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Sample records for thoracic needle decompression

  1. Needle Decompression in Appalachia Do Obese Patients Need Longer Needles?

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    Carter, Thomas Edward

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Needle decompression of a tension pneumothorax can be a lifesaving procedure. It requires an adequate needle length to reach the chest wall to rapidly remove air. With adult obesity exceeding one third of the United States population in 2010, we sought to evaluate the proper catheter length that may result in a successful needle decompression procedure. Advance Trauma Life Support (ATLS currently recommends a 51 millimeter (mm needle, while the needles stocked in our emergency department are 46 mm. Given the obesity rates of our patient population, we hypothesize these needles would not have a tolerable success rate of 90%. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 91 patient records that had computed tomography of the chest and measured the chest wall depth at the second intercostal space bilaterally. Results: We found that 46 mm needles would only be successful in 52.7% of our patient population, yet the ATLS recommended length of 51 mm has a success rate of 64.8%. Therefore, using a 64 mm needle would be successful in 79% percent of our patient population. Conclusion: Use of longer length needles for needle thoracostomy is essential given the extent of the nation’s adult obesity population. [West J Emerg Med. 2013;14(6:650-652.

  2. Emergency percutaneous needle decompression for tension pneumoperitoneum

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    Körner Markus

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tension pneumoperitoneum as a complication of iatrogenic bowel perforation during endoscopy is a dramatic condition in which intraperitoneal air under pressure causes hemodynamic and ventilatory compromise. Like tension pneumothorax, urgent intervention is required. Immediate surgical decompression though is not always possible due to the limitations of the preclinical management and sometimes to capacity constraints of medical staff and equipment in the clinic. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of cases of pneumoperitoneum and tension pneumoperitoneum due to iatrogenic bowel perforation. All patients admitted to our surgical department between January 2005 and October 2010 were included. Tension pneumoperitoneum was diagnosed in those patients presenting signs of hemodynamic and ventilatory compromise in addition to abdominal distension. Results Between January 2005 and October 2010 eleven patients with iatrogenic bowel perforation were admitted to our surgical department. The mean time between perforation and admission was 36 ± 14 hrs (range 30 min - 130 hrs, between ER admission and begin of the operation 3 hrs and 15 min ± 47 min (range 60 min - 9 hrs. Three out of eleven patients had clinical signs of tension pneumoperitoneum. In those patients emergency percutaneous needle decompression was performed with a 16G venous catheter. This improved significantly the patients' condition (stabilization of vital signs, reducing jugular vein congestion, bridging the time to the start of the operation. Conclusions Hemodynamical and respiratory compromise in addition to abdominal distension shortly after endoscopy are strongly suggestive of tension pneumoperitoneum due to iatrogenic bowel perforation. This is a rare but life threatening condition and it can be managed in a preclinical and clinical setting with emergency percutaneous needle decompression like tension pneumothorax. Emergency percutaneous decompression is no

  3. Needle Decompression of Tension Pneumothorax with Colorimetric Capnography.

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    Naik, Nimesh D; Hernandez, Matthew C; Anderson, Jeff R; Ross, Erika K; Zielinski, Martin D; Aho, Johnathon M

    2017-11-01

    The success of needle decompression for tension pneumothorax is variable, and there are no objective measures assessing effective decompression. Colorimetric capnography, which detects carbon dioxide present within the pleural space, may serve as a simple test to assess effective needle decompression. Three swine underwent traumatically induced tension pneumothorax (standard of care, n = 15; standard of care with needle capnography, n = 15). Needle thoracostomy was performed with an 8-cm angiocatheter. Similarly, decompression was performed with the addition of colorimetric capnography. Subjective operator assessment of decompression was recorded and compared with true decompression, using thoracoscopic visualization for both techniques. Areas under receiver operating curves were calculated and pairwise comparison was performed to assess statistical significance (P pneumothorax, that is, the absence of any pathologic/space-occupying lesion, in 100% of cases (10 of 10 attempts). Standard of care needle decompression was detected by operators in 9 of 15 attempts (60%) and was detected in 3 of 10 attempts when tension pneumothorax was not present (30%). True decompression, under direct visualization with thoracoscopy, occurred 15 of 15 times (100%) with capnography, and 12 of 15 times (80%) without capnography. Areas under receiver operating curves were 0.65 for standard of care and 1.0 for needle capnography (P = .002). Needle decompression with colorimetric capnography provides a rapid, effective, and highly accurate method for eliminating operator bias for tension pneumothorax decompression. This may be useful for the treatment of this life-threatening condition. Copyright © 2017 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Failure rate of prehospital chest decompression after severe thoracic trauma.

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    Kaserer, Alexander; Stein, Philipp; Simmen, Hans-Peter; Spahn, Donat R; Neuhaus, Valentin

    2017-03-01

    Chest decompression can be performed by different techniques, like needle thoracocentesis (NT), lateral thoracostomy (LT), or tube thoracostomy (TT). The aim of this study was to report the incidence of prehospital chest decompression and to analyse the effectiveness of these techniques. In this retrospective case series study, all medical records of adult trauma patients undergoing prehospital chest decompression and admitted to the resuscitation area of a level-1 trauma center between 2009 and 2015 were reviewed and analysed. Only descriptive statistics were applied. In a 6-year period 24 of 2261 (1.1%) trauma patients had prehospital chest decompression. Seventeen patients had NT, six patients TT, one patient NT as well as TT, and no patients had LT. Prehospital successful release of a tension pneumothorax was reported by the paramedics in 83% (5/6) with TT, whereas NT was effective in 18% only (3/17). In five CT scans all thoracocentesis needles were either removed or extrapleural, one patient had a tension pneumothorax, and two patients had no pneumothorax. No NT or TT related complications were reported during hospitalization. Prehospital NT or TT is infrequently attempted in trauma patients. Especially NT is associated with a high failure rate of more than 80%, potentially due to an inadequate ratio between chest wall thickness and catheter length as previously published as well as a possible different pathophysiological cause of respiratory distress. Therefore, TT may be considered already in the prehospital setting to retain sufficient pleural decompression upon admission. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  5. Needle Decompression of Tension Pneumothorax Tactical Combat Casualty Care Guideline Recommendations

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    2012-07-06

    suspected torso trauma , consider a tension pneumothorax and decompress the chest on the side of the injury with a 14-gauge, 3.25 inch (8cm) needle...and known or suspected torso trauma , consider a tension pneumothorax and decompress the chest on the side of the injury with a 14-gauge, 3.25 inch...these studies used civilian volunteers, retrospective trauma database analysis and cadavers to measure the mean chest wall thickness. This population

  6. Chest wall thickness and decompression failure: A systematic review and meta-analysis comparing anatomic locations in needle thoracostomy.

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    Laan, Danuel V; Vu, Trang Diem N; Thiels, Cornelius A; Pandian, T K; Schiller, Henry J; Murad, M Hassan; Aho, Johnathon M

    2016-04-01

    Current Advanced Trauma Life Support guidelines recommend decompression for thoracic tension physiology using a 5-cm angiocatheter at the second intercostal space (ICS) on the midclavicular line (MCL). High failure rates occur. Through systematic review and meta-analysis, we aimed to determine the chest wall thickness (CWT) of the 2nd ICS-MCL, the 4th/5th ICS at the anterior axillary line (AAL), the 4th/5th ICS mid axillary line (MAL) and needle thoracostomy failure rates using the currently recommended 5-cm angiocatheter. A comprehensive search of several databases from their inception to July 24, 2014 was conducted. The search was limited to the English language, and all study populations were included. Studies were appraised by two independent reviewers according to a priori defined PRISMA inclusion and exclusion criteria. Continuous outcomes (CWT) were evaluated using weighted mean difference and binary outcomes (failure with 5-cm needle) were assessed using incidence rate. Outcomes were pooled using the random-effects model. The search resulted in 34,652 studies of which 15 were included for CWT analysis, 13 for NT effectiveness. Mean CWT was 42.79 mm (95% CI, 38.78-46.81) at 2nd ICS-MCL, 39.85 mm (95% CI, 28.70-51.00) at MAL, and 34.33 mm (95% CI, 28.20-40.47) at AAL (P=.08). Mean failure rate was 38% (95% CI, 24-54) at 2nd ICS-MCL, 31% (95% CI, 10-64) at MAL, and 13% (95% CI, 8-22) at AAL (P=.01). Evidence from observational studies suggests that the 4th/5th ICS-AAL has the lowest predicted failure rate of needle decompression in multiple populations. Level 3 SR/MA with up to two negative criteria. Therapeutic. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Spinal Epidural Hematoma after Thoracolumbar Posterior Fusion Surgery without Decompression for Thoracic Vertebral Fracture

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    Tsuyoki Minato

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a rare case of spinal epidural hematoma (SEH after thoracolumbar posterior fusion without decompression surgery for a thoracic vertebral fracture. A 42-year-old man was hospitalized for a thoracic vertebral fracture caused by being sandwiched against his back on broken concrete block. Computed tomography revealed a T12 dislocation fracture of AO type B2, multiple bilateral rib fractures, and a right hemopneumothorax. Four days after the injury, in order to promote early orthostasis and to improve respiratory status, we performed thoracolumbar posterior fusion surgery without decompression; the patient had back pain but no neurological deficits. Three hours after surgery, he complained of acute pain and severe weakness of his bilateral lower extremities; with allodynia below the level of his umbilicus, postoperative SEH was diagnosed. We performed immediate revision surgery. After removal of the hematoma, his symptoms improved gradually, and he was discharged ambulatory one month after revision surgery. Through experience of this case, we should strongly consider the possibility of preexisting SEH before surgery, even in patients with no neurological deficits. We should also consider perioperative coagulopathy in patients with multiple trauma, as in this case.

  8. Anterior versus lateral needle decompression of tension pneumothorax: comparison by computed tomography chest wall measurement.

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    Sanchez, Leon D; Straszewski, Shannon; Saghir, Amina; Khan, Atif; Horn, Erin; Fischer, Christopher; Khosa, Faisal; Camacho, Marc A

    2011-10-01

    Recent research describes failed needle decompression in the anterior position. It has been hypothesized that a lateral approach may be more successful. The aim of this study was to identify the optimal site for needle decompression. A retrospective study was conducted of emergency department (ED) patients who underwent computed tomography (CT) of the chest as part of their evaluation for blunt trauma. A convenience sample of 159 patients was formed by reviewing consecutive scans of eligible patients. Six measurements from the skin surface to the pleural surface were made for each patient: anterior second intercostal space, lateral fourth intercostal space, and lateral fifth intercostal space on the left and right sides. The distance from skin to pleura at the anterior second intercostal space averaged 46.3 mm on the right and 45.2 mm on the left. The distance at the midaxillary line in the fourth intercostal space was 63.7 mm on the right and 62.1 mm on the left. In the fifth intercostal space the distance was 53.8 mm on the right and 52.9 mm on the left. The distance of the anterior approach was statistically less when compared to both intercostal spaces (p < 0.01). With commonly available angiocatheters, the lateral approach is less likely to be successful than the anterior approach. The anterior approach may fail in many patients as well. Longer angiocatheters may increase the chances of decompression, but would also carry a higher risk of damage to surrounding vital structures. © 2011 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  9. Surgical decompression of thoracic spinal stenosis in achondroplasia: indication and outcome.

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    Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen; Peul, Wilco

    2012-08-01

    The achondroplastic spinal canal is narrow due to short pedicles and a small interpedicular distance. Compression of neural structures passing through this canal is therefore regularly encountered but rarely described. Symptomatology, radiological evaluation, and treatment of 20 patients with achondroplasia who underwent decompression of the thoracic spinal cord are described and outcome is correlated with the size of the spinal canal and the thoracolumbar kyphotic angle. Scores from the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale, Nurick scale, European Myelopathy scale, Cooper myelopathy scale for lower extremities, and Odom criteria before and after surgery were compared. Magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated to determine the size of the spinal canal, spinal cord compression, and presence of myelomalacia. The thoracolumbar kyphotic angle was measured using fluoroscopy. Patient symptomatology included deterioration of walking pattern, pain, cramps, spasms, and incontinence. Magnetic resonance images of all patients demonstrated spinal cord compression due to degenerative changes. Surgery resulted in a slight improvement on all the ranking scales. Surgery at the wrong level occurred in 15% of cases, but no serious complications occurred. The mean thoracolumbar kyphotic angle was 20°, and no correlation was established between this angle and outcome after surgery. No postoperative increase in this angle was reported. There was also no correlation between size of the spinal canal and outcome. Decompressive surgery of the thoracic spinal cord in patients with achondroplasia can be performed safely if anatomical details are taken into consideration. Spondylodesis did not appear essential. Special attention should be given to the method of surgery, identification of the level of interest, and follow-up of the thoracolumbar kyphotic angle.

  10. Relative device stability of anterior versus axillary needle decompression for tension pneumothorax during casualty movement: Preliminary analysis of a human cadaver model.

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    Leatherman, Matthew L; Held, Jenny M; Fluke, Laura M; McEvoy, Christian S; Inaba, Kenji; Grabo, Daniel; Martin, Matthew J; Earley, Angela S; Ricca, Robert L; Polk, Travis M

    2017-07-01

    Tension pneumothorax (tPTX) remains a significant cause of potentially preventable death in military and civilian settings. The current prehospital standard of care for tPTX is immediate decompression with a 14-gauge 8-cm angiocatheter; however, failure rates may be as high as 17% to 60%. Alternative devices, such as 10-gauge angiocatheter, modified Veress needle, and laparoscopic trocar, have shown to be potentially more effective in animal models; however, little is known about the relative insertional safety or mechanical stability during casualty movement. Seven soft-embalmed cadavers were intubated and mechanically ventilated. Chest wall thickness was measured at the second intercostal space at the midclavicular line (2MCL) and the fifth intercostal space along the anterior axillary line (5AAL). CO2 insufflation created a PTX, and needle decompression was then performed with a randomized device. Insertional depth was measured between hub and skin before and after simulated casualty transport. Thoracoscopy was used to evaluate for intrapleural placement and/or injury during insertion and after movement. Cadaver demographics, device displacement, device dislodgment, and injuries were recorded. Three decompressions were performed at each site (2MCL/5AAL), totaling 12 events per cadaver. Eighty-four decompressions were performed. Average cadaver age was 59 years, and body mass index was 24 kg/m. The CWT varied between cadavers because of subcutaneous emphysema, but the average was 39 mm at the 2MCL and 31 mm at the 5AAL. Following movement, the 2MCL site was more likely to become dislodged than the 5AAL (67% vs. 17%, p = 0.001). Median displacement also differed between 2MCL and 5AAL (23 vs. 2 mm, p = 0.001). No significant differences were noted in dislodgement or displacement between devices. Five minor lung injuries were noted at the 5AAL position. Preliminary results from this human cadaver study suggest the 5AAL position is a more stable and reliable location

  11. Microneurolysis and decompression of long thoracic nerve injury are effective in reversing scapular winging: Long-term results in 50 cases

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    Lyons Andrew B

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long thoracic nerve injury leading to scapular winging is common, often caused by closed trauma through compression, stretching, traction, direct extrinsic force, penetrating injury, or neuritides such as Parsonage-Turner syndrome. We undertook the largest series of long thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis yet reported to demonstrate the usefulness of long thoracic nerve decompression. Methods Winging was bilateral in 3 of the 47 patients (26 male, 21 female, yielding a total of 50 procedures. The mean age of the patients was 33.4 years, ranging from 24–57. Causation included heavy weight-lifting (31 patients, repetitive throwing (5 patients, deep massage (2 patients, repetitive overhead movement (1 patient, direct trauma (1 patient, motor bike accident (1 patient, and idiopathic causes (9 patients. Decompression and microneurolysis of the long thoracic nerve were performed in the supraclavicular space. Follow-up (average of 25.7 months consisted of physical examination and phone conversations. The degree of winging was measured by the operating surgeon (RKN. Patients also answered questions covering 11 quality-of-life facets spanning four domains of the World Health Organization Quality of Life questionnaire. Results Thoracic nerve decompression and neurolysis improved scapular winging in 49 (98% of the 50 cases, producing "good" or "excellent" results in 46 cases (92%. At least some improvement occurred in 98% of cases that were less than 10 years old. Pain reduction through surgery was good or excellent in 43 (86% cases. Shoulder instability affected 21 patients preoperatively and persisted in 5 of these patients after surgery, even in the 5 patients with persistent instability who experienced some relief from the winging itself. Conclusion Surgical decompression and neurolysis of the long thoracic nerve significantly improve scapular winging in appropriate patients, for whom these techniques should be considered

  12. Intraoperative 3-dimensional navigation and ultrasonography during posterior decompression with instrumented fusion for ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the thoracic spine.

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    Tian, Wei; Weng, Chong; Liu, Bo; Li, Qin; Sun, Yu-Qing; Yuan, Qiang; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yong-Qing; He, Da

    2013-08-01

    A retrospective clinical study was conducted. The purpose of this study was to describe the clinical outcomes of intraoperative 3D navigation (ITN) and ultrasonography during posterior decompression and instrumented fusion for thoracic myelopathy due to ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). The symptoms caused by thoracic-ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (T-OPLL) are usually progressive and do not respond to conservative treatment-surgical intervention is the only effective treatment option. Various methods have been described for the treatment of symptomatic T-OPLL, all of which have limitations. The study included 18 patients with T-OPLL who underwent posterior decompression with instrumented fusion from 2006 to 2011. A staged operative procedure was used. First, pedicle screws were placed with ITN and a wide laminectomy was performed with resection of ossification of the ligamentum flavum (if present). With insufficient decompression on intraoperative ultrasonography, additional circumferential decompression was performed through a transpedicular approach. ITN-guided OPLL resection was performed using a burr attached to a navigational tracker. In all cases, posterior instrumented fusion was performed in situ. The outcomes were evaluated with the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores and recovery rates. Intraoperative ultrasonography showed that posterior laminectomy was sufficient in 6 patients; the remaining 12 were treated with additional circumferential decompression. The follow-up period ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean period, 2.8 y). Postoperative transient neurological deterioration occurred in 1 patient, and cerebrospinal fluid leakage occurred in 4 patients. All patients showed neurological recovery with a mean Japanese Orthopaedic Association score that improved from 5.5 points preoperatively to 8.5 points at the final follow-up and a mean recovery rate of 54.5%. Intraoperative ultrasonography and ITN

  13. CT-guided biopsy of thoracic lesions with a novel wire-based needle guide device - initial experiences

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    Kroepil, Patric; Bilk, Philip; Quentin, Michael; Miese, Falk R; Lanzman, Rotem S; Scherer, Axel (Dept. of Radiology, Medical Faculty, Univ. Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf (Germany)), email: Patric.Kroepil@med.uni-duesseldorf.de

    2011-10-15

    Background Biopsies guided by computed tomography (CT) play an important role in clinical practice. A short duration, minimal radiation dose and complication rate are of particular interest. Purpose To evaluate the potential of a novel self-manufactured wire-based needle guide device for CT-guided thoracic biopsies with respect to radiation dose, intervention time and complication rate. Material and Methods Forty patients that underwent CT-guided biopsies of thoracic lesions were included in this study and assigned to two groups. Patients in group A (n = 20, mean age 69 +- 8.4 years) underwent biopsies with a novel wire-based needle guide device, while patients in group B (n = 20, mean age 68.4 +- 10.1 years) were biopsied without a needle guide device. The novel self-manufactured needle guide device consists of an iron/zinc wire modelled to a ring with a flexible arm and an eye at the end of the arm to stabilize the biopsy needle in the optimal position during intervention. Predefined parameters (radiation dose, number of acquired CT-slices, duration of intervention, complications) were compared between both groups. Results Mean radiation dose (CTDIvol 192 mGy versus 541 mGy; P = 0.001) and the number of acquired slices during intervention (n = 49 +- 33 vs. n = 126 +- 78; P = 0.001) were significantly lower in group A compared with group B. Intervention time in group A (13.1 min) was significantly lower than in group B (18.5 min, P < 0.01). A pneumothorax as peri-interventional complication was observed less frequent after device assisted biopsies (n = 4 vs. n = 8, n.s.). Conclusion The novel wire-based needle guide device is a promising tool to facilitate CT-guided thoracic biopsies reducing radiation dose, intervention time, and related complications. Further studies are mandatory to confirm these initial results

  14. CT-guided biopsy of thoracic lesions with a novel wire-based needle guide device - initial experiences

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    Kroepil, Patric; Bilk, Philip; Quentin, Michael; Miese, Falk R; Lanzman, Rotem S; Scherer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Background Biopsies guided by computed tomography (CT) play an important role in clinical practice. A short duration, minimal radiation dose and complication rate are of particular interest. Purpose To evaluate the potential of a novel self-manufactured wire-based needle guide device for CT-guided thoracic biopsies with respect to radiation dose, intervention time and complication rate. Material and Methods Forty patients that underwent CT-guided biopsies of thoracic lesions were included in this study and assigned to two groups. Patients in group A (n = 20, mean age 69 ± 8.4 years) underwent biopsies with a novel wire-based needle guide device, while patients in group B (n = 20, mean age 68.4 ± 10.1 years) were biopsied without a needle guide device. The novel self-manufactured needle guide device consists of an iron/zinc wire modelled to a ring with a flexible arm and an eye at the end of the arm to stabilize the biopsy needle in the optimal position during intervention. Predefined parameters (radiation dose, number of acquired CT-slices, duration of intervention, complications) were compared between both groups. Results Mean radiation dose (CTDIvol 192 mGy versus 541 mGy; P = 0.001) and the number of acquired slices during intervention (n = 49 ± 33 vs. n = 126 ± 78; P = 0.001) were significantly lower in group A compared with group B. Intervention time in group A (13.1 min) was significantly lower than in group B (18.5 min, P < 0.01). A pneumothorax as peri-interventional complication was observed less frequent after device assisted biopsies (n = 4 vs. n = 8, n.s.). Conclusion The novel wire-based needle guide device is a promising tool to facilitate CT-guided thoracic biopsies reducing radiation dose, intervention time, and related complications. Further studies are mandatory to confirm these initial results

  15. Management of cerebrospinal fluid leakage after anterior decompression for ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament in the thoracic spine: the utilization of a volume-controlled pseudomeningocele.

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    Cho, Ji Young; Chan, Chee Keong; Lee, Sang-Ho; Choi, Won-Chul; Maeng, Dae Hyeon; Lee, Ho-Yeon

    2012-06-01

    Retrospective review To determine the efficacy of management of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leakage after the anterior thoracic approach. CSF leakage after incidental durotomy commonly occurs after anterior thoracic ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) surgery. Pseudomeningocele will invariably form under such circumstances. Among them, uncontrolled CSF leakage with a fistulous condition is problematic. As a solution, we have managed these durotomies with chest drains alone without any CSF drainage by the concept of a "volume-controlled pseudomeningocele." Between 2001 and 2009, CSF leakage occurred in 26 patients (37.7%) of the total 69 patients who underwent anterior decompression for thoracic OPLL. In the initial 11 cases, subarachnoid drainage was utilized as an augmentive measure in combination with chest tube drainage in the postoperative period (group A). In the subsequent 15 cases, the durotomy was managed in a similar manner but in the absence of any subarachnoid drainage (group B). Various parameters such as the duration of postoperative hospital stay, clinical outcome score, drainage output, resolution of CSF leakage, complications, and additional surgery performed were analyzed and compared between the 2 groups. A resolution of the CSF leakage grading system was also proposed for the residual pseudomeningocele that formed in each group. There were statistically no significant differences in the outcome parameters between the 2 groups and also in patients with grade I or grade II residual pseudomeningocele of the new grading system. Two complications occurred in group A. No reexploration for persistent CSF leakage was required in both groups. CSF leakage managed with controlled chest tube drainage can produce a comparable result with those with additional subarachnoid drainage when watertight dural repair is impossible. The concept of controlled pseudomeningocele may be a useful and practical technique for the treatment of CSF leakage

  16. Practice pattern of transthoracic needle biopsy: 2016 survey in the members of Korean society of thoracic radiology

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    Jo, Ye Seul [Dept. of Radiology, Incheon St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Kyong Min [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul St. Mary' s Hospital, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jai Soung [Dept. of Radiology, Bucheon Hospital, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Bucheon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Tae Jung [Dept. of Radiology and Center for Imaging Science, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-11-15

    To assess the current practice patterns of radiologists who perform transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB). An email survey of 71 questions on TNB was sent to 240 members of the Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology. The answers to multiple-choice questions (n = 56) were analyzed. Of 60 respondents, 45% had 10 or more years of experience in chest radiology, and 70% had 5 or more years of experience in TNB. For the question on the most frequently used diagnostic method for lesions with high probability of being resectable-stage lung cancer, 70% of respondents answered that TNB is initially used, with or without bronchoscopy. In patients at high-risk of TNB-related complications, the proportion of the respondents who consistently declined TNB was only 5%. The number of rebiopsies was said to be increased; molecular analysis for an established target therapy (43.6%) and clinical trial of a new drug (28.2%) were the two most common reasons for it. The most popular needle type was the coaxial cutting needle (55%), and the popular guiding modality was conventional computed tomography (CT) (56.7%). In addition, 15% of respondents have encountered air embolism. Despite high variation in how TNB is being performed in Korea, some patterns were noted. It is common for patients with resectable-stage lung cancer to undergo TNB prior to surgery. Rebiopsy is now more common than before, with personalized medicine as the most important reason for it. The most popular type of needle is the coaxial system; the most popular modality for guidance is still CT.

  17. Practice pattern of transthoracic needle biopsy: 2016 survey in the members of Korean society of thoracic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jo, Ye Seul; Han, Kyong Min; Park, Jai Soung; Kim, Tae Jung

    2017-01-01

    To assess the current practice patterns of radiologists who perform transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB). An email survey of 71 questions on TNB was sent to 240 members of the Korean Society of Thoracic Radiology. The answers to multiple-choice questions (n = 56) were analyzed. Of 60 respondents, 45% had 10 or more years of experience in chest radiology, and 70% had 5 or more years of experience in TNB. For the question on the most frequently used diagnostic method for lesions with high probability of being resectable-stage lung cancer, 70% of respondents answered that TNB is initially used, with or without bronchoscopy. In patients at high-risk of TNB-related complications, the proportion of the respondents who consistently declined TNB was only 5%. The number of rebiopsies was said to be increased; molecular analysis for an established target therapy (43.6%) and clinical trial of a new drug (28.2%) were the two most common reasons for it. The most popular needle type was the coaxial cutting needle (55%), and the popular guiding modality was conventional computed tomography (CT) (56.7%). In addition, 15% of respondents have encountered air embolism. Despite high variation in how TNB is being performed in Korea, some patterns were noted. It is common for patients with resectable-stage lung cancer to undergo TNB prior to surgery. Rebiopsy is now more common than before, with personalized medicine as the most important reason for it. The most popular type of needle is the coaxial system; the most popular modality for guidance is still CT

  18. The use of intraosseous needles for injection of contrast media for computed tomographic angiography of the thoracic aorta.

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    Winkler, Michael; Talley, Cynthia; Woodward, Connor; Kingsbury, Alexander; Appiah, Frank; Elbelasi, Hossam; Landwher, Kevin; Li, Xingzhe; Fleischmann, Dominik

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the safety and quality of computed tomographic angiography of the thoracic aorta (CTA-TA) exams performed using intraosseous needle intravenous access (ION-IVA) for contrast media injection (CMI). All CTA-TA exams at the study institution performed between 1/1/2013 and 8/14/2015 were reviewed retrospectively to identify those exams which had been performed using ION-IVA (ION-exams). ION-exams were then analyzed to determine aortic attenuation and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Linear regression was used to determine how injection rate and other variables affected image quality for ION-exams. Patient electronic medical records were reviewed to identify any adverse events related to CTA-TA or ION-IVA. 17 (∼0.2%) of 7401 exams were ION-exams. ION-exam CMI rates varied between 2.5 and 4 ml/s. Mean attenuation was 312 HU (SD 88 HU) and mean CNR was 25 (SD 9.9). A strong positive linear association between attenuation and injection rate was found. No immediate or delayed complications related to the ION-exams, or intraosseous needle use in general, occurred. For CTA-TA, ION-IVA appears to be a safe and effective route for CMI at rates up to 4 ml/s. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Complications after CT guided trans thoracic needle biopsy: a 1000 patients-series of pulmonary lesions

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    Velan, Osvaldo; Ayzaguer, Alejandro

    2000-01-01

    To evaluate the complications of the percutaneous biopsy (PB) of pulmonary lesions, the predisposing factors and the behavior to be followed, we compared our experience with the one from other authors. We reviewed 1000 pulmonary biopsies (687 males), finding 78 pneumothorax (4 drained with tube and hospital admittance; 11 drained at the moment of the examination; the rest controlled), 65 pulmonary hemorrhages (1 died). Other complications were: a) hemoptysis (n=9); b) pain (n=4); c) hemo pleura (n=3); d) hypotension (n=1); e) cough (n=1). The PB is a top alternative to establish the etiology of the pulmonary lesion. As with any surgery, there is always the potential risk of complications. In our case, the most frequent ones were the pneumothorax and the intrapulmonary hemorrhage, with or without hemoptysis. With most of the pneumothorax an expectant management was observed, or else they were drained by the physician. When comparing the experience of other authors about the pneumothorax, we underline the following differences: a) Higher incidence in biopsies with posterior access in the middle third of the lung; b) Less total incidence (7,8%); c) Higher incidence of pneumothorax in masses with pleural contact without healthy lung in the needle path (30%); d) The size of the lesion up to 4 cm in diameter was not a significant predisposing factor; e) The conservative management in most of the cases. Although rare, other complications existed, including the death of one patient. (author)

  20. Image-guided automated needle biopsy of 106 thoracic lesions: a retrospective review of diagnostic accuracy and complication rates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Connor, S.; Dyer, J.; Guest, P.

    2000-01-01

    We reviewed the diagnostic accuracy and complication rates of transthoracic needle biopsy (TNB) with an automated 18-gauge core biopsy needle and gun, using either fluoroscopic or CT guidance. One hundred six lesions were biopsied in 103 patients between 1992 and 1998. Hard-copy images, imaging reports, pathology reports and clinical notes were reviewed. In 3 patients it was not possible to establish the lesion as either malignant or benign from the available follow-up, so these were removed from the analysis of diagnostic accuracy. Adequate samples for histological diagnosis were obtained in 104 of 106 (98 %) biopsies. There were 75 of 85 (88 %) true-positive core biopsies for malignant lesions and a specific cell type was identified in 70 of 85 (82 %) cases. A specific histological diagnosis was obtained in 12 of 18 (66 %) biopsies. There was a 19 % rate of pneumothorax with only 2.4 % requiring drainage. Minor haemoptysis occurred in 3.8 % of procedures. The TNB technique with an automated core biopsy needle provides a high level of diagnostic accuracy, effectively distinguishes cell type in malignancy and provides a definite diagnosis in benign disease more frequently than fine needle aspiration (FNA). There is no increased complication rate compared with FNA. (orig.)

  1. Phantom examination for reduction of radiation dose using new needle screen storage phosphor radiography and add beam filter in digital thoracic radiography on adolescents and larger children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyne, J.P.; Mentzel, H.J.; Neumann, R.; Lopatta, E.; Zimmermann, U.; Kaiser, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: how much can the radiation dose be reduced in thoracic radiography on adolescents and larger children by using needle screen storage phosphor (NIP) radiography and add beam filtration? Materials and methods: a chest phantom with typical anatomical structures, pathological findings, added catheters, and simulated nodules, tumors, and calcifications was X-rayed digitally (DX-S, Agfa Healthcare) in posterior-anterior (p.a.) orientation with and without add beam filter. While keeping the voltage constant, the tube current time product was reduced gradually. In addition to LgM, the surface entrance dose (ED) and the dose area product (DAP) were measured by the Dosimax sensor and Kerma X-plus (both Wellhoefer). Five investigators evaluated the images for characteristics and critical features, pathological findings, and catheter recognizability. Results: the ED of the digital chest radiogram p.a. with 115 kV and 0.71 mAs was 27 μGy, the DAP 3.6 μGy x m 2 , the LgM value 1.56. This initial radiogram was able to be evaluated very well and conforms to the quality guidelines. The dose-reduced chest radiograms with the add beam filter Al 1.0 mm/Cu 0.1 mm were evaluated as sufficiently reduced to a dose of 63% of the initial dose, with the add beam filter Al 1.0 mm/Cu 0.2 mm reduced to 50% (0.52 mAs, DAP 1.82 μGy x m 2 , LgM 1.35). P.a. radiograms were able to be X-rayed on 115 kV with 0.52 mAs. (orig.)

  2. Thoracic myelopathy with alkaptonuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akeda, Koji; Kasai, Yuichi; Kawakita, Eiji; Matsumura, Yoshihiro; Kono, Toshibumi; Murata, Tetsuya; Uchida, Atsumasa

    2008-01-15

    A case of thoracic myelopathy with alkaptonuria (ochronotic spondyloarthropathy) is presented. To present and review the first reported case of an alkaptonuric patient with concomitant thoracic myelopathy. Alkaptonuria, a rare hereditary metabolic disease, is characterized by accumulation of homogentistic acid, ochronosis, and destruction of connective tissue resulting in degenerative spondylosis and arthritis. Despite the high incidence of intervertebral disc diseases among patients with alkaptonuria, neurologic symptoms caused by spinal disease are rare. Thoracic myelopathy in a patient with alkaptonuria has not been previously reported. The clinical course, radiologic features, pathology, and treatment outcome of an alkaptonuria patient with thoracic myelopathy was documented. Myelopathy of the patient was caused by rupture of a thoracic intervertebral disc. The neurologic symptoms of the patient were markedly improved after surgery. We have reported for the first time, that an alkaptonuria patient showed thoracic myelopathy caused by rupture of a thoracic intervertebral disc. Decompression followed by the instrumented fusion of the thoracic spine was effective for improving the neurologic symptoms.

  3. Supraclavicular scalenectomy for thoracic outlet syndrome--functional outcomes assessed using the DASH scoring system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Glynn, Ronan W

    2012-02-01

    To evaluate supraclavicular scalenectomy ± cervical rib excision for thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS), employing Disability of Arm, Shoulder, and Hand (DASH) scoring for functional assessment post-decompression.

  4. Thoracic CT

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... through a vein (IV) in your hand or forearm. It may be given through the rectum using ... CT scan Vertebra, thoracic (mid back) Normal lung anatomy Thoracic organs References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden ...

  5. Decompression Mechanisms and Decompression Schedule Calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-01-20

    phisiology - The effects of altitude. Handbook of Physiology, Section 3: Respiration, Vol. II. W.O. Fenn and H. Rahn eds. Wash, D.C.; Am. Physiol. Soc. 1 4...decompression studies from other laboratories. METHODS Ten experienced and physically qualified divers ( ages 22-42) were compressed at a rate of 60...STATISTICS* --- ---------------------------------------------------------- EXPERIMENT N AGE (yr) HEIGHT (cm) WEIGHT (Kg) BODY FAT

  6. Decompression illness - critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C S Mohanty

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decompression illness is caused by intravascular or extravascular bubbles that are formed as a result of reduction in environmental pressure (decompression. The term covers both arterial gas embolism, in which alveolar gas or venous gas emboli (via cardiac shunts or via pulmonary vessels are introduced into the arterial circulation, and decompression sickness, which is caused by in-situ bubble formation from dissolved inert gas. Both syndromes can occur in divers, compressed air workers, aviators, and astronauts, but arterial gas embolism also arises from iatrogenic causes unrelated to decompression. Risk of decompression illness is affected by immersion, exercise, and heat or cold. Manifestations range from itching and minor pain to neurological symptoms, cardiac collapse, and death. First-aid treatment is 1 0 0 % oxygen and definitive treatment is recompression to increased pressure, breathing 1 0 0 % oxygen. Adjunctive treatment, including fluid administration and prophylaxis against venous thromboembolism in paralysed patients, is also recommended Treatment is, in most cases, effective although residual deficits can remain in serious cases, even after several recompressions.

  7. Technical Note: Thoracic duct embolization for treatment of chylothorax: A novel guidance technique for puncture using combined MRI and fluoroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Praveen, Alampath; Sreekumar, Karumathil Pullara; Nazar, Puthukudiyil Kader; Moorthy, Srikanth

    2012-01-01

    Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) is an established radiological interventional procedure for thoracic duct injuries. Traditionally, it is done under fluoroscopic guidance after opacifying the thoracic duct with bipedal lymphangiography. We describe our experience in usinga heavily T2W sequence for guiding thoracic duct puncture and direct injection of glue through the puncture needle without cannulating the duct

  8. Technical Note: Thoracic duct embolization for treatment of chylothorax: A novel guidance technique for puncture using combined MRI and fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Praveen, Alampath; Sreekumar, Karumathil Pullara; Nazar, Puthukudiyil Kader; Moorthy, Srikanth

    2012-04-01

    Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) is an established radiological interventional procedure for thoracic duct injuries. Traditionally, it is done under fluoroscopic guidance after opacifying the thoracic duct with bipedal lymphangiography. We describe our experience in usinga heavily T2W sequence for guiding thoracic duct puncture and direct injection of glue through the puncture needle without cannulating the duct.

  9. Role of Ultrasound Guided Biopsy of Thoracic Lesions | Elameen ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: This prospective study is to evaluate and enhance the role of ultrasound in biopsy guidance of thoracic lesions. Methods: 55 patients were subjected for fine needle aspiration (FNA) and/or core needle biopsy (CNB) from peripheral chest lesions in Ribat University Hospital during the period from April 2011 and ...

  10. Thoracic Trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennis, Bradley M; Bellister, Seth A; Guillamondegui, Oscar D

    2017-10-01

    Management of chest trauma is integral to patient outcomes owing to the vital structures held within the thoracic cavity. Understanding traumatic chest injuries and appropriate management plays a pivotal role in the overall well-being of both blunt and penetrating trauma patients. Whether the injury includes rib fractures, associated pulmonary injuries, or tracheobronchial tree injuries, every facet of management may impact the short- and long-term outcomes, including mortality. This article elucidates the workup and management of the thoracic cage, pulmonary and tracheobronchial injuries. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pancreatic cancer seeding of percutaneous needle tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Zhou, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A 65-year old African-American female presents with biliary ductal dilatation due to an obstructive pancreatic head mass. Percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram performed and biliary drainage catheter placement for decompression of the biliary system. The patient had a Whipple procedure performed several months later. On follow up CT imaging, there was interval development and enlargement of a subcutaneous lesion by the right oblique muscles. Biopsy of this lesion revealed pancreatic adenocarcinoma from percutaneous seeding of the transhepatic needle tract.

  12. Needle counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Yuzo

    1977-01-01

    Needle counter had been devised by Geiger about 60 years ago before the present GM counter appeared. It is suitable for the detection of weak radiation because it is limited in effective volume, if the background due to mainly cosmic ray is proportional to the effective volume of the counter. Recently the very low β detector having a needle counter as the main detector has been developed. It showed highly excellent performance in the measurements of small area samples, about ten times sensitive as compared with other detectors. The counter is installed in the very low radiation measuring well at Nokogiriyama, Chiba Prefecture, using a NaI scintillator as its guard counter. D. H. Wilkinson first treated a gas amplification counter theoretically and quantitatively. The authors have obtained good results in the comparison with the experiments of the counter using a generalized form of Wilkinson theory. The findings obtained through this study seem to be applicable to the electrode arrangement which is important for the counter design. It was found that the excellent rise time of induced pulses in a gas amplification counter was achieved in larger amplification factor and smaller convolution effect. In the detection of charged particles with small obstructing capability such as γ ray, faster rise time and higher pulses can be obtained with needle counters than wire counters. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  13. Patient-specific core decompression surgery for early-stage ischemic necrosis of the femoral head.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Wang

    Full Text Available Core decompression is an efficient treatment for early stage ischemic necrosis of the femoral head. In conventional procedures, the pre-operative X-ray only shows one plane of the ischemic area, which often results in inaccurate drilling. This paper introduces a new method that uses computer-assisted technology and rapid prototyping to enhance drilling accuracy during core decompression surgeries and presents a validation study of cadaveric tests.Twelve cadaveric human femurs were used to simulate early-stage ischemic necrosis. The core decompression target at the anterolateral femoral head was simulated using an embedded glass ball (target. Three positioning Kirschner wires were drilled into the top and bottom of the large rotor. The specimen was then subjected to computed tomography (CT. A CT image of the specimen was imported into the Mimics software to construct a three-dimensional model including the target. The best core decompression channel was then designed using the 3D model. A navigational template for the specimen was designed using the Pro/E software and manufactured by rapid prototyping technology to guide the drilling channel. The specimen-specific navigation template was installed on the specimen using positioning Kirschner wires. Drilling was performed using a guide needle through the guiding hole on the templates. The distance between the end point of the guide needle and the target was measured to validate the patient-specific surgical accuracy.The average distance between the tip of the guide needle drilled through the guiding template and the target was 1.92±0.071 mm.Core decompression using a computer-rapid prototyping template is a reliable and accurate technique that could provide a new method of precision decompression for early-stage ischemic necrosis.

  14. Needle thoracostomy in the treatment of a tension pneumothorax in trauma patients: what size needle?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengerink, Imme; Brink, Peter R; Laupland, Kevin B; Raber, Earl L; Zygun, Dave; Kortbeek, John B

    2008-01-01

    A tension pneumothorax requires immediate decompression using a needle thoracostomy. According to advanced trauma life support guidelines this procedure is performed in the second intercostal space (ICS) in the midclavicular line (MCL), using a 4.5-cm (2-inch) catheter (5-cm needle). Previous studies have shown a failure rate of up to 40% using this technique. Case reports have suggested that this high failure rate could be because of insufficient length of the needle. To analyze the average chest wall thickness (CWT) at the second ICS in the MCL in a trauma population and to evaluate the length of the needle used in needle thoracostomy for emergency decompression of tension pneumothoraces. Retrospective review of major trauma admissions (Injury Severity Score >12) at the Foothills Medical Centre in Calgary, Canada, who underwent a computed tomography chest scan admitted in the period from October 2001 until March 2004. Subgroup analysis on men and women, /=40 years of age was defined a priori. CWT was measured to the nearest 0.01 cm at the second ICS in the MCL. The mean CWT in the 604 male patients and 170 female patients studied averaged 3.50 cm at the left second ICS MCL and 3.51 cm on the right. The mean CWT was significantly higher for women than men (p 4.5 cm and 24.1% to 35.4% of the women studied. A catheter length of 4.5 cm may not penetrate the chest wall of a substantial amount (9.9%-35.4%) of the population, depending on age and gender. This study demonstrates the need for a variable needle length for relief of a tension pneumothorax in certain population groups to improve effectiveness of needle thoracostomy.

  15. [Orbital decompression in Grave's ophtalmopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longueville, E

    2010-01-01

    Graves disease orbitopathy is a complex progressive inflammatory disease. Medical treatment remains in all cases the proposed treatment of choice. Surgical treatment by bone decompression can be considered as an emergency mainly in cases of optic neuropathy or ocular hypertension not being controlled medically or in post-traumatic exophthalmos stage. Emergency bone decompression eliminates compression or stretching of the optic nerve allowing visual recovery. The uncontrolled ocular hypertension will benefit from decompression. The normalization of intraocular pressure may be obtained by this surgery or if needed by the use of postoperative antiglaucoma drops or even filtration surgery. In all operated cases, the IOP was normalized with an average decrease of 7.71 mmHg and a cessation of eye drops in 3/7 cases. Regarding sequelae, our therapeutic strategy involves consecutively surgery of the orbit, extraocular muscles and eyelids. The orbital expansion gives excellent results on the cosmetic level and facilitates the implementation of subsequent actions.

  16. Laser Disc Decompression In Emam Khomeini Hospital 1996-1999

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghaffar Poor. M

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain is among the most frequent medical complaints and a major public health problem. 1.7 percent of cases are caused by herniated disc, 20 percent of which require interventional treatment. Percutaneous laser disc decompression (P.L.DD can be considered as an effective therapeutic alternative in certain cases."nMaterials and Methods: To determine the efficacy of this method in Iran in patient's with low back pain due to disc herniation, 40 patients according to medical history, physical examination and MRI findings were selected for this study. Patients who had canal stenosis, marginal, osteophyte, advanced disc dehydration, ruptured posterior ligament and other contraindication were excluded. CT scan was used only for needle navigation. After proper positioning of needle, nucleous pulposus was evapourated with Nd-YAG laser. Total energy was 1200-1600j. The procedure was done out patient and follow up has been done at 1 day, 1 week, 1,3, 6 and 12 months."nResults: There was no serious complication. 80 percent of patients in one-year follow up showed significant clinical improvement."nConclusion: Our findings suggests that percutaneous laser disc decompression can be considered as an effective alternative method of treatment for disc herniation and patient selection is the critical factor which determines success rate.

  17. Needle autopsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip Davis Marsden

    1997-04-01

    Full Text Available Often in tropical practice there is not time or conditions to do a proper autopsy on a patient who has died. A needle biopsy technique is described for limited closed autopsy examination to clariffy organ histology. In this way the clinician may resolve puzzling fatal disease.Muitas vezes, em clínicas de países tropicais, não há tempo nem condições para se realizar uma necropsia adequada em um paciente que foi a óbito. Um técnica de biópsia por punção é descrita para fins de exame em necropsia limitadamente fechada, para esclarecimento da histologia do órgão. Dessa maneira, o clínico pode resolver enigmas de doenças fatais.

  18. Asphyxiating thoracic dysplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franzcr, J.; Kozlowski, K.

    2008-01-01

    Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia is the most frequent form of Small Thorax - Short Rib Syndromes. Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia in two patients with different clinical course is reported. Radiographic examination is the only method to diagnose Asphyxiating Thoracic Dysplasia with certainty. The correct diagnosis is important for prognostication and genetic counseling. It also excludes the necessity of further, often expensive investigations. (author)

  19. Cardiopulmonary Changes with Moderate Decompression in Rats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, R.; Little, T.; Doursout, M.-F.; Butler, B. D.; Chelly, J. E.

    1996-01-01

    Sprague-Dawley rats were compressed to 616 kPa for 120 min then decompressed at 38 kPa/min to assess the cardiovascular and pulmonary responses to moderate decompression stress. In one series of experiments the rats were chronically instrumented with Doppler ultrasonic probes for simultaneous measurement of blood pressure, cardiac output, heart rate, left and right ventricular wall thickening fraction, and venous bubble detection. Data were collected at base-line, throughout the compression/decompression protocol, and for 120 min post decompression. In a second series of experiments the pulmonary responses to the decompression protocol were evaluated in non-instrumented rats. Analyses included blood gases, pleural and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) protein and hemoglobin concentration, pulmonary edema, BAL and lung tissue phospholipids, lung compliance, and cell counts. Venous bubbles were directly observed in 90% of the rats where immediate post-decompression autopsy was performed and in 37% using implanted Doppler monitors. Cardiac output, stroke volume, and right ventricular wall thickening fractions were significantly decreased post decompression, whereas systemic vascular resistance was increased suggesting a decrease in venous return. BAL Hb and total protein levels were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression, pleural and plasma levels were unchanged. BAL white blood cells and neutrophil percentages were increased 0 and 60 min post decompression and pulmonary edema was detected. Venous bubbles produced with moderate decompression profiles give detectable cardiovascular and pulmonary responses in the rat.

  20. Physiotherapy after subacromial decompression surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, David Høyrup; Falla, Deborah; Frost, Poul

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the development and details of a standardised physiotherapy exercise intervention designed to address pain and disability in patients with difficulty returning to usual activities after arthroscopic decompression surgery for subacromial impingement syndrome. To develop...... the intervention, the literature was reviewed with respect to the effectiveness of postoperative exercises, components of previous exercise programmes were extracted, and input from clinical physiotherapists in the field was obtained through a series of workshops. The physiotherapy exercise intervention...

  1. Sagittal imbalance in patients with lumbar spinal stenosis and outcomes after simple decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, E Kyung; Kim, Chi Heon; Chung, Chun Kee; Choi, Yunhee; Yim, Dahae; Jung, Whei; Park, Sung Bae; Moon, Jung Hyeon; Heo, Won; Kim, Sung-Mi

    2017-02-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is the most common lumbar degenerative disease, and sagittal imbalance is uncommon. Forward-bending posture, which is primarily caused by buckling of the ligamentum flavum, may be improved via simple decompression surgery. The objectives of this study were to identify the risk factors for sagittal imbalance and to describe the outcomes of simple decompression surgery. This is a retrospective nested case-control study PATIENT SAMPLE: This was a retrospective study that included 83 consecutive patients (M:F=46:37; mean age, 68.5±7.7 years) who underwent decompression surgery and a minimum of 12 months of follow-up. The primary end point was normalization of sagittal imbalance after decompression surgery. Sagittal imbalance was defined as a C7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA) ≥40 mm on a 36-inch-long lateral whole spine radiograph. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify the risk factors for sagittal imbalance. Bilateral decompression was performed via a unilateral approach with a tubular retractor. The SVA was measured on serial radiographs performed 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. The prognostic factors for sagittal balance recovery were determined based on various clinical and radiological parameters. Sagittal imbalance was observed in 54% (45/83) of patients, and its risk factors were old age and a large mismatch between pelvic incidence and lumbar lordosis. The 1-year normalization rate was 73% after decompression surgery, and the median time to normalization was 1 to 3 months. Patients who did not experience SVA normalization exhibited low thoracic kyphosis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.04; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.10) (pimbalance was observed in more than 50% of LSS patients, but this imbalance was correctable via simple decompression surgery in 70% of patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Complications corner: Anterior thoracic disc surgery with dural tear/CSF fistula and low-pressure pleural drain led to severe intracranial hypotension

    OpenAIRE

    Oudeman, Eline A.; Tewarie, Rishi D. S. Nandoe; J?bsis, G. Joost; Arts, Mark P.; Kruyt, Nyika D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Thoracic disc surgery can lead to a life-threatening complication: intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Case Description: We report a 63-year-old male with paraparesis due to multiple herniated thoracic discs, with compressive myelopathy. The patient required a circumferential procedure including a laminectomy/fusion followed by an anterior thoracic decompression to address both diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) anteriorly and posterior...

  3. CT guided percutaneous needle biopsy of the chest: initial experience

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this article is to report our first experience of CT guided percutaneous thoracic biopsy and to demonstrate the accuracy and safety of this procedure. This was a retrospective study of 28 CT-Guided Percutaneous Needle Biopsies of the Chest performed on 24 patients between November 2014 and April 2015.

  4. Lower thoracic degenerative spondylithesis with concomitant lumbar spondylosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Po-Chuan; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Chen, Jyi-Feng

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative spondylolisthesis of the spine is less common in the lower thoracic region than in the lumbar and cervical regions. However, lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis may develop secondary to intervertebral disc degeneration. Most of our patients are found to have concomitant lumbar spondylosis. By retrospective review of our cases, current diagnosis and treatments for this rare disease were discussed. We present a series of 5 patients who experienced low back pain, progressive numbness, weakness and even paraparesis. Initially, all of them were diagnosed with lumbar spondylosis at other clinics, and 1 patient had even received prior decompressive lumbar surgery. However, their symptoms continued to progress, even after conservative treatments or lumbar surgeries. These patients also showed wide-based gait, increased deep tendon reflex (DTR), and urinary difficulty. All these clinical presentations could not be explained solely by lumbar spondylosis. Thoracolumbar spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), neurophysiologic studies such as motor evoked potential (MEP) or somatosensory evoked potential (SSEP), and dynamic thoracolumbar lateral radiography were performed, and a final diagnosis of lower thoracic degenerative spondylolisthesis was made. Bilateral facet effusions, shown by hyperintense signals in T2 MRI sequence, were observed in all patients. Neurophysiologic studies revealed conduction defect of either MEP or SSEP. One patient refused surgical management because of personal reasons. However, with the use of thoracolumbar orthosis, his symptoms/signs stabilized, although partial lower leg myelopathy was present. The other patients received surgical decompression in association with fixation/fusion procedures performed for managing the thoracolumbar lesions. Three patients became symptom-free, whereas in 1 patient, paralysis set in before the operation; this patient was able to walk with assistance 6 months after surgical decompression

  5. Tension pneumothorax secondary to automatic mechanical compression decompression device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchings, A C; Darcy, K J; Cumberbatch, G L A

    2009-02-01

    The details are presented of the first published case of a tension pneumothorax induced by an automatic compression-decompression (ACD) device during cardiac arrest. An elderly patient collapsed with back pain and, on arrival of the crew, was in pulseless electrical activity (PEA) arrest. He was promptly intubated and correct placement of the endotracheal tube was confirmed by noting equal air entry bilaterally and the ACD device applied. On the way to the hospital he was noted to have absent breath sounds on the left without any change in the position of the endotracheal tube. Needle decompression of the left chest caused a hiss of air but the patient remained in PEA. Intercostal drain insertion in the emergency department released a large quantity of air from his left chest but without any change in his condition. Post-mortem examination revealed a ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm as the cause of death. Multiple left rib fractures and a left lung laceration secondary to the use of the ACD device were also noted, although the pathologist felt that the tension pneumothorax had not contributed to the patient's death. It is recommended that a simple or tension pneumothorax should be considered when there is unilateral absence of breath sounds in addition to endobronchial intubation if an ACD device is being used.

  6. Temporary quadriplegia following continuous thoracic paravertebral block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calenda, Emile; Baste, Jean Marc; Danielou, Eric; Michelin, Paul

    2012-05-01

    A case of temporary quadriplegia following a continuous thoracic paravertebral block in an adult patient scheduled for video-assisted thoracoscopy is presented. An 18-gauge Tuohy needle was inserted under direct vision by the surgeon but the tip of the catheter was not localized. Postoperatively, the patient developed temporary quadriplegia 90 minutes after the start of a continuous infusion of ropivacaine 0.2%. Imaging studies showed that the catheter was localized in the intrathecal space. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Symptomatic Thoracic Nerve Root Herniation into an Extradural Arachnoid Cyst : Case Report and Review of the Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shanbhag, Nagesh C.; Duyff, Ruurd F.; Groen, Rob J. M.

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spinal extradural arachnoid cysts (SEACs) are relatively rare and usually asymptomatic. They preferentially are situated in the thoracic extradural space and almost always dorsal. SEACs may present with back pain and/or cord compression symptoms. Needle aspiration, needle fenestration,

  8. Percutaneous Emergency Needle Caecostomy for Prevention of Caecal Perforation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Alexandra M; Clement, Zackariah

    2017-01-01

    Caecal perforation is a life-threatening complication of large bowel obstruction with a reported mortality of 34% to 72%. This case describes the novel use of percutaneous needle caecostomy as a life-saving measure to prevent imminent caecal perforation in a 68-year-old lady with large bowel obstruction secondary to an incarcerated incisional hernia. After careful review of computed tomography images and measurement of distances from the abdominal wall to the caecum, the patient's caecum was decompressed in the emergency department using a needle under local anaesthetic. The patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic hernia repair and had an uncomplicated recovery. When conducted safely and with precision in an appropriate patient, percutaneous needle caecostomy can provide immediate symptom relief, reduce risk of caecal perforation, and allow a laparoscopic surgical approach.

  9. Percutaneous Emergency Needle Caecostomy for Prevention of Caecal Perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra M. Limmer

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Caecal perforation is a life-threatening complication of large bowel obstruction with a reported mortality of 34% to 72%. This case describes the novel use of percutaneous needle caecostomy as a life-saving measure to prevent imminent caecal perforation in a 68-year-old lady with large bowel obstruction secondary to an incarcerated incisional hernia. After careful review of computed tomography images and measurement of distances from the abdominal wall to the caecum, the patient’s caecum was decompressed in the emergency department using a needle under local anaesthetic. The patient subsequently underwent laparoscopic hernia repair and had an uncomplicated recovery. When conducted safely and with precision in an appropriate patient, percutaneous needle caecostomy can provide immediate symptom relief, reduce risk of caecal perforation, and allow a laparoscopic surgical approach.

  10. Thoracic spine pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksey Ivanovich Isaikin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic spine pain, or thoracalgia, is one of the common reasons for seeking for medical advice. The epidemiology and semiotics of pain in the thoracic spine unlike in those in the cervical and lumbar spine have not been inadequately studied. The causes of thoracic spine pain are varied: diseases of the cardiovascular, gastrointestinal, pulmonary, and renal systems, injuries to the musculoskeletal structures of the cervical and thoracic portions, which require a thorough differential diagnosis. Facet, costotransverse, and costovertebral joint injuries and myofascial syndrome are the most common causes of musculoskeletal (nonspecific pain in the thoracic spine. True radicular pain is rarely encountered. Traditionally, treatment for thoracalgia includes a combination of non-drug and drug therapies. The cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitor meloxicam (movalis may be the drug of choice in the treatment of musculoskeletal pain.

  11. Decompression sickness in caisson workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghawabi, Samir H. El; Mansour, Mohamed B.; Youssef, Fatma L.; Ghawabi, Mohamed H. El; Latif, Mohamed M. Abd El

    1971-01-01

    El Ghawabi, S. H., Mansour, M. B., Youssef, F. L., El Ghawabi, M. H., and Abd El Latif, M. M. (1971).Brit. J. industr. Med.,28, 323-329. Decompression sickness in caisson workers. An investigation of 55 bridge construction workers is reported. The overall bends rate was 0·97%. (The term `bends' as used in this study is defined in the paper.) Chokes were encountered in 67·27% of workers. A clinical, haematological, and radiological study was performed. Definite bony changes were found in 43·6% of all workers; 91·6% of these had lesions around the elbow. The presence of dense areas in the neck of the scapula is reported in two cases for the first time. The relatively high haematocrit value is thought to play a part in the pathogenesis of bone infarction through its relation with blood viscosity. Images PMID:5124832

  12. Percutaneous CT-Guided Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration in Diagnosing Pneumonia and Mimics of Pneumonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thanos, Loukas; Galani, Panagiota; Mylona, Sophia; Pomoni, Maria; Mpatakis, Nikolaos

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the diagnostic value of percutaneous core needle biopsy (CNB) relative to fine needle aspiration (FNA) in patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. In this prospective study we present our experience with 48 thoracic FNAs and CNBs carried out on 48 patients with pneumonia and pneumonia mimics. Samples were obtained from all patients using both CNB (with an automated 18-G core biopsy needle and a gun) and FNA (with a 22-G needle). A specific diagnosis was made in 10/48 cases (20.83%) by FNA and in 42/48 (87.5%) by CNB. The main complications encountered were pneumothorax (n = 4) and hemoptysis (n = 2), yielding a total complication rate of 12.5%. We concluded that CNB using an automated biopsy gun results in a higher diagnostic accuracy for pneumonia and pneumonia mimic biopsies than FNA. Complications should be considered and proper patient observation should follow the procedure

  13. Improved transvenous liver biopsy needle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Matzen, P; Christoffersen, P

    1979-01-01

    A modified type of the standard transvenous cholangiography biopsy needle is described. The modified tranvenous liver biopsy needle caused only minimal artefactual changes of the liver biopsy specimens. The new type of biopsy needle is a modified Menghini needle. The conventional Menghini needle...... should be avoided for transvenous catheter biopsies because of risk of leaving catheter fragments in the liver....

  14. Needle thoracostomy for tension pneumothorax: the Israeli Defense Forces experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jacob; Nadler, Roy; Schwartz, Dagan; Tien, Homer; Cap, Andrew P; Glassberg, Elon

    2015-06-01

    Point of injury needle thoracostomy (NT) for tension pneumothorax is potentially lifesaving. Recent data raised concerns regarding the efficacy of conventional NT devices. Owing to these considerations, the Israeli Defense Forces Medical Corps (IDF-MC) recently introduced a longer, wider, more durable catheter for the performance of rapid chest decompression. The present series represents the IDF-MC experience with chest decompression by NT. We reviewed the IDF trauma registry from January 1997 to October 2012 to identify all cases in which NT was attempted. During the study period a total of 111 patients underwent chest decompression by NT. Most casualties (54%) were wounded as a result of gunshot wounds (GSW); motor vehicle accidents (MVAs) were the second leading cause (16%). Most (79%) NTs were performed at the point of injury, while the rest were performed during evacuation by ambulance or helicopter (13% and 4%, respectively). Decreased breath sounds on the affected side were one of the most frequent clinical indications for NT, recorded in 28% of cases. Decreased breath sounds were more common in surviving than in nonsurviving patients. (37% v. 19%, p chest tube was installed on the field in 35 patients (32%), all after NT. Standard NT has a high failure rate on the battlefield. Alternative measures for chest decompression, such as the Vygon catheter, appear to be a feasible alternative to conventional NT.

  15. Thoracic and abdominopelvic actinomycosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    thoracic disease.1,2,4 The chronic progressive suppurative infection ... venous Penicillin G for 4 - 6 weeks being the treatment of ... pathology was demonstrated in the liver. (Figs 7a and b ). .... ulceration (may resemble Crohn's disease).3. 2.

  16. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Apply for Membership Membership Directory Pay Your Dues Industry Mailing List License & eBlast Communications Programs Advertise on ... Hotel Discount Copyright © 2017 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. ...

  17. Microvascular decompression for trigeminal neuralgia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.A.; Khan, B.; Khan, A.A.; Afridi, E.A.A.; Mehmood, S.; Muhammad, G.; Hussain, I.; Zadran, K.K.; Bhatti, S.N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Trigeminal Neuralgia (TGN) is the most frequently diagnosed type of facial pain. In idiopathic type of TGN it is caused by the neuro-vascular conflict involving trigeminal nerve. Microvascular decompression (MVD) aims at addressing this basic pathology in the idiopathic type of TGN. This study was conducted to determine the outcome and complications of patients with idiopathic TGN undergoing MVD. Method: In a descriptive case series patients with idiopathic TGN undergoing MVD were included in consecutive manner. Patients were diagnosed on the basis of detailed history and clinical examination. Retromastoid approach with craniectomy was used to access cerebellopontine angle (CP-angle) and microsurgical decompression was done. Patients were followed up for 6 months. Results: A total of 53 patients underwent MVD with mean age of 51.6±4.2 years and male predominance. In majority of cases (58.4 percentage) both Maxillary and Mandibular divisions were involved. Per-operatively superior cerebellar artery (SCA) was causing the neuro-vascular conflict in 33 (62.2 percentage) of the cases, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) in 6 (11.3 percentage) cases, both CSA and AICA in 3 (5.6 percentage) cases, venous compressions in only 1 (1.8percentage) patient and thick arachnoid adhesions were seen in 10 (18.9 percentage) patients. Postoperatively, 33 (68 percentage) patients were pain free, in 14 (26.45 percentage) patients pain was significantly improved whereas in 3 (5.6 percentage) patients there was mild improvement in symptoms. Three (5.6 percentage) patients did not improve after the primary surgery. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak was encountered in 7 (13.2 percentage) patients post-operatively, 4 (7.5 percentage) patients developed wound infection and 1 (1.8 percentage) patient developed aseptic meningitis. Three (5.6 percentage) patients had transient VII nerve palsy while one patient developed permanent VII nerve palsy. Conclusion: MVD is a safe and

  18. Needle phobia during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searing, Kimberly; Baukus, Mary; Stark, Mary Ann; Morin, Karen H; Rudell, Barb

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was to understand the experience of a pregnant woman with needle phobia and examine its impact on her antepartum, intrapartum, and postpartum experience. A case study format was employed. A 21-year-old primiparous woman with diagnosed needle phobia was interviewed, and her prenatal and delivery records were reviewed. Three tasks during pregnancy were identified: seeking trusting relationships with health care providers; establishing and maintaining control and understanding; and coping with fear of needles, pain, and invasion. As frequent caregivers during childbearing, nurses with an understanding of needle phobia can help to establish trusting relationships with women with this phobia and support them and their families during childbearing and their encounters with needles. (c) 2006, AWHONN, the Association of Women's Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses

  19. Fatal paradoxical pulmonary air embolism complicating percutaneous computed tomography-guided needle biopsy of the lung

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakravarti, Rajesh; Singh, Virendra; Isaac, Rethish; John, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    A 63-year-old man with left upper zone haziness on chest X-ray and an infiltrative lesion with a pleural mass in the left upper lobe on CT scan was scheduled for CT-guided percutaneous trans-thoracic needle biopsy. During the procedure, the patient had massive haemoptysis and cardiorespiratory arrest and could not be revived. Post-mortem CT showed air in the right atrium, right ventricle, pulmonary artery and also in the left atrium and aorta. A discussion on paradoxical air embolism following percutaneous trans-thoracic needle biopsy is presented Copyright (2004) Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd

  20. Computed tomography guided needle biopsy: experience from 1,300 procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chojniak, Rubens; Isberner, Rony Klaus; Viana, Luciana Marinho; Yu, Liao Shin; Aita, Alessandro Amorim; Soares, Fernando Augusto [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Radiologia e Patologia

    2006-01-15

    Context and objective: computed tomography (CT) guided biopsy is widely accepted as effective and safe for diagnosis in many settings. Accuracy depends on target organ and needle type. Cutting needles present advantages over fine needles. This study presents experience from CT guided biopsies performed at an oncology center. Design and setting: retrospective study at Hospital do Cancer A. C. Camargo, Sao Paulo.Methods: 1,300 consecutive CT guided biopsies performed between July 1994 and February 2000 were analyzed. Nodules or masses were suspected as primary malignancy in 845 cases (65%) or metastatic lesion in 455 (35%). 628 lesions were thoracic, 281 abdominal, 208 retroperitoneal, 134 musculoskeletal and 49 head/neck. All biopsies were performed by one radiologist or under his supervision: 765 (59%) with 22-gauge fine-needle/aspiration technique and 535 (41%) with automated 16 or 18-gauge cutting-needle biopsy. Results: adequate samples were obtained in 70-92% of fine-needle and 93-100% of cutting-needle biopsies. The specific diagnosis rates were 54-67% for fine-needle and 82-100% for cutting-needle biopsies, according to biopsy site. For any site, sample adequacy and specific diagnosis rate were always better for cutting-needle biopsy. Among 530 lung biopsies, there were 84 pneumothorax (16%) and two hemothorax (0.3%) cases, with thoracic drainage in 24 (4.9%). Among abdominal and retroperitoneal biopsies, there were two cases of major bleeding and one of peritonitis. Conclusion: both types of needle showed satisfactory results, but cutting-needle biopsy should be used when specific diagnosis is desired without greater incidence of complications. (author)

  1. Imaging of thoracic trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uffmann, M.; Herold, C.J.; Fuchs, M.

    1998-01-01

    Blunt trauma to the chest results from transfer of kinetic energy to the human body. It may cause a wide range of mostly life-threatening injuries, including fractures of the thoracic skeleton, disintegration of the pleural space, contusion or laceration of pulmonary parenchyma and damage to the mediastinal structures. For a systematic approach it may be helpful to follow an organ-based evaluation of thoracic trauma. However, it should be borne in mind that subtle injuries may be associated with serious complications. Trauma to the chest may affect different anatomic compartments at the same time, requiring and extending diagnostic approach. Conventional radiography plays a major role in diagnosting thoracic trauma, complemented by ultrasound examination of the pleura and abdomen. It is well documented that CT scanning represents a major technological improvement for assessment of thoracic trauma. With the advent of fast helical CT scanning this method becomes more applicable for severly traumatized patients and potentially replaces other time-consuming procedures. State-of-the-art imaging of both projection and cross-sectional techniques provides useful information for immediate and appropriate treatment mandatory in patients with thoracic trauma. (orig.) [de

  2. Delayed facial nerve decompression for Bell's palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang Hoon; Jung, Junyang; Lee, Jong Ha; Byun, Jae Yong; Park, Moon Suh; Yeo, Seung Geun

    2016-07-01

    Incomplete recovery of facial motor function continues to be long-term sequelae in some patients with Bell's palsy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the efficacy of transmastoid facial nerve decompression after steroid and antiviral treatment in patients with late stage Bell's palsy. Twelve patients underwent surgical decompression for Bell's palsy 21-70 days after onset, whereas 22 patients were followed up after steroid and antiviral therapy without decompression. Surgical criteria included greater than 90 % degeneration on electroneuronography and no voluntary electromyography potentials. This study was a retrospective study of electrodiagnostic data and medical chart review between 2006 and 2013. Recovery from facial palsy was assessed using the House-Brackmann grading system. Final recovery rate did not differ significantly in the two groups; however, all patients in the decompression group recovered to at least House-Brackmann grade III at final follow-up. Although postoperative hearing threshold was increased in both groups, there was no significant between group difference in hearing threshold. Transmastoid decompression of the facial nerve in patients with severe late stage Bell's palsy at risk for a poor facial nerve outcome reduced severe complications of facial palsy with minimal morbidity.

  3. Modified microdissection electrocautery needle

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Virendra; Kumar, Pramod

    2014-01-01

    Electrocautery is routinely used in surgical procedures. The commercially available microdissection electrocautery needles are costly. To overcome this disadvantage, we have modified monopolar electrocautery tip to function as well as commercially available systems.

  4. Decompressive craniectomy in herpes simplex encephalitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammed Jasim Abdul Jalal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial hypertension is a common cause of morbidity in herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE. HSE is the most common form of acute viral encephalitis. Hereby we report a case of HSE in which decompressive craniectomy was performed to treat refractory intracranial hypertension. A 32-year-old male presented with headache, vomiting, fever, and focal seizures involving the right upper limb. Cerebrospinal fluid-meningoencephalitic profile was positive for herpes simplex. Magnetic resonance image of the brain showed swollen and edematous right temporal lobe with increased signal in gray matter and subcortical white matter with loss of gray, white differentiation in T2-weighted sequences. Decompressive craniectomy was performed in view of refractory intracranial hypertension. Decompressive surgery for HSE with refractory hypertension can positively affect patient survival, with good outcomes in terms of cognitive functions.

  5. Surgical Decompression for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-01-24

    Jan 24, 2018 ... spinal cord decompression with or without spinal stabilization in our region. Methodology: We ... decompression and fixation in this series were surgical site infections (11.4%) and ..... group and died of respiratory failure.

  6. Needle-Knife Fistulotomy for the Rescue: An Unusual Cause of Iatrogenic Extrahepatic Biliary Obstruction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura L. Ulmer

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 71-year-old male presented to our institution with cholestatic hepatitis after having recently undergone upper endoscopy for treatment of gastrointestinal bleeding. Further investigation with endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography revealed a hemostatic clip on the ampulla of Vater. After initial attempts at cannulation of the common bile duct were unsuccessful, biliary decompression was achieved by use of needle-knife fistulotomy. A common bile duct stent was placed and the liver function tests improved prior to discharge.

  7. [Surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hrabálek, L; Kalita, O; Langová, K

    2010-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficiency of different surgical approaches to thoracic disc herniation, and to show the role of segmental fusion and selection of an appropriate microsurgical decompression technique for the successful outcome of surgery. A group of 27 patients, 10 men and 17 women, between 31 and 70 years (average age, 49.33 years) were included in this prospective study. They underwent surgery for thoracic degeneration disc disease in the period from June 1994 to August 2008. In all patients, the severity of myelopathy was assessed using the grading Frankel system and JOA score, axial and radicular pain intensity was evaluated with VAS and ODI rating systems. The diagnosis was established on the basis of thoracic spine radiography, thoracic spine MRI and a CT scan of the segment. A total of 30 thoracic segments, in the range of Th4/Th5 to Th12/L1, were indicated for surgery. Localisation of the hernia was medial at 19 segments, mediolateral at three and lateral at eight segments. Soft disc herniation was found in 17 cases and hard disc protrusion at the remaining 13 segments. Surgery for significant myelopathy was carried out in 23 patients and for pain in four patients. According to the surgical procedure used, the patients were allocated to two groups: group A comprised 10 patients treated without disc replacement through a laminectomy or a costotransversectomy exposure, and group B consisted of 17 patients undergo- ing intersomatic fusion via a thoracotomy. Clinical and radiographic examinations were made at regular intervals for at least 1 year of follow-up. The results of clinical assessment, including JOA scores, JOA Recovery Rate, VAS scores at rest and after exercise and ODI, were statistically analysed for each group and compared. There was a statistically significant difference in JOA evaluation of myelopathy between the groups in group A, the mean JOA score declined from 7.9 to 7.0, i.e., -0.9 point, while in group B it

  8. 10 Levels thoracic no-intrumented laminectomy for huge spontaneous spinal subdural hematoma removal. Report of the first case and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visocchi Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: To our knowledge, the present case is the most extensive laminectomy for a SSDH removal never described before. No postoperative instability occurs in 10 levels thoracic laminectomy in case the articular processes are spared. When major neurological deficits are documented, early decompressive laminectomy with evacuation of hematoma should be considered the best treatment for SSDH.

  9. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neely, John C.; Jones, Blaise V.; Crone, Kerry R.

    2008-01-01

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma. (orig.)

  10. Spontaneous extracranial decompression of epidural hematoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neely, John C. [Marshall University School of Medicine, Huntington, WV (United States); Jones, Blaise V. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Crone, Kerry R. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Division of Neurosurgery, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Epidural hematoma (EDH) is a common sequela of head trauma in children. An increasing number are managed nonsurgically, with close clinical and imaging observation. We report the case of a traumatic EDH that spontaneously decompressed into the subgaleal space, demonstrated on serial CT scans that showed resolution of the EDH and concurrent enlargement of the subgaleal hematoma. (orig.)

  11. Decompressive craniectomy following brain injury: factors important ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-01-07

    Jan 7, 2010 ... Background: Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is often performed as an empirical lifesaving measure to protect the injured brain from the damaging effects of propagating oedema and intracranial hypertension. However, there are no clearly defined indications or specified guidelines for patient selection for ...

  12. Severe traumatic brain injury managed with decompressive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-05-29

    May 29, 2012 ... Patients with severe taumatic brain injury may develop intractable raised ICP resulting in high mortality ... Glasgow coma score was 8/15 (E1V3M4) and he had left ... An emergency right fronto-temporo-parietal decompressive.

  13. Complications of cranioplasty after decompressive craniectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maša Glišović

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Cranioplasty is a surgical repair of a defect or deformity of a skull with the use of autologous bone or synthetic materials.[4] It usually follows decompressive craniectomy, which is a commonly practiced neurosurgical intervention in patients with raised intracranial pressure unresponsive to other forms of treatment.[1] There are many conditions that may lead to intracranial hypertension, and the goal is to avoid brain necrosis caused by compartment pressure syndrome.[2] Consequently, the extensive use of decompressive craniectomy directly results in more cranioplasties, which sometimes present with unwanted complications.[5] Generally, the occurence of cranioplasty complications is between 16% and 34%.[3] Because of the many indications for craniectomy based on clinical data that speak in its favour, if will probably remain a relatively common neurosurgical intervention also in the future. The frequency of decompressive craniectomy and consequently of cranioplasty requires awareness of the many potential postoperative complications and understanding of its evolution. This article is a review of pathophysiological mechanisms after decompressive craniectomy and cranioplasty, of its complications and factors that potentially contribute to their occurence.

  14. A Pottery Electric Kiln Using Decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naoe, Nobuyuki; Yamada, Hirofumi; Nakayama, Tetsuo; Nakayama, Minoru; Minamide, Akiyuki; Takemata, Kazuya

    This paper presents a novel type electric kiln which fires the pottery using the decompression. The electric kiln is suitable for the environment and the energy saving as the pottery furnace. This paper described the baking principle and the baking characteristic of the novel type electric kiln.

  15. CT and MRI characteristics of ossification of the ligamenta flava in the thoracic spine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiong, L. [Dept. of Radiology, University of Texas Health Science Center, San Antonio, TX (United States); Zeng, Q.Y. [Dept. of Radiology, General Coal Hospital, Beijing (China); Jinkins, J.R. [Dept. of Radiology, School of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2001-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings with CT findings of mass-forming calcification/ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava (OTLF). Twenty-one Chinese patients presented with clinical evidence of chronic and progressive thoracic spinal cord compression which included: difficulty in walking; weakness; and/or numbness of the extremities, back pain, and lower extremity paresthesias. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed through the thoracic spine on a 1.0-T Impact unit (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Axial CT was obtained with 5-mm contiguous sections through the thoracic region. Decompressive surgery with resection of the OTLF were carried out in all patients. Low signal intensity of the mass-forming OTLF was demonstrated at a single level (n=1) or at multiple levels (n=20) on both T1WI and T2WI. The distribution of OTLF was bilateral at all levels identified in 6 cases, unilateral at all levels in 5 patients, and both unilateral and bilateral at different levels in 10 cases. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava involved the upper thoracic spine (T1-4) in 3 cases, midthoracic spine (T5-8) in 3 cases, lower thoracic spine (T9-12) in 10 cases, and more than one thoracic spinal subregion in 5 cases. Computed tomography confirmed the MR findings regarding the location and distribution of OTLF in all cases, as well as the associated evidence of central spinal canal stenosis. In addition, 5 patients revealed associated ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All patients demonstrated gradual, but incomplete, clinical improvement of the radiculomyelopathy following decompressive surgery. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament resulting in thoracic central spinal canal stenosis and clinical radiculomyelopathy is not uncommon in the Asian people. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava can be accurately evaluated equally well by CT and MR with regard to level

  16. CT and MRI characteristics of ossification of the ligamenta flava in the thoracic spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiong, L.; Zeng, Q.Y.; Jinkins, J.R.

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare MRI findings with CT findings of mass-forming calcification/ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava (OTLF). Twenty-one Chinese patients presented with clinical evidence of chronic and progressive thoracic spinal cord compression which included: difficulty in walking; weakness; and/or numbness of the extremities, back pain, and lower extremity paresthesias. Axial and sagittal T1-weighted imaging (T1WI) and T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) were performed through the thoracic spine on a 1.0-T Impact unit (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany). Axial CT was obtained with 5-mm contiguous sections through the thoracic region. Decompressive surgery with resection of the OTLF were carried out in all patients. Low signal intensity of the mass-forming OTLF was demonstrated at a single level (n=1) or at multiple levels (n=20) on both T1WI and T2WI. The distribution of OTLF was bilateral at all levels identified in 6 cases, unilateral at all levels in 5 patients, and both unilateral and bilateral at different levels in 10 cases. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava involved the upper thoracic spine (T1-4) in 3 cases, midthoracic spine (T5-8) in 3 cases, lower thoracic spine (T9-12) in 10 cases, and more than one thoracic spinal subregion in 5 cases. Computed tomography confirmed the MR findings regarding the location and distribution of OTLF in all cases, as well as the associated evidence of central spinal canal stenosis. In addition, 5 patients revealed associated ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. All patients demonstrated gradual, but incomplete, clinical improvement of the radiculomyelopathy following decompressive surgery. Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament resulting in thoracic central spinal canal stenosis and clinical radiculomyelopathy is not uncommon in the Asian people. Ossification of the thoracic ligamenta flava can be accurately evaluated equally well by CT and MR with regard to level

  17. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajesh Botchu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  18. Pictorial essay: Role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botchu, Rajesh; Khan, Aman; Jeyapalan, Kanagaratnam

    2012-01-01

    USG has been used for the diagnosis of carpal tunnel syndrome. Scarring and incomplete decompression are the main causes for persistence or recurrence of symptoms. We performed a retrospective study to assess the role of ultrasound in failed carpal tunnel decompression. Of 422 USG studies of the wrist performed at our center over the last 5 years, 14 were for failed carpal tunnel decompression. Scarring was noted in three patients, incomplete decompression in two patients, synovitis in one patient, and an anomalous muscle belly in one patient. No abnormality was detected in seven patients. We present a pictorial review of USG findings in failed carpal tunnel decompression.

  19. Managment of thoracic empyema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, M M; Subramanian, V; Berger, R L

    1977-04-01

    Over a ten year period, 102 patients with thoracic empyemata were treated at Boston City Hospital. Only three patients died from the pleural infection while twenty-six succumbed to the associated diseases. Priniciples of management include: (1) thoracentesis; (2) antibiotics; (3) closed-tube thoracostomy; (4) sinogram; (5) open drainage; (6) empyemectomy and decortication in selected patients; and (7) bronchoscopy and barium swallow when the etiology is uncertain.

  20. Thoracic textilomas: CT findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, Dianne Melo; Zanetti, Glaucia; Araujo Neto, Cesar Augusto; Nobre, Luiz Felipe; Meirelles, Gustavo de Souza Portes; Silva, Jorge Luiz Pereira e; Guimaraes, Marcos Duarte; Escuissato, Dante Luiz; Souza Junior, Arthur Soares; Hochhegger, Bruno; Marchiori, Edson, E-mail: edmarchiori@gmail.com [Hospital Universitario Antonio Pedro (HUAP/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-09-15

    Objective: the aim of this study was to analyze chest CT scans of patients with thoracic textiloma. Methods: this was a retrospective study of 16 patients (11 men and 5 women) with surgically confirmed thoracic textiloma. The chest CT scans of those patients were evaluated by two independent observers, and discordant results were resolved by consensus. Results: the majority (62.5%) of the textilomas were caused by previous heart surgery. The most common symptoms were chest pain (in 68.75%) and cough (in 56.25%). In all cases, the main tomographic finding was a mass with regular contours and borders that were well-defined or partially defined. Half of the textilomas occurred in the right hemithorax and half occurred in the left. The majority (56.25%) were located in the lower third of the lung. The diameter of the mass was ≤ 10 cm in 10 cases (62.5%) and > 10 cm in the remaining 6 cases (37.5%). Most (81.25%) of the textilomas were heterogeneous in density, with signs of calcification, gas, radiopaque marker, or sponge-like material. Peripheral expansion of the mass was observed in 12 (92.3%) of the 13 patients in whom a contrast agent was used. Intraoperatively, pleural involvement was observed in 14 cases (87.5%) and pericardial involvement was observed in 2 (12.5%). Conclusions: it is important to recognize the main tomographic aspects of thoracic textilomas in order to include this possibility in the differential diagnosis of chest pain and cough in patients with a history of heart or thoracic surgery, thus promoting the early identification and treatment of this postoperative complication. (author)

  1. Bone biopsy needles. Mechanical properties, needle design and specimen quality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keulers, Annika; Penzkofer, T.; Cunha-Cruz, V.C.; Bruners, P.; Helmholtz Inst. fuer biomedizinische Technik, Aachen; Braunschweig, T.; Schmitz-Rode, T.; Mahnken, A.; Helmholtz Inst. fuer biomedizinische Technik, Aachen

    2011-01-01

    To quantitatively analyze differences in mechanical properties, needle design including signs of wear, subjective handling and specimen quality of bone biopsy needles. Materials and Methods: In this study 19 different bone biopsy systems (total 38; 2 /type) were examined. With each biopsy needle five consecutive samples were obtained from vertebral bodies of swine. During puncture a force-torques sensor measured the mechanical properties and subjective handling was assessed. Before and after each biopsy the needles were investigated using a profile projector and signs of wear were recorded. Afterwards, a pathologist semi-quantitatively examined the specimen regarding sample quality. The overall evaluation considered mechanical properties, needle wear, subjective handling and sample quality. Differences were assessed for statistical significance using ANOVA and t-test. Results: Needle diameter (p = 0.003) as well as needle design (p = 0.008) affect the mechanical properties significantly. Franseen design is significantly superior to other needle designs. Besides, length reduction recorded by the profile projector, as a quality criterion showed notable distinctions in between the needle designs. Conclusion: Bone biopsy needles vary significantly in performance. Needle design has an important influence on mechanical properties, handling and specimen quality. Detailed knowledge of those parameters would improve selecting the appropriate bone biopsy needle. (orig.)

  2. Mechanics of needle-tissue interaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roesthuis, Roy; van Veen, Youri; Jahya, Alex; Misra, Sarthak

    2011-01-01

    When a needle is inserted into soft tissue, interac- tion forces are developed at the needle tip and along the needle shaft. The needle tip force is due to cutting of the tissue, and the force along the needle shaft is due to friction between needle and tissue. In this study, the friction force is

  3. Identifying the Subtle Presentation of Decompression Sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alea, Kenneth

    2015-12-01

    Decompression sickness is an inherent occupational hazard that has the possibility to leave its victims with significant long-lasting effects that can potentially impact an aircrew's flight status. The relative infrequency of this hazard within the military flying community along with the potentially subtle presentation of decompression sickness (DCS) has the potential to result in delayed diagnosis and treatment, leading to residual deficits that can impact a patient's daily life or even lead to death. The patient presented in this work was diagnosed with a Type II DCS 21 h after a cabin decompression at 35,000 ft (10,668 m). The patient had been asymptomatic with a completely normal physical/neurological exam following his flight. The following day, he presented with excessive fatigue and on re-evaluation was recommended for hyperbaric therapy, during which his symptoms completely resolved. He was re-evaluated 14 d later and cleared to resume flight duties without further incident. The manifestation of this patient's decompression sickness was subtle and followed an evaluation that failed to identify any focal findings. A high index of suspicion with strict follow-up contributed to the identification of DCS in this case, resulting in definitive treatment and resolution of the patient's symptoms. Determination of the need for hyperbaric therapy following oxygen supplementation and a thorough history and physical is imperative. If the diagnosis is in question, consider preemptive hyperbaric therapy as the benefits of treatment in DCS outweigh the risks of treatment. Finally, this work introduces the future potential of neuropsychological testing for both the diagnosis of DCS as well as assessing the effectiveness of hyperbaric therapy in Type II DCS.

  4. Bilateral Upper Extremity DVT in a 43-Year-Old Man: Is It Thoracic Outlet Syndrome?!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadoun Jabri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recurrent deep venous thrombosis, involving bilateral upper extremities, is an extremely rare phenomenon. We are presenting a 43-year-old man who was diagnosed with left upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT and was treated with anticoagulation and surgical decompression in 2004. 9 years later, he presented with right arm swelling and was diagnosed with right UEDVT using US venous Doppler. Venogram showed compression of the subclavian vein by the first rib, diagnosing thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS. He was treated with anticoagulation and local venolysis and later by surgical decompression of the subclavian vein. Bilateral UEDVT, as mentioned above, is an extremely rare condition that is uncommonly caused by TOS. To our knowledge, we are reporting the first case of bilateral UEDVT due to TOS. Diagnosis usually starts with US venous Doppler to detect the thrombosis, followed by the gold standard venogram to locate the area of obstruction and lyse the thrombus if needed. The ultimate treatment for TOS remains surgical decompression of the vascular bundle at the thoracic outlet.

  5. Comparative incidences of decompression illness in repetitive, staged, mixed-gas decompression diving: is 'dive fitness' an influencing factor?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayer, Martin Dj; Akroyd, Jim; Williams, Guy D

    2008-06-01

    Wreck diving at Bikini Atoll consists of a relatively standard series of decompression dives with maximum depths in the region of 45-55 metres' sea water (msw). In a typical week of diving at Bikini, divers can perform up to 12 decompression dives to these depths over seven days; on five of those days, divers can perform two decompression dives per day. All the dives employ multi-level, staged decompression schedules using air and surface-supplied nitrox containing 80% oxygen. Bikini is serviced by a single diving operator and so a relatively precise record exists both of the actual number of dives undertaken and of the decompression illness incidents both for customer divers and the dive guides. The dive guides follow exactly the dive profiles and decompression schedules of the customers. Each dive guide will perform nearly 400 decompression dives a year, with maximum depths mostly around 50 msw, compared with an average of 10 (maximum of 12) undertaken typically by each customer diver in a week. The incidence of decompression illness for the customer population (presumed in the absence of medical records) is over ten times higher than that for the dive guides. The physiological reasons for such a marked difference are discussed in terms of customer demographics and dive-guide acclimatization to repetitive decompression stress. The rates of decompression illness for a range of diving populations are reviewed.

  6. Thoracic organ transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierson, Richard N; Barr, Mark L; McCullough, Keith P; Egan, Thomas; Garrity, Edward; Jessup, Mariell; Murray, Susan

    2004-01-01

    This article presents an overview of factors associated with thoracic transplantation outcomes over the past decade and provides valuable information regarding the heart, lung, and heart-lung waiting lists and thoracic organ transplant recipients. Waiting list and post-transplant information is used to assess the importance of patient demographics, risk factors, and primary cardiopulmonary disease on outcomes. The time that the typical listed patient has been waiting for a heart, lung, or heart-lung transplant has markedly increased over the past decade, while the number of transplants performed has declined slightly and survival after transplant has plateaued. Waiting list mortality, however, appears to be declining for each organ and for most diseases and high-severity subgroups, perhaps in response to recent changes in organ allocation algorithms. Based on perceived inequity in organ access and in response to a mandate from Health Resources and Services Administration, the lung transplant community is developing a lung allocation system designed to minimize deaths on the waiting list while maximizing the benefit of transplant by incorporating post-transplant survival and quality of life into the algorithm. Areas where improved data collection could inform evolving organ allocation and candidate selection policies are emphasized.

  7. Thoracic damage control surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Roberto; Saad, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The damage control surgery came up with the philosophy of applying essential maneuvers to control bleeding and abdominal contamination in trauma patients who are within the limits of their physiological reserves. This concept was extended to thoracic injuries, where relatively simple maneuvers can shorten operative time of in extremis patients. This article aims to revise the various damage control techniques in thoracic organs that must be known to the surgeon engaged in emergency care. RESUMO A cirurgia de controle de danos surgiu com a filosofia de se aplicar manobras essenciais para controle de sangramento e contaminação abdominal, em doentes traumatizados, nos limites de suas reservas fisiológicas. Este conceito se estendeu para as lesões torácicas, onde manobras relativamente simples, podem abreviar o tempo operatório de doentes in extremis. Este artigo tem como objetivo, revisar as diversas técnicas de controle de dano em órgãos torácicos, que devem ser de conhecimento do cirurgião que atua na emergência.

  8. Thoracic spine x-ray

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... There is low radiation exposure. X-rays are monitored and regulated to provide the minimum amount of radiation exposure needed to produce the image. Most ...

  9. Redistribution of Decompression Stop Time from Shallow to Deep Stops Increases Incidence of Decompression Sickness in Air Decompression Dives

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    year old active duty male diver surfaced from a 170/30 air dive at <corr>12:11<corr> on 24AUG06 using MK 20 FFM and following the A-2 “deep stops...effort, and this episode responded immediately to pressure. AGE is unlikely due to the experience of the diver, the MK 20 FFM characteristics, and...from a 170/30 air dive at <corr>12:11<corr> on 24AUG06 using MK 20 FFM and following the A-2 “deep stops” experimental decompression profile

  10. Internal fixation for the treatment of the thoracic spine fractures - Multicentric experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maria Ibarra, Javier Ernesto; Arrieta Maria, Victor Elias; Chaparro Rondon, Walker

    2003-01-01

    Thoracic spine fractures has a high social impact because of its frequent association with neurological deficit. There is much controversy about the way to treat them: using transpedicular screws (Roy Camille), books (Harrington) or sublaminar wires (Luque) systems. Forty patients were reviewed in time span from 1993 to 2002; average age 37 years, average follow up 54 months. The analyzed variables were: technique used, diagnostic, mechanism of trauma, neurological deficit, additional injuries, decompressive procedures, anatomic level and complications. There were 28 (70%) luxofractures. The causes of the injuries found were 21 (52%) cases of vehicle motor accidents. 24 patients (60%) had neurological deficit and seven of them required decompression procedures, the mean of levels fixed per patient were seven. the modified Harrington-Luque technique was used in 26 patients and the modular technique was used in 14. The complications presented were two acute infections

  11. Needle bar for warp knitting machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagel, Adolf; Thumling, Manfred

    1979-01-01

    Needle bar for warp knitting machines with a number of needles individually set into slits of the bar and having shafts cranked to such an extent that the head section of each needle is in alignment with the shaft section accommodated by the slit. Slackening of the needles will thus not influence the needle spacing.

  12. Needling the early universe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, I.; Wright, E.L.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility that the whole microwave background can be produced by a bright population of pregalactic stars at a redshift of a few hundred is explored. The radiation is thermalized by a combination of amorphous silicate, amorphous carbon, graphite, and needle-shaped conducting grains which give rise to the opacity needed at wavelengths greater than 3 cm. The occurrence of distortion in a primordial microwave background spectrum due to its interaction with Population III stars and dust is investigated. The possibility of producing deviations small enough to be consistent with the best available observations, but still detectable by COBE, is considered. 65 references

  13. Cardiovascular Pressures with Venous Gas Embolism and Decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B. D.; Robinson, R.; Sutton, T.; Kemper, G. B.

    1995-01-01

    Venous gas embolism (VGE) is reported with decompression to a decreased ambient pressure. With severe decompression, or in cases where an intracardiac septal defect (patent foramen ovale) exists, the venous bubbles can become arterialized and cause neurological decompression illness. Incidence rates of patent foramen ovale in the general population range from 25-34% and yet aviators, astronauts, and deepsea divers who have decompression-induced venous bubbles do not demonstrate neurological symptoms at these high rates. This apparent disparity may be attributable to the normal pressure gradient across the atria of the heart that must be reversed for there to be flow potency. We evaluated the effects of: venous gas embolism (0.025, 0.05 and 0.15 ml/ kg min for 180 min.) hyperbaric decompression; and hypobaric decompression on the pressure gradient across the left and right atria in anesthetized dogs with intact atrial septa. Left ventricular end-diastolic pressure was used as a measure of left atrial pressure. In a total of 92 experimental evaluations in 22 dogs, there were no reported reversals in the mean pressure gradient across the atria; a total of 3 transient reversals occurred during the peak pressure gradient changes. The reasons that decompression-induced venous bubbles do not consistently cause serious symptoms of decompression illness may be that the amount of venous gas does not always cause sufficient pressure reversal across a patent foramen ovale to cause arterialization of the venous bubbles.

  14. Collagen levels are normalized after decompression of experimentally obstructed colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rehn, Martin; Ågren, Sven Per Magnus; Syk, I

    2011-01-01

    Our aim was to define the dynamics in collagen concentrations in the large bowel wall following decompression of experimental obstruction.......Our aim was to define the dynamics in collagen concentrations in the large bowel wall following decompression of experimental obstruction....

  15. [Current status of thoracoscopic surgery for thoracic and lumbar spine. Part 2: treatment of the thoracic disc hernia, spinal deformities, spinal tumors, infections and miscellaneous].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verdú-López, Francisco; Beisse, Rudolf

    2014-01-01

    Thoracoscopic surgery or video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) of the thoracic and lumbar spine has evolved greatly since it appeared less than 20 years ago. It is currently used in a large number of processes and injuries. The aim of this article, in its two parts, is to review the current status of VATS of the thoracic and lumbar spine in its entire spectrum. After reviewing the current literature, we developed each of the large groups of indications where VATS takes place, one by one. This second part reviews and discusses the management, treatment and specific thoracoscopic technique in thoracic disc herniation, spinal deformities, tumour pathology, infections of the spine and other possible indications for VATS. Thoracoscopic surgery is in many cases an alternative to conventional open surgery. The transdiaphragmatic approach has made endoscopic treatment of many thoracolumbar junction processes possible, thus widening the spectrum of therapeutic indications. These include the treatment of spinal deformities, spinal tumours, infections and other pathological processes, as well as the reconstruction of injured spinal segments and decompression of the spinal canal if lesion placement is favourable to antero-lateral approach. Good clinical results of thoracoscopic surgery are supported by growing experience reflected in a large number of articles. The degree of complications in thoracoscopic surgery is comparable to open surgery, with benefits in regard to morbidity of the approach and subsequent patient recovery. Copyright © 2012 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  16. Teaching practices of thoracic epidural catheterizations in different grade of anesthesia residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alagoz

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of residency grade and other factors which influence the success of thoracic epidural catheterization in thoracotomy patients. METHODS: After the ethical committee approval, data were recorded retrospectively from the charts of 415 patients. All patients had given written informed consent. The thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were divided into two groups as second-third year (Group I and fourth year (Group II according to residency grade. We retrospectively collected demographic data, characteristics of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts, and all difficulties and complications during thoracic epidural catheterization. RESULTS: Overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization was similar between the groups. Levels of catheter placement, number and duration of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were not different between the groups (p > 0.05. Change of needle insertion level was statistically higher in Group II (p = 0.008, whereas paresthesia was significantly higher in Group I (p = 0.007. Dural puncture and postdural puncture headache rates were higher in Group I. Higher body mass index and level of the insertion site were significant factors for thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate and those were independence from residents' experience (p < 0.001, 0.005. CONCLUSION: Body mass index and level of insertion site were significant on thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate. We think that residents' grade is not a significant factor in terms overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization, but it is important for outcome of these procedures.

  17. The evolution of thoracic anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodsky, Jay B

    2005-02-01

    The specialty of thoracic surgery has evolved along with the modem practice of anesthesia. This close relationship began in the 1930s and continues today. Thoracic surgery has grown from a field limited almost exclusively to simple chest wall procedures to the present situation in which complex procedures, such as lung volume reduction or lung transplantation, now can be performed on the most severely compromised patient. The great advances in thoracic surgery have followed discoveries and technical innovations in many medical fields. One of the most important reasons for the rapid escalation in the number and complexity of thoracic surgical procedures now being performed has been the evolution of anesthesia for thoracic surgery. There has been so much progress in this area that numerous books and journals are devoted entirely to this subject. The author has been privileged to work with several surgeons who specialized in noncardiac thoracic surgery. As a colleague of 25 years, the noted pulmonary surgeon James B.D. Mark wrote, "Any operation is a team effort... (but) nowhere is this team effort more important than in thoracic surgery, where near-choreography of moves by all participants is essential. Exchange of information, status and plans are mandatory". This team approach between the thoracic surgeon and the anesthesiologist reflects the history of the two specialties. With new advances in technology, such as continuous blood gas monitoring and the pharmacologic management of pulmonary circulation to maximize oxygenation during one-lung ventilation, in the future even more complex procedures may be able to be performed safely on even higher risk patients.

  18. September 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 9/25/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 13 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and pathology communities. After a brief discussion, Gerry Swartzberg was selected as Arizona’s 2014 nominee for Clinician of the Year. There was 1 case presented: Dr. Thomas Colby, pulmonary pathologist from Mayo Clinic Arizona, presented the case of a 67 year old woman with multiple pulmonary nodules. The largest was 1.2 cm CT scan. She had a fine needle aspiration of one of the nodules. The pathology revealed spindle-shaped cells which were synaptophysin + (also known as the major synaptic vesicle protein p38. Synaptophysin marks neuroendocrine tissue and on this basis the patient was diagnosed with multiple carcinoid tumors. Aguayo et al. (1 described six patients with diffuse hyperplasia and dysplasia of pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, multiple carcinoid tumorlets, and peribronchiolar fibrosis …

  19. Impact of sagittal spinopelvic alignment on clinical outcomes after decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis without coronal imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikata, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Kota; Fujita, Nobuyuki; Iwanami, Akio; Hosogane, Naobumi; Ishii, Ken; Nakamura, Masaya; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Matsumoto, Morio

    2015-10-01

    The object of this study was to investigate correlations between sagittal spinopelvic alignment and improvements in clinical and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes after lumbar decompression surgery for lumbar spinal canal stenosis (LCS) without coronal imbalance. The authors retrospectively reviewed data from consecutive patients treated for LCS with decompression surgery in the period from 2009 through 2011. They examined correlations between preoperative or postoperative sagittal vertical axis (SVA) and radiological parameters, clinical outcomes, and health-related (HR)QOL scores in patients divided according to SVA. Clinical outcomes were assessed according to Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and visual analog scale (VAS) scores. Health-related QOL was evaluated using the Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and the JOA Back Pain Evaluation Questionnaire (JOABPEQ). One hundred nine patients were eligible for inclusion in the study. Compared to patients with normal sagittal alignment prior to surgery (Group A: SVA imbalance (Group B: SVA ≥ 50 mm) had significantly smaller lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis angles and larger pelvic tilt. In Group B, there was a significant decrease in postoperative SVA compared with the preoperative SVA (76.3 ± 29.7 mm vs. 54.3 ± 39.8 mm, p = 0.004). The patients in Group B with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual sagittal imbalance after surgery (82.8 ± 41.6 mm). There were no significant differences in clinical and HRQOL outcomes between Groups A and B. Compared to patients with normal postoperative SVA (Group C: SVA imbalance. Decompression surgery improved the SVA value in patients with preoperative sagittal imbalance; however, the patients with severe preoperative sagittal imbalance (SVA > 80 mm) had residual imbalance after decompression surgery. Both clinical and HRQOL outcomes were negatively affected by postoperative residual sagittal imbalance.

  20. Approach to the irradiation of extensive cervical and upper thoracic spinal astrocytoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, E.

    1981-01-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord tumors are relatively rare, especially to the extent presented in this report. A 31-year-old woman had been diagnosed as having an inoperable astrocytoma, grade I-II, involving the entire cervical spinal cord and two upper thoracic segments. After decompressive laminectomy, she was referred for a radical course of radiation therapy. An irradiation technique was devised which allowed treatment of a single cylindrical volume of tissue encompassing the known tumor. Field fractionation with undesirable gaps and/or excessive dose to overlying normal structures was avoided. To the cervical spinal cord she received 5590 cGy in 29 fractions over 42 days. By this schedule she received at the same time 4820 cGy to the medulla oblongata and 4880 cGy to the upper thoracic cord. Partial neurological improvement occurred at the end of the treatment. The treatment approach is discussed in the background of the literature data. (orig.) [de

  1. The management of thoracic inlet syndrome associated with Hurler's syndrome: a novel surgical technique.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ahsan, Rauf M

    2012-02-01

    A 21-year-old male developed significant swelling of his tongue after a respiratory arrest. The patient had a history of Hurler\\'s syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) angiogram delineated that the swelling was due to compression of his internal jugular veins at the level of the first rib, resulting in thoracic inlet obstruction. The standard surgical treatment of thoracic inlet obstruction was not suitable in this patient\\'s case due to his short thick neck and his characteristic Hurler\\'s syndrome body habitus. Therefore, a novel surgical strategy was used to decompress his head and neck vessels. The manubrium was widened using an iliac crest bone graft, stabilised using internal fixation plates and reconstructed with a pectoral muscle flap.

  2. Mosquito inspired medical needles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenau, Torben Anker; Hesselberg, Thomas; Drakidis, Alexandros Dimitrios

    2017-01-01

    The stinging proboscis in mosquitos have diameters of only 40-100 μm which is much less than the thinnest medical needles and the mechanics of these natural stinging mechanisms have therefore attracted attention amongst developers of injection devises. The mosquito use a range of different...... strategies to lower the required penetration force hence allowing a thinner and less stiff proboscis structure. Earlier studies of the mosquito proboscis insertion strategies have shown how each of the single strategies reduces the required penetration force. The present paper gives an overview...... of the advanced set of mechanisms that allow the mosquito to penetrate human skin and also presents other biological mechanisms that facilitate skin penetration. Results from experiments in a skin mimic using biomimetic equivalents to the natural mechanisms are presented. This includes skin stretching, insertion...

  3. Utilization of Cupping Therapy in the Treatment of Vascular Thoracic Outlet Syndrome in a Collegiate Pitcher: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen A. Cage

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Present a clinical case detailing the effectiveness of dry cupping therapy in treating thoracic outlet syndrome. The utilization of dry cupping therapy on a 20-year-old collegiate baseball pitcher with diagnosed thoracic outlet syndrome is presented. Background: Thoracic outlet syndrome is a relatively rare musculoskeletal condition affecting 1/100,000 patients annually. Dry cupping therapy is an ancient therapeutic modality that utilizes various means of suction with the goal of decompressing myofascial layers. Treatment: Following diagnosis, patient was successfully treated in two weeks using dry cupping therapy. The patient experienced no further incidence of thoracic outlet syndrome symptoms and was able to complete the remainder of his competitive season. Uniqueness: The patient’s thoracic outlet syndrome was diagnosed at an early stage, leading to the need of clearance from a vascular specialist before returning to competition. To the author’s knowledge, there are currently no published case reports detailing the use of cupping therapy to treat thoracic outlet syndrome. Conclusion: Cupping therapy may be a viable treatment option when seeking to address tight musculature. Further research needs to be conducted to determine optimal parameters for cupping therapy as a therapeutic modality.

  4. [Decompression problems in diving in mountain lakes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bühlmann, A A

    1989-08-01

    The relationship between tolerated high-pressure tissue nitrogen and ambient pressure is practically linear. The tolerated nitrogen high pressure decreases at altitude, as the ambient pressure is lower. Additionally, tissues with short nitrogen half-times have a higher tolerance than tissues which retain nitrogen for longer duration. For the purpose of determining safe decompression routines, the human body can be regarded as consisting of 16 compartments with half-times from 4 to 635 minutes for nitrogen. The coefficients for calculation of the tolerated nitrogen-high pressure in the tissues can be deduced directly from the half-times for nitrogen. We show as application the results of 573 simulated air dives in the pressure-chamber and 544 real dives in mountain lakes in Switzerland (1400-2600 m above sea level) and in Lake Titicaca (3800 m above sea level). They are in accordance with the computed limits of tolerance.

  5. The probability and severity of decompression sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hada, Ethan A.; Vann, Richard D.; Denoble, Petar J.

    2017-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS), which is caused by inert gas bubbles in tissues, is an injury of concern for scuba divers, compressed air workers, astronauts, and aviators. Case reports for 3322 air and N2-O2 dives, resulting in 190 DCS events, were retrospectively analyzed and the outcomes were scored as (1) serious neurological, (2) cardiopulmonary, (3) mild neurological, (4) pain, (5) lymphatic or skin, and (6) constitutional or nonspecific manifestations. Following standard U.S. Navy medical definitions, the data were grouped into mild—Type I (manifestations 4–6)–and serious–Type II (manifestations 1–3). Additionally, we considered an alternative grouping of mild–Type A (manifestations 3–6)–and serious–Type B (manifestations 1 and 2). The current U.S. Navy guidance allows for a 2% probability of mild DCS and a 0.1% probability of serious DCS. We developed a hierarchical trinomial (3-state) probabilistic DCS model that simultaneously predicts the probability of mild and serious DCS given a dive exposure. Both the Type I/II and Type A/B discriminations of mild and serious DCS resulted in a highly significant (p probability of ‘mild’ DCS resulted in a longer allowable bottom time for the same 2% limit. However, for the 0.1% serious DCS limit, we found a vastly decreased allowable bottom dive time for all dive depths. If the Type A/B scoring was assigned to outcome severity, the no decompression limits (NDL) for air dives were still controlled by the acceptable serious DCS risk limit rather than the acceptable mild DCS risk limit. However, in this case, longer NDL limits were allowed than with the Type I/II scoring. The trinomial model mild and serious probabilities agree reasonably well with the current air NDL only with the Type A/B scoring and when 0.2% risk of serious DCS is allowed. PMID:28296928

  6. 21 CFR 880.5580 - Acupuncture needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Acupuncture needle. 880.5580 Section 880.5580 Food... § 880.5580 Acupuncture needle. (a) Identification. An acupuncture needle is a device intended to pierce the skin in the practice of acupuncture. The device consists of a solid, stainless steel needle. The...

  7. 46 CFR 197.332 - PVHO-Decompression chambers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    .... Each decompression chamber must— (a) Meet the requirements of § 197.328; (b) Have internal dimensions... pressure; (d) Have a means of operating all installed man-way locking devices, except disabled shipping...

  8. Needle Biopsy of the Lung

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clip. The needle is hollow so it can capture the tissue specimen. There are several types of ... breath, difficulty in catching your breath, rapid pulse (heart rate), sharp chest or shoulder pain with breathing, ...

  9. Needle-free influenza vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amorij, Jean-Pierre; Hinrichs, Wouter L.J.; Frijlink, Henderik W.; Wilschut, Jan C.; Huckriede, Anke

    2010-01-01

    Vaccination is the cornerstone of influenza control in epidemic and pandemic situations. Influenza vaccines are typically given by intramuscular injection. However, needle-free vaccinations could offer several distinct advantages over intramuscular injections: they are pain-free, easier to

  10. Thoracic complications of rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massey, H.; Darby, M.; Edey, A.

    2013-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is a relatively common multisystem disease associated with significant mortality and morbidity. Thoracic disease, both pleural and pulmonary, is a frequent extra-articular manifestation of rheumatoid arthritis and responsible for approximately 20% of rheumatoid-associated mortality. Rheumatoid disease and its associated therapies can affect all compartments of the lung inciting a range of stereotyped pathological responses and it is not infrequent for multiple disease entities to co-exist. In some instances, development of pulmonary complications may precede typical rheumatological presentation of the disease and be the first indication of an underlying connective tissue disease. The spectrum of thoracic disease related to rheumatoid arthritis is reviewed

  11. Thoracic outlet syndrome: Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marquez, Juan Camilo; Acosta, Mauricio Fernando; Uribe Jorge Ricardo

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of vascular thoracic outlet syndrome in a young man, diagnosed with upper limb arteriography, leading to repeated arterio-arterial emboli originating from a post-stenotic subclavian artery aneurysm. It is of our interest due to its low incidence and the small number of cases reported that have been diagnosed by arteriography. The thoracic outlet is the path through which vascular and neural structures goes from the neck to the axilla, and it has three anatomical strictures, that when pronounced, can compress the brachial plexus or subclavian vessels, leading to different symptoms and signs.

  12. You’re the Flight Surgeon: Pulmonary Decompression Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    follow-up of this patient Diagnosis: Decompression sickness (DeS) with pulmonary symptoms (Type Il DeS, older nomenclature). Treatment: Hyperbaric ...is quite clear thai any case of suspected decompression sickness in the USAF be discussed with the hyperbariC medicine specialists at Brooks City...physician in as respectful manner as you can that you suspect the patient’s condition is likely related to his hypobaric exposure. B. Agree with

  13. Minimally invasive surgery for resection of ossification of the ligamentum flavum in the thoracic spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Shen, Chaoxiong; Cai, Ranze; Wu, Jianfeng; Zhuang, Yuandong; Cai, Zhaowen; Wang, Rui; Chen, Chunmei

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic ossification of the ligamentum flavum (TOLF) is a common cause of progressive thoracic myelopathy. Surgical decompression is commonly used to treat TOLF. To evaluate the clinical outcomes of microsurgical decompression of TOLF via a paraspinal approach, using a percutaneous tubular retractor system. First, three-dimensional (3D) image reconstruction and printed models were made from thin computed tomography scans for each patient. Then, 3D computer-assisted virtual surgery was performed using the 3D reconstruction to calculate the precise location and sizes of the bone window and the angle of insertion of the percutaneous tubular retractor system. In total, 13 patients underwent the surgery through the percutaneous micro channel unilateral vertebral approach under electrophysiological monitoring. Five days after the surgery, increased creatine phosphokinase levels returned to preoperative levels. The Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score was improved and computed tomography reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging of the thoracic spine showed that decompression was achieved without injuries to the spinal cord or nerve root. The stability of the spine was not affected, nor were any deformities of the spine detected. Finally, nerve functional recovery was achieved with minimal injury to the paraspinal muscle, articulum, spinous process and ligament. The mean operative time was 98.23 ±19.10 min, and mean blood loss was 19.77 ±5.97 ml. At a mean follow-up of 13.3 months (median: 12 months), the mean JOA score was 7.54 ±1.13 at the final follow-up, yielding a mean RR of 49.10 ±15.71%. Using The recovery rate, 7 (53.85%) patients had good outcomes, 5 (38.46%) patients had a fair outcome, and 1 (7.69%) patient had poor outcomes, indicating significant improvement by the final follow-up examination (p < 0.05). The 3D printed patient model-based microsurgical resection of TOLF via the paraspinal approach can achieve decompression of the spinal canal

  14. Fabrication of tungsten wire needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roder, A.

    1983-02-01

    Fine point needles for field emissoin are conventionally produced by electrolytically or chemically etching tungsten wire. Points formed in this manner have a typical tip radius of about 0.5 microns and a cone angle of some 30 degrees. The construction of needle matrix detector chambers has created a need for tungsten needles whose specifications are: 20 mil tungsten wire, 1.5 inch total length, 3 mm-long taper (resulting in a cone angle of about 5 degrees), and 25 micron-radius point (similar to that found on sewing needles). In the process described here for producing such needles, tungsten wire, immersed in a NaOH solution and in the presence of an electrode, is connected first to an ac voltage and then to a dc supply, to form a taper and a point on the end of the wire immersed in the solution. The process parameters described here are for needles that will meet the above specifications. Possible variations will be discussed under each approprite heading

  15. Decompression to altitude: assumptions, experimental evidence, and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Philip P; Butler, Bruce D

    2009-02-01

    Although differences exist, hypobaric and hyperbaric exposures share common physiological, biochemical, and clinical features, and their comparison may provide further insight into the mechanisms of decompression stress. Although altitude decompression illness (DCI) has been experienced by high-altitude Air Force pilots and is common in ground-based experiments simulating decompression profiles of extravehicular activities (EVAs) or astronauts' space walks, no case has been reported during actual EVAs in the non-weight-bearing microgravity environment of orbital space missions. We are uncertain whether gravity influences decompression outcomes via nitrogen tissue washout or via alterations related to skeletal muscle activity. However, robust experimental evidence demonstrated the role of skeletal muscle exercise, activities, and/or movement in bubble formation and DCI occurrence. Dualism of effects of exercise, positive or negative, on bubble formation and DCI is a striking feature in hypobaric exposure. Therefore, the discussion and the structure of this review are centered on those highlighted unresolved topics about the relationship between muscle activity, decompression, and microgravity. This article also provides, in the context of altitude decompression, an overview of the role of denitrogenation, metabolic gases, gas micronuclei, stabilization of bubbles, biochemical pathways activated by bubbles, nitric oxide, oxygen, anthropometric or physiological variables, Doppler-detectable bubbles, and potential arterialization of bubbles. These findings and uncertainties will produce further physiological challenges to solve in order to line up for the programmed human return to the Moon, the preparation for human exploration of Mars, and the EVAs implementation in a non-zero gravity environment.

  16. Decompression sickness in breath-hold divers: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaitre, Frederic; Fahlman, Andreas; Gardette, Bernard; Kohshi, Kiyotaka

    2009-12-01

    Although it has been generally assumed that the risk of decompression sickness is virtually zero during a single breath-hold dive in humans, repeated dives may result in a cumulative increase in the tissue and blood nitrogen tension. Many species of marine mammals perform extensive foraging bouts with deep and long dives interspersed by a short surface interval, and some human divers regularly perform repeated dives to 30-40 m or a single dive to more than 200 m, all of which may result in nitrogen concentrations that elicit symptoms of decompression sickness. Neurological problems have been reported in humans after single or repeated dives and recent necropsy reports in stranded marine mammals were suggestive of decompression sickness-like symptoms. Modelling attempts have suggested that marine mammals may live permanently with elevated nitrogen concentrations and may be at risk when altering their dive behaviour. In humans, non-pathogenic bubbles have been recorded and symptoms of decompression sickness have been reported after repeated dives to modest depths. The mechanisms implicated in these accidents indicate that repeated breath-hold dives with short surface intervals are factors that predispose to decompression sickness. During deep diving, the effect of pulmonary shunts and/or lung collapse may play a major role in reducing the incidence of decompression sickness in humans and marine mammals.

  17. Piezosurgery in Modified Pterional Orbital Decompression Surgery in Graves Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grauvogel, Juergen; Scheiwe, Christian; Masalha, Waseem; Jarc, Nadja; Grauvogel, Tanja; Beringer, Andreas

    2017-10-01

    Piezosurgery uses microvibrations to selectively cut bone, preserving the adjacent soft tissue. The present study evaluated the use of piezosurgery for bone removal in orbital decompression surgery in Graves disease via a modified pterional approach. A piezosurgical device (Piezosurgery medical) was used in 14 patients (20 orbits) with Graves disease who underwent orbital decompression surgery in additional to drills and rongeurs for bone removal of the lateral orbital wall and orbital roof. The practicability, benefits, and drawbacks of this technique in orbital decompression surgery were recorded. Piezosurgery was evaluated with respect to safety, preciseness of bone cutting, and preservation of the adjacent dura and periorbita. Preoperative and postoperative clinical outcome data were assessed. The orbital decompression surgery was successful in all 20 orbits, with good clinical outcomes and no postoperative complications. Piezosurgery proved to be a safe tool, allowing selective bone cutting with no damage to the surrounding soft tissue structures. However, there were disadvantages concerning the intraoperative handling in the narrow space and the efficiency of bone removal was limited in the orbital decompression surgery compared with drills. Piezosurgery proved to be a useful tool in bone removal for orbital decompression in Graves disease. It is safe and easy to perform, without any danger of damage to adjacent tissue because of its selective bone-cutting properties. Nonetheless, further development of the device is necessary to overcome the disadvantages in intraoperative handling and the reduced bone removal rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Thoracic chordoma: CT and MR findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Yoo Mi; Hwang, Hee Young; Kim, Sang Joon; Chung, Hyo Sun; Han, Heon

    1993-01-01

    Chordoma arising from the notochordal remnants is a rare primary bone tumor in the cervicosacral region and is even more unusual in the thoracic region. The authors experienced a case of thoracic chordoma and reports its CT and MR findings

  19. Decompressive craniectomy and CSF disorders in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfiotto, Marie; Mottolese, Carmine; Szathmari, Alexandru; Beuriat, Pierre-Aurelien; Klein, Olivier; Vinchon, Matthieu; Gimbert, Edouard; Roujeau, Thomas; Scavarda, Didier; Zerah, Michel; Di Rocco, Federico

    2017-10-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a lifesaving procedure but is associated to several post-operative complications, namely cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics impairment. The aim of this multicentric study was to evaluate the incidence of such CSF alterations after DC and review their impact on the overall outcome. We performed a retrospective multicentric study to analyze the CSF disorders occurring in children aged from 0 to 17 years who had undergone a DC for traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the major Departments of Pediatric Neurosurgery of France between January 2006 and August 2016. Out of 150 children, ranging in age between 7 months and 17 years, mean 10.75 years, who underwent a DC for TBI in 10 French pediatric neurosurgical centers. Sixteen (6 males, 10 females) (10.67%) developed CSF disorders following the surgical procedure and required an extrathecal CSF shunting. External ventricular drainage increased the risk of further complications, especially cranioplasty infection (p = 0.008). CSF disorders affect a minority of children after DC for TBI. They may develop early after the DC but they may develop several months after the cranioplasty (8 months), consequently indicating the necessity of clinical and radiological close follow-up after discharge from the neurosurgical unit. External ventricular drainage and permanent CSF shunt placement increase significantly the risk of cranioplasty infection.

  20. Clinical and radiological outcome of craniocervical osteo-dural decompression for Chiari I-associated syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spena, Giannantonio; Bernucci, Claudio; Garbossa, Diego; Valfrè, Walter; Versari, Pietro

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes of craniocervical decompression for patients affected by Chiari I-related syringomyelia. We performed a retrospective analysis of a group of patients affected by Chiari I-associated syringomyelia treated by craniocervical decompression (CCD). Surgical and technical aspects and preoperative factors predicting outcome were discussed. A total of 36 patients were reviewed. There were 17 men and 19 women (female/male ratio 1.11), and the mean age was 40.4 (range 18-68). The most important preoperative symptoms were related to myelopathy (pain, weakness, atrophy, spasticity, sensory loss, and dysesthesias). Most syrinxes were in the cervico-thoracic region (61.1%), and the majority of patients had tonsillar descent between the foramen magnum and C1. All patients underwent a craniectomy less than 3 cm in diameter followed by a duroplasty with dura substitute. No arachnoid manipulation was necessary. Three patients (8.1%) experienced cerebrospinal fluid leaks that resolved without complications. At a mean follow up of 40 months (range 16-72) 80.5% of patients exhibited improvement over their preoperative neurological examination while 11.1% stabilized. The syrinx shrank in 80.5% of patients. Chi-square test showed that preoperative syrinx extension and degree of tonsillar descent did not correlate with clinical and neuroradiological postoperative evolution. Treating syringomyelia associated in Chiari I malformation with CCD leads to a large percentage of patients with satisfying results and no irreversible complications.

  1. Chondrosarcoma of a thoracic vertebra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdelwahab, I.F.; Casden, A.M.; Klein, M.J.; Spollman, A.

    1991-01-01

    Central chondrosarcoma is an uncommon primary malignancy of the axial skeleton which usually affects the posterior elements or the posterior part of a vertebral body. The authors present an unusual case of chondrosarcoma involving the anterior part of a thoracic vertebra with massive extravertebral extension into the posterior mediastinum. The roles of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in identifying this pathology are emphasized

  2. Nanotechnology applications in thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofferberth, Sophie C; Grinstaff, Mark W; Colson, Yolonda L

    2016-07-01

    Nanotechnology is an emerging, rapidly evolving field with the potential to significantly impact care across the full spectrum of cancer therapy. Of note, several recent nanotechnological advances show particular promise to improve outcomes for thoracic surgical patients. A variety of nanotechnologies are described that offer possible solutions to existing challenges encountered in the detection, diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Nanotechnology-based imaging platforms have the ability to improve the surgical care of patients with thoracic malignancies through technological advances in intraoperative tumour localization, lymph node mapping and accuracy of tumour resection. Moreover, nanotechnology is poised to revolutionize adjuvant lung cancer therapy. Common chemotherapeutic drugs, such as paclitaxel, docetaxel and doxorubicin, are being formulated using various nanotechnologies to improve drug delivery, whereas nanoparticle (NP)-based imaging technologies can monitor the tumour microenvironment and facilitate molecularly targeted lung cancer therapy. Although early nanotechnology-based delivery systems show promise, the next frontier in lung cancer therapy is the development of 'theranostic' multifunctional NPs capable of integrating diagnosis, drug monitoring, tumour targeting and controlled drug release into various unifying platforms. This article provides an overview of key existing and emerging nanotechnology platforms that may find clinical application in thoracic surgery in the near future. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. All rights reserved.

  3. Computed tomography - guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liao Shin Yu; Deheinzelin, Daniel; Younes, Riad N.; Chojniak, Rubens

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the experience of a radiology department in the use of computed tomography-guided cutting needle biopsy of pulmonary nodules, by evaluating diagnostic yield and incidence of complications. This is a retrospective analysis of 52 consecutive patients who underwent lung lesion biopsy guided by computed tomography, performed between May 1997 and May 2000. Thirty-five patients were male and 17 were female, with ages ranging from 5 to 85 years (median, 62 years). The size of the lesions ranged from 1.8 to 15 cm (median, 5.4 cm). In a total of 52 biopsies of lung lesions, 51 biopsies (98.1%) supplied appropriate material for histopathological diagnosis, with 9 diagnosed (17.3%) as benign and 42 (80.8%) as malignant lesions. Specific diagnosis was obtained in 44 (84.6%) biopsies: 4 benign (9.1%) and 40 (90.9%) malignant lesions. The sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of the cutting needle biopsies for determining presence of malignancy were 96.8%, 100%, and 97.2%, respectively. Complications occurred in 9 cases (17.3%), including 6 cases (11.5%) of small pneumothorax, 1 (1.9%) of hemoptysis, 1 (1.9%) of pulmonary hematoma, and 1 (1.9%) of thoracic wall hematoma. All had spontaneous resolution. There were no complications requiring subsequent intervention. The high sensitivity and specificity of the method and the low rate of complications have established cutting needle biopsy as an efficient and safe tool for the diagnosis of lung lesions. In our hospital, cutting needle biopsy is considered a reliable procedure for the evaluation of indeterminate pulmonary nodules. (author)

  4. Thoracic Duct Injury Following Cervical Spine Surgery: A Multicenter Retrospective Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derakhshan, Adeeb; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P; Corriveau, Mark; Lee, Sungho; Pace, Jonathan R; Smith, Gabriel A; Gokaslan, Ziya; Bydon, Mohamad; Arnold, Paul M; Fehlings, Michael G; Riew, K Daniel; Mroz, Thomas E

    2017-04-01

    Multicenter retrospective case series. To determine the rate of thoracic duct injury during cervical spine operations. A retrospective case series study was conducted among 21 high-volume surgical centers to identify instances of thoracic duct injury during anterior cervical spine surgery. Staff at each center abstracted data for each identified case into case report forms. All case report forms were collected by the AOSpine North America Clinical Research Network Methodological Core for data processing, cleaning, and analysis. Of a total of 9591 patients reviewed that underwent cervical spine surgery, 2 (0.02%) incurred iatrogenic injury to the thoracic duct. Both patients underwent a left-sided anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The interruption of the thoracic duct was addressed intraoperatively in one patient with no residual postoperative effects. The second individual developed a chylous fluid collection approximately 2 months after the operation that required drainage via needle aspiration. Damage to the thoracic duct during cervical spine surgery is a relatively rare occurrence. Rapid identification of the disruption of this lymphatic vessel is critical to minimize deleterious effects of this complication.

  5. Thoracic periaortal fibrosis and Ormond's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kacl, G.M.; Bino, M.; Salomon, F.; Risti, B.; Marincek, B.

    1995-01-01

    Two cases of thoracic periaortal fibrosis as a manifestation of retroperitoneal fibrosis (Ormond's disease) are shown on CT and MRI. Thoracic periaortal fibrosis can result in an inflammatory aneurysmo with chronic dissection. Manifestation of thoracic periaortal fibrosis may typically occur intermittently over decades. (orig.) [de

  6. C-arm cone beam computed tomography needle path overlay for fluoroscopic guided vertebroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alda L; Mohamed, Ashraf; Pfister, Marcus; Chinndurai, Ponraj; Rohm, Esther; Hall, Andrew F; Wallace, Michael J

    2010-05-01

    /3 border of the vertebral body was measured, and 75% when distance from target to needle tip was measured. There were no major complications. Minor complications consisted of 3 cases (25%) of cement extravasation. C-arm CBCT with needle path overlay for fluoroscopic guided vertebroplasty is feasible and allows for reliable unilateral therapy of both lumbar and thoracic vertebral bodies. Extrapedicular approaches were performed safely and with good accuracy of reaching the targets.

  7. Thoracic trauma in newborn foals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jean, D.; Laverty, S.; Halley, J.; Hannigan, D.; Leveille, R.

    1999-01-01

    In a report describing life ending fractures (255 horses) from the Livestock Disease Diagnostic Center, Kentucky (1993 and 1994), 32 foals had rib fractures. The purpose of our study was to examine the incidence of rib fractures in newborn foals on a Thoroughbred studfarm by physical and radiographic examination, to determine factors which may contribute to the problem and to document any clinical consequences. All foals (263) included were examined within 3 days of birth. The thoracic cage was palpated externally for abnormalities and all foals were placed in dorsal recumbency to evaluate thoracic cage symmetry. Radiographs were used to diagnose foals with thoraciccage asymmetry (TCA) and rib fracture (RF). A diagnosis of costochondral dislocation (CD) was made when no radiographic evidence of fracture was present but there was severe TCA, Fifty-five foals (20.1%) had TCA (9 RF), One to 5 ribs were fractured on 9 of 40 radiographic studies. No consequences of the thoracic trauma was detected clinically, radiographically or ultrasonographically in this group of foals or at a 2- and 4-week follow-up examination. The percentage of foals with a history of abnormal parturition was higher in the TCA foals (15%) compared to the normal foals (6.8%). There weremore primiparous dams in the TCA group than in the normal foal group. Fillies (56.6%) had a higher incidence of birth trauma than colts (43.4%), Thisstudy demonstrates that thoracic trauma is often present in newborn foals and may not always be of clinical significance. Dystocia foals and foals from primiparous mares should be considered high risk for thoracic trauma

  8. Precipitation of Oriented Rutile and Ilmenite Needles in Garnet, Northeastern Connecticut, USA: Evidence for Extreme Metamorphic Conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ague, J. J.; Eckert, J. O.

    2011-12-01

    We report the discovery of oriented needles of rutile and, less commonly, ilmenite in the cores of garnets from northeastern CT, USA. The rocks preserve granulite facies mineral assemblages, form part of the Merrimack Synclinorium, and underwent metamorphism and deformation during the Acadian orogeny. The needles appear identical to those reported from a number of extreme P-T environments worldwide, including UHP metamorphic rocks, high-P granulites, and garnet peridotites. The needles are predominantly oriented along directions in garnet. The long axes of the rutile needles commonly do not go extinct parallel to the cross hairs under cross-polarized light (e.g., Griffin et al., 1971). This anomalous extinction indicates that the needles do not preserve a specific crystallographic relationship with their garnet hosts (e.g., Hwang et al., 2007). The needles range from a few hundred nm to a few um in diameter, and can be mm-scale in length. Micrometer-scale plates of rutile, srilankite and crichtonite have also been observed in some garnets together with the Fe-Ti oxide needles. Several origins for the needles have been proposed in the literature; we investigate the hypothesis that they precipitated in situ from originally Ti-rich garnet. Chemical profiles across garnets indicate that some retain Ti zoning, with elevated-Ti concentrations in the cores dropping to low values in the rims. For these zoned garnets, high-resolution, 2-D chemical mapping using the JEOL JXA-8530F field emission gun electron microprobe at Yale University reveals that the needles are surrounded by well-defined Ti-depletion halos. Chemical profiles also document strong depletions of Cr (which is present in both rutile and ilmenite) directly adjacent to needles. The observed Ti-depletions demonstrate that the needles precipitated from Ti-bearing garnet, probably during cooling and/or decompression associated with exhumation. The rutile precipitates must be largely incoherent with respect to the

  9. Ultrastructural changes of compressed lumbar ventral nerve roots following decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Barrany, Wagih G.; Hamdy, Raid M.; Al-Hayani, Abdulmonem A.; Jalalah, Sawsan M.; Al-Sayyad, Mohammad J.

    2006-01-01

    To study whether there will be permanent lumbar nerve rot scanning or degeneration secondary to continuous compression followed by decompression on the nerve roots, which can account for postlaminectomy leg weakness or back pain. The study was performed at the Department of Anatomy, Faulty of Medicine, king Abdulaziz University, Jeddah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia during 2003-2005. Twenty-six adult male New Zealand rabbits were used in the present study. The ventral roots of the left fourth lumbar nerve were clamped for 2 weeks then decompression was allowed by removal of the clips. The left ventral roots of the fourth lumbar nerve were excised for electron microscopic study. One week after nerve root decompression, the ventral root peripheral to the site of compression showed signs of Wallerian degeneration together with signs of regeneration. Schwann cells and myelinated nerve fibers showed severe degenerative changes. Two weeks after decompression, the endoneurium of the ventral root showed extensive edema with an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyentilated nerve fibers, and fibroblasts proliferation. Three weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed an increase in the regenerating myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers with diminution of the endoneurial edema, and number of macrophages and an increase in collagen fibrils. Five and 6 weeks after decompression, the endoneurium showed marked diminution of the edema, macrophages, mast cells and fibroblasts. The enoneurium was filed of myelinated and unmyelinated nerve fibers and collagen fibrils. Decompression of the compressed roots of a spinal nerve is followed by regeneration of the nerve fibers and nerve and nerve recovery without endoneurial scarring. (author)

  10. Dysphonia and dysphagia after anterior cervical decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tervonen, Hanna; Niemelä, Mika; Lauri, Eija-Riitta; Back, Leif; Juvas, Anja; Räsänen, Pirjo; Roine, Risto P; Sintonen, Harri; Salmi, Tapani; Vilkman, S Erkki; Aaltonen, Leena-Maija

    2007-08-01

    In this paper, the authors investigate the effects of anterior cervical decompression (ACD) on swallowing and vocal function. The study comprised 114 patients who underwent ACD. The early group (50 patients) was examined immediately pre- and postoperatively, and the late group (64 patients) was examined at only 3 to 9 months postoperatively. Fifty age- and sex-matched patients from the Department of Otorhinolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery who had not been intubated in the previous 5 years were used as a control group. All patients in the early and control groups were examined by a laryngologist; patients in the late group were examined by a laryngologist and a neurosurgeon. Videolaryngostroboscopy was performed in all members of the patient and control groups, and the function of the ninth through 12th cranial nerves were clinically evaluated. Data were collected concerning swallowing, voice quality, surgery results, and health-related quality of life. Patients with persistent dysphonia were referred for phoniatric evaluation and laryngeal electromyography (EMG). Those with persistent dysphagia underwent transoral endoscopic evaluation of swallowing function and videofluorography. Sixty percent of patients in the early group reported dysphonia and 69% reported dysphagia at the immediate postoperative visit. Unilateral vocal fold paresis occurred in 12%. The prevalence of both dysphonia and dysphagia decreased in both groups 3 to 9 months postoperatively. All six patients with vocal fold paresis in the early group recovered, and in the late group there were two cases of vocal fold paresis. The results of laryngeal EMG were abnormal in 14 of 16 patients with persistent dysphonia. Neither intraoperative factors nor age or sex had any effect on the occurrence of dysphonia, dysphagia, or vocal fold paresis. Most patients were satisfied with the surgical outcome. Dysphonia, dysphagia, and vocal fold paresis are common but usually transient complications of ACD

  11. Complications corner: Anterior thoracic disc surgery with dural tear/CSF fistula and low-pressure pleural drain led to severe intracranial hypotension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudeman, Eline A; Nandoe Tewarie, Rishi D S; Jöbsis, G Joost; Arts, Mark P; Kruyt, Nyika D

    2015-01-01

    Thoracic disc surgery can lead to a life-threatening complication: intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. We report a 63-year-old male with paraparesis due to multiple herniated thoracic discs, with compressive myelopathy. The patient required a circumferential procedure including a laminectomy/fusion followed by an anterior thoracic decompression to address both diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) anteriorly and posterior stenosis. The postoperative course was complicated by severe intracranial hypotension attributed to the erroneous placement of a low-pressure drain placed in the pleural cavity instead of a lumbar drain; this resulted in subdural hematoma's necessitating subsequent surgery. Severe neurological deterioration occurring after thoracic decompressive surgery may rarely be attributed to intracranial hypotension due to a subarachnoid-pleural fistula. Patients should be treated with external lumbar drainage of cerebrospinal fluid for 3-5 days rather than a low-pressure pleural drain to avoid the onset of intracranial hypotension leading to symptomatic subdural hematomas.

  12. Does smoking affect the outcomes of lumbar decompression surgery?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Radha

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Lumbar decompressions and micro-discectomies are commonly performed non-complex spinal surgeries that do not involve the insertion of metalwork into the spine and are done for symptomatic disc prolapse and lumbar spinal stenosis, whereas complex-spinal surgery does require metalwork [1]. Studies of complex-spinal surgeries show that smoking has a significant negative impact on the outcome of the surgery [2] therefore, the cessation of smoking is advised prior to surgery [3]. There are evidences in the literature supportive as well as opposing this statement about continued smoking and poor outcome of decompressive spinal surgeries. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed 143 consecutive patients who have had either a micro-discectomy or a micro-decompression. Results: We found no statistical difference between smokers and non-smokers in the outcomes of lumbar decompression surgery. Both groups improved equally and significantly in terms of back pain, leg pain and functions. Out of 143 patients, only 2% more non-smokers had improved leg pain compared to smokers, 1% less non-smokers had improved back pain and 2% more non-smokers had an improved Oswestry Disability Index (ODI score. Discussion: We recommend that it is important to surgically treat both smokers and non-smokers in need of a lumbar spinal decompression.

  13. Laparoscopic Cholecystectomy under Segmental Thoracic Spinal Anesthesia: A Feasible Economical Alternative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kejriwal, Aditya Kumar; Begum, Shaheen; Krishan, Gopal; Agrawal, Richa

    2017-01-01

    Laparoscopic surgery is normally performed under general anesthesia, but regional techniques like thoracic epidural and lumbar spinal have been emerging and found beneficial. We performed a clinical case study of segmental thoracic spinal anaesthesia in a healthy patient. We selected an ASA grade I patient undergoing elective laparoscopic cholecystectomy and gave spinal anesthetic in T10-11 interspace using 1 ml of bupivacaine 5 mg ml -1 mixed with 0.5 ml of fentanyl 50 μg ml -1 . Other drugs were only given (systemically) to manage patient anxiety, pain, nausea, hypotension, or pruritus during or after surgery. The patient was reviewed 2 days postoperatively in ward. The thoracic spinal anesthetia was performed easily in the patient. Some discomfort which was readily treated with 1mg midazolam and 20 mg ketamine intravenously. There was no neurological deficit and hemodynamic parameters were in normal range intra and post-operatively and recovery was uneventful. We used a narrow gauze (26G) spinal needle which minimized the trauma to the patient and the chances of PDPH, which was more if 16 or 18G epidural needle had been used and could have increased further if there have been accidental dura puncture. Also using spinal anesthesia was economical although it should be done cautiously as we are giving spinal anesthesia above the level of termination of spinal cord.

  14. Ultrasonographyin diagnosis of thoracic diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Stević Ruža; Jaković Radoslav; Mašulović Dragan; Nagorni-Obradović Ljudmila; Mujović Nataša; Jovanović Dragana

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Chest sonography was used until recently mainly for diagnosis of pleural diseases. High resolution ultrasound machines enable ultrasound application not only in pleural diseases detection, but in diagnosing peripheral lung and mediastinal lesions. Ultrasonography can define the origin and structure of the lesion of thoracic wall, pleural and peripheral lung lesions and mediastinal lesions. Pleural lesions. Ultrasonography is very useful in diagnosing pleural effusion and disting...

  15. Ultrasound guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    )-guided percutaneous fine needle aspiration biopsy (PFNAB)/US-guided percutaneous needle core biopsy (PNCB) of abdominal lesions is efficacious in diagnosis, is helpful in treatment choice, to evaluate whether various other investigations ...

  16. MRI diagnosis of acute spinal cord decompression sickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang Xiaofeng; Yuan Fengmei; Ma Heng; Xu Yongzhong; Gai Qingzhu; Wang Ying

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To describe MRI findings of acute spinal cord decompression sickness. Methods: MRI findings of 5 cases with clinical definite acute spinal cord decompression sickness were retrospectively analyzed. The main clinical informations included underwater performance history against regulations, short-term complete or incomplete spinal cord injury symptoms after fast going out of water, sensory disability and urinary and fecal incontinence, etc. Results: Spinal cord vacuole sign was found in all 5 cases. Iso-signal intensity (n=3), high signal intensity (n=1), and low signal intensity (n=1) was demonstrated on T 1 WI, and high signal intensity (n=5) was found on T 2 WI. Owl eye sign was detected in 3 cases, and lacune foci were seen in 2 cases. Conclusion: MRI findings of acute spinal cord decompression sickness had some characteristics, and it was easy to diagnose by combining diving history with clinical manifestations. (authors)

  17. Thoracic aortic aneurysms and dissections: endovascular treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Donald T; Cho, Jae S; Chaer, Rabih A; Makaroun, Michel S

    2010-01-01

    The treatment of thoracic aortic disease has changed radically with the advances made in endovascular therapy since the concept of thoracic endovascular aortic repair was first described 15 years ago. Currently, there is a diverse array of endografts that are commercially available to treat the thoracic aorta. Multiple studies, including industry-sponsored and single-institution reports, have demonstrated excellent outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of thoracic aortic aneurysms, with less reported perioperative morbidity and mortality in comparison with conventional open repair. Additionally, similar outcomes have been demonstrated for the treatment of type B dissections. However, the technology remains relatively novel, and larger studies with longer term outcomes are necessary to more fully evaluate the role of endovascular therapy for the treatment of thoracic aortic disease. This review examines the currently available thoracic endografts, preoperative planning for thoracic endovascular aortic repair, and outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair for the treatment of both thoracic aortic aneurysms and type B aortic dissections. Mt Sinai J Med 77:256-269, 2010. (c) 2010 Mount Sinai School of Medicine.

  18. Processing and Characterization of Needled Carbon Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    needle is used to insert high strength yarns (i.e., threads) through the dry fabric or prepreg laminate , leaving a loose thread loop underneath [9-11...capability which uses commercially-available felting needles to insert z-fibers into composite laminates at different angles (±45/90°) relative to the... laminate plane. Previous work with needled glass/epoxy composites has shown a 270% improvement in Mode I interlaminar fracture toughness when needled

  19. Reasons for revision surgery after orbital decompression for Graves’ orbitopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Sellari-Franceschini

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Stefano Sellari-Franceschini1, Luca Muscatello1, Veronica Seccia1, Riccardo Lenzi1, Amelia Santoro1, Marco Nardi2, Barbara Mazzi3, Aldo Pinchera3, Claudio Marcocci31Department of Neuroscience, 1st ENT division, 2Ophthalmology Division, 3Department of Endocrinology and Metabolism, Orthopaedics and Traumatology, Occupational Medicine, University of Pisa, ItalyObjectives: An analysis of complications and causes of failure in orbital decompression necessitating a second operation.Methods: Between December 1992 and April 2007, 375 patients (719 orbits were operated on using various techniques. Fourteen patients were initially operated on in our unit: 8 (group A1 were re-operated on after a short time due to complications connected with the decompression operation, 7 (group A2 were operated on after some time due to recurrence of the illness or unsatisfactory decompression (one patient is in both group A1 and A2. Five patients (group B underwent a first operation elsewhere.Results: For group A1 the most serious complications were connected to the nasal approach. For group A2 the operations were performed either because of a neuropathy recurrence or for further proptosis reduction due to recurrence or patient dissatisfaction. Lack of preoperative data hinders conclusions about group B, apart from one patient where the operation had not resolved a serious optic neuropathy after decompression based on Olivari technique combined with three-wall operation according to Mourits and colleagues (1990.Conclusions: We can deduce from group A1 that extreme attention is necessary during endonasal access, from group A2 that balancing the eyes is advisable, sacrificing maximum proptosis reduction to gain greater patient satisfaction, and from group B that decompression of the orbital apex is fundamental in the case of neuropathy.Keywords: orbital decompression, Graves’ orbitopathy, revision surgery

  20. Comparative study of decomposable and indecomposable biopsy needle in lung puncture biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Bo; Sheng Zhanxin; Wen Yamin; Zhang Liping; Wen Zongqiu

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To contrast the clinical practice characteristics with decomposable and indecomposable biopsy needle in the CT-guided lung puncture biopsy. Methods: 50 patients with lung tumour carried on puncture biopsy under the CT guidance were divided in two groups randomly: Group A (25 examples): using the indecomposable BioPinceTM biopsy needle; Group B(25 examples): using the decomposable Precisa or Vitesse biopsy needle. The puncture biopsy organization quantity, the first time puncture success rate, the pathological diagnosis result and the incidence of puncture complication were compared in two groups. Results: More striped structures were gained obviously in group A than in group B: 24/25 and 11/25 respectively (P>0.05), The pathological diagnosis 'serious extrusion amoebocyte and nature undetermined' only occurred in group B. But the first time puncture success rate was lower in group A than in B: 52%(13/25) and 80%(20/25) respectively (P>0.05), The incidence of hemorrhage and pneumothorax in group A was higher slightly: 84% and 72%, 16% and 4% respectively (P>0.05). Conclusion: The indecomposable needle (BioPinceTM) was better in lung puncture biopsy, but the lower first time puncture success rate also increases the risk of operation and complication in some degree because of the structure of the needle. On the contrary, decomposable needle (the Precisa or the Vitesse) was not the best choice in lung puncture biopsy. But it had the original superiority, especially regarding the special patient such as patient with small tumour, thin thoracic wall, bad physique for its nimble operation. It is essential for us to use the two different types of biopsy needle rationally to enhance the level of CT-guided lung puncture biopsy. (authors)

  1. The incidence of diplopia following coronal and translid orbital decompression in Graves' orbitopathy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paridaens, D.; Hans, K.; van Buitenen, S.; Mourits, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    PURPOSE: Firstly, to assess the incidence of induced diplopia following orbital decompression in patients with Graves' orbitopathy. Secondly, to assess patient satisfaction after orbital decompression. Thirdly, to determine the factors that contribute to the variable reported incidence of diplopia

  2. Superior vena caval obstruction - decompression with chemotherapy and subsequent irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolaric, K.; Maricic, Z.; Dujmovic, I.; Mrsic, Z.

    1975-01-01

    The clinical picture, pathogenesis and etiology of malignant vena caval obstruction are described. The importance of using modern methods to treat this critical condition is emphasized. Furthermore, the authors examine the principles of chemotherapeutic decompression followed by irradiation. A single dose of nitrogen mustard was applied intravenously, followed by irradiation, on 24 patients with malignant vena caval obstruction. The results of this treatment are presented. The effect of this treatment was controlled by measuring the venous blood pressure and with chest X-rays. The authors conclude, that this method of decompression is successful in the palliative treatment of this syndrom. (orig.) [de

  3. Changing the needle for lumbar punctures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engedal, Thorbjørn Søndergaard; Ording, H.; Vilholm, O. J.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) is a common complication of diagnostic lumbar punctures. Both a non-cutting needle design and the use of smaller size needles have been shown to greatly reduce the risk of PDPH. Nevertheless, larger cutting needles are still widely used. This study d...

  4. Metastatic tumor of thoracic and lumbar spine: prospective study comparing the surgery and radiotherapy vs external immobilization with radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Ioppi, Ana Elisa Empinotti; Grasselli, Juliana

    2007-01-01

    Bone metastases at the thoracic and lumbar segment of the spine are usually presented with painful sensation and medullar compression. The treatment is based on the clinical and neurological conditions of the patient and the degree of tumor invasion. In the present study, 32 patients with spinal metastasis of thoracic and lumbar segment were prospectively analyzed. These patients were treated by decompression and internal stabilization followed by radiotherapy or irradiation with external immobilization. The election of the groups was in accordance with the tumor radiotherapy sensitivity, clinical conditions, spinal stability, medullar or nerve compression and patient's decision. The Frankel scale and pain visual test were applied at the moment of diagnosis and after 1 and 6 months. The surgical group had better results with preserving the ambulation longer and significant reduction of pain.(author)

  5. Relations between Scots pine needle element concentrations and decreased needle longevity along pollution gradients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lamppu, Jukka; Huttunen, Satu

    2003-01-01

    Deceased needle longevity was related to increased heavy metal concentrations. - Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L.) shoots were sampled along transects near one urban pollution source and two smelters. Needle Mg, P and K concentrations decreased from the second to the fourth age class linearly with needle survival along the urban pollution gradient. Still, over 80% of the average concentration of these nutrients remained in the fourth needle age class. Decreased needle longevity was closely related to the increased heavy metal concentrations near the smelters. Near the urban pollution source, it was related to the increased annual needle mass and the increased needle nutrient concentrations. Decreased Mn accumulation along with needle age was detected near all pollution sources. Leaching of Mn from needles and especially from soil as a cause of decreased needle concentrations is discussed

  6. Eruptive dynamics during magma decompression: a laboratory approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, L.; Cimarelli, C.; Scheu, B.; Wadsworth, F.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    A variety of eruptive styles characterizes the activity of a given volcano. Indeed, eruptive styles can range from effusive phenomena to explosive eruptions, with related implications for hazard management. Rapid changes in eruptive style can occur during an ongoing eruption. These changes are, amongst other, related to variations in the magma ascent rate, a key parameter affecting the eruptive style. Ascent rate is in turn dependent on several factors such as the pressure in the magma chamber, the physical properties of the magma and the rate at which these properties change. According to the high number of involved parameters, laboratory decompression experiments are the best way to achieve quantitative information on the interplay of each of those factors and the related impact on the eruption style, i.e. by analyzing the flow and deformation behavior of the transparent volatile-bearing analogue fluid. We carried out decompression experiments following different decompression paths and using silicone oil as an analogue for the melt, with which we can simulate a range of melt viscosity values. For a set of experiments we added rigid particles to simulate the presence of crystals in the magma. The pure liquid or suspension was mounted into a transparent autoclave and pressurized to different final pressures. Then the sample was saturated with argon for a fixed amount of time. The decompression path consists of a slow decompression from the initial pressure to the atmospheric condition. Alternatively, samples were decompressed almost instantaneously, after established steps of slow decompression. The decompression path was monitored with pressure transducers and a high-speed video camera. Image analysis of the videos gives quantitative information on the bubble distribution with respect to depth in the liquid, pressure and time of nucleation and on their characteristics and behavior during the ongoing magma ascent. Furthermore, we also monitored the evolution of

  7. [Effect of twirling-reinforcing-reducing needling manipulations on contents of serum acetylcholine and arterial NOS and cGMP in stress-induced hypertension rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Zhu, Ling-Qun; Chen, Si-Si; Lu, Shu-Chao; Tang, Jie; Liu, Qing-Guo

    2015-04-01

    To observe the effect of twirling-reinforcing or reducing needling manipulations on plasma acetylcholine (Ach) content and expression of nitric oxide synthetase (NOS) and cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) in thoracic artery tissue in stress-induced hypertension rats. A total of 60 male rats were randomly divided into blank control, model, acupuncture (no-needle-manipulation) , twirling-reinforcing needling and twirling-reducing needling groups (n = 12 in each group). The stress hypertension model was established by giving the animals with noise and electric shock stimulation (paw), twice a day for 15 days. Acupuncture stimulation was applied to bilateral "Taichong" (LR 3) for 1 min, followed by retaining the needles for 20 min. The treatment was conducted once daily for 7 days. Systolic blood pressure of the rat's tail was detected with non-invasive method and plasma Ach, and NOS and cGMP contents in the thoracic artery tissue were measured using ELISA method. Compared with the control group, the systolic blood pressure was significantly higher in the model group after 15 days' stress stimulation (P arterial NOS and cGMP were markedly down-regulated (P arterial cGMP content was found in the no-needle-manipulation group (P > 0.05). The effect of the twirling-reducing needling was superior to that of no-needle-manipulation and twirling-reinforcing needling in lowering blood pressure and raising plasma Ach content (P hypertensive effect in stress hypertension rats, which may be associated with its effects in raising blood Ach, and arterial NOS and cGMP levels.

  8. Pneumothorax in severe thoracic traumas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Camassa, N.W.; Boccuzzi, F.; Diettorre, E.; Troilo, A.

    1988-01-01

    The authors reviewed CT scans and supine chest X-ray of 47 patients affected by severe thoracic trauma, examined in 1985-86. The sensibility of the two methodologies in the assessment of pneumothorax was compared. CT detected 25 pneumothorax, whereas supine chest X-ray allowed a diagnosis in 18 cases only. In 8 of the latter (44.4%) the diagnosis was made possible by the presence of indirect signs of pneumothorax only - the most frequent being the deep sulcus sign. The characterization of pneumothorax is important especially in the patients who need to be treated with mechanical ventilation therapy, or who are to undergo surgery in total anaesthesia

  9. Transnasal Endoscopic Optic Nerve Decompression in Post Traumatic Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Devang; Gadodia, Monica

    2018-03-01

    To quantify the successful outcome in patients following optic nerve decompression in post traumatic unilateral optic neuropathy in form of improvement in visual acuity. A prospective study was carried out over a period of 5 years (January 2011 to June 2016) at civil hospital Ahmedabad. Total 20 patients were selected with optic neuropathy including patients with direct and indirect trauma to unilateral optic nerve, not responding to conservative management, leading to optic neuropathy and subsequent impairment in vision and blindness. Decompression was done via Transnasal-Ethmo-sphenoidal route and outcome was assessed in form of post-operative visual acuity improvement at 1 month, 6 months and 1 year follow up. After surgical decompression complete recovery of visual acuity was achieved in 16 (80%) patients and partial recovery in 4 (20%). Endoscopic transnasal approach is beneficial in traumatic optic neuropathy not responding to steroid therapy and can prevent permanent disability if earlier intervention is done prior to irreversible damage to the nerve. Endoscopic optic nerve surgery can decompress the traumatic and oedematous optic nerve with proper exposure of orbital apex and optic canal without any major intracranial, intraorbital and transnasal complications.

  10. A Log Logistic Survival Model Applied to Hypobaric Decompression Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2001-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a complex, multivariable problem. A mathematical description or model of the likelihood of DCS requires a large amount of quality research data, ideas on how to define a decompression dose using physical and physiological variables, and an appropriate analytical approach. It also requires a high-performance computer with specialized software. I have used published DCS data to develop my decompression doses, which are variants of equilibrium expressions for evolved gas plus other explanatory variables. My analytical approach is survival analysis, where the time of DCS occurrence is modeled. My conclusions can be applied to simple hypobaric decompressions - ascents lasting from 5 to 30 minutes - and, after minutes to hours, to denitrogenation (prebreathing). They are also applicable to long or short exposures, and can be used whether the sufferer of DCS is at rest or exercising at altitude. Ultimately I would like my models to be applied to astronauts to reduce the risk of DCS during spacewalks, as well as to future spaceflight crews on the Moon and Mars.

  11. Decompressive craniectomy and hydrocephalus: proposal of a therapeutic flow chart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peraio, Simone; Calcagni, Maria Lucia; Mattoli, Maria Vittoria; Marziali, Giammaria; DE Bonis, Pasquale; Pompucci, Angelo; Anile, Carmelo; Mangiola, Annunziato

    2017-12-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) may be necessary to save the lives of patients suffering from intracranial hypertension. However, this procedure is not complication-free. Its two main complications are hydrocephalus and the sinking skin-flap syndrome (SSFS). The radiological findings and the clinical evaluation may be not enough to decide when and/or how to treat hydrocephalus in a decompressed patient. SSFS and hydrocephalus may be not unrelated. In fact, a patient affected by hydrocephalus, after the ventriculo-peritoneal shunt, can develop SSFS; on the other hand, SSFS per se can cause hydrocephalus. Treating hydrocephalus in decompressed patients can be challenging. Radiological findings and clinical evaluation may not be enough to define the most appropriate therapeutic strategy. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics and metabolic evaluations can represent important diagnostic tools for assessing the need of a CSF shunt in patients with a poor baseline neurologic status. Based on our experience, we propose a flow chart for treating decompressed patients affected by ventriculomegaly.

  12. Health care worker decompression sickness: incidence, risk and mitigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Inadvertent exposure to radiation, chemical agents and biological factors are well recognized hazards associated with the health care delivery system. Less well appreciated yet no less harmful is risk of decompression sickness in those who accompany patients as inside attendants (IAs) during provision of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Unlike the above hazards where avoidance is practiced, IA exposure to decompression sickness risk is unavoidable. While overall incidence is low, when calculated as number of cases over number of exposures or potential for a case during any given exposure, employee cumulative risk, defined here as number of cases over number of IAs, or risk that an IA may suffer a case, is not. Commonly, this unique occupational environmental injury responds favorably to therapeutic recompression and a period of recuperation. There are, however, permanent and career-ending consequences, and at least two nurses have succumbed to their decompression insults. The intent of this paper is to heighten awareness of hyperbaric attendant decompression sickness. It will serve as a review of reported cases and reconcile incidence against largely ignored individual worker risk. Mitigation strategies are summarized and an approach to more precisely identify risk factors that might prompt development of consensus screening standards is proposed. Copyright© Undersea and Hyperbaric Medical Society.

  13. Brachytherapy needle deflection evaluation and correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Gang; Wei Zhouping; Gardi, Lori; Downey, Donal B.; Fenster, Aaron

    2005-01-01

    In prostate brachytherapy, an 18-gauge needle is used to implant radioactive seeds. This thin needle can be deflected from the preplanned trajectory in the prostate, potentially resulting in a suboptimum dose pattern and at times requiring repeated needle insertion to achieve optimal dosimetry. In this paper, we report on the evaluation of brachytherapy needle deflection and bending in test phantoms and two approaches to overcome the problem. First we tested the relationship between needle deflection and insertion depth as well as whether needle bending occurred. Targeting accuracy was tested by inserting a brachytherapy needle to target 16 points in chicken tissue phantoms. By implanting dummy seeds into chicken tissue phantoms under 3D ultrasound guidance, the overall accuracy of seed implantation was determined. We evaluated methods to overcome brachytherapy needle deflection with three different insertion methods: constant orientation, constant rotation, and orientation reversal at half of the insertion depth. Our results showed that needle deflection is linear with needle insertion depth, and that no noticeable bending occurs with needle insertion into the tissue and agar phantoms. A 3D principal component analysis was performed to obtain the population distribution of needle tip and seed position relative to the target positions. Our results showed that with the constant orientation insertion method, the mean needle targeting error was 2.8 mm and the mean seed implantation error was 2.9 mm. Using the constant rotation and orientation reversal at half insertion depth methods, the deflection error was reduced. The mean needle targeting errors were 0.8 and 1.2 mm for the constant rotation and orientation reversal methods, respectively, and the seed implantation errors were 0.9 and 1.5 mm for constant rotation insertion and orientation reversal methods, respectively

  14. Tattoo machines, needles and utilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenkilde, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Starting out as a professional tattooist back in 1977 in Copenhagen, Denmark, Frank Rosenkilde has personally experienced the remarkable development of tattoo machines, needles and utilities: all the way from home-made equipment to industrial products of substantially improved quality. Machines can be constructed like the traditional dual-coil and single-coil machines or can be e-coil, rotary and hybrid machines, with the more convenient and precise rotary machines being the recent trend. This development has resulted in disposable needles and utilities. Newer machines are more easily kept clean and protected with foil to prevent crosscontaminations and infections. The machines and the tattooists' knowledge and awareness about prevention of infection have developed hand-in-hand. For decades, Frank Rosenkilde has been collecting tattoo machines. Part of his collection is presented here, supplemented by his personal notes. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Thoracic organ transplantation: laboratory methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Jignesh K; Kobashigawa, Jon A

    2013-01-01

    Although great progress has been achieved in thoracic organ transplantation through the development of effective immunosuppression, there is still significant risk of rejection during the early post-transplant period, creating a need for routine monitoring for both acute antibody and cellular mediated rejection. The currently available multiplexed, microbead assays utilizing solubilized HLA antigens afford the capability of sensitive detection and identification of HLA and non-HLA specific antibodies. These assays are being used to assess the relative strength of donor specific antibodies; to permit performance of virtual crossmatches which can reduce the waiting time to transplantation; to monitor antibody levels during desensitization; and for heart transplants to monitor antibodies post-transplant. For cell mediated immune responses, the recent development of gene expression profiling has allowed noninvasive monitoring of heart transplant recipients yielding predictive values for acute cellular rejection. T cell immune monitoring in heart and lung transplant recipients has allowed individual tailoring of immunosuppression, particularly to minimize risk of infection. While the current antibody and cellular laboratory techniques have enhanced the ability to manage thoracic organ transplant recipients, future developments from improved understanding of microchimerism and graft tolerance may allow more refined allograft monitoring techniques.

  16. Imaging of thoracic aortic dissection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, F.H.; Young, N.; Soo, Y.S.

    1994-01-01

    Acute thoracic aortic dissection has a high mortality rate if untreated, so the diagnosis must be rapidly made. Multiple imaging techniques are often used. This retrospective study from 1988 to 1993 assesses the usefulness in diagnosis of chest X-rays, computed tomography (CT) scanning, aortography, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), trans-thoracic (TTE) and trans-oesophageal (TOE) echocardiography. Forty-two patients with a final clinical diagnosis of dissection were studied. The diagnosis was confirmed in 16 (13 at surgery and three at autopsy). Three died with dissection given as the only cause of death. Chest X-ray abnormalities were seen in all 19 patients with surgery or death from dissection, with a widened mediastinum and/or dilated aorta being present in 17. In the group of 16 patients with surgery or autopsy proof, CT scans found dissections in 9 out of 12 patients studied and correctly classified the type in only five. Aortography was preformed in five, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in all. TTE found dissections in three of eight patients imaged by this method. MRI and TOE were preformed each on two patients, with accurate depiction of dissection and type in each. Because of the relatively low sensitivity of CT scanning in defining aortic dissections Westmead Hospital is currently assessing the use of TOE as the prime imaging modality prior to surgical intervention. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 4 figs

  17. Original endoscopic orbital decompression of lateral wall through hairline approach for Graves’ ophthalmopathy: an innovation of balanced orbital decompression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gong Y

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Yi Gong,1,* Jiayang Yin,2,* Boding Tong,2 Jingkun Li,3 Jiexi Zeng,2 Zhongkun Zuo,1 Fei Ye,1 Yongheng Luo,4 Jing Xiao,1 Wei Xiong2 1Department of Minimal Invasive Surgery, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China; 2Department of Ophthalmology and Eye Research Center, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China; 3E.N.T Department, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China; 4Department of Radiology, The Second Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Orbital decompression is an important surgical procedure for treatment of Graves’ ophthalmopathy (GO, especially in women. It is reasonable for balanced orbital decompression of the lateral and medial wall. Various surgical approaches, including endoscopic transnasal surgery for medial wall and eye-side skin incision surgery for lateral wall, are being used nowadays, but many of them lack the validity, safety, or cosmetic effect. Patients and methods: Endoscopic orbital decompression of lateral wall through hairline approach and decompression of medial wall via endoscopic transnasal surgery was done to achieve a balanced orbital decompression, aiming to improve the appearance of proptosis and create conditions for possible strabismus and eyelid surgery afterward. From January 29, 2016 to February 14, 2017, this surgery was performed on 41 orbits in 38 patients with GO, all of which were at inactive stage of disease. Just before surgery and at least 3 months after surgery, Hertel’s ophthalmostatometer and computed tomography (CT were used to check proptosis and questionnaires of GO quality of life (QOL were completed. Findings: The postoperative retroversion of eyeball was 4.18±1.11 mm (Hertel’s ophthalmostatometer and 4.17±1.14 mm (CT method. The patients’ QOL was significantly improved, especially the change in appearance without

  18. Biomechanical Evaluation of the MACSTL Internal Fixator for Thoracic Spinal Stabilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Veselý

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Unstable fractures of the thoracic spine in humans represent a serious social and economic issue. They may lead to persistent consequences and chronic disease. The anatomical and biomechanical characteristics of the thoracic spine are different from all the other spinal parts due to its higher mobility. The vertebrae of the chest area are less mobile, conferring a higher degree of rigidity to the spine. To destabilize this relatively rigid system, a considerable force is necessary. The treatment of unstable spinal fractures is solely surgical. The decompression of the spinal canal with reposition and stabilisation of the fracture is indicated urgently. This intervention is performed mostly from the posterior approach in the first phase. However, the anterior spinal column is the structure responsible for the stability of the spine. Therefore, the recent advances in spine surgery focus on this area of expertise. For this reason, we carried out a bio-mechanical study aimed at assessing the effectiveness of two surgical tactics used. The study consisted of comparative experiments performed by computer-aided device on segments of pig cadavers (n = 5. The experiment involved a comparison of segments of the thoracic spine under the following conditions: an anatomically intact segment, a spine segment with an artificially created anterior instability, and a segment with an applied internal fixator. The experiment compared the mechanical characteristics of these segments. The experiment has demonstrated that after application of the internal fixator used for stabilisation of the injured anterior spinal column at defined pre-loading of 200 N, the stability of damaged spinal segment in torsion increased twofold. It was also verified that sufficient stability can be ensured using the Modular Anterior Construct System (MACSTL implant for ventral stabilisation of thoracic spine unstable injuries. Endoscopic application of this implant represents an

  19. Multidimensional Analysis of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Early Impairment in Thoracic and Thoracolumbar Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabray, Marc C.; Whetstone, William D.; Dhall, Sanjay S.; Phillips, David B.; Pan, Jonathan Z.; Manley, Geoffrey T.; Bresnahan, Jacqueline C.; Beattie, Michael S.; Haefeli, Jenny

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Literature examining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in acute spinal cord injury (SCI) has focused on cervical SCI. Reproducible systems have been developed for MRI-based grading; however, it is unclear how they apply to thoracic SCI. Our hypothesis is that MRI measures will group as coherent multivariate principal component (PC) ensembles, and that distinct PCs and individual variables will show discriminant validity for predicting early impairment in thoracic SCI. We undertook a retrospective cohort study of 25 patients with acute thoracic SCI who underwent MRI on admission and had American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS) assessment at hospital discharge. Imaging variables of axial grade, sagittal grade, length of injury, thoracolumbar injury classification system (TLICS), maximum canal compromise (MCC), and maximum spinal cord compression (MSCC) were collected. We performed an analytical workflow to detect multivariate PC patterns followed by explicit hypothesis testing to predict AIS at discharge. All imaging variables loaded positively on PC1 (64.3% of variance), which was highly related to AIS at discharge. MCC, MSCC, and TLICS also loaded positively on PC2 (22.7% of variance), while variables concerning cord signal abnormality loaded negatively on PC2. PC2 was highly related to the patient undergoing surgical decompression. Variables of signal abnormality were all negatively correlated with AIS at discharge with the highest level of correlation for axial grade as assessed with the Brain and Spinal Injury Center (BASIC) score. A multiple variable model identified BASIC as the only statistically significant predictor of AIS at discharge, signifying that BASIC best captured the variance in AIS within our study population. Our study provides evidence of convergent validity, construct validity, and clinical predictive validity for the sampled MRI measures of SCI when applied in acute thoracic and thoracolumbar SCI. PMID:26414451

  20. Evolution of thoracic surgery in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deslauriers, Jean; Pearson, F Griffith; Nelems, Bill

    2015-01-01

    Canada's contributions toward the 21st century's practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another. To describe the numerous and important achievements of Canadian thoracic surgeons in the areas of surgery for pulmonary tuberculosis, thoracic oncology, airway surgery and lung transplantation. Information was collected through reading of the numerous publications written by Canadian thoracic surgeons over the past 100 years, interviews with interested people from all thoracic surgery divisions across Canada and review of pertinent material form the archives of several Canadian hospitals and universities. Many of the developments occurred by chance. It was the early and specific focus on thoracic surgery, to the exclusion of cardiac and general surgery, that distinguishes the Canadian experience, a model that is now emerging everywhere. From lung transplantation in chimera twin calves to ex vivo organ preservation, from the removal of airways to tissue regeneration, and from intensive care research to complex science, Canadians have excelled in their commitment to research. Over the years, the influence of Canadian thoracic surgery on international practice has been significant. Canada spearheaded the development of thoracic surgery over the past 100 years to a greater degree than any other country. From research to education, from national infrastructures to the regionalization of local practices, it happened in Canada.

  1. Advancements in robotic-assisted thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steenwyk, Brad; Lyerly, Ralph

    2012-12-01

    Advancements in robotic-assisted thoracic surgery present potential advantages for patients as well as new challenges for the anesthesia and surgery teams. This article describes the major aspects of the surgical approach for the most commonly performed robotic-assisted thoracic surgical procedures as well as the pertinent preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative anesthetic concerns. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Thoracic duct lymphography by subcutaneous contrast agent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A second lymphography revealed a collateral thoracic duct that was not detected during the first lymphography. The collateral duct was ligated and chylothorax was resolved after the second surgery. The lymphography applied in this study was minimally-invasive and easily provided images of the thoracic duct in a dog with ...

  3. Visualization of the thoracic duct by lymphoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baulieu, F.; Baulieu, J.L.; Itti, R.; Tours Univ., 37

    1987-01-01

    Imaging of the thoracic duct is usually performed by radiological lymphography. However, this procedure, which uses an oil based dye injected directly into the lymph channels, has some adverse effects. In this paper we note that lymphoscintigraphy, a physiological and non invasive method, may visualize thoracic duct abnormalities, and might be particularly usefull when radiological lymphography is contraindicated. (orig.)

  4. Bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.H.A. Willems; Braakman, R. (Reinder); B. van Linge (Bert)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractTwo cases of traumatic bilateral locked facets in the thoracic spine are reported. Both patients had only minor neurological signs. They both made a full neurological recovery after surgical reduction of the locked facets. Bilateral locked facets are very uncommon in the thoracic spine.

  5. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; van der Zwan, Jan Maarten; Izarzugaza, Isabel; Jaal, Jana; Treasure, Tom; Foschi, Roberto; Ricardi, Umberto; Groen, Harry; Tavilla, Andrea; Ardanaz, Eva

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  6. Rare thoracic cancers, including peritoneum mesothelioma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siesling, Sabine; Zwan, J.M.V.D.; Izarzugaza, I.; Jaal, J.; Treasure, T.; Foschi, R.; Ricardi, U.; Groen, H.; Tavilla, A.; Ardanaz, E.

    2012-01-01

    Rare thoracic cancers include those of the trachea, thymus and mesothelioma (including peritoneum mesothelioma). The aim of this study was to describe the incidence, prevalence and survival of rare thoracic tumours using a large database, which includes cancer patients diagnosed from 1978 to 2002,

  7. Radiologic findings of thoracic trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akgul Ozmen C

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Cihan Akgul Ozmen,1 Serdar Onat,2 Delal Aycicek3 1Department of Radiology, 2Department of Chest Surgery, Dicle University School of Medicine, Diyarbakir, 3Radiology Unit, Siirt State Hospital, Siirt, Turkey Introduction: Chest trauma may be blunt or penetrating and the chest is the third most common trauma region. It is a significant cause of mortality. Multidetector computed tomography (MDCT has been an increasingly used method to evaluate chest trauma because of its high success in detecting tissue and organ injuries. Herein, we aimed to present MDCT findings in patients with blunt and penetrating chest trauma admitted to our department. Methods: A total of 240 patients admitted to the emergency department of our hospital between April 2012 and July 2013 with a diagnosis of chest trauma who underwent MDCT evaluations were included. Most of the patients were male (83.3% and victims of a blunt chest trauma. The images were analyzed with respect to the presence of fractures of bony structures, hemothorax, pneumothorax, mediastinal organ injury, and pulmonary and vascular injuries. Results: MDCT images of the 240 patients yielded a prevalence of 41.7% rib fractures, 11.2% scapular fractures, and 7.5% clavicle fractures. The prevalence of thoracic vertebral fracture was 13.8% and that of sternal fracture was 3.8%. The prevalence of hemothorax, pneumothorax, pneumomediastinum, and subcutaneous emphysema was 34.6%, 62.1%, 9.6%, and 35.4%, respectively. The prevalence of rib, clavicle, and thoracic vertebral fractures and pulmonary contusion was higher in the blunt trauma group, whereas the prevalence of hemothorax, subcutaneous emphysema, diaphragmatic injury, and other vascular lacerations was significantly higher in the penetrating trauma group than in the blunt trauma group (p<0.05. Conclusion: MDCT images may yield a high prevalence of fracture of bony structures, soft tissue lacerations, and vascular lesions, which should be well understood by

  8. Decompression Sickness during Construction of the Dartford Tunnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golding, F. Campbell; Griffiths, P.; Hempleman, H. V.; Paton, W. D. M.; Walder, D. N.

    1960-01-01

    A clinical, radiological and statistical survey has been made of decompression sickness during the construction of the Dartford Tunnel. Over a period of two years, 1,200 men were employed on eight-hour shifts at pressures up to 28 pounds per square inch (p.s.i.). There were 689 cases of decompression sickness out of 122,000 compressions, an incidence of 0·56%. The majority of cases (94·9%) were simple “bends”. The remainder (5·1%) exhibited signs and symptoms other than pain and were more serious. All cases were successfully treated and no fatality or permanent disability occurred. In two serious cases, cysts in the lungs were discovered. It is suggested that these gave rise to air embolism when the subjects were decompressed, and pulmonary changes may contribute more than hitherto believed to the pathogenesis of bends. Some other clinical features are described, including “skin-mottling” and an association between bends and the site of an injury. The bends rate is higher for the back shift (3 p.m. to 11 p.m.) and the night shift (11 p.m. to 7 a.m.) than for the day shift. In the treatment of decompression sickness it appears to be more satisfactory to use the minimum pressure required for relief of symptoms followed by slow decompression with occasional “soaks”, than to attempt to drive the causative bubbles into solution with high pressures. During the contract the decompression tables recently prescribed by the Ministry of Labour were used. Evidence was obtained that they could be made safer, and that the two main assumptions on which they are based (that sickness will not occur at pressures below 18 p.s.i., and that a man saturates in four hours) may be incorrect. It is desirable to test tables based on 15 p.s.i. and eight-hour saturation. The existence of acclimatization to pressure was confirmed; it is such that the bends rate may fall in two to three weeks to 0·1% of the incidence on the first day of exposure. Acclimatization is lost again

  9. Shoulder Pain After Thoracic Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blichfeldt-Eckhardt, Morten R; Andersen, Claus; Ørding, Helle

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the time course of ipsilateral shoulder pain after thoracic surgery with respect to incidence, pain intensity, type of pain (referred versus musculoskeletal), and surgical approach. DESIGN: Prospective, observational cohort study. SETTING: Odense University Hospital, Denmark...... for musculoskeletal involvement (muscle tenderness on palpation and movement) with follow-up 12 months after surgery. Clinically relevant pain was defined as a numeric rating scale score>3. Of the 60 patients included, 47 (78%) experienced ipsilateral shoulder pain, but only 25 (42%) reported clinically relevant...... shoulder pain. On postoperative day 4, 19 patients (32%) still suffered shoulder pain, but only 4 patients (7%) had clinically relevant pain. Four patients (8%) still suffered shoulder pain 12 months after surgery. In 26 patients (55%), the shoulder pain was classified as referred versus 21 patients (45...

  10. Carcinoma of the thoracic esophagus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herskovic, A.M.; Leichman, L.; Lattin, P.B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors analyzed all cases of thoracic esophagel carcinoma seen from 1980 to 1984 inclusive, plus an additional 22 cases from a pilot study at Wayne State University. Most patients received preoperative combination radiation and chemotherapy. Eighty-nine patients completed treatment (5-fluorouracil, cisplatin, and radiation therapy) as in both the RTOG and SWOG national studies. Of these 89, 39 refused or were not offered planned surgery. Four patients are still alive and well. Fifty patients underwent esophagectomy; 12 patients were free of tumor at esophagectomy, and four of these are alive and well. One patient with a tumor in the resected esophagus alone is still alive. Twenty-two patients were enrolled in the pilot study in which surgery was reserved for salvage, the initial radiation volume was increased, the tumor dose was increased to 5,000 rad give continuously, and chemotherapy was increased to four courses

  11. Accuracy of Core Needle Biopsy Versus Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology for Diagnosing Salivary Gland Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    In Hye Song

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Core needle biopsy is a relatively new technique used to diagnose salivary gland lesions, and its role in comparison with fine needle aspiration cytology needs to be refined. Methods: We compared the results of 228 ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy and 371 fine needle aspiration procedures performed on major salivary gland tumors with their postoperative histological diagnoses. Results: Core needle biopsy resulted in significantly higher sensitivity and more accurate tumor subtyping, especially for malignant tumors, than fine needle aspiration. No patient developed major complications after core needle biopsy. Conclusions: We recommend ultrasoundguided core needle biopsy as the primary diagnostic tool for the preoperative evaluation of patients with salivary gland lesions, especially when malignancy is suspected.

  12. Freehand biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C; Nielsen, Marie Kristina Rue; Nielsen, M Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking.......To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking....

  13. Experiences with a new breast localisation needle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hergan, K.; Amann, T.; Doringer, W.; Hollenstein, P.

    1990-01-01

    In view of the increasing number of biopsies of non-palpable lesions of the female breast we found an ideal localisation system in the Hawkins breast localisation needle. Localisation was successful without technical problems in 31 out of 34 patients. The special advantages of the needle are its stability in position and excellent manoeverability due to the construction of the needle. The very simple handling of the needle is an advantage not only for the radiologist but also for the surgeon. (orig.) [de

  14. Migration of innumerable chronically retained acupuncture needles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Lazarow, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of a 50-year-old female with a 2-day history of back and abdominal pain who was discovered to have innumerable chronically retained acupuncture needles, which had migrated throughout her abdomen and pelvis. Although many of these needles were in precarious positions, including the epidural space, renal parenchyma, small bowel, and vasculature, there was no evidence for acute injury. We also briefly discuss evidence for the magnetic resonance imaging compatibility of acupuncture needles. Although a rare complication, given the high frequency of acupuncture therapy in the United States, physicians must be aware of the potential for retained and migrated needles.

  15. Spinal decompression sickness: mechanical studies and a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, B A; James, P B

    1982-09-01

    Six experimental investigations of various mechanical aspects of the spinal cord are described relevant to its injury by gas deposited from solution by decompression. These show appreciable resistances to gas pockets dissipating by tracking along tissue boundaries or distending tissue, the back pressure often exceeding the probable blood perfusion pressure--particularly in the watershed zones. This leads to a simple mechanical model of spinal decompression sickness based on the vascular "waterfall" that is consistent with the pathology, the major quantitative aspects, and the symptomatology--especially the reversibility with recompression that is so difficult to explain by an embolic mechanism. The hypothesis is that autochthonous gas separating from solution in the spinal cord can reach sufficient local pressure to exceed the perfusion pressure and thus occlude blood flow.

  16. Report on computation of repetitive hyperbaric-hypobaric decompression tables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edel, P. O.

    1975-01-01

    The tables were constructed specifically for NASA's simulated weightlessness training program; they provide for 8 depth ranges covering depths from 7 to 47 FSW, with exposure times of 15 to 360 minutes. These tables were based up on an 8 compartment model using tissue half-time values of 5 to 360 minutes and Workmanline M-values for control of the decompression obligation resulting from hyperbaric exposures. Supersaturation ratios of 1.55:1 to 2:1 were used for control of ascents to altitude following such repetitive dives. Adequacy of the method and the resultant tables were determined in light of past experience with decompression involving hyperbaric-hypobaric interfaces in human exposures. Using these criteria, the method showed conformity with empirically determined values. In areas where a discrepancy existed, the tables would err in the direction of safety.

  17. Natural gas decompression energy recovery: Energy savings potential in Italy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Piatti, A.; Piemonte, C.; Rampini, E.; Vatrano, F.; Techint SpA, Milan; ENEA, Rome

    1992-01-01

    This paper surveyed the natural gas distribution systems employed in the Italian civil, industrial and thermoelectric sectors to identify those installations which can make use of gas decompression energy recovery systems (consisting of turbo-expanders or alternative expanders) to economically generate electric power. Estimates were then made of the total amount of potential energy savings. The study considered as eligible for energy savings interventions only those plants with a greater than 5,000 standard cubic meter per hour plant capacity. It was evaluated that, with suitable decompression equipment installed at 50 key installations (33 civil, 15 industrial), about 200 GWh of power could be produced annually, representing potential savings of about 22,000 petroleum equivalent tonnes of energy. A comparative analysis was done on three investment alternatives involving inputs of varying amounts of Government financial assistance

  18. Decompression syndrome (Caisson disease) in an Indian diver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phatak, Uday A; David, Eric J; Kulkarni, Pravin M

    2010-07-01

    Acute decompression syndrome (Caisson's disease) is an acute neurological emergency in divers. It is caused due to release of nitrogen gas bubbles that impinge the blood vessels of the spinal cord and brain and result in severe neurodeficit. There are very few case reports in Indian literature. There are multiple factors in the pathogenesis of Acute decompression syndrome (Caisson's disease) such as health problems in divers (respiratory problems or congenital heart diseases like atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus etc), speed of ascent from the depth and habits like smoking that render divers susceptible for such neurological emergency. Usually, immediate diagnosis of such a condition with MRI is not possible in hospitals in the Coastal border. Even though, MRI is performed, it has very low specificity and sensitivity. Facilities like hyperbaric oxygen treatment are virtually non-existent in these hospitals. Therefore, proper education of the divers and appropriate preventive measures in professional or recreational divers is recommended.

  19. [Orbital decompression in Grave's disease: comparison of techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellari-Franceschini, S; Berrettini, S; Forli, F; Bartalena, L; Marcocci, C; Tanda, M L; Nardi, M; Lepri, A; Pinchera, A

    1999-12-01

    Grave's ophthalmopathy is an inflammatory, autoimmune disorder often associated with Grave's disease. The inflammatory infiltration involves the retrobulbar fatty tissue and the extrinsic eye muscles, causing proptosis, extraocular muscle dysfunction and often diplopia. Orbital decompression is an effective treatment in such cases, particularly when resistant to drugs and external radiation therapy. This work compares the results of orbital decompression performed by removing: a) the medial and lateral walls (Mourits technique) in 10 patients (19 orbits) and b) the medial and lower walls (Walsh-Ogura technique) in 17 patients (31 orbits). The results show that removing the floor of the orbit enables better reduction of proptosis but more easily leads to post-operative diplopia. Thus it proves necessary to combine the two techniques, modifying the surgical approach on a case-by-case basis.

  20. Embolization for Thoracic Duct Collateral Leakage in High-Output Chylothorax After Thoracic Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kariya, Shuji, E-mail: kariyas@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Nakatani, Miyuki, E-mail: nakatanm@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Yoshida, Rie, E-mail: yagir@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Ueno, Yutaka, E-mail: uenoyut@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp; Komemushi, Atsushi, E-mail: komemush@takii.kmu.ac.jp; Tanigawa, Noboru, E-mail: tanigano@hirakata.kmu.ac.jp [Kansai Medical University, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2017-01-15

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate thoracic duct collateral leakage and the supply route of lymphatic fluid by lymphangiography and transcatheter thoracic ductography and to evaluate the results of embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage performed to cut off this supply route.MethodsData were retrospectively collected from five patients who underwent embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage in persistent high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery. Extravasation of lipiodol at the ruptured thoracic duct collaterals was confirmed in all patients on lymphangiography. Transcatheter thoracic ductography was used to identify extravasation of iodinated contrast agent and to identify communication between the thoracic duct and leakage site. Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) was performed using the percutaneous transabdominal approach to cut off the supply route using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) mixed with lipiodol (1:5–1:20).ResultsClinical success (drainage volume ≤10 mL/kg/day within 7 days after TDE) was achieved in all patients. The collateral routes developed as consequence of surgical thoracic duct ligation. In three patients, NBCA-Lipiodol reached the leakage site through direct communication between the thoracic duct and the ruptured lymphatic duct. In the other two patients, direct communication and extravasation was not detected on thoracic ductography, and NBCA-Lipiodol did not reach the leakage site. However, NBCA-Lipiodol did reach the cisterna chyli, lumbar trunks, and some collateral routes via the cisterna chyli or lumbar lymphatics. As a result, leakage was stopped.ConclusionsTDE was effective for the management of leakage of the collaterals in high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery.

  1. Embolization for Thoracic Duct Collateral Leakage in High-Output Chylothorax After Thoracic Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kariya, Shuji; Nakatani, Miyuki; Yoshida, Rie; Ueno, Yutaka; Komemushi, Atsushi; Tanigawa, Noboru

    2017-01-01

    PurposeThis study was designed to investigate thoracic duct collateral leakage and the supply route of lymphatic fluid by lymphangiography and transcatheter thoracic ductography and to evaluate the results of embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage performed to cut off this supply route.MethodsData were retrospectively collected from five patients who underwent embolization for thoracic duct collateral leakage in persistent high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery. Extravasation of lipiodol at the ruptured thoracic duct collaterals was confirmed in all patients on lymphangiography. Transcatheter thoracic ductography was used to identify extravasation of iodinated contrast agent and to identify communication between the thoracic duct and leakage site. Thoracic duct embolization (TDE) was performed using the percutaneous transabdominal approach to cut off the supply route using N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) mixed with lipiodol (1:5–1:20).ResultsClinical success (drainage volume ≤10 mL/kg/day within 7 days after TDE) was achieved in all patients. The collateral routes developed as consequence of surgical thoracic duct ligation. In three patients, NBCA-Lipiodol reached the leakage site through direct communication between the thoracic duct and the ruptured lymphatic duct. In the other two patients, direct communication and extravasation was not detected on thoracic ductography, and NBCA-Lipiodol did not reach the leakage site. However, NBCA-Lipiodol did reach the cisterna chyli, lumbar trunks, and some collateral routes via the cisterna chyli or lumbar lymphatics. As a result, leakage was stopped.ConclusionsTDE was effective for the management of leakage of the collaterals in high-output chylothorax after thoracic surgery.

  2. How needless are Buffon's needles?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babović, Miloš; Babović, Vukota

    2013-01-01

    The study of statistical physics requires introductory preparation regarding probability theory. Understanding its fundamental concepts (randomness, distributions, fluctuations), and some experience in application of the basic concepts of statistics can be obtained in several ways. We found that the basic training in probability and statistics needed for physics and engineering study can be achieved by focusing on Buffon's needle problem. We believe this approach could help university specialists make study more efficient when probability and statistics play an important role. Buffon's experiment, with its convincing simplicity and flexibility, as well as its attractiveness, is in our opinion a useful tool in physics education at university level. (paper)

  3. Immediate pain relief by microvascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralagia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haq, N.U.; Ali, M.; Khan, H.M.; Ishaq, M.; Khattak, M.I.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Trigeminal neuralgia is a common entity which is managed by neurosurgeons in day to day practice. Up-till now many treatment options have been adopted for it but micro-vascular decompression is much impressive in terms of pain control and recurrence rate in all of them. The objective of study was known the efficacy of micro vascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia by using muscle patch in terms of immediate pain relief. Methods: This descriptive study was carried out in Neurosurgery Department lady reading hospital, Peshawar from January 2010 to December 2012. All patients who underwent micro vascular decompression for idiopathic trigeminal neuralgia were included in the study. Patients were assessed 72 hours after the surgery by borrow neurological institute pain scale (BNIP scale) for pain relief and findings were documented on predesigned proforma. Data was analysed by SPSS-17. Results: Total 52 patients were included in this study. Among these 32 (61.53 percentage) were female and 20 (38.46 percentage) were males having age from 22-76 years (mean 49 years). Right side was involved in 36 (69.23 percentage) and left side in 16 (30.76 percentage) patients. Duration of symptoms ranged from 6 months to 16 years (mean 8 years). History of dental extraction and peripheral neurectomy was present in 20 (38 percentage) and 3(5.76 percentage) patients while V3 was most commonly involved branch with 28(57.69 percentage) frequency and combined V2,V3 involvement was 1 (11.53 percentage). Superior cerebellar artery was most common offending vessel in 46(88.46 percentage) while arachnoid adhesions were in 2(3.84 percentage) patients. We assessed patient immediate postoperatively using BNIP pain scale. Conclusion: Micro-vascular decompression is most effective mode of treatment for trigeminal neuralgia in terms of immediate pain relief. (author)

  4. On-the-Fly Decompression and Rendering of Multiresolution Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P; Cohen, J D

    2009-04-02

    We present a streaming geometry compression codec for multiresolution, uniformly-gridded, triangular terrain patches that supports very fast decompression. Our method is based on linear prediction and residual coding for lossless compression of the full-resolution data. As simplified patches on coarser levels in the hierarchy already incur some data loss, we optionally allow further quantization for more lossy compression. The quantization levels are adaptive on a per-patch basis, while still permitting seamless, adaptive tessellations of the terrain. Our geometry compression on such a hierarchy achieves compression ratios of 3:1 to 12:1. Our scheme is not only suitable for fast decompression on the CPU, but also for parallel decoding on the GPU with peak throughput over 2 billion triangles per second. Each terrain patch is independently decompressed on the fly from a variable-rate bitstream by a GPU geometry program with no branches or conditionals. Thus we can store the geometry compressed on the GPU, reducing storage and bandwidth requirements throughout the system. In our rendering approach, only compressed bitstreams and the decoded height values in the view-dependent 'cut' are explicitly stored on the GPU. Normal vectors are computed in a streaming fashion, and remaining geometry and texture coordinates, as well as mesh connectivity, are shared and re-used for all patches. We demonstrate and evaluate our algorithms on a small prototype system in which all compressed geometry fits in the GPU memory and decompression occurs on the fly every rendering frame without any cache maintenance.

  5. Nerve Decompression and Restless Legs Syndrome: A Retrospective Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Anderson

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available IntroductionRestless legs syndrome (RLS is a prevalent sleep disorder affecting quality of life and is often comorbid with other neurological diseases, including peripheral neuropathy. The mechanisms related to RLS symptoms remain unclear, and treatment options are often aimed at symptom relief rather than etiology. RLS may present in distinct phenotypes often described as “primary” vs. “secondary” RLS. Secondary RLS is often associated with peripheral neuropathy. Nerve decompression surgery of the common and superficial fibular nerves is used to treat peripheral neuropathy. Anecdotally, surgeons sometimes report improved RLS symptoms following nerve decompression for peripheral neuropathy. The purpose of this retrospective analysis was to quantify the change in symptoms commonly associated with RLS using visual analog scales (VAS.MethodsForty-two patients completed VAS scales (0–10 for pain, burning, numbness, tingling, weakness, balance, tightness, aching, pulling, cramping, twitchy/jumpy, uneasy, creepy/crawly, and throbbing, both before and 15 weeks after surgical decompression.ResultsSubjects reported significant improvement among all VAS categories, except for “pulling” (P = 0.14. The change in VAS following surgery was negatively correlated with the pre-surgery VAS for both the summed VAS (r = −0.58, P < 0.001 and the individual VAS scores (all P < 0.01, such that patients who reported the worst symptoms before surgery exhibited relatively greater reductions in symptoms after surgery.ConclusionThis is the first study to suggest improvement in RLS symptoms following surgical decompression of the common and superficial fibular nerves. Further investigation is needed to quantify improvement using RLS-specific metrics and sleep quality assessments.

  6. Does a paresthesia during spinal needle insertion indicate intrathecal needle placement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pong, Ryan P; Gmelch, Benjamin S; Bernards, Christopher M

    2009-01-01

    Paresthesias are relatively common during spinal needle insertion, however, the clinical significance of the paresthesia is unknown. A paresthesia may result from needle-to-nerve contact with a spinal nerve in the epidural space, or, with far lateral needle placement, may result from contact with a spinal nerve within the intervertebral foramen. However, it is also possible and perhaps more likely, that paresthesias occur when the spinal needle contacts a spinal nerve root within the subarachnoid space. This study was designed to test this latter hypothesis. Patients (n = 104) scheduled for surgery under spinal anesthesia were observed during spinal needle insertion. If a paresthesia occurred, the needle was fixed in place and the stylet removed to observe whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flowed from the hub. The presence of CSF was considered proof that the needle had entered the subarachnoid space. Paresthesias occurred in 14/103 (13.6%) of patients; 1 patient experienced a paresthesia twice. All paresthesias were transient. Following a paresthesia, CSF was observed in the needle hub 86.7% (13/15) of the time. Our data suggest that the majority of transient paresthesias occur when the spinal needle enters the subarachnoid space and contacts a spinal nerve root. Therefore, when transient paresthesias occur during spinal needle placement it is appropriate to stop and assess for the presence of CSF in the needle hub, rather than withdraw and redirect the spinal needle away from the side of the paresthesia as some authors have suggested.

  7. Decryption-decompression of AES protected ZIP files on GPUs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duong, Tan Nhat; Pham, Phong Hong; Nguyen, Duc Huu; Nguyen, Thuy Thanh; Le, Hung Duc

    2011-10-01

    AES is a strong encryption system, so decryption-decompression of AES encrypted ZIP files requires very large computing power and techniques of reducing the password space. This makes implementations of techniques on common computing system not practical. In [1], we reduced the original very large password search space to a much smaller one which surely containing the correct password. Based on reduced set of passwords, in this paper, we parallel decryption, decompression and plain text recognition for encrypted ZIP files by using CUDA computing technology on graphics cards GeForce GTX295 of NVIDIA, to find out the correct password. The experimental results have shown that the speed of decrypting, decompressing, recognizing plain text and finding out the original password increases about from 45 to 180 times (depends on the number of GPUs) compared to sequential execution on the Intel Core 2 Quad Q8400 2.66 GHz. These results have demonstrated the potential applicability of GPUs in this cryptanalysis field.

  8. [Microvascular decompression for hemifacial spasm. Ten years of experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revuelta-Gutiérrez, Rogelio; Vales-Hidalgo, Lourdes Olivia; Arvizu-Saldaña, Emiliano; Hinojosa-González, Ramón; Reyes-Moreno, Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    Hemifacial spasm characterized by involuntary paroxistic contractions of the face is more frequent on left side and in females. Evolution is progressive and in a few cases may disappear. Management includes medical treatment, botulinum toxin, and microvascular decompression of the nerve. We present the results of 116 microvascular decompressions performed in 88 patients over 10 years. All patients had previous medical treatment. All patients were operated on with microsurgical technique by asterional craniotomy. Vascular compression was present in all cases with one exception. Follow-up was from 1 month to 133 months. Were achieved excellent results in 70.45% of cases after first operation, good results in 9.09%, and poor results in 20.45% of patients. Long-term results were excellent in 81.82%, good in 6.82%, and poor in 11.36% of patients. Hypoacusia and transitory facial palsy were the main complications. Hemifacial spasm is a painless but disabling entity. Medical treatment is effective in a limited fashion. Injection of botulinum toxin has good response but benefit is transitory. Microvascular decompression is treatment of choice because it is minimally invasive, not destructive, requires minimum technical support, and yields best long-term results.

  9. Interspinous Process Decompression: Expanding Treatment Options for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierce D. Nunley

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Interspinous process decompression is a minimally invasive implantation procedure employing a stand-alone interspinous spacer that functions as an extension blocker to prevent compression of neural elements without direct surgical removal of tissue adjacent to the nerves. The Superion® spacer is the only FDA approved stand-alone device available in the US. It is also the only spacer approved by the CMS to be implanted in an ambulatory surgery center. We computed the within-group effect sizes from the Superion IDE trial and compared them to results extrapolated from two randomized trials of decompressive laminectomy. For the ODI, effect sizes were all very large (>1.0 for Superion and laminectomy at 2, 3, and 4 years. For ZCQ, the 2-year Superion symptom severity (1.26 and physical function (1.29 domains were very large; laminectomy effect sizes were very large (1.07 for symptom severity and large for physical function (0.80. Current projections indicate a marked increase in the number of patients with spinal stenosis. Consequently, there remains a keen interest in minimally invasive treatment options that delay or obviate the need for invasive surgical procedures, such as decompressive laminectomy or fusion. Stand-alone interspinous spacers may fill a currently unmet treatment gap in the continuum of care and help to reduce the burden of this chronic degenerative condition on the health care system.

  10. Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Jennifer A; Sokol, Jason A; Whittaker, Thomas J; Bernard, Benjamin; Farris, Bradley K

    2016-01-01

    Our purpose is to introduce the use of the Farris-Tang retractor in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. The procedure of optic nerve sheath fenestration was reviewed at our tertiary care teaching hospital, including the use of the Farris-Tang retractor. Pseudotumor cerebri is a syndrome of increased intracranial pressure without a clear cause. Surgical treatment can be effective in cases in which medical therapy has failed and disc swelling with visual field loss progresses. Optic nerve sheath decompression surgery (ONDS) involves cutting slits or windows in the optic nerve sheath to allow cerebrospinal fluid to escape, reducing the pressure around the optic nerve. We introduce the Farris-Tang retractor, a retractor that allows for excellent visualization of the optic nerve sheath during this surgery, facilitating the fenestration of the sheath and visualization of the subsequent cerebrospinal fluid egress. Utilizing a medial conjunctival approach, the Farris-Tang retractor allows for easy retraction of the medial orbital tissue and reduces the incidence of orbital fat protrusion through Tenon's capsule. The Farris-Tang retractor allows safe, easy, and effective access to the optic nerve with good visualization in optic nerve sheath decompression surgery. This, in turn, allows for greater surgical efficiency and positive patient outcomes.

  11. Rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shugang Wang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, laboratory experiments are conducted to investigate the rapid decompression and desorption induced energetic failure in coal using a shock tube apparatus. Coal specimens are recovered from Colorado at a depth of 610 m. The coal specimens are saturated with the strong sorbing gas CO2 for a certain period and then the rupture disc is suddenly broken on top of the shock tube to generate a shock wave propagating upwards and a rarefaction wave propagating downwards through the specimen. This rapid decompression and desorption has the potential to cause energetic fragmentation in coal. Three types of behaviors in coal after rapid decompression are found, i.e. degassing without fragmentation, horizontal fragmentation, and vertical fragmentation. We speculate that the characteristics of fracture network (e.g. aperture, spacing, orientation and stiffness and gas desorption play a role in this dynamic event as coal can be considered as a dual porosity, dual permeability, dual stiffness sorbing medium. This study has important implications in understanding energetic failure process in underground coal mines such as coal gas outbursts.

  12. Protective effects of fluoxetine on decompression sickness in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Eric Blatteau

    Full Text Available Massive bubble formation after diving can lead to decompression sickness (DCS that can result in central nervous system disorders or even death. Bubbles alter the vascular endothelium and activate blood cells and inflammatory pathways, leading to a systemic pathophysiological process that promotes ischemic damage. Fluoxetine, a well-known antidepressant, is recognized as having anti-inflammatory properties at the systemic level, as well as in the setting of cerebral ischemia. We report a beneficial clinical effect associated with fluoxetine in experimental DCS. 91 mice were subjected to a simulated dive at 90 msw for 45 min before rapid decompression. The experimental group received 50 mg/kg of fluoxetine 18 hours before hyperbaric exposure (n = 46 while controls were not treated (n = 45. Clinical assessment took place over a period of 30 min after surfacing. At the end, blood samples were collected for blood cells counts and cytokine IL-6 detection. There were significantly fewer manifestations of DCS in the fluoxetine group than in the controls (43.5% versus 75.5%, respectively; p = 0.004. Survivors showed a better and significant neurological recovery with fluoxetine. Platelets and red cells were significantly decreased after decompression in controls but not in the treated mice. Fluoxetine reduced circulating IL-6, a relevant marker of systemic inflammation in DCS. We concluded that fluoxetine decreased the incidence of DCS and improved motor recovery, by limiting inflammation processes.

  13. Decompression of the facial nerve in cases of hemifacial spasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten Kettel

    1954-12-01

    Full Text Available Among 11 patients a complete cure was obtained in one case, a fair result in 4 cases, while in 6 cases the effect of the operation has only been temporary and full recurrence has taken place. Even if decompression has thus resulted in a few recoveries and improvements, the results in the majority of cases have been disappointing. Everything points to hemifacial spasm being due to a disorder of the lower motor neuron. Intracranial lesions in the vicinity of the facial nerve are known to have resulted in irritation and spasm. It may be perfectly true that the majority of cases of hemifacial spasm are due to a lesion, the nature of which may vary, in the Fallopian canal near the stylomastoid foramen, not least the postparalytic following Bell's palsy. But the disappointing results of decompression seems to indicate that at the time of operation irreparable damage to the nerve has in the majority of cases been already done. Consequently I gave up decompression in cases of hemifacial spasm some years ago. Good results from injections of alcohol into the nerve have been reported13 but I prefer selective sections of the branches to the muscles involved as described by German and Greenwood8.

  14. Anterior cervical decompression and fusion with caspar plate fixation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, L.; Akbar, H.; Das, G.; Hashim, A.S.M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the role of anterior cervical decompression and fixation with Caspar plating in cervical spine injury on neurological outcome. Study Design: A case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurosurgery, Jinnah Postgraduate Medical Centre, Karachi, from July 2008 to March 2011. Methodology: Thirty patients admitted with cervical spine injuries were inducted in the study. All cases were evaluated for their clinical features, level of injury and degree of neurological injury was assessed using Frankel grading. Pre and postoperative record with X-rays and MRI were maintained. Cervical traction was applied to patients with sub-luxation. All patients underwent anterior cervical decompression, fusion and Caspar plate fixation. The follow-up period was 6 months with clinical and radiological assessment. Results: Among 30 patients, 24 (80%) were males and 6 (20%) were females. Age ranged from 15 to 55 years. Causes of injury were road traffic accident (n = 20), fall (n = 8) and assault (n = 2). Commonest mode of injury was road traffic accident (66.6%). Postoperative follow-up showed that pain and neurological deficit were improved in 21 patients. There was no improvement in 7 patients, one patient deteriorated and one expired. All patients developed pain at donor site. Conclusion: Anterior decompression, fusion and fixation with Caspar plate is an effective method with good neurological and radiological outcome. However, it is associated with pain at donor site. (author)

  15. Emergency Anaesthetic Management of Extensive Thoracic Trauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H C Chandola

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available High speed vehicles, drug abuse, alcohol and easy availability of handguns are the main reasons of increasing number of trauma especially thoracic trauma. Anaesthesiologist plays an important role in the management of extensive thoracic trauma. Thoracic trauma, penetrating or blunt, may cause damage to organs suspended in thorax viz. pleura, lungs, heart, great vessels, trachea and oesophagus. It may lead to pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade or life threatening haemorrhage. With aggressive care and management of these factors, majority of patients can survive and return to normal life.

  16. Geographical and climatic limits of needle types of one- and two-needled pinyon pines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, K.L.; Fisher, J.; Arundel, S.T.; Cannella, J.; Swift, S.

    2008-01-01

    Aim: The geographical extent and climatic tolerances of one- and two-needled pinyon pines (Pinus subsect. Cembroides) are the focus of questions in taxonomy, palaeoclimatology and modelling of future distributions. The identification of these pines, traditionally classified by one- versus two-needled fascicles, is complicated by populations with both one- and two-needled fascicles on the same tree, and the description of two more recently described one-needled varieties: the fallax-type and californiarum-type. Because previous studies have suggested correlations between needle anatomy and climate, including anatomical plasticity reflecting annual precipitation, we approached this study at the level of the anatomy of individual pine needles rather than species. Location: Western North America. Methods: We synthesized available and new data from field and herbarium collections of needles to compile maps of their current distributions across western North America. Annual frequencies of needle types were compared with local precipitation histories for some stands. Historical North American climates were modelled on a c. 1-km grid using monthly temperature and precipitation values. A geospatial model (ClimLim), which analyses the effect of climate-modulated physiological and ecosystem processes, was used to rank the importance of seasonal climate variables in limiting the distributions of anatomical needle types. Results: The pinyon needles were classified into four distinct types based upon the number of needles per fascicle, needle thickness and the number of stomatal rows and resin canals. The individual needles fit well into four categories of needle types, whereas some trees exhibit a mixture of two needle types. Trees from central Arizona containing a mixture of Pinus edulis and fallax-type needles increased their percentage of fallax-type needles following dry years. All four needle types occupy broader geographical regions with distinctive precipitation regimes

  17. Use of impedance threshold device in conjunction with our novel adhesive glove device for ACD-CPR does not result in additional chest decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Andre; Udassi, Sharda; Porvasnik, Stacy L; Lamb, Melissa A; Badugu, Srinivasarao; Venkata, Giridhar Kaliki; Lopez-Colon, Dalia; Haque, Ikram U; Zaritsky, Arno L; Udassi, Jai P

    2013-10-01

    To evaluate the hemodynamic effects of using an adhesive glove device (AGD) to perform active compression-decompression CPR (AGD-CPR) in conjunction with an impedance threshold device (ITD) in a pediatric cardiac arrest model. Controlled, randomized animal study. In this study, 18 piglets were anesthetized, ventilated, and continuously monitored. After 3min of untreated ventricular fibrillation, animals were randomized (6/group) to receive either standard CPR (S-CPR), active compression-decompression CPR via adhesive glove device (AGD-CPR) or AGD-CPR along with an ITD (AGD-CPR+ITD) for 2min at 100-120compressions/min. AGD is delivered using a fingerless leather glove with a Velcro patch on the palmer aspect and the counter Velcro patch adhered to the pig's chest. Data (mean±SD) were analyzed using one-way ANOVA with pair wise multiple comparisons to assess differences between groups. p-Value≤0.05 was considered significant. Both AGD-CPR and AGD-CPR+ITD groups produced lower intrathoracic pressure (IttP, mmHg) during decompression phase (-13.4±6.7, p=0.01 and -11.9±6.5, p=0.01, respectively) in comparison to S-CPR (-0.3±4.2). Carotid blood flow (CBF, % of baseline mL/min) was higher in AGD-CPR and AGD-CPR+ITD (respectively 64.3±47.3%, p=0.03 and 67.5±33.1%, p=0.04) as compared with S-CPR (29.1±12.5%). Coronary perfusion pressure (CPP, mmHg) was higher in AGD-CPR and AGD-CPR+ITD (respectively 19.7±4.6, p=0.04 and 25.6±12.1, p=0.02) when compared to S-CPR (9.6±9.1). There was no statistically significant difference between AGD-CPR and AGD-CPR+ITD groups with reference to intra-thoracic pressure, carotid blood flow and coronary perfusion pressure. Active compression decompression delivered by this simple and inexpensive adhesive glove device resulted in improved cerebral blood flow and coronary perfusion pressure. There was no statistically significant added effect of ITD use along with AGD-CPR on the decompression of the chest. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier

  18. A retrospective analysis of ultrasound-guided large core needle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-07-27

    Jul 27, 2016 ... The different types of non-surgical breast biopsy procedures include: fine needle aspiration biopsy. (FNAB), core needle ... needle biopsies of breast lesions at a regional public hospital in ..... NCR_2009_FINAL.pdf. 2. Parikh J ...

  19. Intraoperative computed tomography for cervicomedullary decompression of foramen magnum stenosis in achondroplasia: two case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arishima, Hidetaka; Tsunetoshi, Kenzo; Kodera, Toshiaki; Kitai, Ryuhei; Takeuchi, Hiroaki; Kikuta, Ken-Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    The authors report two cases of cervicomedullary decompression of foramen magnum (FM) stenosis in children with achondroplasia using intraoperative computed tomography (iCT). A 14-month-old girl with myelopathy and retarded motor development, and a 10-year-old girl who had already undergone incomplete FM decompression was presented with myelopathy. Both patients underwent decompressive sub-occipitalcraniectomy and C1 laminectomy without duraplasty using iCT. It clearly showed the extent of FM decompression during surgery, which finally enabled sufficient decompression. After the operation, their myelopathy improved. We think that iCT can provide useful information and guidance for sufficient decompression for FM stenosis in children with achondroplasia.

  20. Freehand biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewertsen, C; Nielsen, Marie Kristina Rue; Nielsen, M Bachmann

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the overall accuracy and time spent on biopsy guided by electromagnetic needle tracking in a phantom compared with the standard technique of US-guided biopsy with an attached steering device. Furthermore, to evaluate off-plane biopsy guided by needle tracking....

  1. Observations of needle-tissue interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Misra, Sarthak; Reed, Kyle B.; Ramesh, K.T.; Okamura, Allison M.

    2009-01-01

    Needles with asymmetric bevel tips naturally bend when they are inserted into soft tissue. In this study, we present an analytical model for the loads developed at the bevel tip during needle-tissue interaction. The model calculates the loads based on the geometry of the bevel edge and gel material

  2. Catamenial pneumothorax caused by thoracic endometriosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Maniglio, MD

    2018-02-01

    Conclusion: The diagnosis of thoracic endometriosis is challenging. The first line of treatment is medical, whereas the surgical treatment is performed secondly. Moreover, surgical treatment can lead to a significant rate of recurrence, often reduced by a coadjutant medical treatment.

  3. Surgical treatment of double thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis with a rigid proximal thoracic curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Hideki; Abe, Yuichiro; Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Iwasaki, Norimasa; Ito, Manabu

    2016-02-01

    There is limited consensus on the optimal surgical strategy for double thoracic adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS). Recent studies have reported that pedicle screw constructs to maximize scoliosis correction cause further thoracic spine lordosis. The objective of this study was to apply a new surgical technique for double thoracic AIS with rigid proximal thoracic (PT) curves and assess its clinical outcomes. Twenty one consecutive patients with Lenke 2 AIS and a rigid PT curve (Cobb angle ≥30º on side-bending radiographs, flexibility ≤30 %) treated with the simultaneous double-rod rotation technique (SDRRT) were included. In this technique, a temporary rod is placed at the concave side of the PT curve. Then, distraction force is applied to correct the PT curve, which reforms a sigmoid double thoracic curve into an approximate single thoracic curve. As a result, the PT curve is typically converted from an apex left to an apex right curve before applying the correction rod for PT and main thoracic curve. All patients were followed for at least 2 years (average 2.7 years). The average main thoracic and PT Cobb angle correction rate at the final follow-up was 74.7 and 58.0 %, respectively. The average preoperative T5-T12 thoracic kyphosis was 9.3°, which improved significantly to 19.0° (p corrected using SDRRT for Lenke 2 AIS with a rigid PT curve.

  4. Investigating the Effects of Three Needling Parameters (Manipulation, Retention Time, and Insertion Site) on Needling Sensation and Pain Profiles: A Study of Eight Deep Needling Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loyeung, Bertrand Y. K.; Cobbin, Deirdre M.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. In traditional Chinese acupuncture, needle sensation (deqi) is purported to contribute to a therapeutic outcome. While researchers have attempted to define deqi qualitatively, few have examined the effects of needling parameters on its intensity. Methods. 24 healthy subjects completed eight interventions scheduled at least one week apart, which involved manual acupuncture to LI4 or a designated nonacupoint (NAP) on the hand, with real or simulated manipulation each three minutes and needle retentions of one or 21 minutes. Intensities of needling sensation and pain were reported every three minutes and sensation qualities were reported post-intervention. Results. Immediately after needle insertion, similar levels of mean needle sensation and of pain were reported independent of intervention. At subsequent measurement times, only two interventions (one at LI4 and one at NAP) maintained statistically significantly elevated needle sensation and pain scores and reported higher numbers of needle sensation descriptors. For both, the needle was retained for 21 minutes and manipulated every three minutes. Neither intervention differed significantly in terms of levels of pain, and needle sensation or numbers and qualities of needle sensation described. Conclusion. In this group of healthy subjects, the initial needling for all eight interventions elicited similar levels of needle sensation and pain. These levels were only maintained if there was ongoing of needle manipulation and retention of the needle. By contrast, the strength of needle sensation or pain experienced was independent of insertion site. PMID:24159337

  5. A History of Thoracic Aortic Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Paul Michael; Wiggins, Luke M; Boys, Joshua A

    2017-08-01

    Ancient historical texts describe the presence of aortic pathology conditions, although the surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease remained insurmountable until the 19th century. Surgical treatment of thoracic aortic disease then progressed along with advances in surgical technique, conduit production, cardiopulmonary bypass, and endovascular technology. Despite radical advances in aortic surgery, principles established by surgical pioneers of the 19th century hold firm to this day. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. [Professor WU Zhongchao's experience of penetration needling].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ning; Wang, Bing; Zhou, Yu

    2016-08-12

    Professor WU Zhongchao has unique application of penetration needling in clinical treatment. Professor WU applies penetration needling along meridians, and the methods of penetration needling include self-meridian penetration, exterior-interior meridian penetration, identical-name meridian penetration, different meridian penetration. The meridian differentiation is performed according to different TCM syndromes, locations and natures of diseases and acupoint nature, so as to make a comprehensive assessment. The qi movement during acupuncture is focused. In addition, attention is paid on anatomy and long-needle penetration; the sequence and direction of acupuncture is essential, and the reinforcing and reducing methods have great originality, presented with holding, waiting, pressing and vibrating. Based on classical acupoint, the acupoint of penetration needling is flexible, forming unique combination of acupoints.

  7. Thoracic trauma: analysis of 100 consecutive cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maíra Benito Scapolan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To analyze thoracic trauma assisted by the EmergencyService of Hospital da Irmandade da Santa Casa de Misericórdia deSão Paulo. Methods: One hundred patients with thoracic trauma wereassisted throughout six months in 2006. Data from their records werecollected and a protocol of thoracic trauma was fulfilled. The RevisedTrauma Score was used to evaluate gravity of injury and to calculatethe survival index. Results: Prevalence of trauma injury in male from20 to 29 years old was observed. Out of all patients, 44 had blunttrauma and 56 penetrating trauma (78.6% presented stab woundsand 21.4% gun shots. Up to the settings of injuries, 23% were in thethoracoabdominal transition, 7% in the precordium and 70% in theremainder thoracic area. In those with the thoracoabdominal transitioninjury, 22.7% were hemodynamically unstable and 77.3% stable.Thoracoabdominal injury patients presented 40.9% of diaphragmwound and all were stable. Of those with precordium wound, 37.5%presented cardiac injury. In cardiac onset, 66.7% presented stableand 33.3% unstable. Thoracic drainage was the most accomplishedsurgical procedure (71%. Conclusions: The thoracic trauma patientis most prevalently young male with stab wound penetrating injury,without associated injuries, hemodynamically stable, presentinghemothorax, with high probability of survival.

  8. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavhan, Govind B.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Muthusami, Prakash [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); The Hospital for Sick Children, Division of Image Guided Therapy, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Towbin, Alexander J. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology and Medical Imaging, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Borschel, Gregory H. [The Hospital for Sick Children and University of Toronto, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Pediatric Surgery, Toronto, ON (Canada)

    2017-09-15

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation. (orig.)

  9. MRI of thoracic outlet syndrome in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavhan, Govind B.; Batmanabane, Vaishnavi; Muthusami, Prakash; Towbin, Alexander J.; Borschel, Gregory H.

    2017-01-01

    Thoracic outlet syndrome is caused by compression of the neurovascular bundle as it passes from the upper thorax to the axilla. The neurovascular bundle can be compressed by bony structures such as the first rib, cervical ribs or bone tubercles, or from soft-tissue abnormalities like a fibrous band, muscle hypertrophy or space-occupying lesion. Thoracic outlet syndrome commonly affects young adults but can be seen in the pediatric age group, especially in older children. Diagnosis is based on a holistic approach encompassing clinical features, physical examination findings including those triggered by various maneuvers, electromyography, nerve conduction studies and imaging. Imaging is performed to confirm the diagnosis, exclude mimics and classify thoracic outlet syndrome into neurogenic, arterial, venous or mixed causes. MRI and MR angiography are useful in this process. A complete MRI examination for suspected thoracic outlet syndrome should include the assessment of anatomy and any abnormalities using routine sequences, vessel assessment with the arms in adduction by MR angiography and assessment of dynamic compression of vessels with abduction of the arms. The purpose of this paper is to describe the anatomy of the thoracic outlet, causes of thoracic outlet syndrome, the MR imaging techniques used in its diagnosis and the principles of image interpretation. (orig.)

  10. Initial thoracic involvement in lymphoma. CT assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bustos, A.; Corredoira, J.; Ferreiros, J.; Cabeza, B.; Jorquera, M.; Pedrosa, I.; Martinez, R.; Fernandez, C.

    2002-01-01

    To analyze the initial thoracic involvement by CT in a consecutive series of patients with lymphoma. A retrospective analysis was made of thoracic CT studies made at the time of diagnosis of 259 patients with lymphoma. Mediastinal pulmonary, pleural, pericardial and chest wall involvement was assessed by CT. Of 259 patients (129 men y 130 women), 56 had Hodgkin's disease (HD) and 203 had non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL). Forty-two percent (42.5%, 110/259) of the patients had chest involvement on CT: 33 of 56 patients with HD (58.9%) and 77 of 203 patients with NHL (37.9%). All the patients with thoracic HD) and 71.4% of patients with thoracic NHL, had mediastinal lymph node involvement. of the patients with thoracic involvement 12.1% (4/33) of the patient with HD and 23.3% (18/77) of the patients with NHL had pulmonary involvement. Thoracic involvement on CT was more frequent in HD. Mediastinal lymph node involvement was the most common finding fundamentally in HD. Pulmonary disease always occurred in the presence of mediastinal lymph node involvement in HD but could occur as an isolated finding in NHL. (Author) 24 refs

  11. Frequency of decompression illness among recent and extinct mammals and "reptiles": a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Agnete Weinreich

    2017-08-01

    The frequency of decompression illness was high among the extinct marine "reptiles" and very low among the marine mammals. Signs of decompression illness are still found among turtles but whales and seals are unaffected. In humans, the risk of decompression illness is five times increased in individuals with Patent Foramen Ovale; this condition allows blood shunting from the venous circuit to the systemic circuit. This right-left shunt is characteristic of the "reptile" heart, and it is suggested that this could contribute to the high frequency of decompression illness in the extinct reptiles.

  12. Aseptic necrosis in caisson workers: a new set of decompression tables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downs, G J; Kindwall, E P

    1986-06-01

    There is a high incidence of aseptic necrosis and decompression sickness among caisson workers due to inadequate decompression using the current OSHA decompression tables (1-7). Because of this, a new set of tables--Autodec III-O2--was developed which more effectively eliminates nitrogen from the body and, therefore, should decrease the incidence of both bends and aseptic necrosis. The Autodec III-O2 schedule's superiority was statistically significant at a level of 0.08 compared to the OSHA table. It is our conclusion that OSHA should adopt the Autodec III-O2 schedule as a replacement for the current decompression tables.

  13. Evaluation of safety of hypobaric decompressions and EVA from positions of probabilistic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaev, V. P.

    Formation and subsequent evolution of gas bubbles in blood and tissues of subjects exposed to decompression are casual processes in their nature. Such character of bubbling processes in a body predetermines probabilistic character of decompression sickness (DCS) incidence in divers, aviators and astronauts. Our original probabilistic theory of decompression safety is based on stochastic models of these processes and on the concept of critical volume of a free gas phase in body tissues. From positions of this theory, the probability of DCS incidence during single-stage decompressions and during hypobaric decompressions under EVA in particular, is defined by the distribution of possible values of nucleation efficiency in "pain" tissues and by its critical significance depended on the parameters of a concrete decompression. In the present study the following is shown: 1) the dimensionless index of critical nucleation efficiency for "pain" body tissues is a more adequate index of decompression stress in comparison with Tissue Ratio, TR; 2) a priory the decompression under EVA performed according to the Russian protocol is more safe than decompression under EVA performed in accordance with the U.S. protocol; 3) the Russian space suit operated at a higher pressure and having a higher "rigidity" induces a stronger inhibition of mechanisms of cavitation and gas bubbles formation in tissues of a subject located in it, and by that provides a more considerable reduction of the DCS risk during real EVA performance.

  14. Trends in Orbital Decompression Techniques of Surveyed American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Shani S; Null, Robert C; Timoney, Peter J; Sokol, Jason A

    To assess current members of the American Society of Ophthalmic Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (ASOPRS) regarding preference in surgical techniques for orbital decompression in Graves' disease. A 10-question web-based, anonymous survey was distributed to oculoplastic surgeons utilizing the ASOPRS listserv. The questions addressed the number of years of experience performing orbital decompression surgery, preferred surgical techniques, and whether orbital decompression was performed in collaboration with an ENT surgeon. Ninety ASOPRS members participated in the study. Most that completed the survey have performed orbital decompression surgery for >15 years. The majority of responders preferred a combined approach of floor and medial wall decompression or balanced lateral and medial wall decompression; only a minority selected a technique limited to 1 wall. Those surgeons who perform fat decompression were more likely to operate in collaboration with ENT. Most surgeons rarely remove the orbital strut, citing risk of worsening diplopia or orbital dystopia except in cases of optic nerve compression or severe proptosis. The most common reason given for performing orbital decompression was exposure keratopathy. The majority of surgeons perform the surgery without ENT involvement, and number of years of experience did not correlate significantly with collaboration with ENT. The majority of surveyed ASOPRS surgeons prefer a combined wall approach over single wall approach to initial orbital decompression. Despite the technological advances made in the field of modern endoscopic surgery, no single approach has been adopted by the ASOPRS community as the gold standard.

  15. Effect of Needle Size in Ultrasound-guided Core Needle Breast Biopsy: Comparison of 14-, 16-, and 18-Gauge Needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuliani, Michela; Rinaldi, Pierluigi; Rella, Rossella; Fabrizi, Gina; Petta, Federica; Carlino, Giorgio; Di Leone, Alba; Mulè, Antonino; Bufi, Enida; Romani, Maurizio; Belli, Paolo; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2017-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound-guided core needle biopsy (US-CNB) of breast lesions, comparing smaller needles (16- and 18-gauge) with the 14-gauge needle, and to analyze the lesion characteristics influencing US-CNB diagnostic performance. All the patients provided informed consent before the biopsy procedure. The data from breast lesions that had undergone US-CNB in our institution from January 2011 to January 2015 were retrospectively reviewed. The inclusion criterion was the surgical histopathologic examination findings of the entire lesion or radiologic follow-up data for ≥ 24 months. The exclusion criterion was the use of preoperative neoadjuvant therapy. The US-CNB results were compared with the surgical pathologic results or with the follow-up findings in the 3 needle size groups (14-, 16-, and 18-gauge). The needle size- and lesion characteristic-specific diagnostic accuracy parameters were evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using a dedicated software program, and P ≤ .01 was considered significant. A total of 1118 US-CNB cases (1042 patients) were included. Of the 1118 cases, 630 (56.3%) were in the 14-gauge group, 136 (12.2%) in the 16-gauge, and 352 (31.5%) in the 18-gauge needle group. Surgery was performed on 800 lesions (71.6%). Of these, 619 were malignant, 77 were high risk, and 104 were benign. The remaining 318 lesions (28.4%) underwent follow-up imaging studies. All the lesions were stable and, therefore, were considered benign. No differences were observed in the diagnostic accuracy parameters among the 3 needle size groups (P > .01). The false-negative rate was greater for lesions  .01). US-CNB performed with small needles (16 and 18 gauge) had the same diagnostic accuracy as that performed with 14-gauge needles, regardless of the lesion characteristics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Anterolateral Approach for Central Thoracic Disc Prolapse-Surgical Strategies Used to Tackle Differing Operative Findings: 3-Dimensional Operative Video.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Krunal; Budohoski, Karol P; Kenyon, Olivia R P; Barone, Damiano G; Santarius, Thomas; Kirollos, Ramez W; Mannion, Richard J; Trivedi, Rikin A

    2018-04-02

    Thoracic disc prolapses causing cord compression can be challenging. For compressive central disc protrusions, a posterior approach is not suitable due to an unacceptable level of cord manipulation. An anterolateral transthoracic approach provides direct access to the disc prolapse allowing for decompression without disturbing the spinal cord. In this video, we describe 2 cases of thoracic myelopathy from a compressive central thoracic disc prolapse. In both cases, informed consent was obtained. Despite similar radiological appearances of heavy calcification, intraoperatively significant differences can be encountered. We demonstrate different surgical strategies depending on the consistency of the disc and the adherence to the thecal sac. With adequate exposure and detachment from adjacent vertebral bodies, soft discs can be, in most instances, separated from the theca with minimal cord manipulation. On the other hand, largely calcified discs often present a significantly greater challenge and require thinning the disc capsule before removal. In cases with significant adherence to dura, in order to prevent cord injury or cerebrospinal fluid leak a thinned shell can be left, providing total detachment from adjacent vertebrae can be achieved. Postoperatively, the first patient, with a significantly calcified disc, developed a transient left leg weakness which recovered by 3-month follow-up. This video outlines the anatomical considerations and operative steps for a transthoracic approach to a central disc prolapse, whilst demonstrating that computed tomography appearances are not always indicative of potential operative difficulties.

  17. Effect of oxygen-breathing during a decompression-stop on bubble-induced platelet activation after an open-sea air dive: oxygen-stop decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, J-M; Lambrechts, K

    2014-06-01

    We highlighted a relationship between decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet micro-particle (PMP) release after a scuba air-dive. It is known that decompression protocol using oxygen-stop accelerates the washout of nitrogen loaded in tissues. The aim was to study the effect of oxygen deco-stop on bubble formation and cell-derived MP release. Healthy experienced divers performed two scuba-air dives to 30 msw for 30 min, one with an air deco-stop and a second with 100% oxygen deco-stop at 3 msw for 9 min. Bubble grades were monitored with ultrasound and converted to the Kisman integrated severity score (KISS). Blood samples for cell-derived micro-particle analysis (AnnexinV for PMP and CD31 for endothelial MP) were taken 1 h before and after each dive. Mean KISS bubble score was significantly lower after the dive with oxygen-decompression stop, compared to the dive with air-decompression stop (4.3 ± 7.3 vs. 32.7 ± 19.9, p air-breathing decompression stop, we observed an increase of the post-dive mean values of PMP (753 ± 245 vs. 381 ± 191 ng/μl, p = 0.003) but no significant change in the oxygen-stop decompression dive (329 ± 215 vs. 381 +/191 ng/μl, p = 0.2). For the post-dive mean values of endothelial MP, there was no significant difference between both the dives. The Oxygen breathing during decompression has a beneficial effect on bubble formation accelerating the washout of nitrogen loaded in tissues. Secondary oxygen-decompression stop could reduce bubble-induced platelet activation and the pro-coagulant activity of PMP release preventing the thrombotic event in the pathogenesis of decompression sickness.

  18. Surgical decompression for traumatic spinal cord injury in a tertiary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The spectrum of injuries included cervical 27 (77.1%), thoracic 7 (20.0%), and lumbar vertebrae 1 (2.9%). The outcome as measured by Frankel's grade at 6 months after surgery showed improvement in 9 (25.7%) patients following intervention. All patients who presented with Frankel's Grade C and D improved to Grade E ...

  19. Effect of needle tract bleeding on occurrence of pneumothorax after transthoracic needle biopsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Topal, U.; Berkman, Yahya M.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Occasionally bleeding along the needle trajectory is observed at post-biopsy computed tomographic sections. This study was designed to evaluate the possible effect of needle tract bleeding on the occurrence of pneumothorax and on requirement of chest tube insertion. Materials and methods: Two hundred eighty-four needle biopsies performed in 275 patients in whom the needle traversed the aerated lung parenchyma were retrospectively reviewed. Bleeding along the needle tract, occurrence of pneumothorax and need for chest tube insertion, type and size of the needle, size of the lesion, length of the lung traversed by the needle, presence or absence of emphysema were noted. Effect of these factors on the rate of pneumothorax and needle-tract bleeding was evaluated. The data were analyzed by χ 2 test. Results: Pneumothorax developed in 100 (35%) out of 284 procedures requiring chest tube placement in 16 (16%). Variables that were significantly associated with an increased risk of pneumothorax were depth of the lesion (P 0.05). However, analysis of the relation between length of lung traversed by the needle, tract-bleeding and pneumothorax rate indicated that tract-bleeding had a preventive effect on development of pneumothorax (P 0.05). Conclusion: Bleeding in the needle tract has a preventive effect on the occurrence of the pneumothorax in deep-seated lesions and in the presence of emphysema, although it does not affect the overall rate of pneumothorax

  20. Posterior Fossa Decompression with Duraplasty in Chiari-1 Malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rehman, L.; Akbar, H.; Bokhari, I.; Babar, A. K.; Hahim, A. S. M.; Arain, S. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the symptomatic outcome after PFD (Posterior Fossa Decompression) with duraplasty in Chiari-1 malformations. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Neurosurgery, JPMC, Karachi, from July 2008 to September 2012. Methodology: This included 21 patients of Chiari 1 malformations admitted in department through OPD with clinical features of headache, neck pain, numbness, neurological deficit, and syringomyelia. Diagnosis was confirmed by MRI. PFD followed by C1 laminectomy with duraplasty was done in all cases and symptomatic outcome was assessed in follow-up clinic. Results: Among 21 patients, 13 were females and 8 were males. Age ranged from 18 to 40 years. All the patients had neck pain and numbness in hands. Only 3 patients had weakness of all four limbs and 12 with weakness of hands. Symptoms evolved over a mean of 12 months. Syringomyelia was present in all cases. All patients underwent posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty with an additional C1 laminectomy and in 2 cases C2 laminectomy was done. Syringo-subarachnoid shunt was placed in one patient and ventriculo-peritoneal shunt was placed in 2 patients. Pain was relieved in all cases. Weakness was improved in all cases and numbness was improved in 19 cases. Syringomyelia was improved in all cases. Postoperative complications included CSF leak in 2 patients and wound infection in one patient. However, there was no mortality. Conclusion: Posterior fossa decompression with duraplasty is the best treatment option for Chiari-1 malformations because of symptomatic improvement and less chances of complications. (author)

  1. Decompression tables for inside chamber attendants working at altitude.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James; Thombs, Paul A; Davison, William J; Weaver, Lindell K

    2014-01-01

    Hyperbaric oxygen (HBO2) multiplace chamber inside attendants (IAs) are at risk for decompression sickness (DCS). Standard decompression tables are formulated for sea-level use, not for use at altitude. At Presbyterian/St. Luke's Medical Center (Denver, Colorado, 5,924 feet above sea level) and Intermountain Medical Center (Murray, Utah, 4,500 feet), the decompression obligation for IAs is managed with U.S. Navy Standard Air Tables corrected for altitude, Bühlmann Tables, and the Nobendem© calculator. IAs also breathe supplemental oxygen while compressed. Presbyterian/St. Luke's (0.83 atmospheres absolute/atm abs) uses gauge pressure, uncorrected for altitude, at 45 feet of sea water (fsw) (2.2 atm abs) for routine wound care HBO2 and 66 fsw (2.8 atm abs) for carbon monoxide/cyanide poisoning. Presbyterian/St. Luke's provides oxygen breathing for the IAs at 2.2 atm abs. At Intermountain (0.86 atm abs), HBO2 is provided at 2.0 atm abs for routine treatments and 3.0 atm abs for carbon monoxide poisoning. Intermountain IAs breathe intermittent 50% nitrogen/50% oxygen at 3.0 atm abs and 100% oxygen at 2.0 atm abs. The chamber profiles include a safety stop. From 1990-2013, Presbyterian/St. Luke's had 26,900 total IA exposures: 25,991 at 45 fsw (2.2 atm abs) and 646 at 66 fsw (2.8 atm abs); there have been four cases of IA DCS. From 2008-2013, Intermountain had 1,847 IA exposures: 1,832 at 2 atm abs and 15 at 3 atm abs, with one case of IA DCS. At both facilities, DCS incidents occurred soon after the chambers were placed into service. Based on these results, chamber inside attendant risk for DCS at increased altitude is low when the inside attendants breathe supplemental oxygen.

  2. Piezosurgery for orbital decompression surgery in thyroid associated orbitopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponto, Katharina A; Zwiener, Isabella; Al-Nawas, Bilal; Kahaly, George J; Otto, Anna F; Karbach, Julia; Pfeiffer, Norbert; Pitz, Susanne

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess a piezosurgical device as a novel tool for bony orbital decompression surgery. At a multidisciplinary orbital center, 62 surgeries were performed in 40 patients with thyroid associated orbitopathy (TAO). Within this retrospective case-series, we analyzed the medical records of these consecutive unselected patients. The reduction of proptosis was the main outcome measure. Indications for a two (n = 27, 44%) or three wall (35, 56%) decompression surgery were proptosis (n = 50 orbits, 81%) and optic neuropathy (n = 12, 19%). Piezosurgery enabled precise bone cuts without intraoperative complications. Proptosis decreased from 23.6 ± 2.8 mm (SD) by 3 mm (95% CI: -3.6 to -2.5 mm) after surgery and stayed stable at 3 months (-3 mm, 95% CI: -3.61 to -2.5 mm, p 24 mm versus ≤ 24 mm: -3.4 mm versus -2.81 mm before discharge from hospital and -4.1 mm versus -2.1 mm at 3 months: p < 0.001, respectively). After a mean long-term follow-up period of 14.6 ± 10.4 months proptosis decreased by further -0.7 ± 2.0 mm (p < 0.001). Signs of optic nerve compression improved after surgery. Infraorbital hypesthesia was present in 11 of 21 (52%) orbits 3 months after surgery. The piezosurgical device is a useful tool for orbital decompression surgery in TAO. By cutting bone selectively, it is precise and reduces the invasiveness of surgery. Nevertheless, no improvement in outcome or reduction in morbidity over conventional techniques has been shown so far. Copyright © 2014 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. SLAP repair with arthroscopic decompression of spinoglenoid cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashiguchi Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: A spinoglenoid cyst with suprascapular nerve disorders is highly associated with superior labrum anterior posterior (SLAP lesion. Conservative or surgical treatment is applied to relieve pain and neurological symptoms. The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical outcomes of patients treated by arthroscopic surgery for SLAP lesion with a spinoglenoid cyst. Methods: The subjects of this study were six patients with SLAP lesion with a spinoglenoid cyst who underwent arthroscopic surgery. There was one female and five males with a mean age of 48.5 years. SLAP lesion was found in all the patients at arthroscopy. A small tear of the rotator cuff was found in the two patients. The SLAP lesion was repaired using suture anchors, and the rotator cuff tears were repaired by suture-bridge fixation. The spinoglenoid cyst was decompressed through the torn labrum in three patients, and through the released superior to posterior portion of the capsule in the other three patients. Results: All patients showed excellent improvement in pain and muscle strength at the final follow-up examination. The mean Constant score was improved from 60.5 points preoperatively to 97.2 points postoperatively. The mean visual analog scale (VAS score decreased from 4.5 on the day of the surgery to 2.5 within one week postoperatively. Postoperative MRI showed disappearance or reduction of the spinoglenoid cyst in four and two patients, respectively. There were no complications from the surgical intervention and in the postoperative period. Discussion: The patients treated by decompression through the released capsule obtained pain relief at an early period after the surgery. Arthroscopic treatment for a spinoglenoid cyst can provide a satisfactory clinical outcome. Arthroscopic decompression of a spinoglenoid cyst through the released capsule is recommended for a safe and reliable procedure for patients with suprascapular nerve disorders.

  4. Emergency thoracic surgery in elderly patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limmer, Stefan; Unger, Lena; Czymek, Ralf; Kujath, Peter; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Emergency thoracic surgery in the elderly represents an extreme situation for both the surgeon and patient. The lack of an adequate patient history as well as the inability to optimize any co-morbidities, which are the result of the emergent situation, are the cause of increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the outcome and prognostic factors for this selected group of patients. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care referral center. Participants Emergency patients treated at the Department of Thoracic Surgery, University Hospital of Luebeck, Germany. Main outcome measures Co-morbidities, mortality, risk factors and hospital length of stay. Results A total of 124 thoracic procedures were performed on 114 patients. There were 79 men and 36 women (average age 72.5 ±6.4 years, range 65–94). The overall operative mortality was 25.4%. The most frequent indication was thoracic/mediastinal infection, followed by peri- or postoperative thoracic complications. Risk factors for hospital mortality were a high ASA score, pre-existing diabetes mellitus and renal insufficiency. Conclusions Our study documents a perioperative mortality rate of 25% in patients over 65 who required emergency thoracic surgery. The main indication for a surgical intervention was sepsis with a thoracic/mediastinal focus. Co-morbidities and the resulting perioperative complications were found to have a significant effect on both inpatient length of stay and outcome. Long-term systemic co-morbidities such as diabetes mellitus are difficult to equalize with respect to certain organ dysfunctions and significantly increase mortality. PMID:21369531

  5. Decompression illness treated in Denmark 1999-2013

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juhl, Christian Svendsen; Hedetoft, Morten; Bidstrup, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    of previous dives, type of diving, initial type of hyperbaric treatment and DCI symptoms. Trend in annual case numbers was evaluated using run chart analysis and Spearman's correlation. Age, height, weight, and BMI were evaluated using linear regression. The presence of long-term residual symptoms......INTRODUCTION: The incidence, diver characteristics and symptomatology of decompression illness (DCI) in Denmark has not been assessed since 1982, and the presence of long-term residual symptoms among divers receiving hyperbaric oxygen therapy in Denmark has never been estimated to our knowledge...

  6. Investigation of Hematologic and Pathologic Response to Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-05-10

    in tadpole and very young kangaroos . Am. J. Physiol. 120:59—74 , 1937. 12. D’ C’~~~’ B.G. and Swanson , H. Bubble free decompression of blood samples...1955. 24. Takeda , Y. Studies of the metabol i~~ 5 and distribution of fibrino— gen in healthy men with autologous I-labe led fibrinogen. J. Clin...this connective tissue protein. However , the metabolism of bone collagen is affected by hormonal control (l0; 3l) and vitamin influences (3 ;ll). It

  7. Technique of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression effectively reduces postoperative complications of severe bifrontal contusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guan eSun

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background Bifrontal contusion is a common clinical brain injury. In the early stage, it is often mild, but it progresses rapidly and frequently worsens suddenly. This condition can become life threatening and therefore requires surgery. Conventional decompression craniectomy is the commonly used treatment method. In this study, the effect of ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression surgery on the prognosis of patients with acute severe bifrontal contusion was investigated. Method A total of 136 patients with severe bifrontal contusion combined with deteriorated intracranial hypertension admitted from March 2001 to March 2014 in our hospital were selected and randomly divided into two groups, i.e., a conventional decompression group and an intracranial pressure (ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression group (68 patients each, to conduct a retrospective study. The incidence rates of acute intraoperative encephalocele, delayed hematomas, and postoperative cerebral infarctions and the Glasgow outcome scores (GOSs 6 months after the surgery were compared between the two groups.Results (1 The incidence rates of acute encephalocele and contralateral delayed epidural hematoma in the stepwise decompression surgery group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group; the differences were statistically significant (P < 0.05; (2 6 months after the surgery, the incidence of vegetative state and mortality in the stepwise decompression group were significantly lower than those in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05; the rate of favorable prognosis in the stepwise decompression group was also significantly higher than that in the conventional decompression group (P < 0.05.Conclusions The ICP monitored stepwise intracranial decompression technique reduced the perioperative complications of traumatic brain injury through the gradual release of intracranial pressure and was beneficial to the prognosis of

  8. Thoracic CT in the ED: a study of thoracic computed tomography utilisation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Williams, E

    2010-02-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the use of thoracic Computed Tomography (CT) in the Emergency Department of a Dublin Academic Teaching Hospital over a six month period. Data was retrieved using the hospital\\'s computerised information system. There were 202 referrals in total for thoracic CT from the Emergency Department during this time period. The most common indication for thoracic CT referral was for the investigation of pulmonary embolism with 127 (63%) referrals. There were 40 (25%) referrals for suspected malignancy and lung disease, whilst 8 (4%) of the referrals were for investigation of thoracic aortic dissection, 8 (4%) for infection, and 6 (3%) were for investigation of thoracic injury. Only 8 (4%) of all referrals were for investigation of injury as a result of chest trauma.

  9. Sugar export limits size of conifer needles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rademaker, Hanna; Zwieniecki, Maciej A.; Bohr, Tomas

    2017-01-01

    Plant leaf size varies by more than three orders of magnitude, from a few millimeters to over one meter. Conifer leaves, however, are relatively short and the majority of needles are no longer than 6 cm. The reason for the strong confinement of the trait-space is unknown. We show that sugars...... does not contribute to sugar flow. Remarkably, we find that the size of the active part does not scale with needle length. We predict a single maximum needle size of 5 cm, in accord with data from 519 conifer species. This could help rationalize the recent observation that conifers have significantly...

  10. Needle muscle biopsy and its application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-long CHEN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Needle muscle biopsy is a straightforward and reliable minimally-invasive technique. During the past century, the needle biopsy can provide adequate samples and the technique has gradually gained wider acceptance. Compared with open biopsy, needle biopsy is less traumatic, with low rate of complications, and is suitable for the identifications and evaluations of muscular dystrophy, inflammatory myopathies and systemic diseases involving muscles, specially for infants and young children. Domestic insiders should be encouraged to apply this technique. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2015.06.003 

  11. Thoracic spinal anesthesia is safe for patients undergoing abdominal cancer surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellakany, Mohamed Hamdy

    2014-01-01

    A double-blinded randomized controlled study to compare discharge time and patient satisfaction between two groups of patients submitted to open surgeries for abdominal malignancies using segmental thoracic spinal or general anesthesia. Open surgeries for abdominal malignancy are usually done under general anesthesia, but many patients with major medical problems sometimes can't tolerate such anesthesia. Regional anesthesia namely segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia may be beneficial in such patients. A total of 60 patients classified according to American Society of Anesthesiology (ASA) as class II or III undergoing surgeries for abdominal malignancy, like colonic or gastric carcinoma, divided into two groups, 30 patients each. Group G, received general anesthesia, Group S received a segmental (T9-T10 injection) thoracic spinal anesthesia with intrathecal injection of 2 ml of hyperbaric bupivacaine 0.5% (10 mg) and 20 ug fentanyl citrate. Intraoperative monitoring, postoperative pain, complications, recovery time, and patient satisfaction at follow-up were compared between the two groups. Spinal anesthesia was performed easily in all 30 patients, although two patients complained of paraesthesiae, which responded to slight needle withdrawal. No patient required conversion to general anesthesia, six patients required midazolam for anxiety and six patients required phenylephrine and atropine for hypotension and bradycardia, recovery was uneventful and without sequelae. The two groups were comparable with respect to gender, age, weight, height, body mass index, ASA classification, preoperative oxygen saturation and preoperative respiratory rate and operative time. This preliminary study has shown that segmental thoracic spinal anesthesia can be used successfully and effectively for open surgeries for abdominal malignancies by experienced anesthetists. It showed shorter postanesthesia care unit stay, better postoperative pain relief and patient satisfaction than

  12. Thoracic surgical resident education: a costly endeavor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoon, John H; Baisden, Clint; Holler, Ben; Hicks, George L; Bove, Ed L; Wright, Cameron D; Merrill, Walter H; Fullerton, Dave A

    2014-12-01

    We sought to define an accurate measure of thoracic surgical education costs. Program directors from six distinct and differently sized and geographically located thoracic surgical training programs used a common template to provide estimates of resident educational costs. These data were reviewed, clarifying questions or discrepancies when noted and using best estimates when exact data were unavailable. Subsequently, a composite of previously published cost-estimation products was used to capture accurate cost data. Data were then compiled and averaged to provide an accurate picture of all costs associated with thoracic surgical education. Before formal accounting was performed, the estimated average for all programs was approximately $250,000 per year per resident. However, when formal evaluations by the six programs were performed, the annual cost of resident education ranged from $330,000 to $667,000 per year per resident. The average cost of $483,000 per year was almost double the initial estimates. Variability was noted by region and size of program. Faculty teaching costs varied from $208,000 to $346,000 per year. Simulation costs ranged from $0 to $80,000 per year. Resident savings to program ranged from $0 to $135,000 per year and averaged $37,000 per year per resident. Thoracic surgical education costs are considerably higher than initial estimates from program directors and probably represent an unappreciated source of financial burden for cardiothoracic surgical educational programs. Copyright © 2014 The Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Thoracic CT findings at hypovolemic shock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rotondo, A.; Angelelli, G.; Catalano, O.; Grassi, R.; Scialpi, M.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To describe and discuss the thoracic CT features of hypovolemic shock. Material and Methods: From a group of 18 patients with signs of hypovolemia on contrast-enhanced abdominal CT, 11 were selected for our study as having also undergone a complete chest examination. Pulse rate, blood pressure, trauma score value, Glasgow coma scale value, surgical result, and final outcome were retrospectively evaluated. The CT features analyzed were: decreased cardiac volume, reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta, aortic branches and caval venous system, increased enhancement of the aorta, and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions. Results: All 11 subjects presented severe injuries and hemodynamic instability; 7 were stable enough to undergo surgery; only 1 of the 11 survived. Two patients showed none of the features of thoracic hypovolemia. All the other patients presented at least two signs: reduced caliber of the thoracic aorta in 7 cases; decreased volume of the cardiac chambers and increased aortic enhancement in 6; decreased caliber of the aortic vessels in 4; decreased caliber of the caval veins in 3; and increased enhancement of the pulmonary collapses/contusions in 3. Conclusions: In patients with hypovolemia, CT may show several thoracic findings in addition to abdominal ones. Knowledge of these features is important for distinguishing them from traumatic injuries. (orig.)

  14. Distribution of elements in needles of Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) was uneven and affected by needle age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Yuanwen; Wen Dazhi; Zhou Guoyi; Liu Shizhong

    2007-01-01

    Macronutrients (P, S, K, Na, Mg, Ca), heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd) and Al concentrations as well as values of Ca/Al in the tip, middle, base sections and sheaths of current year and previous year needles of Pinus massoniana from Xiqiao Mountain were analyzed and the distribution patterns of those elements were compared. The results indicated that many elements were unevenly distributed among the different components of needles. Possible deficiency of P, K, Ca, Mn and Al toxicity occurred in needles under air pollution. Heavy metals may threaten the health of Masson pine. Needle sheaths were good places to look for particulate pollutants, in this case including Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd and Al. - Pine needle sections as bioindicator for heavy metals and nutrient deficiency particularly needle sheath for particle pollutants

  15. Distribution of elements in needles of Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) was uneven and affected by needle age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Yuanwen [Institute of Ecology, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: kuangyw@scbg.ac.cn; Wen Dazhi [Institute of Ecology, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: dzwen@scbg.ac.cn; Zhou Guoyi [Institute of Ecology, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: gyzhou@scbg.ac.cn; Liu Shizhong [Institute of Ecology, South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: lsz@scbg.ac.cn

    2007-01-15

    Macronutrients (P, S, K, Na, Mg, Ca), heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd) and Al concentrations as well as values of Ca/Al in the tip, middle, base sections and sheaths of current year and previous year needles of Pinus massoniana from Xiqiao Mountain were analyzed and the distribution patterns of those elements were compared. The results indicated that many elements were unevenly distributed among the different components of needles. Possible deficiency of P, K, Ca, Mn and Al toxicity occurred in needles under air pollution. Heavy metals may threaten the health of Masson pine. Needle sheaths were good places to look for particulate pollutants, in this case including Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd and Al. - Pine needle sections as bioindicator for heavy metals and nutrient deficiency particularly needle sheath for particle pollutants.

  16. Distribution of elements in needles of Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) was uneven and affected by needle age

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuang Yuanwen [South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: kuangyw@scbg.ac.cn; Wen Dazhi [South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: dzwen@scbg.ac.cn; Zhou Guoyi [South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: gyzhou@scbg.ac.cn; Liu Shizhong [South China Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 510650 Guangzhou (China)]. E-mail: lsz@scbg.ac.cn

    2007-02-15

    Macronutrients (P, S, K, Na, Mg, Ca), heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd,) and Al concentrations as well as values of Ca/Al in the tip, middle and base sections, and sheaths of current year and previous year needles of Pinus massoniana from Xiqiao Mountain were analyzed and the distribution patterns of those elements were compared. The results indicated that many elements were unevenly distributed among the different components of needles. Possible deficiency of P, K, Ca, Mn and Al toxicity occurred in needles under air pollution. Heavy metals may threaten the health of Masson pine. Needle sheaths were good places to look for particulate pollutants, in this case including Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd and Al. - Pine needle sections as bioindicator for heavy metals and nutrient deficiency particularly needle sheath for particle pollutants.

  17. [Discussion on needling sensation, arrival of qi and needling response (Deqi)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fang; Wang, Hong-Du

    2012-12-01

    The current appointed teaching material of Science of Acupuncture and Moxibustion holds that there is no difference among the needling sensation, arrival of qi and needling response. However, the author has a different understanding. Therefore, Neijing (Internal Classic), its annotation, exposition and understandings of ancient and modern famous experts are cited to analyze their meanings. And the result indicates that the needling sensation is subjective feelings and perceived responses of doctors and patients. Arrival of qi is the healing process of the organ through activating the anti-pathogenic qi to expel the pathogens. The needling response is the final aim of acupuncture therapy. Thus, the meaning of needling sensation, arrival of qi, and needling response are different. And an accurate understanding can better guide acupuncture treatment.

  18. Distribution of elements in needles of Pinus massoniana (Lamb.) was uneven and affected by needle age

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuang Yuanwen; Wen Dazhi; Zhou Guoyi; Liu Shizhong

    2007-01-01

    Macronutrients (P, S, K, Na, Mg, Ca), heavy metals (Fe, Zn, Mn, Cu, Pb, Cr, Ni, Cd,) and Al concentrations as well as values of Ca/Al in the tip, middle and base sections, and sheaths of current year and previous year needles of Pinus massoniana from Xiqiao Mountain were analyzed and the distribution patterns of those elements were compared. The results indicated that many elements were unevenly distributed among the different components of needles. Possible deficiency of P, K, Ca, Mn and Al toxicity occurred in needles under air pollution. Heavy metals may threaten the health of Masson pine. Needle sheaths were good places to look for particulate pollutants, in this case including Fe, Cu, Zn, Pb, Cr, Cd and Al. - Pine needle sections as bioindicator for heavy metals and nutrient deficiency particularly needle sheath for particle pollutants

  19. Effect of active compression-decompression resuscitation (ACD-CPR) on survival: a combined analysis using individual patient data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mauer, Dietmar; Nolan, Jerry; Plaisance, Patrick

    1999-01-01

    Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, compression, decompression, cardiac arrest, emergency medical service, advanced cardiac life support, survival......Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, compression, decompression, cardiac arrest, emergency medical service, advanced cardiac life support, survival...

  20. Analysis of a Steerable Needle for Fine Needle Aspiration and Biopsy: Efficiency and Radiation Dose Compared With a Conventional Straight Needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutigliano, Sandra; Abraham, John A; Kenneally, Barry E; Zoga, Adam C; Nevalainen, Mika; Roedl, Johannes B

    Percutaneous computed tomography (CT)-guided needle biopsy has proven to be an efficacious method for sampling of many soft tissue lesions, especially deep-seated masses in the abdomen and pelvis. This study sought to test the potential for a novel steerable needle to improve localization and to reduce procedure duration and radiation dose compared with a conventional straight needle. A fresh, raw meat sample (lean bovine flank) was imbedded with cylindrical radiopaque and radiolucent obstacles designed to simulate vessels (radiolucent objects) and bones (radiopaque objects) on CT. A pit-containing olive (partially radiopaque) was imbedded beyond the obstacles to represent the target. Two sites on the surface of the meat were selected and marked to determine initial needle placement. Two radiologists with different levels of experience proceeded to position a straight needle and the steerable needle from each skin site to the target using CT guidance as efficiently as possible, avoiding the obstacles. The total positioning time, the number of CT scans required for positioning, and the number of repositioning events (partial withdrawal followed by advancement) were tracked for the straight and steerable needles. For the straight needle, total time to reach the target was 499 to 667 seconds (mean, 592 seconds); for the steerable needle, total time to reach the target was 281 to 343 seconds (mean, 309 seconds), on average, 48% lower. The number of CT scans needed for needle positioning averaged 6.25 for the straight needle and 3.5 for the steerable needle, which is 44% lower. Repositioning events (withdrawing and readvancing the needle) ranged from 3 to 10 for the straight needle (mean, 6.5) and 0 for the steerable needle. Using an in vitro model embedded with obstacles, the steerable needle performed better than a straight needle with regard to procedure time, needle repositioning events, and CT scans required for placement.

  1. Deep lateral wall orbital decompression following strabismus surgery in patients with Type II ophthalmic Graves' disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Michael P; Broxterman, Emily C; Hromas, Alan R; Whittaker, Thomas J; Sokol, Jason A

    2018-01-10

    Surgical management of ophthalmic Graves' disease traditionally involves, in order, orbital decompression, followed by strabismus surgery and eyelid surgery. Nunery et al. previously described two distinct sub-types of patients with ophthalmic Graves' disease; Type I patients exhibit no restrictive myopathy (no diplopia) as opposed to Type II patients who do exhibit restrictive myopathy (diplopia) and are far more likely to develop new-onset worsening diplopia following medial wall and floor decompression. Strabismus surgery involving extra-ocular muscle recession has, in turn, been shown to potentially worsen proptosis. Our experience with Type II patients who have already undergone medial wall and floor decompression and strabismus surgery found, when additional decompression is necessary, deep lateral wall decompression (DLWD) appears to have a low rate of post-operative primary-gaze diplopia. A case series of four Type II ophthalmic Graves' disease patients, all of whom had already undergone decompression and strabismus surgery, and went on to develop worsening proptosis or optic nerve compression necessitating further decompression thereafter. In all cases, patients were treated with DLWD. Institutional Review Board approval was granted by the University of Kansas. None of the four patients treated with this approach developed recurrent primary-gaze diplopia or required strabismus surgery following DLWD. While we still prefer to perform medial wall and floor decompression as the initial treatment for ophthalmic Graves' disease, for proptosis following consecutive strabismus surgery, DLWD appears to be effective with a low rate of recurrent primary-gaze diplopia.

  2. Influence of surgical decompression on the expression of inflammatory and tissue repair biomarkers in periapical cysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Janderson Teixeira; Dos Santos Antunes, Henrique; Armada, Luciana; Pires, Fábio Ramôa

    2017-12-01

    The biologic effects of surgical decompression on the epithelium and connective tissues of periapical cysts are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of tissue repair and inflammatory biomarkers in periapical cysts before and after surgical decompression. Nine specimens of periapical cysts treated with decompression before undergoing complete enucleation were immunohistochemically analyzed to investigate the expression of interleukin-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α, transforming growth factor-β1, matrix metalloproteinase-9, Ki-67, and epidermal growth factor receptor. Expression of the biomarkers was classified as positive, focal, or negative. Ki-67 immunoexpression was calculated as a cell proliferation index. The expression of the biomarkers was compared in the specimens from decompression and from the final surgical procedure. Computed tomography demonstrated that volume was reduced in all cysts after decompression. There were no differences in the immunoexpression of the proinflammatory and tissue repair biomarkers when comparing the specimens obtained before and after the decompression. Surgical decompression was efficient in reducing the volume of periapical cysts before complete enucleation. When comparing the specimens obtained from surgical decompression and from complete surgical removal, the immunohistochemical analysis did not show a decrease in proinflammatory biomarkers; neither did it show an increase in tissue repair biomarkers. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pine needle abortion biomarker detected in bovine fetal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine needle abortion is a naturally occurring condition in free-range cattle caused by the consumption of pine needles from select species of cypress, juniper, pine, and spruce trees. Confirmatory diagnosis of pine needle abortion has previously relied on a combined case history of pine needle cons...

  4. Case Descriptions and Observations About Cutis Marmorata From Hypobaric Decompressions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, Johnny; Pilmanis, Andrew A.; Webb, James T.

    2002-01-01

    There is disagreement about the pathophysiology, classification, and treatment of cutis marmorata (CM), so there is disagreement about the disposition and medical status of a person that had CM. CM is rare, associated with stressful decompressions, and may be associated with serious signs and symptoms of decompression sickness (DCS). CM presents as purple or bluish-red skin mottling, often in the pectoral region, shoulders, chest, or upper abdomen. It is unethical to induce CM in humans so all information comes from retrospective analysis of case reports, or from animal models. A literature search, seven recent case reports from the Johnson Space Center and Brooks Air Force Base Hypobaric DCS Databases, interviews with DCS treatment experts, and responses to surveys provided the factual information used to arrive at our conclusions and recommendations. The "weight of evidence" indicates that CM is a local, not centrally mediated or systemic response to bubbles. It is unclear whether obstruction of arterial or venous blood flow is the primary insult since the lesion is reported under either condition. Any neurological or cardiovascular involvements are coincidental, developing along the same time course. The skin could be the source of the bubbles due to its mass, the associated layer of fat, and the variable nature of skin blood flow. CM should not be categorized as Type II DCS, should be included with other skin manifestations in a category called cutaneous DCS, and hyperbaric treatment is only needed if ground level oxygen is ineffective in the case of altitude-induced CM.

  5. A metastable liquid melted from a crystalline solid under decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chuanlong; Smith, Jesse S.; Sinogeikin, Stanislav V.; Kono, Yoshio; Park, Changyong; Kenney-Benson, Curtis; Shen, Guoyin

    2017-01-01

    A metastable liquid may exist under supercooling, sustaining the liquid below the melting point such as supercooled water and silicon. It may also exist as a transient state in solid-solid transitions, as demonstrated in recent studies of colloidal particles and glass-forming metallic systems. One important question is whether a crystalline solid may directly melt into a sustainable metastable liquid. By thermal heating, a crystalline solid will always melt into a liquid above the melting point. Here we report that a high-pressure crystalline phase of bismuth can melt into a metastable liquid below the melting line through a decompression process. The decompression-induced metastable liquid can be maintained for hours in static conditions, and transform to crystalline phases when external perturbations, such as heating and cooling, are applied. It occurs in the pressure-temperature region similar to where the supercooled liquid Bi is observed. Akin to supercooled liquid, the pressure-induced metastable liquid may be more ubiquitous than we thought.

  6. Decompression syndrome (Caisson disease in an Indian diver

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phatak Uday

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute decompression syndrome (Caisson′s disease is an acute neurological emergency in divers. It is caused due to release of nitrogen gas bubbles that impinge the blood vessels of the spinal cord and brain and result in severe neurodeficit. There are very few case reports in Indian literature. There are multiple factors in the pathogenesis of Acute decompression syndrome (Caisson′s disease such as health problems in divers (respiratory problems or congenital heart diseases like atrial septal defect, patent ductus arteriosus etc, speed of ascent from the depth and habits like smoking that render divers susceptible for such neurological emergency. Usually, immediate diagnosis of such a condition with MRI is not possible in hospitals in the Coastal border. Even though, MRI is performed, it has very low specificity and sensitivity. Facilities like hyperbaric oxygen treatment are virtually non-existent in these hospitals. Therefore, proper education of the divers and appropriate preventive measures in professional or recreational divers is recommended.

  7. Endoscopic Decompression and Marsupialization of A Duodenal Duplication Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza I-Lin Sin

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Duodenal duplication cysts are rare congenital foregut anomalies, accounting for 2%–12% of all gastrointestinal tract duplications. Surgical excision entails risk of injury to the pancreaticobiliary structures due to proximity or communication with the cyst. We present a case of duodenal duplication cyst in a 3 year-old boy who successfully underwent endoscopic decompression. Case report: AT is a young boy who first presented at 15 months of age with abdominal pain. There was one subsequent episode of pancreatitis. Ultrasonography showed the typical double wall sign of a duplication cyst and magnetic resonance cholangio-pancreatography showed a large 5 cm cyst postero-medial to the second part of the duodenum, communicating with the pancreaticobiliary system and causing dilatation of the proximal duodenum. He subsequently underwent successful endoscopic ultrasound guided decompression at 3 years of age under general anesthesia, and had an uneventful postoperative recovery. Conclusion: Endoscopic ultrasound guided assessment and treatment of gastrointestinal duplication cysts is increasingly reported in adults. To the best of our knowledge, only one case of endoscopic treatment of duodenal duplication cyst, in an older child, has been reported thus far in the paediatric literature. In this paper, we review the current literature and discuss the therapeutic options of this rare condition.

  8. The voluntary driven exoskeleton Hybrid Assistive Limb (HAL) for postoperative training of thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Kengo; Abe, Tetsuya; Kubota, Shigeki; Marushima, Aiki; Kawamoto, Hiroaki; Ueno, Tomoyuki; Matsushita, Akira; Nakai, Kei; Saotome, Kosaku; Kadone, Hideki; Endo, Ayumu; Haginoya, Ayumu; Hada, Yasushi; Matsumura, Akira; Sankai, Yoshiyuki; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2017-05-01

    The hybrid assistive limb (HAL) is a wearable robot suit that assists in voluntary control of knee and hip joint motion by detecting bioelectric signals on the surface of the skin with high sensitivity. HAL has been reported to be effective for functional recovery in motor impairments. However, few reports have revealed the utility of HAL for patients who have undergone surgery for thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (thoracic OPLL). Herein, we present a postoperative thoracic OPLL patient who showed remarkable functional recovery after training with HAL. A 63-year-old woman, who could not walk due to muscle weakness before surgery, underwent posterior decompression and fusion. Paralysis was re-aggravated after the initial postoperative rising. We diagnosed that paralysis was due to residual compression from the anterior lesion and microinstability after posterior fixation, and prescribed bed rest for a further 3 weeks. The incomplete paralysis gradually recovered, and walking training with HAL was started on postoperative day 44 in addition to standard physical therapy. The patient underwent 10 sessions of HAL training until discharge on postoperative day 73. Results of a 10-m walk test were assessed after every session, and the patient's speed and cadence markedly improved. At discharge, the patient could walk with 2 crutches and no assistance. Furthermore, no adverse events associated with HAL training occurred. HAL training for postoperative thoracic OPLL patients may enhance improvement in walking ability, even if severe impairment of ambulation and muscle weakness exist preoperatively.

  9. A low-level needle counter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Y.; Taguchi, Y.; Imamura, M.; Inoue, T.; Tanaka, S.

    1977-01-01

    A small end-window type gas-flow counter which has a sharpened needle (anode) against the end-window plane (cathode) was developed for low-level counting of β particles to the amount of less than one count per hour in solid sources of relatively high specific activity. The advantage of the needle counter for low-level work is that being of a conical shape the active volume as against the window area is small. The background count rate of 0.0092+-0.0005 cpm was obtained for a 10 mm dia needle counter operating in GM mode and in anticoincidence with a well-type NaI(Tl) guard crystal with massive shields. The counter design and the counter characteristics are presented in detail. The needle counter is simple in design, low-cost and stable in long time operation. (author)

  10. Fine needle aspiration cytology of cervicofacial actinomycosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Kusuma

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Actinomycosis is a chronic infection caused by Actinomyces israelii, usually seen in immunocompromised patients or in the background of tissue injury. Cervicofacial actinomycosis presenting as a fixed jaw swelling in an elderly individual can mimic malignancy and pose a diagnostic dilemma. We report here a case of cervicofacial actinomycosis diagnosed by fine needle aspiration, along with a review of the relevant literature. A 60 year-old man presented with a gradually increasing 6 x 5 cm swelling in the left side of his jaw. The swelling was fixed, without any apparent sinus or abscess. Fine needle aspiration was diagnostic as it revealed colonies of actinomyces surrounded by polymorphs and chronic inflammatory cells. The histopathological study of the excised specimen confirmed the cytological findings. Fine needle aspiration is an effective tool in the diagnosis of actinomycosis although its documentation is rare. Difficulties in the management can be avoided by early diagnosis using the fine needle aspiration technique.

  11. Enhanced Recovery in Thoracic Surgery: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vesna D. Dinic

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of enhanced recovery program after thoracic surgery is to minimize stress response, reduce postoperative pulmonary complications, and improve patient outcome, which will in addition decrease hospital stay and reduce hospital costs. As minimally invasive technique, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery represents an important element of enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery. Anesthetic management during preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative period is essential for the enhanced recovery. In the era of enhanced recovery protocols, non-intubated thoracoscopic procedures present a step forward. This article focuses on the key elements of the enhanced recovery program in thoracic surgery. Having reviewed recent literature, the authors highlight potential procedures and techniques that might be incorporated into the program.

  12. A Case of Fatal Pulmonary Hypoplasia with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia, Thoracic Myelomeningocele, and Thoracic Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Ai; Fujinaga, Hideshi; Matsui, Sachiko; Tago, Kumiko; Iwasaki, Yuka; Fujino, Shuhei; Nagasawa, Junko; Amari, Shoichiro; Kaneshige, Masao; Wada, Yuka; Takahashi, Shigehiro; Tsukamoto, Keiko; Miyazaki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Takako; Ishiguro, Akira; Ito, Yushi

    2017-10-01

    Background  Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is fatal in severe cases of pulmonary hypoplasia. We experienced a fatal case of pulmonary hypoplasia due to CDH, thoracic myelomeningocele (MMC), and thoracic dysplasia. This constellation of anomalies has not been previously reported. Case Report  A male infant with a prenatal diagnosis of thoracic MMC with severe hydrocephalus and scoliosis was born at 36 weeks of gestation. CDH was found after birth and the patient died of respiratory failure due to pulmonary hypoplasia and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn at 30 hours of age despite neonatal intensive care. An autopsy revealed a left CDH without herniation of the liver or stomach into the thoracic cavity, severe hydrocephalus, Chiari malformation type II, MMC with spina bifida from Th4 to Th12, hemivertebrae, fused ribs, deformities of the thoracic cage and legs, short trunk, and agenesis of the left kidney. Conclusion  We speculate that two factors may be associated with the severe pulmonary hypoplasia: decreased thoracic space due to the herniation of visceral organs caused by CDH and thoracic dysplasia due to skeletal deformity and severe scoliosis.

  13. A RARE CASE OF THORACIC ACTINOMYCOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Das

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available PRESENTATION OF CASE Actinomycetes are branching gram-positive anaerobic bacteria belonging to Actinomycetaceae family and are commensals in human oropharynx, gastrointestinal tract and female genitalia. Thoracic or pulmonary actinomycosis is an uncommon bacterial infection. The diagnosis of pulmonary or thoracic actinomycosis is often confounding because of its shared clinical features with malignant lung diseases and chronic suppurative lung diseases. However, chest physicians should be aware of actinomycosis being a differential diagnosis in persistent shadows in lung as early diagnosis leads to good prognosis. 1

  14. Failures and complications of thoracic drainage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đorđević Ivana

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Thoracic drainage is a surgical procedure for introducing a drain into the pleural space to drain its contents. Using this method, the pleura is discharged and set to the physiological state which enables the reexpansion of the lungs. The aim of the study was to prove that the use of modern principles and protocols of thoracic drainage significantly reduces the occurrence of failures and complications, rendering the treatment more efficient. Methods. The study included 967 patients treated by thoracic drainage within the period from January 1, 1989 to June 1, 2000. The studied patients were divided into 2 groups: group A of 463 patients treated in the period from January 1, 1989 to December 31, 1994 in whom 386 pleural drainage (83.36% were performed, and group B of 602 patients treated form January 1, 1995 to June 1, 2000 in whom 581 pleural drainage (96.51% were performed. The patients of the group A were drained using the classical standards of thoracic drainage by the general surgeons. The patients of the group B, however, were drained using the modern standards of thoracic drainage by the thoracic surgeons, and the general surgeons trained for this kind of the surgery. Results. The study showed that better results were achieved in the treatment of the patients from the group B. The total incidence of the failures and complications of thoracic drainage decreased from 36.52% (group A to 12.73% (group B. The mean length of hospitalization of the patients without complications in the group A was 19.5 days versus 10 days in the group B. The mean length of the treatment of the patients with failures and complications of the drainage in the group A was 33.5 days versus 17.5 days in the group B. Conclusion. The shorter length of hospitalization and the lower morbidity of the studied patients were considered to be the result of the correct treatment using modern principles of thoracic drainage, a suitable surgical technique, and a

  15. Thoracic pain in a collegiate runner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, G P; Benesky, W T

    2002-08-01

    This case study describes the process of examination, re-examination, and intervention for a collegiate runner with mechanical thoracic pain preventing athletic participation and limiting daily function. Unimpaired function fully returned in less than 3 weeks with biweekly sessions to re-establish normal and painfree thoracic mechanics via postural hygiene, exercise, mobilization, and manipulation. The outcome of this case study supports the original hypothesis that the pattern of impairments was in fact responsible for the functional limitations and disability in this athlete. At the time of publication the athlete was without functional limitations and had fully returned to competitive sprinting for the university track team.

  16. Idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazda K Turel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic spinal cord herniation is a rare and often missed cause of thoracic myelopathy. The clinical presentation and radiological appearance is inconsistent and commonly confused with a dorsal arachnoid cyst and often is a misdiagnosed entity. While ventral spinal cord herniation through a dural defect has been previously described, intravertebral herniation is a distinct entity and extremely rare. We present the case of a 70-year old man with idiopathic thoracic transdural intravertebral spinal cord herniation and discuss the clinico-radiological presentation, pathophysiology and operative management along with a review the literature of this unusual entity.

  17. Lungs, pleura, thoracal wall. 7. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stender, H.S.

    1988-01-01

    The book describes the anatomy of the lungs, as well as X-ray, computerized tomography, nuclear magnetic resonance, and nuclear-medical imaging techniques. Following a discussion of the general symptomatology of pulmonary diseases verifiable by X-ray, the individual diseases including inhalation damage from inorganic dusts and gases are dealt with. Traumatic thoracal conditions, the image of the thorax after operations, alterations of the thoracal wall, as well as pleural diseases are also discussed. (MG) With 1776 figs., 52 tabs [de

  18. Two-Stage Surgical Management of Multilevel Symptomatic Thoracic Haemangioma Using Ethanol and Iliac Crest Bone Graft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmajoshyula, Venkatramana; Mayi, Shivanand; Teegala, Suman

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a 56-year-old obese female who presented with back pain and progressive weakness in her lower limbs for three months. She was bed-ridden for one week before reporting to our hospital. Plain radiographs showed vertical striations in multiple vertebrae classical of haemangioma. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) spine revealed multiple thoracic and lumbar vertebral haemangiomas. Extra osseous extension of haemangioma at T12 was causing spinal cord compression. Two-stage surgery was performed with absolute alcohol (ethanol) injection followed by pedicle screw fixation and decompression with tricortical iliac crest bone graft into the vertebral body. Postoperatively rapid neurological improvement was seen. After three weeks, she could walk independently. One year later, computed tomography showed complete incorporation of bone graft and maintained vertebral body height. MRI showed complete resolution of the cord edema at T12. These findings indicated diminished vascularity of the tumor. PMID:25187869

  19. Reliability of pressure waveform analysis to determine correct epidural needle placement in labouring women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aamri, I; Derzi, S H; Moore, A; Elgueta, M F; Moustafa, M; Schricker, T; Tran, D Q

    2017-07-01

    Pressure waveform analysis provides a reliable confirmatory adjunct to the loss-of-resistance technique to identify the epidural space during thoracic epidural anaesthesia, but its role remains controversial in lumbar epidural analgesia during labour. We performed an observational study in 100 labouring women of the sensitivity and specificity of waveform analysis to determine the correct location of the epidural needle. After obtaining loss-of-resistance, the anaesthetist injected 5 ml saline through the epidural needle (accounting for the volume already used in the loss-of-resistance). Sterile extension tubing, connected to a pressure transducer, was attached to the needle. An investigator determined the presence or absence of a pulsatile waveform, synchronised with the heart rate, on a monitor screen that was not in the view of the anaesthetist or the parturient. A bolus of 4 ml lidocaine 2% with adrenaline 5 μg.ml -1 was administered, and the epidural block was assessed after 15 min. Three women displayed no sensory block at 15 min. The results showed: epidural block present, epidural waveform present 93; epidural block absent, epidural waveform absent 2; epidural block present, epidural waveform absent 4; epidural block absent, epidural waveform present 1. Compared with the use of a local anaesthetic bolus to ascertain the epidural space, the sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of waveform analysis were 95.9%, 66.7%, 98.9% and 33.3%, respectively. Epidural waveform analysis provides a simple adjunct to loss-of-resistance for confirming needle placement during performance of obstetric epidurals, however, further studies are required before its routine implementation in clinical practice. © 2017 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  20. EARLY AND LONG-TERM RESULTS OF SURGICAL TREATMENT OF THE THORACIC AND LUMBAR VERTEBRAL AND SPINAL TRAUMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. D. Usikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article demonstrates the outcomes of operative treatment of 190 patients with spinal cord injuryof thoracic and lumbar spine for 10 years. Associated injuries were revealed in 96 patients, the mean ISS score being27.5. All patients underwent decompressive and stabilizing interventions using a transpedicular system of “Synthes” production (Saint Petersburg. Ventral interventions were performed in 27 (14.2% patients. In all cases, decompression of the spinal canalcontents at the level of damage was achieved. In those patients who were operated within two weeks after trauma, transpedicular system allowed for recovery of a form and size of the spinal canal and the damaged vertebral body. The fractures of transpedicular system were observed in patients operated both with only rear and with combined access. The errors and complications, which happened during surgery, did not influence the outcomes of treatment. The outcomes of treatment were assessed according to the neurological statusdynamics (ASIA score, recovery of support ability of the spine, the presence of pain, and patients’ recovery (Е Denis score. Favorable outcomes were achieved in 114 (61.3% patients, satisfactoryin 53 (28.5%,and poor in 19 (10.2 %.

  1. Transbronchial needle aspiration with a new electromagnetically-tracked TBNA needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jae; Popa, Teo; Gruionu, Lucian

    2009-02-01

    Transbronchial needle aspiration (TBNA) is a common method used to collect tissue for diagnosis of different chest diseases and for staging lung cancer, but the procedure has technical limitations. These limitations are mostly related to the difficulty of accurately placing the biopsy needles into the target mass. Currently, pulmonologists plan TBNA by examining a number of Computed Tomography (CT) scan slices before the operation. Then, they manipulate the bronchoscope down the respiratory track and blindly direct the biopsy. Thus, the biopsy success rate is low. The diagnostic yield of TBNA is approximately 70 percent. To enhance the accuracy of TBNA, we developed a TBNA needle with a tip position that can be electromagnetically tracked. The needle was used to estimate the bronchoscope's tip position and enable the creation of corresponding virtual bronchoscopic images from a preoperative CT scan. The TBNA needle was made with a flexible catheter embedding Wang Transbronchial Histology Needle and a sensor tracked by electromagnetic field generator. We used Aurora system for electromagnetic tracking. We also constructed an image-guided research prototype system incorporating the needle and providing a user-friendly interface to assist the pulmonologist in targeting lesions. To test the feasibility of the accuracy of the newly developed electromagnetically-tracked needle, a phantom study was conducted in the interventional suite at Georgetown University Hospital. Five TBNA simulations with a custom-made phantom with a bronchial tree were performed. The experimental results show that our device has potential to enhance the accuracy of TBNA.

  2. Physical Properties Of Acupuncture Needles: Do Disposable Acupuncture Needles Break With Normal Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Orofacial Pain Graduate...JOURNAL PHYSICAL PROPERTIES OF ACUPUNCTURE NEEDLES: DO DISPOSABLE ACUPUNCTURE NEEDLES BREAK WITH NORMAL USE? James Kyle Vick DDS, Orofacial Pain ...MS CAPT, DC, USN Orofacial Pain Department Head Naval Postgraduate Dental School vi    TABLE OF CONTENTS GUIDELINE I. TITLE

  3. Evolution of Thoracic Surgery in Canada

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    Jean Deslauriers

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Canada’s contributions toward the 21st century’s practice of thoracic surgery have been both unique and multilayered. Scattered throughout are tales of pioneers where none had gone before, where opportunities were greeted by creativity and where iconic figures followed one another.

  4. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome: Current concept in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Thoracic endometriosis is a rare pathology. The diagnosis is often delayed or missed, however recently, there has been significant advances in the knowledge of this condition and hence, an improvement in the diagnosis and treatment. Objective: To review the current concepts in the pathophysiology and ...

  5. Thoracic Ectopia Cordis in an Ethiopian Neonate

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GB

    2017-03-01

    Mar 1, 2017 ... Thoracic Ectopia Cordis in an Ethiopian Neonate. Henok Tadele*. 1 ... the chest wall. Initial treatment included covering the heart with sterile-saline soaked dressing, starting systemic antibiotics and supportive care. A staged ... of thoracoabdominal EC, anterior diaphragmatic hernia, lower sternal defect and ...

  6. April 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The April 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 4/23/2014 at Scottsdale Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, pathology and radiology communities. It was announced that there will be a wine tasting with the California, New Mexico and Colorado Thoracic Societies at the American Thoracic Society International Meeting. The tasting will be led by Peter Wagner and is scheduled for the Cobalt Room in the Hilton San Diego Bayfront on Tuesday, May 20, from 4-8 PM. Guideline development was again discussed. The consensus was to await publication of the IDSA Cocci Guidelines and respond appropriately. George Parides, Arizona Chapter Representative, gave a presentation on Hill Day. Representatives of the Arizona, New Mexico and Washington Thoracic Societies met with their Congressional delegations, including Rep. David Schweikert, to discuss the Cigar Bill, NIH funding, and the Medicare Sustainable Growth ...

  7. November 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The November 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, November 15, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with a lecture followed by case presentations. There were 15 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, allergy, infectious disease and radiology communities. At the beginning of the meeting several issues were discussed: 1. CME offered by the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine (SWJPCC is currently offered to only the Southwest state thoracic societies and the Mayo Clinic. After discussion it was felt that this restriction of access was no longer appropriate and CME credits should be available to all. 2. Efforts continue to obtain CME for the Arizona Thoracic Society meetings. Our Chapter Representative, Dr. Gerry Schwartzberg, is approaching this with the American Thoracic Society. Locally, HonorHealth sent out a survey on CME needs. Members were encouraged …

  8. Thoracic trauma: presentation and management outcome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saaiq, M.; Shah, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    To determine the presentation and management outcome of thoracic trauma in a tertiary care setting. A total of 143 patients, who presented with chest trauma, were included in the study. All the patients were assessed by the history, physical examination and ancillary investigations. Appropriate managements were instituted as required. Data was described in percentages. out of 143 patients, 119 (83)% were males and 24 (17)% were females. Most of the patients belonged to the age group of 21-50 years. Ninety seven (66)% patients were admitted for indoor management. Blunt injury was found in 125 (87.4%) patients, while penetrating injuries in only 18 (12.6%) patients. Road Traffic Accidents (RTAs) were the commonest cause of trauma (n=103, 72%). Rib fracture was the commonest chest injury (74% patients). Head injury was the most frequently associated injury (18% of the patients). Tube thoracostomy was the commonest intervention undertaken in 65 (45%) patients. Seventeen (11.88%) patients were managed with mechanical ventilation. there were 17 deaths with a mortality rate of 11.88%. Thoracic trauma is an important cause of hospitalization, morbidity and mortality in the younger population. RTAs constitute the leading cause of thoracic trauma in our setup. Tube thoracostomy is the most frequent and at times the only invasive procedure required as a definitive measure in thoracic trauma patients. A policy of selective hospitalization helps to avoid unnecessary hospital admissions. (author)

  9. Thoracic epidural anaesthesia for major abdominal surgeries ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The pulse rate, blood pressure and oxygen saturation were monitored throughout the procedure and recorded. Data were obtained from the ... In a previous study, Consani et al.3 documented the feasibility of thoracic epidural ... thoracostomy and mastectomy in high-risk patients.2,6 Since TEA places less demand on drugs, ...

  10. Thoracic and abdominopelvic actinomycosis | Spiegel | SA Journal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intervention it is worthwhile including actinomycosis infection in the differential diagnosis. We present radiological findings for 4 patients presenting with different forms of thoracic and abdominopelvic actinomycosis infection, and a short review of the documented literature findings. South African Journal of Radiology Vol.

  11. Acquired intrathoracic kidney in thoracic kyphosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murayama, Sadayuki; Kawashima, Akira; Ohuchida, Toshiyuki; Russell, W.J.

    1986-12-01

    Two cases of acquired intrathoracic kidney associated with thoracic kyphosis are reported, with emphasis on the radiographic manifestations. A search of the scientific literature disclosed that the acquired type of this abnormality is rare. The importance of recognizing this entity from a differential diagnostic standpoint is underscored. (author)

  12. Effectiveness of early decompressive surgery for massive hemispheric embolic infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osada, Hideo; Mori, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Takuji; Nakao, Yasuaki; Oyama, Kazutaka; Esaki, Takanori; Watanabe, Mitsuya

    2008-01-01

    Massive hemispheric embolic infarction associated with acute brain swelling and rapid clinical deterioration is known as malignant infarction because of the significant rates of mortality and morbidity. Decompressive hemicraniectomy is effective; however, the timing and outcome still remain unclear. Ninety-four patients with massive embolic hemispheric infarctions (infarct volume >200 ml) were retrospectively divided into 3 groups: 29 patients, treated conservatively (conservative group); 33 patients, operated on after the appearance of signs of brain herniation (late surgery group); and 32 patients, operated on before the onset of signs of brain herniation signs (early surgery group). The mortality at 1 and 6 months in the late surgery group (15.2% and 24.2%, respectively) was significantly improved as compared to the conservative group (62.1% and 69.0%, respectively) (p 200 ml) should be performed before the onset of brain herniation. Early surgery may achieve a satisfactory functional recovery. (author)

  13. Feedback control of thermal instability by compression and decompression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, M.; Hirano, K.; Amano, T.; Ohnishi, M.

    1983-01-01

    Active feedback control of the fusion output power by means of plasma compression-decompression is considered with the purpose of achieving steady-state plasma ignition in a tokamak. A simple but realistic feedback control system is modelled and zero-dimensional energy balance equations are solved numerically by taking into account the errors in the measurements, a procedure that is necessary for the feedback control. It is shown that the control can stabilize the thermal runaway completely and maintain steady-state operation without any significant change in major radius or thermal output power. Linear stability is analysed for a general type of scaling law, and the dependence of the stability conditions on the scaling law is studied. The possibility of load-following operation is considered. Finally, a one-dimensional analysis is applied to the large-aspect-ratio case. (author)

  14. The potential role of perfluorocarbon emulsions in decompression illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiess, Bruce D

    2010-03-01

    Decompression illness (DCI) is an occasional occurrence in sport, professional, and military diving as well as a potential catastrophe in high-altitude flight, space exploration, mining, and caisson bridge construction. DCI theoretically could be a success-limiting problem in escape from a disabled submarine (DISSUB). Perfluorocarbon emulsions (PFCs) have previously been investigated as 'blood substitutes' with one approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of myocardial ischaemia. PFCs possess enhanced (as compared to plasma) respiratory gas solubility characteristics, including oxygen, nitrogen and carbon dioxide. This review examines approximately 30 years of research regarding the utilization of PFCs in gas embolism as well as experimental DCI. To date, no humans have been treated with PFCs for DCI.

  15. Compressed air tunneling and caisson work decompression procedures: development, problems, and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindwall, E P

    1997-01-01

    Multinational experience over many years indicates that all current air decompression schedules for caisson and compressed air tunnel workers are inadequate. All of them, including the Occupational Safety and Health Administration tables, produce dysbaric osteonecrosis. The problem is compounded because decompression sickness (DCS) tends to be underreported. Permanent damage in the form of central nervous system or brain damage may occur in compressed air tunnel workers, as seen on magnetic resonance imaging, in addition to dysbaric osteonecrosis. Oxygen decompression seems to be the only viable method for safely decompressing tunnel workers. Oxygen decompression of tunnel workers has been successfully used in Germany, France, and Brazil. In Germany, only oxygen decompression of compressed air workers is permitted. In our experience, U.S. Navy tables 5 and 6 usually prove adequate to treat DCS in caisson workers despite extremely long exposure times, allowing patients to return to work following treatment for DCS. Tables based on empirical data and not on mathematical formulas seem to be reasonably safe. U.S. Navy Exceptional Exposure Air Decompression tables are compared with caisson tables from the United States and Great Britain.

  16. Computed chest tomography in an animal model for decompression sickness: radiologic, physiologic, and pathologic findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.; Struck, N.; Heller, M.; Tetzlaff, K.; Brasch, F.; Mueller, K.M.; Gerriets, T.; Weiher, M.; Hansen, J.; Hirt, S.

    2000-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the early pulmonary effects of acute decompression in an animal model for human decompression sickness by CT and light microscopy. Ten test pigs were exposed to severe decompression stress in a chamber dive. Three pigs were kept at ambient pressure to serve as controls. Decompression stress was monitored by measurement of pulmonary artery pressure and arterial and venous Doppler recording of bubbles of inert gas. Chest CT was performed pre- and postdive and in addition the inflated lungs were examined after resection. Each lung was investigated by light microscopy. Hemodynamic data and bubble recordings reflected severe decompression stress in the ten test pigs. Computed tomography revealed large quantities of ectopic gas, predominantly intravascular, in three of ten pigs. These findings corresponded to maximum bubble counts in the Doppler study. The remaining test pigs showed lower bubble grades and no ectopic gas by CT. Sporadic interstitial edema was demonstrated in all animals - both test and control pigs - by CT of resected lungs and on histologic examination. A severe compression-decompression schedule can liberate large volumes of inert gas which are detectable by CT. Despite this severe decompression stress, which led to venous microembolism, CT and light microscopy did not demonstrate changes in lung structure related to the experimental dive. Increased extravascular lung water found in all animals may be due to infusion therapy. (orig.)

  17. 2014 Decompression Sickness/Extravehicular Activity Risks Standing Review Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan; Mahon, Richard; Klaus, David; Neuman, Tom; Pilmanis, Andrew; Regis, David

    2014-01-01

    The 2014 Decompression Sickness (DCS)/Extravehicular Activity (EVA) Risks Standing Review Panel (from here on referred to as the SRP) met for a site visit in Houston, TX on November 4 - 5, 2014. The SRP reviewed the Research Plans for The Risk of Decompression Sickness and the Risk of Injury and Compromised Performance due to EVA Operations, as well as the Evidence Reports for both of these Risks. The SRP found that the NASA DCS/EVA team did an excellent job of presenting their research plans. The SRP considers it critical that NASA proceeds with the high priority tasks identified in this report (DCS1, DCS3, DCS5). The highest priority is to determine the acceptable DCS and hypoxia risk associated with the planned human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The risk of DCS is highly dependent upon the pressure within the exploration vehicle. If slightly more hypoxia is permitted then (even with the same percentage of oxygen) the pressure within the exploration vehicle can be lowered thus further mitigating the risk of DCS. The second highest priority is to test and validate the recommended 8.2psi/34% O2 atmosphere. Development of procedures and equipment for human exploration missions are very limited until the results of this testing are completed. The SRP also suggests that DCS7 be separated into two Gaps. Gap DCS7 should deal with DCS treatment while a new Gap should be created to deal with the long-term effects of DCS. The SRP also encourages NASA to increase collaboration with other organizations and pool resources where possible. The current NASA DCS/EVA team has the extensive expertise and a wealth of knowledge in this area. The SRP suggests that increased manpower for this team would be highly productive.

  18. The Mars Project: Avoiding Decompression Sickness on a Distant Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, Johnny

    2000-05-01

    A cost-effective approach for Mars exploration is to use available resources, such as water and atmospheric gases. Nitrogen (N2) and argon (Ar) are available and could form the inert gas component of a habitat atmosphere at 8.0, 9.0, or 10.0 pounds per square inch (psia). The habitat and space suit are designed as an integrated system: a comfortable living environment about 85% of the time and a safe working environment about 15% of the time. A goal is to provide a system that permits unrestricted exploration of Mars, but the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) during the extravehicular activity in a 3.75-psia suit, after exposure to any of the three habitat conditions, may limit unrestricted exploration. I evaluate here the risk of DCS since a significant proportion of a trinary breathing gas in the habitat might contain Ar. I draw on past experience and published information to extrapolate into untested, multivariable conditions to evaluate risk. A rigorous assessment of risk as a probability of DCS for each habitat condition is not yet possible. Based on many assumptions about Ar in hypobaric decompressions, I conclude that the presence of Ar significantly increases the risk of DCS. The risk is significant even with the best habitat option: 2.56 psia oxygen, 3.41 psia N2, and 2.20 psia Ar. Several hours of prebreathing 100% 02, a higher suit pressure, or a combination of other important variables such as limited exposure time on the surface or exercise during prebreathe would be necessary to reduce the risk of DCS to an acceptable level. The acceptable level for DCS risk on Mars has not yet been determined. Mars is a great distance from Earth and therefore from primary medical care. The acceptable risk would necessarily be defined by the capability to treat DCS in the Rover vehicle, in the habitat, or both.

  19. Right thoracic curvature in the normal spine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masuda Keigo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Trunk asymmetry and vertebral rotation, at times observed in the normal spine, resemble the characteristics of adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS. Right thoracic curvature has also been reported in the normal spine. If it is determined that the features of right thoracic side curvature in the normal spine are the same as those observed in AIS, these findings might provide a basis for elucidating the etiology of this condition. For this reason, we investigated right thoracic curvature in the normal spine. Methods For normal spinal measurements, 1,200 patients who underwent a posteroanterior chest radiographs were evaluated. These consisted of 400 children (ages 4-9, 400 adolescents (ages 10-19 and 400 adults (ages 20-29, with each group comprised of both genders. The exclusion criteria were obvious chest and spinal diseases. As side curvature is minimal in normal spines and the range at which curvature is measured is difficult to ascertain, first the typical curvature range in scoliosis patients was determined and then the Cobb angle in normal spines was measured using the same range as the scoliosis curve, from T5 to T12. Right thoracic curvature was given a positive value. The curve pattern was organized in each collective three groups: neutral (from -1 degree to 1 degree, right (> +1 degree, and left ( Results In child group, Cobb angle in left was 120, in neutral was 125 and in right was 155. In adolescent group, Cobb angle in left was 70, in neutral was 114 and in right was 216. In adult group, Cobb angle in left was 46, in neutral was 102 and in right was 252. The curvature pattern shifts to the right side in the adolescent group (p Conclusions Based on standing chest radiographic measurements, a right thoracic curvature was observed in normal spines after adolescence.

  20. CT morphometry of adult thoracic intervertebral discs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Justin G R; Stringer, Mark D; Briggs, Christopher A; Davies, Tilman M; Woodley, Stephanie J

    2015-10-01

    Despite being commonly affected by degenerative disorders, there are few data on normal thoracic intervertebral disc dimensions. A morphometric analysis of adult thoracic intervertebral discs was, therefore, undertaken. Archival computed tomography scans of 128 recently deceased individuals (70 males, 58 females, 20-79 years) with no known spinal pathology were analysed to determine thoracic disc morphometry and variations with disc level, sex and age. Reliability was assessed by intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs). Anterior and posterior intervertebral disc heights and axial dimensions were significantly greater in men (anterior disc height 4.0±1.4 vs 3.6±1.3 mm; posterior disc height 3.6±0.90 vs 3.4±0.93 mm; p<0.01). Disc heights and axial dimensions at T4-5 were similar or smaller than at T2-3, but thereafter increased caudally (mean anterior disc height T4-5 and T10-11, 2.7±0.7 and 5.4±1.2 mm, respectively, in men; 2.6±0.8 and 5.1±1.3 mm, respectively, in women; p<0.05). Except at T2-3, anterior disc height decreased with advancing age and anteroposterior and transverse disc dimensions increased; posterior and middle disc heights and indices of disc shape showed no consistent statistically significant changes. Most parameters showed substantial to almost perfect agreement for intra- and inter-rater reliability. Thoracic disc morphometry varies significantly and consistently with disc level, sex and age. This study provides unique reference data on adult thoracic intervertebral disc morphometry, which may be useful when interpreting pathological changes and for future biomechanical and functional studies.

  1. TU-H-CAMPUS-JeP3-05: Adaptive Determination of Needle Sequence HDR Prostate Brachytherapy with Divergent Needle-By-Needle Delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borot de Battisti, M; Maenhout, M; Lagendijk, J J W; Van Vulpen, M; Moerland, M A; Denis de Senneville, B; Hautvast, G; Binnekamp, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a new method which adaptively determines the optimal needle insertion sequence for HDR prostate brachytherapy involving divergent needle-by-needle dose delivery by e.g. a robotic device. A needle insertion sequence is calculated at the beginning of the intervention and updated after each needle insertion with feedback on needle positioning errors. Methods: Needle positioning errors and anatomy changes may occur during HDR brachytherapy which can lead to errors in the delivered dose. A novel strategy was developed to calculate and update the needle sequence and the dose plan after each needle insertion with feedback on needle positioning errors. The dose plan optimization was performed by numerical simulations. The proposed needle sequence determination optimizes the final dose distribution based on the dose coverage impact of each needle. This impact is predicted stochastically by needle insertion simulations. HDR procedures were simulated with varying number of needle insertions (4 to 12) using 11 patient MR data-sets with PTV, prostate, urethra, bladder and rectum delineated. Needle positioning errors were modeled by random normally distributed angulation errors (standard deviation of 3 mm at the needle’s tip). The final dose parameters were compared in the situations where the needle with the largest vs. the smallest dose coverage impact was selected at each insertion. Results: Over all scenarios, the percentage of clinically acceptable final dose distribution improved when the needle selected had the largest dose coverage impact (91%) compared to the smallest (88%). The differences were larger for few (4 to 6) needle insertions (maximum difference scenario: 79% vs. 60%). The computation time of the needle sequence optimization was below 60s. Conclusion: A new adaptive needle sequence determination for HDR prostate brachytherapy was developed. Coupled to adaptive planning, the selection of the needle with the largest dose coverage impact

  2. CT-assisted transcutaneous interstitial implantation of thoracic tumors: Early experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heelan, R.T.; Hilaris, B.S.; Anderson, L.; Caravelli, J.F.; Nori, D.; Martini, N.; Watson, R.C.; Linares, L.

    1986-01-01

    The authors have transcutaneously implanted I-125 radioactive seeds in six patients with thoracic tumors (three with lung cancer; three with metastases) to determine the feasibility of this procedure. In four patients the thoracic tumors were localized without evidence of distant metastases, but these patients were not candidates for resection because of chronic pulmonary disease. Tumor volume was measured on CT scans (with sagittal and coronal reconstructions) and the required number of seeds was determined based on tumor volume. Between 6 and 11 needles were placed in the tumor and the seeds were implanted as the needle was withdrawn. Between 40 and 60 seeds were implanted in each patient, under local anesthesia. In this preliminary series all patients were found to have tumor attached to pleura. Four of the six patients underwent implantation during a day-time admission to the institution's Adult Day Hospital. No patient suffered any complication as a result of the procedure. Four patients experienced a symptomatic relief of pain and a decrease in size of tumor bulk (local control). Two patients eventually exhibited renewed tumor growth in the edges of the implanted mass after 6 months; the authors plan to supplement future implantations with external radiation therapy. One patient underwent implantation after local recurrence of tumor, returned to work the day following the procedure, and is without evidence of local recurrence 18 months later. They are encouraged by these preliminary results, for several reasons: the lack of morbidity, the achievement of local control of tumor while avoiding surgery and its potential complications, and avoidance of hospital stay (with consequent financial savings). The intent is to expand this series to include patients with lung tumors not attached to pleura

  3. EUS needle identification comparison and evaluation (NICE) study (with videos)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shou-jiang; Vilmann, Andreas S.; Saftoiu, Adrian; Wang, Wanmei; Streba, Costin; Fink, Peter P.; Griswold, Michael; Wu, Ruonan; Dietrich, Christoph F.; Jenssen, Christian; Hocke, Michael; Kantowski, Marcus; Pohl, Jürgen; Fockens, Paul; Annema, Jouke T.; van der Heijden, Erik H.F.M.; Havre, Roald Flesland; Pham, Khanh Do-Cong; Kunda, Rastislav; Deprez, Pierre H.; Mariana, Jinga; Vazquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Larghi, Alberto; Buscarini, Elisabetta; Fusaroli, Pietro; Lahav, Maor; Puri, Rajesh; Garg, Pramod Kumar; Sharma, Malay; Maluf-Filho, Fauze; Sahai, Anand; Brugge, William R.; Lee, Linda S.; Aslanian, Harry R.; Wang, Andrew Y.; Shami, Vanessa M.; Markowitz, Arnold; Siddiqui, Ali A.; Mishra, Girish; Scheiman, James M.; Isenberg, Gerard; Siddiqui, Uzma D.; Shah, Raj J.; Buxbaum, James; Watson, Rabindra R.; Willingham, Field F.; Bhutani, Manoop S.; Levy, Michael J.; Harris, Cynthia; Wallace, Michael B.; Nolsøe, Christian Pállson; Lorentzen, Torben; Bang, Niels; Sørensen, Sten Mellerup; Gilja, Odd Helge; D’Onofrio, Mirko; Piscaglia, Fabio; Gritzmann, Norbert; Radzina, Maija; Sparchez, Zeno Adrian; Sidhu, Paul S.; Freeman, Simon; McCowan, Timothy C.; de Araujo, Cyrillo Rodrigues; Patel, Akash; del Ali, Mohammad A; Campbell, Garth; Chen, Edward; Vilmann, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Background and Aims Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS)-guided fine-needle aspiration (FNA) or biopsy is widely practiced. Optimal sonographic visualization of the needle is critical for image guided interventions. There are several commercially available needles but no bench-top testing and direct comparison of these needles to reveal their inherent echogenicity. The aims are to provide bench-top data that can be used to guide clinical applications and to promote future device research and development. Methods Descriptive bench-top testing and comparison. Bench-top testing of 8 commonly used EUS-FNA needles (all of 22 gauge in size): SonoTip Pro Control (Medi-Globe); Expect Slimline (Boston Scientific); EchoTip, EchoTip Ultra, EchoTip ProCore High Definition, (Cook Medical); ClearView (Conmed); EZ Shot2 (Olympus); BNX (Beacon Endoscopic); and 2 new prototype needles that are coated by echogenic polymers by Medi-Globe. Blinded evaluation of standardized and unedited videos by 43 EUS endoscopists and 17 radiologists specialized in gastrointestinal ultrasound examination that is unfamiliar with EUS needle devices. Results There was no significant difference in the ratings and rankings of these needles between endosonographers and radiologists. Overall, one prototype needle was rated as the best, ranking 10% to 40% higher than all other needles (p<0.01). Among the commercially available needles, the EchoTip Ultra needle and the ClearView needle were top choices. The EZ Shot 2 needle was ranked statistically lower than other needles (30%–75% worse, p<0.001). Conclusions All FNA needles have their inherent and different echogenicity, and these differences are similarly recognized by EUS endoscopists and radiologists. Needles with polymeric coating from the entire shaft to the needle tip may offer better echogenicity. PMID:26873530

  4. Medically relevant ElectroNeedle technology development.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmidt, Carrie Frances; Thomas, Michael Loren; McClain, Jaime L.; Harper, Jason C.; Achyuthan, Komandoor E.; Ten Eyck, Gregory A.

    2008-11-01

    ElectroNeedles technology was developed as part of an earlier Grand Challenge effort on Bio-Micro Fuel Cell project. During this earlier work, the fabrication of the ElectroNeedles was accomplished along with proof-of-concept work on several electrochemically active analytes such as glucose, quinone and ferricyanide. Additionally, earlier work demonstrated technology potential in the field of immunosensors by specifically detecting Troponin, a cardiac biomarker. The current work focused upon fabrication process reproducibility of the ElectroNeedles and then using the devices to sensitively detect p-cresol, a biomarker for kidney failure or nephrotoxicity. Valuable lessons were learned regarding fabrication assurance and quality. The detection of p-cresol was accomplished by electrochemistry as well as using fluorescence to benchmark ElectroNeedles performance. Results from these studies will serve as a guide for the future fabrication processes involving ElectroNeedles as well as provide the groundwork necessary to expand technology applications. One paper has been accepted for publication acknowledging LDRD funding (K. E. Achyuthan et al, Comb. Chem. & HTS, 2008). We are exploring the scope for a second paper describing the applications potential of this technology.

  5. Unusual Clinical Presentation and Role of Decompressive Craniectomy in Herpes Simplex Encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singhi, Pratibha; Saini, Arushi Gahlot; Sahu, Jitendra Kumar; Kumar, Nuthan; Vyas, Sameer; Vasishta, Rakesh Kumar; Aggarwal, Ashish

    2015-08-01

    Decompressive craniectomy in pediatric central nervous infections with refractory intracranial hypertension is less commonly practiced. We describe improved outcome of decompressive craniectomy in a 7-year-old boy with severe herpes simplex encephalitis and medically refractory intracranial hypertension, along with a brief review of the literature. Timely recognition of refractory intracranial hypertension and surgical decompression in children with herpes simplex encephalitis can be life-saving. Additionally, strokelike atypical presentations are being increasingly recognized in children with herpes simplex encephalitis and should not take one away from the underlying herpes simplex encephalitis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  6. Evaluation on therapeutic effect of de-compressive craniectomies for patients with diffuse brain swelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Sanchao; Zhang Changrong; Zuo Yi; Zhou Xiaowei; Li Jian

    2000-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the therapeutic effect of de-compressive craniectomies in acute traumatic patients with diffuse brain swelling. Methods: 23 patients with acute posttraumatic diffuse brain swelling admitted and confirmed by X-CT were randomly treated by surgical de-compressive craniectomies (operative group). Their treated results were compared with those of another 11 patients treated conservatively (non-operative group) at the same period. Results: The mortality rate was similar in both operative and nonoperative groups. Conclusion: The de-compressive craniectomy operation has no value and not valid for treatment of acute posttraumatic diffuse brain swelling

  7. Effect of Blinding With a New Pragmatic Placebo Needle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Baoyan; Xu, Huanfang; Ma, Rui; Mo, Qian; Yan, Shiyan; Liu, Zhishun

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Placebo control is a useful method for determining the efficacy of a therapy. In acupuncture researches, the preferred method for placebo control is acupuncture using a placebo needle that has a blunt tip and achieves no skin penetration. We performed a crossover study to validate the blinding effect of a new type of placebo needle. Sixty volunteers were randomized to receive acupuncture using 2 types of needles with different sequences: sequence AB, involving first the pragmatic placebo needle and then the real needle, and sequence BA, in a reverse order. Placebo acupuncture was performed by administering the placebo needle through an adhesive pad without skin penetration on the acupoints LI4, RN12, BL25, and BL36. Real acupuncture was performed by needling through the pad and penetrating the skin to 15 mm using a real needle on the same acupoints. The acupuncture was administered every other day with 3 sessions for 1 type of needle. The primary outcome was the perception of needle penetration. Besides degree of acupuncture pain, type, and degree of needle sensation, needle acceptability and factors influencing the subject blinding effect were assessed. Needle penetration was felt by 100%, 90% (54/60), 88.3% (53/60), and 95% (57/60) of volunteers receiving placebo acupuncture and 98.3% (59/60), 96.7% (58/60), 95% (57/60), and 95% (57/60) of volunteers receiving real acupuncture on LI4, RN12, BL25, and BL36, respectively. Differences of the volunteers’ perception of needle penetration between the placebo needle and real needle were not significant for the 4 acupoints (all P > 0.05). Volunteers experienced fewer distension sensations (P = 0.01), a lower degree of needle sensation (P = 0.007), and less pain (P = 0.006) during placebo acupuncture than during real acupuncture. The placebo needle was more easily accepted than the real needle (OR = 1.63, 95% CI, 1.01–2.64). The influences of age, sex, educational level, acupuncture

  8. [Effects of slow twisting needle insertion and tubing needle insertion at Neiguan (PC 6) on cardiovascular function: a comparative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Shaoli; Zhao, Lihua; Xu, Lingjun; Huang, Yu; Pang, Yong; Huang, Dingjian

    2016-01-01

    To compare the effects between slow twisting needle insertion and tubing needle insertion. With cross-over design, 100 healthy young subjects (half male and half female) aged from 19 to 23 years were randomly divided into two groups by random digital table, 50 cases in each one. At the first stage, subjects in the group A were treated with slow twisting needle insertion while, subjects in,the group B were treated with tubing needle insertion. One week later, the procedure of second stage was performed alternately. The needle was inserted into Neiguan (PC 6) with two methods by one acupuncturist. The needle was retained for 5 min before removal. Five min before needle insertion as well as needle withdrawal and 30 min after needle withdrawal, ZXG-E automatic cardiovascular diagnostic apparatus was used to test cardiovascular function. At the tim of needle withdrawal, slow twisting needle insertion could improve effect work of kinetics (EWK), effective blood volume (BV) and reduce elastic expansion coefficient of blood vessel (FEK) and left ventricular spray blood impedance (VER), which was significantly different from tubing needle insertion (all P 0.05). The slow twisting needle insertion is significantly superior to tubing needle insertion on lowering vascular tension and VER, improving EWK and BV.

  9. Spruce needles used as radioecological biotracers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seidel, C.; Gruber, V.; Baumgartner, A.

    2009-01-01

    In a two years project spruce needle samples of the Austrian Bioindicator Grid were analysed by gamma-ray spectrometry to investigate the spatial and temporal distribution of radionuclides in spruce needles of the last 25 years with the main focus on the radioactive contamination before and after the Chernobyl fallout 1986. More than 600 spruce needle samples at selected locations of the Bioindicator Grid were analysed for different natural and anthropogenic radionuclides: 137 Cs, 40 K, 210 Pb, 226 Ra, 228 Ra, 238 U. Additionally, soil samples were taken at selected sites to study the soil-to-plant transfer. This radioecological evaluation is an important part of an existing environmental surveillance programme in Upper Austria in order to gain basic information on the impact of environmental changes on the radioecological behaviour of spruce trees. (orig.)

  10. The European educational platform on thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massard, Gilbert; Rocco, Gaetano; Venuta, Federico

    2014-05-01

    As the largest scientific organisation world-wide exclusively dedicated to general thoracic surgery (GTS), the European Society of Thoracic Surgeons (ESTS) recognized that one of its priorities is education. The educational platform designed ESTS addresses not only trainees, but also confirmed thoracic surgeons. The two main aims are (I) to prepare trainees to graduation and to the certification by the European Board of Thoracic Surgery and (II) to offer opportunities for continuous medical education in the perspective of life-long learning and continuous professional development to certified thoracic surgeons. It is likely that recertification will become an obligation during the coming decade. At its inception, the platform differentiated two different events. A 6-day course emphasizing on theoretic knowledge was created in Antalya in 2007. The same year, a 2-day school oriented to practical issues with hands-on in the animal lab was launched in Antalya. These two teaching tracks need further development. In the knowledge track, we intend to organize highly specialized 2-day courses to deepen insight into theoretical questions. The skill track will be implemented by specialized courses for high technology such as tracheal surgery, ECMO, robotics or chest wall reconstruction. In order to promote tomorrows' leadership, we created an academic competence track giving an insight into medical communication, methodology and management. We also had to respond to an increasing demand from the Russian speaking countries, where colleagues may face problems to attend western meetings, and where the language bareer may be a major impediment. We initiated a Russian school with three events yearly in 2012. Contemporary teaching must be completed with an e-learning platform, which is currently under development. The school activities are organized by the educational committee, which is headed by the ESTS Director of Education, assisted by coordinators of the teaching tracks and

  11. Magnetic resonance-thoracic ductography. Imaging aid for thoracic surgery and thoracic duct depiction based on embryological considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuda, Itsuko; Udagawa, Harushi; Takahashi, Junji; Yamase, Hiromi; Kohno, Tadasu; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2009-01-01

    We describe the optimal protocol of magnetic resonance-thoracic ductography (MRTD) and provide examples of thoracic ducts (TD) and various anomalies. The anatomical pathway of the TD was analyzed based on embryological considerations. A total of 78 subjects, consisting of noncancer adults and patients with esophageal cancer and lung cancer, were enrolled. The MRTD protocol included a long echo time and was based on emphasizing signals from the liquid fraction and suppressing other signals, based on the principle that lymph flow through the TD appears hyperintense on T2-weighted images. The TD configuration was classified into nine types based on location [right and/or left side(s) of the descending aorta] and outflow [right and/or left venous angle(s)]. MRTD was conducted in 78 patients, and the three-dimensional reconstruction was considered to provide excellent view of the TD in 69 patients, segmentalization of TD in 4, and a poor view of the TD in 5. MRTD achieved a visualization rate of 94%. Most of the patients had a right-side TD that flowed into the left venous angle. Major configuration variations were noted in 14% of cases. Minor anomalies, such as divergence and meandering, were frequently seen. MRTD allows noninvasive evaluation of TD and can be used to identify TD configuration. Thus, this technique is considered to contribute positively to safer performance of thoracic surgery. (author)

  12. Fine needle diagnosis in lumbar osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Joshi, K.B.; Brinker, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    Lumbar vertebral body and disk infection, presenting as low back pain, is a relatively uncommon disease but is seen more often in drug addicts. Radiographs show typical changes of infection of the lumbar vertebrae and adjacent disc. Under local anesthesia a fine needle is placed, saline injected, and aspirated. The entire needle-syringe unit is submitted to the bacteriology department. Pseudomonas infection is usually found. This method of diagnosis is simple, cost effective, well accepted by the patients, and can be done on outpatients. (orig.)

  13. [King Injo's disease and burnt needle therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, In-Sook

    2004-12-01

    This paper investigates an interrelationship between burnt needle therapy and King Injo's disease. From 1633 (Year 11 in King Injo's reign) to May 5, 1649 (Year 27 in King Injo's reign), right before his death, King Injo was treated with burnt needles by Yi Hyeongik, an acupuncturist when the king had health problems. This study arises from two questions: why was King Injo often treated with burnt needles? and what effect did burnt needles have?Burnt needle therapy is a combined form of acupuncture and moxibustion. Yi Hyeongik was famous for eradicating pathogenic factors. He was appointed as a doctor in the Royal Hospital. The medical definition for pathogenic factors is that they are disease-causing factors. Understanding the pathogenic factor for King Injo's disease could make it possible to find the interrelationship between burnt needles and the king's disease. In the Joseon ear, the prevalent belief about diseases was that diseases could be caused by homeopathic magic. Some people thought homeopathic magic caused King Injo's disease. The actual reasons for King Injo's disease were the participation in the excessive rites of Queen Mother Inmok's funeral and the constant oppression from the Ching Dynasty after disgraceful defeat in the war. When King Injo started to be sick, homeopathic magic cases were found in the royal palace. The king's incurable disease was believed to have happened as a result of homeopathic magic. King Injo's suspicion toward Princess Jeongmyeong derived from her mother, Queen Mother Inmok. Moral justification for King Injo's coup was Gwanghaegun or Prince Gwanghae's immoral conduct toward Queen Mothe Inmok. After he was installed, King Injo obeyed the Queen Mother and showed her every attention. Meanwhile, he treated Princess Jeongmyeong with respect, maximized the moral justification for the coup, and solidified the royal authority. However, constant rebellions and treasons threatened King Injo. The king suspected that Queen Mother

  14. King Injo's Disease and Burnt Needle Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    KIM In-Sook

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates an interrelationship between burnt needle therapy(번침 and King Injo'sdisease. From 1633 (Year 11 in King Injo's reign to May 5, 1649 (Year 27 King in Injo's reign, right before his death, King Injo(인조 was treated with burnt needles by Yi Hyeongik(이형익, an acupuncturist when the king had health problems. This study arises from two questions: why was King Injo often treated with burnt needles? and what effect did burnt needles have? Burnt needle therapy is a combined form of acupuncture and moxibustion. Yi Hyeongik was famous for eradicating pathogenic factors. He was appointed as a doctor in the Royal Hospital. The medical definition for pathogenic factors is that they are disease-causing factors. Understanding the pathogenic factor for King Injo's disease could make it possible to find the interrelationship between burnt needles and the king's disease. In the Joseon era, the prevalent belief about diseases was that diseases could be caused by homeopathic magic. Some people thought homeopathic magic caused King Injo's disease.  The actual reasons for King Injo's disease were the participation in the excessive rites of Queen Mother Inmok's funeral and the constant oppression from the Ching Dynasty after disgraceful defeat in the war. When King Injo started to be sick, homeopathic magic cases were found in the royal palace. The king's incurable disease was believed to have happened as a result of homeopathic magic. King Injo's suspicion toward Princess Jeongmyeong(정명공주 derived from her mother, Queen Mother Inmok(인목대비. Moral justification for King Injo's coup was Gwanghaegun(광해군 or Prince Gwanghae's immoral conduct toward Queen Mother Inmok. After he was installed, King Injo obeyed the Queen Mother and showed her every attention. Meanwhile, he treated Princess Jeongmyeong with respect, maximized the moral justification for the coup, and solidified the royal authority. However, constant

  15. Arterial puncture using insulin needle is less painful than with standard needle: a randomized crossover study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Irwani; Yau, Ying Wei; Ong, Lizhen; Chan, Yiong Huak; Kuan, Win Sen

    2015-03-01

    Arterial punctures are important procedures performed by emergency physicians in the assessment of ill patients. However, arterial punctures are painful and can create anxiety and needle phobia in patients. The pain score of radial arterial punctures were compared between the insulin needle and the standard 23-gauge hypodermic needle. In a randomized controlled crossover design, healthy volunteers were recruited to undergo bilateral radial arterial punctures. They were assigned to receive either the insulin or the standard needle as the first puncture, using blocked randomization. The primary outcome was the pain score measured on a 100-mm visual analogue scale (VAS) for pain, and secondary outcomes were rate of hemolysis, mean potassium values, and procedural complications immediately and 24 hours postprocedure. Fifty healthy volunteers were included in the study. The mean (±standard deviation) VAS score in punctures with the insulin needle was lower than the standard needle (23 ± 22 mm vs. 39 ± 24 mm; mean difference = -15 mm; 95% confidence interval = -22 mm to -7 mm; p standard needle (31.3% vs. 11.6%, p = 0.035; and 4.6 ±0.7 mmol/L vs. 4.2 ±0.5 mmol/L, p = 0.002). Procedural complications were lower in punctures with the insulin needle both immediately postprocedure (0% vs. 24%; p standard needles. However, due to the higher rate of hemolysis, its use should be limited to conditions that do not require a concurrent potassium value in the same blood sample. © 2015 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  16. Teaching practices of thoracic epidural catheterizations in different grade of anesthesia residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Alagoz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: In this study, we aimed to clarify the importance of residency grade and other factors which influence the success of thoracic epidural catheterization in thoracotomy patients. Methods: After the ethical committee approval, data were recorded retrospectively from the charts of 415 patients. All patients had given written informed consent. The thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were divided into two groups as second–third year (Group I and fourth year (Group II according to residency grade. We retrospectively collected demographic data, characteristics of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts, and all difficulties and complications during thoracic epidural catheterization. Results: Overall success rate of thoracic epidural catheterization was similar between the groups. Levels of catheter placement, number and duration of thoracic epidural catheterization attempts were not different between the groups (p > 0.05. Change of needle insertion level was statistically higher in Group II (p = 0.008, whereas paresthesia was significantly higher in Group I (p = 0.007. Dural puncture and postdural puncture headache rates were higher in Group I. Higher body mass index and level of the insertion site were significant factors for thoracic epidural catheterization failure and postoperative complication rate and those were independence from residents’ experience (p  0,05. A alteração do nível de inserção da agulha foi estatisticamente maior no Grupo II (p = 0,008, enquanto que a parestesia foi significativamente maior no Grupo I (p = 0,007. As taxas de cefaléia durante e após punção dural foram maiores no Grupo I. Um índice de massa corporal (IMC maior e o nível do local de inserção foram fatores significativos para o fracasso do CET e para as taxas de complicações no pós-operatório, mas independentes da experiência dos residentes (p < 0,001, 0,005. Conclusão: O IMC e o nível do local

  17. Technical strategies and anatomic considerations for parapedicular access to thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beall, Douglas P.; Martin, Hal D.; Stapp, Annette M.; Puckett, Timothy A.; Stechison, M.T.; Braswell, John J.

    2007-01-01

    To investigate and illustrate a variation on the traditional percutaneous access to the vertebral body via a parapedicular approach. An effective parapedicular access technique that could safely and reliably guide the needle tip into the center of the vertebral body was developed from cadaver dissection observations for the purpose of clinical use. A total of 102 vertebral compression fractures from T-4 to L-5 were treated via the parapedicular access at our institution between July 2005 and March 2006. There were 72 patients between the ages of 17 and 96 years (mean age: 68.2 years) who underwent treatment. The cadaver dissection revealed a relatively avascular and aneural portion of the vertebral body along the superior margin of the vertebral body-pedicle junction. A total 102 vertebral fractures were treated using the parapedicular access technique without any recognized clinical complications from the needle access or the instrumentation. The thoracic and lumbar vertebral bodies may be safely, reliably, and reproducibly accessed using a percutaneous parapedicular access technique. The technique presented represents a relatively avascular and aneural approach to vertebral body. (orig.)

  18. Analysis of the NovoTwist pen needle in comparison with conventional screw-thread needles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aye, Tandy

    2011-11-01

    Administration of insulin via a pen device may be advantageous over a vial and syringe system. Hofman and colleagues introduce a new insulin pen needle, the NovoTwist, to simplify injections to a small group of children and adolescents. Their overall preferences and evaluation of the handling of the needle are reported in the study. This new needle has the potential to ease administration of insulin via a pen device that may increase both the use of a pen device and adherence to insulin therapy. © 2011 Diabetes Technology Society.

  19. A study on models of the inhomogeneity of the decompression in a bubble chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badier, J.

    1961-01-01

    Before building a hydrogen bubble chamber with liquid decompression the 'Saturne' cyclotron department wished to study for this chamber a shape leading to a homogeneous decompression as far as possible, without the production of vortices even after prolonged operation. The 'Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aeronautiques' (ONERA) were ready to carry out experiments on a model by strioscopy. The model was filled with air but an attempt was made to simulate the actual conditions as far as possible by varying the speed of the piston. The model was placed at one end of a tunnel, at the other end of which were produced alternatively compression and decompression waves. The study made it possible to conclude that it was necessary to make the base of the chamber round and that, in the space between the decompression cylinder and the body of the chamber it was advantageous to use 5 fins instead of 3. (author) [fr

  20. Decompressive craniectomy in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage for hematoma or oedema versus secondary infarction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedemans, Taco; Verbaan, Dagmar; Coert, Bert A.; Sprengers, Marieke E. S.; van den Berg, René; Vandertop, W. Peter; van den Munckhof, Pepijn

    2017-01-01

    Decompressive craniectomy (DC) has been proposed as lifesaving treatment in aneurysmal subarachnoid haemorrhage (aSAH) patients with elevated intracranial pressure (ICP). However, data is sparse and controversy exists whether the underlying cause of elevated ICP influences neurological outcome. The

  1. Human Decompression Trial With 1.3 ATA Oxygen in Helium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1998-01-01

    The Naval Medical Research Institute (NMRI) was tasked to develop helium-oxygen decompression tables for a proposed closed circuit breathing apparatus which Will deliver a constant oxygen partial pressure of 1.3 atmospheres (ATA...

  2. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY OF DECOMPRESSION, PERMEABILITY AND HEALING OF SILICATE ROCKS IN FAULT ZONES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ya. Medvedev

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article presents results of petrophysical laboratory experiments in studies of decompression phenomena associated with consequences of abrupt displacements in fault zones. Decompression was studied in cases of controlled pressure drop that caused sharp changes of porosity and permeability parameters, and impacts of such decompression were analyzed. Healing of fractured-porous medium by newly formed phases was studied. After experiments with decompression, healing of fractures and pores in silicate rock samples (3×2×2 cm, 500 °C, 100 MPa took about 800–1000 hours, and strength of such rocks was restored to 0.6–0.7 of the original value. In nature, fracture healing is influenced by a variety of factors, such as size of discontinuities in rock masses, pressure and temperature conditions, pressure drop gradients, rock composition and saturation with fluid. Impacts of such factors are reviewed.

  3. Interspinous process device versus standard conventional surgical decompression for lumbar spinal stenosis: Randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.A. Moojen (Wouter); M.P. Arts (Mark); W.C.H. Jacobs (Wilco); E.W. van Zwet (Erik); M.E. van den Akker-van Marle (Elske); B.W. Koes (Bart); C.L.A.M. Vleggeert-Lankamp (Carmen); W.C. Peul (Wilco)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract Objective To assess whether interspinous process device implantation is more effective in the short term than conventional surgical decompression for patients with intermittent neurogenic claudication due to lumbar spinal stenosis. Design Randomized controlled

  4. Transconjunctival orbital decompression in Graves' ophthalmopathy: lateral wall approach ab interno

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.A. Paridaens (Dion); K. Verhoeff; D. Bouwens; W.A. van den Bosch (Willem)

    2000-01-01

    textabstractAIMS: A modified surgical technique is described to perform a one, two, or three wall orbital decompression in patients with Graves' ophthalmopathy. METHODS: The lateral wall was approached ab interno through a "swinging eyelid" approach (lateral canthotomy

  5. Early versus late orbital decompression in Graves' orbitopathy: a retrospective study in 125 patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baldeschi, Lelio; Wakelkamp, Iris M. M. J.; Lindeboom, Robert; Prummel, Marc F.; Wiersinga, Wilmar M.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine if early rehabilitative orbital decompression in Graves' orbitopathy (GO) leads to a more effective postoperative outcome than the same intervention performed at a later, more likely, fibrotic stage. DESIGN: Retrospective comparative case series. PARTICIPANTS: The medical

  6. [Digital thoracic radiology: devices, image processing, limits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frija, J; de Géry, S; Lallouet, F; Guermazi, A; Zagdanski, A M; De Kerviler, E

    2001-09-01

    In a first part, the different techniques of digital thoracic radiography are described. Since computed radiography with phosphore plates are the most commercialized it is more emphasized. But the other detectors are also described, as the drum coated with selenium and the direct digital radiography with selenium detectors. The other detectors are also studied in particular indirect flat panels detectors and the system with four high resolution CCD cameras. In a second step the most important image processing are discussed: the gradation curves, the unsharp mask processing, the system MUSICA, the dynamic range compression or reduction, the soustraction with dual energy. In the last part the advantages and the drawbacks of computed thoracic radiography are emphasized. The most important are the almost constant good quality of the pictures and the possibilities of image processing.

  7. Comminuted fracture of the thoracic spine.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Cashman, J P

    2012-02-03

    BACKGROUND: Road deaths fell initially after the introduction of the penalty points but despite this, the rate of spinal injuries remained unchanged. AIMS: We report a patient with a dramatic spinal injury, though without neurological deficit. We discuss the classification, management and economic impact of these injuries. METHODS: We describe the management of a patient with a comminuted thoracic spinal fracture without neurological injury. We conducted a literature review with regard to the availability of literature of the management of these injuries. RESULTS: This 17-year-old female was managed surgically and had a good functional outcome. There is no clear consensus in the published literature on the management of these injuries. CONCLUSIONS: Comminuted thoracic spinal factures are potentially devastating. Such a patient presents challenges in determining the appropriate treatment.

  8. Palpation of the upper thoracic spine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Wulff; Vach, Werner; Vach, Kirstin

    2002-01-01

    procedure. RESULTS: Using an "expanded" definition of agreement that accepts small inaccuracies (+/-1 segment) in the numbering of spinal segments, we found--based on the pooled data from the thoracic spine--kappa values of 0.59 to 0.77 for the hour-to-hour and the day-to-day intraobserver reliability......OBJECTIVE: To assess the intraobserver reliability (in terms of hour-to-hour and day-to-day reliability) and the interobserver reliability with 3 palpation procedures for the detection of spinal biomechanic dysfunction in the upper 8 segments of the thoracic spine. DESIGN: A repeated....... INTERVENTION: Three types of palpation were performed: Sitting motion palpation and prone motion palpation for biomechanic dysfunction and paraspinal palpation for tenderness. Each dimension was rated as "absent" or "present" for each segment. All examinations were performed according to a standard written...

  9. Incidental Cardiac Findings on Thoracic Imaging.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Kok, Hong Kuan

    2013-02-07

    The cardiac structures are well seen on nongated thoracic computed tomography studies in the investigation and follow-up of cardiopulmonary disease. A wide variety of findings can be incidentally picked up on careful evaluation of the pericardium, cardiac chambers, valves, and great vessels. Some of these findings may represent benign variants, whereas others may have more profound clinical importance. Furthermore, the expansion of interventional and surgical practice has led to the development and placement of new cardiac stents, implantable pacemaker devices, and prosthetic valves with which the practicing radiologist should be familiar. We present a collection of common incidental cardiac findings that can be readily identified on thoracic computed tomography studies and briefly discuss their clinical relevance.

  10. March 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was a special meeting. In conjunction with the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and the Arizona Respiratory Center the Eighteenth Annual Farness Lecture was held in the Sonntag Pavilion at St. Joseph's Hospital at 6 PM on Friday, April 4, 2014. The guest speaker was Antonio "Tony" Catanzaro, MD from the University of California San Diego and current president of the Cocci Study Group. There were 57 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and infectious disease communities. After opening remarks by Arizona Thoracic Society president, Lewis Wesselius (a former fellow under Dr. Catanzaro at UCSD, John Galgiani, director of the Valley Fever Center for Excellence, gave a brief history of the Farness lecture before introducing Dr. Catanzaro. The lecture is named for Orin J. Farness, a Tucson physician, who was the first to report culture positive coccidioidomycosis (cocci or Valley Fever. ...

  11. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome: CT and MRI features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rousset, P.; Rousset-Jablonski, C.; Alifano, M.; Mansuet-Lupo, A.; Buy, J.-N.; Revel, M.-P.

    2014-01-01

    Thoracic endometriosis is considered to be rare, but is the most frequent form of extra-abdominopelvic endometriosis. Thoracic endometriosis syndrome affects women of reproductive age. Diagnosis is mainly based on clinical findings, which can include catamenial pneumothorax and haemothorax, non-catamenial endometriosis-related pneumothorax, catamenial haemoptysis, lung nodules, and isolated catamenial chest pain. Symptoms are typically cyclical and recurrent, with a right-sided predominance. Computed tomography (CT) is the first-line imaging method, but is poorly specific; therefore, its main role is to rule out other pulmonary diseases. However, in women with a typical clinical history, some key CT findings may help to confirm this often under-diagnosed syndrome. MRI can also assist with the diagnosis, by showing signal changes typical of haemorrhage within diaphragmatic or pleural lesions

  12. Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid An ... Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? What is Ultrasound-Guided Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy of the Thyroid? During ...

  13. Effect of ponderosa pine needle litter on grass seedling survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burt R. McConnell; Justin G. Smith

    1971-01-01

    Hard fescue survival rates were followed for 6 years on four different pine needle treatment plots. Needle litter had a significant effect on initial survival of fescue seedlings, but subsequent losses undoubtedly resulted from the interaction of many factors.

  14. Using insulin pen needles up to five times does not affect needle tip shape nor increase pain intensity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puder, Jardena J; Atar, Michael; Muller, Beat; Pavan, Marco; Keller, Ulrich

    2005-02-01

    Reusing insulin pen needles could help to reduce the increasing economic burden of diabetes. We tested the hypothesis that reusing insulin pen needles leads to needle tip deformity and increased pain. Three blinded reviewers assessed 123 electron microscope pictures analyzing needle tip deformity of insulin pen needles used up to four times by diabetic subjects and up to five times by blinded non-diabetic volunteers. The estimated frequency of needle use was correlated to the actual number of needle use. Pain intensity and unpleasantness of each injection were measured by a visual analogue scale and their differences analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. Unused needles could be differentiated visually from used needles. However, there was no correlation between the actual and guessed number of times a needle was used (r = 0.07, P = 0.2). Evaluating all 270 injections, neither pain intensity nor unpleasantness increased with repeated injections of the same needles in people with diabetes (P = 0.1 and 0.96) and in the volunteers (P = 0.63 and 0.92). Using pen needles four to five times does not lead to progressive needle tip deformity and does not increase pain intensity or unpleasantness, but could increase convenience and lead to substantial financial savings in Europe of around EUR 100 million/year.

  15. Thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Tomoyuki; Urata, Teruo; Nemoto, Daisuke; Hitomi, Shigemi

    2017-03-01

    We report a case of thoracic empyema caused by Campylobacter rectus, an organism considered as a periodontal pathogen but rarely recovered from extraoral specimens. The patient fully recovered through drainage of purulent pleural fluid and administration of antibiotics. The present case illustrates that C. rectus can be a cause of not only periodontal disease but also pulmonary infection. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The thoracic paraspinal shadow: normal appearances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, H H; Kolbenstvedt, A

    1982-01-01

    The width of the right and left thoracic paraspinal shadows were measured at all levels in 200 presumably normal individuals. The paraspinal shadow could be identified in nearly all cases on the left side and in approximately one-third on the right. The range of variation was greater on the left side than one the right. The left paraspinal shadow was wider at the upper levels and in individuals above 40 years of age.

  17. March 2014 Arizona thoracic society notes

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins RA

    2014-01-01

    No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The March 2014 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was a special meeting. In conjunction with the Valley Fever Center for Excellence and the Arizona Respiratory Center the Eighteenth Annual Farness Lecture was held in the Sonntag Pavilion at St. Joseph's Hospital at 6 PM on Friday, April 4, 2014. The guest speaker was Antonio "Tony" Catanzaro, MD from the University of California San Diego and current president of the Cocci Study Group. T...

  18. Emergency thoracic surgery in elderly patients

    OpenAIRE

    Limmer, Stefan; Unger, Lena; Czymek, Ralf; Kujath, Peter; Hoffmann, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Objectives Emergency thoracic surgery in the elderly represents an extreme situation for both the surgeon and patient. The lack of an adequate patient history as well as the inability to optimize any co-morbidities, which are the result of the emergent situation, are the cause of increased morbidity and mortality. We evaluated the outcome and prognostic factors for this selected group of patients. Design Retrospective chart review. Setting Academic tertiary care referral center. Participants ...

  19. Oxygen breathing accelerates decompression from saturation at 40 msw in 70-kg swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Kyle; Soutiere, Shawn E; Tucker, Kathryn E; Dainer, Hugh M; Mahon, Richard T

    2010-07-01

    Submarine disaster survivors can be transferred from a disabled submarine at a pressure of 40 meters of seawater (msw) to a new rescue vehicle; however, they face an inherently risky surface interval before recompression and an enormous decompression obligation due to a high likelihood of saturation. The goal was to design a safe decompression protocol using oxygen breathing and a trial-and-error methodology. We hypothesized that depth, timing, and duration of oxygen breathing during decompression from saturation play a role to mitigate decompression outcomes. Yorkshire swine (67-75 kg), compressed to 40 msw for 22 h, underwent one of three accelerated decompression profiles: (1) 13.3 h staged air decompression to 18 msw, followed by 1 h oxygen breathing, then dropout; (2) direct decompression to 18 msw followed by 1 h oxygen breathing then dropout; and (3) 1 h oxygen prebreathe at 40 msw followed by 1 h mixed gas breathing at 26 msw, 1 h oxygen breathing at 18 msw, and 1 h ascent breathing oxygen. Animals underwent 2-h observation for signs of DCS. Profile 1 (14.3 h total) resulted in no deaths, no Type II DCS, and 20% Type I DCS. Profile 2 (2.1 h total) resulted in 13% death, 50% Type II DCS, and 75% Type I DCS. Profile 3 (4.5 h total) resulted in 14% death, 21% Type II DCS, and 57% Type I DCS. No oxygen associated seizures occurred. Profile 1 performed best, shortening decompression with no death or severe DCS, yet it may still exceed emergency operational utility in an actual submarine rescue.

  20. Alternative technique in atypical spinal decompression: the use of the ultrasonic scalpel in paediatric achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodacre, Timothy; Sewell, Matthew; Clarke, Andrew J; Hutton, Mike

    2016-01-01

    Spinal stenosis can be a very disabling condition. Surgical decompression carries a risk of dural tear and neural injury, which is increased in patients with severe stenosis or an atypical anatomy. We present an unusual case of symptomatic stenosis secondary to achondroplasia presenting in a paediatric patient, and highlight a new surgical technique used to minimise the risk of dural and neural injury during decompression. PMID:27288205

  1. Bilateral Ocular Decompression Retinopathy after Ahmed Valve Implantation for Uveitic Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javier Flores-Preciado

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Case Report: We report the case of a 29-year-old man who underwent Ahmed valve implantation in both eyes as treatment for uveitic glaucoma, subsequently presenting with bilateral ocular decompression retinopathy in the postoperative period. Discussion: Ocular decompression retinopathy is a rare complication of filtering surgery in patients with glaucoma; however, the course is benign in most cases, with spontaneous resolution of bleedings and improvement of visual acuity.

  2. Left Atrial Decompression by Percutaneous Left Atrial Venting Cannula Insertion during Venoarterial Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Support

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ha Eun Kim

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Patients with venoarterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO frequently suffer from pulmonary edema due to left ventricular dysfunction that accompanies left heart dilatation, which is caused by left atrial hypertension. The problem can be resolved by left atrium (LA decompression. We performed a successful percutaneous LA decompression with an atrial septostomy and placement of an LA venting cannula in a 38-month-old child treated with venoarterial ECMO for acute myocarditis.

  3. One-stage sequential bilateral thoracic expansion for asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy (Jeune syndrome).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muthialu, Nagarajan; Mussa, Shafi; Owens, Catherine M; Bulstrode, Neil; Elliott, Martin J

    2014-10-01

    Jeune syndrome (asphyxiating thoracic dystrophy) is a rare disorder characterized by skeletal dysplasia, reduced diameter of the thoracic cage and extrathoracic organ involvement. Fatal, early respiratory insufficiency may occur. Two-stage lateral thoracic expansion has been reported, addressing each side sequentially over 3-12 months. While staged repair theoretically provides less invasive surgery in a small child with respiratory distress, we utilized a single stage, bilateral procedure aiming to rapidly maximize lung development. Combined bilateral surgery also offered the chance of rapid recovery, and reduced hospital stay. We present our early experience of this modification of existing surgical treatment for an extremely rare condition, thought to be generally fatal in early childhood. Nine children (6 males, 3 females; median age 30 months [3.5-75]) underwent thoracic expansion for Jeune syndrome in our centre. All patients required preoperative respiratory support (5 with tracheostomy, 8 requiring positive pressure ventilation regularly within each day/night cycle). Two children underwent sequential unilateral (2-month interval between stages) and 7 children bilateral thoracic expansion by means of staggered osteotomies of third to eighth ribs and plate fixation of fourth to fifth rib and sixth to seventh rib, leaving the remaining ribs floating. There was no operative mortality. There were 2 deaths within 3 months of surgery, due to pulmonary hypertension (1 following two-stage and 1 following single-stage thoracic expansion). At the median follow-up of 11 months (1-15), 3 children have been discharged home from their referring unit and 2 have significantly reduced respiratory support. One child remains on non-invasive ventilation and another is still ventilated with a high oxygen requirement. Jeune syndrome is a difficult condition to manage, but bilateral thoracic expansion offers an effective reduction in ventilator requirements in these children

  4. Exploiting Aerobic Fitness to Reduce Risk of Hypobaric Decompression Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.; Gernhardt, M. L.; Wessel, J. H.

    2007-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is multivariable. But we hypothesize an aerobically fit person is less likely to experience hypobaric DCS than an unfit person given that fitness is exploited as part of the denitrogenation (prebreathe, PB) process prior to an altitude exposure. Aerobic fitness is peak oxygen uptake (VO2pk, ml/kg/min). Treadmill or cycle protocols were used over 15 years to determine VO2pks. We evaluated dichotomous DCS outcome and venous gas emboli (VGE) outcome detected in the pulmonary artery with Doppler ultrasound associated with VO2pk for two classes of experiments: 1) those with no PB or PB under resting conditions prior to ascent in an altitude chamber, and 2) PB that included exercise for some part of the PB. There were 165 exposures (mean VO2pk 40.5 plus or minus 7.6 SD) with 25 cases of DCS in the first protocol class and 172 exposures (mean VO2pk 41.4 plus or minus 7.2 SD) with 25 cases of DCS in the second. Similar incidence of the DCS (15.2% vs. 14.5%) and VGE (45.5% vs. 44.8%) between the two classes indicates that decompression stress was similar. The strength of association between outcome and VO2pk was evaluated using univariate logistic regression. An inverse relationship between the DCS outcome and VO2pk was evident, but the relationship was strongest when exercise was done as part of the PB (exercise PB, coef. = -0.058, p = 0.07; rest or no PB, coef. = -0.005, p = 0.86). There was no relationship between VGE outcome and VO2pk (exercise PB, coef. = -0.003, p = 0.89; rest or no PB, coef. = 0.014, p = 0.50). A significant change in probability of DCS was associated with fitness only when exercise was included in the denitrogenation process. We believe a fit person that exercises during PB efficiently eliminates dissolved nitrogen from tissues.

  5. Epidemiology and pathogenesis of thoracic outlet syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wojcik Gustaw

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The superior thoracic aperture is a place particularly vulnerable to the occurrence of tissue conflict and the development of a number of neurovascular changes carrying a risk of upper limb dysfunction. The triggering factor in this case is the pressure on the nerve vascular elements brought about by too large muscles of the chest and neck, clavicle fracture and dislocation of the upper ribs, anomalies in the form of ribs, in the neck, or by apex of the lung tumors. Each anatomical anomaly may be a cause of a number of lesions and lead to the development of the disease. Due to the nature of the oppressed structures, there are two basic groups: neurogenic and vascular. The most common variant giving clinical symptoms is neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. In this, the compression ratio, the brachial plexus, and for this reason, the vascular surface of the upper limb dysfunction is often overlooked. However, the vascular variant, and especially arterial sub-variant, is very dangerous because it can give complications even in the form of aneurysms, and even upper limb ischemia. The aim of the study is to present the most common changes in the thoracic outlet causing functional disorders of the upper limb.

  6. CT findings in severe thoracic sarcoidosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hennebicque, Anne-Sophie; Brillet, Pierre-Yves; Moulahi, Hassen; Brauner, Michel W.; Nunes, Hilario; Valeyre, Dominique

    2005-01-01

    Severe thoracic sarcoidosis includes manifestations with significant clinical and functional impairment and a risk of mortality. Severe thoracic sarcoidosis can take on various clinical presentations and is associated with increased morbidity. The purpose of this article was to describe the CT findings in severe thoracic sarcoidosis and to explain some of their mechanisms. Subacute respiratory insufficiency is a rare and early complication due to a high profusion of pulmonary lesions. Chronic respiratory insufficiency due to pulmonary fibrosis is a frequent and late complication. Three main CT patterns are identified: bronchial distortion, honeycombing and linear opacities. CT can be helpful in diagnosing some mechanisms of central airway obstruction such as bronchial distortion due to pulmonary fibrosis or an extrinsic bronchial compression by enlarged lymph nodes. An intrinsic narrowing of the bronchial wall by endobronchial granulomatous lesions may be suggested by CT when it shows evidence of bronchial mural thickening. Pulmonary hypertension usually occurs in patients with end-stage pulmonary disease and is related to fibrotic destruction of the distal capillary bed and to the resultant chronic hypoxemia. Several other mechanisms may contribute to the development of pulmonary hypertension including extrinsic compression of major pulmonary arteries by enlarged lymph nodes and secondary pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Aspergilloma colonization of a cavity is the main cause of hemoptysis in sarcoidosis. Other rare causes are bronchiesctasis, necrotizing bronchial aspergillosis, semi-invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, erosion of a pulmonary artery due to a necrotic sarcoidosis lesion, necrosis of parenchymal sarcoidosis lesions and specific endobronchial macroscopic lesions. (orig.)

  7. [Thoracic surgery for patients with bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyoda, A; Satoh, Y

    2012-07-01

    Thoracic surgery poses a risk for complications in the respiratory system. In particular, for patients with bronchial asthma, we need to care for perioperative complications because it is well known that these patients frequently have respiratory complications after surgery, and they may have bronchial spasms during surgery. If we can get good control of their bronchial asthma, we can usually perform surgery for these patients without limitations. For safe postoperative care, it is desirable that these patients have stable asthma conditions that are well-controlled before surgery, as thoracic surgery requires intrabronchial intubation for anesthesia and sometimes bronchial resection. These stimulations to the bronchus do not provide for good conditions because of the risk of bronchial spasm. Therefore, we should use the same agents that are used to control bronchial asthma if it is already well controlled. If it is not, we have to administer a β₂ stimulator, aminophylline, or steroidal agents for good control. Isoflurane or sevoflurane are effective for the safe control of anesthesia during surgery, and we should use a β₂ stimulator, with or without inhalation, or steroidal agents after surgery. It is important to understand that we can perform thoracic surgery for asthma patients if we can provide perioperative control of bronchial asthma, although these patients still have severe risks.

  8. Endovascular repair of traumatic thoracic aortic tears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, M Ashraf; Kirk, Jeffrey S; Cuff, Robert F; Banegas, Shonda L; Ambrosi, Gavin M; Liao, Timothy H; Chambers, Christopher M; Wong, Peter Y; Heiser, John C

    2012-03-01

    Patients with thoracic aorta injuries (TAI) present a unique challenge. The purpose of this study was to review the outcomes of thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR) in patients with TAI. A retrospective chart review of all patients admitted for TEVAR for trauma was performed. In a 5-year period, 19 patients (6 women and 13 men; average age, 42 y) were admitted to our trauma center with TAI. Mechanism of injury was a motor vehicle crash in 12 patients, motorcycle crash in 2 patients, automobile-pedestrian accident in 2 patients, 1 fall, 1 crush injury, and 1 stab wound to the back. A thoracic endograft was used in 6 patients and proximal aortic cuffs were used in 13 patients (68%). One patient (5%) died. There were no strokes, myocardial infarctions, paraplegia, or renal failure. TEVAR for TAI appears to be a safe option for patients with multiple injuries. TEVAR in young patients is still controversial because long-term endograft behavior is unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. October 2012 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. A dinner meeting was held on 10/24/2012 at Scottsdale Shea beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 23 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, infectious disease, pathology, and radiology communities. An announcement was made that the Colorado Thoracic Society has accepted an invitation to partner with the Arizona and New Mexico Thoracic Societies in the Southwest Journal of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine. Discussions continue to be held regarding a combined Arizona Thoracic Society meeting with Tucson either in Casa Grande or electronically. Six cases were presented: Dr. Tim Kuberski, chief of Infectious Disease at Maricopa Medical Center, presented a 48 year old female who had been ill for 2 weeks. A CT of the chest revealed a left lower lobe nodule and a CT of the abdomen showed hydronephrosis and a pelvic mass. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA was elevated. All turned out to be coccidioidomycosis on biopsy. CEA decreased …

  10. Robotics in general thoracic surgery procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, M Jawad; Park, Bernard J

    2017-01-01

    The use of robotic technology in general thoracic surgical practice continues to expand across various institutions and at this point many major common thoracic surgical procedures have been successfully performed by general thoracic surgeons using the robotic technology. These procedures include lung resections, excision of mediastinal masses, esophagectomy and reconstruction for malignant and benign esophageal pathologies. The success of robotic technology can be attributed to highly magnified 3-D visualization, dexterity afforded by 7 degrees of freedom that allow difficult dissections in narrow fields and the ease of reproducibility once the initial set up and instruments become familiar to the surgeon. As the application of robotic technology trickle downs from major academic centers to community hospitals, it becomes imperative that its role, limitations, learning curve and financial impact are understood by the novice robotic surgeon. In this article, we share our experience as it relates to the setup, common pitfalls and long term results for more commonly performed robotic assisted lung and thymic resections using the 4 arm da Vinci Xi robotic platform (Intuitive Surgical, Inc., Sunnyvale, CA, USA) to help guide those who are interested in adopting this technology.

  11. Endoscopic Transforaminal Thoracic Foraminotomy and Discectomy for the Treatment of Thoracic Disc Herniation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Hong-Fei; Liu, Kai-Xuan

    2013-01-01

    Thoracic disc herniation is a relatively rare yet challenging-to-diagnose condition. Currently there is no universally accepted optimal surgical treatment for symptomatic thoracic disc herniation. Previously reported surgical approaches are often associated with high complication rates. Here we describe our minimally invasive technique of removing thoracic disc herniation, and report the primary results of a series of cases. Between January 2009 and March 2012, 13 patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniation were treated with endoscopic thoracic foraminotomy and discectomy under local anesthesia. A bone shaver was used to undercut the facet and rib head for foraminotomy. Discectomy was achieved by using grasper, radiofrequency, and the Holmium-YAG laser. We analyzed the clinical outcomes of the patients using the visual analogue scale (VAS), MacNab classification, and Oswestry disability index (ODI). At the final follow up (mean: 17 months; range: 6–41 months), patient self-reported satisfactory rate was 76.9%. The mean VAS for mid back pain was improved from 9.1 to 4.2, and the mean ODI was improved from 61.0 to 43.8. One complication of postoperative spinal headache occurred during the surgery and the patient was successfully treated with epidural blood patch. No other complications were observed or reported during and after the surgery. PMID:24455232

  12. A traumatic central cord syndrome occurring after adequate decompression for cervical spondylosis: biomechanics of injury: case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickerman, Rob D; Lefkowitz, Michael; Epstein, Joseph A

    2005-10-15

    Case report with review of the literature. To present the first case of a central cord syndrome occurring after adequate decompression, and review the mechanics of the cervical spinal cord injury and postoperative biomechanical and anatomic changes occurring after cervical decompressive laminectomy. Cervical spondylosis is a common pathoanatomic occurrence in the elderly population and is thought to be one of the primary causes for a central cord syndrome. Decompressive laminectomy with or without fusion has been a primary treatment for spondylotic disease and is thought to be protective against further injury. To our knowledge, there are no cases of a central cord syndrome occurring after adequate decompression reported in the literature. Case study with extensive review of the literature. The patient underwent C3-C7 cervical laminectomy without complications. After surgery, the patient's spasticity and gait difficulties improved. She was discharged to inpatient rehabilitation for further treatment of upper extremity weakness. The patient fell in the rehabilitation center, with a central cord syndrome despite adequate decompression of her spinal canal. The patient was treated conservatively for the central cord and had minimal improvement. Decompressive laminectomy provides an immediate decompressive effect on the spinal cord as seen by the dorsal migration of the cord, however, the biomechanics of the cervical spine after decompressive laminectomy remain uncertain. This case supports the ongoing research and need for more intensive research on postoperative cervical spine biomechanics, including decompressive laminectomies, decompressive laminectomy and fusion, and laminoplasty.

  13. STUDY & ANALYSIS OF MICRO NEEDLE MATERIAL BY ANSYS

    OpenAIRE

    Santosh Kumar Singh*, Prabhat Sinha, N.N. Singh, Nagendra Kumar

    2017-01-01

    In this research the concept of design and analysis, silicon and stainless steel based on hollow micro-needles for transdermal drug delivery(TDD) have been evaluated by Using ANSYS & computational fluid dynamic (CFD), structural. Micro fluidic analysis has performed to ensure the micro-needles design suitability for Drug delivery. The effect of axial and transverse load on single and micro-needle array has investigated with the mechanical properties of micro-needle. The analysis predicte...

  14. Evaluation of decompression tables by Doppler technique in caisson work in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breedijk, J H; Van der Putten, G J G M; Schrier, L M; Sterk, W

    2009-01-01

    Hyperbaric work was conducted for constructing an underground tramway in the Netherlands. A total of 11,647 exposures were conducted in 41,957 hours. For these working conditions specifically developed oxygen decompression tables were used. Fifteen workers were submitted to Doppler monitoring after caisson work at a depth at 12 msw. Measurements were done according to the Canadian DCIEM protocol. For bubble grading the Kisman-Masurel 12-points ordinal scale (0-IV) was used. Bubbles were detected in 17 of the 38 examinations. The highest grade (III-) was found in four measurements. At rest the grading was never higher than I+. Two hours after decompression the grading was remarkably higher than after one hour. Bubble scores were relatively low, although the maximum grading probably is not reached within two hours after decompression. It may be concluded that the oxygen decompression tables used, were reliable under these heavy working conditions. At group level, decompression stress can be evaluated by Doppler monitoring. In order to reduce health hazard of employees, use of oxygen during decompression in caisson work should be embodied in the occupational standard.

  15. Decompression of keratocystic odontogenic tumors leading to increased fibrosis, but without any change in epithelial proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awni, Sarah; Conn, Brendan

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether decompression treatment induces changes in the histology or biologic behavior of keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT). Seventeen patients with KCOT underwent decompression treatment with or without enucleation. Histologic evaluation and immunohistochemical expression of p53, Ki-67, and Bcl-2 were analyzed by using conventional microscopy. KCOT showed significantly increased fibrosis (P = .01) and a subjective reduction in mitotic activity (P = .03) after decompression. There were no statistically significant changes in the expression of proliferation markers. An increase in daughter-cysts or epithelial rests was seen after decompression (P = .04). Recurrence was noted in four of 16 cases, and expression of p53 was strongly correlated with prolonged duration of treatment (P = .01) and intense inflammatory changes (P = .02). Structural changes in the KCOT epithelium or capsule following decompression facilitate surgical removal of the tumor. There was no statistical evidence that decompression influences expression of proliferation markers in the lining, indicating that the potential for recurrence may not be restricted to the cellular level. The statistically significant increase of p53 expression with increased duration of treatment and increase of inflammation may also indicate the possibility of higher rates of recurrence with prolonged treatment and significant inflammatory changes. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Biocompatible 3D printed magnetic micro needles

    KAUST Repository

    Kavaldzhiev, Mincho

    2017-01-30

    Biocompatible functional materials play a significant role in drug delivery, tissue engineering and single cell analysis. We utilized 3D printing to produce high aspect ratio polymer resist microneedles on a silicon substrate and functionalized them by iron coating. Two-photon polymerization lithography has been used for printing cylindrical, pyramidal, and conical needles from a drop cast IP-DIP resist. Experiments with cells were conducted with cylindrical microneedles with 630 ± 15 nm in diameter with an aspect ratio of 1:10 and pitch of 12 μm. The needles have been arranged in square shaped arrays with various dimensions. The iron coating of the needles was 120 ± 15 nm thick and has isotropic magnetic behavior. The chemical composition and oxidation state were determined using energy electron loss spectroscopy, revealing a mixture of iron and Fe3O4 clusters. A biocompatibility assessment was performed through fluorescence microscopy using calcein/EthD-1 live/dead assay. The results show a very high biocompatibility of the iron coated needle arrays. This study provides a strategy to obtain electromagnetically functional microneedles that benefit from the flexibility in terms of geometry and shape of 3D printing. Potential applications are in areas like tissue engineering, single cell analysis or drug delivery.

  17. The Single Needle Lockstitch Machine. Module 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This module on parts of the machine, one in a series on the single needle lockstitch sewing machine for student self-study, contains eight sections. Each section contains the following parts: an introduction, directions, an objective, learning activities, student information, student self-check, check-out activities, and an instructor's final…

  18. Extrapulmonary tuberculosis: Fine needle aspiration cytology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients and Methods: This is a consecutive 9-year analysis of patients with peripheral lymphadenopathy. All the patients had fine needle aspiration. Smears were made, fixed in 95% alcohol and stained with hematoxylin and eosin and Zeihl Neelsen stains. Results: 48 patients, 31 males and 17 females, were analyzed.

  19. Acylated flavonol glycosides from Larix needles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Niemann, Gerard J.

    2006-01-01

    Kaempferol-3-p-coumarylglucoside (KCG) was isolated from ether fractions of acetone-extracted freeze-dried needles of all larch species investigated. In each case, KCG was found as one of the main flavonoids, whereas often a variety of closely related, acylated flavonoids was present in either

  20. Biocompatible 3D printed magnetic micro needles

    KAUST Repository

    Kavaldzhiev, Mincho; Perez, Jose E.; Ivanov, Yurii; Bertoncini, Andrea; Liberale, Carlo; Kosel, Jü rgen

    2017-01-01

    Biocompatible functional materials play a significant role in drug delivery, tissue engineering and single cell analysis. We utilized 3D printing to produce high aspect ratio polymer resist microneedles on a silicon substrate and functionalized them by iron coating. Two-photon polymerization lithography has been used for printing cylindrical, pyramidal, and conical needles from a drop cast IP-DIP resist. Experiments with cells were conducted with cylindrical microneedles with 630 ± 15 nm in diameter with an aspect ratio of 1:10 and pitch of 12 μm. The needles have been arranged in square shaped arrays with various dimensions. The iron coating of the needles was 120 ± 15 nm thick and has isotropic magnetic behavior. The chemical composition and oxidation state were determined using energy electron loss spectroscopy, revealing a mixture of iron and Fe3O4 clusters. A biocompatibility assessment was performed through fluorescence microscopy using calcein/EthD-1 live/dead assay. The results show a very high biocompatibility of the iron coated needle arrays. This study provides a strategy to obtain electromagnetically functional microneedles that benefit from the flexibility in terms of geometry and shape of 3D printing. Potential applications are in areas like tissue engineering, single cell analysis or drug delivery.

  1. Relationship between needle phobia and dental anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Majstorovic, M.; Veerkamp, J.S.J.

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: This cross-sectional study aimed to explain the nature of needle phobia and its relationship in dental phobic children with evidence on age-related differences. Methods: The study used 2,865 patients (52% boys, 48% girls), 4 to 11 years old (mean=7.18 years). The patient sample included

  2. Rooting of needle fascicles from western white pine seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramond J. Hoff; Geral I. McDonald

    1968-01-01

    In one test, 45 out of 318 (14 percent) needle fascicles from 2-year-old seedlings of Pinus monticola Dougl. were rooted. Eight of the needle fascicles produced shoot growth. In another test, 392 out of 742 (53 percent) needle fascicles were rooted, but none of these produced shoot growth.

  3. 21 CFR 868.5150 - Anesthesia conduction needle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction needle. 868.5150 Section 868...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5150 Anesthesia conduction needle. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction needle is a device used to inject local anesthetics into a patient to...

  4. Exploring needle anxiety among students attending a Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Needle anxiety, a form of specific phobia refers to an intense fear of needles used for various medical procedures. It may result in the avoidance of such needle-involving procedures like intramuscular injections or vaccinations. About 4-8% of children and adolescents are said to generally suffer some form of anxiety.

  5. Robotic needle steering: design, modeling, planning, and image guidance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cowan, Noah J.; Goldberg, Ken; Chirikjian, Gregory S.; Fichtinger, Gabor; Alterovitz, Ron; Reed, Kyle B.; Kallem, Vinutha; Misra, Sarthak; Park, Wooram; Okamura, Allison M.; Rosen, Jacob; Hannaford, Blake; Satava, Richard M.

    2010-01-01

    This chapter describes how advances in needle design, modeling, planning, and image guidance make it possible to steer flexible needles from outside the body to reach specified anatomical targets not accessible using traditional needle insertion methods. Steering can be achieved using a variety of

  6. Measurement of tritium in tissue free water of pine needles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng Xiaomin; Wu Zongmei

    1993-01-01

    Tissue Free Water (TFW) of pine needles is separated out through azeotropic distillation of pine needles and toluene. Recovery ratio of TFW is 90%. Tritium activity in the needles is 1.8 Bq/L(H 2 O), which is of the same level with tritiated water vapour (HTO) in atmosphere during the corresponding period

  7. [Stiletto needle and needle-knife for influence of gravity index in treating knee osteoarthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Li-Jun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Wen-Hua; Tang, Yan; Dong, Fu-Hui

    2017-12-25

    To explore stiletto needle and needle-knife for influence of double sufficient weight in treating knee osteoarthritis patients. One hundred and thirteen early and medium term knee osteoarthritis patients were randomly divided into three groups, including stiletto needle group(38 cases), needle-knife group (38 cases) and voltaren group (37 cases). In stiletto needle group, there were 13 males and 25 females with an average of(55.87±7.72) years old, treated by stiletto needle once a week, and 2 weeks were a course; there were 11 males and 27 females in needle-knife group with an average of(57.11±7.07) years old, treated by acupotome once a week, and 2 weeks were a course; there were 12 males and 25 females in voltaren group with an average age of(57.62±8.08) years old, treated by votalin emulsion smearing 3 to 5 cm on painful area of knee joint, three times a day for 2 weeks; 36 patients in normal group, including 11 males and 25 females with a mean age of (55.28±7.55) years old, treated with nothing. Gravitational four lattice used to measure bipedal back and forth load before and after treatment in further observe weight-bearing situation among three groups, d value, which was the distance from center of gravity to original point, was measured as a obvervational index, JOA score was used to evaluate clinical effect. Five patients were fall out, including 2 patients in stiletto needle group, 2 patients in needle-knife group and 1 patient in voltaren group. Other 108 patients were followed-up from 28 to 35 d with an average of 30 d, and without untoward effect. There was significant difference in d value between treatment group and control group at 1 month after treatment( P 0.05), and d value was decreased before treatment than that of after treatment. There was no significant difference in JOA score among treatment group after treatment at 1 month( P 0.05) after treatment at 1 month. Stiletto needle, needle-knife and voltaren for the treatment of knee

  8. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R. [Yale School of Medicine, Yale New Haven Hospital, New Haven, CT (United States); Division of Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, 789 Howard Avenue, P.O. Box 208042, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  9. Idiopathic chylopericardium treated by percutaneous thoracic duct embolization after failed surgical thoracic duct ligation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtney, Malachi; Ayyagari, Raj R.

    2015-01-01

    Chylopericardium rarely occurs in pediatric patients, but when it does it is most often a result of lymphatic injury during cardiothoracic surgery. Primary idiopathic chylopericardium is especially rare, with few cases in the pediatric literature. We report a 10-year-old boy who presented with primary idiopathic chylopericardium after unsuccessful initial treatment with surgical lymphatic ligation and creation of a pericardial window. Following readmission to the hospital for a right-side chylothorax resulting from the effluent from the pericardial window, he had successful treatment by interventional radiology with percutaneous thoracic duct embolization. This case illustrates the utility of thoracic duct embolization as a less-invasive alternative to surgical thoracic duct ligation, or as a salvage procedure when surgical ligation fails. (orig.)

  10. Cost-Effectiveness of Postoperative Ketamine in Chiari Decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDowell, Michael M; Alhourani, Ahmad; Pearce-Smith, Beverly A; Mazurkiewicz, Anna; Friedlander, Robert M

    2018-02-01

    In Chiari I patients, postoperative pain and discomfort frequently slow the transition back to the home setting. We sought to determine the effect of standardized ketamine infusion protocols on hospital length of stay (LOS). This retrospective cohort study reviewed 100 consecutive adult patients undergoing Chiari I decompression. Fifty-nine patients were placed on a 2-3 mg/hr ketamine drip until postoperative day 1. This group was compared with a group who received 2-3 mg/hr of ketamine until postoperative day 2 (19 patients) and patients who did not receive ketamine at all (22 patients). Clinical characteristics, opioid use, LOS, and relative hospitalization costs were assessed. All narcotic amounts were converted into milligram equivalents of morphine. LOS of the short-ketamine group was 46.5 hours when compared with the long-ketamine group (66.8 hours) and no-ketamine group (56.9 hours). There was a statistically significant difference when comparing the short-ketamine group with the long-ketamine group and no-ketamine group together (P ketamine protocol was used (P ketamine group, 196 mg in the long-ketamine group, and 187 mg in the no-ketamine group (P = 0.65). No adverse events from ketamine were noted. Ketamine at subanesthetic levels may be an effective tool to facilitate early return home postoperatively and may significantly reduce medical costs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Habitat Options to Protect Against Decompression Sickness on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, J.

    2000-07-01

    Men and women are alive today, although perhaps still in diapers, who will explore the surface of Mars. Two achievable goals to enable this exploration are to use Martian resources, and to provide a safe means for unrestricted access to the surface. A cost-effective approach for Mars exploration is to use the available resources, such as water and atmospheric gases. Nitrogen (N2) and Argon (Ar) in a concentration ratio of 1.68/1.0 are available, and could form the inert gas component of a habitat atmosphere at 8.0, 9.0, or 10.0 pounds per square inch absolute (psia). The habitat and space suit must be designed as an integrated, complementary, system: a comfortable living environment about 85% of the time and a safe working environment about 15% of the time. A goal is to provide a system that permits unrestricted exploration of Mars. However the risk of decompression sickness (DCS) during the extravehicular activity (EVA) in a 3.75 psia suit after exposure to either of the three habitat conditions may limit unrestricted exploration.

  12. Inner ear decompression sickness in compressed-air diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klingmann, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    Inner ear decompression sickness (IEDCS) has become more frequently reported in recreational diving. We examined 34 divers after IEDCS and analyzed their dive profiles, pattern of symptoms, time of symptom onset and the association with a right-to left shunt (r/l shunt). Four divers used mixed gas and were excluded from the analysis. Of the remaining 30 divers, 25 presented with isolated IEDCS alone, while five divers had additional skin and neurological symptoms. All divers presented with vertigo (100%), and 12 divers reported additional hearing loss (40%). All symptoms occurred within 120 minutes (median 30 minutes) of ascent. Twenty-two of 30 divers (73.3%) showed a r/l shunt. A possible explanation for the frequent association of a r/l shunt and the dominance of vestibular rather than cochlear symptoms could be attributed to the different blood supply of the inner ear structures and the different size of the labyrinthine compartments. The cochlea has a blood supply up to four times higher than the vestibular part of the inner ear, whereas the vestibular fluid space is 30% larger. The higher prevalence of symptoms referrable to the less well-perfused vestibular organ provides further evidence that persistent local inert gas supersaturation may cause growth of incoming arterial bubbles and may therefore be an important pathophysiological factor in IEDCS.

  13. Towards new paradigms for the treatment of hypobaric decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dart, T S; Butler, W

    1998-04-01

    Altitude induced (hypobaric) decompression sickness (DCS) has long been treated with ground level oxygen and U.S. Navy Treatment Tables 5 and 6. These treatment tables originate from surface excursion diving and, when implemented, require significant resource allocation. Although they are effective treatment regimens, these tables were not developed for treating hypobaric DCS which has an etiology similar to saturation diving DCS. In this review, different treatment options for hypobaric DCS are presented. These options include more aggressive use of ground level oxygen and treatment tables using a maximum pressure of 2 atmospheres (ATA). Specific attention is given to USAF Table VIII, an experimental hypobaric DCS treatment-table, and space suit overpressurization treatment. This paradigm shift for DCS treatment is based on a projected increase in hypobaric DCS treatment from exposure to low pressure during several operational conditions: cruise flight in the next generation aircraft (e.g., F-22); high altitude, unpressurized flight by special operations forces; and the extraordinary amount of extravehicular activity (EVA) required to construct the international space station. Anticipating the need to treat DCS encountered during these and other activities, it is proposed that 2 ATA or less hyperbaric oxygen (HBO) treatment conjoined with new collapsible chamber technology can be used to address these issues in a safe and cost effective fashion.

  14. Development of a finite element model of decompressive craniectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tim L Fletcher

    Full Text Available Decompressive craniectomy (DC, an operation whereby part of the skull is removed, is used in the management of patients with brain swelling. While the aim of DC is to reduce intracranial pressure, there is the risk that brain deformation and mechanical strain associated with the operation could damage the brain tissue. The nature and extent of the resulting strain regime is poorly understood at present. Finite element (FE models of DC can provide insight into this applied strain and hence assist in deciding on the best surgical procedures. However there is uncertainty about how well these models match experimental data, which are difficult to obtain clinically. Hence there is a need to validate any modelling approach outside the clinical setting. This paper develops an axisymmetric FE model of an idealised DC to assess the key features of such an FE model which are needed for an accurate simulation of DC. The FE models are compared with an experimental model using gelatin hydrogel, which has similar poro-viscoelastic material property characteristics to brain tissue. Strain on a central plane of the FE model and the front face of the experimental model, deformation and load relaxation curves are compared between experiment and FE. Results show good agreement between the FE and experimental models, providing confidence in applying the proposed FE modelling approach to DC. Such a model should use material properties appropriate for brain tissue and include a more realistic whole head geometry.

  15. Endoscopic optic nerve decompression for nontraumatic compressive optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-long REN

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective To describe the preliminary experience with endoscopic optic nerve decompression (EOND for nontraumatic compressive optic neuropathies (NCONs. Methods The clinical data of 10 patients, male 5 and female 5, with a mean age of 44.3±5.1 years, who underwent EOND for visual loss (n=5 or visual deterioration (n=5 due to tumor compression in General Hospital of Armed Police Forces of China in the period from April 2013 to April 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Preoperative and 6-month-postoperative clinical and imaging data of these patients were reviewed and analyzed. Results Among 5 patients who lost light perception (including 2 patients with bilateral optic nerve compression before operation, 4 of them showed visual improvement to different degrees on the 7th day after operation (with improvement of bilateral visual acuity. The other 5 patients with visual impairment before operation recovered their visual acuity to different extent after the operation. All of the patients had no obvious post-operative complications. Conclusion EOND is a safe, effective, and minimally invasive surgical technique affording recovery of visual function to NCON patients. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2015.11.12

  16. Hydrocephalus after decompressive craniectomy for malignant hemispheric cerebral infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiang-Ping; Ma, Jun-Peng; Zhou, Zhang-Ming; Yang, Min; You, Chao

    2016-08-01

    Several studies have investigated the incidence and risk factors of hydrocephalus after decompressive craniectomy (DC) for malignant hemispheric cerebral infarction. However, the results are controversial. Therefore, the following is a retrospective cohort study to determine the incidence and risk factors of hydrocephalus after DC for malignant hemispheric cerebral infarction. From January 2004 to June 2014, patients at two medical centres in south-west China, who underwent DC for malignant hemispheric cerebral infarction, were included. The patients' clinical and radiologic findings were retrospectively reviewed. A chi-square test, Mann-Whitney U-test and logistic regression model were used to identify the risk factors. A total of 128 patients were included in the study. The incidence of ventriculomegaly and shunt-dependent hydrocephalus were 42.2% (54/128) and 14.8% (19/128), respectively. Lower preoperative Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) score and presence of subarachnoid haemorrhage (SAH) were factors significantly associated with the development of post-operative hydrocephalus after DC. Cerebral infarction patients receiving DC have a moderate tendency to suffer from post-operative hydrocephalus. A poor GCS score and the presence of SAH were significantly associated with the development of hydrocephalus after DC.

  17. Gas and particle motions in a rapidly decompressed flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Blair; Zunino, Heather; Adrian, Ronald; Clarke, Amanda

    2017-11-01

    To understand the behavior of a rapidly decompressed particle bed in response to a shock, an experimental study is performed in a cylindrical (D = 4.1 cm) glass vertical shock tube of a densely packed (ρ = 61%) particle bed. The bed is comprised of spherical glass particles, ranging from D50 = 44-297 μm between experiments. High-speed pressure sensors are incorporated to capture shock speeds and strengths. High-speed video and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements are collected to examine vertical and radial velocities of both the particles and gas to elucidate features of the shock wave and resultant expansion wave in the lateral center of the tube, away from boundaries. In addition to optically analyzing the front velocity of the rising particle bed, interaction between the particle and gas phases are investigated as the flow accelerates and the particle front becomes more dilute. Particle and gas interactions are also considered in exploring mechanisms through which turbulence develops in the flow. This work is supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, Advanced Simulation and Computing Program, as a Cooperative Agreement under the Predictive Science and Academic Alliance Program, under Contract No. DE-NA0002378.

  18. Herniation despite Decompressive Hemicraniectomy in Large Hemispherical Ischemic Strokes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinduja, Archana; Samant, Rohan; Feng, Dongxia; Hannawi, Yousef

    2018-02-01

    Despite decompressive hemicraniectomy (DHC), progressive herniation resulting in death has been reported following middle cerebral artery (MCA) strokes. We aimed to determine the surgical parameters measured on brain computed tomography (CT) scan that are associated with progressive herniation despite DHC in large MCA strokes. Retrospective chart review of medical records of patients with malignant hemispheric infarction who underwent DHC for cerebral edema was performed. Infarct volume was calculated on CT scans obtained within 24 hours of ictus. Radiological parameters of craniectomy bone flap size, brain volume protruding out of the skull, adequate centering of the craniectomy over the stroke bed, and the infarct volume outside the craniectomy bed (volume not centered [VNC]) were measured on the postoperative brain CT. Of 41 patients who underwent DHC, 7 had progressive herniation leading to death. Radiographic parameters significantly associated with progressive herniation included insufficient centering of craniectomy bed on the stroke bed (P = .03), VNC (P = .011), additional anterior cerebral artery infarction (P = .047), and smaller craniectomy length (P = .05). Multivariate logistic regression analysis for progressive herniation using craniectomy length and VNC as independent variables demonstrated that a higher VNC was significantly associated with progressive herniation despite surgery (P = .029). In large MCA strokes, identification of large infarct volume outside the craniectomy bed was associated with progressive herniation despite surgery. These results will need to be verified in larger prospective studies. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Type II decompression sickness in a hyperbaric inside attendant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson-Arbor, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) of an inside attendant (IA) is rarely encountered in hyperbarics. This report describes an IA who developed Type II DCS after a routine hyperbaric exposure. A 50-year-old male complained of lower extremity weakness and paresthesias after serving as an IA during a hyperbaric treatment to 40 fsw (122.52 kPa). Within 10 minutes after the conclusion of the treatment, the IA experienced irritability and confusion, and was unable to walk. Physical examination revealed decreased sensation below the T7 level, and decreased strength in the lower extremities. Type II DCS was diagnosed, and the IA was recompressed to 60 fsw (183.78 kPa) on a U.S. Navy Treatment Table 6, which resulted in improvement of his symptoms. Transthoracic echocardiography with bubble study performed 16 months after the event demonstrated a large patent foramen ovale (PFO). Increased age, decreased physical fitness and the undiagnosed PFO may have predisposed this attendant to developing DCS. Although rare, DCS may occur in IAs. Routine monitoring and reporting of the long-term health of hyperbaric IAs should be considered by hyperbaric facilities and medical directors in order to further understand the characteristics of DCS and other hyperbaric-related conditions in these workers.

  20. Acupuncture sensation during ultrasound guided acupuncture needling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jongbae J.; Akazawa, Margeaux; Ahn, Jaeki; Beckman-Harned, Selena; Lin, Feng-Chang; Lee, Kwangjae; Fine, Jason; Davis, Robert T; Langevin, Helene

    2014-01-01

    Background Although acupuncture sensation (also known as de qi) is a cornerstone of traditional acupuncture therapy, most research has accepted the traditional method of defining acupuncture sensation only through subjective patient reports rather than on any quantifiable physiological basis. Purpose To preliminarily investigate the frequency of key sensations experienced while needling to specific, quantifiable tissue levels (TLs) guided by ultrasound (US) imaging. Methods Five participants received needling at two acupuncture points and two control points at four TLs. US scans were used to determine when each TL was reached. Each volunteer completed 32 sets of modified Southampton Needle Sensation Questionnaires. Part one of the study tested sensations experienced at each TL and part two compared the effect of oscillation alone versus oscillation + rotation. Results In all volunteers, the frequency of pricking, sharp sensations was significantly greater in shallower TLs than deeper (p=0.007); the frequency of sensations described as deep, dull and heavy, as spreading, and as electric shocks was significantly greater in deeper TLs than shallower (p=0.002). Sensations experienced did not significantly differ between real and control points within each of three TLs (p>0.05) except TL 4 (p=0.006). The introduction of needle rotation significantly increased deep, dull, heavy sensations, but not pricking and sharp sensations; within each level, the spectrum of sensation experienced during both oscillation + rotation and oscillation alone did not significantly differ between acupuncture and control points. Conclusion The preliminary study indicates a strong connection between acupuncture sensation and both tissue depth and needle rotation. Furthermore, the new methodology has been proven feasible. A further study with an objective measurement is warranted. PMID:21642648

  1. [Deep needling and shallow needling at three acupoints around ear for subjective tinnitus: a randomized controlled trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Tao; Ni, Jinxia; Zhu, Wenzeng

    2015-10-01

    To compare the effective differences between deep needling and shallow needling at three acupoints around ear for subjective tinnitus. Fifty patients with subjective tinnitus were randomized divided into a deep needling group and a shallow needling group, 25 cases in each group. Twenty-two patients in the deep needling group and 20 patients in the shallow needling group were brought into statistic in the end. In the two groups, the three acupoints around ear and distal acupoints were both selected. The acupoints of the affected side such as Yifeng (TE 17), Tinghui (GB 2), Ermen (TE 21), Zhigou (TE 6), Zhongzhu (TE 3) and Hegu (LI 4) were adopted. Yifeng (TE 17), Tinghui (GB 2) and Ermen (TE 21) were acupunctured 30-38 mm in the deep needling group and 15-20 mm in the shallow needling group. The other acupoints were conventionally acupunctured in the two groups. The needles were retained for 30 min,once a day and five times a week for all patients. The treatment was continuously for 4 weeks in the two groups. Tinnitus handicap inventory (THI) scores, tinnitus grades and visual analogue scale (VAS) for tinnitus sound levels were observed before and after treatment, and the effects of the two groups were compared. The total effective rate in the deep needling group was 59.1% (13/22), and it was better than 20.0% (4/20) in the shallow needling group (P deep needling, group, the THI score, tinnitus grade and the VAS score were improved than those before treatment (all P shallow needling group, the three above indices before and after treatment were not different in statistical significance (all P > 0.05). After treatment, all the three indices in the deep needling group were superior to those in the shallow needling group (all P shallow needling at the three acupoints.

  2. Acute Paraplegia due to Thoracic Hematomyelia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aykut Akpınar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spontaneous intraspinal intramedullary hemorrhage is a rare entity with the acute onset of neurologic symptoms. The etiology of idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia (ISH is unknown, and there are few published case reports. Hematomyelia is mostly associated with trauma, but the other nontraumatic etiologies are vascular malformations, tumors, bleeding disorders, syphilis, syrinx, and myelitis. MRI is a good choice for early diagnosis. Hematomyelia usually causes acute spinal cord syndrome due to the compression and destruction of the spinal cord. A high-dose steroid treatment and surgical decompression and evacuation of hematoma are the urgent solution methods. We present idiopathic spontaneous hematomyelia of a previously healthy 80-year-old male with a sudden onset of back pain and paraplegia.

  3. Radiologic evaluation after posterior instrumented surgery for thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: union between rostral and caudal ossifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Kei; Imagama, Shiro; Ito, Zenya; Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Ukai, Junichi; Muramoto, Akio; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-05-01

    Retrospective clinical study. To investigate, using multislice CT images, how thoracic ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) changes with time after thoracic posterior fusion surgery. Few studies have evaluated thoracic OPLL preoperatively and post using computed tomography (CT). The subjects included 19 patients (7 men and 12 women) with an average age at surgery of 52 years (38-66 y) who underwent indirect posterior decompression with corrective fusion and instrumentation at our institute. Minimum follow-up period was 1 year, and averaged 3 years 10 months (12-120 mo). Using CT images, we investigated fusion range, preoperative and postoperative Cobb angles of thoracic fusion levels, intraoperative and postoperative blood loss, operative time, hyperintense areas on preoperative MRI of thoracic spine and thickness of the OPLL on the reconstructed sagittal, multislice CT images taken before the operation and at 3 months, 6 months and 1 year after surgery. The basic fusion area was 3 vertebrae above and below the OPLL lesion. The mean operative time was 7 hours and 48 min (4 h 39 min-10 h 28 min), and blood loss was 1631 mL (160-11,731 mL). Intramedullary signal intensity change on magnetic resonance images was observed at the most severe ossification area in 18 patients. Interestingly, the rostral and caudal ossification regions of the OPLLs, as seen on sagittal CT images, were discontinuous across the disk space in all patients. Postoperatively, the discontinuous segments connected in all patients without progression of OPLL thickness by 5.1 months on average. All patients needing surgery had discontinuity across the disk space between the rostral and caudal ossified lesions as seen on CT. This discontinuity was considered to be the main reason for the myelopathy because a high-intensity area on magnetic resonance imaging was seen in 18 of 19 patients at the same level. Rigid fixation with instrumentation may allow the discontinuous segments

  4. Iso-risk air no decompression limits after scoring marginal decompression sickness cases as non-events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, F Gregory; Swingler, Ashleigh J; Gerth, Wayne A; Howle, Laurens E

    2018-01-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) in humans is associated with reductions in ambient pressure that occur during diving, aviation, or certain manned spaceflight operations. Its signs and symptoms can include, but are not limited to, joint pain, radiating abdominal pain, paresthesia, dyspnea, general malaise, cognitive dysfunction, cardiopulmonary dysfunction, and death. Probabilistic models of DCS allow the probability of DCS incidence and time of occurrence during or after a given hyperbaric or hypobaric exposure to be predicted based on how the gas contents or gas bubble volumes vary in hypothetical tissue compartments during the exposure. These models are calibrated using data containing the pressure and respired gas histories of actual exposures, some of which resulted in DCS, some of which did not, and others in which the diagnosis of DCS was not clear. The latter are referred to as marginal DCS cases. In earlier works, a marginal DCS event was typically weighted as 0.1, with a full DCS event being weighted as 1.0, and a non-event being weighted as 0.0. Recent work has shown that marginal DCS events should be weighted as 0.0 when calibrating gas content models. We confirm this indication in the present work by showing that such models have improved performance when calibrated to data with marginal DCS events coded as non-events. Further, we investigate the ramifications of derating marginal events on model-prescribed air diving no-stop limits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Thoracic fistulas of the pancreas and their complications in childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fritsch, R; Schirg, E; Buerger, D

    1981-08-01

    The article reports on two thoracic fistulas of the pancreas in infants. Anamnesis revealed that recurring abdominal pain had occured in those children for years; at the time of their admission to hospital there was considerable dyspnoea with thoracic pain depending on the respiration. Fistulas of the pancreas with thoracic connection were identified as the cause. The article goes into the details of genesis, differential diagnosis and course of the disease.

  6. Decompression Device Using a Stainless Steel Tube and Wire for Treatment of Odontogenic Cystic Lesions: A Technical Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eun-Joo; Baek, Jin-A; Leem, Dae-Ho

    2014-11-01

    Decompression is considered an effective treatment for odontogenic cystic lesions in the jaw. A variety of decompression devices are successfully used for the treatment of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, radicular cysts, dentigerous cysts, and ameloblastoma. The purpose of these devices is to keep an opening between the cystic lesion and the oral environment during treatment. The aim of this report is to describe an effective decompression tube using a stainless steel tube and wire for treatment of jaw cystic lesions.

  7. The research of knitting needle status monitoring setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lu; Liao, Xiao-qing; Zhu, Yong-kang; Yang, Wei; Zhang, Pei; Zhao, Yong-kai; Huang, Hui-jie

    2013-09-01

    In textile production, quality control and testing is the key to ensure the process and improve the efficiency. Defect of the knitting needles is the main factor affecting the quality of the appearance of textiles. Defect detection method based on machine vision and image processing technology is universal. This approach does not effectively identify the defect generated by damaged knitting needles and raise the alarm. We developed a knitting needle status monitoring setup using optical imaging, photoelectric detection and weak signal processing technology to achieve real-time monitoring of weaving needles' position. Depending on the shape of the knitting needle, we designed a kind of Glass Optical Fiber (GOF) light guides with a rectangular port used for transmission of the signal light. To be able to capture the signal of knitting needles accurately, we adopt a optical 4F system which has better imaging quality and simple structure and there is a rectangle image on the focal plane after the system. When a knitting needle passes through position of the rectangle image, the reflected light from needle surface will back to the GOF light guides along the same optical system. According to the intensity of signals, the computer control unit distinguish that the knitting needle is broken or curving. The experimental results show that this system can accurately detect the broken needles and the curving needles on the knitting machine in operating condition.

  8. Modified “in-window” technique for decompressive craniotomy for severe brain injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Momir J.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased intracranial pressure and decreased cerebral perfusion in patients with severe traumatic brain injury are associated with cerebral ischemia and poor outcome. Lowering intracranial pressure is one of the goals of treatment. We analyzed the effects of decompressive craniotomy on intracranial pressure levels and outcome. In addition, we compared the results of decompressive craniotomy performed with our original technique (modified “in-window” technique, with no need for cranioplasty with results of classic techniques. We formed two groups: 52 patients with TBI (GCS≤8, with monitored intracranial pressure, and the control: 45 patients without intracranial pressure monitoring. In the first group, malignant intracranial hypertension was treated by decompressive craniotomy, using a modified "in-window" technique. Results were analyzed using standard statistical methods. In the first group, with intracranial pressure monitoring, 17/52 had decompressive craniotomy, and significant reduction of intracranial pressure appeared in the early postoperative period (38.82 to 22.76 mmHg, mean, with significant decrease of intracranial pressure at the end of treatment, compared to the control group (mean=25.00, and 45.30 mmHg, respectively. Late complications were similar to results of other studies. Our results were 20% of epileptic seizures, 8% of hydrocephalus, 12% contusion/hematoma progression and 12% subdural hygroma. Outcome (measured with Glasgow Outcome Score-GOS in the first group, at the time of discharge, was better with decompressive craniotomy than without decompressive craniotomy (GOS=2.47, and GOS=1.00, respectively. Modified "in-window" technique for decompressive craniotomy in severe traumatic brain injury is safe, promising and according to our experience offers a lower rate of complications with no need for additional cranioplastic surgery.

  9. MRI Evaluation of Post Core Decompression Changes in Avascular Necrosis of Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nori, Madhavi; Marupaka, Sravan Kumar; Alluri, Swathi; Md, Naseeruddin; Irfan, Kazi Amir; Jampala, Venkateshwarlu; Apsingi, Sunil; Eachempati, Krishna Kiran

    2015-12-01

    Avascular necrosis of hip typically presents in young patients. Core decompression in precollapse stage provides pain relief and preservation of femoral head. The results of core decompression vary considerably despite early diagnosis. The role of MRI in monitoring patients post surgically has not been clearly defined. To study pre and post core decompression MRI changes in avascular necrosis of hip. This is a contiguous observational cohort of 40 hips treated by core decompression for precollapse avascular necrosis of femoral head, who had a baseline MRI performed before surgery. Core decompression of the femoral head was performed within 4 weeks. Follow up radiograph and MRI scans were done at six months. Harris hip score preoperatively, 1 month and 6 months after the surgery was noted. Success in this study was defined as postoperative increase in Harris hip score (HHS) by 20 points and no additional femoral collapse. End point of clinical adverse outcome as defined by fall in Harris hip score was conversion or intention to convert to total hip replacement (THR). MRI parameters in the follow up scan were compared to the preoperative MRI. Effect of core decompression on bone marrow oedema and femoral head collapse was noted. Results were analysed using SPSS software version. Harris hip score improved from 57 to 80 in all patients initially. Six hips had a fall in Harris hip score to mean value of 34.1 during follow up (9 to 12 months) and underwent total hip replacement. MRI predictors of positive outcome are lesions with grade A extent, Grade A & B location. Bone marrow oedema with lesions less than 50% involvement, medial and central location. Careful selection of patients by MR criteria for core decompression provides satisfactory outcome in precollapse stage of avascular necrosis of hip.

  10. NUTRIENTS CONCENTRATION AND RETRANSLOCATION IN THE Pinus taeda L. NEEDLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcio Viera

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Aiming at evaluating nutrients concentration and retranslocation in the Pinus taeda L. needles, this study was developed in two stands, in native grass area and in second rotation area, with same species and same age (7.5 years old in Cambará do Sul, RS. The needles were collected in plants in four orthogonal points (South, North, East and West, sampled new needles, mature needles and old needles. The material was dried in a stove, milled and chemically analyzed (macro and micronutrients. The concentrations of N, P, K, B, Cu and Zn had decreased, of Ca, Fe and Mn increased, and the Mg and S have remained constant with the age of the needles. The retranslocation rate (old-new needles was more than 50% for most nutrients, except for Mn and Fe, showed that cumulative effect and the Ca reference element.

  11. Investigation of environmental pollution with pine needles by NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Kil Yong; Yoon, Yoon Yeol; Yang, Myung Kwon; Shim, Sang Kwon; Seo, Bum Kyoung [Korea Inst. of Geosience and Mineral Resources, Environmental Geology Division, Daejeon (Korea); Chung, Yong Sam [Korea Atomic Energy Research Inst., HANARO Center, Daejeon (Japan)

    2002-04-01

    NAA was studied to precision analysis of metallic elements in pine needle. The pine needle was investigated whether it can be feasible or not as a bio-monitor. Only one year old needle was taken from three different regions of urban, suburban and rural area in four seasons. The needle sample was divided with two aliquots, and then one was cleaned and the other was not. Loss and contamination of analytes were cautiously minimized when the needle was sample and transferred from mountain to laboratory and prepared for NAA. Some elements such as As, Br, Ce, W, Zn have shown different characteristics with regions and seasons as well as surface cleaning. It is found that about twenty elements in pine needle could be simply analyzed by NAA and the pine needle could be suitable as a bio-monitor for the monitoring of environmental pollution in Korea. (author)

  12. Internal Thoracic Artery Encircled by an Unusual Phrenic Nerve Loop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Fu-Chean Chen

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available We report an anatomic variation of the phrenic nerve. During a routine gross anatomical dissection course at our medical university, we found an unusual loop of the left phrenic nerve around the internal thoracic artery, about 1 cm from the take-off of the left subclavian artery. The phrenic nerve is close to the internal thoracic artery and is easily injured when dissecting the internal thoracic artery for coronary artery bypass conduit. Therefore, we suggest that the anatomic relationship of the phrenic nerve and internal thoracic artery is important in preventing incidental injury of the phrenic nerve.

  13. An Exploration of the Needling Depth in Acupuncture: The Safe Needling Depth and the Needling Depth of Clinical Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaung-Geng Lin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To explore the existing scientific information regarding safe needling depth of acupuncture points and the needling depth of clinical efficacy. Methods. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane, Allied and Complementary Medicine (AMED, The National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM, and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI databases to identify relevant monographs and related references from 1991 to 2013. Chinese journals and theses/dissertations were hand searched. Results. 47 studies were recruited and divided into 6 groups by measuring tools, that is, MRI, in vivo evaluation, CT, ultrasound, dissected specimen of cadavers, and another group with clinical efficacy. Each research was analyzed for study design, definition of safe depth, and factors that would affect the measured depths. Depths of clinical efficacy were discussed from the perspective of de-qi and other clinical observations. Conclusions. Great inconsistency in depth of each point measured from different subject groups and tools exists. The definition of safe depth should be established through standardization. There is also lack of researches to compare the clinical efficacy. A well-designed clinical trial selecting proper measuring tools to decide the actual and advisable needling depth for each point, to avoid adverse effects or complications and promote optimal clinical efficacy, is a top priority.

  14. A reappraisal of pediatric thoracic surface anatomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Nicholas J; Morreau, Jonty; Sugunesegran, Ramanen; Taghavi, Kiarash; Mirjalili, S Ali

    2017-09-01

    Accurate knowledge of surface anatomy is fundamental to safe clinical practice. A paucity of evidence in the literature regarding thoracic surface anatomy in children was identified. The associations between surface landmarks and internal structures were meticulously analyzed by reviewing high quality computed tomography (CT) images of 77 children aged from four days to 12 years. The results confirmed that the sternal angle is an accurate surface landmark for the azygos-superior vena cava junction in a plane through to the level of upper T4 from birth to age four, and to lower T4 in older children. The concavity of the aortic arch was slightly below this plane and the tracheal and pulmonary artery bifurcations were even lower. The cardiac apex was typically at the 5 th intercostal space (ICS) from birth to age four, at the 4 th ICS and 5 th rib in 4-12 year olds, and close to the midclavicular line at all ages. The lower border of the diaphragm was at the level of the 6 th or 7 th rib at the midclavicular line, the 7 th ICS and 8 th rib at the midaxillary line, and the 11 th thoracic vertebra posteriorly. The domes of the diaphragm were generally flatter and lower in children, typically only one rib level higher than its anterior level at the midclavicular line. Diaphragm apertures were most commonly around the level of T9, T10, and T11 for the IVC, esophagus and aorta, respectively. This is the first study to provide an evidence-base for thoracic surface anatomy in children. Clin. Anat. 30:788-794, 2017. © 2017Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apostolaki Mary

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%, the stones (7.4%, the arrow (5.5% and the sword (5.5%. We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim, medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield, and severe (those which cause death of the victim. According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95% and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%. The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield.

  16. The reported thoracic injuries in Homer's Iliad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apostolakis, Efstratios; Apostolaki, Georgia; Apostolaki, Mary; Chorti, Maria

    2010-11-19

    Homer's Iliad is considered to be a prominent and representative work of the tradition of the ancient Greek epic poetry. In this poem Homer presents the battles which took place during the last year of the 10-year lasting Trojan War between Achaeans and Trojans. We wanted to examine the chest wounds, especially those which are described in detail, according to their localization, severity and mortality. Finally, there are reported 54 consecutive thoracic injuries in the Iliad. The mostly used weapons were the spear (63%), the stones (7.4%), the arrow (5.5%) and the sword (5.5%). We divided the injuries according to their severity in mild (those which did not cause serious injury to the victim), medium (those which cause the victim to abandon the battlefield), and severe (those which cause death of the victim). According to this classification, the reported injuries were mild in 11.11%, medium in 18.52%, and severe in the last 70.37% of the reported cases. In other words, 89% of the injuries belong to the medium or severe category of thoracic injury. As far as the mortality of the injuries is concerned, 38 out of 54 thoracic injuries include death, which makes the mortality percentage reach 70.37%. Concerning the "allocation of the roles", the Achaean were in 68% perpetrators and the Trojans in only 32%. In terms of gravity, out of 38 mortal injuries 30 involve a Trojan (78.95%) and the remaining 8 an Achaean (21.05%). The excellent and detailed description of the injuries by Homer, as well as of the symptoms, may reveal a man with knowledge of anatomy and medicine who cared for the injured warriors in the battlefield.

  17. [Needling technique of Professor Li Yan-Fang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Li-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Experiences of needling techniques of Professor LI Ya- fang is introduced in this article. Gentle and superficial insertion is adopted by Professor LI in clinic. Emphases are put on the qi regulation function, needling sensation to the affected region and insertion with both hands, especially the function of the left hand as pressing hand. The gentle and superficial insertion should be done as the follows: hold the needle with the right hand, press gently along the running course of meridians with the left hand to promote qi circulation, hard pressing should be applied at acupoints to disperse the local qi and blood, insert the needle gently and quickly into the subcutaneous region with the right hand, and stop the insertion when patient has the needling sensation. While the fast needling is characterized with shallow insertion and swift manipulation: the left hand of the manipulator should press first along the running course of the meridian, and fix the local skin, hold the needle with the right hand and insert the needle quickly into the acupoint. Withdrawal of the needle should be done immediately after the reinforcing and reducing manipulations. Professor LI is accomplished in qi regulation. It is held by him that regulating qi circulation is essence of acupuncture, letting the patient get the needling sensation is the most important task of needling. Lifting, thrusting and rotation manipulations should be applied to do reinforcing or reducing. The tissue around the tip of the needle should not be too contracted or too relaxed, and the resistance should not be too strong or too weak. The feeling of the insertion hand of the practitioner should not be too smooth or too hesitant. Needle should be inserted into the skin quickly at the moment of hard pressing by the left hand. And then, slow rotation and gentle lifting and thrusting can be applied to promote the needling sensation like electric current pass through and to reach the affected region along the

  18. Integrated diagnostic imaging of primary thoracic rhabdomyosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almberger, M.; Iannicelli, E.; Matrunola, M.; Schiavetti, A.; Capocaccia, P.

    2001-01-01

    We report a rare case of primary thoracic rhabdomyosarcoma in a girl who was referred with acute chest pain, hacking cough, and wheezing. A chest X-ray revealed a complete opacity of the right hemithorax. Ultrasound revealed a right-sided pleural effusion and a solid mass above the liver dome, suggesting a neoplastic disease, which quickly led to further specific examination. Use of CT and MRI together with bone scintigraphy completed the investigation. The biopsy specimen showed a pattern of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. This case was reported to emphasize the role of US in the evaluation of a child with hemithorax opacity. (orig.)

  19. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-01-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram

  20. Integrated diagnostic imaging of primary thoracic rhabdomyosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almberger, M.; Iannicelli, E. [Dept. of Radiology, University ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy); Matrunola, M.; Schiavetti, A.; Capocaccia, P. [Dept. of Pediatric Radiology, University ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Rome (Italy)

    2001-03-01

    We report a rare case of primary thoracic rhabdomyosarcoma in a girl who was referred with acute chest pain, hacking cough, and wheezing. A chest X-ray revealed a complete opacity of the right hemithorax. Ultrasound revealed a right-sided pleural effusion and a solid mass above the liver dome, suggesting a neoplastic disease, which quickly led to further specific examination. Use of CT and MRI together with bone scintigraphy completed the investigation. The biopsy specimen showed a pattern of alveolar rhabdomyosarcoma. This case was reported to emphasize the role of US in the evaluation of a child with hemithorax opacity. (orig.)

  1. Digital subtraction angiography of the thoracic aorta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grossman, L.B.; Buonocore, E.; Modic, M.T.; Meaney, T.F.

    1984-02-01

    Forty-three patients with acquired and congenital abnormalities of the thoracic aorta were studied using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) after an intravenous bolus injection of 40 ml of contrast material. Abnormalities studied included coarctation, pseudocoarctation, Marfan syndrome, cervical aorta, double aortic arch, aneurysm, dissection, and tumor. Twenty-four patients also had conventional angiography. DSA was accurate in 95% of cases; in the other 5%, involving patients with acute type I dissection, the coronary arteries could not be seen. The authors concluded that in 92% of their patients, DSA could have replaced the standard aortogram.

  2. Operativ behandling af thoracic outlet syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkeland, Peter; Stiasny, Jerzy

    2012-01-01

    of the brachial plexus. At surgery, we found and severed a fibrous band that compressed the inferior trunk. Postoperatively, the pain subsided and fine hand movements improved. One patient had no cervical rib, however, in the two other cases we found rudimentary cervical ribs. Magnetic resonance imaging......We present three cases with longstanding true neurogenic thoracic outlet syndrome. All patients had aching pain in the shoulder, arm and ulnar border of the hand. On examination, we found atrophy of the hand muscles. Electromyography revealed signs of compromised function of the inferior trunk...

  3. Teflon granulomas mimicking cerebellopontine angle tumors following microvascular decompression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deep, Nicholas L; Graffeo, Christopher S; Copeland, William R; Link, Michael J; Atkinson, John L; Neff, Brian A; Raghunathan, Aditya; Carlson, Matthew L

    2017-03-01

    To report two patients with a history of microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm who presented with Teflon granulomas (TG) mimicking cerebellopontine angle (CPA) tumors and to perform a systematic review of the English-language literature. Case series at a single tertiary academic referral center and systematic review. Retrospective chart review with analysis of clinical, radiological, and histopathological findings. Systematic review using PubMed, Embase, MEDLINE, and Web of Science databases. Two patients with large skull base TGs mimicking CPA tumors clinically and radiographically were managed at the authors' institution. The first presented 4 years after MVD with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss, multiple progressive cranial neuropathies, and brainstem edema due to a growing TG. Reoperation with resection of the granuloma confirmed a foreign-body reaction consisting of multinucleated giant cells containing intracytoplasmic Teflon particles. The second patient presented 11 years after MVD with asymmetrical sensorineural hearing loss and recurrent hemifacial spasm. No growth was noted over 2 years, and the patient has been managed expectantly. Only one prior case of TG after MVD for hemifacial spasm has been reported in the English literature. TG is a rare complication of MVD for hemifacial spasm. The diagnosis should be suspected in patients presenting with a new-onset enhancing mass of the CPA after MVD, even when performed decades earlier. A thorough clinical and surgical history is critical toward establishing an accurate diagnosis to guide management and prevent unnecessary morbidity. Surgical intervention is not required unless progressive neurologic complications ensue. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:715-719, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Association of microparticles and neutrophil activation with decompression sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thom, Stephen R; Bennett, Michael; Banham, Neil D; Chin, Walter; Blake, Denise F; Rosen, Anders; Pollock, Neal W; Madden, Dennis; Barak, Otto; Marroni, Alessandro; Balestra, Costantino; Germonpre, Peter; Pieri, Massimo; Cialoni, Danilo; Le, Phi-Nga Jeannie; Logue, Christopher; Lambert, David; Hardy, Kevin R; Sward, Douglas; Yang, Ming; Bhopale, Veena B; Dujic, Zeljko

    2015-09-01

    Decompression sickness (DCS) is a systemic disorder, assumed due to gas bubbles, but additional factors are likely to play a role. Circulating microparticles (MPs)--vesicular structures with diameters of 0.1-1.0 μm--have been implicated, but data in human divers have been lacking. We hypothesized that the number of blood-borne, Annexin V-positive MPs and neutrophil activation, assessed as surface MPO staining, would differ between self-contained underwater breathing-apparatus divers suffering from DCS vs. asymptomatic divers. Blood was analyzed from 280 divers who had been exposed to maximum depths from 7 to 105 meters; 185 were control/asymptomatic divers, and 90 were diagnosed with DCS. Elevations of MPs and neutrophil activation occurred in all divers but normalized within 24 h in those who were asymptomatic. MPs, bearing the following proteins: CD66b, CD41, CD31, CD142, CD235, and von Willebrand factor, were between 2.4- and 11.7-fold higher in blood from divers with DCS vs. asymptomatic divers, matched for time of sample acquisition, maximum diving depth, and breathing gas. Multiple logistic regression analysis documented significant associations (P < 0.001) between DCS and MPs and for neutrophil MPO staining. Effect estimates were not altered by gender, body mass index, use of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory agents, or emergency oxygen treatment and were modestly influenced by divers' age, choice of breathing gas during diving, maximum diving depth, and whether repetitive diving had been performed. There were no significant associations between DCS and number of MPs without surface proteins listed above. We conclude that MP production and neutrophil activation exhibit strong associations with DCS. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Persistent hemifacial spasm after microvascular decompression: a risk assessment model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Aalap; Horowitz, Michael

    2017-06-01

    Microvascular decompression (MVD) for hemifacial spasm (HFS) provides resolution of disabling symptoms such as eyelid twitching and muscle contractions of the entire hemiface. The primary aim of this study was to evaluate the predictive value of patient demographics and spasm characteristics on long-term outcomes, with or without intraoperative lateral spread response (LSR) as an additional variable in a risk assessment model. A retrospective study was undertaken to evaluate the associations of pre-operative patient characteristics, as well as intraoperative LSR and need for a staged procedure on the presence of persistent or recurrent HFS at the time of hospital discharge and at follow-up. A risk assessment model was constructed with the inclusion of six clinically or statistically significant variables from the univariate analyses. A receiving operator characteristic curve was generated, and area under the curve was calculated to determine the strength of the predictive model. A risk assessment model was first created consisting of significant pre-operative variables (Model 1) (age >50, female gender, history of botulinum toxin use, platysma muscle involvement). This model demonstrated borderline predictive value for persistent spasm at discharge (AUC .60; p=.045) and fair predictive value at follow-up (AUC .75; p=.001). Intraoperative variables (e.g. LSR persistence) demonstrated little additive value (Model 2) (AUC .67). Patients with a higher risk score (three or greater) demonstrated greater odds of persistent HFS at the time of discharge (OR 1.5 [95%CI 1.16-1.97]; p=.035), as well as greater odds of persistent or recurrent spasm at the time of follow-up (OR 3.0 [95%CI 1.52-5.95]; p=.002) Conclusions: A risk assessment model consisting of pre-operative clinical characteristics is useful in prognosticating HFS persistence at follow-up.

  6. Supraorbital keyhole surgery for optic nerve decompression and dura repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Hao; Lin, Shinn-Zong; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Ju, Da-Tong; Liu, Ming-Ying; Chen, Guann-Juh

    2004-07-01

    Supraorbital keyhole surgery is a limited surgical procedure with reduced traumatic manipulation of tissue and entailing little time in the opening and closing of wounds. We utilized the approach to treat head injury patients complicated with optic nerve compression and cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSF). Eleven cases of basal skull fracture complicated with either optic nerve compression and/or CSF leakage were surgically treated at our department from February 1995 to June 1999. Six cases had primary optic nerve compression, four had CSF leakage and one case involved both injuries. Supraorbital craniotomy was carried out using a keyhole-sized burr hole plus a small craniotomy. The size of craniotomy approximated 2 x 3 cm2. The optic nerve was decompressed via removal of the optic canal roof and anterior clinoid process with high-speed drills. The defect of dura was repaired with two pieces of tensa fascia lata that were attached on both sides of the torn dural defect with tissue glue. Seven cases with optic nerve injury included five cases of total blindness and two cases of light perception before operation. Vision improved in four cases. The CSF leakage was stopped successfully in all four cases without complication. As optic nerve compression and CSF leakage are skull base lesions, the supraorbital keyhole surgery constitutes a suitable approach. The supraorbital keyhole surgery allows for an anterior approach to the skull base. This approach also allows the treatment of both CSF leakage and optic nerve compression. Our results indicate that supraorbital keyhole operation is a safe and effective method for preserving or improving vision and attenuating CSF leakage following injury.

  7. A plasma needle generates nitric oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoffels, E; Gonzalvo, Y Aranda; Whitmore, T D; Seymour, D L; Rees, J A

    2006-01-01

    Generation of nitric oxide (NO) by a plasma needle is studied by means of mass spectrometry. The plasma needle is an atmospheric glow generated by a radio-frequency excitation in a mixture of helium and air. This source is used for the treatment of living tissues, and nitric oxide may be one of the most important active agents in plasma therapy. Efficient NO generation is of particular importance in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Mass spectrometric measurements have been performed under various plasma conditions; gas composition in the plasma and conversion of feed gases (nitrogen and oxygen) into other species has been studied. Up to 30% of the N 2 and O 2 input is consumed in the discharge, and NO has been identified as the main conversion product

  8. [Fine needle aspiration cytology of mammography screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engvad, B.; Laenkholm, A.V.; Schwartz, Thue W.

    2009-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In the year 2000 a quality assurance programme for the preoperative breast diagnostics was introduced in Denmark. The programme was based on the "European guidelines for quality assurance in breast cancer screening and diagnosis" where - among other measures - five cytological...... diagnostic classes were introduced. The aim of this study was to evaluate the quality assurance programme in a screening population to determine whether fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) as first choice remains a useful tool in the preoperative diagnostics, or if needle core biopsy should be the first...... of 66% of the 783 FNACs had a malignant cytology diagnosis, which in 99% of the cases turned out to be the correct diagnosis. Four lesions were false positives all of which represented benign proliferative breast diseases. The surgical procedures in these cases were either excisional biopsy...

  9. Maxillofacial Changes in Melnick-Needles Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leilane Larissa Albuquerque do Nascimento

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Melnick-Needles Syndrome is rare congenital hereditary skeletal dysplasia caused by mutations in the FLNA gene, which codifies the protein filamin A. This condition leads to serious skeletal abnormalities, including the stomatognathic region. Case Presentation. This paper describes the case of a 13-year-old girl diagnosed with Melnick-Needles Syndrome presenting with different forms of skeletal dysplasia, such as cranial hyperostosis, short upper limbs, bowed long bones, metaphyseal thickening, genu valgum (knock-knee, shortened distal phalanges, narrow pelvis and shoulders, rib tapering and irregularities, elongation of the vertebrae, kyphoscoliosis, micrognathia, hypoplastic coronoid processes of the mandible, left stylohyoid ligament suggesting ossification, and dental development anomalies. Conclusion. Knowledge of this rare syndrome on the part of dentists is important due to the fact that this condition involves severe abnormalities of the stomatognathic system that cause an impact on the development of the entire face as well as functional and esthetic impairments.

  10. A retractable barb needle for drug darts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G.L. van Rooyen

    1973-07-01

    Full Text Available The mechanism and action of a new retractable barbneedle for drug darts are described. This dart needle is particularly successful in obviating unnecessary flight reactions andtrauma in darted animals, and facilitates the complete injection of the drug dose before the barb is retracted and the dart is dislogded from the animal. The whole process is completed within a few seconds and the expended dart can usually be retrieved in the immediate vicinity where the animal was darted.

  11. Outcome after decompressive craniectomy for the treatment of severe traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Jerry Lee; Cipolle, Mark D; Anderson, Meredith; Sabella, Victoria; Shollenberger, Daniele; Li, P Mark; Pasquale, Michael D

    2008-08-01

    Using decompressive craniectomy as part of the treatment regimen for severe traumatic brain injury (STBI) has become more common at our Level I trauma center. This study was designed to examine this practice with particular attention to long-term functional outcome. A retrospective review of prospectively collected data was performed for patients with STBI admitted from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2005. Our institution manages patients using the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines. Data collected from patients undergoing decompressive craniectomy included: age, Injury Severity Score, admission and follow-up Glasgow Coma Score, timing of, and indication for decompressive craniectomy, and procedure-related complications. The Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE) was performed by a experienced trauma clinical research coordinator using a structured phone interview to assess long-term outcome in the survivors. Student's t test and chi2 were used to examine differences between groups. Forty STBI patients were treated with decompressive craniectomy; 24 were performed primarily in conjunction with urgent evacuation of extra-axial hemorrhage and 16 were performed primarily in response to increased intracranial pressure with 4 of these after an initial craniotomy. Decompressive craniectomy was very effective at lowering intracranial pressure in these 16 patients (35.0 mm Hg +/- 13.5 mm Hg to 14.6 mm Hg +/- 8.7 mm Hg, p = 0.005). Twenty-two decompressive craniectomy patients did not survive to hospital discharge, whereas admission Glasgow Coma Score and admission pupil size and reactivity correlated with outcome, age, and Injury Severity Score did not. At a mean of 11 months (range, 3-26 months) after decompressive craniectomy, 6 survivors had a poor functional outcome (GOSE 1-4), whereas 12 survivors had a good outcome (GOSE 5-8). Therefore, 70% of these patients had an unfavorable outcome (death or severe disability), and 30% had a favorable long-term functional outcome

  12. Dynamics of translational friction in needle-tissue interaction during needle insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadian, Ali; Patel, Rajni V; Kermani, Mehrdad R

    2014-01-01

    In this study, a distributed approach to account for dynamic friction during needle insertion in soft tissue is presented. As is well known, friction is a complex nonlinear phenomenon. It appears that classical or static models are unable to capture some of the observations made in systems subjected to significant frictional effects. In needle insertion, translational friction would be a matter of importance when the needle is very flexible, or a stop-and-rotate motion profile at low insertion velocities is implemented, and thus, the system is repeatedly transitioned from a pre-sliding to a sliding mode and vice versa. In order to characterize friction components, a distributed version of the LuGre model in the state-space representation is adopted. This method also facilitates estimating cutting force in an intra-operative manner. To evaluate the performance of the proposed family of friction models, experiments were conducted on homogeneous artificial phantoms and animal tissue. The results illustrate that our approach enables us to represent the main features of friction which is a major force component in needle-tissue interaction during needle-based interventions.

  13. "White Cord Syndrome" of Acute Hemiparesis After Posterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion for Chronic Cervical Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antwi, Prince; Grant, Ryan; Kuzmik, Gregory; Abbed, Khalid

    2018-05-01

    "White cord syndrome" is a very rare condition thought to be due to acute reperfusion of chronically ischemic areas of the spinal cord. Its hallmark is the presence of intramedullary hyperintense signal on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging sequences in a patient with unexplained neurologic deficits following spinal cord decompression surgery. The syndrome is rare and has been reported previously in 2 patients following anterior cervical decompression and fusion. We report an additional case of this complication. A 68-year-old man developed acute left-sided hemiparesis after posterior cervical decompression and fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. The patient improved with high-dose steroid therapy. The rare white cord syndrome following either anterior cervical decompression and fusion or posterior cervical decompression and fusion may be due to ischemic-reperfusion injury sustained by chronically compressed parts of the spinal cord. In previous reports, patients have improved following steroid therapy and acute rehabilitation. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Optic neuropathy in thyroid eye disease: results of the balanced decompression technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baril, Catherine; Pouliot, Denis; Molgat, Yvonne

    2014-04-01

    To determine the efficacy of combined endoscopic medial and external lateral orbital decompression for the treatment of compressive optic neuropathy (CON) in thyroid eye disease (TED). A retrospective review of all patients undergoing combined surgical orbital decompression for CON between 2000 and 2010 was conducted. Fifty-nine eyes of 34 patients undergoing combined surgical orbital decompression for CON. Clinical outcome measures included visual acuity, Hardy-Rand-Rittler (HRR) colour plate testing, relative afferent pupillary defect, intraocular pressure measurement, and Hertel exophthalmometry. A CON score was calculated preoperatively and postoperatively based on the visual acuity and the missed HRR plates. A higher CON score correlates with more severe visual dysfunction. All patients had improvement of their optic neuropathy after surgical decompression. CON score was calculated for 54 eyes and decreased significantly from a mean of 13.2 ± 10.35 preoperatively to a mean of 8.51 ± 10.24 postoperatively (p < 0.0001). Optic neuropathy was completely resolved in 93.22% (55/59 eyes). Eighteen of 34 patients (52.94%) experienced development of new-onset postoperative strabismus that required subsequent surgical intervention. Endoscopic medial combined with external lateral orbital decompression is an effective technique for the treatment of TED-associated CON. © 2013 Canadian Ophthalmological Society Published by Canadian Ophthalmological Society All rights reserved.

  15. A comparative study of the intracranial environment before and after cranioplasty in decompressive craniectamized cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Utsugi, Osamu; Saito, Fumio; Inaba, Izumi; Takeda, Yasuaki; Miki, Tamotsu; Miwa, Tetsurou

    1990-01-01

    The external decompression is performed as a secondary method for the surgical treatment of increased intracranial pressure due to trauma or cerebrovascular disease. We have had the experience that, if patients are kept in a decompressed state for a prolonged period, they often complain of various minor neurological disorders; cranioplasty done on such patients improves those disorders. In this investigation, the authors made a plan to elucidate this mechanism. The subjects were 30 cases of non-progressive diseases, such as postoperative lesions of ruptured aneurysms, and intracerebral hematomas. We proved that the cerebral function improves after the cranioplasty by an average score of 5.7 on Hasegawa's simple intelligent evaluation scale and by 88.9% in EEG. The morphological change was observed by a CT scan, which showed as a compressive deformity of the lateral ventricle, subdural fluid collection, and a prolonged residue of brain edema. These findings were rapidly and greatly improved after the cranioplasty. It was also found, by the measurement of the regional cerebral blood flow by means of SPECT, that the hemicerebral blood flow rate on the side of the decompressive craniectomy was significantly improved after the cranioplasty compared with the control group. From the above data, it was presumed that the persistence of neurological disorders in decompressive craniectomy is caused largely by a regional cerebral blood flow disorder. Therefore, the authors considered that, when external decompression is done, it is essential to perform cranioplasty as soon as possible after the intracranial pressure has been relieved. (author)

  16. September 2017 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated at 150 words. The September 2017 Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, September 27, 2017 at the HonorHealth Rehabilitation Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. This was a dinner meeting with case presentations. There were 16 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and radiology communities. There was a discussion of the Tobacco 21 bill which had been introduced the last session in the Arizona State Legislature. Since it seems likely that the bill will be reintroduced, the Arizona Thoracic Society will support the bill in the future. Dr. Rick Robbins announced that the SWJPCC has applied to be included in PubMed. In addition, Dr. Robbins was assigned the task of tracking down the campaign contributions to congressional members from the tobacco PAC before the next election. There were 7 case presentations: 1.\tAshley L. Garrett, MD, pulmonary fellow at Mayo, presented an elderly man with insulin-dependent diabetes who felt he …

  17. October 2013 Arizona thoracic society notes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbins RA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available No abstract available. Article truncated after 150 words. The October Arizona Thoracic Society meeting was held on Wednesday, 10/23/2013 at Shea Hospital beginning at 6:30 PM. There were 21 in attendance representing the pulmonary, critical care, sleep, and thoracic surgery communities. A proposal was made to decrease the number of meetings from 10 to 8 per year. After a brief discussion, this was adopted. Dr. Parides will try and coordinate these changes with Tucson. Meetings were announced for December in Tucson, January in Carmel, February in Albuquerque, and April in Phoenix. A suggestion was made to have a separate area for meetings on the SWJPCC website. There were 2 cases presented-both by Nick Sparacino, a first year fellow at Good Samaritan/VA. 1. The first case was a 48 year old man admitted to podiatry for chronic diabetic foot ulcers. His preoperative chest x-ray revealed multiple pulmonary nodules. Importantly, he had a history of working in a brake pad …

  18. Thoracic Ganglioneuromas Resulting in Nonimmune Hydrops Fetalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction - Most often, ganglioneuromas affect older pediatric and adult patients. They are typically slow growing tumors that remain clinically silent until they become large enough to cause symptoms by compression of adjacent structures. Case - We report a case of a 22-year-old Hispanic gravida 2 para 1 female patient who was found to have massive hydrops fetalis at 20 completed gestational weeks. Fetal echocardiography revealed a narrowed distal ductal arch and proximal descending aorta. Cesarean delivery was undertaken at 29 completed gestational weeks for refractory labor and nonreassuring fetal status. The neonate expired at 47 minutes of life despite aggressive resuscitation. At autopsy, multiple thoracic masses were found adjacent to a compressed proximal descending aorta. Histological and immunohistochemical analysis confirmed the diagnosis of a ganglioneuroma, a rare type of neural crest tumor. Discussion - A variety of intrathoracic masses have previously been reported to cause hydrops fetalis including teratomas, fibrosarcomas, and lymphangiomas. To our knowledge, this case is the first description of hydrops fetalis caused by ganglioneuromas. We propose that multiple thoracic ganglioneuromas led to biventricular distal outflow tract obstruction and hydrops fetalis.

  19. [Design and application of silver needle-knife].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guodong; Shi, Bin; Zhang, Benwu; Xu, Haidong

    2015-04-01

    A silver needle-knife which has the dual function of silver needle and needle-knife is designed. The main components of this silver needle-knife are approximately 50% silver and approximately 50% nichrome. The silver needle-knife is composed of five parts, including needle-knife tail, spiral handle; steering handle, needle-knife body and needle-knife edge. It converges the advantages of needle-knife and silver needle, which can cut loose of diseased tissue and peel adhesion of lesions, but also be heated with moxa cone and thermal therapeutic instrument, and connect with electroacupuncture apparatus. It has the function of warming channel and removing coldness, dispelling wind and eliminating dampness, resolving spasm and relieving pain, dredging the channel and so on. Due to the spiral handle and the steering handle, the operation is easier, which reduces the blindness of cutting and increase the safety. It is mainly used for soft tissue injury, rheumatism and rheumatoid arthritis, as well as degenerative diseases of spine and joint, and it has obvious efficacy on some internal medical diseases.

  20. Laser Generated Leaky Acoustic Waves for Needle Visualization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kai-Wen; Wang, Yi-An; Li, Pai-Chi

    2018-04-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided needle operation is usually used to visualize both tissue and needle position such as tissue biopsy and localized drug delivery. However, the transducer-needle orientation is limited due to reflection of the acoustic waves. We proposed a leaky acoustic wave method to visualize the needle position and orientation. Laser pulses are emitted on top of the needle to generate acoustic waves; then, these acoustic waves propagate along the needle surface. Leaky wave signals are detected by the US array transducer. The needle position can be calculated by phase velocities of two different wave modes and their corresponding emission angles. In our experiments, a series of needles was inserted into a tissue mimicking phantom and porcine tissue to evaluate the accuracy of the proposed method. The results show that the detection depth is up to 51 mm and the insertion angle is up to 40° with needles of different diameters. It is demonstrated that the proposed approach outperforms the conventional B-mode US-guided needle operation in terms of the detection range while achieving similar accuracy. The proposed method reveals the potentials for further clinical applications.

  1. The effects of needle deformation during lumbar puncture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Hüseyin Özdemir

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study is to assess deformation of the tip and deflection from the axis of 22-gauge Quincke needles when they are used for diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP. Thus, it can be determined whether constructional alterations of needles are important for predicting clinical problems after diagnostic LP. Materials and Methods: The 22-gauge Quincke needles used for diagnostic LP were evaluated. A specially designed protractor was used for measurement and evaluation. Waist circumference was measured in each patient. Patients were questioned about headaches occurring after LP. Results: A total of 115 Quincke-type spinal needles used in 113 patients were evaluated. No deflection was detected in 38 (33.1% of the needles. Deflection between 0.1° and 5° occurred in 43 (37.3% of the needles and deflection ≥ 5.1° occurred in 34 patients (29.6%. Forty-seven (41.5% patients experienced post lumbar puncture headache (PLPH and 13 (11.5% patients experienced intracranial hypotension (IH. No statistically significant correlation between the degree of deflection and headache was found (P > 0.05. Epidural blood patch was performed for three patients. Deformity in the form of bending like a hook occurred in seven needles and IH occurred in six patients using these needles. Two of the needles used in three patients requiring blood patch were found to be bent. Conclusion: Deformation of needles may increase complications after LP. Needle deformation may lead to IH. In case of deterioration in the structure of the needle, termination of the puncture procedure and the use of a new needle could reduce undesirable clinical consequences, especially IH.

  2. The effects of needle deformation during lumbar puncture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Hasan Hüseyin; Demir, Caner F.; Varol, Sefer; Arslan, Demet; Yıldız, Mustafa; Akil, Eşref

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to assess deformation of the tip and deflection from the axis of 22-gauge Quincke needles when they are used for diagnostic lumbar puncture (LP). Thus, it can be determined whether constructional alterations of needles are important for predicting clinical problems after diagnostic LP. Materials and Methods: The 22-gauge Quincke needles used for diagnostic LP were evaluated. A specially designed protractor was used for measurement and evaluation. Waist circumference was measured in each patient. Patients were questioned about headaches occurring after LP. Results: A total of 115 Quincke-type spinal needles used in 113 patients were evaluated. No deflection was detected in 38 (33.1%) of the needles. Deflection between 0.1° and 5° occurred in 43 (37.3%) of the needles and deflection ≥ 5.1° occurred in 34 patients (29.6%). Forty-seven (41.5%) patients experienced post lumbar puncture headache (PLPH) and 13 (11.5%) patients experienced intracranial hypotension (IH). No statistically significant correlation between the degree of deflection and headache was found (P > 0.05). Epidural blood patch was performed for three patients. Deformity in the form of bending like a hook occurred in seven needles and IH occurred in six patients using these needles. Two of the needles used in three patients requiring blood patch were found to be bent. Conclusion: Deformation of needles may increase complications after LP. Needle deformation may lead to IH. In case of deterioration in the structure of the needle, termination of the puncture procedure and the use of a new needle could reduce undesirable clinical consequences, especially IH. PMID:25883480

  3. Novel Double-Needle System That Can Prevent Intravascular Injection of Any Filler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsiang Huang, MD

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Summary:. A new type of needle system combines 2 parts, an inner needle and an outer needle. The inner needle is used for filler injection and the outer needle acts as a guiding needle that can observe blood reflow when inserting into the vessel lumen during injection process. This new needle system can be used for all kinds of filler, providing real time monitoring for physician and preventing intravascular injection of any filler.

  4. A rare constellation of empyema, lung abscess, and mediastinal abscess as a complication of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chun-Ta; Chen, Chung-Yu; Ho, Chao-Chi; Yu, Chong-Jen

    2011-07-01

    The introduction of endobronchial ultrasound-guided transbronchial needle aspiration (EBUS-TBNA) brought about significant advancement in the field of bronchoscopy. The major indications for EBUS-TBNA are lung cancer staging and diagnosis of mediastinal lymphadenopathy. This procedure is minimally invasive and cost saving, and no complications have been described in large-scale studies. In this report, we present a case of empyema, lung abscess, and mediastinal abscess that developed in a patient undergoing EBUS-TBNA; the patient subsequently recovered uneventfully after aggressive surgical debridement and antimicrobial therapy. Copyright © 2010 European Association for Cardio-Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Free thyroxine in needle washout after fine needle aspiration biopsy of toxic thyroid nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raikov, Nikolai; Nonchev, Boyan; Chaushev, Borislav; Vjagova, Diyana; Todorov, Svetoslav; Bocheva, Yana; Malceva, Daniela; Vicheva, Snejinka; Raikova, Asyia; Argatska, Antoaneta; Raikov, Miroslav

    2016-01-01

    The main diagnostic tool for toxic adenomas (TA) is radionuclide imaging indicated in patients with evidence of thyroid nodules in combination with thyrotoxic syndrome. Thyroid ultrasound and fine-needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) are widely used for the valuation of thyroid masses. There is no literature data concerning the utility of FNAB and related tests for the diagnosis of hyperfunctioning thyroid nodules. The purpose of this study is to determine the levels of free thyroxine (FT4) in the needle washout after FNAB of hot thyroid nodules. The results of our study show that the FT4 levels in needle washout from TA were significantly higher than the surrounding parenchyma and correlated with the hormonal changes in patients with thyroid hyperfunctioning nodules. Further studies on a large number of patients are needed to refine the diagnostic value of this method and evaluate its importance in quantitative risk assessment of thyroid autonomy.

  6. EFFICACY OF IMMUNOHISTOCHEMISTRY IN PROSTATE NEEDLE BIOPSIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tameem Afroz

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Prostate needle biopsies can pose a major diagnostic challenge when it comes to differentiating adenocarcinoma and its variants from its benign mimics. In needle biopsies, when the suspicious focus is small, morphological features may not suffice to differentiate it from its morphologic mimics like atrophy, basal cell hyperplasia, reactive inflammatory changes, seminal vesicles and adenosis. Immunohistochemical marker for basal cells, p63 and prostate cancer specific marker, Alpha-Methylacyl-CoA Racemase (AMACR help in overcoming such diagnostic dilemmas. MATERIALS AND METHODS We analysed 157 prostate core needle biopsies over a period of 2 years. Routine Hematoxylin and Eosin (H and E sections and immunohistochemical markers for basal cells (p63 and prostate cancer specific marker (AMACR were used. Prospective study was done on prostate needle core biopsies. Biopsy was done under ultrasound guidance with an 18-gauge needle. Biopsy was done in patients with raised serum PSA levels for exclusion of prostate carcinoma. RESULTS Over a period of two years, 157 prostate core needle biopsies were studied. 83 were benign lesions comprising 69 benign prostatic hyperplasias, five basal cell hyperplasias, four granulomatous lesions and three showed atrophic changes. Two biopsies morphologically resembled seminal vesicles. Prostate cancer specific marker, AMACR was negative in all, but two lesions. In these two lesions, it showed weak nonspecific staining. Basal cell marker p63 showed a continuous staining pattern highlighting the basal cells in all the 69 cases of benign prostatic hyperplasia, 5 cases of basal hyperplasia showed positivity in all the hyperplastic basal cells. In the two cases of seminal vesicles, it showed intense basal cell positivity. It showed a discontinuous pattern in two of the four granulomatous lesions and showed a weak, but a continuous staining pattern in the atrophic lesions. 74 were adenocarcinomas; the predominant

  7. Menstruation in an unusual place: A case of thoracic endometriosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    While pelvic endometriosis is relatively common, thoracic menstruation is rare. A report of what is believed to be the first case of thoracic endometriosis in Uganda is given. A 34 year old female was complaining of on and off chest pain mainly on the right side. Clinically she had signs of pleural effusion and 500 mls of altered ...

  8. State of the art thoracic ultrasound: intervention and therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corcoran, John P.; Tazi-Mezalek, Rachid; Maldonado, Fabien; Yarmus, Lonny B.; Annema, Jouke T.; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F. N.; St Noble, Victoria; Rahman, Najib M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of thoracic ultrasound outside the radiology department and in everyday clinical practice is becoming increasingly common, having been incorporated into standards of care for many specialties. For the majority of practitioners, their experience of, and exposure to, thoracic ultrasound will

  9. Ultrasound probe and needle-guide calibration for robotic ultrasound scanning and needle targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chunwoo; Chang, Doyoung; Petrisor, Doru; Chirikjian, Gregory; Han, Misop; Stoianovici, Dan

    2013-06-01

    Image-to-robot registration is a typical step for robotic image-guided interventions. If the imaging device uses a portable imaging probe that is held by a robot, this registration is constant and has been commonly named probe calibration. The same applies to probes tracked by a position measurement device. We report a calibration method for 2-D ultrasound probes using robotic manipulation and a planar calibration rig. Moreover, a needle guide that is attached to the probe is also calibrated for ultrasound-guided needle targeting. The method is applied to a transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) probe for robot-assisted prostate biopsy. Validation experiments include TRUS-guided needle targeting accuracy tests. This paper outlines the entire process from the calibration to image-guided targeting. Freehand TRUS-guided prostate biopsy is the primary method of diagnosing prostate cancer, with over 1.2 million procedures performed annually in the U.S. alone. However, freehand biopsy is a highly challenging procedure with subjective quality control. As such, biopsy devices are emerging to assist the physician. Here, we present a method that uses robotic TRUS manipulation. A 2-D TRUS probe is supported by a 4-degree-of-freedom robot. The robot performs ultrasound scanning, enabling 3-D reconstructions. Based on the images, the robot orients a needle guide on target for biopsy. The biopsy is acquired manually through the guide. In vitro tests showed that the 3-D images were geometrically accurate, and an image-based needle targeting accuracy was 1.55 mm. These validate the probe calibration presented and the overall robotic system for needle targeting. Targeting accuracy is sufficient for targeting small, clinically significant prostatic cancer lesions, but actual in vivo targeting will include additional error components that will have to be determined.

  10. Severe capillary leak syndrome after inner ear decompression sickness in a recreational scuba diver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gempp, Emmanuel; Lacroix, Guillaume; Cournac, Jean-Marie; Louge, Pierre

    2013-07-01

    Post-decompression shock with plasma volume deficit is a very rare event that has been observed under extreme conditions of hypobaric and hyperbaric exposure in aviators and professional divers. We report a case of severe hypovolemic shock due to extravasation of plasma in a recreational scuba diver presenting with inner ear decompression sickness. Impaired endothelial function can lead to capillary leak with hemoconcentration and hypotension in severe cases. This report suggests that decompression-induced circulating bubbles may have triggered the endothelial damage, activating the classic inflammatory pathway of increased vascular permeability. This observation highlights the need for an accurate diagnosis of this potentially life-threatening condition at the initial presentation in the Emergency Department after a diving-related injury. An elevated hematocrit in a diver should raise the suspicion for the potential development of capillary leak syndrome requiring specific treatment using albumin infusion as primary fluid replacement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Complicated Pseudomeningocele Repair After Chiari Decompression: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Tommasi, Claudio; Bond, Aaron E

    2016-04-01

    Pseudomeningocele is a recognised complication after posterior fossa decompression for Chiari malformation. Its management can be challenging and treatment options vary in literature. A difficult-to-treat case of a pseudomeningocele after posterior fossa decompression for a Chiari I malformation is presented. A 34-year-old woman underwent an initial decompression followed by multiple revision surgeries after the development of a symptomatic pseudomeningocele and a low-grade infection. Complications associated with standard treatment modalities, including lumbar drainage and dural repair, are discussed. A review of the existing literature is presented. The reported case ultimately required complete removal of all dural repair materials to eliminate the patient's low-grade infection, a muscular flap, and placement of a ventricular-peritoneal shunt for definitive treatment after a trial of a lumbar drain led to herniation and development of a syrinx. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. General Purpose Graphics Processing Unit Based High-Rate Rice Decompression and Reed-Solomon Decoding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loughry, Thomas A. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-02-01

    As the volume of data acquired by space-based sensors increases, mission data compression/decompression and forward error correction code processing performance must likewise scale. This competency development effort was explored using the General Purpose Graphics Processing Unit (GPGPU) to accomplish high-rate Rice Decompression and high-rate Reed-Solomon (RS) decoding at the satellite mission ground station. Each algorithm was implemented and benchmarked on a single GPGPU. Distributed processing across one to four GPGPUs was also investigated. The results show that the GPGPU has considerable potential for performing satellite communication Data Signal Processing, with three times or better performance improvements and up to ten times reduction in cost over custom hardware, at least in the case of Rice Decompression and Reed-Solomon Decoding.

  13. Risk Associated With The Decompression Of High Pressure High Temperature Fluids - Study On Black Oil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Figueroa, D. C.; Fosbøl, P. L.; Thomsen, K.

    2015-01-01

    Fluids produced from deep underground reservoirs may result in exponential increase in temperature. It is a consequence of adiabatic fluid decompression from the inverse Joule Thomson Effect (JTE). The phenomenon requires analysis in order to avoid any operational risks. This study evaluates...... the JTE upon decompression of black oil in high pressure-high temperature reservoirs. Also the effect caused by the presence of water and brine on the black oil is studied. The final temperature is calculated from the corresponding energy balance at isenthalpic and non-isenthalpic conditions. It is found...... that the final temperature of black oil increases upon adiabatic decompression. In the case of the isenthalpic process at initial conditions of the reservoir, e.g. 150°C and 1000 bars, it is found that the final temperature can increase to 173.7°C. At non-isenthalpic conditions the final temperature increases...

  14. Prognostic Factors for Satisfaction After Decompression Surgery for Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paulsen, Rune Tendal; Bouknaitir, Jamal Bech; Fruensgaard, Søren

    2018-01-01

    : To present clinical outcome data and identify prognostic factors related to patient satisfaction 1 yr after posterior decompression surgery for lumbar spinal stenosis. METHOD: This multicenter register study included 2562 patients. Patients were treated with various types of posterior decompression. Patients...... with previous spine surgery or concomitant fusion were excluded. Patient satisfaction was analyzed for associations with age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, duration of pain, number of decompressed vertebral levels, comorbidities, and patient-reported outcome measures, which were used to quantify....... CONCLUSION: This study found smoking, long duration of leg pain, and cancerous and neurological disease to be associated with patient dissatisfaction, whereas good walking capacity at baseline was positively associated with satisfaction after 1 yr....

  15. MRI-guidance in percutaneous core decompression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kerimaa, Pekka; Vaeaenaenen, Matti; Ojala, Risto; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Radiology (Finland); Hyvoenen, Pekka; Lehenkari, Petri [Oulu University Hospital, Department of Surgery (Finland)

    2016-04-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MRI-guidance for core decompression of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Twelve MRI-guided core decompressions were performed on patients with different stages of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The patients were asked to evaluate their pain and their ability to function before and after the procedure and imaging findings were reviewed respectively. Technical success in reaching the target was 100 % without complications. Mean duration of the procedure itself was 54 min. All patients with ARCO stage 1 osteonecrosis experienced clinical benefit and pathological MRI findings were seen to diminish. Patients with more advanced disease gained less, if any, benefit and total hip arthroplasty was eventually performed on four patients. MRI-guidance seems technically feasible, accurate and safe for core decompression of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Patients with early stage osteonecrosis may benefit from the procedure. (orig.)

  16. MRI-guidance in percutaneous core decompression of osteonecrosis of the femoral head

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kerimaa, Pekka; Vaeaenaenen, Matti; Ojala, Risto; Tervonen, Osmo; Blanco Sequeiros, Roberto; Hyvoenen, Pekka; Lehenkari, Petri

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of MRI-guidance for core decompression of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Twelve MRI-guided core decompressions were performed on patients with different stages of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. The patients were asked to evaluate their pain and their ability to function before and after the procedure and imaging findings were reviewed respectively. Technical success in reaching the target was 100 % without complications. Mean duration of the procedure itself was 54 min. All patients with ARCO stage 1 osteonecrosis experienced clinical benefit and pathological MRI findings were seen to diminish. Patients with more advanced disease gained less, if any, benefit and total hip arthroplasty was eventually performed on four patients. MRI-guidance seems technically feasible, accurate and safe for core decompression of avascular necrosis of the femoral head. Patients with early stage osteonecrosis may benefit from the procedure. (orig.)

  17. Outcomes of decompressive craniectomy in patients after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Mithun; MacIsaac, Christopher; Grabinski, Rafal; Liew, Danny; Kavar, Bhadrakant

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) can result in cerebral oedema and vascular changes resulting in an increase in intracranial pressure (ICP), which can lead to further secondary damage. Decompressive craniectomy (DC) is a surgical option in the management of ICP. We aimed to investigate outcomes of DC after TBI. We performed a retrospective audit of 57 adult patients (aged > 15 years) who underwent DC after TBI, at the Royal Melbourne Hospital from 1 January 2005 to 30 June 2011. Our functional outcome measure was the Extended Glasgow Outcome Scale (GOSE). Patients had a median age of 30 years (range, 17- 73 years). The hospital mortality rate was 47% (27 patients). A higher postoperative median ICP was the most significant predictor of hospital mortality (OR, 1.1; 95% CI, 1-1.3). There was a mean decrease of 7.7mmHg in ICP between the mean preoperative and postoperative ICP values (95% CI, - 10.5 to - 5.0mmHg). There was a mean decrease of 3.5mmHg in the mean cerebral perfusion pressure (CPP) from preoperative to postoperative CPP values (95% CI, - 6.2 to - 0.8mmHg). At the 6-month follow-up, a poor outcome (GOSE score, 1-4) was seen in 39 patients (68%), while a good outcome (GOSE score, 5- 8) was noted in 15 patients (26%). A high APACHE II score on admission was the most significant predictor of a worse GOSE score at 6 months (OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.5). Analysis of the APACHE II and IMPACT scores as models for predicting mortality at 6 months showed an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.792 and 0.805, respectively, and for predicting poor outcome at 6 months, showed an AUC of 0.862 and 0.883, respectively. DC decreased ICP postoperatively. The IMPACT and APACHE II scores are good models for prediction of death and poor outcome at 6 months.

  18. Experimental Evidence of Low Density Liquid Water under Decompression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, G.; Lin, C.; Sinogeikin, S. V.; Smith, J.

    2017-12-01

    Water is not only the most important substance for life, but also plays important roles in liquid science for its anomalous properties. It has been widely accepted that water's anomalies are not a result of simple thermal fluctuation, but are connected to the formation of various structural aggregates in the hydrogen bonding network. Among several proposed scenarios, one model of fluctuations between two different liquids has gradually gained traction. These two liquids are referred to as a low-density liquid (LDL) and a high-density liquid (HDL) with a coexistence line in the deeply supercooled regime at elevated pressure. The LDL-HDL transition ends with decreasing pressure at a liquid-liquid critical point (LLCP) with its Widom line extending to low pressures. Above the Widom line lies mostly HDL which is favored by entropy, while LDL, mostly lying below the Widom line, is favored by enthalpy in the tetrahedral hydrogen bonding network. The origin of water's anomalies can then be explained by the increase in structural fluctuations, as water is cooled down to deeply supercooled temperatures approaching the Widom line. Because both the LLCP and the LDL-HDL transition line lie in water's "no man's land" between the homogeneous nucleation temperature (TH, 232 K) and the crystallization temperature (TX, 150 K), the success of experiments exploring this region has been limited thus far. Using a rapid decompression technique integrated with in situ x-ray diffraction, we observe that a high-pressure ice phase transforms to a low-density noncrystalline (LDN) form upon rapid release of pressure at temperatures of 140-165K. The LDN subsequently crystallizes into ice-Ic through a diffusion-controlled process. The change in crystallization rate with temperature indicates that the LDN is a LDL with its tetrahedrally-coordinated network fully developed and clearly linked to low-density amorphous ices. The observation of the tetrahedral LDL supports the two-liquid model for

  19. Risk of needle stick injuries in health care workers: bad habits (recapping needles) last long.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogowska-Szadkowska, Dorota; Stanisławowicz, Małgorzata; Chlabicz, Sławomir

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess the nurses' knowledge concerning the risk of hepatitis B and C viruses or human immunodeficiency virus infection while performing their professional duties, an anonymous questionnaire developed by the authors was distributed in 2008. Surprisingly 64% respondents occasionally recapping needles after injections, although they know the procedures which are obligatory at the ward. The first step in preventing percutaneous injuries should focus on efforts to eliminate the practice of recapping needles, though education and convenient placement of puncture-resistant containers for the disposal of used sharps.

  20. The Effect of Dry Needling Compared With Ischemic Pressure on Pain Intensity on Active Trigger Point in Upper Trapezius Muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Ziaeifar

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Myofascial trigger point is one of the most common causes of musculoskeletal pain and disorders. Myofascial trigger point in upper trapezius has been reported as a frequent symptom in patients with neck and thoracic pain. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of dry needling compared with ischemic pressure on active trigger point in upper trapezius muscle. Materials & Methods: 32 women with active myofascial trigger point in upper trapezius muscle participated in this randomized clinical trial (RCT study. The subjects were randomly assigned into two groups: dry needling (N=15 and ischemic pressure (N=17. The visual analogue scale (VAS was used to assess the pain intensity before and after treatment in both groups. Paired t-test was used to determine any significant difference in pain intensity after treatment sessions compared with pre-treatment score in control and experimental group. Analysis of Covariance (ANCOVA was calculated to determine the significance of differences between the control and experimental groups in post-test scores, with pre-treatment scores used as covariates in the analysis. Results: Statistical analysis (paired t-test revealed significant decrease in pain intensity after treatment sessions in control and experimental group (P=0.00 compared with pre-treatment score. In the ANCOVA, controlling for pre-test scores, no significant difference was found between the two groups (P=0.8. Conclusion: It seems that that both dry needling and ischemic pressure are effective in improvement in the pain intensity in subjects with myofascial trigger points. However, dry needling can be used by clinicians and therapist in physiotherapy clinics.

  1. Ultrasound-guided fine needle aspiration versus core needle biopsy: comparison of post-biopsy hematoma rates and risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, In Hye; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Moon, Hee Jung; Yoon, Jung Hyun; Park, Vivian Y; Kwak, Jin Young

    2017-07-01

    To compare post-biopsy hematoma rates between ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy, and to investigate risk factors for post-biopsy hematoma. A total of 5304 thyroid nodules which underwent ultrasound guided biopsy were included in this retrospective study. We compared clinical and US features between patients with and without post-biopsy hematoma. Associations between these features and post-biopsy hematoma were analyzed. Post-biopsy hematoma rate was 0.8% (43/5121) for ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and 4.9% (9/183) for ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy (P core needle biopsy (9/179, 5.0%) than with ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration (9/1138, 0.8%) (P core needle biopsy was the only significant risk factor for post-biopsy hematoma (adjusted Odds Ratio, 6.458, P core needle biopsy than in ultrasound guided-fine needle aspiration and ultrasound guided-core needle biopsy was the only independent factor of post-biopsy hematoma in thyroid nodules.

  2. Comparison of specimen adequacy in fine needle aspiration cytology performed with different gauge needles in palpable external swellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarfraz, T.; Bashir, S.; Tariq, H.; Malik, T.M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology (FNAC) of external swellings may yield different specimen adequacy depending on different gauge needles used for aspiration. Objective: To compare the specimen adequacy aspirated by various gauge (21 and 22) needles in external palpable swellings of lymph nodes, thyroid gland, salivary glands, breast and soft tissue. Study Design: Comparative cross sectional study. Duration: Six months (1st Jan 2012 to 30th June 2012). Setting: Histopathology/Cytology department Combined Military Hospital Peshawar (Pakistan). Methodology: This was a prospective study of 200 cases in which FNAC was performed with either 21 or 22 gauge needles (100 cases with 21 gauge and 100 with 22 gauge needles). Equal number of aspirations were done with 21 and 22 gauge needles from the swellings of thyroid gland, lymph nodes, salivary glands, breast and soft tissue. Results were analyzed for specimen adequacy by using SPSS 17. Results: A total number of 200 cases were recruited in this study, out of which 100 were aspirated with 21 gauge needles and 100 with 22 gauge needles. Specimen adequacy in swellings of thyroid, lymph nodes and salivary glands was better with 22 gauge amounting 90%, 80% and 80% respectively, as compared to yield with 21 gauge needles which was 85%, 70% and 60% respectively. On the other hand in swellings of breast and soft tissue, the specimen adequacy was better with 21 gauge needles giving 98% and 90 % adequate yield respectively as compared to 22 gauge needles which was 70% and 40 % respectively. Conclusion: Needles of smaller gauge (22 gauge) give a better yield in swellings of thyroid, lymph nodes and salivary gland while in swellings of breast and soft tissue sample adequacy is better with larger gauge needle (21 gauge). (author)

  3. Magma decompression rates during explosive eruptions of Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii, recorded by melt embayments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, David J.; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Ruprecht, Philipp; Plank, Terry; Hauri, Erik H.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2016-10-01

    The decompression rate of magma as it ascends during volcanic eruptions is an important but poorly constrained parameter that controls many of the processes that influence eruptive behavior. In this study, we quantify decompression rates for basaltic magmas using volatile diffusion in olivine-hosted melt tubes (embayments) for three contrasting eruptions of Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii. Incomplete exsolution of H2O, CO2, and S from the embayment melts during eruptive ascent creates diffusion profiles that can be measured using microanalytical techniques, and then modeled to infer the average decompression rate. We obtain average rates of ~0.05-0.45 MPa s-1 for eruptions ranging from Hawaiian style fountains to basaltic subplinian, with the more intense eruptions having higher rates. The ascent timescales for these magmas vary from around ~5 to ~36 min from depths of ~2 to ~4 km, respectively. Decompression-exsolution models based on the embayment data also allow for an estimate of the mass fraction of pre-existing exsolved volatiles within the magma body. In the eruptions studied, this varies from 0.1 to 3.2 wt% but does not appear to be the key control on eruptive intensity. Our results do not support a direct link between the concentration of pre-eruptive volatiles and eruptive intensity; rather, they suggest that for these eruptions, decompression rates are proportional to independent estimates of mass discharge rate. Although the intensity of eruptions is defined by the discharge rate, based on the currently available dataset of embayment analyses, it does not appear to scale linearly with average decompression rate. This study demonstrates the utility of the embayment method for providing quantitative constraints on magma ascent during explosive basaltic eruptions.

  4. Early versus Late Decompression for Traumatic Spinal Cord Injuries; a Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoud Yousefifard

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Despite the vast number of surveys, no consensus has been reached on the optimum timing of spinal decompression surgery. This systematic review and meta-analysis aimed to compare the effects of early and late spinal decompression surgery on neurologic improvement and post-surgical complications in patients with traumatic spinal cord injuries.Methods: Two independent reviewers carried out an extended search in electronic databases. Data of neurological outcome and post-surgery complication were extracted. Finally, pooled relative risk (RR with a 95% confidence interval (CI was reported for comparing of efficacy of early and late surgical decompression.Results: Eventually 22 studies were included. The pooled RR was 0.77 (95% CI: 0.68-0.89 for at least one grade neurological improvement, and 0.84 (95% CI: 0.77-0.92 for at least two grade improvement. Pooled RR for surgical decompression performed within 12 hours after the injury was 0.26 (95% CI: 0.13-0.52; p<0.001, while it was 0.75 (95% CI: 0.63-0.90; p=0.002 when the procedure was performed within 24 hours, and 0.93 (95% CI: 0.76-1.14; p=0.48 when it was carried out in the first 72 hours after the injury. Surgical decompression performed within 24 hours after injury was found to be associated with significantly lower rates of post-surgical complications (RR=0.77; 95% CI: 0.68-0.86; p<0.001.Conclusion: The findings of this study indicate that early spinal decompression surgery can improve neurologic recovery and is associated with less post-surgical complications. The optimum efficacy is observed when the procedure is performed within 12 hours of the injury.

  5. Magma decompression rates during explosive eruptions of Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii, recorded by melt embayments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, David J.; Gonnermann, Helge M.; Ruprecht, Philipp; Plank, Terry; Hauri, Erik H.; Houghton, Bruce F.; Swanson, Donald A.

    2016-01-01

    The decompression rate of magma as it ascends during volcanic eruptions is an important but poorly constrained parameter that controls many of the processes that influence eruptive behavior. In this study, we quantify decompression rates for basaltic magmas using volatile diffusion in olivine-hosted melt tubes (embayments) for three contrasting eruptions of Kīlauea volcano, Hawaii. Incomplete exsolution of H2O, CO2, and S from the embayment melts during eruptive ascent creates diffusion profiles that can be measured using microanalytical techniques, and then modeled to infer the average decompression rate. We obtain average rates of ~0.05–0.45 MPa s−1 for eruptions ranging from Hawaiian style fountains to basaltic subplinian, with the more intense eruptions having higher rates. The ascent timescales for these magmas vary from around ~5 to ~36 min from depths of ~2 to ~4 km, respectively. Decompression-exsolution models based on the embayment data also allow for an estimate of the mass fraction of pre-existing exsolved volatiles within the magma body. In the eruptions studied, this varies from 0.1 to 3.2 wt% but does not appear to be the key control on eruptive intensity. Our results do not support a direct link between the concentration of pre-eruptive volatiles and eruptive intensity; rather, they suggest that for these eruptions, decompression rates are proportional to independent estimates of mass discharge rate. Although the intensity of eruptions is defined by the discharge rate, based on the currently available dataset of embayment analyses, it does not appear to scale linearly with average decompression rate. This study demonstrates the utility of the embayment method for providing quantitative constraints on magma ascent during explosive basaltic eruptions.

  6. Torsional Dynamics of Steerable Needles: Modeling and Fluoroscopic Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swensen, John P.; Lin, MingDe; Okamura, Allison M.; Cowan, Noah J.

    2017-01-01

    Needle insertions underlie a diversity of medical interventions. Steerable needles provide a means by which to enhance existing needle-based interventions and facilitate new ones. Tip-steerable needles follow a curved path and can be steered by twisting the needle base during insertion, but this twisting excites torsional dynamics that introduce a discrepancy between the base and tip twist angles. Here, we model the torsional dynamics of a flexible rod—such as a tip-steerable needle—during subsurface insertion and develop a new controller based on the model. The torsional model incorporates time-varying mode shapes to capture the changing boundary conditions inherent during insertion. Numerical simulations and physical experiments using two distinct setups—stereo camera feedback in semi-transparent artificial tissue and feedback control with real-time X-ray imaging in optically opaque artificial tissue— demonstrate the need to account for torsional dynamics in control of the needle tip. PMID:24860026

  7. Adjacent-segment disease after thoracic pedicle screw fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, Nitin; Heary, Robert F; Agarwal, Prateek

    2018-03-01

    OBJECTIVE Pedicle screw fixation is a technique widely used to treat conditions ranging from spine deformity to fracture stabilization. Pedicle screws have been used traditionally in the lumbar spine; however, they are now being used with increasing frequency in the thoracic spine as a more favorable alternative to hooks, wires, or cables. Although safety concerns, such as the incidence of adjacent-segment disease (ASD) after cervical and lumbar fusions, have been reported, such issues in the thoracic spine have yet to be addressed thoroughly. Here, the authors review the literature on ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation and report their own experience specifically involving the use of pedicle screws in the thoracic spine. METHODS Select references from online databases, such as PubMed (provided by the US National Library of Medicine at the National Institutes of Health), were used to survey the literature concerning ASD after thoracic pedicle screw fixation. To include the authors' experience at Rutgers New Jersey Medical School, a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database was performed to determine the incidence of complications over a 13-year period in 123 consecutive adult patients who underwent thoracic pedicle screw fixation. Children, pregnant or lactating women, and prisoners were excluded from the review. By comparing preoperative and postoperative radiographic images, the occurrence of thoracic ASD and disease within the surgical construct was determined. RESULTS Definitive radiographic fusion was detected in 115 (93.5%) patients. Seven incidences of instrumentation failure and 8 lucencies surrounding the screws were observed. One patient was observed to have ASD of the thoracic spine. The mean follow-up duration was 50 months. CONCLUSIONS This long-term radiographic evaluation revealed the use of pedicle screws for thoracic fixation to be an effective stabilization modality. In particular, ASD seems to be less of a problem in the

  8. Cutis marmorata in decompression illness may be cerebrally mediated: a novel hypothesis on the aetiology of cutis marmorata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kemper, Tom Cpm; Rienks, R.; van Ooij, P. Jam; van Hulst, R. A.

    2015-01-01

    Cutaneous decompression sickness (DCS) is often considered to be a mild entity that may be explained by either vascular occlusion of skin vessels by bubbles entering the arterial circulation through a right-to-left shunt or bubble formation due to saturated subcutaneous tissue during decompression.

  9. Continuous decompression of unicameral bone cyst with cannulated screws: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brecelj, Janez; Suhodolcan, Lovro

    2007-09-01

    We determined the role of mechanical decompression in the resolution of unicameral bone cyst. A total of 69 children with unicameral bone cysts were treated either by (i) open curettage and bone grafting, (ii) steroid injection or (iii) cannulated screw insertion. During a mean follow-up of 69 months (range, 12-58), the cysts were evaluated by radiological criteria. The healing rates in the three groups were 25, 12 and 29% after the first treatment, and a further 50, 19 and 65% after the second. The study has demonstrated the advantages of the decompression technique for unicameral bone cysts over other treatment modalities studied.

  10. [Developing and testing of decompression regimes for caisson operations while constructing Moscow metro].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodchenkov, S V; Syrovegin, A V; Shulagin, I A

    1996-01-01

    Decompression regimes for caisson operations at the pressures up to 5 ata exceeding duration of the regimes specified in the caisson regulations have been developed. The regimes were tested and validated in dry altitude chamber with participation of exercising human subjects. Seventeen test-subjects took part in 54 tests. No symptoms of decompression sickness were documented. Air embolism was observed in 28 +/- 6% of cases at rest and in 72 +/- 6% of cases following provocative leg movements. The air embolism expression tended to increase with exposure to pressure.

  11. Arthroscopic Resection of The Distal Clavicle With Concomitant Subacromial Decompression: A Case Series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HZ Chan

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Shoulder impingement syndrome and acromioclavicular joint osteoarthritis often occur simultaneously and easily missed. Kay et al. reported excellent results with combined arthroscopic subacromial decompression and resection of the distal end of the clavicle in patients with both disorders. Arthroscopic treatment of these disorders produces more favourable results than open procedures. We report two patients who were not responding to conservative management and were treated with direct arthroscopic distal clavicle excision and subacromial decompression in single setting. Both patients gained good postoperative outcome in terms of pain score, function and strength improvement assessed objectively with visual analogue score (VAS and University of California Los Angeles Score (UCLA.

  12. Evaluating the advances and use of hypodermic needles in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boynes, Sean G

    2014-10-01

    Different injection techniques and patient management methodologies have been proposed to decrease the fear patients may have concerning dental needles. Dental providers should have an understanding of the technological advances, changes in techniques, and patient perceptions associated with the hypodermic needle. This article provides an overview of the pain perception process associated with dental injections. It reviews the two main sensory nerve fibers associated with injection pain and discusses needle properties as well as complications and adverse occurrences.

  13. Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsy in a Rural Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ultrasound scan. A 21-gauge 1½-inch or 23-gauge 1¼-inch needle, attached to a 10-mL disposable plastic syringe, was used for FNAB of superficial masses. For percutaneous FNAB of deep-seated organs and masses, a 23 gauge 1¼-inch needle or 3½-inch spinal needle was used. The aspirate was spread on slides and ...

  14. Magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinner, W.N. von; Rifal, A.; Te Strake, L.; Sieck, J.; King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh; Michigan Univ., Ann Arbor

    1990-01-01

    Two patients with thoracic manifestations of hydatid disease (HD) are discussed; one patient had recurrent HD of the chest wall and the other, intrapulmonary HD after rupture and intrathoracic extension of an infradiaphragmatic cyst. At magnetic resonance (MR) imaging the manifestations of HD in the thorax are similar to previously reported MR findings in HD in the liver. The presence of a low signal intensity rim on T2 weighted images representing the cyst wall was confirmed. On T1 weighted images cysts with heterogeneous low and intermediate signal intensity contents and a relatively high signal intensity wall were seen. ''Folded parasitic membranes'' previously not described on MR were noted. Daughter cysts may have a low or high signal intensity depending on contents. Reactive changes in the lung may be quite marked compared with the liver, due to reaction to the parasite or simply because the lung is more easily compressed leading to secondary atelectasis. (orig.)

  15. Evaluation of registration methods on thoracic CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, K.; van Ginneken, B.; Reinhardt, J.

    2011-01-01

    method and the evaluation is independent, using the same criteria for all participants. All results are published on the EMPIRE10 website (http://empire10.isi.uu.nl). The challenge remains ongoing and open to new participants. Full results from 24 algorithms have been published at the time of writing......EMPIRE10 (Evaluation of Methods for Pulmonary Image REgistration 2010) is a public platform for fair and meaningful comparison of registration algorithms which are applied to a database of intra-patient thoracic CT image pairs. Evaluation of non-rigid registration techniques is a non trivial task....... This article details the organisation of the challenge, the data and evaluation methods and the outcome of the initial launch with 20 algorithms. The gain in knowledge and future work are discussed....

  16. Motion correction in thoracic positron emission tomography

    CERN Document Server

    Gigengack, Fabian; Dawood, Mohammad; Schäfers, Klaus P

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory and cardiac motion leads to image degradation in Positron Emission Tomography (PET), which impairs quantification. In this book, the authors present approaches to motion estimation and motion correction in thoracic PET. The approaches for motion estimation are based on dual gating and mass-preserving image registration (VAMPIRE) and mass-preserving optical flow (MPOF). With mass-preservation, image intensity modulations caused by highly non-rigid cardiac motion are accounted for. Within the image registration framework different data terms, different variants of regularization and parametric and non-parametric motion models are examined. Within the optical flow framework, different data terms and further non-quadratic penalization are also discussed. The approaches for motion correction particularly focus on pipelines in dual gated PET. A quantitative evaluation of the proposed approaches is performed on software phantom data with accompanied ground-truth motion information. Further, clinical appl...

  17. Idiopathic Thoracic Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdurrahman Aycan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 33-year-old male patient experienced temporary sensory loss and weakness in the right lower extremity one month prior to admission. The patient was admitted to a private clinic with a three-day history of acute onset of sensory loss and weakness in both lower extremities and was treated and followed up with a prediagnosis of transverse myelitis and the Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS. The patient was subsequently transferred to our clinic and the neurologic examination revealed paraplegia in both lower extremities, positive bilateral Babinski signs, and hypesthesia below the T10 dermatome with saddle anesthesia. The patient had urinary incontinence and thoracic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI showed an image of a mass compressing the medulla.

  18. An Official American Thoracic Society Research Statement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slatore, Christopher G; Horeweg, Nanda; Jett, James R

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pulmonary nodules are frequently detected during diagnostic chest imaging and as a result of lung cancer screening. Current guidelines for their evaluation are largely based on low-quality evidence, and patients and clinicians could benefit from more research in this area. METHODS......: In this research statement from the American Thoracic Society, a multidisciplinary group of clinicians, researchers, and patient advocates reviewed available evidence for pulmonary nodule evaluation, characterized six focus areas to direct future research efforts, and identified fundamental gaps in knowledge...... demographic and nodule characteristics with patient-level outcomes. Methods to share data from registries are also necessary. CONCLUSIONS: This statement may help researchers to develop impactful and innovative research projects and enable funders to better judge research proposals. We hope...

  19. Thoracic manifestations of ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levin, M.F.; Hutton, L.C.; Kaplan, B.R. [University of Western Ontario, London, ON (Canada)

    1995-02-01

    In order to determine the thoracic manifestations of severe ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome, the medical records and available images of 771 patients who had received gonadotropins to induce superovulation, were reviewed. In 22 patients (3%) severe hyperstimulation syndrome was diagnosed clinically and confirmed with ultrasonography (US). Pleural effusion occurred in five of these (23%), one of whom required thoracentesis. Atelectasis and internal jugular vein thrombosis developed in one patient, and ventilation-perfusion mismatch occurred in another. The study concluded that respiratory distress in patients with ovarian hyperstimulation syndrome was most likely due to lung restriction. Pulmonary manifestations formed an important part of this syndrome, and radiologic input were considered necessary for assessment, monitoring and management. 10 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Benchmarking in Thoracic Surgery. Third Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freixinet Gilart, Jorge; Varela Simó, Gonzalo; Rodríguez Suárez, Pedro; Embún Flor, Raúl; Rivas de Andrés, Juan José; de la Torre Bravos, Mercedes; Molins López-Rodó, Laureano; Pac Ferrer, Joaquín; Izquierdo Elena, José Miguel; Baschwitz, Benno; López de Castro, Pedro E; Fibla Alfara, Juan José; Hernando Trancho, Florentino; Carvajal Carrasco, Ángel; Canalís Arrayás, Emili; Salvatierra Velázquez, Ángel; Canela Cardona, Mercedes; Torres Lanzas, Juan; Moreno Mata, Nicolás

    2016-04-01

    Benchmarking entails continuous comparison of efficacy and quality among products and activities, with the primary objective of achieving excellence. To analyze the results of benchmarking performed in 2013 on clinical practices undertaken in 2012 in 17 Spanish thoracic surgery units. Study data were obtained from the basic minimum data set for hospitalization, registered in 2012. Data from hospital discharge reports were submitted by the participating groups, but staff from the corresponding departments did not intervene in data collection. Study cases all involved hospital discharges recorded in the participating sites. Episodes included were respiratory surgery (Major Diagnostic Category 04, Surgery), and those of the thoracic surgery unit. Cases were labelled using codes from the International Classification of Diseases, 9th revision, Clinical Modification. The refined diagnosis-related groups classification was used to evaluate differences in severity and complexity of cases. General parameters (number of cases, mean stay, complications, readmissions, mortality, and activity) varied widely among the participating groups. Specific interventions (lobectomy, pneumonectomy, atypical resections, and treatment of pneumothorax) also varied widely. As in previous editions, practices among participating groups varied considerably. Some areas for improvement emerge: admission processes need to be standardized to avoid urgent admissions and to improve pre-operative care; hospital discharges should be streamlined and discharge reports improved by including all procedures and complications. Some units have parameters which deviate excessively from the norm, and these sites need to review their processes in depth. Coding of diagnoses and comorbidities is another area where improvement is needed. Copyright © 2015 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  1. Current status of core needle biopsy of the thyroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, Jung Hwan [Dept. of Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    Thyroid nodules are a common clinical problem. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA) and large-needle biopsy have been used to diagnose thyroid nodules. Before the 1980s, large-needle biopsy was the standard procedure for the thyroid, but FNA became the standard diagnostic tool in the 1980s because it is a safe procedure that leads to accurate diagnoses. With advances in core needle biopsy (CNB) devices (i.e., spring-activated core needles) and development of high-resolution ultrasound, it has become possible to make accurate diagnoses while minimizing complications. Although 18- to 21-gauge core needles can be used to biopsy thyroid nodules, 18-gauge needles are most commonly used in Korea. The relationships among the size of the needle, the number of core specimens, and diagnostic accuracy have not yet been conclusively established, but the general tendency is that thinner needles cause less damage to the normal thyroid, but allow a smaller amount of thyroid tissue to be biopsied to be obtained. These relationships may be validated in the future.

  2. Computed tomographic-guided iodine-125 interstitial implants for malignant thoracic tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Qiming [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China); The Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 34 Zhongshan Bei Road, Quanzhou 362000 (China); Chen, Jin; Chen, Qunlin [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China); Lai, Qingquan; Cai, Siqing [The Department of Radiology, Second Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 34 Zhongshan Bei Road, Quanzhou 362000 (China); Luo, Kaidong [The Department of Radiology, Longyan Hosptial of Traditional Chinese Medical, 59 Longteng Middle Road, Longyan 364000 (China); Lin, Zhengyu, E-mail: linsinlan@yahoo.com.cn [The Department of Radiology, First Affiliated Hospital of Fujian Medical University, 20 Chazhong Road, Fuzhou 350005 (China)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility and efficacy of percutaneous interstitial brachytherapy using iodine-125 ({sup 125}I) radioactive seeds under computed tomographic (CT) guidance for malignant thoracic tumors. Materials and methods: Forty-one patients (34 males, 7 females; 18–90 years; mean, 63.7 years) with 77 lesions (3 in the mediastinum, 7 in the chest wall, 67 in the lung) underwent percutaneous interstitial implantation of {sup 125}I radioactive seeds under CT guidance. A treatment planning system (TPS) was employed to calculate the number and distribution of seeds preoperatively. An 18-G needle was inserted into the lesions under CT guidance and send the seeds according to TPS. Two patients with mediastinal lesions undergoing seed implantation received an artificial pneumothorax. One patient with lung carcinoma adjacent to the anterior mediastinum underwent seed implantation through the sternum. Follow-up CT was done every 2 months postoperatively. Results: The procedure was successful in all patients. No major procedure-associated death occurred. The mean duration of follow-up was 19.4 ± 1.3 months (3–49 months). A complete response (CR) was seen in 49 lesions (63.6%), partial response (PR) in 9 lesions (11.7%), stable disease (SD) in 12 lesions (12.8%), and progressive disease (PD) in 7 lesions (7.4%). The overall response rate (CR + PR) was 75.3%; the local control rate (CR + PR + SD) was 90.9%. The 1-, 2- and 3-year progression-free rates for local tumors were 91%, 88% and 88%, respectively. The 1-, 2- and 3-year survival rates were 87%, 74% and 68%, respectively. Conclusion: Implantation of CT-guided {sup 125}I seeds is feasible and effective for patients with malignant thoracic tumors.

  3. [Percutaneous needle aponeurotomy for Dupuytren's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spies, C K; Müller, L P; Skouras, E; Bassemir, D; Hahn, P; Unglaub, F

    2016-02-01

    Percutaneous transverse aponeurotomy of the cord by using a hypodermic needle as a scalpel blade in order to improve function of the hand. Symptomatic flexion contracture with positive table top test caused by a single, palpable cord within the palm (primarily Tubiana stages I and II). Multiple, infiltrating or broad-based cords within the palm; irritated skin conditions; exclusive digital cord localization; recurrence after aponeurectomy; previous surgical intervention at the site of interest, digital nerve lesions; lack of patient compliance. Pinpoint surface anesthesia is obtained by injecting each portal area subdermally with 0.1 ml of local anesthetic. These applications start from distally to proximally within the palm while the most distal injection site is located proximal to the distal palm crease. Then the needle tip is introduced perpendicular to the cord. Sawing movements through the cord are performed transversely. While passively extending the contracted finger, the cord is held under tension which guarantees safe cutting. Patients are encouraged to report immediate pain sensation or numbness in order to prevent injuries to neurovascular structures and active finger flexion excludes tendon lesions during the procedure. Introducing the needle tip may be performed at several sites along the cord, if necessary, from distal to proximal at least 5 mm apart with prior pinpoint surface anesthesia. Finally, cautious passive stretching may be done after each release. Bandaging allowing immediate motion; application of a hand-based extension splint-glove during the night for 3-6 months. Recurrence rate was 53% in 15 retrospectively examined patients after a mean interval of 40 months postoperatively.

  4. Comparison of ultrasound imaging in transverse median and parasagittal oblique planes for thoracic epidurals: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khemka, Rakhi; Rastogi, Sonal; Desai, Neha; Chakraborty, Arunangshu; Sinha, Subir

    2016-06-01

    The use of ultrasound (US) scanning to assess the depth of epidural space to prevent neurological complications is established in current practice. In this study, we hypothesised that pre-puncture US scanning for estimating the depth of epidural space for thoracic epidurals is comparable between transverse median (TM) and paramedian sagittal oblique (PSO) planes. We performed pre-puncture US scanning in 32 patients, posted for open abdominal surgeries. The imaging was done to detect the depth of epidural space from skin (ultrasound depth [UD]) and needle insertion point, in parasagittal oblique plane in PSO group and transverse median plane in TM group. Subsequently, epidural space was localised through the predetermined insertion point by 'loss of resistance' technique and needle depth (ND) to the epidural space was marked. Correlation between the UD and actual ND was calculated and concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) was used to determine the degree of agreement between UD and ND in both the planes. The primary outcome, i.e., the comparison between UD and ND, done using Pearson correlation coefficient, was 0.99 in both PSO and TM groups, and the CCC was 0.93 (95% confidence interval [95% CI]: 0.81-0.97) and 0.90 (95% CI: 0.74-0.96) in PSO and TM groups respectively, which shows a strong positive association between UD and ND in both groups. The use of pre-puncture US scanning in both PSO and TM planes for estimating the depth of epidural space at the level of mid- and lower-thoracic spine is comparable.

  5. [Flexible endoscope in thoracic surgery: CITES or cVATS?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assouad, J; Fénane, H; Masmoudi, H; Giol, M; Karsenti, A; Gounant, V; Grunenwald, D

    2013-10-01

    Early pain and persistent parietal disorders remains a major unresolved problem in thoracic surgery. Thoracotomy and the use of multiple ports in most Video Assisted Thoracic Surgery (VATS) procedures are the major cause of this persistent pain. For the last decade, a few publications describing the use of either single incision VATS and cervical thoracic approaches have been reported without significant results in comparison with current used techniques. Intercostals compression during surgery and early after by intercostals chest tube placement, are probably the major cause of postoperative pain. Flexible endoscope is currently used in several surgeries and will take more and more importance in our daily use in thoracic surgery. Instrument flexibility allows its use through minimally invasive approaches and offers a very interesting intra-thoracic navigation. We describe here the first use in France of a flexible endoscope in thoracic surgery through a single cervical incision to perform simultaneous exploration and biopsies of the mediastinum and right pleura using the original approach of Cervical Incision Thoracic Endoscopic Surgery (CITES). Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Probabilistic Assessment of Hypobaric Decompression Sickness Treatment Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conkin, Johnny; Abercromby, Andrew F. J.; Dervay, Joseph P.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Gernhardt, Michael L.; Norcross, Jason R.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wessel, James H., III

    2014-01-01

    The Hypobaric Decompression Sickness (DCS) Treatment Model links a decrease in computed bubble volume from increased pressure (DeltaP), increased oxygen (O2) partial pressure, and passage of time during treatment to the probability of symptom resolution [P(symptom resolution)]. The decrease in offending volume is realized in 2 stages: a) during compression via Boyle's Law and b) during subsequent dissolution of the gas phase via the O2 window. We established an empirical model for the P(symptom resolution) while accounting for multiple symptoms within subjects. The data consisted of 154 cases of hypobaric DCS symptoms along with ancillary information from tests on 56 men and 18 women. Our best estimated model is P(symptom resolution) = 1 / (1+exp(-(ln(Delta P) - 1.510 + 0.795×AMB - 0.00308×Ts) / 0.478)), where (DeltaP) is pressure difference (psid), AMB = 1 if ambulation took place during part of the altitude exposure, otherwise AMB = 0; and where Ts is the elapsed time in mins from start of the altitude exposure to recognition of a DCS symptom. To apply this model in future scenarios, values of DeltaP as inputs to the model would be calculated from the Tissue Bubble Dynamics Model based on the effective treatment pressure: (DeltaP) = P2 - P1 | = P1×V1/V2 - P1, where V1 is the computed volume of a spherical bubble in a unit volume of tissue at low pressure P1 and V2 is computed volume after a change to a higher pressure P2. If 100% ground level O2 (GLO) was breathed in place of air, then V2 continues to decrease through time at P2 at a faster rate. This calculated value of (DeltaP then represents the effective treatment pressure at any point in time. Simulation of a "pain-only" symptom at 203 min into an ambulatory extravehicular activity (EVA) at 4.3 psia on Mars resulted in a P(symptom resolution) of 0.49 (0.36 to 0.62 95% confidence intervals) on immediate return to 8.2 psia in the Multi-Mission Space Exploration Vehicle. The P(symptom resolution) increased

  7. CT-guided transthoracic cutting needle biopsy of intrathoracic lesions: Comparison between coaxial and single needle technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Reng-Hong; Tzeng, Wen-Sheng; Lee, Wei-Jing; Chang, Shih-Chin; Chen, Chia-Huei; Fung, Jui-Lung; Wang, Yen-Jen; Mak, Chee-Wai

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the complication rates and diagnostic accuracy of two different CT-guided transthoracic cutting needle biopsy techniques: coaxial method and single needle method. Methods: This study involved 198 consecutive subjects with 198 intrathoracic lesions. The first 98 consecutive subjects received a single needle cutting technique and the next 100 consecutive subjects received a coaxial technique. Both groups were compared in relation the diagnostic accuracy and complication rates. Results: No significant difference was found between the two groups concerning patient characteristics, lesions and procedure variables. There was a borderline statistical difference in the incidence of pneumothorax at within 24-h post biopsy between patients in the single needle group (5%) and the coaxial group (13%) (P = 0.053). Little difference was found in the pneumothorax rate at immediately post biopsy between the two groups, which was 28% in the single needle group and 31% in the coaxial group. There was no significant difference in the hemoptysis rate between the two groups, which was 9.2% in the single needle group and 11% in the coaxial group. Both techniques yielded an overall diagnostic accuracy of 98% for malignant lesions with similar sensitivity (single needle: 96.9% vs. coaxial: 96.4%) and specificity (single needle: 100% vs. coaxial: 100%). Conclusion: There is little difference in the pneumothorax rates and bleeding complications between patients who either received a single needle or a coaxial transthoracic cutting biopsy. Both techniques produce an overall diagnostic accuracy of 98% for malignant lesions.

  8. Effect and safety of deep needling and shallow needling for functional constipation: a multicenter, randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jiani; Liu, Baoyan; Li, Ning; Sun, Jianhua; Wang, Lingling; Wang, Liping; Cai, Yuying; Ye, Yongming; Liu, Jun; Wang, Yang; Liu, Zhishun

    2014-12-01

    Aupuncture is widely used for functional constipation. Effect of acupuncture might be related to the depth of needling; however, the evidence is limited. This trial aimed to evaluate the effect and safety of deep needling and shallow needling for functional constipation, and to assess if the deep needling and shallow needling are superior to lactulose. We conducted a prospective, superiority-design, 5-center, 3-arm randomized controlled trial. A total of 475 patients with functional constipation were randomized to the deep needling group (237), shallow needling group (119), and lactulose-controlled group (119) in a ratio of 2:1:1. Sessions lasted 30 minutes each time and took place 5 times a week for 4 weeks in 2 acupuncture groups. Participants in the lactulose group took lactulose orally for 16 continuous weeks. The primary outcome was the change from baseline of mean weekly spontaneous bowel movements (SBMs) during week 1 to 4 (changes from the baselines of the weekly SBMs at week 8 and week 16 in follow-up period were also assessed simultaneously). Secondary outcomes were the weekly SBMs of each assessing week, the mean score change from the baseline of constipation-related symptoms over week 1 to 4, and the time to the first SBM. Emergency drug usage and adverse effects were monitored throughout the study.SBMs and constipation-related symptoms were all improved in the 3 groups compared with baseline at each time frame (Pdeep needling group, 2 (1.75) in the shallow needling group, and 2 (2) in the lactulose group (P>0.05, both compared with the lactulose group). The changes of mean weekly SBMs at week 8 and week 16 in the follow-up period were 2 (2), 2 (2.5) in the deep needling group, 2 (3), 1.5 (2.5) in the shallow needling group, and 1 (2), 1 (2) in the lactulose group (Pdeep or shallow needling group. Deep and shallow needling at Tianshu (ST25) can improve intestinal function remarkably and safely. Therapeutic effects of deep and shallow needling are not

  9. Robotic thoracic surgery: The state of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Arvind; Asaf, Belal Bin

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive thoracic surgery has come a long way. It has rapidly progressed to complex procedures such as lobectomy, pneumonectomy, esophagectomy, and resection of mediastinal tumors. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) offered perceptible benefits over thoracotomy in terms of less postoperative pain and narcotic utilization, shorter ICU and hospital stay, decreased incidence of postoperative complications combined with quicker return to work, and better cosmesis. However, despite its obvious advantages, the General Thoracic Surgical Community has been relatively slow in adapting VATS more widely. The introduction of da Vinci surgical system has helped overcome certain inherent limitations of VATS such as two-dimensional (2D) vision and counter intuitive movement using long rigid instruments allowing thoracic surgeons to perform a plethora of minimally invasive thoracic procedures more efficiently. Although the cumulative experience worldwide is still limited and evolving, Robotic Thoracic Surgery is an evolution over VATS. There is however a lot of concern among established high-volume VATS centers regarding the superiority of the robotic technique. We have over 7 years experience and believe that any new technology designed to make minimal invasive surgery easier and more comfortable for the surgeon is most likely to have better and safer outcomes in the long run. Our only concern is its cost effectiveness and we believe that if the cost factor is removed more and more surgeons will use the technology and it will increase the spectrum and the reach of minimally invasive thoracic surgery. This article reviews worldwide experience with robotic thoracic surgery and addresses the potential benefits and limitations of using the robotic platform for the performance of thoracic surgical procedures. PMID:25598601

  10. RF Photoelectric injectors using needle cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewellen, J.W.; Brau, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Photocathode RF guns, in various configurations, are the injectors of choice for both current and future applications requiring high-brightness electron beams. Many of these applications, such as single-pass free-electron lasers, require beams with high brilliance but not necessarily high charge per bunch. Field-enhanced photoelectric emission has demonstrated electron-beam current density as high as 10 10 A/m 2 , with a quantum efficiency in the UV that approaches 10% at fields on the order of 10 10 V/m. Thus, the use of even a blunt needle holds promise for increasing cathode quantum efficiency without sacrificing robustness. We present an initial study on the use of needle cathodes in photoinjectors to enhance beam brightness while reducing beam charge. Benefits include lower drive-laser power requirements, easier multibunch operation, lower emittance, and lower beam degradation due to charge-dependent effects in the postinjector accelerator. These benefits result from a combination of a smaller cathode emission area, greatly enhanced RF field strength at the cathode, and the charge scaling of detrimental postinjector linac effects, e.g., transverse wakefields and CSR

  11. RF Photoelectric injectors using needle cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewellen, J. W.; Brau, C. A.

    2003-07-01

    Photocathode RF guns, in various configurations, are the injectors of choice for both current and future applications requiring high-brightness electron beams. Many of these applications, such as single-pass free-electron lasers, require beams with high brilliance but not necessarily high charge per bunch. Field-enhanced photoelectric emission has demonstrated electron-beam current density as high as 10 10 A/m 2, with a quantum efficiency in the UV that approaches 10% at fields on the order of 10 10 V/m. Thus, the use of even a blunt needle holds promise for increasing cathode quantum efficiency without sacrificing robustness. We present an initial study on the use of needle cathodes in photoinjectors to enhance beam brightness while reducing beam charge. Benefits include lower drive-laser power requirements, easier multibunch operation, lower emittance, and lower beam degradation due to charge-dependent effects in the postinjector accelerator. These benefits result from a combination of a smaller cathode emission area, greatly enhanced RF field strength at the cathode, and the charge scaling of detrimental postinjector linac effects, e.g., transverse wakefields and CSR.

  12. Extramedullary plasmacytoma. Fine needle aspiration findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P V; Owji, S M; Talei, A R; Malekhusseini, S A

    1997-01-01

    To determine the role of fine needle aspiration cytology in the diagnosis of extramedullary plasmacytoma. The study group consisted of 13 patients with palpable masses at various sites. The tumors were aspirated for cytologic study. The smears revealed groups of mature and immature plasma cells at various stages of maturation. Mature plasma cells showed an eccentric nucleus and abundant, deep, basophilic cytoplasm with a paranuclear halo. Plasmablasts (immature plasma cells) showed a prominent, eccentric nucleus with single, large nucleolus and abundant, deep, basophilic cytoplasm with no paranuclear halo. Binucleate and multinucleate forms were also seen quite often. The tumors were excised, and the histologic sections confirmed the cytologic diagnosis. All the patients received radiotherapy. One patient (18 years old) developed recurrence and died due to extensive infiltration into the maxilla and mandible. Two patients (57 and 62 years) developed multiple myeloma one to two years after the excision of tumors, and both died two to three months later. The remaining 10 patients were alive and well at this writing. The smears from all 13 patients were diagnosed as extramedullary plasmacytomas by fine needle aspiration cytology.

  13. Fine needle aspiration cytology of parapharyngeal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mondal Palash

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Parapharyngeal tumors are rare and often pose diagnostic difficulties due to their location and plethora of presentations. Objectives: The study was undertaken to study the occurrence in the population and to evaluate the exact nature by fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC. Materials and Methods: A total of five hundred and six cases of lateral neck lesions were studied over three and half years. Of these 56 suspected parapharyngeal masses were selected by clinical and radiological methods. Cytopathology evaluation was done by fine needle aspiration cytology with computed tomography and ultrasonography guidance wherever necessary. Histopathology confirmation was available in all the cases. Results: On FNAC diagnosis could be established in 54 cases while in two cases the material was insufficient to establish a diagnosis. The tumors encountered were, pleomorphic adenoma (33, schwannoma (3, neurofibroma (11, paraganglioma (5, angiofibroma (1 and adenoid cystic carcinoma (1. Four false positives and two false negative cases were encountered. Overall sensitivity was 96%, with specificity of 99% and accuracy being 98.8%. Conclusions: With proper clinical and radiological assessment, FNAC can be extremely useful in diagnosing most of these lesions except a few which need histopathological and even immunohistochemical confirmation.

  14. Investigations of needle-free jet injections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schramm-Baxter, J R; Mitragotri, S

    2004-01-01

    Jet injection is a needle-free drug delivery method in which a high-speed stream of fluid impacts the skin and delivers drugs. Although a number of jet injectors are commercially available, especially for insulin delivery, they have a low market share compared to needles possibly due to occasional pain associated with jet injection. Jets employed by the traditional jet injectors penetrate deep into the dermal and sub-dermal regions where the nerve endings are abundantly located. To eliminate the pain associated with jet injections, we propose to utilize microjets that penetrate only into the superficial region of the skin. However, the choice of appropriate jet parameters for this purpose is challenging owing to the multiplicity of factors that determine the penetration depth. Here, we describe the dependence of jet injections into human skin on the power of the jet. Dermal delivery of liquid jets was quantified using two measurements, penetration of a radiolabeled solute, mannitol, into skin and the shape of jet dispersion in the skin which was visualized using sulforhodamine B. The dependence of the amount of liquid delivered in the skin and the geometric measurements of jet dispersion on nozzle diameter and jet velocity was captured by a single parameter, jet power.

  15. Needle placement accuracy during stereotactic localization mammography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Aim: To derive a mathematical model to describe the relationship between lesion position in the breast and measurements derived from the stereoradiographs to enable more accurate sampling of a lesion during stereotactic mammographic needle placement. Materials and methods: The affect that registration errors have on the accuracy of needle placement when identifying the lesion on the stereoradiographs was investigated using the mathematical model. Results: The focus-to-film distance of the x-ray tube and the horizontal distance of the lesion from the centre of rotation have little effect on error. Registration errors for lesions lying at a greater perpendicular distance in the breast from the centre of rotation produce smaller localization errors when compared with lesions sited closer. Lesion registration errors during marking of the stereoradiographs are exacerbated by decreasing the angle of x-ray tube swing. Conclusions: When problems are encountered in making an accurate registration of the lesion on the stereoradiographs, consider the following error reducing strategies: (1) employ an approach that places the lesion the maximum distance away from the film cassette; (2) avoid reducing the angle of tube swing; and (3) consider sampling superficial and deep to, as well as at, the location indicated. The possibility of erroneous tissue sampling should be borne in mind when reviewing the pathology report.

  16. Hemifacial spasm : Intraoperative electromyographic monitoring as a guide for microvascular decompression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, JJA; Mustafa, MK; van Weerden, TW

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Microvascular decompression is the logical and well-accepted treatment of choice for hemifacial spasm (HFS). In experienced hands, good to excellent results can be obtained. However, sometimes the exact site of the vascular compression is unclear. The aim of this study was to analyze

  17. Analysis of direct costs of decompressive craniectomy in victims of traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badke, Guilherme Lellis; Araujo, João Luiz Vitorino; Miura, Flávio Key; Guirado, Vinicius Monteiro de Paula; Saade, Nelson; Paiva, Aline Lariessy Campos; Avelar, Tiago Marques; Pedrozo, Charles Alfred Grander; Veiga, José Carlos Esteves

    2018-04-01

    Decompressive craniectomy is a procedure required in some cases of traumatic brain injury (TBI). This manuscript evaluates the direct costs and outcomes of decompressive craniectomy for TBI in a developing country and describes the epidemiological profile. A retrospective study was performed using a five-year neurosurgical database, taking a sample of patients with TBI who underwent decompressive craniectomy. Several variables were considered and a formula was developed for calculating the total cost. Most patients had multiple brain lesions and the majority (69.0%) developed an infectious complication. The general mortality index was 68.8%. The total cost was R$ 2,116,960.22 (US$ 661,550.06) and the mean patient cost was R$ 66,155.00 (US$ 20,673.44). Decompressive craniectomy for TBI is an expensive procedure that is also associated with high morbidity and mortality. This was the first study performed in a developing country that aimed to evaluate the direct costs. Prevention measures should be a priority.

  18. Influence of Lumbar Lordosis on the Outcome of Decompression Surgery for Lumbar Canal Stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Han Soo

    2018-01-01

    Although sagittal spinal balance plays an important role in spinal deformity surgery, its role in decompression surgery for lumbar canal stenosis is not well understood. To investigate the hypothesis that sagittal spinal balance also plays a role in decompression surgery for lumbar canal stenosis, a prospective cohort study analyzing the correlation between preoperative lumbar lordosis and outcome was performed. A cohort of 85 consecutive patients who underwent decompression for lumbar canal stenosis during the period 2007-2011 was analyzed. Standing lumbar x-rays and 36-item short form health survey questionnaires were obtained before and up to 2 years after surgery. Correlations between lumbar lordosis and 2 parameters of the 36-item short form health survey (average physical score and bodily pain score) were statistically analyzed using linear mixed effects models. There was a significant correlation between preoperative lumbar lordosis and the 2 outcome parameters at postoperative, 6-month, 1-year, and 2-year time points. A 10° increase of lumbar lordosis was associated with a 5-point improvement in average physical scores. This correlation was not present in preoperative scores. This study showed that preoperative lumbar lordosis significantly influences the outcome of decompression surgery on lumbar canal stenosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Treatment of decompression illness with heliox: the best of both worlds?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    There are many ways to treat decompression illness (DCI) at increased pressure. In the last 20 years much has been published on the use of oxygen and helium/oxygen mixtures at different depths. The type of information ranges from impressive work on animals, case reports, small series of case reports

  20. Women's experiences of daily life after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermansen, Anna; Peolsson, Anneli; Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi; Hjelm, Katarina

    2016-04-01

    To explore and describe women's experiences of daily life after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery. Qualitative explorative design. Fourteen women aged 39-62 years (median 52 years) were included 1.5-3 years after anterior cervical decompression and fusion for cervical disc disease. Individual semi-structured interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis with an inductive approach. The women described their experiences of daily life in 5 different ways: being recovered to various extents; impact of remaining symptoms on thoughts and feelings; making daily life work; receiving support from social and occupational networks; and physical and behavioural changes due to interventions and encounters with healthcare professionals. This interview study provides insight into women's daily life after anterior cervical decompression and fusion. Whilst the subjects improved after surgery, they also experienced remaining symptoms and limitations in daily life. A variety of mostly active coping strategies were used to manage daily life. Social support from family, friends, occupational networks and healthcare professionals positively influenced daily life. These findings provide knowledge about aspects of daily life that should be considered in individualized postoperative care and rehabilitation in an attempt to provide better outcomes in women after anterior cervical decompression and fusion.

  1. Impact of timing of cranioplasty on hydrocephalus after decompressive hemicraniectomy in malignant middle cerebral artery infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, Tobias; Prinz, Vincent; Schreck, Evelyn; Pinczolits, Alexandra; Bayerl, Simon; Liman, Thomas; Woitzik, Johannes; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2017-02-01

    Patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction frequently develop hydrocephalus after decompressive hemicraniectomy. Hydrocephalus itself and known shunt related complications after ventriculo-peritoneal shunt implantation may negatively impact patientś outcome. Here, we aimed to identify factors associated with the development of hydrocephalus after decompressive hemicraniectomy in malignant middle cerebral artery infarction. A total of 99 consecutive patients with the diagnosis of large hemispheric infarctions and the indication for decompressive hemicraniectomy were included. We retrospectively evaluated patient characteristics (gender, age and selected preoperative risk factors), stroke characteristics (side, stroke volume and existing mass effect) and surgical characteristics (size of the bone flap, initial complication rate, time to cranioplasty, complication rate following cranioplasty, type of implant, number of revision surgeries and mortality). Frequency of hydrocephalus development was 10% in our cohort. Patients who developed a hydrocephalus had an earlier time point of bone flap reimplantation compared to the control group (no hydrocephalus=164±104days, hydrocephalus=108±52days, phydrocephalus with a trend towards significance (p=0.08). Communicating hydrocephalus is frequent in patients with malignant middle cerebral artery infarction after decompressive hemicraniectomy. A later time point of cranioplasty might lead to a lower incidence of required shunting procedures in general as we could show in our patient cohort. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Decompression sickness in a vegetarian diver: are vegetarian divers at risk? A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, Robert A.; van der Kamp, Wim

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a diver who suffered decompression sickness (DCS), but who also was a strict vegetarian for more than 10 years. He presented with symptoms of tingling of both feet and left hand, weakness in both legs and sensory deficits for vibration and propriocepsis after two deep dives with

  3. Assessment of two methods of gastric decompression for the initial management of gastric dilatation-volvulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodrich, Z J; Powell, L L; Hulting, K J

    2013-02-01

    To assess gastric trocarization and orogastric tubing as a means of gastric decompression for the initial management of gastric dilatation-volvulus. Retrospective review of 116 gastric dilatation-volvulus cases from June 2001 to October 2009. Decompression was performed via orogastric tubing in 31 dogs, gastric trocarization in 39 dogs and a combination of both in 46 dogs. Tubing was successful in 59 (75·5%) dogs and unsuccessful in 18 (23·4%) dogs. Trocarization was successful in 73 (86%) dogs and unsuccessful in 12 (14%) dogs. No evidence of gastric perforation was noted at surgery in dogs undergoing either technique. One dog that underwent trocarization had a splenic laceration identified at surgery that did not require treatment. Oesophageal rupture or aspiration pneumonia was not identified in any dog during hospitalization. No statistical difference was found between the method of gastric decompression and gastric compromise requiring surgical intervention or survival to discharge. Orogastric tubing and gastric trocarization are associated with low complication and high success rates. Either technique is an acceptable method for gastric decompression in dogs with gastric dilatation-volvulus. © 2013 British Small Animal Veterinary Association.

  4. Bubble formation after a 20-m dive: deep-stop vs. shallow-stop decompression profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Nico A. M.; Corstius, Jan-Jaap Brandt; Germonpré, Peter; Sterk, Wouter

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It is claimed that performing a "deep stop," a stop at about half of maximal diving depth (MDD), can reduce the amount of detectable precordial bubbles after the dive and may thus diminish the risk of decompression sickness. In order to ascertain whether this reduction is caused by the

  5. Exogenous application of platelet-leukocyte gel during open subacromial decompression contributes to improved patient outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Everts, P. A.; Devilee, R. J. J.; Mahoney, C. Brown; van Erp, A.; Oosterbos, C. J. M.; Stellenboom, M.; Knape, J. T. A.; van Zundert, A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Platelet-leukocyte gel (PLG) is being used during various surgical procedures in an attempt to enhance the healing process. We studied the effects of PLG on postoperative recovery of patients undergoing open subacromial decompression (OSD). Methods: PLG was produced from

  6. Rectus extraocular muscle paths and decompression surgery for Graves orbitopathy: mechanism of motility disturbances

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abràmoff, Michael D.; Kalmann, Rachel; de Graaf, Mieke E. L.; Stilma, Jan S.; Mourits, Maarten P.

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To study possible causes of motility disturbances that may result from orbital decompression surgery in patients with Graves orbitopathy and especially the role of rectus extraocular muscle paths. METHODS: Sixteen patients with Graves orbitopathy were studied before and 3 to 6 months after

  7. Implementing effective and sustainable multidisciplinary clinical thoracic oncology programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osarogiagbon, Raymond U; Freeman, Richard K; Krasna, Mark J

    2015-08-01

    Three models of care are described, including two models of multidisciplinary care for thoracic malignancies. The pros and cons of each model are discussed, the evidence supporting each is reviewed, and the need for more (and better) research into care delivery models is highlighted. Key stakeholders in thoracic oncology care delivery outcomes are identified, and the need to consider stakeholder perspectives in designing, validating and implementing multidisciplinary programs as a vehicle for quality improvement in thoracic oncology is emphasized. The importance of reconciling stakeholder perspectives, and identify meaningful stakeholder-relevant benchmarks is also emphasized. Metrics for measuring program implementation and overall success are proposed.

  8. Right main bronchial fracture resolution by digital thoracic drainage system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés Julián, Gildardo; Mier, José M; Iñiguez, Marco A; Guzmán de Alba, Enrique

    2016-03-01

    Tracheobronchial stenosis is common in the thoracic surgery service, and iatrogenic injury of the airway after manipulation is not infrequent. When a digital thoracic drainage system came onto the market, many advantages were evident. A 24-year-old woman with critical right main bronchial stenosis underwent airway dilation that was complicated by a tear with a massive air leak, resulting in a total right pneumothorax. We employed a pleural drain connected to a digital thoracic drainage system. The drain was removed 2 days after successful resolution of the air leak. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Magnetic resonance in prenatal diagnosis of thoracic anomalies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietrani, M.; Elias, D.; Wojakowski, A.; Fataljaef, V.; Carcano, M.; Otano, L.

    2007-01-01

    The objective of this article is to communicate the experience in the evaluation of fetal anomalies thoracic by means of magnetic resonance. Between January, 2001 - March, 2007 16 fetus were evaluated by means of magnetic resonance with echographic diagnosis of thoracic anomalies. An equipment of 1.5 TESLA was used. The thoracic anatomy was valued in general. At the presence of discovering pulmonary mass, their size, volume and intensity of sign were determined. The echographic and magnetic resonance findings were checked against the perinatal results [es

  10. Fetal magnetic resonance imaging of thoracic and abdominal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woitek, R.; Asenbaum, U.; Furtner, J.; Prayer, D.; Brugger, P.C.

    2013-01-01

    Diagnosis and differential diagnosis of fetal thoracic and abdominal malformations. Ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In cases of suspected pathologies based on fetal ultrasound MRI can be used for more detailed examinations and can be of assistance in the differential diagnostic process. Improved imaging of anatomical structures and of the composition of different tissues by the use of different MRI sequences. Fetal MRI has become a part of clinical routine in thoracic and abdominal malformations and is the basis for scientific research in this field. In cases of thoracic or abdominal malformations fetal MRI provides important information additional to ultrasound to improve diagnostic accuracy, prognostic evaluation and surgical planning. (orig.) [de

  11. Economic evaluation of decompressive craniectomy versus barbiturate coma for refractory intracranial hypertension following traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alali, Aziz S; Naimark, David M J; Wilson, Jefferson R; Fowler, Robert A; Scales, Damon C; Golan, Eyal; Mainprize, Todd G; Ray, Joel G; Nathens, Avery B

    2014-10-01

    Decompressive craniectomy and barbiturate coma are often used as second-tier strategies when intracranial hypertension following severe traumatic brain injury is refractory to first-line treatments. Uncertainty surrounds the decision to choose either treatment option. We investigated which strategy is more economically attractive in this context. We performed a cost-utility analysis. A Markov Monte Carlo microsimulation model with a life-long time horizon was created to compare quality-adjusted survival and cost of the two treatment strategies, from the perspective of healthcare payer. Model parameters were estimated from the literature. Two-dimensional simulation was used to incorporate parameter uncertainty into the model. Value of information analysis was conducted to identify major drivers of decision uncertainty and focus future research. Trauma centers in the United States. Base case was a population of patients (mean age = 25 yr) who developed refractory intracranial hypertension following traumatic brain injury. We compared two treatment strategies: decompressive craniectomy and barbiturate coma. Decompressive craniectomy was associated with an average gain of 1.5 quality-adjusted life years relative to barbiturate coma, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of $9,565/quality-adjusted life year gained. Decompressive craniectomy resulted in a greater quality-adjusted life expectancy 86% of the time and was more cost-effective than barbiturate coma in 78% of cases if our willingness-to-pay threshold is $50,000/quality-adjusted life year and 82% of cases at a threshold of $100,000/quality-adjusted life year. At older age, decompressive craniectomy continued to increase survival but at higher cost (incremental cost-effectiveness ratio = $197,906/quality-adjusted life year at mean age = 85 yr). Based on available evidence, decompressive craniectomy for the treatment of refractory intracranial hypertension following traumatic brain injury provides better

  12. Skin Blood Perfusion and Cellular Response to Insertion of Insulin Pen Needles With Different Diameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Præstmark, Kezia Ann; Stallknecht, Bente Merete; Bo Jensen, Casper

    2014-01-01

    skin blood perfusion response around needle insertion sites. Three common sized pen needles of 28G, 30G, and 32G as well as hooked 32G needles, were inserted into the neck skin of pigs and then removed. Laser Speckle Contrast Analysis was used to measure skin blood perfusion for 20 minutes after...... blood perfusion recording and grouped according to needle type, skin blood perfusion response relates to needle diameter. The response was significantly higher after insertions with 28G and hooked 32G needles than with 30G (P ..., but there was a trend of an increased response with increasing needle diameter. Skin blood perfusion response to pen needle insertions rank according to needle diameter, and the tissue response caused by hooked 32G needles corresponds to that of 28G needles. The relation between needle diameter and trauma when...

  13. Does Early Decompressive Craniectomy Improve Outcome? Experience from an Active UK Recruiter Centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. García Vicente

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The results of the recent DECRA study suggest that although craniectomy decreases ICP and ICU length of stay, it is also associated with worst outcomes. Our experience, illustrated by these two striking cases, supports that early decompressive craniectomy may significantly improve the outcome in selected patients. Case Reports. The first patient, a 20-year-old man who suffered severe brain contusion and subarachnoid haemorrhage after a fall downstairs, with refractory ICP of 35 mmHg, despite maximal medical therapy, eventually underwent decompressive craniectomy. After 18 days in intensive care, he was discharged for rehabilitation. The second patient, a 23-year-old man was found at the scene of a road accident with a GCS of 3 and fixed, dilated pupils who underwent extensive unilateral decompressive craniectomy for refractory intracranial hypertension. After three weeks of cooling, paralysis, and neuroprotection, he eventually left ICU for rehabilitation. Outcomes. Four months after leaving ICU, the first patient abseiled 40 m down the main building of St. Mary’s Hospital to raise money for the Trauma Unit. He has returned to part-time work. The second patient, was decannulated less than a month later and made a full cognitive recovery. A year later, with a titanium skull prosthesis, he is back to part-time work and to playing football. Conclusions. Despite the conclusions of the DECRA study, our experience of the use of early decompressive craniectomy has been associated with outstanding outcomes. We are currently actively recruiting patients into the RESCUEicp trial and have high hopes that it will clarify the role of the decompressive craniectomy in traumatic brain injury and whether it effectively improves outcomes.

  14. Surgical outcome after decompressive craniectomy in patients with extensive cerebral infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Otani, Naoki; Takasato, Yoshio; Masaoka, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Extensive cerebral hemispheric infarction is a devastating condition leading to early death in nearly 80% of cases due to the rapid rise of intracranial pressure in spite of maximum medical treatment for brain edema and swelling. Recently, decompressive craniectomy has been reevaluated to prevent the brain herniation caused by extensive hemispheric cerebral infarction. We studied the surgical results after decompressive craniectomy for extensive cerebral infarction. Between December 1997 and August 2006, 13 consecutive patients (7 males and 6 females aged from 39 to 73 with a mean age of 59 years) with massive cerebral infarction of internal carotid (IC) (11 patients) and middle cerebral artery (MCA) (2 patients) territory were treated with decompressive craniectomy and dural plasty. Five patients had a left-sided stroke with severe aphasia. The cardioembolic source of stroke was seen in 5 patients. Surgery was performed at the point of neurological deterioration, anisocoria, and effacement of perimesencephalic cistern on CT findings. The mean time between stroke onset and surgery was 39.8 hr and ranged from 13 to 102 hr. Glasgow outcome scale (GOS) on discharge was moderately disabled (MD) 1, severe disabled (SD) 5, vegetative state (VS) 1, and dead (D) 3 (mortality rate 30.8%). Severe pneumoniae were the causes of death. All survivors underwent cranioplasty and were transferred with the aim of rehabilitation. In this study, we showed that the decompressive craniectomy reduced mortality after extensive cerebral infarction. However, the functional outcome and level of independence are poor. It seems that the early decompressive craniectomy should be aggressively performed for extensive cerebral infarction before neurological deterioration such as worsening of consciousness disturbance or pupil abnormalities. Further investigations will be needed to clarify the surgical indications, timing, and functional outcomes. (author)

  15. Does decompression of odontogenic cysts and cystlike lesions change the histologic diagnosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlieve, Thomas; Miloro, Michael; Kolokythas, Antonia

    2014-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to report the histopathologic findings after postdecompression definitive treatment of odontogenic cystlike lesions and determine whether the diagnosis was consistent with the pretreatment diagnosis, thereby answering the clinical question: does decompression change the histologic diagnosis? The authors implemented a retrospective cohort study from a sample of patients diagnosed with a benign odontogenic cystlike lesion and who underwent decompression followed by definitive surgery as part of their treatment. The predictor variable was treatment by decompression and the dependent variable was change in histologic diagnosis. Age, gender, and lesion location were included as variables. The χ(2) test was used for statistical analysis of the categorical data and P values less than .05 were considered statistically significant. Twenty-five cysts and cystlike lesions in 25 patients were treated with decompression followed by enucleation and curettage. The mean age was 34 years (range, 13 to 80 yr) and 56% (14) were male patients. Lesions were located in the mandible in 76% (19 of 25) of patients. Postdecompression histologic examination at the time of definitive surgical treatment was consistent with the preoperative biopsy diagnosis in 91% (10 of 11) of keratocystic odontogenic tumors, 67% (2 of 3) of glandular odontogenic cysts, 75% (3 of 4) of dentigerous cysts, and 100% (7 of 7) of cystic ameloblastomas. The histologic diagnosis at time of definitive treatment by enucleation and curettage is consistent with the predecompression diagnosis. Therefore, all lesions should be definitively treated after decompression based on the initial lesion diagnosis, with all patients placed on appropriate follow-up protocols. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  16. ORACLE Stroke Study: Opinion Regarding Acceptable Outcome Following Decompressive Hemicraniectomy for Ischemic Stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeybul, Stephen; Ho, Kwok M; Blacker, David W

    2016-08-01

    There continues to be considerable interest in the use of decompressive hemicraniectomy in the management of malignant cerebral artery infarction; however, concerns remain about long-term outcome. To assess opinion on consent and acceptable outcome among a wide range of healthcare workers. Seven hundred seventy-three healthcare workers at the 2 major public neurosurgical centers in Western Australia participated. Participants were asked to record their opinion on consent and acceptable outcome based on the modified Rankin Score (mRS). The evidence for clinical efficacy of the procedure was presented, and participants were then asked to reconsider their initial responses. Of the 773 participants included in the study, 407 (52.7%) initially felt that they would provide consent for a decompressive craniectomy as a lifesaving procedure, but only a minority of them considered an mRS score of 4 or 5 an acceptable outcome (for mRS score ≤4, n = 67, 8.7%; for mRS score = 4, n = 57, 7.4%). After the introduction of the concept of the disability paradox and the evidence for the clinical efficacy of decompressive craniectomy, more participants were unwilling to accept decompressive craniectomy (18.1% vs 37.8%), but at the same time, more were willing to accept an mRS score ≤4 as an acceptable outcome (for mRS score ≤4, n = 92, 11.9%; for mRS score = 4, n = 79, 10.2%). Most participants felt survival with dependency to be unacceptable. However, many would be willing to provide consent for surgery in the hopes that they may survive with some degree of independence. DESTINY, Decompressive Surgery for the Treatment of Malignant Infarction of the Middle Cerebral ArterymRS, modified Rankin Scale.

  17. Facet Effusion without Radiographic Instability Has No Effect on the Outcome of Minimally Invasive Decompression Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Koji; Kato, Minori; Konishi, Sadahiko; Matsumura, Akira; Hayashi, Kazunori; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2017-02-01

    Retrospective cohort study. Lumbar segmental instability is a key factor determining whether decompression alone or decompression and fusion surgery is required to treat lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS). Some recent reports have suggested that facet joint effusion is correlated with spinal segmental instability. The aim of this study is to report the effect of facet effusion without radiographic segmental instability on the outcome of less-invasive decompression surgery for LSS. Seventy-nine patients with LSS (32 women, mean age: 69.1 ± 9.1 years) who had no segmental instability on dynamic radiographs before undergoing L4-L5 microsurgical decompression and who were followed for at least 2 years postoperatively were analyzed. They were divided into three groups on the basis of the existence and size of L4-L5 facet effusion using preoperative magnetic resonance imaging: grade 0 had no effusion ( n  = 31), grade 1 had measurable effusion ( n  = 35), and grade 2 had large effusion ( n  = 13). Japanese Orthopedics Association (JOA) score, visual analog scale (VAS), and the Short-Form (SF)-36 scores were recorded preoperatively and 12 and 24 months postoperatively. JOA score; VAS of low back pain, leg pain, and numbness; and SF-36 (physical component summary and mental component summary) scores did not differ significantly between the three groups in every terms ( p  = 0.921, 0.996, 0.950, 0.693, 0.374, 0.304, and 0.624, respectively, at final follow-up). In the absence of radiographic instability, facet joint effusion has no effect on the outcome of less-invasive decompression surgery.

  18. Mortality Rates After Emergent Posterior Fossa Decompression for Ischemic or Hemorrhagic Stroke in Older Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puffer, Ross C; Graffeo, Christopher; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Van Gompel, Jamie J

    2016-08-01

    Cerebellar stroke causes major morbidity in the aging population. Guidelines from the American Stroke Association recommend emergent decompression in patients who have brainstem compression, hydrocephalus, or clinical deterioration. The objective of this study was to determine 30-day and 1-year mortality rates in patients >60 years old undergoing emergent posterior fossa decompression. Surgical records identified all patients >60 years old who underwent emergent posterior fossa decompression. Mortality rates were calculated at 30 days and 1 year postoperatively, and these rates were compared with patient and procedure characteristics. During 2000-2014, 34 emergent posterior fossa decompressions were performed in patients >60 years old. Mortality rates at 30 days were 0%, 33%, and 25% for age deciles 60-69 years, 70-79 years, and ≥80 years. Increasing age (alive at 30 days 75.2 years ± 1.7 vs. deceased 81.1 years ± 1.7, P = 0.01) and smaller craniectomy dimensions were associated with 30-day mortality. Mortality rates at 1 year were 0%, 50%, and 67% for age deciles 60-69 years, 70-79 years, and ≥80 years. Increasing age was significantly associated with mortality at 1 year (alive at 1 year 72.3 years ± 2.0 vs. deceased 81.1 years ± 1.2, P mortality. Age was independent of admission Glasgow Coma Scale score as a predictor of mortality at 30 days, 90 days, and 1 year postoperatively. Increasing age and smaller craniectomy size were significantly associated with mortality in patients undergoing emergent posterior fossa decompression. Among patients ≥80 years old, one-quarter were dead within 1 month of the operation, and more than two-thirds were dead within 1 year. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Closed needle-biopsy in the diagnosis of neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, M; Perelli Ercolini, M; Beani, G

    1979-04-01

    The AA. demonstrate with this communication the validity of the needle biopsie for the diagnosis of neoplasms. They had used it for the breast, thyroid, flg and some other superficial tumefactions. In the mass-screening for the feminine neoplasms the clinical examination and the needle biopsy are very good method for a careful diagnosis.

  20. Darning Needle Impacted in the Male Urethra | Singla | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foreign bodies of varied nature have been introduced into the urethra to achieve sexual stimulation. We report the case of a long (9.5 cm) darning needle impacted in the urethra of a male patient following urethral masturbation. After a failed trial at endoscopic extraction the needle had to be removed via open surgery.

  1. Prevalence of Needle Stick Injuries among Healthcare Workers in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Needle stick injuries represent one of the most important occupational hazards to which health workers are exposed. These injuries result from accidental piercing of the skin and or mucous membranes by sharp objects. Needle stick injuries carry the risk of exposure to blood-borne pathogens, especially ...

  2. Effect of dietary mugwort ( Artemisia vulgaris L.) and pine needle ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of dietary mugwort and pine needle powder supplementation on growth performance, serum cholesterol, and meat quality of broilers were evaluated in a 35 days feed trial. 200 one day old broilers were randomly allocated to five dietary treatments (0, 1 and 2% mugwort or 1 and 2% pine needle powder) with ...

  3. Improvements to the Processing and Characterization of Needled Composite Laminates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    the automated processing equipment are shown and discussed. The modifications allow better spatial control at the penetration sites and the ability... automated processing equipment are shown and discussed. The modifications allow better spatial control at the penetration sites and the ability to...semi- automated processing equipment, commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) needles and COTS aramid mat designed for other applications. Needled material

  4. Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology In Tumour Diagnosis | Obaseki ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Fine needle aspiration cytology (FNAC), a technique for obtaining cellular material for cytological examination and diagnosis using a 21- gauge or smaller needle, is performed using a 5, 10, or 20ml syringe either freehand or using special syringe holders. It allows a minimally invasive, rapid diagnosis of tissue samples but

  5. Diagnosis Of Thyroid Enlargement: Use Of Fine Needle Aspiration ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and ten Fine Needle Aspiration Biopsies (FNAC) obtained from 87 patients with thyroid enlargement or nodules were retrospectively reviewed. Aspiration biopsy was accomplished using 21-gauge needle attached with 20-ml plastic syringe. There were 14 males and 73 females involved in the study. Sixty- four ...

  6. Needle-shaped and platelet growth of borax crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takoo, R.K.; Patel, B.R.; Joshi, M.S.

    1983-01-01

    Needle-shaped and platelet growth of borax crystals from solutions is reported. Results of microtopographical studies on both the varieties are discussed. It is suggested that a slow rate of evaporation favours needle growth and a faster rate is conducive to the growth of platelets. (author)

  7. Spinal anaesthesia in young patients: evaluation of needle gauge ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background:The well-known complication of spinal anaesthesia, postdural puncture headache (PDPH), is especially troublesome in young patients. The needle gauge and configuration of needle tip appear to be the important factors in reducing the incidence of PDPH; however it may increase the incidence of technical ...

  8. Observations on rotating needle insertions using a brachytherapy robot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meltsner, M A; Ferrier, N J; Thomadsen, B R

    2007-01-01

    A robot designed for prostate brachytherapy implantations has the potential to greatly improve treatment success. Much of the research in robotic surgery focuses on measuring accuracy. However, there exist many factors that must be optimized before an analysis of needle placement accuracy can be determined. Some of these parameters include choice of the needle type, insertion velocity, usefulness of the rotating needle and rotation speed. These parameters may affect the force at which the needle interacts with the tissue. A reduction in force has been shown to decrease the compression of the prostate and potentially increase the accuracy of seed position. Rotating the needle as it is inserted may reduce frictional forces while increasing accuracy. However, needle rotations are considered to increase tissue damage due to the drilling nature of the insertion. We explore many of the factors involved in optimizing a brachytherapy robot, and the potential effects each parameter may have on the procedure. We also investigate the interaction of rotating needles in gel and suggest the rotate-cannula-only method of conical needle insertion to minimize any tissue damage while still maintaining the benefits of reduced force and increased accuracy

  9. Discordance Rate between Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Discordance Rate between Thyroid Fine Needle Aspiration Cytology and Histopathologic Diagnosis. Wondwossen Ergete, Daniel Abebe. Abstract. Fine Needle Aspiration (FNA) of the thyroid is a low cost procedure, which can give an accurate diagnosis promptly. The objective of this study was to assess the diagnostic ...

  10. Extended replacement of the thoracic aorta.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hino, Yutaka; Okada, Kenji; Oka, Takanori; Inoue, Takeshi; Tanaka, Akiko; Omura, Atsushi; Kano, Hiroya; Okita, Yutaka

    2013-01-01

    We present our experience of total aortic arch replacement. Twenty-nine patients (21 males and 8 females; mean age 63.3 ± 13.3 years) with extended thoracic aortic aneurysms underwent graft replacement. The pathology of the diseased aorta was non-dissecting aneurysm in 11 patients, including one aortitis and aortic dissection in 18 patients (acute type A: one, chronic type A: 11, chronic type B: six). Five patients had Marfan syndrome. In their previous operation, two patients had undergone the Bentall procedure, three had endovascular stenting, one had aortic root replacement with valve sparing and 12 had hemi-arch replacement for acute type A dissection. Approaches to the aneurysm were as follows: posterolateral thoracotomy with rib-cross incision in 16, posterolateral thoracotomy extended to the retroperitoneal abdominal aorta in seven, mid-sternotomy and left pleurotomy in three, anterolateral thoracotomy with partial lower sternotomy in two and clam-shell incision in one patient. Extension of aortic replacement was performed from the aortic root to the descending aorta in 4, from the ascending aorta to the descending aorta in 17 and from the ascending to the abdominal aorta in eight patients. Arterial inflow for cardiopulmonary bypass consisted of the femoral artery in 15 patients, ascending aorta and femoral artery in seven, descending or abdominal aorta in five and ascending aorta in two. Venous drainage site was the femoral vein in 10, pulmonary artery in eight, right atrium in five, femoral artery with right atrium/pulmonary artery in four and pulmonary artery with right atrium in two patients. The operative mortality, 30-day mortality and hospital mortality was one (cardiac arrest due to aneurysm rupture), one (rupture of infected aneurysm) and one (brain contusion), respectively. Late mortality occurred in three patients due to pneumonia, ruptured residual aneurysm and intracranial bleeding. Actuarial survival at 5 years after the operations was 80.6

  11. Laser-Controlled Growth of Needle-Shaped Organic Nanoaggregates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balzer, Frank; Rubahn, Horst-Günter

    2002-01-01

    Arrays of mutually parallel oriented, single-crystalline, needle-like structures of light-emitting p-hexaphenyl molecules are generated in the focus of an argon ion laser. The cross sectional dimensions of the needles are of the order of 100 to 200 nm with lengths up to several hundred micrometer....... While the orientation of the individual molecules in the needles is defined by the direction of surface dipoles, the localization on the surface, the length distribution as well as mutual distances can be adjusted via size and position of the laser focus spot.......Arrays of mutually parallel oriented, single-crystalline, needle-like structures of light-emitting p-hexaphenyl molecules are generated in the focus of an argon ion laser. The cross sectional dimensions of the needles are of the order of 100 to 200 nm with lengths up to several hundred micrometers...

  12. NEEDLE KNIFE SPHINCTEROTOMY - THE CHRIS HANI BARAGWANATH ACADEMIC HOSPITAL EXPERIENCE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, J T; Smith, M D; Omoshoro-Jones, J A O; Devar, J D; Khan, Z K; Jugmohan, B J

    2017-06-01

    Deep biliary cannulation is essential in performing a therapeutic ERCP. Cannulation can be enhanced through the utilization of a pre-cut by means of a needle knife sphincterotomy. Retrospective analysis of the Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital's ERCP database was performed. All ERCPs performed with the aid of a needle knife were identified and analysed for successful and unsuccessful deep biliary cannulation. 2830 ERCPs were performed during the study period. 369 (13%) required needle knife sphincterotomies and successful deep biliary cannulation was achieved in 229 (62%) of these patients. Repeat ERCPs were performed on 125 (34%) patients. 61 (49%) of the repeat ERCPs were performed because of previously failed cannulation. 34 (56%) of these repeat ERCPs resulted in successful deep biliary cannulation at re-attempt. 99% of successful cannulations at repeat ERCP had had a needle knife sphincterotomy at the first ERCP. Needle knife sphincterotomy improves deep biliary cannulation at initial ERCP and subsequent ERCPs with low incidences of complications.

  13. CUDA accelerated simulation of needle insertions in deformable tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patriciu, Alexandru

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a stiff needle-deformable tissue interaction model. The model uses a mesh-less discretization of continuum; avoiding thus the expensive remeshing required by the finite element models. The proposed model can accommodate both linear and nonlinear material characteristics. The needle-deformable tissue interaction is modeled through fundamental boundaries. The forces applied by the needle on the tissue are divided in tangent forces and constraint forces. The constraint forces are adaptively computed such that the material is properly constrained by the needle. The implementation is accelerated using NVidia CUDA. We present detailed analysis of the execution timing in both serial and parallel case. The proposed needle insertion model was integrated in a custom software that loads DICOM images, generate the deformable model, and can simulate different insertion strategies.

  14. Master-slave robotic system for needle indentation and insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaehyun; Zhong, Yongmin; Gu, Chengfan

    2017-12-01

    Bilateral control of a master-slave robotic system is a challenging issue in robotic-assisted minimally invasive surgery. It requires the knowledge on contact interaction between a surgical (slave) robot and soft tissues. This paper presents a master-slave robotic system for needle indentation and insertion. This master-slave robotic system is able to characterize the contact interaction between the robotic needle and soft tissues. A bilateral controller is implemented using a linear motor for robotic needle indentation and insertion. A new nonlinear state observer is developed to online monitor the contact interaction with soft tissues. Experimental results demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed master-slave robotic system for robotic needle indentation and needle insertion.

  15. Thoracic splenosis as a differential diagnosis of juxtapleural nodules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Lopes

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thoracic splenosis is rare and consists of ectopic implantation of splenic tissue into the chest after concomitant thoracic and abdominal trauma with diaphragm injury. It occurs in about 18% of cases of splenic ruptures. In almost all cases, diagnosis is given incidentally once patients are usually asymptomatic. Thoracic splenosis should be considered as a differential diagnosis in all patients with history of trauma presenting with juxtapleural nodules in chest computed tomography. However, malignant conditions should be ruled out firstly. Biopsy is not essential for the diagnosis once nuclear medicine can confirm splenosis in patients with pertinent history of trauma and suggestive tomographic image. We present a typical case of thoracic splenosis whose diagnosis was made by nuclear medicine and no invasive procedures were required.

  16. Anesthesia for thoracic surgery: A survey of middle eastern practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldawlatly, Abdelazeem; Turkistani, Ahmed; Shelley, Ben; El-Tahan, Mohamed; Macfie, Alistair; Kinsella, John

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The main objective of this survey is to describe the current practice of thoracic anesthesia in the Middle Eastern (ME) region. Methods: A prospective online survey. An invitation to participate was e-mailed to all members of the ME thoracic-anaesthesia group. A total of 58 members participated in the survey from 19 institutions in the Middle East. Questions concerned ventilation strategies during one-lung ventilation (OLV), anesthesia regimen, mode of postoperative analgesia, use of lung isolation techniques, and use of i.v. fluids. Results: Volume-controlled ventilation was favored over pressure-controlled ventilation (62% vs 38% of respondents, Panesthesia practice. Failure to pass a DLT and difficult airway are the most commonly cited indications for BB use. Regarding postoperative analgesia, the majority 61.8% favor thoracic epidural analgesia over other techniques (P<0.05). Conclusions: Our survey provides a contemporary snapshot of the ME thoracic anesthetic practice. PMID:23162388

  17. Left Sided Trans-thoracic Esophagectomy for Resectable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ADMIN

    Background: Surgery is the main stay of treatment for Esophageal Cancer but there is no .... patients and a nasogastric tube positioned in the gastric tube in all. .... infection, thorough drainage of the thoracic cavity, maintenance of nutrition and ...

  18. “Clavicular Duplication Causing Thoracic Outlet Obstruction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and left shoulder pain radiating to hand, and associated with paresthesia and .... results in fracture instead of acromioclavicular joint sprain and a “new” clavicle ... such as anomalous cervical ribs, hypoplastic first thoracic rib, exostoses of the ...

  19. variations in dimensions and shape of thoracic cage with aging

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the rib cage dimensions, the shape and cross- ..... Figure 6: CT axial section of thorax, showing the internal thoracic dimensions and shape at different age .... Dean J, Koehler R, Schleien C, Michael J, Chantarojanasiri T, Rogers M, Traystman ...

  20. Sampling Efficiency and Performance of Selected Thoracic Aerosol Samplers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Görner, Peter; Simon, Xavier; Boivin, Alexis; Bau, Sébastien

    2017-08-01

    Measurement of worker exposure to a thoracic health-related aerosol fraction is necessary in a number of occupational situations. This is the case of workplaces with atmospheres polluted by fibrous particles, such as cotton dust or asbestos, and by particles inducing irritation or bronchoconstriction such as acid mists or flour dust. Three personal and two static thoracic aerosol samplers were tested under laboratory conditions. Sampling efficiency with respect to particle aerodynamic diameter was measured in a horizontal low wind tunnel and in a vertical calm air chamber. Sampling performance was evaluated against conventional thoracic penetration. Three of the tested samplers performed well, when sampling the thoracic aerosol at nominal flow rate and two others performed well at optimized flow rate. The limit of flow rate optimization was found when using cyclone samplers. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.