an extension of the Dai-Yuan conjugate gradient method proposed by Dai and Yuan to linear equality constrained optimization problem. It can be applied to solve large linear equality constrained problem due to lower storage requirement. An attractive property of the method is that the generated direction is always feasible and descent direction. Under mild conditions, the global convergence of the proposed method with exact line search is established. Numerical experiments are also given which show the efficiency of the method.

  9. Automatic histogram threshold using fuzzy measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Lopes, Nuno; Mogadouro do Couto, Pedro A; Bustince, Humberto; Melo-Pinto, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, an automatic histogram threshold approach based on a fuzziness measure is presented. This work is an improvement of an existing method. Using fuzzy logic concepts, the problems involved in finding the minimum of a criterion function are avoided. Similarity between gray levels is the key to find an optimal threshold. Two initial regions of gray levels, located at the boundaries of the histogram, are defined. Then, using an index of fuzziness, a similarity process is started to find the threshold point. A significant contrast between objects and background is assumed. Previous histogram equalization is used in small contrast images. No prior knowledge of the image is required.

  10. Reaction thresholds in doubly special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyman, Daniel; Major, Seth; Hinteleitner, Franz

    2004-01-01

    Two theories of special relativity with an additional invariant scale, 'doubly special relativity', are tested with calculations of particle process kinematics. Using the Judes-Visser modified conservation laws, thresholds are studied in both theories. In contrast with some linear approximations, which allow for particle processes forbidden in special relativity, both the Amelino-Camelia and Magueijo-Smolin frameworks allow no additional processes. To first order, the Amelino-Camelia framework thresholds are lowered and the Magueijo-Smolin framework thresholds may be raised or lowered

  11. Digital IP Protection Using Threshold Voltage Control

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Joseph; Kulkarni, Niranjan; Yang, Jinghua; Dengi, Aykut; Vrudhula, Sarma

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to completely hide the functionality of a digital standard cell. This is accomplished by a differential threshold logic gate (TLG). A TLG with $n$ inputs implements a subset of Boolean functions of $n$ variables that are linear threshold functions. The output of such a gate is one if and only if an integer weighted linear arithmetic sum of the inputs equals or exceeds a given integer threshold. We present a novel architecture of a TLG that not only allows a single...

  12. Accelerated gradient methods for constrained image deblurring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonettini, S; Zanella, R; Zanni, L; Bertero, M

    2008-01-01

    In this paper we propose a special gradient projection method for the image deblurring problem, in the framework of the maximum likelihood approach. We present the method in a very general form and we give convergence results under standard assumptions. Then we consider the deblurring problem and the generality of the proposed algorithm allows us to add a energy conservation constraint to the maximum likelihood problem. In order to improve the convergence rate, we devise appropriate scaling strategies and steplength updating rules, especially designed for this application. The effectiveness of the method is evaluated by means of a computational study on astronomical images corrupted by Poisson noise. Comparisons with standard methods for image restoration, such as the expectation maximization algorithm, are also reported.

  13. Shape reconstruction from gradient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettl, Svenja; Kaminski, Jürgen; Knauer, Markus C; Häusler, Gerd

    2008-04-20

    We present a generalized method for reconstructing the shape of an object from measured gradient data. A certain class of optical sensors does not measure the shape of an object but rather its local slope. These sensors display several advantages, including high information efficiency, sensitivity, and robustness. For many applications, however, it is necessary to acquire the shape, which must be calculated from the slopes by numerical integration. Existing integration techniques show drawbacks that render them unusable in many cases. Our method is based on an approximation employing radial basis functions. It can be applied to irregularly sampled, noisy, and incomplete data, and it reconstructs surfaces both locally and globally with high accuracy.

  14. Temperature Gradient in Hall Thrusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Staack, D.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N.J.

    2003-01-01

    Plasma potentials and electron temperatures were deduced from emissive and cold floating probe measurements in a 2 kW Hall thruster, operated in the discharge voltage range of 200-400 V. An almost linear dependence of the electron temperature on the plasma potential was observed in the acceleration region of the thruster both inside and outside the thruster. This result calls into question whether secondary electron emission from the ceramic channel walls plays a significant role in electron energy balance. The proportionality factor between the axial electron temperature gradient and the electric field is significantly smaller than might be expected by models employing Ohmic heating of electrons

  15. On Nonconvex Decentralized Gradient Descent

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    difference between each local point and their global average is subject to a bound proportional to the step size. This note then establishes similar...estimation, and control. When fi’s are convex, the existing algorithms include the (sub)gradient meth- ods [5], [7], [10], [11], [18], [14], [15], and the...set of n nodes and E is the edge set. Any edge (i, j) ∈ E represents an arc between node i and node j. Let x(i) ∈ Rp denote the local copy of x at node

  16. Stringy bounces and gradient instabilities

    CERN Document Server

    Giovannini, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Bouncing solutions are obtained from a generally covariant action characterized by a potential which is a nonlocal functional of the dilaton field at two separated space-time points. Gradient instabilities are shown to arise in this context but they are argued to be nongeneric. After performing a gauge-invariant and frame-invariant derivation of the evolution equations of the fluctuations, a heuristic criterium for the avoidance of pathological instabilities is proposed and corroborated by a number of explicit examples that turn out to be compatible with a quasi-flat spectrum of curvature inhomogeneities for typical wavelengths larger than the Hubble radius.

  17. On Scalable Deep Learning and Parallelizing Gradient Descent

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2129036; Möckel, Rico; Baranowski, Zbigniew; Canali, Luca

    Speeding up gradient based methods has been a subject of interest over the past years with many practical applications, especially with respect to Deep Learning. Despite the fact that many optimizations have been done on a hardware level, the convergence rate of very large models remains problematic. Therefore, data parallel methods next to mini-batch parallelism have been suggested to further decrease the training time of parameterized models using gradient based methods. Nevertheless, asynchronous optimization was considered too unstable for practical purposes due to a lacking understanding of the underlying mechanisms. Recently, a theoretical contribution has been made which defines asynchronous optimization in terms of (implicit) momentum due to the presence of a queuing model of gradients based on past parameterizations. This thesis mainly builds upon this work to construct a better understanding why asynchronous optimization shows proportionally more divergent behavior when the number of parallel worker...

  18. Bioinspired Mechanical Gradients in Cellulose Nanofibril/Polymer Nanopapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Baochun; Benitez, Alejandro J; Lossada, Francisco; Merindol, Remi; Walther, Andreas

    2016-05-10

    Mechanical gradients are important as tough joints, for strain field engineering in printable electronics, for actuators, and for biological studies, yet they are difficult to prepare and quantitatively characterize. We demonstrate the additive fabrication of gradient bioinspired nanocomposites based on stiff, renewable cellulose nanofibrils that are bottom-up toughened via a tailor-made copolymer. Direct filament writing of different nanocomposite hydrogels in patterns, and subsequent healing of the filaments into continuous films while drying leads to a variety of linear, parabolic and striped bulk gradients. In situ digital image correlation under tensile deformation reveals important differences in the strain fields regarding asymmetry and step heights of the patterns. We envisage that merging top-down and bottom-up structuring of nanocellulose hybrids opens avenues for aperiodic and multiscale, bioinspired nanocomposites with optimized combinations of stiffness and toughness. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Proton electrochemical gradient: Driving and regulating neurotransmitter uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farsi, Zohreh; Jahn, Reinhard; Woehler, Andrew

    2017-05-01

    Accumulation of neurotransmitters in the lumen of synaptic vesicles (SVs) relies on the activity of the vacuolar-type H + -ATPase. This pump drives protons into the lumen, generating a proton electrochemical gradient (Δμ H+ ) across the membrane. Recent work has demonstrated that the balance between the chemical (ΔpH) and electrical (ΔΨ) components of Δμ H+ is regulated differently by some distinct vesicle types. As different neurotransmitter transporters use ΔpH and ΔΨ with different relative efficiencies, regulation of this gradient balance has the potential to influence neurotransmitter uptake. Nevertheless, the underlying mechanisms responsible for this regulation remain poorly understood. In this review, we provide an overview of current neurotransmitter uptake models, with a particular emphasis on the distinct roles of the electrical and chemical gradients and current hypotheses for regulatory mechanisms. © 2017 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Improving the performance of IPMCs with a gradient in thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Yang; Xu, Bing; Zheng, Gaofeng; Zheng, Jianyi; Qiu, Xiaochun; Zhuang, Mingfeng; Sun, Daoheng

    2013-01-01

    An ionic polymer metal composite (IPMC) is a kind of electro-active polymer. Due to the properties of low driving voltage, large deformation, flexibility and lightness, it is becoming one of the more popular from a diversity of smart materials. In this study, a novel structure of Nafion ® film is proposed to improve the performance of an IPMC. IPMC samples with a gradient structure in thickness are fabricated and their performance is investigated to confirm the validity of the gradient structure. The deformation displacement and the blocking force are compared under AC and DC voltage by experiments. The results indicate that the structure of gradient in thickness would improve the performance both in deformation displacement and blocking force. (paper)

  1. Ant functional responses along environmental gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnan, Xavier; Cerdá, Xim; Retana, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Understanding species distributions and diversity gradients is a central challenge in ecology and requires prior knowledge of the functional traits mediating species' survival under particular environmental conditions. While the functional ecology of plants has been reasonably well explored, much less is known about that of animals. Ants are among the most diverse, abundant and ecologically significant organisms on earth, and they perform a great variety of ecological functions. In this study, we analyse how the functional species traits present in ant communities vary along broad gradients in climate, productivity and vegetation type in the south-western Mediterranean. To this end, we compiled one of the largest animal databases to date: it contains information on 211 local ant communities (including eight climate variables, productivity, and vegetation type) and 124 ant species, for which 10 functional traits are described. We used traits that characterize different dimensions of the ant functional niche with respect to morphology, life history and behaviour at both individual and colony level. We calculated two complementary functional trait community indices ('trait average' and 'trait dissimilarity') for each trait, and we analysed how they varied along the three different gradients using generalized least squares models that accounted for spatial autocorrelation. Our results show that productivity, vegetation type and, to a lesser extent, each climate variable per se might play an important role in shaping the occurrence of functional species traits in ant communities. Among the climate variables, temperature and precipitation seasonality had a much higher influence on functional responses than their mean values, whose effects were almost lacking. Our results suggest that strong relationships might exist between the abiotic environment and the distribution of functional traits among south-western Mediterranean ant communities. This finding indicates that

  2. Developing a Biological Condition Gradient for the Protection of Puerto Rico's Coral Reefs

    Science.gov (United States)

    We introduce the application of the Biological Condition Gradient (BCG) to coral reefs: a conceptual model that describes how biological attributes of coral reef ecosystems might change along a gradient of increasing anthropogenic stress. Under authority of the Clean Water Act, t...

  3. Metallicity gradient of the thick disc progenitor at high redshift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawata, Daisuke; Allende Prieto, Carlos; Brook, Chris B.; Casagrande, Luca; Ciucă, Ioana; Gibson, Brad K.; Grand, Robert J. J.; Hayden, Michael R.; Hunt, Jason A. S.

    2018-01-01

    We have developed a novel Markov Chain Monte Carlo chemical 'painting' technique to explore possible radial and vertical metallicity gradients for the thick disc progenitor. In our analysis, we match an N-body simulation to the data from the Apache Point Observatory Galactic Evolution Experiment survey. We assume that the thick disc has a constant scaleheight and has completed its formation at an early epoch, after which time radial mixing of its stars has taken place. Under these assumptions, we find that the initial radial metallicity gradient of the thick disc progenitor should not be negative, but either flat or even positive, to explain the current negative vertical metallicity gradient of the thick disc. Our study suggests that the thick disc was built-up in an inside-out and upside-down fashion, and older, smaller and thicker populations are more metal poor. In this case, star-forming discs at different epochs of the thick disc formation are allowed to have different radial metallicity gradients, including a negative one, which helps to explain a variety of slopes observed in high-redshift disc galaxies. This scenario helps to explain the positive slope of the metallicity-rotation velocity relation observed for the Galactic thick disc. On the other hand, radial mixing flattens the slope of an existing gradient.

  4. Secure information management using linguistic threshold approach

    CERN Document Server

    Ogiela, Marek R

    2013-01-01

    This book details linguistic threshold schemes for information sharing. It examines the opportunities of using these techniques to create new models of managing strategic information shared within a commercial organisation or a state institution.

  5. Melanin microcavitation threshold in the near infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Morgan S.; Kennedy, Paul K.; Vincelette, Rebecca L.; Schuster, Kurt J.; Noojin, Gary D.; Wharmby, Andrew W.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.

    2014-02-01

    Thresholds for microcavitation of isolated bovine and porcine melanosomes were determined using single nanosecond (ns) laser pulses in the NIR (1000 - 1319 nm) wavelength regime. Average fluence thresholds for microcavitation increased non-linearly with increasing wavelength. Average fluence thresholds were also measured for 10-ns pulses at 532 nm, and found to be comparable to visible ns pulse values published in previous reports. Fluence thresholds were used to calculate melanosome absorption coefficients, which decreased with increasing wavelength. This trend was found to be comparable to the decrease in retinal pigmented epithelial (RPE) layer absorption coefficients reported over the same wavelength region. Estimated corneal total intraocular energy (TIE) values were determined and compared to the current and proposed maximum permissible exposure (MPE) safe exposure levels. Results from this study support the proposed changes to the MPE levels.

  6. A prototype threshold Cherenkov counter for DIRAC

    CERN Document Server

    Bragadireanu, M; Cima, E; Dulach, B; Gianotti, P; Guaraldo, C; Iliescu, M A; Lanaro, A; Levi-Sandri, P; Petrascu, C; Girolami, B; Groza, L; Kulikov, A; Kuptsov, A; Topilin, N; Trusov, S

    1999-01-01

    We have designed, built and tested a gas threshold Cherenkov counter as prototype for a larger counter foreseen for use in the DIRAC experiment, at CERN. We describe the performances of the counter on a test beam.

  7. Recent progress in understanding climate thresholds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Good, Peter; Bamber, Jonathan; Halladay, Kate; Harper, Anna B.; Jackson, Laura C.; Kay, Gillian; Kruijt, Bart; Lowe, Jason A.; Phillips, Oliver L.; Ridley, Jeff; Srokosz, Meric; Turley, Carol; Williamson, Phillip

    2018-01-01

    This article reviews recent scientific progress, relating to four major systems that could exhibit threshold behaviour: ice sheets, the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation (AMOC), tropical forests and ecosystem responses to ocean acidification. The focus is on advances since the

  8. Cost?effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons

    OpenAIRE

    Bertram, Melanie Y; Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cost?effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost?effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost?effectiveness thresholds allow cost?effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization?s Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost?effectiveness thresholds based...

  9. Thresholding functional connectomes by means of mixture modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bielczyk, Natalia Z; Walocha, Fabian; Ebel, Patrick W; Haak, Koen V; Llera, Alberto; Buitelaar, Jan K; Glennon, Jeffrey C; Beckmann, Christian F

    2018-05-01

    Functional connectivity has been shown to be a very promising tool for studying the large-scale functional architecture of the human brain. In network research in fMRI, functional connectivity is considered as a set of pair-wise interactions between the nodes of the network. These interactions are typically operationalized through the full or partial correlation between all pairs of regional time series. Estimating the structure of the latent underlying functional connectome from the set of pair-wise partial correlations remains an open research problem though. Typically, this thresholding problem is approached by proportional thresholding, or by means of parametric or non-parametric permutation testing across a cohort of subjects at each possible connection. As an alternative, we propose a data-driven thresholding approach for network matrices on the basis of mixture modeling. This approach allows for creating subject-specific sparse connectomes by modeling the full set of partial correlations as a mixture of low correlation values associated with weak or unreliable edges in the connectome and a sparse set of reliable connections. Consequently, we propose to use alternative thresholding strategy based on the model fit using pseudo-False Discovery Rates derived on the basis of the empirical null estimated as part of the mixture distribution. We evaluate the method on synthetic benchmark fMRI datasets where the underlying network structure is known, and demonstrate that it gives improved performance with respect to the alternative methods for thresholding connectomes, given the canonical thresholding levels. We also demonstrate that mixture modeling gives highly reproducible results when applied to the functional connectomes of the visual system derived from the n-back Working Memory task in the Human Connectome Project. The sparse connectomes obtained from mixture modeling are further discussed in the light of the previous knowledge of the functional architecture

  10. Experimental and Finite Element Modeling of Near-Threshold Fatigue Crack Growth for the K-Decreasing Test Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Stephen W.; Seshadri, Banavara R.; Newman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The experimental methods to determine near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate data are prescribed in ASTM standard E647. To produce near-threshold data at a constant stress ratio (R), the applied stress-intensity factor (K) is decreased as the crack grows based on a specified K-gradient. Consequently, as the fatigue crack growth rate threshold is approached and the crack tip opening displacement decreases, remote crack wake contact may occur due to the plastically deformed crack wake surfaces and shield the growing crack tip resulting in a reduced crack tip driving force and non-representative crack growth rate data. If such data are used to life a component, the evaluation could yield highly non-conservative predictions. Although this anomalous behavior has been shown to be affected by K-gradient, starting K level, residual stresses, environmental assisted cracking, specimen geometry, and material type, the specifications within the standard to avoid this effect are limited to a maximum fatigue crack growth rate and a suggestion for the K-gradient value. This paper provides parallel experimental and computational simulations for the K-decreasing method for two materials (an aluminum alloy, AA 2024-T3 and a titanium alloy, Ti 6-2-2-2-2) to aid in establishing clear understanding of appropriate testing requirements. These simulations investigate the effect of K-gradient, the maximum value of stress-intensity factor applied, and material type. A material independent term is developed to guide in the selection of appropriate test conditions for most engineering alloys. With the use of such a term, near-threshold fatigue crack growth rate tests can be performed at accelerated rates, near-threshold data can be acquired in days instead of weeks without having to establish testing criteria through trial and error, and these data can be acquired for most engineering materials, even those that are produced in relatively small product forms.

  11. Application of habitat thresholds in conservation: Considerations, limitations, and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yntze van der Hoek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Habitat thresholds are often interpreted as the minimum required area of habitat, and subsequently promoted as conservation targets in natural resource policies and planning. Unfortunately, several recent reviews and messages of caution on the application of habitat thresholds in conservation have largely fallen on deaf ears, leading to a dangerous oversimplification and generalization of the concept. We highlight the prevalence of oversimplification/over-generalization of results from habitat threshold studies in policy documentation, the consequences of such over-generalization, and directions for habitat threshold studies that have conservation applications without risking overgeneralization. We argue that in order to steer away from misapplication of habitat thresholds in conservation, we should not focus on generalized nominal habitat values (i.e., amounts or percentages of habitat, but on the use of habitat threshold modeling for comparative exercises of area-sensitivity or the identification of environmental dangers. In addition, we should remain focused on understanding the processes and mechanisms underlying species responses to habitat change. Finally, studies could that focus on deriving nominal value threshold amounts should do so only if the thresholds are detailed, species-specific, and translated to conservation targets particular to the study area only.

  12. Wavefront reconstruction from its gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talmi, Amos; Ribak, Erez N

    2006-02-01

    Wavefronts reconstructed from measured gradients are composed of a straightforward integration of the measured data, plus a correction term that disappears when there are no measurement errors. For regions of any shape, this term is a solution of Poisson's equation with Dirichlet conditions (V = 0 on the boundaries). We show that for rectangular regions, the correct solution is not a periodic one, but one expressed with Fourier cosine series. The correct solution has a lower variance than the periodic Fourier transform solution. Similar formulas exist for a circular region with obscuration. We present a near-optimal solution that is much faster than fast-Fourier-transform methods. By use of diagonal multigrid methods, a single iteration brings the correction term to within a standard deviation of 0.08, two iterations, to within 0.0064, etc.

  13. Reaction Gradients Viewed Inside Single Photoactive Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, P.; Corral Arroyo, P.; Dou, J.; Kreiger, U.; Luo, B.; Peter, T.; Ammann, M.

    2017-12-01

    In terms of chemical selectivity and spatial resolution, a technique known as scanning transmission X-ray microscopy coupled to near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (STXM/NEXAFS) is unmatched and will remain so for years into the future. We present a recent development coupling STXM/NEXAFS to a custom-built photochemical environmental reactor in which aerosol particles reside allowing for in situ chemical imaging. A laboratory investigation of metal-organic complex photochemistry was conducted. Transition metals are of great importance to atmospheric chemistry and aerosol photochemical aging due to their ability to catalyze oxidation reactions. Aerosol particles composed of mixtures of citric acid and iron citrate were probed for their organic carbon composition and iron oxidation state under atmospherically relevant conditions. At 40% relative humidity, oxygen diffusion and reaction was severely limited. Fe was reoxidized in the first 200 nm of the particle surface leaving reduced iron in the core. Similar gradients were observed at 60% RH, however waiting approximately 2 hours in the dark resulted in a recovery of the initial Fe(III) concentration. We draw two main conclusions from our findings. Frist, the oxidation gradients must have been the result of anoxic conditions at the interior of aerosol particles. This was predicted using a newly developed model for molecular diffusion through multiple layers with a reaction framework describing the photochemical processing of the metal organic matrix. Second, the lifetime of organic radicals in an anoxic diffusion limited organic matrix must be considerably long ( hours) to completely reoxidize iron as they wait for molecular oxygen. Long radical lifetimes in viscous organic aerosol in turn, could create high radical concentrations or favor radical-radical reactions in particles typically not considered when oxygen is plentiful. Our results impact predictions of aerosol physiochemical properties, e

  14. Identifying Threshold Concepts for Information Literacy: A Delphi Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori Townsend

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study used the Delphi method to engage expert practitioners on the topic of threshold concepts for information literacy. A panel of experts considered two questions. First, is the threshold concept approach useful for information literacy instruction? The panel unanimously agreed that the threshold concept approach holds potential for information literacy instruction. Second, what are the threshold concepts for information literacy instruction? The panel proposed and discussed over fifty potential threshold concepts, finally settling on six information literacy threshold concepts.

  15. Cost-effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Melanie Y; Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost-effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost-effectiveness thresholds allow cost-effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization's Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost-effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country's per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this - in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost-effectiveness ratios - can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost-effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations - e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations - in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost-effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair.

  16. Threshold concepts in finance: conceptualizing the curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-08-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to the mastery of finance and by exploring their potential for informing curriculum design and pedagogical practices to improve student outcomes. In this paper, we report the results of an online survey of finance academics at multiple institutions in Australia, Canada, New Zealand, South Africa and the United Kingdom. The outcomes of our research are recommendations for threshold concepts in finance endorsed by quantitative evidence, as well as a model of the finance curriculum incorporating finance, modelling and statistics threshold concepts. In addition, we draw conclusions about the application of threshold concept theory supported by both quantitative and qualitative evidence. Our methodology and findings have general relevance to the application of threshold concept theory as a means to investigate and inform curriculum design and delivery in higher education.

  17. Latitudinal gradients in ecosystem engineering by oysters vary across habitats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Dominic; Cole, Victoria J; Bishop, Melanie J

    2016-04-01

    Ecological theory predicts that positive interactions among organisms will increase across gradients of increasing abiotic stress or consumer pressure. This theory has been supported by empirical studies examining the magnitude of ecosystem engineering across environmental gradients and between habitat settings at local scale. Predictions that habitat setting, by modifying both biotic and abiotic factors, will determine large-scale gradients in ecosystem engineering have not been tested, however. A combination of manipulative experiments and field surveys assessed whether along the east Australian coastline: (1) facilitation of invertebrates by the oyster Saccostrea glomerata increased across a latitudinal gradient in temperature; and (2) the magnitude of this effect varied between intertidal rocky shores and mangrove forests. It was expected that on rocky shores, where oysters are the primary ecosystem engineer, they would play a greater role in ameliorating latitudinal gradients in temperature than in mangroves, where they are a secondary ecosystem engineer living under the mangrove canopy. On rocky shores, the enhancement of invertebrate abundance in oysters as compared to bare microhabitat decreased with latitude, as the maximum temperatures experienced by intertidal organisms diminished. By contrast, in mangrove forests, where the mangrove canopy resulted in maximum temperatures that were cooler and of greater humidity than on rocky shores, we found no evidence of latitudinal gradients of oyster effects on invertebrate abundance. Contrary to predictions, the magnitude by which oysters enhanced biodiversity was in many instances similar between mangroves and rocky shores. Whether habitat-context modifies patterns of spatial variation in the effects of ecosystem engineers on community structure will depend, in part, on the extent to which the environmental amelioration provided by an ecosystem engineer replicates that of other co-occurring ecosystem engineers.

  18. Elevational gradient in clutch size of Red-faced Warblers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, Kristen G.; Conway, Courtney J.

    2015-01-01

    Our understanding of life history evolution has benefited from debates regarding the underlying causes, and geographic ubiquity, of spatial patterns in avian clutch sizes. Past studies have revealed that birds lay smaller clutch sizes at higher elevation. However, in most previous studies, investigators have failed to adequately control for elevational differences in breeding phenology. To better understand the elevational gradient in avian clutch size, we need to know how clutch size changes across the entire elevational breeding range of a species (i.e., the shape of the relationship between elevation and clutch size), and whether the elevational gradient in clutch size is merely an artifact of elevational gradients in breeding phenology or breeding season length. We examined the relationship between breeding elevation and clutch size of Red-faced Warblers (Cardellina rubrifrons) along a 1000-m elevational gradient in Arizona. Our objectives were to determine how clutch size changed with elevation, and if the relationship between clutch size and elevation merely reflected elevational changes in breeding season length or phenology. The proportion of 5-egg clutches decreased and the proportion of 3- and 4-egg clutches increased non-linearly with increasing elevation, even after controlling for the elevational gradient in nest initiation date. Thus, average clutch size declined across the elevational breeding range of Red-faced Warblers, but this decline was not due to elevational variation in breeding phenology. Timing of breeding changed, but the duration of the breeding season did not change appreciably across the elevational gradient. Hence, elevational differences in breeding season length or breeding phenology cannot explain why Red-faced Warblers (and perhaps other birds) breeding at higher elevations have smaller clutches.

  19. The effect of shear flow and the density gradient on the Weibel instability growth rate in the dense plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amininasab, S.; Sadighi-Bonabi, R.; Khodadadi Azadboni, F.

    2018-02-01

    Shear stress effect has been often neglected in calculation of the Weibel instability growth rate in laser-plasma interactions. In the present work, the role of the shear stress in the Weibel instability growth rate in the dense plasma with density gradient is explored. By increasing the density gradient, the shear stress threshold is increasing and the range of the propagation angles of growing modes is limited. Therefore, by increasing steps of the density gradient plasma near the relativistic electron beam-emitting region, the Weibel instability occurs at a higher stress flow. Calculations show that the minimum value of the stress rate threshold for linear polarization is greater than that of circular polarization. The Wiebel instability growth rate for linear polarization is 18.3 times circular polarization. One sees that for increasing stress and density gradient effects, there are smaller maximal growth rates for the range of the propagation angles of growing modes /π 2 stress and density gradient tend to stabilize the Weibel instability for /k c ω p stress and density gradient tend to stabilize the Weibel instability for the range of the propagation angles of growing modes /π 2 < θ m i n < π and /3 π 2 < θ m i n < 2 π in circular polarized plasma.

  20. Jupiter's evolution with primordial composition gradients

    OpenAIRE

    Vazan, A.; Helled, R.; Guillot, T.

    2018-01-01

    Recent formation and structure models of Jupiter suggest that the planet can have composition gradients and not be fully convective (adiabatic). This possibility directly affects our understanding of Jupiter's bulk composition and origin. In this Letter we present Jupiter's evolution with a primordial structure consisting of a relatively steep heavy-element gradient of 40 Earth masses. We show that for a primordial structure with composition gradients, most of the mixing occurs in the outer p...

  1. Thermal conduction down steep temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, A.R.; Evans, R.G.; Nicholas, D.J.

    1980-08-01

    The Fokker-Planck equation has been solved numerically in one spatial and two velocity dimensions in order to study thermal conduction in large temperature gradients. An initially cold plasma is heated at one end of the spatial grid producing temperature gradients with scale lengths of a few times the electron mean free path. The heat flow is an order of magnitude smaller than that predicted by the classical theory which is valid in the limit of small temperature gradients. (author)

  2. Accelerated fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithms for sparsity-regularized cone-beam CT image reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Yang, Deshan; Tan, Jun; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) remains an active and important research area. Even with hardware acceleration, the overwhelming majority of the available 3D iterative algorithms that implement nonsmooth regularizers remain computationally burdensome and have not been translated for routine use in time-sensitive applications such as image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, two variants of the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (FISTA) are proposed and investigated for accelerated iterative image reconstruction in CBCT. Methods: Algorithm acceleration was achieved by replacing the original gradient-descent step in the FISTAs by a subproblem that is solved by use of the ordered subset simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OS-SART). Due to the preconditioning matrix adopted in the OS-SART method, two new weighted proximal problems were introduced and corresponding fast gradient projection-type algorithms were developed for solving them. We also provided efficient numerical implementations of the proposed algorithms that exploit the massive data parallelism of multiple graphics processing units. Results: The improved rates of convergence of the proposed algorithms were quantified in computer-simulation studies and by use of clinical projection data corresponding to an IGRT study. The accelerated FISTAs were shown to possess dramatically improved convergence properties as compared to the standard FISTAs. For example, the number of iterations to achieve a specified reconstruction error could be reduced by an order of magnitude. Volumetric images reconstructed from clinical data were produced in under 4 min. Conclusions: The FISTA achieves a quadratic convergence rate and can therefore potentially reduce the number of iterations required to produce an image of a specified image quality as compared to first-order methods. We have proposed and investigated

  3. Accelerated fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithms for sparsity-regularized cone-beam CT image reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Qiaofeng; Sawatzky, Alex; Anastasio, Mark A.; Yang, Deshan; Tan, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The development of iterative image reconstruction algorithms for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) remains an active and important research area. Even with hardware acceleration, the overwhelming majority of the available 3D iterative algorithms that implement nonsmooth regularizers remain computationally burdensome and have not been translated for routine use in time-sensitive applications such as image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT). In this work, two variants of the fast iterative shrinkage thresholding algorithm (FISTA) are proposed and investigated for accelerated iterative image reconstruction in CBCT. Methods: Algorithm acceleration was achieved by replacing the original gradient-descent step in the FISTAs by a subproblem that is solved by use of the ordered subset simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (OS-SART). Due to the preconditioning matrix adopted in the OS-SART method, two new weighted proximal problems were introduced and corresponding fast gradient projection-type algorithms were developed for solving them. We also provided efficient numerical implementations of the proposed algorithms that exploit the massive data parallelism of multiple graphics processing units. Results: The improved rates of convergence of the proposed algorithms were quantified in computer-simulation studies and by use of clinical projection data corresponding to an IGRT study. The accelerated FISTAs were shown to possess dramatically improved convergence properties as compared to the standard FISTAs. For example, the number of iterations to achieve a specified reconstruction error could be reduced by an order of magnitude. Volumetric images reconstructed from clinical data were produced in under 4 min. Conclusions: The FISTA achieves a quadratic convergence rate and can therefore potentially reduce the number of iterations required to produce an image of a specified image quality as compared to first-order methods. We have proposed and investigated

  4. Overwash threshold experiment for gravel barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matias, Ana; Williams, Jon; Bradbury, Andrew; Masselink, Gerhard; Ferreira, Óscar

    2010-05-01

    Field measurements of overwash effects, associated physical forcing, and determination of threshold conditions, are much less common for gravel than for sandy barriers (e.g., field measurements by Lorang, 2002; Bradbury et al., 2005; and laboratory studies by Obhrai et al., 2008). In order to define overwash thresholds for gravel there is a need for measurements under a variety of forcing conditions that include waves, tides and surges. Flume experiments allow the manipulation of physical forcing and can make a valuable contribution to improve the understanding and prediction of overwash. To study gravel barrier overwash processes, BARDEX proto-type scale laboratory experiment was undertaken in the Delta flume (Williams et al., 2009). A 4 m high, 50 m wide gravel barrier composed of sediments with D50 = 10 mm was emplaced in the flume and subjected to a range of water levels, wave heights and wave periods. Barrier morphology was surveyed before and after each run. Two situations were simulated: overwashing and overtopping. Following Orford and Carter (1982) terminology, the distinction between overtopping and overwash was based on the type of morphological change over the barrier crest. Overtopping causes vertical accretion at the crest, whereas overwashing promotes the formation of washover deposits landwards from the crest. Ten overwash experiments were conducted (divided in 63 runs), and overtopping was recorded in 22 runs and overwash in 20 runs. In other runs, only the beach face was reworked by waves. In a systematic series of tests water levels were varied between 3.00 m and 3.75 m (in steps of 0.125 m); wave height was varied between 0.8 m and 1.3 m (in steps of 0.05 or 0.1 m); and wave periods of 4.5, 6, 7 and 8 seconds were used. These hydrodynamic conditions were used to compute wave run-up using several well-known formulae (cf., Powell, 1990; Stockdon et al., 2007). Comparison between run-up estimations and the barrier crest elevation prior to wave

  5. A Class Of Iterative Thresholding Algorithms For Real-Time Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, M. H.

    1989-03-01

    Thresholding algorithms are developed for segmenting gray-level images under nonuniform illumination. The algorithms are based on learning models generated from recursive digital filters which yield to continuously varying threshold tracking functions. A real-time region growing algorithm, which locates the objects in the image while thresholding, is developed and implemented. The algorithms work in a raster-scan format, thus making them attractive for real-time image segmentation in situations requiring fast data throughput such as robot vision and character recognition.

  6. Position Estimation for Switched Reluctance Motor Based on the Single Threshold Angle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Li, Pang; Yu, Yue

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents a position estimate model of switched reluctance motor based on the single threshold angle. In view of the relationship of between the inductance and rotor position, the position is estimated by comparing the real-time dynamic flux linkage with the threshold angle position flux linkage (7.5° threshold angle, 12/8SRM). The sensorless model is built by Maltab/Simulink, the simulation are implemented under the steady state and transient state different condition, and verified its validity and feasibility of the method..

  7. STOCHASTIC GRADIENT METHODS FOR UNCONSTRAINED OPTIMIZATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Krejić

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This papers presents an overview of gradient based methods for minimization of noisy functions. It is assumed that the objective functions is either given with error terms of stochastic nature or given as the mathematical expectation. Such problems arise in the context of simulation based optimization. The focus of this presentation is on the gradient based Stochastic Approximation and Sample Average Approximation methods. The concept of stochastic gradient approximation of the true gradient can be successfully extended to deterministic problems. Methods of this kind are presented for the data fitting and machine learning problems.

  8. Wireless SAW Based Temperature Gradient Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Prime Photonics proposes design and development of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) based temperature gradient sensor for instrumentation of thermal protection systems...

  9. Community and ecosystem responses to elevational gradients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundqvist, Maja K.; Sanders, Nate; Wardle, David A.

    2013-01-01

    elevational gradients for understanding community and ecosystem responses to global climate change at much larger spatial and temporal scales than is possible through conventional ecological experiments. However, future studies that integrate elevational gradient approaches with experimental manipulations...... will provide powerful information that can improve predictions of climate change impacts within and across ecosystems.......Community structure and ecosystem processes often vary along elevational gradients. Their responses to elevation are commonly driven by changes in temperature, and many community- and ecosystem-level variables therefore frequently respond similarly to elevation across contrasting gradients...

  10. On lower order strain gradient plasticity theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Niordson, Christian Frithiof; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2003-01-01

    the tangent moduli governing increments of stress and strain. It is shown that the modification is far from benign from a mathematical standpoint, changing the qualitative character of solutions and leading to a new type of localization that is at odds with what is expected from a strain gradient theory......By way of numerical examples, this paper explores the nature of solutions to a class of strain gradient plasticity theories that employ conventional stresses, equilibrium equations and boundary conditions. Strain gradients come into play in these modified conventional theories only to alter....... The findings raise questions about the physical acceptability of this class of strain gradient theories....

  11. Spatial Resolution Effect on Forest Road Gradient Calculation and Erosion Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, L.; Elliot, W.

    2017-12-01

    Road erosion is one of the main sediment sources in a forest watershed and should be properly evaluated. With the help of GIS technology, road topography can be determined and soil loss can be predicted at a watershed scale. As a vector geographical feature, the road gradient should be calculated following road direction rather than hillslope direction. This calculation might be difficult with a coarse (30-m) DEM which only provides the underlying topography information. This study was designed to explore the effect of road segmentation and DEM resolution on the road gradient calculation and erosion prediction at a watershed scale. The Water Erosion Prediction Project (WEPP) model was run on road segments of 9 lengths ranging from 40m to 200m. Road gradient was calculated from three DEM data sets: 1m LiDAR, and 10m and 30m USGS DEMs. The 1m LiDAR DEM calculated gradients were very close to the field observed road gradients, so we assumed the 1m LiDAR DEM predicted the true road gradient. The results revealed that longer road segments skipped detail topographical undulations and resulted in lower road gradients. Coarser DEMs computed steeper road gradients as larger grid cells covered more adjacent areas outside road resulting in larger elevation differences. Field surveyed results also revealed that coarser DEM might result in more gradient deviation in a curved road segment when it passes through a convex or concave slope. As road segment length increased, the gradient difference between three DEMs was reduced. There were no significant differences between road gradients of different segment lengths and DEM resolution when segments were longer than 100m. For long segments, the 10m DEM calculated road gradient was similar to the 1m LiDAR gradient. When evaluating the effects of road segment length, the predicted erosion rate decreased with increasing length when road gradient was less than 3%. In cases where the road gradients exceed 3% and rill erosion dominates

  12. Aqueous gradient by balancing diffusive and convective mass transport (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habhab, Mohammed-Baker I.; Ismail, Tania; Lo, Joe F.; Haque, Arefa

    2016-03-01

    In wounds, cells secret biomolecules such as vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein that controls many processes in healing. VEGF protein is expressed in a gradient in tissue, and its shape will be affected by the tissue injury sustained during wounding. In order to study the responses of keratinocyte cell migration to VEGF gradients and the geometric factors on wound healing, we designed a microfluidic gradient device that can generate large area gradients (1.5 cm in diameter) capable of mimicking arbitrary wound shapes. Microfluidic devices offer novel techniques to address biological and biomedical issues. Different from other gradient microfluidics, our device balances diffusion of biomolecules versus the convective clearance by a buffer flow on the opposite ends of the gradient. This allows us to create a large area gradient within shorter time scales by actively driving mass transport. In addition, the microfluidic device makes use of a porous filter membrane to create this balance as well as to deliver the resulting gradient to a culture of cells. The culture of cells are seeded above the gradient in a gasket chamber. However, Keratinocytes do not migrate effectively on filter paper. Therefore, in order to improve the motility of cells on the surface, we coated the filter paper with a 30m thick layer of gelatin type B. after observation under the microscope we found that the gelatin coated sample showed cells with more spread out morphology, with 97% viability, suggesting better adhesion than the non-coated sample.

  13. Interrelationship between flexoelectricity and strain gradient elasticity in ferroelectric nanofilms: A phase field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Limei; Xu, Xiaofei; Zhou, Yichun

    2016-12-01

    With the development of the integrated circuit technology and decreasing of the device size, ferroelectric films used in nano ferroelectric devices become thinner and thinner. Along with the downscaling of the ferroelectric film, there is an increasing influence of two strain gradient related terms. One is the strain gradient elasticity and the other one is flexoelectricity. To investigate the interrelationship between flexoelectricity and strain gradient elasticity and their combined effect on the domain structure in ferroelectric nanofilms, a phase field model of flexoelectricity and strain gradient elasticity on the ferroelectric domain evolution is developed based on Mindlin's theory of strain-gradient elasticity. Weak form is derived and implemented in finite element formulations for numerically solving the model equations. The simulation results show that upper bounds for flexoelectric coefficients can be enhanced by increasing strain gradient elasticity coefficients. While a large flexoelectricity that exceeds the upper bound can induce a transition from a ferroelectric state to a modulated/incommensurate state, a large enough strain gradient elasticity may lead to a conversion from an incommensurate state to a ferroelectric state. Strain gradient elasticity and the flexoelectricity have entirely opposite effects on polarization. The observed interrelationship between the strain gradient elasticity and flexoelectricity is rationalized by an analytical solution of the proposed theoretical model. The model proposed in this paper could help us understand the mechanism of phenomena observed in ferroelectric nanofilms under complex electromechanical loads and provide some guides on the practical application of ferroelectric nanofilms.

  14. Regression Discontinuity Designs Based on Population Thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eggers, Andrew C.; Freier, Ronny; Grembi, Veronica

    ) to measure the effects of these threshold-based policies on political and economic outcomes. Using evidence from France, Germany, and Italy, we highlight two common pitfalls that arise in exploiting population-based policies (confounded treatment and sorting) and we provide guidance for detecting......In many countries, important features of municipal government (such as the electoral system, mayors' salaries, and the number of councillors) depend on whether the municipality is above or below arbitrary population thresholds. Several papers have used a regression discontinuity design (RDD...... and addressing these pitfalls. Even when these problems are present, population-threshold RDD may be the best available research design for studying the effects of certain policies and political institutions....

  15. THRESHOLD PARAMETER OF THE EXPECTED LOSSES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josip Arnerić

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of extreme value analysis is to quantify the probabilistic behavior of unusually large losses using only extreme values above some high threshold rather than using all of the data which gives better fit to tail distribution in comparison to traditional methods with assumption of normality. In our case we estimate market risk using daily returns of the CROBEX index at the Zagreb Stock Exchange. Therefore, it’s necessary to define the excess distribution above some threshold, i.e. Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD is used as much more reliable than the normal distribution due to the fact that gives the accent on the extreme values. Parameters of GPD distribution will be estimated using maximum likelihood method (MLE. The contribution of this paper is to specify threshold which is large enough so that GPD approximation valid but low enough so that a sufficient number of observations are available for a precise fit.

  16. Threshold Theory Tested in an Organizational Setting

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Bo T.; Hartmann, Peter V. W.; Hedegaard Rasmussen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    correlations differed significantly. The finding was stable across distinct parts of the sample, providing support for the theory, although the correlations in all subsamples were small. The findings lend support to the existence of threshold effects using perceptual measures of behavior in real......A large sample of leaders (N = 4257) was used to test the link between leader innovativeness and intelligence. The threshold theory of the link between creativity and intelligence assumes that below a certain IQ level (approximately IQ 120), there is some correlation between IQ and creative...... potential, but above this cutoff point, there is no correlation. Support for the threshold theory of creativity was found, in that the correlation between IQ and innovativeness was positive and significant below a cutoff point of IQ 120. Above the cutoff, no significant relation was identified, and the two...

  17. Measurement and interpretation of threshold stress intensity factors for steels in high-pressure hydrogen gas.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadfarnia, Mohsen (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Nibur, Kevin A.; San Marchi, Christopher W.; Sofronis, Petros (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL); Somerday, Brian P.; Foulk, James W., III; Hayden, Gary A. (CP Industries, McKeesport, PA)

    2010-07-01

    Threshold stress intensity factors were measured in high-pressure hydrogen gas for a variety of low alloy ferritic steels using both constant crack opening displacement and rising crack opening displacement procedures. The sustained load cracking procedures are generally consistent with those in ASME Article KD-10 of Section VIII Division 3 of the Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code, which was recently published to guide design of high-pressure hydrogen vessels. Three definitions of threshold were established for the two test methods: K{sub THi}* is the maximum applied stress intensity factor for which no crack extension was observed under constant displacement; K{sub THa} is the stress intensity factor at the arrest position for a crack that extended under constant displacement; and K{sub JH} is the stress intensity factor at the onset of crack extension under rising displacement. The apparent crack initiation threshold under constant displacement, K{sub THi}*, and the crack arrest threshold, K{sub THa}, were both found to be non-conservative due to the hydrogen exposure and crack-tip deformation histories associated with typical procedures for sustained-load cracking tests under constant displacement. In contrast, K{sub JH}, which is measured under concurrent rising displacement and hydrogen gas exposure, provides a more conservative hydrogen-assisted fracture threshold that is relevant to structural components in which sub-critical crack extension is driven by internal hydrogen gas pressure.

  18. Constrained Optimization via Stochastic approximation with a simultaneous perturbation gradient approximation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sadegh, Payman

    1997-01-01

    This paper deals with a projection algorithm for stochastic approximation using simultaneous perturbation gradient approximation for optimization under inequality constraints where no direct gradient of the loss function is available and the inequality constraints are given as explicit functions...... of the optimization parameters. It is shown that, under application of the projection algorithm, the parameter iterate converges almost surely to a Kuhn-Tucker point, The procedure is illustrated by a numerical example, (C) 1997 Elsevier Science Ltd....

  19. Selection Strategies for Social Influence in the Threshold Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karampourniotis, Panagiotis; Szymanski, Boleslaw; Korniss, Gyorgy

    The ubiquity of online social networks makes the study of social influence extremely significant for its applications to marketing, politics and security. Maximizing the spread of influence by strategically selecting nodes as initiators of a new opinion or trend is a challenging problem. We study the performance of various strategies for selection of large fractions of initiators on a classical social influence model, the Threshold model (TM). Under the TM, a node adopts a new opinion only when the fraction of its first neighbors possessing that opinion exceeds a pre-assigned threshold. The strategies we study are of two kinds: strategies based solely on the initial network structure (Degree-rank, Dominating Sets, PageRank etc.) and strategies that take into account the change of the states of the nodes during the evolution of the cascade, e.g. the greedy algorithm. We find that the performance of these strategies depends largely on both the network structure properties, e.g. the assortativity, and the distribution of the thresholds assigned to the nodes. We conclude that the optimal strategy needs to combine the network specifics and the model specific parameters to identify the most influential spreaders. Supported in part by ARL NS-CTA, ARO, and ONR.

  20. Effect of Electron Seeding on Experimentally Measured Multipactor Discharge Threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Jonathan; Graves, Timothy; Lemon, Colby; Looper, Mark; Farkas, Alex

    2012-10-01

    Multipactor is a vacuum phenomenon in which electrons, moving in resonance with an externally applied electric field, impact material surfaces. If the number of secondary electrons created per primary electron impact averages more than unity, the resonant interaction can lead to an electron avalanche. Multipactor is a generally undesirable phenomenon, as it can cause local heating, absorb power, or cause detuning of RF circuits. In order to increase the probability of multipactor initiation, test facilities often employ various seeding sources such as radioactive sources (Cesium 137, Strontium 90), electron guns, or photon sources. Even with these sources, the voltage for multipactor initiation is not certain as parameters such as material type, RF pulse length, and device wall thickness can all affect seed electron flux and energy in critical gap regions, and hence the measured voltage threshold. This study investigates the effects of seed electron source type (e.g., photons versus beta particles), material type, gap size, and RF pulse length variation on multipactor threshold. In addition to the experimental work, GEANT4 simulations will be used to estimate the production rate of low energy electrons (< 5 keV) by high energy electrons and photons. A comparison of the experimental fluxes to the typical energetic photon and particle fluxes experienced by spacecraft in various orbits will also be made. Initial results indicate that for a simple, parallel plate device made of aluminum, there is no threshold variation (with seed electrons versus with no seed electrons) under continuous-wave RF exposure.

  1. Ultrahigh Error Threshold for Surface Codes with Biased Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, David K.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Flammia, Steven T.

    2018-02-01

    We show that a simple modification of the surface code can exhibit an enormous gain in the error correction threshold for a noise model in which Pauli Z errors occur more frequently than X or Y errors. Such biased noise, where dephasing dominates, is ubiquitous in many quantum architectures. In the limit of pure dephasing noise we find a threshold of 43.7(1)% using a tensor network decoder proposed by Bravyi, Suchara, and Vargo. The threshold remains surprisingly large in the regime of realistic noise bias ratios, for example 28.2(2)% at a bias of 10. The performance is, in fact, at or near the hashing bound for all values of the bias. The modified surface code still uses only weight-4 stabilizers on a square lattice, but merely requires measuring products of Y instead of Z around the faces, as this doubles the number of useful syndrome bits associated with the dominant Z errors. Our results demonstrate that large efficiency gains can be found by appropriately tailoring codes and decoders to realistic noise models, even under the locality constraints of topological codes.

  2. Large Covariance Estimation by Thresholding Principal Orthogonal Complements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2012-01-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of a high-dimensional covariance with a conditional sparsity structure and fast-diverging eigenvalues. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix in an approximate factor model, we allow for the presence of some cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common but unobservable factors. We introduce the Principal Orthogonal complEment Thresholding (POET) method to explore such an approximate factor structure with sparsity. The POET estimator includes the sample covariance matrix, the factor-based covariance matrix (Fan, Fan, and Lv, 2008), the thresholding estimator (Bickel and Levina, 2008) and the adaptive thresholding estimator (Cai and Liu, 2011) as specific examples. We provide mathematical insights when the factor analysis is approximately the same as the principal component analysis for high-dimensional data. The rates of convergence of the sparse residual covariance matrix and the conditional sparse covariance matrix are studied under various norms. It is shown that the impact of estimating the unknown factors vanishes as the dimensionality increases. The uniform rates of convergence for the unobserved factors and their factor loadings are derived. The asymptotic results are also verified by extensive simulation studies. Finally, a real data application on portfolio allocation is presented. PMID:24348088

  3. Immobilization thresholds of electrofishing relative to fish size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolan, C.R.; Miranda, L.E.

    2003-01-01

    Fish size and electrical waveforms have frequently been associated with variation in electrofishing effectiveness. Under controlled laboratory conditions, we measured the electrical power required by five electrical waveforms to immobilize eight fish species of diverse sizes and shapes. Fish size was indexed by total body length, surface area, volume, and weight; shape was indexed by the ratio of body length to body depth. Our objectives were to identify immobilization thresholds, elucidate the descriptors of fish size that were best associated with those immobilization thresholds, and determine whether the vulnerability of a species relative to other species remained constant across electrical treatments. The results confirmed that fish size is a key variable controlling the immobilization threshold and further suggested that the size descriptor best related to immobilization is fish volume. The peak power needed to immobilize fish decreased rapidly with increasing fish volume in small fish but decreased slowly for fish larger than 75-100 cm 3. Furthermore, when we controlled for size and shape, different waveforms did not favor particular species, possibly because of the overwhelming effect of body size. Many of the immobilization inconsistencies previously attributed to species might simply represent the effect of disparities in body size.

  4. Large Covariance Estimation by Thresholding Principal Orthogonal Complements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Jianqing; Liao, Yuan; Mincheva, Martina

    2013-09-01

    This paper deals with the estimation of a high-dimensional covariance with a conditional sparsity structure and fast-diverging eigenvalues. By assuming sparse error covariance matrix in an approximate factor model, we allow for the presence of some cross-sectional correlation even after taking out common but unobservable factors. We introduce the Principal Orthogonal complEment Thresholding (POET) method to explore such an approximate factor structure with sparsity. The POET estimator includes the sample covariance matrix, the factor-based covariance matrix (Fan, Fan, and Lv, 2008), the thresholding estimator (Bickel and Levina, 2008) and the adaptive thresholding estimator (Cai and Liu, 2011) as specific examples. We provide mathematical insights when the factor analysis is approximately the same as the principal component analysis for high-dimensional data. The rates of convergence of the sparse residual covariance matrix and the conditional sparse covariance matrix are studied under various norms. It is shown that the impact of estimating the unknown factors vanishes as the dimensionality increases. The uniform rates of convergence for the unobserved factors and their factor loadings are derived. The asymptotic results are also verified by extensive simulation studies. Finally, a real data application on portfolio allocation is presented.

  5. Social contagion with degree-dependent thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eun; Holme, Petter

    2017-07-01

    We investigate opinion spreading by a threshold model in a situation in which the influence of people is heterogeneously distributed. We assume that there is a coupling between the influence of an individual (measured by the out-degree) and the threshold for accepting a new opinion or habit. We find that if the coupling is strongly positive, the final state of the system will be a mix of different opinions. Otherwise, it will converge to a consensus state. This phenomenon cannot simply be explained as a phase transition, but it is a combined effect of mechanisms and their relative dominance in different regions of parameter space.

  6. Color image Segmentation using automatic thresholding techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrabi, R.; Ben Braiek, E.

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, entropy and between-class variance based thresholding methods for color images segmentation are studied. The maximization of the between-class variance (MVI) and the entropy (ME) have been used as a criterion functions to determine an optimal threshold to segment images into nearly homogenous regions. Segmentation results from the two methods are validated and the segmentation sensitivity for the test data available is evaluated, and a comparative study between these methods in different color spaces is presented. The experimental results demonstrate the superiority of the MVI method for color image segmentation.

  7. Development of Thresholds and Exceedance Probabilities for Influent Water Quality to Meet Drinking Water Regulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, K. L.; Samson, C.; Summers, R. S.; Balaji, R.

    2017-12-01

    Drinking water treatment utilities (DWTU) are tasked with the challenge of meeting disinfection and disinfection byproduct (DBP) regulations to provide safe, reliable drinking water under changing climate and land surface characteristics. DBPs form in drinking water when disinfectants, commonly chlorine, react with organic matter as measured by total organic carbon (TOC), and physical removal of pathogen microorganisms are achieved by filtration and monitored by turbidity removal. Turbidity and TOC in influent waters to DWTUs are expected to increase due to variable climate and more frequent fires and droughts. Traditional methods for forecasting turbidity and TOC require catchment specific data (i.e. streamflow) and have difficulties predicting them under non-stationary climate. A modelling framework was developed to assist DWTUs with assessing their risk for future compliance with disinfection and DBP regulations under changing climate. A local polynomial method was developed to predict surface water TOC using climate data collected from NOAA, Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) data from the IRI Data Library, and historical TOC data from three DWTUs in diverse geographic locations. Characteristics from the DWTUs were used in the EPA Water Treatment Plant model to determine thresholds for influent TOC that resulted in DBP concentrations within compliance. Lastly, extreme value theory was used to predict probabilities of threshold exceedances under the current climate. Results from the utilities were used to produce a generalized TOC threshold approach that only requires water temperature and bromide concentration. The threshold exceedance model will be used to estimate probabilities of exceedances under projected climate scenarios. Initial results show that TOC can be forecasted using widely available data via statistical methods, where temperature, precipitation, Palmer Drought Severity Index, and NDVI with various lags were shown to be important

  8. High-gradient two-beam accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Yu Kazakov

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available A novel cavity structure is described that could be the basis for a two-beam, high-gradient, accelerator. Versions of the structure could be used for acceleration of beams of electrons, positrons, muons, protons, or heavier ions; with either electron or proton drive beams. The structure embodies cavities that are excited in several harmonically related eigenmodes, such that rf fields reach their peak values only during small portions of each basic rf period. This feature could help raise breakdown and pulse heating thresholds. The two-beam accelerator structure comprises chains of these cavities. In this configuration, no transfer elements are needed to couple rf energy from the drive beam to the accelerated beam, since both beams traverse the same cavities. Purposeful cavity detuning is used to provide much smaller deceleration for a high-current drive beam, than acceleration for a low-current accelerated beam, i.e., to provide a high transformer ratio. A self-consistent theory is presented to calculate idealized acceleration gradient, transformer ratio, and efficiency for energy transfer from the drive beam to the accelerated beam, for either parallel or antiparallel motion of the beams. The theory has been cast in dimensionless quantities so as to facilitate optimization with respect to efficiency, acceleration gradient, or transformer ratio, and to illuminate the interdependence of these parameters. Means for dramatically shortening the structure fill time are also described. However, no beam dynamics analysis is presented, so the range of parameters within which this new acceleration concept can be used will remain uncertain until it is established that stable beam transport along the structure using an appropriate focusing system is possible.

  9. A study of gradient strengthening based on a finite-deformation gradient crystal-plasticity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouriayevali, Habib; Xu, Bai-Xiang

    2017-11-01

    A comprehensive study on a finite-deformation gradient crystal-plasticity model which has been derived based on Gurtin's framework (Int J Plast 24:702-725, 2008) is carried out here. This systematic investigation on the different roles of governing components of the model represents the strength of this framework in the prediction of a wide range of hardening behaviors as well as rate-dependent and scale-variation responses in a single crystal. The model is represented in the reference configuration for the purpose of numerical implementation and then implemented in the FEM software ABAQUS via a user-defined subroutine (UEL). Furthermore, a function of accumulation rates of dislocations is employed and viewed as a measure of formation of short-range interactions. Our simulation results reveal that the dissipative gradient strengthening can be identified as a source of isotropic-hardening behavior, which may represent the effect of irrecoverable work introduced by Gurtin and Ohno (J Mech Phys Solids 59:320-343, 2011). Here, the variation of size dependency at different magnitude of a rate-sensitivity parameter is also discussed. Moreover, an observation of effect of a distinctive feature in the model which explains the effect of distortion of crystal lattice in the reference configuration is reported in this study for the first time. In addition, plastic flows in predefined slip systems and expansion of accumulation of GNDs are distinctly observed in varying scales and under different loading conditions.

  10. Comparison between intensity- duration thresholds and cumulative rainfall thresholds for the forecasting of landslide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagomarsino, Daniela; Rosi, Ascanio; Rossi, Guglielmo; Segoni, Samuele; Catani, Filippo

    2014-05-01

    This work makes a quantitative comparison between the results of landslide forecasting obtained using two different rainfall threshold models, one using intensity-duration thresholds and the other based on cumulative rainfall thresholds in an area of northern Tuscany of 116 km2. The first methodology identifies rainfall intensity-duration thresholds by means a software called MaCumBA (Massive CUMulative Brisk Analyzer) that analyzes rain-gauge records, extracts the intensities (I) and durations (D) of the rainstorms associated with the initiation of landslides, plots these values on a diagram, and identifies thresholds that define the lower bounds of the I-D values. A back analysis using data from past events can be used to identify the threshold conditions associated with the least amount of false alarms. The second method (SIGMA) is based on the hypothesis that anomalous or extreme values of rainfall are responsible for landslide triggering: the statistical distribution of the rainfall series is analyzed, and multiples of the standard deviation (σ) are used as thresholds to discriminate between ordinary and extraordinary rainfall events. The name of the model, SIGMA, reflects the central role of the standard deviations in the proposed methodology. The definition of intensity-duration rainfall thresholds requires the combined use of rainfall measurements and an inventory of dated landslides, whereas SIGMA model can be implemented using only rainfall data. These two methodologies were applied in an area of 116 km2 where a database of 1200 landslides was available for the period 2000-2012. The results obtained are compared and discussed. Although several examples of visual comparisons between different intensity-duration rainfall thresholds are reported in the international literature, a quantitative comparison between thresholds obtained in the same area using different techniques and approaches is a relatively undebated research topic.

  11. Insights into flexoelectricity from strain-gradient elasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Sheng

    2014-01-01

    A material is said to be flexoelectric when it polarizes in response to strain gradients. The phenomenon is well known in liquid crystals and biomembranes but has received less attention in hard materials such as ceramics. Here we derive the governing equations for a flexoelectric solid under small deformation. We assume a linear constitutive relation and use it to prove a reciprocal theorem for flexoelectric materials as well as to obtain a higher-order Navier equation in the isotropic case....

  12. Canonical trivialization of gravitational gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niedermaier, Max

    2017-01-01

    A one-parameter family of canonical transformations is constructed that reduces the Hamiltonian form of the Einstein–Hilbert action to its strong coupling limit where dynamical spatial gradients are absent. The parameter can alternatively be viewed as the overall scale of the spatial metric or as a fractional inverse power of Newton’s constant. The generating function of the canonical transformation is constructed iteratively as a powerseries in the parameter to all orders. The algorithm draws on Lie–Deprit transformation theory and defines a ‘trivialization map’ with several bonus properties: (i) Trivialization of the Hamiltonian constraint implies that of the action while the diffeomorphism constraint is automatically co-transformed. (ii) Only a set of ordinary differential equations needs to be solved to drive the iteration via a homological equation where no gauge fixing is required. (iii) In contrast to (the classical limit of) a Lagrangian trivialization map the algorithm also produces series solutions of the field equations. (iv) In the strong coupling theory temporal gauge variations are abelian, nevertheless the map intertwines with the respective gauge symmetries on the action, the field equations, and their solutions. (paper)

  13. Canonical trivialization of gravitational gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niedermaier, Max

    2017-06-01

    A one-parameter family of canonical transformations is constructed that reduces the Hamiltonian form of the Einstein-Hilbert action to its strong coupling limit where dynamical spatial gradients are absent. The parameter can alternatively be viewed as the overall scale of the spatial metric or as a fractional inverse power of Newton’s constant. The generating function of the canonical transformation is constructed iteratively as a powerseries in the parameter to all orders. The algorithm draws on Lie-Deprit transformation theory and defines a ‘trivialization map’ with several bonus properties: (i) Trivialization of the Hamiltonian constraint implies that of the action while the diffeomorphism constraint is automatically co-transformed. (ii) Only a set of ordinary differential equations needs to be solved to drive the iteration via a homological equation where no gauge fixing is required. (iii) In contrast to (the classical limit of) a Lagrangian trivialization map the algorithm also produces series solutions of the field equations. (iv) In the strong coupling theory temporal gauge variations are abelian, nevertheless the map intertwines with the respective gauge symmetries on the action, the field equations, and their solutions.

  14. Mangrove expansion and contraction at a poleward range limit: climate extremes and land-ocean temperature gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osland, Michael J; Day, Richard H; Hall, Courtney T; Brumfield, Marisa D; Dugas, Jason L; Jones, William R

    2017-01-01

    Within the context of climate change, there is a pressing need to better understand the ecological implications of changes in the frequency and intensity of climate extremes. Along subtropical coasts, less frequent and warmer freeze events are expected to permit freeze-sensitive mangrove forests to expand poleward and displace freeze-tolerant salt marshes. Here, our aim was to better understand the drivers of poleward mangrove migration by quantifying spatiotemporal patterns in mangrove range expansion and contraction across land-ocean temperature gradients. Our work was conducted in a freeze-sensitive mangrove-marsh transition zone that spans a land-ocean temperature gradient in one of the world's most wetland-rich regions (Mississippi River Deltaic Plain; Louisiana, USA). We used historical air temperature data (1893-2014), alternative future climate scenarios, and coastal wetland coverage data (1978-2011) to investigate spatiotemporal fluctuations and climate-wetland linkages. Our analyses indicate that changes in mangrove coverage have been controlled primarily by extreme freeze events (i.e., air temperatures below a threshold zone of -6.3 to -7.6°C). We expect that in the past 121 yr, mangrove range expansion and contraction has occurred across land-ocean temperature gradients. Mangrove resistance, resilience, and dominance were all highest in areas closer to the ocean where temperature extremes were buffered by large expanses of water and saturated soil. Under climate change, these areas will likely serve as local hotspots for mangrove dispersal, growth, range expansion, and displacement of salt marsh. Collectively, our results show that the frequency and intensity of freeze events across land-ocean temperature gradients greatly influences spatiotemporal patterns of range expansion and contraction of freeze-sensitive mangroves. We expect that, along subtropical coasts, similar processes govern the distribution and abundance of other freeze

  15. Gradient Flow Convolutive Blind Source Separation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Michael Syskind; Nielsen, Chinton Møller

    2004-01-01

    Experiments have shown that the performance of instantaneous gradient flow beamforming by Cauwenberghs et al. is reduced significantly in reverberant conditions. By expanding the gradient flow principle to convolutive mixtures, separation in a reverberant environment is possible. By use of a circ...

  16. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient

  17. Preconditioning the modified conjugate gradient method ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the convergence analysis of the conventional conjugate Gradient method was reviewed. And the convergence analysis of the modified conjugate Gradient method was analysed with our extension on preconditioning the algorithm. Convergence of the algorithm is a function of the condition number of M-1A.

  18. 40 CFR 230.25 - Salinity gradients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Salinity gradients. 230.25 Section 230.25 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) OCEAN DUMPING SECTION 404(b... Physical and Chemical Characteristics of the Aquatic Ecosystem § 230.25 Salinity gradients. (a) Salinity...

  19. Restorative Treatment Thresholds: Factors Influencing the Treatment Thresholds and Modalities of General Dentists in Kuwait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Mai E.; Alomari, Qasem D.; Ngo, Hien; Doméjean, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the thresholds at which general dentists in Kuwait would restore approximal and occlusal carious lesions and examined the demographic characteristics of the dentists in relation to their decision making. Subjects and Methods The study population consisted of a random sample of 185 general dentists practicing in the Ministry of Health of Kuwait. A survey questionnaire was administered. The questionnaire presented different stages and locations of carious lesions; the participants were asked to identify the stage at which a restoration is required under different conditions, the preparation technique, and their choice of restorative material. Results For approximal carious lesions, 74 (40%) of the participants reported that they would restoratively intervene when the carious lesion reached the outer third of the dentin. A total of 91 (49.2%) reported the use of traditional class II restorations. For occlusal carious lesions, 128 (69.2%) said they would intervene when lesions reached the middle third of the dentin. 146 (78.9%) said they would remove the carious tissue only in their preparation. For both approximal and occlusal lesions, the participants preferred resin composite as the material for restoration. Conclusions The respondents tended to delay restorative intervention until dentinal penetration of the caries. Resin restorative materials were used in conservatively prepared cavities. Participants chose a conservative approach for occlusal lesions but still believed in a traditional approach when it concerned approximal lesions. Experience, university dental education, and participation in continuous education courses were most significantly related to restorative treatment. PMID:24943861

  20. Restorative treatment thresholds: factors influencing the treatment thresholds and modalities of general dentists in Kuwait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Mai E; Alomari, Qasem D; Ngo, Hien; Doméjean, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the thresholds at which general dentists in Kuwait would restore approximal and occlusal carious lesions and examined the demographic characteristics of the dentists in relation to their decision making. The study population consisted of a random sample of 185 general dentists practicing in the Ministry of Health of Kuwait. A survey questionnaire was administered. The questionnaire presented different stages and locations of carious lesions; the participants were asked to identify the stage at which a restoration is required under different conditions, the preparation technique, and their choice of restorative material. For approximal carious lesions, 74 (40%) of the participants reported that they would restoratively intervene when the carious lesion reached the outer third of the dentin. A total of 91 (49.2%) reported the use of traditional class II restorations. For occlusal carious lesions, 128 (69.2%) said they would intervene when lesions reached the middle third of the dentin. 146 (78.9%) said they would remove the carious tissue only in their preparation. For both approximal and occlusal lesions, the participants preferred resin composite as the material for restoration. The respondents tended to delay restorative intervention until dentinal penetration of the caries. Resin restorative materials were used in conservatively prepared cavities. Participants chose a conservative approach for occlusal lesions but still believed in a traditional approach when it concerned approximal lesions. Experience, university dental education, and participation in continuous education courses were most significantly related to restorative treatment. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Patterns of macromycete community assemblage along an elevation gradient: options for fungal gradient and metacommunity analyse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marko Gómez-Hernández; Guadalupe Williams-Linera; Roger Guevara; D. Jean Lodge

    2012-01-01

    Gradient analysis is rarely used in studies of fungal communities. Data on macromycetes from eight sites along an elevation gradient in central Veracruz, Mexico, were used to demonstrate methods for gradient analysis that can be applied to studies of communities of fungi. Selected sites from 100 to 3,500 m altitude represent tropical dry forest, tropical montane cloud...

  2. Density Gradient Stabilization of Electron Temperature Gradient Driven Turbulence in a Spherical Tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, Y; Mazzucato, E; Guttenfelder, W; Bell, R E; Domier, C W; LeBlanc, B P; Lee, K C; Luhmann Jr, N C; Smith, D R

    2011-03-21

    In this letter we report the first clear experimental observation of density gradient stabilization of electron temperature gradient driven turbulence in a fusion plasma. It is observed that longer wavelength modes, k⊥ρs ≤10, are most stabilized by density gradient, and the stabilization is accompanied by about a factor of two decrease in the plasma effective thermal diffusivity.

  3. The pain threshold of high-threshold mechanosensitive receptors subsequent to maximal eccentric exercise is a potential marker in the prediction of DOMS associated impairment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Fleckenstein

    Full Text Available Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS refers to dull pain and discomfort in people after participating in exercise, sport or recreational physical activities. The aim of this study was to detect underlying mechanical thresholds in an experimental model of DOMS.Randomised study to detect mechanical pain thresholds in a randomised order following experimentally induced DOMS of the non-dominant arm in healthy participants. Main outcome was the detection of the pressure pain threshold (PPT, secondary thresholds included mechanical detection (MDT and pain thresholds (MPT, pain intensity, pain perceptions and the maximum isometric voluntary force (MIVF.Twenty volunteers (9 female and 11 male, age 25.2 ± 3.2 years, weight 70.5 ± 10.8 kg, height 177.4 ± 9.4 cm participated in the study. DOMS reduced the PPT (at baseline 5.9 ± 0.4 kg/cm2 by a maximum of 1.5 ± 1.4 kg/cm2 (-24% at 48 hours (p < 0.001. This correlated with the decrease in MIVF (r = -0.48, p = 0.033. Whereas subjective pain was an indicator of the early 48 hours, the PPT was still present after 72 hours (r = 0.48, p = 0.036. Other mechanical thresholds altered significantly due to DOMS, but did show no clinically or physiologically remarkable changes.Functional impairment following DOMS seems related to the increased excitability of high-threshold mechanosensitive nociceptors. The PPT was the most valid mechanical threshold to quantify the extent of dysfunction. Thus PPT rather than pain intensity should be considered a possible marker indicating the athletes' potential risk of injury.

  4. On the two steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling of extreme events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardara, Pietro; Mazas, Franck; Weiss, Jerome; Andreewsky, Marc; Kergadallan, Xavier; Benoit, Michel; Hamm, Luc

    2013-04-01

    The estimation of the probability of occurrence of extreme events is traditionally achieved by fitting a probability distribution on a sample of extreme observations. In particular, the extreme value theory (EVT) states that values exceeding a given threshold converge through a Generalized Pareto Distribution (GPD) if the original sample is composed of independent and identically distributed values. However, the temporal series of sea and ocean variables usually show strong temporal autocorrelation. Traditionally, in order to select independent events for the following statistical analysis, the concept of a physical threshold is introduced: events that excess that threshold are defined as "extreme events". This is the so-called "Peak Over a Threshold (POT)" sampling, widely spread in the literature and currently used for engineering applications among many others. In the past, the threshold for the statistical sampling of extreme values asymptotically convergent toward GPD and the threshold for the physical selection of independent extreme events were confused, as the same threshold was used for both sampling data and to meet the hypothesis of extreme value convergence, leading to some incoherencies. In particular, if the two steps are performed simultaneously, the number of peaks over the threshold can increase but also decrease when the threshold decreases. This is logic in a physical point of view, since the definition of the sample of "extreme events" changes, but is not coherent with the statistical theory. We introduce a two-steps threshold selection for over-threshold modelling, aiming to discriminate (i) a physical threshold for the selection of extreme and independent events, and (ii) a statistical threshold for the optimization of the coherence with the hypothesis of the EVT. The former is a physical events identification procedure (also called "declustering") aiming at selecting independent extreme events. The latter is a purely statistical optimization

  5. Development of a flow history correction factor for sediment entrainment thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, K. I.; Haynes, H.

    2012-12-01

    A plethora of sediment transport equations exist with which to predict sediment load and morphology of river systems; however, these are often sensitive to the entrainment threshold parameter employed. Many practising river engineers still prefer use of the Shields parameter's critical threshold value ~0.06 (Shields, 1936) as generally applicable for uniform grain size. Yet, recent research suggest that this is value may be highly sensitive to the flow history that the bed is exposed to prior to entrainment (e.g. Paphitis and Collins, 2005; Monteith and Pender, 2005; Haynes and Pender, 2007; Ockelford et al., 2010). Laboratory experiments were conducted for planar sand beds of uniform grain size (D50 = 1.7mm) using a 5m x 0.3 m recirculation flume set to a 1 in 300 gradient. Entrainment threshold was defined using Yalin's visual method (Yalin, 1972) and associated shear stresses estimated using a depth-slope product approach. Beds were subjected to flow histories of 0, 60, 120 and 240 minutes of sub-threshold flow (50% critical shear stress); these were then subjected to incremental increases of applied shear stresses to establish the revised entrainment threshold shear stress. Compared with the Shields diagram and the modified diagram by Parker et al. (2003) results indicate that water-working increases the Shield parameter by 10-60%. Given that data clearly indicate a positive relationship between flow history duration and parameter magnitude, detailed comparison with wider experimental flow history research has been undertaken to propose a novel mathematical correction factor for entrainment threshold. This yields important implications for improved modelling practice for bedload transport in river systems.

  6. Mesoscale spatial variability in seawater cavitation thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikov, N. P.; Elistratov, V. P.

    2017-03-01

    The paper presents the spatial variability of cavitation thresholds and some hydrological and hydrochemical parameters of seawater in the interfrontal zone of the Pacific Subarctic Front, in the Drake Passage, and in the equatorial part of the Pacific Ocean, measured in the near-surface layer to a depth of 70 m.

  7. Intraoperative transfusion threshold and tissue oxygenation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K; Dahl, B; Johansson, P I

    2012-01-01

    Transfusion with allogeneic red blood cells (RBCs) may be needed to maintain oxygen delivery during major surgery, but the appropriate haemoglobin (Hb) concentration threshold has not been well established. We hypothesised that a higher level of Hb would be associated with improved subcutaneous...

  8. Threshold Concepts in Finance: Conceptualizing the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoadley, Susan; Tickle, Leonie; Wood, Leigh N.; Kyng, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Graduates with well-developed capabilities in finance are invaluable to our society and in increasing demand. Universities face the challenge of designing finance programmes to develop these capabilities and the essential knowledge that underpins them. Our research responds to this challenge by identifying threshold concepts that are central to…

  9. Heritability estimates derived from threshold analyses for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    Abstract. The object of this study was to estimate heritabilities and sire breeding values for stayability and reproductive traits in a composite multibreed beef cattle herd using a threshold model. A GFCAT set of programmes was used to analyse reproductive data. Heritabilities and product-moment correlations between.

  10. Design of Threshold Controller Based Chaotic Circuits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohamed, I. Raja; Murali, K.; Sinha, Sudeshna

    2010-01-01

    We propose a very simple implementation of a second-order nonautonomous chaotic oscillator, using a threshold controller as the only source of nonlinearity. We demonstrate the efficacy and simplicity of our design through numerical and experimental results. Further, we show that this approach...

  11. Grid - a fast threshold tracking procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fereczkowski, Michal; Dau, Torsten; MacDonald, Ewen

    2016-01-01

    A new procedure, called “grid”, is evaluated that allows rapid acquisition of threshold curves for psychophysics and, in particular, psychoacoustic, experiments. In this method, the parameterresponse space is sampled in two dimensions within a single run. This allows the procedure to focus more e...

  12. Atherogenic Risk Factors and Hearing Thresholds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, Thomas Winther; Ramlau-Hansen, Cecilia Høst; Stokholm, Zara Ann

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of atherogenic risk factors on hearing thresholds. In a cross-sectional study we analyzed data from a Danish survey in 2009-2010 on physical and psychological working conditions. The study included 576 white- and blue-collar workers from c...

  13. 40 CFR 68.115 - Threshold determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... in accordance with the definition of flammability hazard rating 4 in the NFPA 704, Standard System... more than a threshold quantity is present at a stationary source. (iii) Naturally occurring hydrocarbon..., regulated substances in naturally occurring hydrocarbon mixtures need not be considered when determining...

  14. Identification of Threshold Concepts for Biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loertscher, Jennifer; Green, David; Lewis, Jennifer E.; Lin, Sara; Minderhout, Vicky

    2014-01-01

    Threshold concepts (TCs) are concepts that, when mastered, represent a transformed understanding of a discipline without which the learner cannot progress. We have undertaken a process involving more than 75 faculty members and 50 undergraduate students to identify a working list of TCs for biochemistry. The process of identifying TCs for…

  15. Determining lower threshold concentrations for synergistic effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjergager, Maj-Britt Andersen; Dalhoff, Kristoffer; Kretschmann, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    which proven synergists cease to act as synergists towards the aquatic crustacean Daphnia magna. To do this, we compared several approaches and test-setups to evaluate which approach gives the most conservative estimate for the lower threshold for synergy for three known azole synergists. We focus.......619±8.555μgL(-1)) and 0.122±0.0417μM (40.236±13.75μgL(-1)), respectively, in the 14-days tests. Testing synergy in relation to concentration addition provided the most conservative values. The threshold values for the vertical assessments in tests where the two could be compared were in general 1.2 to 4.......7 fold higher than the horizontal assessments. Using passive dosing rather than dilution series or spiking did not lower the threshold significantly. Below the threshold for synergy, slight antagony could often be observed. This is most likely due to induction of enzymes active in metabolization of alpha...

  16. Microplastic effect thresholds for freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Redondo Hasselerharm, P.E.; Dede Falahudin, Dede; Peeters, E.T.H.M.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2018-01-01

    Now that microplastics have been detected in lakes, rivers and estuaries all over the globe, evaluating their effects on biota has become an urgent research priority. This is the first study that aims at determining the effect thresholds for a battery of six freshwater benthic macroinvertebrates

  17. Distribution of sensory taste thresholds for phenylthiocarbamide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The ability to taste Phenylthiocarbamide (PTC), a bitter organic compound has been described as a bimodal autosomal trait in both genetic and anthropological studies. This study is based on the ability of a person to taste PTC. The present study reports the threshold distribution of PTC taste sensitivity among some Muslim ...

  18. Thresholding methods for PET imaging: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dewalle-Vignion, A.S.; Betrouni, N.; Huglo, D.; Vermandel, M.; Dewalle-Vignion, A.S.; Hossein-Foucher, C.; Huglo, D.; Vermandel, M.; Dewalle-Vignion, A.S.; Hossein-Foucher, C.; Huglo, D.; Vermandel, M.; El Abiad, A.

    2010-01-01

    This work deals with positron emission tomography segmentation methods for tumor volume determination. We propose a state of art techniques based on fixed or adaptive threshold. Methods found in literature are analysed with an objective point of view on their methodology, advantages and limitations. Finally, a comparative study is presented. (authors)

  19. Low-threshold conical microcavity dye lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossmann, Tobias; Schleede, Simone; Hauser, Mario

    2010-01-01

    element simulations confirm that lasing occurs in whispering gallery modes which corresponds well to the measured multimode laser-emission. The effect of dye concentration on lasing threshold and lasing wavelength is investigated and can be explained using a standard dye laser model....

  20. Classification error of the thresholded independence rule

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Britta Anker; Fenger-Grøn, Morten; Jensen, Jens Ledet

    We consider classification in the situation of two groups with normally distributed data in the ‘large p small n’ framework. To counterbalance the high number of variables we consider the thresholded independence rule. An upper bound on the classification error is established which is taylored...

  1. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  2. Distance Discrimination Thresholds During Flight Simulation in a Maritime Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-01

    UNCLASSIFIED Distance Discrimination Thresholds During Flight Simulation in a Maritime Environment Jessica Parker Air Operations...Distance Discrimination Thresholds During Flight Simulation in a Maritime Environment Executive Summary The Aeronautical Design Standard...position to be perceived. This minimum distance was defined as the distance discrimination threshold. For both high and low sea states, the thresholds

  3. Cost–effectiveness thresholds: pros and cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Jeremy A; De Joncheere, Kees; Edejer, Tessa; Hutubessy, Raymond; Kieny, Marie-Paule; Hill, Suzanne R

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cost–effectiveness analysis is used to compare the costs and outcomes of alternative policy options. Each resulting cost–effectiveness ratio represents the magnitude of additional health gained per additional unit of resources spent. Cost–effectiveness thresholds allow cost–effectiveness ratios that represent good or very good value for money to be identified. In 2001, the World Health Organization’s Commission on Macroeconomics in Health suggested cost–effectiveness thresholds based on multiples of a country’s per-capita gross domestic product (GDP). In some contexts, in choosing which health interventions to fund and which not to fund, these thresholds have been used as decision rules. However, experience with the use of such GDP-based thresholds in decision-making processes at country level shows them to lack country specificity and this – in addition to uncertainty in the modelled cost–effectiveness ratios – can lead to the wrong decision on how to spend health-care resources. Cost–effectiveness information should be used alongside other considerations – e.g. budget impact and feasibility considerations – in a transparent decision-making process, rather than in isolation based on a single threshold value. Although cost–effectiveness ratios are undoubtedly informative in assessing value for money, countries should be encouraged to develop a context-specific process for decision-making that is supported by legislation, has stakeholder buy-in, for example the involvement of civil society organizations and patient groups, and is transparent, consistent and fair. PMID:27994285

  4. Multimodal distribution of human cold pain thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lötsch, Jörn; Dimova, Violeta; Lieb, Isabel; Zimmermann, Michael; Oertel, Bruno G; Ultsch, Alfred

    2015-01-01

    It is assumed that different pain phenotypes are based on varying molecular pathomechanisms. Distinct ion channels seem to be associated with the perception of cold pain, in particular TRPM8 and TRPA1 have been highlighted previously. The present study analyzed the distribution of cold pain thresholds with focus at describing the multimodality based on the hypothesis that it reflects a contribution of distinct ion channels. Cold pain thresholds (CPT) were available from 329 healthy volunteers (aged 18 - 37 years; 159 men) enrolled in previous studies. The distribution of the pooled and log-transformed threshold data was described using a kernel density estimation (Pareto Density Estimation (PDE)) and subsequently, the log data was modeled as a mixture of Gaussian distributions using the expectation maximization (EM) algorithm to optimize the fit. CPTs were clearly multi-modally distributed. Fitting a Gaussian Mixture Model (GMM) to the log-transformed threshold data revealed that the best fit is obtained when applying a three-model distribution pattern. The modes of the identified three Gaussian distributions, retransformed from the log domain to the mean stimulation temperatures at which the subjects had indicated pain thresholds, were obtained at 23.7 °C, 13.2 °C and 1.5 °C for Gaussian #1, #2 and #3, respectively. The localization of the first and second Gaussians was interpreted as reflecting the contribution of two different cold sensors. From the calculated localization of the modes of the first two Gaussians, the hypothesis of an involvement of TRPM8, sensing temperatures from 25 - 24 °C, and TRPA1, sensing cold from 17 °C can be derived. In that case, subjects belonging to either Gaussian would possess a dominance of the one or the other receptor at the skin area where the cold stimuli had been applied. The findings therefore support a suitability of complex analytical approaches to detect mechanistically determined patterns from pain phenotype data.

  5. Do multiple body modifications alter pain threshold?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamotová, A; Hrabák, P; Hříbek, P; Rokyta, R

    2017-12-30

    In recent years, epidemiological data has shown an increasing number of young people who deliberately self-injure. There have also been parallel increases in the number of people with tattoos and those who voluntarily undergo painful procedures associated with piercing, scarification, and tattooing. People with self-injury behaviors often say that they do not feel the pain. However, there is no information regarding pain perception in those that visit tattoo parlors and piercing studios compared to those who don't. The aim of this study was to compare nociceptive sensitivity in four groups of subjects (n=105, mean age 26 years, 48 women and 57 men) with different motivations to experience pain (i.e., with and without multiple body modifications) in two different situations; (1) in controlled, emotionally neutral conditions, and (2) at a "Hell Party" (HP), an event organized by a piercing and tattoo parlor, with a main event featuring a public demonstration of painful techniques (burn scars, hanging on hooks, etc.). Pain thresholds of the fingers of the hand were measured using a thermal stimulator and mechanical algometer. In HP participants, information about alcohol intake, self-harming behavior, and psychiatric history were used in the analysis as intervening variables. Individuals with body modifications as well as without body modifications had higher thermal pain thresholds at Hell Party, compared to thresholds measured at control neutral conditions. No such differences were found relative to mechanical pain thresholds. Increased pain threshold in all HP participants, irrespectively of body modification, cannot be simply explained by a decrease in the sensory component of pain; instead, we found that the environment significantly influenced the cognitive and affective component of pain.

  6. Variation in the reproductive strategy of a lichenized fungus along a climatic gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merinero, Sonia; Méndez, Marcos; Aragón, Gregorio; Martínez, Isabel

    2017-07-01

    Onset of reproduction and reproductive allocation patterns are key components of plant reproductive strategies. Life history theory predicts that plants in adverse environments for juvenile performance start reproduction at smaller sizes and exhibit higher reproductive allocation compared to their counterparts in favourable environments. Life history theory will gain in generality if its predictions are shown to apply to a broad range of organisms and modes of reproduction. This study tested whether the asexual reproductive strategy of a lichenized fungus changed along a climatic gradient. The variation in threshold size for asexual reproduction and asexual reproductive allocation of the lichen Lobarina scrobiculata was assessed in 18 populations (9665 individuals) along a climatic gradient spanning 800 km in latitude in Southern Europe. Using generalized linear models and standardized major axis regressions, the allometric relationships and the associated variation in climatic factors according to the changes in the threshold size for reproduction and reproductive allocation patterns were assessed. The onset of reproduction was size-dependent and the reproductive allocation increased with individual size. Both the threshold size for reproduction and the reproductive allocation varied along the rainfall gradient. A lower threshold size for reproduction and higher reproductive allocation in drier, adverse locations were found. Therefore, populations in drier locations fitted the predictions of life history theory for sexually reproducing organisms in adverse environments for juvenile performance. This study highlights the applicability of the life history theory to fungi and to modes of reproduction other than sexual reproduction. Based on the intraspecific variation in the asexual reproductive strategy of a fungal organism with climatic factors, these findings expand the scope of life history theory predictions and increase our understanding of life history

  7. A brief peripheral motion contrast threshold test predicts older drivers' hazardous behaviors in simulated driving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Steven; Woods-Fry, Heather; Collin, Charles A; Gagnon, Sylvain; Voloaca, Misha; Grant, John; Rosenthal, Ted; Allen, Wade

    2015-05-01

    Our research group has previously demonstrated that the peripheral motion contrast threshold (PMCT) test predicts older drivers' self-report accident risk, as well as simulated driving performance. However, the PMCT is too lengthy to be a part of a battery of tests to assess fitness to drive. Therefore, we have developed a new version of this test, which takes under two minutes to administer. We assessed the motion contrast thresholds of 24 younger drivers (19-32) and 25 older drivers (65-83) with both the PMCT-10min and the PMCT-2min test and investigated if thresholds were associated with measures of simulated driving performance. Younger participants had significantly lower motion contrast thresholds than older participants and there were no significant correlations between younger participants' thresholds and any measures of driving performance. The PMCT-10min and the PMCT-2min thresholds of older drivers' predicted simulated crash risk, as well as the minimum distance of approach to all hazards. This suggests that our tests of motion processing can help predict the risk of collision or near collision in older drivers. Thresholds were also correlated with the total lane deviation time, suggesting a deficiency in processing of peripheral flow and delayed detection of adjacent cars. The PMCT-2min is an improved version of a previously validated test, and it has the potential to help assess older drivers' fitness to drive. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Density-Gradient-Driven trapped-electron-modes in improved-confinement RFP plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, James; Sarff, John; Ding, Weixing; Brower, David; Parke, Eli; Chapman, Brett; Terry, Paul; Pueschel, M. J.; Williams, Zach

    2017-10-01

    Short wavelength density fluctuations in improved-confinement MST plasmas exhibit multiple features characteristic of the trapped-electron-mode (TEM). Core transport in the RFP is normally governed by magnetic stochasticity stemming from long wavelength tearing modes that arise from current profile peaking, which are suppressed via inductive control for this work. The improved confinement is associated with an increase in the pressure gradient that can destabilize drift waves. The measured density fluctuations have f 50 kHz, kϕρs sharp decrease in global tearing mode associated fluctuations, their amplitude increases with local density gradient, and they exhibit a density-gradient threshold at R /Ln 15 . The GENE code, modified for the RFP, predicts the onset of density-gradient-driven TEM for these strong-gradient plasma conditions. While nonlinear analysis shows a large Dimits shift associated with predicted strong zonal flows, the inclusion of residual magnetic fluctuations, comparable to experimental magnetic fluctuations, causes a collapse of the zonal flows and an increase in the predicted transport to a level close to the experimentally measured heat flux. Work supported by US DOE.

  9. Thermal gradient induced flexoelectric effects in bulk Ba0.67Sr0.33TiO3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeyang; Huang, Wenbin; Huang, Shujin; Jiang, Xiaoning

    2016-05-01

    Flexoelectric effect, denoting electric field gradient induced mechanical strain or mechanical strain gradient induced electric polarization, is a universal phenomenon in all dielectrics. Although research on the topic of flexoelectricity under stress fields and electric fields has advanced significantly, information regarding the phenomenon under thermal fields is rather limited. In this letter, the flexoelectricity field of Ba0.67Sr0.33TiO3 (BST) was investigated by generating temperature gradients along the lengths of samples with symmetric geometry. An electric field gradient induced by a thermal gradient was analyzed based on the temperature-dependent dielectric property of BST. The strain was then experimentally verified due to the electric field gradient. Experimental results suggest converse flexoelectric effect of BST samples with symmetric geometry in a thermal field. This result was not only consistent with the theoretical prediction, but it also followed the scaling effect of flexoelectricity.

  10. Metallicity gradients in early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schombert, James M.; Hanlan, Patricia C.; Barsony, Mary; Rakos, Karl D.

    1993-01-01

    A study of medium-to-bright early-type galaxies in six bandpasses from 3500 A to 2.2 microns is presented in order to quantify their colors and color gradients and relate these to metallicity and properties of the underlying stellar population. The Stromgren filter system chosen makes it possible to introduce a new calibration to the Mg(2) system from the present narrow-band v - y indices. A comparison is presented of narrow-band colors centered on particular spectral features vs a color dominated by the mean temperature of the giant branch (i.e., J - K) to test the effects of light vs heavy element abundances on knowledge of the total system metallicity, Z, and the effects of reddening. A good correlation is found between v - y and Mg(2); it provides a connection between one light element metallicity indicator (v - y centers on the CN blend) and another, Mg. The color-magnitude relations for all five optical and near-IR colors are shown. The strongest correlation exists for the metallicity colors, v - y and J - K.

  11. Radar rainfall estimation for the identification of debris-flow precipitation thresholds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marra, Francesco; Nikolopoulos, Efthymios I.; Creutin, Jean-Dominique; Borga, Marco

    2014-05-01

    Identification of rainfall thresholds for the prediction of debris-flow occurrence is a common approach for warning procedures. Traditionally the debris-flow triggering rainfall is derived from the closest available raingauge. However, the spatial and temporal variability of intense rainfall on mountainous areas, where debris flows take place, may lead to large uncertainty in point-based estimates. Nikolopoulos et al. (2014) have shown that this uncertainty translates into a systematic underestimation of the rainfall thresholds, leading to a step degradation of the performances of the rainfall threshold for identification of debris flows occurrence under operational conditions. A potential solution to this limitation lies on use of rainfall estimates from weather radar. Thanks to their high spatial and temporal resolutions, these estimates offer the advantage of providing rainfall information over the actual debris flow location. The aim of this study is to analyze the value of radar precipitation estimations for the identification of debris flow precipitation thresholds. Seven rainfall events that triggered debris flows in the Adige river basin (Eastern Italian Alps) are analyzed using data from a dense raingauge network and a C-Band weather radar. Radar data are elaborated by using a set of correction algorithms specifically developed for weather radar rainfall application in mountainous areas. Rainfall thresholds for the triggering of debris flows are identified in the form of average intensity-duration power law curves using a frequentist approach by using both radar rainfall estimates and raingauge data. Sampling uncertainty associated to the derivation of the thresholds is assessed by using a bootstrap technique (Peruccacci et al. 2012). Results show that radar-based rainfall thresholds are largely exceeding those obtained by using raingauge data. Moreover, the differences between the two thresholds may be related to the spatial characteristics (i.e., spatial

  12. Latitudinal Gradients in Induced and Constitutive Resistance against Herbivores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anstett, Daniel N; Chen, Wen; Johnson, Marc T J

    2016-08-01

    Plants are hypothesized to evolve increased defense against herbivores at lower latitudes, but an increasing number of studies report evidence that contradicts this hypothesis. Few studies have examined the evolution of constitutive and induced resistance along latitudinal gradients. When induction is not considered, underlying patterns of latitudinal clines in resistance can be obscured because plant resistance represents a combination of induced and constitutive resistance, which may show contrasting patterns with latitude. Here, we asked if there are latitudinal gradients in constitutive versus induced resistance by using genotypes of Oenothera biennis (Onagraceae) sampled along an 18° latitudinal gradient. We conducted two bioassay experiments to compare the resistance of plant genotypes against one generalist (Spodoptera exigua) and one specialist (Acanthoscelidius acephalus) herbivore. These insects were assayed on: i) undamaged control plants, ii) plants that had been induced with jasmonic acid, and iii) plants induced with herbivore damage. Additionally, we examined latitudinal gradients of constitutive and induced chemical resistance by measuring the concentrations of total phenolics, the concentration of oxidized phenolics, and the percentage of phenolics that were oxidized. Spodoptera exigua showed lower performance on plants from lower latitudes, whereas A. acephalus showed no latitudinal pattern. Constitutive total phenolics were greater in plants from lower latitudes, but induced plants showed higher total phenolics at higher latitudes. Oxidative activity was greatest at higher latitudes regardless of induction. Overall, both latitude and induction have an impact on different metrics of plant resistance to herbivory. Further studies should consider the effect of induction and herbivore specialization more explicitly, which may help to resolve the controversy in latitudinal gradients in herbivory and defense.

  13. Proposal of threshold levels for the definition of non-radioactive wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, Yoshikazu

    1979-01-01

    With increasing amounts of radioactive wastes along with the advances of nuclear power generation and radioactive material utilizations, the needs for management cost reduction and resource saving have arisen. Under the situation, the threshold levels for the definition of non-radioactive solid wastes are required. The problem has been studied by an ad hoc committee in Nuclear Safety Research Association, by the request of the Science and Technology Agency. The matters described are the procedures of deriving the threshold levels, the feasibility studies of the management of waste threshold-level with several enterprises, and future subjects of study. The threshold levels are grouped in two, i.e. the unconditional level and the conditional level. According to the unconditional threshold level, solid wastes are separated definitely into radioactive and non-radioactive ones. According to the conditional threshold level, under certain conditions, some radioactive solid wastes according to the unconditional level are regarded as non-radioactive ones. (J.P.N.)

  14. The PM2.5 threshold for aerosol extinction in the Beijing megacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbin; Xin, Jinyuan; Liu, Zirui; Zhang, Kequan; Tang, Guiqian; Zhang, Wenyu; Wang, Yuesi

    2017-10-01

    Particulate pollution has remained at a high level in the megacity of Beijing in the past decade. The PM2.5, PM10, aerosol optical depth (AOD), Angstrom exponent(α), and PM2.5/PM10 ratio (the proportion of PM2.5 in PM10) in Beijing were 70±6 μg m-3, 128±6 μg m-3, 0.57 ± 0.05, 1.10 ± 0.08, 45 ± 4%, respectively, from 2005 to 2014. The annual means of PM concentration, AOD, α, and PM2.5/PM10 ratio decreased slightly during this decade, meanwhile PM concentration increased in the winter. Furthermore, we found there were thresholds of PM2.5 concentration for aerosol extinction. When the PM concentration was lower than a certain threshold, AOD decreased quickly with the decline of PM concentration. To make the improvement of the particle pollution more noticeable, the PM concentration should be controlled under the threshold. The annual averaged threshold is 63 μg m-3, and the threshold values reached the maximum of 74 μg m-3 in spring, ranged from 54 to 56 μg m-3 in the three other seasons. The threshold values ranged from 55 to 77 μg m-3 under other relevant factors, including air masses directions and relative humidity.

  15. On the controlling parameters for fatigue-crack threshold at low homologous temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, W.; Gerberich, W.W.

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation phenomena near the threshold stress intensity level ΔK /SUB TH/ , has been a vigorously studied topic in recent years. Near threshold the crack propagates rather slowly, thus giving enough time for various physical and chemical reactions to take place. Room air, which is the most commonly encountered environment, can still supply various ingredients such as oxygen, water vapor (and thus hydrogen) to support these reactions. Much effort had been directed toward the environmental aspects of near threshold fatigue crack growth. By conducting tests under vacuum, Suresh and coworkers found that the crack propagation rate in a 2-1/4 Cr-1Mo steel was higher in vacuum than in air. An oxide induced closure, which served to reduce the effective stress intensity at the crack tip, seems to furnish a good explanation. Neumann and coworkers proposed that during the fatigue process, extrusion-intrusion pairs can develop as a consequence of reversed slip around the crack tip when the crack was propagated near threshold stress intensity. Beevers demonstrated that fatigue fracture surfaces contact each other during unloading even under tension-tension cycling. Kanninen and Atkinson also reached the conclusion that the compressive stress acting at the crack tip due to residual plasticity can induce closure. Microstructural effects have also been cited as important factors in near threshold crack growth. It is generally accepted that coarser grains have a beneficial effect on the resistance to the near threshold crack propagation

  16. Disaggregated energy consumption and GDP in Taiwan: A threshold co-integration analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, J.-L.; Lin, C.-H.

    2008-01-01

    Energy consumption growth is much higher than economic growth for Taiwan in recent years, worsening its energy efficiency. This paper provides a solid explanation by examining the equilibrium relationship between GDP and disaggregated energy consumption under a non-linear framework. The threshold co-integration test developed with asymmetric dynamic adjusting processes proposed by Hansen and Seo [Hansen, B.E., Seo, B., 2002. Testing for two-regime threshold cointegration in vector error-correction models. Journal of Econometrics 110, 293-318.] is applied. Non-linear co-integrations between GDP and disaggregated energy consumptions are confirmed except for oil consumption. The two-regime vector error-correction models (VECM) show that the adjustment process of energy consumption toward equilibrium is highly persistent when an appropriately threshold is reached. There is mean-reverting behavior when the threshold is reached, making aggregate and disaggregated energy consumptions grow faster than GDP in Taiwan

  17. Experimental nickel elicitation thresholds--a review focusing on occluded nickel exposure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Louise Arup; Menné, Torkil; Johansen, Jeanne Duus

    2005-01-01

    Nickel (Ni) is the most frequent cause of contact allergy among the female population. This makes it interesting to examine thresholds for elicitation under different conditions. Even though Ni exposure may be open, occluded, penetrating or oral, most dose-response studies in the literature concern...... single occluded application. The aims of this study were to assess thresholds of response by making a statistical analysis of available dose-response studies with single occluded exposure and comparing the results to thresholds from other modes of exposure. 8 occluded Ni dose-response studies were...... 10% reacted in occluded exposure. When combining the exposure to Ni with an irritant, divagating results were found, although the literature shows evidence of an augmented response when combining exposure to an allergen and an irritant. The thresholds of penetrating exposure were found to be lower...

  18. Intracellular chemical gradients: morphing principle in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Endres Robert G

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Advances in computational biology allow systematic investigations to ascertain whether internal chemical gradients can be maintained in bacteria – an open question at the resolution limit of fluorescence microscopy. While it was previously believed that the small bacterial cell size and fast diffusion in the cytoplasm effectively remove any such gradient, a new computational study published in BMC Biophysics supports the emerging view that gradients can exist. The study arose from the recent observation that phosphorylated CtrA forms a gradient prior to cell division in Caulobacter crescentus, a bacterium known for its complicated cell cycle. Tropini et al. (2012 postulate that such gradients can provide an internal chemical compass, directing protein localization, cell division and cell development. More specifically, they describe biochemical and physical constraints on the formation of such gradients and explore a number of existing bacterial cell morphologies. These chemical gradients may limit in vitro analyses, and may ensure timing control and robustness to fluctuations during critical stages in cell development.

  19. Human impacts flatten rainforest-savanna gradient and reduce adaptive diversity in a rainforest bird.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam H Freedman

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Ecological gradients have long been recognized as important regions for diversification and speciation. However, little attention has been paid to the evolutionary consequences or conservation implications of human activities that fundamentally change the environmental features of such gradients. Here we show that recent deforestation in West Africa has homogenized the rainforest-savanna gradient, causing a loss of adaptive phenotypic diversity in a common rainforest bird, the little greenbul (Andropadus virens. Previously, this species was shown to exhibit morphological and song divergence along this gradient in Central Africa. Using satellite-based estimates of forest cover, recent morphological data, and historical data from museum specimens collected prior to widespread deforestation, we show that the gradient has become shallower in West Africa and that A. virens populations there have lost morphological variation in traits important to fitness. In contrast, we find no loss of morphological variation in Central Africa where there has been less deforestation and gradients have remained more intact. While rainforest deforestation is a leading cause of species extinction, the potential of deforestation to flatten gradients and inhibit rainforest diversification has not been previously recognized. More deforestation will likely lead to further flattening of the gradient and loss of diversity, and may limit the ability of species to persist under future environmental conditions.

  20. Ignition threshold of aluminized HMX-based PBXs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher; Zhou, Min

    2017-06-01

    We report the results of micromechanical simulations of the ignition of aluminized HMX-based PBX under loading due to impact by thin flyers. The conditions analyzed concern loading pulses on the order of 20 nanoseconds to 0.8 microseconds in duration and impact piston velocities on the order of 300-1000 ms-1. The samples consist of a stochastically similar bimodal distribution of HMX grains, an Estane binder, and 50 μm aluminum particles. The computational model accounts for constituent elasto-vicoplasticity, viscoelasticity, bulk compressibility, fracture, interfacial debonding, fracture, internal contact, bulk and frictional heating, and heat conduction. The analysis focuses on the development of hotspots under different material settings and loading conditions. In particular, the ignition threshold in the form of the James relation and the corresponding ignition probability are calculated for the PBXs containing 0%, 6%, 10%, and 18% aluminum by volume. It is found that the addition of aluminum increases the ignition threshold, causing the materials to be less sensitive. Dissipation and heating mechanism changes responsible for this trend are delineated. Support by DOE NNSA SSGF is gratefully acknowledged.

  1. Threshold pion electroproduction at large momentum transfers; Threshold Pion-Elektroproduktion bei grossen Energieuebertraegen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Andreas

    2008-02-15

    We consider pion electroproduction close to threshold for Q{sup 2} in the region 1-10 GeV{sup 2} on a nucleon target. The momentum transfer dependence of the S-wave multipoles at threshold, E{sub 0+} and L{sub 0+}, is calculated in the chiral limit using light-cone sum rules. Predictions for the cross sections in the threshold region are given taking into account P-wave contributions that, as we argue, are model independent to a large extent. The results are compared with the SLAC E136 data on the structure function F{sub 2}(W,Q{sup 2}) in the threshold region. (orig.)

  2. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qian, Feng [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); School of Physics & Electronic Engineering, Changshu Institute of Technology, Changshu 215500 (China); Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou, E-mail: xzliu@nju.edu.cn; Gong, Xiufen [Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Institute of Acoustics and School of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center of Advanced Microstructures, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2015-10-28

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking.

  3. On fracture in finite strain gradient plasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martínez Pañeda, Emilio; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2016-01-01

    predictions. These differences increase significantly when large strains are taken into account, as a consequence of the contribution of strain gradients to the work hardening of the material. The magnitude of stress elevation at the crack tip and the distance ahead of the crack where GNDs significantly alter......In this work a general framework for damage and fracture assessment including the effect of strain gradients is provided. Both mechanism-based and phenomenological strain gradient plasticity (SGP) theories are implemented numerically using finite deformation theory and crack tip fields...

  4. Speciation gradients and the distribution of biodiversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schluter, Dolph; Pennell, Matthew W

    2017-05-31

    Global patterns of biodiversity are influenced by spatial and environmental variations in the rate at which new species form. We relate variations in speciation rates to six key patterns of biodiversity worldwide, including the species-area relationship, latitudinal gradients in species and genetic diversity, and between-habitat differences in species richness. Although they sometimes mirror biodiversity patterns, recent rates of speciation, at the tip of the tree of life, are often highest where species richness is low. Speciation gradients therefore shape, but are also shaped by, biodiversity gradients and are often more useful for predicting future patterns of biodiversity than for interpreting the past.

  5. Sound beam manipulation based on temperature gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian, Feng; Quan, Li; Liu, Xiaozhou; Gong, Xiufen

    2015-01-01

    Previous research with temperature gradients has shown the feasibility of controlling airborne sound propagation. Here, we present a temperature gradients based airborne sound manipulation schemes: a cylindrical acoustic omnidirectional absorber (AOA). The proposed AOA has high absorption performance which can almost completely absorb the incident wave. Geometric acoustics is used to obtain the refractive index distributions with different radii, which is then utilized to deduce the desired temperature gradients. Since resonant units are not applied in the scheme, its working bandwidth is expected to be broadband. The scheme is temperature-tuned and easy to realize, which is of potential interest to fields such as noise control or acoustic cloaking

  6. Predicting visual acuity from detection thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newacheck, J S; Haegerstrom-Portnoy, G; Adams, A J

    1990-03-01

    Visual performance based exclusively on high luminance and high contrast letter acuity measures often fails to predict individual performance at low contrast and low luminance. Here we measured visual acuity over a wide range of contrasts and luminances (low mesopic to photopic) for 17 young normal observers. Acuity vs. contrast functions appear to fit a single template which can be displaced laterally along the log contrast axis. The magnitude of this lateral displacement for different luminances was well predicted by the contrast threshold difference for a 4 min arc spot. The acuity vs. contrast template, taken from the mean of all 17 subjects, was used in conjunction with individual spot contrast threshold measures to predict an individual's visual acuity over a wide range of luminance and contrast levels. The accuracy of the visual acuity predictions from this simple procedure closely approximates test-retest accuracy for both positive (projected Landolt rings) and negative contrast (Bailey-Lovie charts).

  7. Edith Wharton's threshold phobia and two worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtzman, Deanna; Kulish, Nancy

    2014-08-01

    The American novelist Edith Wharton suffered an unusual childhood neurotic symptom, a fear of crossing thresholds, a condition that might be called a "threshold phobia." This symptom is identified and examined in autobiographical material, letters, diaries, and selected literary fiction and nonfiction left by Wharton to arrive at a formulation not previously drawn together. A fascinating theme-living or being trapped between "two worlds"-runs through much of the writer's life and work. The phobia is related to this theme, and both can be linked more broadly to certain sexual conflicts in women. This understanding of Wharton's phobia, it is argued, throws new light on the developmental issues and conflicts related to the female "oedipal" or triadic phase, characterized by the need to negotiate the two worlds of mother and of father. © 2014 by the American Psychoanalytic Association.

  8. Multiparty Computation from Threshold Homomorphic Encryption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cramer, Ronald; Damgård, Ivan Bjerre; Nielsen, Jesper Buus

    2001-01-01

    We introduce a new approach to multiparty computation (MPC) basing it on homomorphic threshold crypto-systems. We show that given keys for any sufficiently efficient system of this type, general MPC protocols for n parties can be devised which are secure against an active adversary that corrupts...... any minority of the parties. The total number of bits broadcast is O(nk|C|), where k is the security parameter and |C| is the size of a (Boolean) circuit computing the function to be securely evaluated. An earlier proposal by Franklin and Haber with the same complexity was only secure for passive...... adversaries, while all earlier protocols with active security had complexity at least quadratic in n. We give two examples of threshold cryptosystems that can support our construction and lead to the claimed complexities....

  9. The Resting Motor Threshold - Restless or Resting?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karabanov, Anke Ninija; Raffin, Estelle Emeline; Siebner, Hartwig Roman

    2015-01-01

    Background The resting motor threshold (RMT) is used to individually adjust the intensity of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) intensity and is assumed to be stable. Here we challenge this notion by showing that RMT expresses acute context-dependent fluctuations. Method In twelve participants......, the RMT of the right first dorsal interosseus muscle was repeatedly determined using a threshold-hunting procedure while participants performed motor imagery and visual attention tasks with the right or left hand. Data were analyzed using repeated-measure ANOVA. Results RMT differed depending on which...... hand performed the task (P = 0.003). RMT of right FDI was lower during motor imagery than during visual attention of the right hand (P = 0.002), but did not differ between left-hand tasks (P = 0.988). Conclusions State-dependent changes of RMT occur in absence of overt motor activity and can...

  10. Gamin partable radiation meter with alarm threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payat, Rene.

    1981-10-01

    The Gamin Radiation meter is a direct reading, portable, battery-powered gamma doserate meter featuring alarm thresholds. Doserate is read on a micro-ammeter with a millirad-per-hour logarithmic scale, covering a range of 0,1 to 1000 millirads/hour. The instrument issues an audible warning signal when dose-rate level exceeds a threshold value, which can be selected. The detector tube is of the Geiger-Muller counter, energy compensated type. Because of its low battery drain, the instrument can be operated continously for 1000 hours. It is powered by four 1.5 volt alcaline batteries of the R6 type. The electronic circuitry is housed in a small lightweight case made of impact resistant plastic. Applications of the Gamin portable radiation monitor are found in health physics, safety departments, medical facilities, teaching, civil defense [fr

  11. Rayleigh scattering from ions near threshold

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roy, S.C.; Gupta, S.K.S.; Kissel, L.; Pratt, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical studies of Rayleigh scattering of photons from neon atoms with different degrees of ionization, for energies both below and above the K-edges of the ions, are presented. Some unexpected structures both in Rayleigh scattering and in photoionization from neutral and weakly ionized atoms, very close to threshold, have been reported. It has recently been realized that some of the predicted structures may have a nonphysical origin and are due to the limitation of the independent-particle model and also to the use of a Coulombic Latter tail. Use of a K-shell vacancy potential - in which an electron is assumed to be removed from the K-shell - in calculating K-shell Rayleigh scattering amplitudes removes some of the structure effects near threshold. We present in this work a discussion of scattering angular distributions and total cross sections, obtained utilizing vacancy potentials, and compare these predictions with those previously obtained in other potential model. (author) [pt

  12. The monolithic double-threshold discriminator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baturitsky, M.A.; Dvornikov, O.V.

    1999-01-01

    A double-threshold discriminator capable of processing input signals of different duration is described. Simplicity of the discriminator circuitry makes it possible to embody the discriminator in multichannel ICs using microwave bipolar-JFET technology. Time walk is calculated to be less than 0.35 ns for the input ramp signals with rise times 25-100 ns and amplitudes 50 mV-1 V

  13. Bivariate hard thresholding in wavelet function estimation

    OpenAIRE

    Piotr Fryzlewicz

    2007-01-01

    We propose a generic bivariate hard thresholding estimator of the discrete wavelet coefficients of a function contaminated with i.i.d. Gaussian noise. We demonstrate its good risk properties in a motivating example, and derive upper bounds for its mean-square error. Motivated by the clustering of large wavelet coefficients in real-life signals, we propose two wavelet denoising algorithms, both of which use specific instances of our bivariate estimator. The BABTE algorithm uses basis averaging...

  14. Estimasi Regresi Wavelet Thresholding Dengan Metode Bootstrap

    OpenAIRE

    Suparti, Suparti; Mustofa, Achmad; Rusgiyono, Agus

    2007-01-01

    Wavelet is a function that has the certainly characteristic for example, it oscillate about zero point ascillating, localized in the time and frequency domain and construct the orthogonal bases in L2(R) space. On of the wavelet application is to estimate non parametric regression function. There are two kinds of wavelet estimator, i.e., linear and non linear wavelet estimator. The non linear wavelet estimator is called a thresholding wavelet rstimator. The application of the bootstrap method...

  15. Factors affecting mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janczak, Andrew M; Ranheim, Birgit; Fosse, Torunn K; Hild, Sophie; Nordgreen, Janicke; Moe, Randi O; Zanella, Adroaldo J

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the stability and repeatability of measures of mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets and to examine potentially confounding factors when using a hand held algometer. Descriptive, prospective cohort. Forty-four piglets from four litters, weighing 4.6 ± 1.0 kg (mean ± SD) at 2 weeks of age. Mechanical thresholds were measured twice on each of 2 days during the first and second week of life. Data were analyzed using a repeated measures design to test the effects of behavior prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, and repetition within day. The effect of body weight and the interaction between piglet weight and behaviour were also tested. Piglet was entered into the model as a random effect as an additional test of repeatability. The effect of repeated testing was used to test the stability of measures. Pearson correlations between repeated measures were used to test the repeatability of measures. Variance component analysis was used to describe the variability in the data. Variance component analysis indicated that piglet explained only 17% of the variance in the data. All variables in the model (behaviour prior to testing, sex, week, day within week, repetition within day, body weight, the interaction between body weight and behaviour, piglet identity) except sex had a significant effect (p testing and measures changed with repeated testing and increased with increasing piglet weight, indicating that time (age) and animal body weight should be taken into account when measuring mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds in piglets. Mechanical (nociceptive) thresholds can be used both for testing the efficacy of anaesthetics and analgesics, and for assessing hyperalgesia in chronic pain states in research and clinical settings. © 2012 The Authors. Veterinary Anaesthesia and Analgesia. © 2012 Association of Veterinary Anaesthetists and the American College of Veterinary Anesthesiologists.

  16. Near threshold studies of photoelectron satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heimann, P.A.

    1986-11-01

    Photoelectron spectroscopy and synchrotron radiation have been used to study correlation effects in the rare gases: He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. Two kinds of time-of-flight electron analyzers were employed to examine photoionization very close to threshold and at higher kinetic energies. Partial cross sections and angular distributions have been measured for a number of photoelectron satellites. The shake-off probability has been determined at some inner-shell resonances. 121 refs., 28 figs., 13 tabs

  17. The Price Equation, Gradient Dynamics, and Continuous Trait Game Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehtonen, Jussi

    2018-01-01

    A recent article convincingly nominated the Price equation as the fundamental theorem of evolution and used it as a foundation to derive several other theorems. A major section of evolutionary theory that was not addressed is that of game theory and gradient dynamics of continuous traits with frequency-dependent fitness. Deriving fundamental results in these fields under the unifying framework of the Price equation illuminates similarities and differences between approaches and allows a simple, unified view of game-theoretical and dynamic concepts. Using Taylor polynomials and the Price equation, I derive a dynamic measure of evolutionary change, a condition for singular points, the convergence stability criterion, and an alternative interpretation of evolutionary stability. Furthermore, by applying the Price equation to a multivariable Taylor polynomial, the direct fitness approach to kin selection emerges. Finally, I compare these results to the mean gradient equation of quantitative genetics and the canonical equation of adaptive dynamics.

  18. Experimental and theoretical investigation of high gradient acceleration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wurtele, J.S.; Bekefi, G.; Chen, C.; Chen, S.C.; Temkin, R.J.

    1993-01-01

    This report contains a technical progress summary of the research conducted under the auspices of DOE Grant No. DE-AC02-91-ER40648, ''Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of High Gradient Acceleration''. This grant supports three research tasks: Task A consists of the design, fabrication and testing of a 17GHz RF photocathode gun, which can produce 2ps electron pulses with up to 1nC of charge at 2MeV energy and at a 1OHz repetition rate. Task B supports the testing of high gradient acceleration at 33GHz structure, and Task C comprises theoretical investigations, both in support of the experimental tasks and on critical physics issues for the development of high energy linear colliders

  19. A gradient enhanced plasticity-damage microplane model for concrete

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zreid, Imadeddin; Kaliske, Michael

    2018-03-01

    Computational modeling of concrete poses two main types of challenges. The first is the mathematical description of local response for such a heterogeneous material under all stress states, and the second is the stability and efficiency of the numerical implementation in finite element codes. The paper at hand presents a comprehensive approach addressing both issues. Adopting the microplane theory, a combined plasticity-damage model is formulated and regularized by an implicit gradient enhancement. The plasticity part introduces a new microplane smooth 3-surface cap yield function, which provides a stable numerical solution within an implicit finite element algorithm. The damage part utilizes a split, which can describe the transition of loading between tension and compression. Regularization of the model by the implicit gradient approach eliminates the mesh sensitivity and numerical instabilities. Identification methods for model parameters are proposed and several numerical examples of plain and reinforced concrete are carried out for illustration.

  20. Strain gradient crystal plasticity effects on flow localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borg, Ulrik

    2007-01-01

    In metal grains one of the most important failure mechanisms involves shear band localization. As the band width is small, the deformations are affected by material length scales. To study localization in single grains a rate-dependent crystal plasticity formulation for finite strains is presented...... for metals described by the reformulated Fleck-Hutchinson strain gradient plasticity theory. The theory is implemented numerically within a finite element framework using slip rate increments and displacement increments as state variables. The formulation reduces to the classical crystal plasticity theory...... in the absence of strain gradients. The model is used to study the effect of an internal material length scale on the localization of plastic flow in shear bands in a single crystal under plane strain tension. It is shown that the mesh sensitivity is removed when using the nonlocal material model considered...

  1. Two New PRP Conjugate Gradient Algorithms for Minimization Optimization Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonglin Yuan

    Full Text Available Two new PRP conjugate Algorithms are proposed in this paper based on two modified PRP conjugate gradient methods: the first algorithm is proposed for solving unconstrained optimization problems, and the second algorithm is proposed for solving nonlinear equations. The first method contains two aspects of information: function value and gradient value. The two methods both possess some good properties, as follows: 1 βk ≥ 0 2 the search direction has the trust region property without the use of any line search method 3 the search direction has sufficient descent property without the use of any line search method. Under some suitable conditions, we establish the global convergence of the two algorithms. We conduct numerical experiments to evaluate our algorithms. The numerical results indicate that the first algorithm is effective and competitive for solving unconstrained optimization problems and that the second algorithm is effective for solving large-scale nonlinear equations.

  2. Development of Gradient Cemented Carbides Through ICME Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Yong; Peng, Yingbiao; Zhang, Weibin; Chen, Weimin; Zhou, Peng; Xie, Wen; Cheng, Kaiming; Zhang, Lijun; Wen, Guanghua; Wang, Shequan

    An integrated computational materials engineering (ICME) including CALPHAD method is a powerful tool for materials process optimization and alloy design. The quality of CALPHAD-type calculations is strongly dependent on the quality of the thermodynamic and diffusivity databases. The development of a thermodynamic database, CSUTDCC1, and a diffusivity database, CSUDDCC1, for cemented carbides is described. Several gradient cemented carbides sintered under vacuum and various partial pressures of N2 have been studied via experiment and simulation. The microstructure and concentration profile of the gradient zones have been investigated via SEM and EPMA. Examples of ICME applications in design and manufacture for different kinds of cemented carbides are shown using the databases and comparing where possible against experimental data, thereby validating its accuracy.

  3. Threshold Learning Dynamics in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Avella, Juan Carlos; Eguíluz, Victor M.; Marsili, Matteo; Vega-Redondo, Fernado; San Miguel, Maxi

    2011-01-01

    Social learning is defined as the ability of a population to aggregate information, a process which must crucially depend on the mechanisms of social interaction. Consumers choosing which product to buy, or voters deciding which option to take with respect to an important issue, typically confront external signals to the information gathered from their contacts. Economic models typically predict that correct social learning occurs in large populations unless some individuals display unbounded influence. We challenge this conclusion by showing that an intuitive threshold process of individual adjustment does not always lead to such social learning. We find, specifically, that three generic regimes exist separated by sharp discontinuous transitions. And only in one of them, where the threshold is within a suitable intermediate range, the population learns the correct information. In the other two, where the threshold is either too high or too low, the system either freezes or enters into persistent flux, respectively. These regimes are generally observed in different social networks (both complex or regular), but limited interaction is found to promote correct learning by enlarging the parameter region where it occurs. PMID:21637714

  4. Near threshold computing technology, methods and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Silvano, Cristina

    2016-01-01

    This book explores near-threshold computing (NTC), a design-space using techniques to run digital chips (processors) near the lowest possible voltage.  Readers will be enabled with specific techniques to design chips that are extremely robust; tolerating variability and resilient against errors.  Variability-aware voltage and frequency allocation schemes will be presented that will provide performance guarantees, when moving toward near-threshold manycore chips.  ·         Provides an introduction to near-threshold computing, enabling reader with a variety of tools to face the challenges of the power/utilization wall; ·         Demonstrates how to design efficient voltage regulation, so that each region of the chip can operate at the most efficient voltage and frequency point; ·         Investigates how performance guarantees can be ensured when moving towards NTC manycores through variability-aware voltage and frequency allocation schemes.  .

  5. Threshold photoelectron spectroscopy of acetaldehyde and acrolein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yencha, Andrew J.; Siggel-King, Michele R.F.; King, George C.; Malins, Andrew E.R.; Eypper, Marie

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acetaldehyde. •High-resolution threshold photoelectron spectrum of acrolein. •High-resolution total photoion yield spectrum of acetaldehyde. •High-resolution total photoion yield spectrum of acrolein. •Determination of vertical ionization potentials in acetaldehyde and acrolein. -- Abstract: High-resolution (6 meV and 12 meV) threshold photoelectron (TPE) spectra of acetaldehyde and acrolein (2-propenal) have been recorded over the valence binding energy region 10–20 eV, employing synchrotron radiation and a penetrating-field electron spectrometer. These TPE spectra are presented here for the first time. All of the band structures observed in the TPE spectra replicate those found in their conventional HeI photoelectron (PE) spectra. However, the relative band intensities are found to be dramatically different in the two types of spectra that are attributed to the different dominant operative formation mechanisms. In addition, some band shapes and their vertical ionization potentials are found to differ in the two types of spectra that are associated with the autoionization of Rydberg states in the two molecules

  6. Auditory temporal resolution threshold in elderly individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queiroz, Daniela Soares de; Momensohn-Santos, Teresa Maria; Branco-Barreiro, Fátima Cristina Alves

    2010-01-01

    the Random Gap Detection Test (RGDT) evaluates temporal resolution threshold. There are doubts as to whether performance in this task remains unchanged with the aging process. At the same time, there is a concern about how much the difficulties of communication experienced by elderly individuals are related to the deterioration of temporal resolution. to determine auditory temporal resolution threshold in elderly individuals with normal peripheral hearing or symmetric mild sensorineural hearing loss, and to correlate findings with gender, age, audiometric findings and scores obtained in the Self - Assessment of Communication (SAC) questionnaire. 63 elderly individuals, aged between 60 and 80 years (53 women and 10 men), were submitted to the RGDT and the SAC. statistical analysis of the relationship between gender and the RGDT indicated that the performance of elderly females was statistically poorer when compared to elderly males. Age and audiometric configuration did not correlate to performance in the RDGT and in the SAC. The results indicate that in the SAC both genders presented no significant complaints about communication difficulties regardless of the outcome obtained in the RGDT or audiometric configuration. the average temporal resolution threshold for women was 104.81ms. Considering gender, females did not present correlations between age and audiometric configuration, not only when considering the RGDT results but also when analyzing the SAC results.

  7. Chemical sensing thresholds for mine detection dogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelan, James M.; Barnett, James L.

    2002-08-01

    Mine detection dogs have been found to be an effective method to locate buried landmines. The capabilities of the canine olfaction method are from a complex combination of training and inherent capacity of the dog for odor detection. The purpose of this effort was to explore the detection thresholds of a limited group of dogs that were trained specifically for landmine detection. Soils were contaminated with TNT and 2,4-DNT to develop chemical vapor standards to present to the dogs. Soils contained ultra trace levels of TNT and DNT, which produce extremely low vapor levels. Three groups of dogs were presented the headspace vapors from the contaminated soils in work environments for each dog group. One positive sample was placed among several that contained clean soils and, the location and vapor source (strength, type) was frequently changed. The detection thresholds for the dogs were determined from measured and extrapolated dilution of soil chemical residues and, estimated soil vapor values using phase partitioning relationships. The results showed significant variances in dog sensing thresholds, where some dogs could sense the lowest levels and others had trouble with even the highest source. The remarkable ultra-trace levels detectable by the dogs are consistent with the ultra-trace chemical residues derived from buried landmines; however, poor performance may go unnoticed without periodic challenge tests at levels consistent with performance requirements.

  8. Treating acetaminophen overdose: thresholds, costs and uncertainties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosselin, S; Hoffman, R S; Juurlink, D N; Whyte, I; Yarema, M; Caro, J

    2013-03-01

    The United Kingdom's Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) modified the indications for N-acetylcysteine therapy of acetaminophen (paracetamol) overdose in September 2012. The new treatment threshold line was lowered to 100 mg/L (662 μmol/L) for a 4 hours acetaminophen concentration from the previous 200 mg/L (1325 μmol/L). This decision has the potential to substantially increase overall costs associated with acetaminophen overdose with unclear benefits from a marginal increase in patients protected from hepatotoxicity, fulminant hepatic failure, death, or transplant. Changing the treatment threshold for acetaminophen overdose also implies that ingestion amounts previously thought not to require acetaminophen concentration measurements would need to be revised. As a result, more individuals will be sent to hospitals in order that everyone with a predicted 4 hours concentration above the 100 mg/L line will have concentrations measured and potentially be treated with N-acetylcysteine. Before others consider adopting this new treatment guideline, formal cost-effectiveness analyses need to be performed to define the appropriate thresholds for referral and treatment.

  9. Experimental and theoretical studies of oxygen gradients in rat pial microvessels

    OpenAIRE

    Sharan, Maithili; Vovenko, Eugene P; Vadapalli, Arjun; Popel, Aleksander S; Pittman, Roland N

    2008-01-01

    Using modified oxygen needle microelectrodes and intravital videomicroscopy, measurements were made of tissue oxygen tension (PO2) profiles near cortical arterioles and transmural PO2 gradients in the pial arterioles of the rat. Under control conditions, the transmural PO2 gradient averaged 1.17 ± 0.06 mm Hg/μm (mean ± s.e., n = 40). Local arteriolar dilation resulted in a marked decrease in the transmural PO2 gradient to 0.68 ± 0.04 mm Hg/μm (P < 0.001, n = 38). The major finding of this stu...

  10. Improving GOCE cross-track gravity gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siemes, Christian

    2018-01-01

    The GOCE gravity gradiometer measured highly accurate gravity gradients along the orbit during GOCE's mission lifetime from March 17, 2009, to November 11, 2013. These measurements contain unique information on the gravity field at a spatial resolution of 80 km half wavelength, which is not provided to the same accuracy level by any other satellite mission now and in the foreseeable future. Unfortunately, the gravity gradient in cross-track direction is heavily perturbed in the regions around the geomagnetic poles. We show in this paper that the perturbing effect can be modeled accurately as a quadratic function of the non-gravitational acceleration of the satellite in cross-track direction. Most importantly, we can remove the perturbation from the cross-track gravity gradient to a great extent, which significantly improves the accuracy of the latter and offers opportunities for better scientific exploitation of the GOCE gravity gradient data set.

  11. Flexoelectricity: strain gradient effects in ferroelectrics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Wenhui [Department of Physics, Shantou Unversity, Shantou, Guangdong 515063 (China)

    2007-12-15

    Mechanical strain gradient induced polarization effect or flexoelectricity in perovskite-type ferroelectric and relaxor ferroelectric ceramics was investigated. The flexoelectric coefficients measured at room temperature ranged from about 1 {mu} C m{sup -1} for lead zirconate titanate to 100 {mu} C m{sup -1} for barium strontium titanate. Flexoelectric effects were discovered to be sensitive to chemical makeup, phase symmetry, and domain structures. Based on phenomenological discussion and experimental data on flexoelectricity, the present study proposed that mechanical strain gradient field could influence polarization responses in a way analogous to electric field. Flexoelectric coefficients were found to be nonlinearly enhanced by dielectric permittivity and strain gradient. Interfacial mismatch in epitaxial thin films can give rise to high strain gradients, enabling flexoelectric effects to make a significant impact in properly engineered ferroelectric heterostructure systems.

  12. Flexoelectricity: strain gradient effects in ferroelectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Wenhui

    2007-01-01

    Mechanical strain gradient induced polarization effect or flexoelectricity in perovskite-type ferroelectric and relaxor ferroelectric ceramics was investigated. The flexoelectric coefficients measured at room temperature ranged from about 1 μ C m -1 for lead zirconate titanate to 100 μ C m -1 for barium strontium titanate. Flexoelectric effects were discovered to be sensitive to chemical makeup, phase symmetry, and domain structures. Based on phenomenological discussion and experimental data on flexoelectricity, the present study proposed that mechanical strain gradient field could influence polarization responses in a way analogous to electric field. Flexoelectric coefficients were found to be nonlinearly enhanced by dielectric permittivity and strain gradient. Interfacial mismatch in epitaxial thin films can give rise to high strain gradients, enabling flexoelectric effects to make a significant impact in properly engineered ferroelectric heterostructure systems

  13. Integral Field Spectroscopy Surveys: Oxygen Abundance Gradients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, S. F.; Sánchez-Menguiano, L.

    2017-07-01

    We present here the recent results on our understanding of oxygen abundance gradients derived using Integral Field Spectroscopic surveys. In particular we analyzed more than 2124 datacubes corresponding to individual objects observed by the CALIFA (˜ 734 objects) and the public data by MaNGA (˜ 1390 objects), deriving the oxygen abundance gradient for each galaxy. We confirm previous results that indicate that the shape of this gradient is very similar for all galaxies with masses above 109.5M⊙, presenting in average a very similar slope of ˜ -0.04 dex within 0.5-2.0 re, with a possible drop in the inner regions (r109.5M⊙) the gradient seems to be flatter than for more massive ones. All these results agree with an inside-out growth of massive galaxies and indicate that low mass ones may still be growing in an outside in phase.

  14. Unimodal and crossmodal gradients of spatial attention

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Föcker, J.; Hötting, K.; Gondan, Matthias

    2010-01-01

    Behavioral and event-related potential (ERP) studies have shown that spatial attention is gradually distributed around the center of the attentional focus. The present study compared uni- and crossmodal gradients of spatial attention to investigate whether the orienting of auditory and visual...... spatial attention is based on modality specific or supramodal representations of space. Auditory and visual stimuli were presented from five speaker locations positioned in the right hemifield. Participants had to attend to the innermost or outmost right position in order to detect either visual...... or auditory deviant stimuli. Detection rates and event-related potentials (ERPs) indicated that spatial attention is distributed as a gradient. Unimodal spatial ERP gradients correlated with the spatial resolution of the modality. Crossmodal spatial gradients were always broader than the corresponding...

  15. Microinstabilities in weak density gradient tokamak systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, W.M.; Rewoldt, G.; Chen, L.

    1986-04-01

    A prominent characteristic of auxiliary-heated tokamak discharges which exhibit improved (''H-mode type'') confinement properties is that their density profiles tend to be much flatter over most of the plasma radius. Depsite this favorable trend, it is emphasized here that, even in the limit of zero density gradient, low-frequency microinstabilities can persist due to the nonzero temperature gradient.

  16. Tolman temperature gradients in a gravitational field

    OpenAIRE

    Santiago, Jessica; Visser, Matt

    2018-01-01

    Tolman's relation for the temperature gradient in an equilibrium self-gravitating general relativistic fluid is broadly accepted within the general relativity community. However, the concept of temperature gradients in thermal equilibrium continues to cause confusion in other branches of physics, since it contradicts naive versions of the laws of classical thermodynamics. In this paper we discuss the crucial role of the universality of free fall, and how thermodynamics emphasises the great di...

  17. Ultimate gradient in solid-state accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The authors recall the motivation for research in high-gradient acceleration and the problems posed by a compact collider. They summarize the phenomena known to appear in operation of a solid-state structure with large fields, and research relevant to the question of the ultimate gradient. They take note of new concepts, and examine one in detail, a miniature particle accelerator based on an active millimeter-wave circuit and parallel particle beams.

  18. Ultimate gradient in solid-state accelerators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittum, D.H.

    1998-08-01

    The authors recall the motivation for research in high-gradient acceleration and the problems posed by a compact collider. They summarize the phenomena known to appear in operation of a solid-state structure with large fields, and research relevant to the question of the ultimate gradient. They take note of new concepts, and examine one in detail, a miniature particle accelerator based on an active millimeter-wave circuit and parallel particle beams

  19. Intratumoral oxygen gradients mediate sarcoma cell invasion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Daniel M.; Park, Kyung Min; Tang, Vitor; Xu, Yu; Pak, Koreana; Eisinger-Mathason, T. S. Karin; Simon, M. Celeste; Gerecht, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is a critical factor in the progression and metastasis of many cancers, including soft tissue sarcomas. Frequently, oxygen (O2) gradients develop in tumors as they grow beyond their vascular supply, leading to heterogeneous areas of O2 depletion. Here, we report the impact of hypoxic O2 gradients on sarcoma cell invasion and migration. O2 gradient measurements showed that large sarcoma mouse tumors (>300 mm3) contain a severely hypoxic core [≤0.1% partial pressure of O2 (pO2)] whereas smaller tumors possessed hypoxic gradients throughout the tumor mass (0.1–6% pO2). To analyze tumor invasion, we used O2-controllable hydrogels to recreate the physiopathological O2 levels in vitro. Small tumor grafts encapsulated in the hydrogels revealed increased invasion that was both faster and extended over a longer distance in the hypoxic hydrogels compared with nonhypoxic hydrogels. To model the effect of the O2 gradient accurately, we examined individual sarcoma cells embedded in the O2-controllable hydrogel. We observed that hypoxic gradients guide sarcoma cell motility and matrix remodeling through hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) activation. We further found that in the hypoxic gradient, individual cells migrate more quickly, across longer distances, and in the direction of increasing O2 tension. Treatment with minoxidil, an inhibitor of hypoxia-induced sarcoma metastasis, abrogated cell migration and matrix remodeling in the hypoxic gradient. Overall, we show that O2 acts as a 3D physicotactic agent during sarcoma tumor invasion and propose the O2-controllable hydrogels as a predictive system to study early stages of the metastatic process and therapeutic targets. PMID:27486245

  20. Temperature Regimes Impact Coral Assemblages along Environmental Gradients on Lagoonal Reefs in Belize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin H Baumann

    Full Text Available Coral reefs are increasingly threatened by global and local anthropogenic stressors such as rising seawater temperature, nutrient enrichment, sedimentation, and overfishing. Although many studies have investigated the impacts of local and global stressors on coral reefs, we still do not fully understand how these stressors influence coral community structure, particularly across environmental gradients on a reef system. Here, we investigate coral community composition across three different temperature and productivity regimes along a nearshore-offshore gradient on lagoonal reefs of the Belize Mesoamerican Barrier Reef System (MBRS. A novel metric was developed using ultra-high-resolution satellite-derived estimates of sea surface temperatures (SST to classify reefs as exposed to low (lowTP, moderate (modTP, or high (highTP temperature parameters over 10 years (2003 to 2012. Coral species richness, abundance, diversity, density, and percent cover were lower at highTP sites relative to lowTP and modTP sites, but these coral community traits did not differ significantly between lowTP and modTP sites. Analysis of coral life history strategies revealed that highTP sites were dominated by hardy stress-tolerant and fast-growing weedy coral species, while lowTP and modTP sites consisted of competitive, generalist, weedy, and stress-tolerant coral species. Satellite-derived estimates of Chlorophyll-a (chl-a were obtained for 13-years (2003-2015 as a proxy for primary production. Chl-a concentrations were highest at highTP sites, medial at modTP sites, and lowest at lowTP sites. Notably, thermal parameters correlated better with coral community traits between site types than productivity, suggesting that temperature (specifically number of days above the thermal bleaching threshold played a greater role in defining coral community structure than productivity on the MBRS. Dominance of weedy and stress-tolerant genera at highTP sites suggests that corals