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Sample records for thermosynthesis starvation survival

  1. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea

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    Yaicha D. Winters

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea—microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum

  2. Starvation-Survival in Haloarchaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winters, Yaicha D; Lowenstein, Tim K; Timofeeff, Michael N

    2015-11-12

    Recent studies claiming to revive ancient microorganisms trapped in fluid inclusions in halite have warranted an investigation of long-term microbial persistence. While starvation-survival is widely reported for bacteria, it is less well known for halophilic archaea-microorganisms likely to be trapped in ancient salt crystals. To better understand microbial survival in fluid inclusions in ancient evaporites, laboratory experiments were designed to simulate growth of halophilic archaea under media-rich conditions, complete nutrient deprivation, and a controlled substrate condition (glycerol-rich) and record their responses. Haloarchaea used for this work included Hbt. salinarum and isolate DV582A-1 (genus Haloterrigena) sub-cultured from 34 kyear Death Valley salt. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 reacted to nutrient limitation with morphological and population changes. Starved populations increased and most cells converted from rods to small cocci within 56 days of nutrient deprivation. The exact timing of starvation adaptations and the physical transformations differed between species, populations of the same species, and cells of the same population. This is the first study to report the timing of starvation strategies for Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1. The morphological states in these experiments may allow differentiation between cells trapped with adequate nutrients (represented here by early stages in nutrient-rich media) from cells trapped without nutrients (represented here by experimental starvation) in ancient salt. The hypothesis that glycerol, leaked from Dunaliella, provides nutrients for the survival of haloarchaea trapped in fluid inclusions in ancient halite, is also tested. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1 were exposed to a mixture of lysed and intact Dunaliella for 56 days. The ability of these organisms to utilize glycerol from Dunaliella cells was assessed by documenting population growth, cell length, and cell morphology. Hbt. salinarum and DV582A-1

  3. Starvation-survival of subsurface bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magill, N.G.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of four subsurface isolates to survive starvation was examined and the results were compared to survival curves obtained for Escherichia coli B and Serratia marcescens. To examine the starvation-survival phenomenon further, several experimental parameters including nutritional history, initial cell density, growth phase, temperature of growth and starvation, and aeration. Nutritional history, initial cell density, and growth phases of the cells had some effect on the ability of these bacteria to survive whereas temperature and limited aeration had no effect under the conditions tested. No conditions were found where E. coli B or Serratia marcescens died rapidly or where less than 10% of the original cell number of viable cells remained. Because the apparent survival of these bacteria may be due to cryptic growth, cross-feeding experiments with 14 C-labeled cells and unlabeled cells were carried out with E. coli B and Pseudomonas Lula V. Leaked extracellular 14 C-compounds were not used for growth or maintenance energy, and were not taken up by either bacterium. Cryptic growth did not occur; the cells were truly starving under the experimental conditions used

  4. Finding extraterrestrial organisms living on thermosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Anthonie W J

    2003-01-01

    During thermal cycling, organisms could live on thermosynthesis, a theoretical mechanism applicable to the origin of life and the early evolution of biological energy conversion. All extraterrestrial ice may be a repository for frozen dead or dormant organisms from earlier stages of evolution. In the presence of a thermal gradient within the ice, organisms might still be harvesting energy from thermosynthesis. Possible habitats for thermosynthesizers can be found throughout the Solar System, particularly in the cold traps on Mercury and the Moon, convecting waters on Mars, the oceans on moons in the outer Solar System, and smaller bodies rotating in the sunlight such as cosmic dust, meteorites, asteroids, and comets. A general strategy for detecting thermosynthetic organisms on Earth is offered, and highlights of current and upcoming robotic exploratory missions relevant to the detection of thermosynthesis are reviewed.

  5. Effects of early starvation on the development and survival of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Macrobrachium vollenhovenii (Herklots) has been identified as a crustacean species with great culture potential. The effects of starvation on development and survival of early larval stages of the African river prawn M. vollenhovenii were investigated. As an aspect of the ongoing effort to determine the culturability of the ...

  6. Candida albicans survival and biofilm formation under starvation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Y; Hu, X; Ling, J; Du, Y; Liu, J; Liu, H; Peng, Z

    2013-01-01

    To investigate the survival and biofilm formation capacity of Candida albicans in starvation and under anaerobic conditions. Candida albicans growth and survival were monitored in vitro for up to 8 months. Fungal suspensions from late exponential, stationary and starvation phases were incubated on human dentine, polystyrene and glass slides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was used to observe the process of biofilm formation. 2,3-bis(2-Methoxy-4-nitro-5-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium-5-carboxyanilide inner salt (XTT) reduction assay was performed to quantify the biofilm formation capability, and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) was used to study and make semi-quantitative comparisons of the ultrastructure of biofilms formed on human dentine. 'XTT bioactivity' and 'COMSTAT results' were analysed by two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and one-way ANOVA, respectively. Candida albicans survived for over six months. SEM demonstrated that starving C. albicans produced mature biofilms on different substrata. C. albicans of the same growth phase incubated on human dentine displayed significantly higher biofilm formation capability than on polystyrene or glass slides (P roughness coefficient and surface/volume ratio (P < 0.05). Candida albicans cells can survive and form biofilms in anaerobic and nutrient-limited conditions and may pose a treatment challenge. © 2012 International Endodontic Journal.

  7. Multi-omics Analyses of Starvation Responses Reveal a Central Role for Lipoprotein Metabolism in Acute Starvation Survival in C. elegans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harvald, Eva Bang; Sprenger, Richard R; Dall, Kathrine Brændgaard

    2017-01-01

    Starvation causes comprehensive metabolic changes, which are still not fully understood. Here, we used quantitative proteomics and RNA sequencing to examine the temporal starvation responses in wild-type Caenorhabditis elegans and animals lacking the transcription factor HLH-30. Our findings show...... that starvation alters the abundance of hundreds of proteins and mRNAs in a temporal manner, many of which are involved in central metabolic pathways, including lipoprotein metabolism. We demonstrate that premature death of hlh-30 animals under starvation can be prevented by knockdown of either vit-1 or vit-5......, encoding two different lipoproteins. We further show that the size and number of intestinal lipid droplets under starvation are altered in hlh-30 animals, which can be rescued by knockdown of vit-1. Taken together, this indicates that survival of hlh-30 animals under starvation is closely linked...

  8. Impact of starvation on survival, meat condition and metabolism of Chlamys farreri

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong-Sheng; Wang, Jian; Zhou, Yi; Wang, Ping; He, Yi-Chao; Zhang, Fu-Sui

    2001-03-01

    The effects of 60-day starvation on survival rate, condition index (CI), changes of nutrient composition of different tissues, respiration and excretion of scallop Chlamys farreri were studied in laboratory from Oct. 17 to Dec. 15, 1997. Two groups (control and starvation with 200 individuals each) were cultured in two 2 m3 tanks, with 31 to 32 salinity water at 17°C. Starvation effects were measured after 10, 20, 40 and 60 days. There was no mass mortality of scallops of the two tanks and survival rates of the control and starvation groups were 93.5% and 92.0%, respectively. Starvation had strong effect on the meat condition of the scallops, especially after 10 days; when relative lipid percentage dropped sharply while relative protein percentage increased. The impact of starvation on the oxygen consumption rate (OCR) and the ammonia-N excretion rate (AER) was obvious. The OCR increased rapidly after 10 days but decreased after 20 days. The AER increased after 10 days and 20 days, but decreased obviously from 20 to 40 days. The O∶N ratios varied to different degrees, and minimized after 20 days. The low O∶N ratios implied that the protein was the main material for the metabolism of C. farreri.

  9. daf-16/FoxO promotes gluconeogenesis and trehalose synthesis during starvation to support survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hibshman, Jonathan D; Doan, Alexander E; Moore, Brad T; Kaplan, Rebecca EW; Hung, Anthony; Webster, Amy K; Bhatt, Dhaval P; Chitrakar, Rojin; Hirschey, Matthew D

    2017-01-01

    daf-16/FoxO is required to survive starvation in Caenorhabditis elegans, but how daf-16IFoxO promotes starvation resistance is unclear. We show that daf-16/FoxO restructures carbohydrate metabolism by driving carbon flux through the glyoxylate shunt and gluconeogenesis and into synthesis of trehalose, a disaccharide of glucose. Trehalose is a well-known stress protectant, capable of preserving membrane organization and protein structure during abiotic stress. Metabolomic, genetic, and pharmacological analyses confirm increased trehalose synthesis and further show that trehalose not only supports survival as a stress protectant but also serves as a glycolytic input. Furthermore, we provide evidence that metabolic cycling between trehalose and glucose is necessary for this dual function of trehalose. This work demonstrates that daf-16/FoxO promotes starvation resistance by shifting carbon metabolism to drive trehalose synthesis, which in turn supports survival by providing an energy source and acting as a stress protectant. PMID:29063832

  10. Proteorhodopsin phototrophy promotes survival of marine bacteria during starvation.

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    Laura Gómez-Consarnau

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Proteorhodopsins are globally abundant photoproteins found in bacteria in the photic zone of the ocean. Although their function as proton pumps with energy-yielding potential has been demonstrated, the ecological role of proteorhodopsins remains largely unexplored. Here, we report the presence and function of proteorhodopsin in a member of the widespread genus Vibrio, uncovered through whole-genome analysis. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that the Vibrio strain AND4 obtained proteorhodopsin through lateral gene transfer, which could have modified the ecology of this marine bacterium. We demonstrate an increased long-term survival of AND4 when starved in seawater exposed to light rather than held in darkness. Furthermore, mutational analysis provides the first direct evidence, to our knowledge, linking the proteorhodopsin gene and its biological function in marine bacteria. Thus, proteorhodopsin phototrophy confers a fitness advantage to marine bacteria, representing a novel mechanism for bacterioplankton to endure frequent periods of resource deprivation at the ocean's surface.

  11. Hematological Responses, Survival, and Respiratory Exchange in the Olive Flounder, , during Starvation

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    I.-S. Park

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A 12-wk experiment was conducted to examine the hematological changes, survival, and respiratory exchange in the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during starvation. The growth, survival and respiratory exchange rates of the starved group were lower than those of the fed group during the experiment. Blood analysis, including hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cells, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular volume, did not differ significantly (p>0.05 between the fed and starved groups at the end of the experiment. There were no significant differences in plasma cortisol, glucose, Na+, Cl−, K+, or aspartate aminotransferase between the fed and starved groups (p>0.05. Alanine aminotransferase levels were higher in the starved group than in the fed group, whereas plasma osmolality was lower in the starved group than in the fed group. It was shown that starved fish had various problems after four weeks, which did not occur in the fed group. Long-term starvation is infrequent in aquaculture farms. However, starvation studies of this kind are very useful for a basic understanding of how physiological changes affect fish health, life expectancy, and growth.

  12. Hematological Responses, Survival, and Respiratory Exchange in the Olive Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, I-S; Hur, J W; Choi, J W

    2012-09-01

    A 12-wk experiment was conducted to examine the hematological changes, survival, and respiratory exchange in the olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, during starvation. The growth, survival and respiratory exchange rates of the starved group were lower than those of the fed group during the experiment. Blood analysis, including hematocrit, hemoglobin, red blood cells, mean corpuscular hemoglobin, mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, and mean corpuscular volume, did not differ significantly (p>0.05) between the fed and starved groups at the end of the experiment. There were no significant differences in plasma cortisol, glucose, Na(+), Cl(-), K(+), or aspartate aminotransferase between the fed and starved groups (p>0.05). Alanine aminotransferase levels were higher in the starved group than in the fed group, whereas plasma osmolality was lower in the starved group than in the fed group. It was shown that starved fish had various problems after four weeks, which did not occur in the fed group. Long-term starvation is infrequent in aquaculture farms. However, starvation studies of this kind are very useful for a basic understanding of how physiological changes affect fish health, life expectancy, and growth.

  13. [Survival of the mite Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross & Krantz) (Prostigmata: Acarophenacidae) under starvation].

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    de Oliveira, Carlos R F; Faroni, Lêda R D'A; Guedes, Raul N C; Araújo, Ana P A

    2006-01-01

    The ability of a natural enemy to tolerate starvation increases its chances to survive in the absence of food, what is an important factor for its success in storage grain environment. The objective of the present work was to assess the survival of Acarophenax lacunatus (Cross & Krantz) in the absence of food. The experiment used individualized physogastric females of A. lacunatus placed in petri dishes (5 cm diameter) and maintained at 20, 25, 28, 30 and 32 degrees C, 50+/-5 % R.H. and 24h scotophase. The number of live mites was recorded every 6h thus assessing the progeny survival without food at different temperatures. The mites died within 60h at the temperatures 30 degrees C and 32 degrees C, while they survived for up to 108h at 20, 25 and 28 degrees C. The mean lethal time for death was 58.6h for the lowest temperatures and 39.3h for the highest temperatures. Thus, A. lacunatus subjected to starvation lived longer under lower temperatures, what is probably due to its lower metabolism. In contrast, the mites survived for about 90h at 28 degrees C, temperature commonly observed in tropical and subtropical climates, what may favor their use as control agents of stored product insects in these regions.

  14. Iron starvation-induced proteomic changes in Anabaena (Nostoc) sp. PCC 7120: exploring survival strategy.

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    Narayan, Om Prakash; Kumari, Nidhi; Rai, Lal Chand

    2011-02-01

    This study provides first-hand proteomic data on the survival strategy of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 when subjected to long-term iron-starvation conditions. 2D-gel electrophoresis followed by MALDI-TOF/MS analysis of iron-deficient Anabaena revealed significant and reproducible alterations in ten proteins, of which six are associated with photosynthesis and respiration, three with the antioxidative defense system, and the last, hypothetical protein all1861, conceivably connected with iron homeostasis. Iron-starved Anabaena registered a reduction in growth, photosynthetic pigments, PSI, PSII, whole-chain electron transport, carbon and nitrogen fixation, and ATP and NADPH content. The kinetics of hypothetical protein all1861 expression, with no change in expression until day 3, maximum expression on the 7th day, and a decline in expression from the 15th day onward, coupled with in silico analysis, suggested its role in iron sequestration and homeostasis. Interestingly, the up-regulated FBP-aldolase, Mn/Fe-SOD, and all1861 all appear to assist the survival of Anabeana subjected to iron-starvation conditions. Furthermore, the N2-fixation capabilities of the iron-starved Anabaena encourage us to recommend its application as a biofertilizer, particularly in iron-limited paddy soils.

  15. [Effects of starvation and refeeding in winter on the growth, survival, and biochemical composition of different size Ruditapes philippinarum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xi-wu; Yao, Tuo; Zhang, Yue-huan; Huo, Zhong-ming; Zhao, Yue; Yang, Feng; Zhang, Guo-fan

    2009-12-01

    From December 2007 to April 2008, a laboratory experiment was conducted to study the effects of various starvation periods followed by the same refeeding period on the growth, survival, and biochemical composition of different size Ruditapes philippinarum at water temperature 3.0 degrees C-4.2 degrees C, salinity 25-27, and pH 7.90-8.16. No significant differences in the growth characteristics of R. philippinarum at low temperatures were observed among different size groups. The tolerance to starvation increased with increasing size, while the survival rate decreased with increasing starvation period, point-of-no return (PNR50) was not observed during the study period. For the larger size group (7 mm), the body moisture and lipid concentrations generally decreased with increasing starvation period. During starvation, the body protein content increased initially as a result of lipid being utilized for energy, but decreased thereafter when the lipid was depleting. Ash content remained unchanged during the study period, and was not affected by starvation or refeeding.

  16. Laboratory and Field Evidence for Long-Term Starvation Survival of Microorganisms in Subsurface Terrestrial Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kieft, T.L. [Biology Dept., New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States); Murphy, E.M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Amy, P.S.; Haldeman, D.L. [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Nevada, Las Vegas, NV (United States); Ringelberg, D. B. [Center for Environmental Biotechnology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1997-12-31

    BIOGEOCHEMICAL MODELING OF GROUNDWATER FLOW AND NUTRIENT FLUX IN SUBSURFACE ENVIRONMENTS INDICATES THAT INHABITANT MICROORGANISMS EXPERIENCE SEVERE NUTRIENT LIMITATION. USING LABORATORY AND FIELD METHODS, WE HAVE BEEN TESTING STARVATION SURVIVAL IN SUBSURFACE MICROORGANISMS. IN MICROCOSM EXPERIMENTS, WE HAVE SHOWN THAT STRAINS OF TWO COMMONLY ISOLATED SUBSURFACE GENERA, ARTHROBACTER AND PSEUDOMONAS, ARE ABLE TO MAINTAIN VIABILITY IN LOW-NUTRIENT, NATURAL SUBSURFACE SEDIMENTS FOR OVER ONE YEAR. THESE NON-SPORE-FORMING BACTERIA UNDERGO RAPID INITIAL MINIATURIZATION FOLLOWED BY A STABILIZATION OF CELL SIZE. MEMBRANE LIPID PHOSPHOLIPID FATTY ACID (PLFA) PROFILES OF THE PSEUDOMONAS ARE CONSISTENT WITH ADAPTATION TO NUTRIENT STRESS; ARTHROBACTER APPARENTLY RESPONDS TO NUTRIENT DEPRIVATION WITHOUT ALTERING MEMBRANE PLFA. TO TEST SURVIVABILITY OF MICROORGANISMS OVER A GEOLOGIC TIME SCALE, WE CHARACTERIZED MICROBIAL COMMUNITIES IN A SEQUENCE OF UNSATURATED SEDIMENTS RANGING IN AGE FROM MODEM TO {gt}780,000 years. Sediments were relatively uniform silts in Eastern Washington State. Porewater ages at depth (measured by the chloride mass-balance approach) were as old as 3,600 years. Microbial abundance, biomass, and activities (measured by direct counts, culture counts, total PLFAs, and radiorespirometry) declined with sediment age. The pattern is consistent with laboratory microcosm studies of Microbial survival: rapid short-term change followed by long-term survival of a proportion of cells. Even the oldest sediments evinced a small but viable Microbial community. Microbial survival appeared to be a function of sediment age. Porewater age appeared to influence the markup of surviving communities, as indicated by PLFA profiles. Sites with different Porewater recharge rates and patterns of Pleistocene flooding had different communities.

  17. Formation of stable bdelloplasts as a starvation-survival strategy of marine bdellovibrios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-Amat, A.; Torrella, F. (Universidad de Murcia (Spain))

    1990-09-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Bdellovibrio have been isolated from a variety of habitats, including soil (15), rivers (1), estuarine water, seawater, and solar salt concentration ponds. Several wild-type isolates of marine bdellovibrios formed stable bdelloplasts when they infected gram-negative bacterial prey under certain culture conditions. Synchronous predator-prey cultures and low nutrient concentrations increased the yield of stable bdelloplasts. The bdellovibrio cells retained in the stable bdelloplasts showed a high survival capacity in nutrient-depleted saline solution (10% viable Bdellovibrio cells after 3 months at 25{degrees}C), whereas Bdellovibrio attack-phase cells kept under the same starvation conditions lost viability more quickly (1% viable cells after 48 h). The addition of yeast extract to a stable bdelloplast suspension induced lysis of the bdelloplasts and release of motile infecting attack-phase Bdellovibrio cells. Other substances, such as free amino acids, protein hydrolysates, NH{sub 4}{sup +}, carbohydrates, and organic amines, did not induce such a release. Stable bdelloplasts were highly hydrophobic and had a lower endogenous respiration rate than attack-phase cells. In general, stable bdelloplasts were almost as sensitive to temperature changes, desiccation, sonication, tannic acid, and Triton X-100 treatment as attack-phase cells. Electron microscopy of stable bdelloplasts did not reveal any extra cell wall layer, either in the bdelloplast envelope or in the retained Bdellovibrio cells, unlike the bdellocysts of the soil bacterium Bdellovibrio sp. strain W. The authors propose that formation of stable bdelloplasts is a survival strategy of marine bdellovibrios which occurs in response to nutrient- and prey-poor seawater habitats.

  18. Up-Regulation of Glioma-Associated Oncogene Homolog 1 Expression by Serum Starvation Promotes Cell Survival in ER-Positive Breast Cancer Cells

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    Juan Xu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Cancer cells are resistant to ischemia and starvation. Glioma-associated oncogene homolog 1 (Gli1 is a positive transcriptional activator of Hedgehog (Hh pathway and plays an essential role in the development of cancers, including breast cancer. However, how Gli1 promotes cell survival remains elusive. The main purpose of this study is to investigate the pro-survival effect of Gli1 under serum starvation and its molecular mechanism in ER-positive breast cancer cells. Methods: Gene expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR (QRT-PCR and Western blot. The survival of Gli1 stably transfected ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (Gli1-MCF-7 and Gli1-T47D cells and their untransfected control cells was estimated by WST-8 assay. Microarray analysis was performed to screen downstream Hh/Gli1 target genes in Gli1-overexpressed MCF-7 cells. Transcriptional activities of NF-kappaB were measured by luciferase assays. ChIP analysis was performed to explore whether cIAP2 was a direct target gene of Gli1. Results: Serum starvation significantly up-regulated the expression of Gli1 gene through activating PI3K/AKT pathway. Over-expression of Gli1 markedly promoted cell survival under serum starvation. Microarray analysis revealed that 338 genes were differentially expressed in Gli1-MCF-7 cells compared with those in the control cells. Among these genes, cellular inhibitor of apoptosis 2 (cIAP2, coding an anti-apoptosis and pro-survival protein, was significantly up-regulated not only by Hh/Gli1 pathway, but also by serum starvation. However, ChIP assay revealed no binding of Gli1 to cIAP2 promoter at the region of -1792 to -1568bp. Moreover, over-expression of Gli1 resulted in enhanced trans-activation of transcriptional factor NF-κB. Suppression of NF-κB signaling with NF-κB inhibitor Bay11-7082, significantly reduced the expression of cIAP2 and the cell survival under serum starvation. Conclusion: Serum starvation

  19. Effect of starvation on survival and virulence expression of Aeromonas hydrophila from different sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casabianca, Anna; Orlandi, Chiara; Barbieri, Federica; Sabatini, Luigia; Di Cesare, Andrea; Sisti, Davide; Pasquaroli, Sonia; Magnani, Mauro; Citterio, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    Aeromonas hydrophila is an aquatic bacterium responsible for several human illnesses. The aim of this work was to investigate the survival ability and virulence expression of two strains from different sources (fish, strain 87 and surface water, strain LS) maintained in a seawater microcosm. The strains were analyzed for the total and viable bacterial counts, adhesion ability to Hep-2 cells and aerA gene expression by qPCR throughout the experiment (35 days). Both strains reached a putative VBNC state and lost adhesive properties but exhibited a different behavior in the expression of aerA. This could be due to the different origin of the two strains; the former adapted to a habitat rich of nutrient and the latter already used to survive in a more hostile environment. Moreover, our results indicate that the quantitative determination of aerA mRNA can be a useful indicator of virulence expression under stress conditions.

  20. Insights into the Survival of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during Sulfur Starvation Based on Microarray Analysis of Gene Expression† ‡

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhaoduo; Shrager, Jeff; Jain, Monica; Chang, Chiung-Wen; Vallon, Olivier; Grossman, Arthur R.

    2004-01-01

    Responses of photosynthetic organisms to sulfur starvation include (i) increasing the capacity of the cell for transporting and/or assimilating exogenous sulfate, (ii) restructuring cellular features to conserve sulfur resources, and (iii) modulating metabolic processes and rates of cell growth and division. We used microarray analyses to obtain a genome-level view of changes in mRNA abundances in the green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii during sulfur starvation. The work confirms and extends...

  1. Dormancy in Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1 as a survival strategy to escape from deleterious effects of carbon starvation and temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Matías; González, Karina; González, Carlos; Parra, Boris; Martínez, Miguel

    2015-09-01

    Dormancy is characterized by low metabolism and absence of protein synthesis and cellular division enabling bacterial cells to survive under stress. The aim was to determine if carbon starvation and low temperature are factors that modify the proportion of dormant/active cells in Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1. By flow cytometry, RedoxSensor Green (RSG) was used to quantify metabolic activity and Propidium Iodide (PI) to evaluate membrane integrity in order to determine the percentage of dormant cells. Cell size and morphology were determined using scanning electronic microscopy. Under carbon starvation at 30°C, Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1 increased its proportion of dormant cells from 0.1% to 20%, decreased the count of culturable cells and average cell volume decreased 7.1 times. At 4°C, however, the proportion of dormant cells increased only to 6%, without a change in the count of culturable cells and an average cellular volume decrease of 4.1 times and 3% of the dormant cells were able to be awakened. Results indicate a greater proportion of dormant Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1 cells at 30ºC and it suggests that carbon starvation is more deleterious condition at 30ºC than 4ºC. For this reason Deinococcus sp. UDEC-P1 cells are more likely to enter into dormancy at higher temperature as a strategy to survive. Copyright© by the Spanish Society for Microbiology and Institute for Catalan Studies.

  2. Survivorship During Starvation for Cimex lectularius L.

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    Carlyle C. Brewster

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Four bed bug strains (Cimex lectularius with different levels of pyrethroid resistance were evaluated to determine their ability to survive extended periods of starvation. First instar bed bugs of all strains were the most vulnerable to starvation (13.8–36.3 days mean survival time. Fifth instars and adults survived the longest during starvation (41.5–142.6 days. Significant differences in survivorship during starvation were observed between resistant and susceptible strains of bed bugs. Overall, all immature and adult stages of the resistant bed bug strains had significantly shorter survival times than those of the susceptible strains (P < 0.05.

  3. The Capacity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis To Survive Iron Starvation Might Enable It To Persist in Iron-Deprived Microenvironments of Human Granulomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurthkoti, Krishna; Amin, Hamel; Marakalala, Mohlopheni J; Ghanny, Saleena; Subbian, Selvakumar; Sakatos, Alexandra; Livny, Jonathan; Fortune, Sarah M; Berney, Michael; Rodriguez, G Marcela

    2017-08-15

    This study was conducted to investigate the role of iron deprivation in the persistence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis We present evidence of iron restriction in human necrotic granulomas and demonstrate that under iron starvation M. tuberculosis persists, refractive to antibiotics and capable of restarting replication when iron is made available. Transcriptomics and metabolomic analyses indicated that the persistence of M. tuberculosis under iron starvation is dependent on strict control of endogenous Fe utilization and is associated with upregulation of pathogenicity and intrinsic antibiotic resistance determinants. M. tuberculosis mutants compromised in their ability to survive Fe starvation were identified. The findings of this study advance the understanding of the physiological settings that may underpin the chronicity of human tuberculosis (TB) and are relevant to the design of effective antitubercular therapies. IMPORTANCE One-third of the world population may harbor persistent M. tuberculosis , causing an asymptomatic infection that is refractory to treatment and can reactivate to become potentially lethal tuberculosis disease. However, little is known about the factors that trigger and maintain M. tuberculosis persistence in infected individuals. Iron is an essential nutrient for M. tuberculosis growth. In this study, we show, first, that in human granulomas the immune defense creates microenvironments in which M. tuberculosis likely experiences drastic Fe deprivation and, second, that Fe-starved M. tuberculosis is capable of long-term persistence without growth. Together, these observations suggest that Fe deprivation in the lung might trigger a state of persistence in M. tuberculosis and promote chronic TB. We also identified vulnerabilities of iron-restricted persistent M. tuberculosis , which can be exploited for the design of new antitubercular therapies. Copyright © 2017 Kurthkoti et al.

  4. Enzymatic capacities of metabolic fuel use in cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) and responses to food deprivation: insight into the metabolic organization and starvation survival strategy of cephalopods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speers-Roesch, Ben; Callaghan, Neal I; MacCormack, Tyson J; Lamarre, Simon G; Sykes, Antonio V; Driedzic, William R

    2016-08-01

    Food limitation is a common challenge for animals. Cephalopods are sensitive to starvation because of high metabolic rates and growth rates related to their "live fast, die young" life history. We investigated how enzymatic capacities of key metabolic pathways are modulated during starvation in the common cuttlefish (Sepia officinalis) to gain insight into the metabolic organization of cephalopods and their strategies for coping with food limitation. In particular, lipids have traditionally been considered unimportant fuels in cephalopods, yet, puzzlingly, many species (including cuttlefish) mobilize the lipid stores in their digestive gland during starvation. Using a comprehensive multi-tissue assay of enzymatic capacities for energy metabolism, we show that, during long-term starvation (12 days), glycolytic capacity for glucose use is decreased in cuttlefish tissues, while capacities for use of lipid-based fuels (fatty acids and ketone bodies) and amino acid fuels are retained or increased. Specifically, the capacity to use the ketone body acetoacetate as fuel is widespread across tissues and gill has a previously unrecognized capacity for fatty acid catabolism, albeit at low rates. The capacity for de novo glucose synthesis (gluconeogenesis), important for glucose homeostasis, likely is restricted to the digestive gland, contrary to previous reports of widespread gluconeogenesis among cephalopod tissues. Short-term starvation (3-5 days) had few effects on enzymatic capacities. Similar to vertebrates, lipid-based fuels, putatively mobilized from fat stores in the digestive gland, appear to be important energy sources for cephalopods, especially during starvation when glycolytic capacity is decreased perhaps to conserve available glucose.

  5. Emerging role of mammalian autophagy in ketogenesis to overcome starvation

    OpenAIRE

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the survival of lower organisms under conditions of nutrient depletion. However, whether autophagy plays a physiological role in mammals experiencing starvation is unknown. Ketogenesis is critical for overcoming starvation in mammals. We recently revealed that hepatic and renal autophagy are involved in starvation-induced ketogenesis, by utilizing tissue-specific autophagy-deficient mouse models. The liver is the principal organ to regulate ketogenesis, and a defici...

  6. Emerging role of mammalian autophagy in ketogenesis to overcome starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Autophagy is essential for the survival of lower organisms under conditions of nutrient depletion. However, whether autophagy plays a physiological role in mammals experiencing starvation is unknown. Ketogenesis is critical for overcoming starvation in mammals. We recently revealed that hepatic and renal autophagy are involved in starvation-induced ketogenesis, by utilizing tissue-specific autophagy-deficient mouse models. The liver is the principal organ to regulate ketogenesis, and a deficiency of liver-specific autophagy partially but significantly attenuates starvation-induced ketogenesis. While deficiency of renal-specific autophagy does not affect starvation-induced ketogenesis, mice with deficiency of both liver and kidney autophagy have even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity under starvation conditions than those lacking autophagy in the liver alone. These results suggest that the kidney can compensate for impaired hepatic ketogenesis. Since ketone bodies are catabolized from fatty acids, the uptake of fatty acids, the formation of intracellular lipid droplets, and fatty acid oxidation are critical for ketogenesis. We found that starvation-induced lipid droplet formation is impaired in autophagy-deficient organs. Thus, hepatic and renal autophagy are required for starvation-induced ketogenesis. This process is essential for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis and physical activity during starvation. Our findings provide a novel insight into mammalian autophagy and the physiology of starvation.

  7. Body size-mediated starvation resistance in an insect predator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergs, André; Jager, Tjalling

    2014-07-01

    Individual organisms have to endure transient periods of low-food supply with consequences for growth, reproduction and survival. To resist starvation, animals usually store resources in their bodies: the larger the animals are, the more resources they can carry, but the more energy they need to allocate for maintaining bodily functions. It is unclear how survival relates to body size when food is scarce or absent, and how to characterize individual differences in survival within a population. We use a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model to describe food acquisition, subsequent reserve dynamics and allocation of reserve to body maintenance, growth and maturation of an aquatic insect predator, Notonecta maculata. In a DEB context, we can assume that starvation-induced death strikes when the reserve of an organism is depleted to a certain extent. The way reserve dynamics change upon starvation might thereby influence the ability to survive in the absence of food. Moreover, individuals in a starved population do not die at the same time, even though they might be of the same body size with similar life histories. To describe individual differences in starvation resistance, we link the reserve dynamics derived from the DEB model to the general unified threshold model of survival (GUTS). We tested two different special cases within GUTS, individual tolerance (IT) and stochastic death (SD), and three different starvation options for their suitability in representing experimental data on body size-related starvation resistance. The DEB model reproduced laboratory data on the development of juvenile N. maculata under different food conditions well and closely predicted the weight loss of individuals during prolonged starvation. Both the combined IT-model and the combined SD-model closely fit survival for different food conditions including starvation. However, the two models make different predictions for survival under repeated transient starvation periods. Our results

  8. Survival of Unstressed and Acid-, Cold-, and Starvation-Stress-Adapted Listeria monocytogenes in Ham Extract with Hops Beta Acids and Consumer Acceptability of HBA on Ready-to-Eat Ham

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of hops beta acids (HBA against unstressed and stress-adapted Listeria monocytogenes in ham extract and the consumers’ acceptability of HBA on ready-to-eat (RTE hams were investigated. Unstressed or acid-, cold-, or starvation-stress-adapted L. monocytogenes was inoculated (1.3–1.5 log CFU/mL into 10% ham extract, without (control or with HBA (4.44 or 10.0 µg/mL. Survival/growth of the pathogen during storage (7.2°C, 26 days was monitored periodically. Sensory evaluation (30 participants, 9-point hedonic scale was performed with hams dipped into 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23% HBA solution. Ham extracts without HBA supported rapid growth of unstressed and stress-adapted cells with growth rates of 0.39–0.71 log CFU/mL/day and lag phases of 0–3.26 days. HBA inhibited growth of unstressed L. monocytogenes by slowing (P0.05 affect sensory attributes of RTE ham. These results are useful for RTE meat processors to develop operational protocols using HBA to control L. monocytogenes.

  9. Survival of Unstressed and Acid-, Cold-, and Starvation-Stress-Adapted Listeria monocytogenes in Ham Extract with Hops Beta Acids and Consumer Acceptability of HBA on Ready-to-Eat Ham.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Li; Shen, Cangliang

    2015-01-01

    The efficacy of hops beta acids (HBA) against unstressed and stress-adapted Listeria monocytogenes in ham extract and the consumers' acceptability of HBA on ready-to-eat (RTE) hams were investigated. Unstressed or acid-, cold-, or starvation-stress-adapted L. monocytogenes was inoculated (1.3-1.5 log CFU/mL) into 10% ham extract, without (control) or with HBA (4.44 or 10.0 µg/mL). Survival/growth of the pathogen during storage (7.2 °C, 26 days) was monitored periodically. Sensory evaluation (30 participants, 9-point hedonic scale) was performed with hams dipped into 0.05, 0.11, and 0.23% HBA solution. Ham extracts without HBA supported rapid growth of unstressed and stress-adapted cells with growth rates of 0.39-0.71 log CFU/mL/day and lag phases of 0-3.26 days. HBA inhibited growth of unstressed L. monocytogenes by slowing (P 0.05) affect sensory attributes of RTE ham. These results are useful for RTE meat processors to develop operational protocols using HBA to control L. monocytogenes.

  10. Using the reactive scope model to understand why stress physiology predicts survival during starvation in Galápagos marine iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, L Michael

    2012-05-01

    Even though the term "stress" is widely used, a precise definition is notoriously difficult. Notwithstanding this difficulty, stress continues to be an important concept in biology because it attempts to describe how animals cope with environmental change under emergency conditions. Without a precise definition, however, it becomes nearly impossible to make testable a priori predictions about how physiological and hormonal systems will respond to emergency conditions and what the ultimate impact on the animal will be. The reactive scope model is a recent attempt to formulate testable predictions. This model provides a physiological basis to explain why corticosterone negative feedback, but not baseline corticosterone concentrations, corticosterone responses to acute stress, or the interrenal capacity to secrete corticosterone, is correlated with survival during famine conditions in Galápagos marine iguanas. Reactive scope thus provides a foundation for interpreting and predicting physiological stress responses. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Physiological responses of Lactococcus lactis ML3 to alternating conditions of growth and starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunji, E.R.S.; Ubbink, T.; Matin, A.; Poolman, B.; Konings, W.N.

    Lactococcus lactis species can survive periods of carbohydrate starvation for relatively long periods of time. In the first hours of starvation, however, the maximal glycolytic and arginine deiminase (ADI) pathway activities decline rapidly. The rate of decrease of the pathway activities diminishes

  12. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, Michal

    2016-01-01

    In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism.

  13. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michal Knapp

    Full Text Available In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual starvation resistance was strongly positively affected by pre-starvation body mass but only slightly by beetle structural body size per se. Females outperformed males even when the effect of gender was corrected for the effects of structural body size and pre-starvation body mass. The better performance of females compared to males and of beetles with higher relative pre-starvation body mass could be linked to higher fat content and lean dry mass before starvation, followed by a greater decrease in both during starvation. There was also a difference between the sexes in the extent of body mass changes both during ad libitum feeding and following starvation; the body masses of females fluctuated more compared to males. This study stresses the need to distinguish between body mass and structural body size when investigating the ecological and evolutionary consequences of body size. Investigation of the net effects of body size and sex is necessary to disentangle the causes of differences in individual performances in studies of species with significant sexual size dimorphism.

  14. Body size mediated starvation resistance in an insect predator.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gergs, A.; Jager, T.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Individual organisms have to endure transient periods of low-food supply with consequences for growth, reproduction and survival. To resist starvation, animals usually store resources in their bodies: the larger the animals are, the more resources they can carry, but the more energy they

  15. The oogenic germline starvation response in C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah S Seidel

    Full Text Available Many animals alter their reproductive strategies in response to environmental stress. Here we have investigated how L4 hermaphrodites of Caenorhabditis elegans respond to starvation. To induce starvation, we removed food at 2 h intervals from very early- to very late-stage L4 animals. The starved L4s molted into adulthood, initiated oogenesis, and began producing embryos; however, all three processes were severely delayed, and embryo viability was reduced. Most animals died via 'bagging,' because egg-laying was inhibited, and embryos hatched in utero, consuming their parent hermaphrodites from within. Some animals, however, avoided bagging and survived long term. Long-term survival did not rely on embryonic arrest but instead upon the failure of some animals to produce viable progeny during starvation. Regardless of the bagging fate, starved animals showed two major changes in germline morphology: All oogenic germlines were dramatically reduced in size, and these germlines formed only a single oocyte at a time, separated from the remainder of the germline by a tight constriction. Both changes in germline morphology were reversible: Upon re-feeding, the shrunken germlines regenerated, and multiple oocytes formed concurrently. The capacity for germline regeneration upon re-feeding was not limited to the small subset of animals that normally survive starvation: When bagging was prevented ectopically by par-2 RNAi, virtually all germlines still regenerated. In addition, germline shrinkage strongly correlated with oogenesis, suggesting that during starvation, germline shrinkage may provide material for oocyte production. Finally, germline shrinkage and regeneration did not depend upon crowding. Our study confirms previous findings that starvation uncouples germ cell proliferation from germline stem cell maintenance. Our study also suggests that when nutrients are limited, hermaphrodites scavenge material from their germlines to reproduce. We discuss

  16. Developmental acclimation to low or high humidity conditions affect starvation and heat resistance of Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkash, Ravi; Ranga, Poonam; Aggarwal, Dau Dayal

    2014-09-01

    Several Drosophila species originating from tropical humid localities are more resistant to starvation and heat stress than populations from high latitudes but mechanistic bases of such physiological changes are largely unknown. In order to test whether humidity levels affect starvation and heat resistance, we investigated developmental acclimation effects of low to high humidity conditions on the storage and utilization of energy resources, body mass, starvation survival, heat knockdown and heat survival of D. melanogaster. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity (85% RH) stored significantly higher level of lipids and showed greater starvation survival hours but smaller in body size. In contrast, lines reared at low humidity evidenced reduced levels of body lipids and starvation resistance. Starvation resistance and lipid storage level were higher in females than males. However, the rate of utilization of lipids under starvation stress was lower for lines reared under higher humidity. Adult flies of lines reared at 65% RH and acclimated under high or low humidity condition for 200 hours also showed changes in resistance to starvation and heat but such effects were significantly lower as compared with developmental acclimation. Isofemale lines reared under higher humidity showed greater heat knockdown time and heat-shock survival. These laboratory observations on developmental and adult acclimation effects of low versus high humidity conditions have helped in explaining seasonal changes in resistance to starvation and heat of the wild-caught flies of D. melanogaster. Thus, we may suggest that wet versus drier conditions significantly affect starvation and heat resistance of D. melanogaster. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The Role of Leptin in Maintaining Plasma Glucose During Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Rachel J; Shulman, Gerald I

    2018-03-01

    For 20 years it has been known that concentrations of leptin, a hormone produced by the white adipose tissue (WAT) largely in proportion to body fat, drops precipitously with starvation, particularly in lean humans and animals. The role of leptin to suppress the thyroid and reproductive axes during a prolonged fast has been well defined; however, the impact of leptin on metabolic regulation has been incompletely understood. However emerging evidence suggests that, in starvation, hypoleptinemia increases activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, promoting WAT lipolysis, increasing hepatic acetyl-CoA concentrations, and maintaining euglycemia. In addition, leptin may be largely responsible for mediating a shift from a reliance upon glucose metabolism (absorption and glycogenolysis) to fat metabolism (lipolysis increasing gluconeogenesis) which preserves substrates for the brain, heart, and other critical organs. In this way a leptin-mediated glucose-fatty acid cycle appears to maintain glycemia and permit survival in starvation.

  18. Relative Importance of Sex, Pre-Starvation Body Mass and Structural Body Size in the Determination of Exceptional Starvation Resistance of Anchomenus dorsalis (Coleoptera: Carabidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Knapp, Michal

    2016-01-01

    In nature, almost all animals have to cope with periods of food shortage during their lifetimes. Starvation risks are especially high for carnivorous predatory species, which often experience long intervals between stochastic prey capturing events. A laboratory experiment using the common predatory carabid beetle Anchomenus dorsalis revealed an exceptional level of starvation resistance in this species: males survived up to 137 days and females up to 218 days without food at 20°C. Individual ...

  19. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittman, Joseph R.; Kline, La’Kesha C.; Kenyon, William J.

    2015-01-01

    The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation) is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance). To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C), low pH (pH 2.8), and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2). In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth. PMID:27682115

  20. Carbon-Starvation Induces Cross-Resistance to Thermal, Acid, and Oxidative Stress in Serratia marcescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph R. Pittman

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The broad host-range pathogen Serratia marcescens survives in diverse host and non-host environments, often enduring conditions in which the concentration of essential nutrients is growth-limiting. In such environments, carbon and energy source starvation (carbon-starvation is one of the most common forms of stress encountered by S. marcescens. Related members of the family Enterobacteriaceae are known to undergo substantial changes in gene expression and physiology in response to the specific stress of carbon-starvation, enabling non-spore-forming cells to survive periods of prolonged starvation and exposure to other forms of stress (i.e., starvation-induced cross-resistance. To determine if carbon-starvation also results in elevated levels of cross-resistance in S. marcescens, both log-phase and carbon-starved cultures, depleted of glucose before the onset of high cell-density stationary-phase, were grown in minimal media at either 30 °C or 37 °C and were then challenged for resistance to high temperature (50 °C, low pH (pH 2.8, and oxidative stress (15 mM H2O2. In general, carbon-starved cells exhibited a higher level of resistance to thermal stress, acid stress, and oxidative stress compared to log-phase cells. The extent of carbon-starvation-induced cross-resistance was dependent on incubation temperature and on the particular strain of S. marcescens. In addition, strain- and temperature-dependent variations in long-term starvation survival were also observed. The enhanced stress-resistance of starved S. marcescens cells could be an important factor in their survival and persistence in many non-host environments and within certain host microenvironments where the availability of carbon sources is suboptimal for growth.

  1. The combined effects of starvation and pH on the virulence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Shigella sonnei encounter numerous different stresses during their growth, survival and infection. In this study, the effect of stress response to pH and starvation was investigated. We studied the survival, adhesion and the morphology of Shigella after its incubation in several pH. Our results show that after 2 h of incubation, ...

  2. Starvation induced cell death in autophagy-defective yeast mutants is caused by mitochondria dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho W Suzuki

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly-conserved cellular degradation and recycling system that is essential for cell survival during nutrient starvation. The loss of viability had been used as an initial screen to identify autophagy-defective (atg mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the mechanism of cell death in these mutants has remained unclear. When cells grown in a rich medium were transferred to a synthetic nitrogen starvation media, secreted metabolites lowered the extracellular pH below 3.0 and autophagy-defective mutants mostly died. We found that buffering of the starvation medium dramatically restored the viability of atg mutants. In response to starvation, wild-type (WT cells were able to upregulate components of the respiratory pathway and ROS (reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes, but atg mutants lacked this synthetic capacity. Consequently, autophagy-defective mutants accumulated the high level of ROS, leading to deficient respiratory function, resulting in the loss of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA. We also showed that mtDNA deficient cells are subject to cell death under low pH starvation conditions. Taken together, under starvation conditions non-selective autophagy, rather than mitophagy, plays an essential role in preventing ROS accumulation, and thus in maintaining mitochondria function. The failure of response to starvation is the major cause of cell death in atg mutants.

  3. Origin of microbial life hypothesis: a gel cytoplasm lacking a bilayer membrane, with infrared radiation producing exclusion zone (EZ) water, hydrogen as an energy source and thermosynthesis for bioenergetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevors, J T; Pollack, G H

    2012-01-01

    The hypothesis is proposed that pre-biotic bacterial cell(s) and the first cells capable of growth/division did not require a cytoplasmic membrane. A gel-like microscopic structure less than a cubic micrometer may have had a dual role as both an ancient pre-cytoplasm and a boundary layer to the higher-entropy external environment. The gel pre-cytoplasm exposed to radiant energy, especially in the infrared (IR) region of the EM spectrum resulted in the production of an exclusion zone (EZ) with a charge differential (-100 to -200 mV) and boundary that may have been a possible location for the latter organization of the first cytoplasmic membrane. Pre-biotic cells and then-living cells may have used hydrogen as the universal energy source, and thermosynthesis in their bioenergetic processes. These components will be discussed as to how they are interconnected, and their hypothesized roles in the origin of life. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  4. Transcriptome response to nitrogen starvation in rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... groups that responded to N starvation, demonstrated the existence of conserved N stress coupling mechanism among plants. Additional analysis of transcription profiles of microRNAs revealed differential expression of miR399 and miR530 under N starvation, suggesting their potential roles in plant nutrient homeostasis.

  5. Transcriptome response to nitrogen starvation in rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    miR530 in rice plant by qRT-PCR. CK: no N starvation treatment; -N: 7d after N starvation. Y-axis means the relative expression levels, values are mean ± SD from three independent biological replicates. * Significant differences at the level of P ...

  6. Eggs and hatchlings variations in desert locusts: phase related characteristics and starvation tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutaro Ould Maeno

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Locusts are grasshopper species that express phase polyphenism: modifying their behavior, morphology, coloration, life history and physiology in response to crowding. Desert locusts, Schistocerca gregaria, epigenetically modify progeny quality and quantity in response to crowding. Gregarious (crowded females produce larger but fewer progeny than do solitarious (isolated ones. The variability of progeny quality within single egg pod and the reasons why gregarious progeny have a better survival than solitarious ones remains unclear. This study investigated 1 the effects of rearing density on the variation in egg size within single egg pods 2 the starvation tolerance of hatchlings from mothers with different phases and 3 the physiological differences in hatchling energy reserve. Isolated females produced smaller but more eggs than did crowded ones. The variation in egg size within egg pods was greater in the latter than in the former. A negative relationship between egg size and number of eggs per egg pod was observed for both groups. Under starvation conditions, gregarious hatchlings survived significantly longer than solitarious ones. Among the solitarious hatchlings, the survival time was longer as hatchling body size increased. However, small individuals survived as long as large ones among the gregarious hatchlings. The percentage of water content per fresh body weight was almost equal between the two phases, before and after starvation. In contrast, the percentage of lipid content per dry body weight was significantly higher in gregarious hatchlings than in solitarious ones before starvation, but became almost equal after starvation. These results demonstrated that female locusts not only trade-off to modify their progeny size and number, but also vary progenies’ energy reserves. We hypothesized that gregarious females enhance their fitness by producing progeny differently adapted to high environmental variability and particularly to

  7. Resistance of soil microorganisms to starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M.; Alexander, M.

    1972-01-01

    Most groups of soil microorganisms died when exposed to prolonged starvation in a carbon-free solution, but the relative abundance of Bacillus and actinomycetes increased with time. Certain nonspore-forming bacteria also persisted. The ability of individual soil isolates to endure starvation in solution was not correlated with their glycogen content or rate of endogenous respiration. However, cells of the resistant populations were rich in poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate, whereas the starvation-susceptible bacteria generally contained little of this substance. Poly-beta-hydroxybutyrate was used rapidly in cells deprived of exogenous sources of carbon.

  8. Transcriptional and Proteomic Responses to Carbon Starvation in Paracoccidioides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Patrícia de Sousa; Casaletti, Luciana; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; de Vasconcelos, Ana Tereza Ribeiro; Fernandes, Gabriel da Rocha; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2014-01-01

    Background The genus Paracoccidioides comprises human thermal dimorphic fungi, which cause paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), an important mycosis in Latin America. Adaptation to environmental conditions is key to fungal survival during human host infection. The adaptability of carbon metabolism is a vital fitness attribute during pathogenesis. Methodology/Principal Findings The fungal pathogen Paracoccidioides spp. is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, in the human host. In this study, a comprehensive response of Paracoccidioides, Pb01, under carbon starvation was investigated using high-resolution transcriptomic (RNAseq) and proteomic (NanoUPLC-MSE) approaches. A total of 1,063 transcripts and 421 proteins were differentially regulated, providing a global view of metabolic reprogramming during carbon starvation. The main changes were those related to cells shifting to gluconeogenesis and ethanol production, supported by the degradation of amino acids and fatty acids and by the modulation of the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic cycles. This proposed carbon flow hypothesis was supported by gene and protein expression profiles assessed using qRT-PCR and western blot analysis, respectively, as well as using enzymatic, cell dry weight and fungus-macrophage interaction assays. The carbon source provides a survival advantage to Paracoccidioides inside macrophages. Conclusions/Significance For a complete understanding of the physiological processes in an organism, the integration of approaches addressing different levels of regulation is important. To the best of our knowledge, this report presents the first description of the responses of Paracoccidioides spp. to host-like conditions using large-scale expression approaches. The alternative metabolic pathways that could be adopted by the organism during carbon starvation can be important for a better understanding of the fungal adaptation to the host, because systems for detecting and responding

  9. Effects of starvation and molting on the metabolic rate of the bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVries, Zachary C; Kells, Stephen A; Appel, Arthur G

    2015-01-01

    The bed bug (Cimex lectularius L.) is a common hematophagous pest in the urban environment and is capable of surviving extended periods of starvation. However, the relationship between starvation and metabolism in bed bugs is not well understood. To better understand this relationship, we measured the metabolism of all life stages for >900 h after feeding (starvation) using closed-system respirometry. Measurements were made around molting for the immature life stages, which occurs only after a blood meal. In addition, both mated and unmated adults were measured. Starvation and molting had significant effects on the metabolism of the bed bug. Mass-specific metabolic rate (V(O2); mL g(-1) h(-1)) declined in a curvilinear fashion with the period of starvation for adults and with the postmolting period for immature bed bugs (used to standardize all immature life stages). A standard curve was developed to depict the generalized pattern of metabolic decline observed in all life stages that molted. Individual metabolic comparisons among life stages that molted revealed some differences in metabolic rate between unmated males and females. In addition, the mass scaling coefficient was found to decline with starvation time (postmolting time) for all life stages that molted. In most life stages, the ratio of V(CO2) to V(O2) (respiratory exchange ratio) declined over time, indicating a change in metabolic substrate with starvation. Finally, daily percent loss in body mass declined in a pattern similar to that of V(O2). The observed patterns in metabolic decline are evaluated in relation to the life history of bed bugs. In addition, the evolutionary development of these patterns is discussed. The metabolic pattern after feeding was also found to share several similarities with that of other ectothermic species.

  10. ROS-induced DNA damage and PARP-1 are required for optimal induction of starvation-induced autophagy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodríguez-Vargas, José Manuel; Ruiz-Magaña, María José; Ruiz-Ruiz, Carmen

    2012-01-01

    In response to nutrient stress, cells start an autophagy program that can lead to adaptation or death. The mechanisms underlying the signaling from starvation to the initiation of autophagy are not fully understood. In the current study we show that the absence or inactivation of PARP-1 strongly...... delays starvation-induced autophagy. We have found that DNA damage is an early event of starvation-induced autophagy as measured by ¿-H2AX accumulation and comet assay, with PARP-1 knockout cells displaying a reduction in both parameters. During starvation, ROS-induced DNA damage activates PARP-1......, leading to ATP depletion (an early event after nutrient deprivation). The absence of PARP-1 blunted AMPK activation and prevented the complete loss of mTOR activity, leading to a delay in autophagy. PARP-1 depletion favors apoptosis in starved cells, suggesting a pro-survival role of autophagy and PARP-1...

  11. The carbon starvation response of Aspergillus niger during submerged cultivation: Insights from the transcriptome and secretome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitsche Benjamin M

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Filamentous fungi are confronted with changes and limitations of their carbon source during growth in their natural habitats and during industrial applications. To survive life-threatening starvation conditions, carbon from endogenous resources becomes mobilized to fuel maintenance and self-propagation. Key to understand the underlying cellular processes is the system-wide analysis of fungal starvation responses in a temporal and spatial resolution. The knowledge deduced is important for the development of optimized industrial production processes. Results This study describes the physiological, morphological and genome-wide transcriptional changes caused by prolonged carbon starvation during submerged batch cultivation of the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger. Bioreactor cultivation supported highly reproducible growth conditions and monitoring of physiological parameters. Changes in hyphal growth and morphology were analyzed at distinct cultivation phases using automated image analysis. The Affymetrix GeneChip platform was used to establish genome-wide transcriptional profiles for three selected time points during prolonged carbon starvation. Compared to the exponential growth transcriptome, about 50% (7,292 of all genes displayed differential gene expression during at least one of the starvation time points. Enrichment analysis of Gene Ontology, Pfam domain and KEGG pathway annotations uncovered autophagy and asexual reproduction as major global transcriptional trends. Induced transcription of genes encoding hydrolytic enzymes was accompanied by increased secretion of hydrolases including chitinases, glucanases, proteases and phospholipases as identified by mass spectrometry. Conclusions This study is the first system-wide analysis of the carbon starvation response in a filamentous fungus. Morphological, transcriptomic and secretomic analyses identified key events important for fungal survival and their chronology. The

  12. Larval starvation improves metabolic response to adult starvation in honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Campbell, Jacob B; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V; Harrison, Jon F

    2016-04-01

    Environmental changes during development have long-term effects on adult phenotypes in diverse organisms. Some of the effects play important roles in helping organisms adapt to different environments, such as insect polymorphism. Others, especially those resulting from an adverse developmental environment, have a negative effect on adult health and fitness. However, recent studies have shown that those phenotypes influenced by early environmental adversity have adaptive value under certain (anticipatory) conditions that are similar to the developmental environment, though evidence is mostly from morphological and behavioral observations and it is still rare at physiological and molecular levels. In the companion study, we applied a short-term starvation treatment to fifth instar honey bee larvae and measured changes in adult morphology, starvation resistance, hormonal and metabolic physiology and gene expression. Our results suggest that honey bees can adaptively respond to the predicted nutritional stress. In the present study, we further hypothesized that developmental starvation specifically improves the metabolic response of adult bees to starvation instead of globally affecting metabolism under well-fed conditions. Here, we produced adult honey bees that had experienced a short-term larval starvation, then we starved them for 12 h and monitored metabolic rate, blood sugar concentrations and metabolic reserves. We found that the bees that experienced larval starvation were able to shift to other fuels faster and better maintain stable blood sugar levels during starvation. However, developmental nutritional stress did not change metabolic rates or blood sugar levels in adult bees under normal conditions. Overall, our study provides further evidence that early larval starvation specifically improves the metabolic responses to adult starvation in honey bees. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  13. Differential neuropeptide responses to starvation with ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneda, T; Makino, S; Nishiyama, M; Asaba, K; Hashimoto, K

    2001-12-01

    During starvation, counterregulatory responses to loss of food (i.e. responses that lead to an increase in appetite) occur in the central nervous system (CNS). This study was designed to examine whether middle-aged rats show greater or smaller behavioural, peripheral and central hormonal responses during starvation compared to young rats. In experiment 1, refeeding following 4 days of starvation was measured in both middle-aged (72-week-old) and young (9-week-old) rats. The level of refeeding was similar to each prestarved level until 3 days after the end of starvation in both groups. From the 4th day, the level of refeeding in young rats increased and reached beyond the prestarved level, whereas refeeding in middle-aged rats remained similar to the prestarved level. Thus, overall refeeding throughout 7 days was greater in young rats than in middle-aged rats. In experiment 2, middle-aged and young rats were starved for 4 days and were killed in the morning. Middle-aged rats showed a smaller plasma corticosterone response than that of young rats. The magnitude of decreases in plasma glucose, insulin and leptin was similar in both groups. In the arcuate nucleus, the starvation-induced increase in neuropeptide Y (NPY) mRNA and the decrease in proopiomelanocortin (POMC) mRNA were smaller in middle-aged rats than in young rats. In contrast, the starvation-induced decrease in corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) mRNA in the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus was greater in middle-aged rats than young rats. The magnitude of decrease in type-2 CRH receptor mRNA in the ventromedial hypothalamus was similar in both groups. The results indicate that (a) ageing impaired refeeding response (b), middle-aged rats showed the same directional neuropeptide mRNA responses as seen in young rats during starvation and (c) the magnitude of these counterregulatory responses in the CNS in middle-aged versus young rats was not uniform, but rather was site-specific or neuropeptide

  14. Freshwater Ammonia-Oxidizing Archaea Retain amoA mRNA and 16S rRNA during Ammonia Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth French

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In their natural habitats, microorganisms are often exposed to periods of starvation if their substrates for energy generation or other nutrients are limiting. Many microorganisms have developed strategies to adapt to fluctuating nutrients and long-term starvation. In the environment, ammonia oxidizers have to compete with many different organisms for ammonium and are often exposed to long periods of ammonium starvation. We investigated the effect of ammonium starvation on ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA and bacteria (AOB enriched from freshwater lake sediments. Both AOA and AOB were able to recover even after almost two months of starvation; however, the recovery time differed. AOA and AOB retained their 16S rRNA (ribosomes throughout the complete starvation period. The AOA retained also a small portion of the mRNA of the ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA for the complete starvation period. However, after 10 days, no amoA mRNA was detected anymore in the AOB. These results indicate that AOA and AOB are able to survive longer periods of starvation, but might utilize different strategies.

  15. Effect of starvation and subsequent feeding on glycogen concentration, behavior and mortality in the golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857 (Bivalvia: Mytilidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelmara I.S. Cordeiro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of Limnoperna fortunei as an invasive species is related to its physiological plasticity that allows them to endure adverse environmental conditions. Starvation tolerance is considered to be an important trait associated with bivalve invasiveness. In natural ecosystems, food resources can vary during the year, exposing mussels to variable periods of starvation or limited food availability. Thus, mussels have developed physiological strategies to tolerate and survive fluctuations in food availability. Glycogen concentration has been used in different monitoring studies as an indicator of the nutritional condition of bivalves. The aim of this study was to investigate the physiological responses of L. fortunei based on the glycogen concentrations of specimens under four treatments, comprising different combinations of feeding and starvation, during 125 days. The experiment was carried out in two phases. In the phase I, mussels were divided in two treatments: starvation (S and feeding (F. After 100 days, tissue samples were collected to quantify glycogen concentrations and, each phase I group was divided in two subgroups: starvation (S and feeding (F, resulting in four treatments. In the phase II, that lasted 25 days, starvation specimens (S from phase I were allowed to feed (starvation-feeding treatment , or S-F, or continued to undergo starvation (starvation-starvation treatment , or S-S and the feeding specimens (F continued feeding (feeding-feeding group, or F-F, or were subjected to starvation (feeding-starvation treatment , or F-S. Behavior (valve-closing and mortality were recorded in 24 h intervals. After the 25 days (phase II all specimens were killed, and their soft tissue was removed to quantify glycogen concentrations. The glycogen concentration of the S-F treatment was lower than that of the F-S treatment, which was initially allowed to feed (phase I and then subjected to starvation (phase II. Stability in the glycogen

  16. Protein Kinase A Activation Promotes Cancer Cell Resistance to Glucose Starvation and Anoikis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Palorini

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Cancer cells often rely on glycolysis to obtain energy and support anabolic growth. Several studies showed that glycolytic cells are susceptible to cell death when subjected to low glucose availability or to lack of glucose. However, some cancer cells, including glycolytic ones, can efficiently acquire higher tolerance to glucose depletion, leading to their survival and aggressiveness. Although increased resistance to glucose starvation has been shown to be a consequence of signaling pathways and compensatory metabolic routes activation, the full repertoire of the underlying molecular alterations remain elusive. Using omics and computational analyses, we found that cyclic adenosine monophosphate-Protein Kinase A (cAMP-PKA axis activation is fundamental for cancer cell resistance to glucose starvation and anoikis. Notably, here we show that such a PKA-dependent survival is mediated by parallel activation of autophagy and glutamine utilization that in concert concur to attenuate the endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress and to sustain cell anabolism. Indeed, the inhibition of PKA-mediated autophagy or glutamine metabolism increased the level of cell death, suggesting that the induction of autophagy and metabolic rewiring by PKA is important for cancer cellular survival under glucose starvation. Importantly, both processes actively participate to cancer cell survival mediated by suspension-activated PKA as well. In addition we identify also a PKA/Src mechanism capable to protect cancer cells from anoikis. Our results reveal for the first time the role of the versatile PKA in cancer cells survival under chronic glucose starvation and anoikis and may be a novel potential target for cancer treatment.

  17. Transcriptome response to nitrogen starvation in rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-13

    Aug 13, 2012 ... pivotal regulator involved in many biological processes, including carbon metabolism, amino acid ..... to produce more N metabolites that maintained plants sur- viving under N starvation condition. The pH ..... vation will likely facilitate the identification of downstream conserved modules for general stress ...

  18. Zinc starvation induces autophagy in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawamata, Tomoko; Horie, Tetsuro; Matsunami, Miou; Sasaki, Michiko; Ohsumi, Yoshinori

    2017-05-19

    Zinc is an essential nutrient for all forms of life. Within cells, most zinc is bound to protein. Because zinc serves as a catalytic or structural cofactor for many proteins, cells must maintain zinc homeostasis under severely zinc-deficient conditions. In yeast, the transcription factor Zap1 controls the expression of genes required for uptake and mobilization of zinc, but to date the fate of existing zinc-binding proteins under zinc starvation remains poorly understood. Autophagy is an evolutionarily conserved cellular degradation/recycling process in which cytoplasmic proteins and organelles are sequestered for degradation in the vacuole/lysosome. In this study, we investigated how autophagy functions under zinc starvation. Zinc depletion induced non-selective autophagy, which is important for zinc-limited growth. Induction of autophagy by zinc starvation was not directly related to transcriptional activation of Zap1. Instead, TORC1 inactivation directed zinc starvation-induced autophagy. Abundant zinc proteins, such as Adh1, Fba1, and ribosomal protein Rpl37, were degraded in an autophagy-dependent manner. But the targets of autophagy were not restricted to zinc-binding proteins. When cellular zinc is severely depleted, this non-selective autophagy plays a role in releasing zinc from the degraded proteins and recycling zinc for other essential purposes. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  19. Transcriptome response to nitrogen starvation in rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Nitrogen is an essential mineral nutrient required for plant growth and development. Insufficient nitrogen (N) supply triggers extensive physiological and biochemical changes in plants. In this study, we used Affymetrix GeneChip rice genome arrays to analyse the dynamics of rice transcriptome under N starvation.

  20. Transcriptome response to nitrogen starvation in rice

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-08-13

    Aug 13, 2012 ... [Cai H, Lu Y, Xie W, Zhu T and Lian X 2012 Transcriptome response to nitrogen starvation in rice. J. Biosci. 37 731–747] DOI ... nitrate transport, nitrate reduction and nitrite reduction, ammo- nium assimilation, and .... weight genes in less significant neighbours, comparing to the classic FET. Thus, we used ...

  1. Phosphate acquisition efficiency and phosphate starvation tolerance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Here, we have reported the presence as well as the expression of a previously characterized rice gene, phosphate starvation tolerance ... from a cross between Gobindabhog and Satabdi, also did not show any linkage with P-deficiency tolerance ability. Thus, ... vated in P-limiting conditions which work in a cascade and.

  2. The intestinal microbiome of fish under starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Jun Hong; Lin, Grace; Fu, Gui Hong; Wan, Zi Yi; Lee, May; Wang, Le; Liu, Xiao Jun; Yue, Gen Hua

    2014-04-05

    Starvation not only affects the nutritional and health status of the animals, but also the microbial composition in the host's intestine. Next-generation sequencing provides a unique opportunity to explore gut microbial communities and their interactions with hosts. However, studies on gut microbiomes have been conducted predominantly in humans and land animals. Not much is known on gut microbiomes of aquatic animals and their changes under changing environmental conditions. To address this shortcoming, we determined the microbial gene catalogue, and investigated changes in the microbial composition and host-microbe interactions in the intestine of Asian seabass in response to starvation. We found 33 phyla, 66 classes, 130 orders and 278 families in the intestinal microbiome. Proteobacteria (48.8%), Firmicutes (15.3%) and Bacteroidetes (8.2%) were the three most abundant bacteria taxa. Comparative analyses of the microbiome revealed shifts in bacteria communities, with dramatic enrichment of Bacteroidetes, but significant depletion of Betaproteobacteria in starved intestines. In addition, significant differences in clusters of orthologous groups (COG) functional categories and orthologous groups were observed. Genes related to antibiotic activity in the microbiome were significantly enriched in response to starvation, and host genes related to the immune response were generally up-regulated. This study provides the first insights into the fish intestinal microbiome and its changes under starvation. Further detailed study on interactions between intestinal microbiomes and hosts under dynamic conditions will shed new light on how the hosts and microbes respond to the changing environment.

  3. Effect of starvation and subsequent feeding on glycogen concentration, behavior and mortality in the golden mussel Limnoperna fortunei (Dunker, 1857) (Bivalvia: Mytilidae

    OpenAIRE

    Nelmara I.S. Cordeiro; Jennifer T.M. Andrade; Lângia C. Montresor; Dalva M.R. Luz; Carlos B. Martinez; Gustavo Darrigran; Jairo Pinheiro; Teofânia H.D.A. Vidigal

    2016-01-01

    The success of Limnoperna fortunei as an invasive species is related to its physiological plasticity that allows them to endure adverse environmental conditions. Starvation tolerance is considered to be an important trait associated with bivalve invasiveness. In natural ecosystems, food resources can vary during the year, exposing mussels to variable periods of starvation or limited food availability. Thus, mussels have developed physiological strategies to tolerate and survive fluctuations i...

  4. Stress response and pathogenic potential of Campylobacter jejuni cells exposed to starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klancnik, Anja; Guzej, Bernarda; Jamnik, Polona; Vucković, Darinka; Abram, Maja; Mozina, Sonja Smole

    2009-06-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a Gram-negative, fragile, spiral bacterium, known worldwide to be a major cause of acute human enteritis. Like many other food-borne bacteria, campylobacters must be able to survive under diverse conditions both inside the host and in the environment. Understanding stress response mechanisms provides information necessary for improving food processing and strategies that enhance food safety as well as clarifying the pathogenesis of campylobacteriosis. We investigated the relation between stress response to starvation and pathogenic potential in C. jejuni. Starvation changed the morphology and physiology of C. jejuni cells. However, the lower metabolic activity of 5-h-starved culture was not a dormant state, but probably a viable but non-culturable (VBNC) form of the cells, since starved C. jejuni induced heat stress resistance. The health hazard potential of starved cells is still unclear. We showed that, in spite of starvation, C. jejuni survived in vitro within Caco-2 enterocites up to 4 days and caused systemic campylobacteriosis in vivo in a mouse model. However, bacterial numbers in investigated organs were significantly lower and the infection was resolved sooner. Our results show that nutrient insufficiency is responsible for C. jejuni transformation, influencing but not abolishing its survival and virulence properties while in the VBNC state.

  5. [Starvation ketosis in a breastfeeding woman].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnier, D; Goulenok, T; Allary, J; Zarrouk, V; Fantin, B

    2015-12-01

    Bovine ketosis is a rare cause of metabolic acidosis. It is a starvation ketosis that appears in lactating woman. A 29-year-old woman had a previous gastric surgery one month ago while breastfeeding her 6-month child. She presented to emergency with dyspnea, fatigue, weight loss and anorexia. The explorations revealed a serious metabolic acidosis with a high anion gap, for which all other causes have been eliminated. A restrictive diet in lactating patients is a major risk of ketosis or bovine ketosis. Medico-surgical treatment of obesity during lactation seems unreasonable. Breastfeeding should be systematically sought before a medical and surgical management of obesity. With the spread of bariatric surgery, starvation ketosis is a cause of metabolic acidosis not to ignore. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of short-term starvation on Leydig cell function in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grizard, G; Artonne, C; Grizard, J; Boucher, D

    1997-01-01

    An experiment was carried out to analyze the effect of 3 days of starvation on the Leydig cell function in adult rats. Starvation markedly decreased plasma insulin and testosterone levels (p starvation-associated decrease in plasma testosterone.

  7. Adaptive response to starvation in the fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare: cell viability and ultrastructural changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arias Covadonga R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ecology of columnaris disease, caused by Flavobacterium columnare, is poorly understood despite the economic losses that this disease inflicts on aquaculture farms worldwide. Currently, the natural reservoir for this pathogen is unknown but limited data have shown its ability to survive in water for extended periods of time. The objective of this study was to describe the ultrastructural changes that F. columnare cells undergo under starvation conditions. Four genetically distinct strains of this pathogen were monitored for 14 days in media without nutrients. Culturability and cell viability was assessed throughout the study. In addition, cell morphology and ultrastructure was analyzed using light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Revival of starved cells under different nutrient conditions and the virulence potential of the starved cells were also investigated. Results Starvation induced unique and consistent morphological changes in all strains studied. Cells maintained their length and did not transition into a shortened, coccus shape as observed in many other Gram negative bacteria. Flavobacterium columnare cells modified their shape by morphing into coiled forms that comprised more than 80% of all the cells after 2 weeks of starvation. Coiled cells remained culturable as determined by using a dilution to extinction strategy. Statistically significant differences in cell viability were found between strains although all were able to survive in absence of nutrients for at least 14 days. In later stages of starvation, an extracellular matrix was observed covering the coiled cells. A difference in growth curves between fresh and starved cultures was evident when cultures were 3-months old but not when cultures were starved for only 1 month. Revival of starved cultures under different nutrients revealed that cells return back to their original elongated rod shape upon

  8. Can bacteria adapt to starvation-free environment?

    OpenAIRE

    Kei Kitahara

    2012-01-01

    Bacteria will experience starvation-free environment if infinite nutrition is supplied continuously for a long period. In this study, an evolutionary experiment was performed for 118 days where bacteria adapted to starvation-free environment and reduced their doubling time. It is anticipated that this finding will help to select bacterial strains that can grow more rapidly in rich media.

  9. Temporal pattern of feeding response of Chaoborus larvae to starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; James F. Haney

    1986-01-01

    The effect of starvation on the feeding rate of larval Chaoborus (Diptera. Chaoboridae) was investigated using Daphnia rosea as prey. The starvation period varied from 12 h to 22 days. The starved Chaoborus were individually incubated with 10 Daphnia under controlled light and temperature...

  10. Bioenergetic Consequences of Lactose Starvation for Continuously Cultured Streptococcus cremoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poolman, Bert; Smid, Eddy J.; Veldkamp, H.; Konings, Wil N.

    Streptococcus cremoris cells that had been grown in a chemostat were starved for lactose. The viability of the culture remained essentially constant in the first hours of starvation and subsequently declined logarithmically. The viability pattern during starvation varied with the previously imposed

  11. K(+) starvation inhibits water-stress-induced stomatal closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlloch-González, María; Arquero, Octavio; Fournier, José María; Barranco, Diego; Benlloch, Manuel

    2008-04-18

    The effect of potassium starvation on stomatal conductance was studied in olive trees and sunflower plants, two major crops with greatly differing botanical characteristics. In both species, K(+) starvation inhibited water-stress-induced stomatal closure. In olive trees, potassium starvation favoured stomatal conductance and transpiration, as well as inhibiting shoot growth, in the three cultivars studied: 'Lechín de Granada', 'Arbequina' and 'Chetoui'. However, 'Lechín de Granada' - generally considered more drought-tolerant than 'Arbequina' and 'Chetoui' - proved less susceptible to potassium starvation. Results for olive trees also suggest genetic variability in olive cultivars in relation to potassium requirements for stem growth and the regulation of water transpiration. The results obtained suggest that inhibition of the stomatal closure mechanism produced by moderate potassium starvation is a widespread plant physiological disorder, and may be the cause of tissue dehydration in many water-stressed crops.

  12. Resistance to starvation of first-stage juveniles of the Caribbean spiny lobster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa-Magaña, Alí; Lozano-Álvarez, Enrique; Briones-Fourzán, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    The non-feeding postlarva (puerulus) of spiny lobsters actively swims from the open ocean to the coastal habitats where it settles and molts to the first-stage juvenile (JI). Because pueruli use much of their energy reserves swimming and preparing for the post-settlement molt, the survival of JIs presumably depends on resuming feeding as soon as possible. To test this hypothesis, the resistance to starvation of JIs of the Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus , was evaluated by measuring their point-of-no-return (PNR, minimum time of initial starvation preventing recovery after later feeding) and point-of-reserve-saturation (PRS, minimum time of initial feeding allowing for food-independent development through the rest of the molting cycle) in a warm and a cold season. Each experiment consisted of eight groups: a continuously fed control (FC) group, a continuously starved control (SC) group, and six groups subjected to differential periods of either initial starvation and subsequent feeding (PNR experiments) or initial feeding and subsequent starvation (PSR experiments). No JIs molted under continuous absence of food (SC). In both PNR experiments (temperature in warm season: 29.79 ± 0.07°C, mean ± 95% CI; in cold season: 25.63 ± 0.12°C) mortality increased sharply after 9 d of initial starvation and intermolt periods increased with period of initial starvation, but were longer in the cold season. The PNR 50 was longer in the warm season (12.1 ± 1.2 d, mean ± 95% CI) than in the cold season (9.5 ± 2.1 d). In PRS experiments (temperature in warm season: 29.54 ± 0.07 °C; in cold season: 26.20 ± 0.12 °C), JIs that molted did so near the end of the feeding period; all JIs initially fed for up to 6 d succumbed, and no JIs molted after 13 d of starvation despite having fed previously. The PRS 50 did not differ between the cold (13.1 ± 0.7 d) and warm seasons (12.1 ± 1.1 d). JIs of P. argus exhibit a remarkable resistance to starvation

  13. Resistance to starvation of first-stage juveniles of the Caribbean spiny lobster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alí Espinosa-Magaña

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The non-feeding postlarva (puerulus of spiny lobsters actively swims from the open ocean to the coastal habitats where it settles and molts to the first-stage juvenile (JI. Because pueruli use much of their energy reserves swimming and preparing for the post-settlement molt, the survival of JIs presumably depends on resuming feeding as soon as possible. To test this hypothesis, the resistance to starvation of JIs of the Caribbean spiny lobster, Panulirus argus, was evaluated by measuring their point-of-no-return (PNR, minimum time of initial starvation preventing recovery after later feeding and point-of-reserve-saturation (PRS, minimum time of initial feeding allowing for food-independent development through the rest of the molting cycle in a warm and a cold season. Each experiment consisted of eight groups: a continuously fed control (FC group, a continuously starved control (SC group, and six groups subjected to differential periods of either initial starvation and subsequent feeding (PNR experiments or initial feeding and subsequent starvation (PSR experiments. No JIs molted under continuous absence of food (SC. In both PNR experiments (temperature in warm season: 29.79 ± 0.07°C, mean ± 95% CI; in cold season: 25.63 ± 0.12°C mortality increased sharply after 9 d of initial starvation and intermolt periods increased with period of initial starvation, but were longer in the cold season. The PNR50 was longer in the warm season (12.1 ± 1.2 d, mean ± 95% CI than in the cold season (9.5 ± 2.1 d. In PRS experiments (temperature in warm season: 29.54 ± 0.07 °C; in cold season: 26.20 ± 0.12 °C, JIs that molted did so near the end of the feeding period; all JIs initially fed for up to 6 d succumbed, and no JIs molted after 13 d of starvation despite having fed previously. The PRS50 did not differ between the cold (13.1 ± 0.7 d and warm seasons (12.1 ± 1.1 d. JIs of P. argus exhibit a remarkable resistance to

  14. Doxycyclin ameliorates a starvation-induced germline tumor in C. elegans daf-18/PTEN mutant background.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Tim; Qi, Wenjing; Schindler, Verena; Runkel, Eva Diana; Baumeister, Ralf

    2014-08-01

    Managing available resources is a key necessity of each organism to cope with the environment. The nematode C. elegans responds to nutritional deprivation or harsh environmental conditions with a multitude of developmental adaptations, among them a starvation-induced quiescence at early larval development (L1). daf-18, the C. elegans homolog of the human tumor suppressor gene PTEN, is essential for the maintenance of survival and germline stem cell arrest during the L1 diapause. We show here that daf-18 mutants, independently to their failure to maintain G2 arrest of the primordial germ cells, develop a gonad phenotype after refeeding. This highly penetrant gonadal phenotype is further enhanced by a mutation in shc-1, encoding a protein homologous to the human adaptor ShcA. Features of this phenotype are a tumor-like phenotype encompassing hyper-proliferation of germ cell nuclei and disruption/invasion of the basement membrane surrounding the gonad. The penetrance of this phenotype is reduced by decreasing starvation temperature. In addition, it is also ameliorated in a dose-dependent way by exposure to the antibiotic doxycyclin either during starvation or during subsequent refeeding. Since, in eukaryotic cells, doxycyclin specifically blocks mitochondrial translation, our results suggest that daf-18 and shc-1;daf-18 mutants fail to adapt mitochondrial activity to reduced nutritional availability during early larval developing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to nitrogen starvation in wine alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesnière, Catherine; Brice, Claire; Blondin, Bruno

    2015-09-01

    Nitrogen is an important nutrient in alcoholic fermentation because its starvation affects both fermentation kinetics and the formation of yeast metabolites. In most alcoholic fermentations, yeasts have to ferment in nitrogen-starved conditions, which requires modifications of cell functions to maintain a high sugar flux and enable cell survival for long periods in stressful conditions. In this review, we present an overview of our current understanding of the responses of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to variations of nitrogen availability. Adaptation to nitrogen starvation involves changes in the activity of signaling pathways such as target of rapamycin (TOR) and nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR), which are important for the remodeling of gene expression and the establishment of stress responses. Upon starvation, protein degradation pathways involving autophagy and the proteasome play a major role in nitrogen recycling and the adjustment of cellular activity. Recent progress in the understanding of the role of these mechanisms should enable advances in fermentation management and the design of novel targets for the selection or improvement of yeast strains.

  16. Hepatic Fatty Acid Oxidation Restrains Systemic Catabolism during Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jieun Lee

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The liver is critical for maintaining systemic energy balance during starvation. To understand the role of hepatic fatty acid β-oxidation on this process, we generated mice with a liver-specific knockout of carnitine palmitoyltransferase 2 (Cpt2L−/−, an obligate step in mitochondrial long-chain fatty acid β-oxidation. Fasting induced hepatic steatosis and serum dyslipidemia with an absence of circulating ketones, while blood glucose remained normal. Systemic energy homeostasis was largely maintained in fasting Cpt2L−/− mice by adaptations in hepatic and systemic oxidative gene expression mediated in part by Pparα target genes including procatabolic hepatokines Fgf21, Gdf15, and Igfbp1. Feeding a ketogenic diet to Cpt2L−/− mice resulted in severe hepatomegaly, liver damage, and death with a complete absence of adipose triglyceride stores. These data show that hepatic fatty acid oxidation is not required for survival during acute food deprivation but essential for constraining adipocyte lipolysis and regulating systemic catabolism when glucose is limiting.

  17. [Starvation and chemoreception in Antarctic benthic invertebrates].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakusa-Suszczewski, S; Janecki, T; Domanov, M M

    2010-01-01

    Sensitivity (chemoreception) to different amino acids was studied in six invertebrate species: Serolis polita, Glyptonotus antarcticus, Abyssochromene plebs, Waldeckia obesa, Odontaster validus, and Sterechinus neumayeri. The sensitivity was estimated by the changes in basic metabolism (respiration rate). Starvation increased the sensitivity in all the species. The metabolism rates increased in the presence of L-glutamic acid in G. antarcticus, A. plebs, O. validus, and S. neumayeri. The serine and arginine amino acids had a significant impact on the metabolism of the necrophagous species S. polita and W. obesa. The chemical information may be mediated by means of L-glutamic acid via glutamate receptors, which can be blocked by kynurenic acid, as occurs in the experiments with G. antarcticus and A. plebs.

  18. Unususal increase of lipogenesis in rat white adipose tissue after multiple cycles of starvation-refeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kochan, Z; Karbowska, J; Swierczyński, J

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the response of liver and brown (BAT) and white (WAT) adipose tissue lipogenesis and total body weight in rats subjected to multiple cycles of 3 days of fasting and 3 days of refeeding. Rats fasted for 3 days showed significant reduction in body weight. These changes were reversed on 3 days' refeeding. Body weight was much higher in rats fed ad libitum than in animals experiencing more than one cycle of 3 days of fasting followed by 3 days of refeeding. Despite the significant body weight reduction, an unusual increase of lipogenesis in WAT was found after multiple cycles of starvation-refeeding of rats on standard laboratory diet. The rate of lipogenesis in the liver and BAT was also elevated but to a much smaller extent. A parallel increase in enzymatic activities related to fatty acid synthesis, ie, fatty acid synthase, acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase, adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-citrate lyase, NADP-linked malic enzyme, and hexose monophosphate shunt dehydrogenases, suggests that the increased rate of lipogenesis in WAT is a consequence of increased lipogenic enzyme activities. These data suggest that upregulation of WAT lipogenesis occurs after the multiple cycles of the starvation-refeeding protocol. An unusual increase of lipogenesis in rat WAT may have a survival advantage, because starved-refed rats must develop the ability to ingest large amounts of food during a refeeding period to store it in a convenient form than can be used as an oxidizable substrate during a period of starvation. Moreover, these results suggest that it is possible to develop appropriate starvation-refeeding conditions that may inhibit body weight gain.

  19. Starvation stress during larval development facilitates an adaptive response in adult worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Kaftanoglu, Osman; Brent, Colin S; Page, Robert E; Amdam, Gro V

    2016-04-01

    Most organisms are constantly faced with environmental changes and stressors. In diverse organisms, there is an anticipatory mechanism during development that can program adult phenotypes. The adult phenotype would be adapted to the predicted environment that occurred during organism maturation. However, whether this anticipatory mechanism is present in eusocial species is questionable because eusocial organisms are largely shielded from exogenous conditions by their stable nest environment. In this study, we tested whether food deprivation during development of the honey bee (Apis mellifera), a eusocial insect model, can shift adult phenotypes to better cope with nutritional stress. After subjecting fifth instar worker larvae to short-term starvation, we measured nutrition-related morphology, starvation resistance, physiology, endocrinology and behavior in the adults. We found that the larval starvation caused adult honey bees to become more resilient toward starvation. Moreover, the adult bees were characterized by reduced ovary size, elevated glycogen stores and juvenile hormone (JH) titers, and decreased sugar sensitivity. These changes, in general, can help adult insects survive and reproduce in food-poor environments. Overall, we found for the first time support for an anticipatory mechanism in a eusocial species, the honey bee. Our results suggest that this mechanism may play a role in honey bee queen-worker differentiation and worker division of labor, both of which are related to the responses to nutritional stress. © 2016. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  20. Biochemical evaluation of aestivation and starvation in two snail ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-08

    3. 1Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria. ... aestivation and starvation on endogenous metabolic reserves in haemolymph of two snail species .... authority in Abeokuta, Ogun state.

  1. Increased hormone levels in Tetrahymena after long-lasting starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaba, G; Kovács, P; Pállinger, Eva

    2007-09-01

    Tetrahymena contains vertebrate hormone-like materials. The level of one of these, insulin increased during starvation in a previous experiment. We hypothesized that other hormones are also influenced by starvation. To prove the hypothesis Tetrahymena pyriformis cultures were (1) starved for 24h; (2) starved for 24h and re-fed for 30min or (3) starved for 30min. Amount and localization of vertebrate-like hormones, produced by Tetrahymena, beta-endorphin, adrenocorticotropin (ACTH), serotonin, histamine, insulin and triiodothyronine (T(3)) were studied by immunocytochemical methods using flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Long starvation elevated with 50% the hormone levels, while short starvation moderately elevated only the serotonin level in the cells. After short re-feeding endorphin and histamine returned to the basal level, ACTH and serotonin approached the basal level, however, remained significantly higher, while insulin and T(3) stood at the starvation level. The results show that such a stress as long starvation provokes the enhanced production of hormones which likely needed for tolerating the life-threatening effect of stress.

  2. Starvation dynamics of a greedy forager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhat, U.; Redner, S.; Bénichou, O.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the dynamics of a greedy forager that moves by random walking in an environment where each site initially contains one unit of food. Upon encountering a food-containing site, the forager eats all the food there and can subsequently hop an additional S steps without food before starving to death. Upon encountering an empty site, the forager goes hungry and comes one time unit closer to starvation. We investigate the new feature of forager greed; if the forager has a choice between hopping to an empty site or to a food-containing site in its nearest neighborhood, it hops preferentially towards food. If the neighboring sites all contain food or are all empty, the forager hops equiprobably to one of these neighbors. Paradoxically, the lifetime of the forager can depend non-monotonically on greed, and the sense of the non-monotonicity is opposite in one and two dimensions. Even more unexpectedly, the forager lifetime in one dimension is substantially enhanced when the greed is negative; here the forager tends to avoid food in its local neighborhood. We also determine the average amount of food consumed at the instant when the forager starves. We present analytic, heuristic, and numerical results to elucidate these intriguing phenomena.

  3. Complete and Voluntary Starvation of 50 Days

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bradley Elliott

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A 34-year-old obese male (96.8 kg; BMI, 30.2 kg m −1 volitionally undertook a 50-day fast with the stated goal of losing body mass. During this time, only tea, coffee, water, and a daily multivitamin were consumed. Severe and linear loss of body mass is recorded during these 50 days (final 75.4 kg; BMI, 23.5 kg mT 1 . A surprising resilience to effects of fasting on activity levels and physical function is noted. Plasma samples are suggestive of early impairment of liver function, and perturbations to cardiovascular dynamics are also noted. One month following resumption of feeding behavior, body weight was maintained (75.0 kg; BMI, 23.4 kg m −1 . Evidence-based decision-making with the fasting or hunger striking patient is limited by a lack of evidence. This case report suggests that total body mass, not mass lost, may be a key observation in clinical decision-making during fasting and starvation.

  4. The control of partitioning between protein and fat during human starvation: its internal determinants and biological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulloo, A G; Jacquet, J

    1999-11-01

    Human subjects vary in the extent to which their body's protein and fat compartments are mobilized for fuel during starvation. Although an inverse association between the initial adiposity and the contribution of protein as fuel during starvation has been known for nearly a century, interest in the quantitative importance and functional significance of the initial percentage fat as a determinant of biological variation in energy-partitioning between protein and fat (and hence in determining the partitioning characteristic of the individual) is relatively recent. The present paper addresses these issues by revisiting the classic Minnesota experiment of semi-starvation and refeeding from a standpoint of system physiology. In a quantitative analysis of the relationship between the initial body composition (ration FAT0: fat-free mass (FFM)0) and the composition of weight loss (ratio delta FAT: delta FFM) in the thirty-two men in the Minnesota study, the arguments are put forward that the fraction of FFM lost when the fat stores reach total depletion is independent of the initial percentage fat, and that this fraction represents the 'dispensable' component of the protein compartment that is compatible with life (i.e. the protein energy-reserve, rp). The concepts are developed that (1) the initial percentage body fat (which reflects the initial ratio FAT0:FFM0) provides a 'memory of partitioning' which dictates the control of partitioning between protein and fat in such a way that both the protein energy-reserve (rp) and the fat energy-reserve (rf) each complete depletion simultaneously, a strategy that would ensure maximum length of survival during long-term food scarcity, and that (2) variability in the relative sizes of these two energy reserves (i.e. in rf:rp) could, in addition to the initial percentage fat, also contribute to human variability in energy-partitioning. The basic assumptions underlying this re-analysis of the Minnesota data, and the concepts that are

  5. Glucose starvation boosts Entamoeba histolytica virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayala Tovy

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The unicellular parasite, Entamoeba histolytica, is exposed to numerous adverse conditions, such as nutrient deprivation, during its life cycle stages in the human host. In the present study, we examined whether the parasite virulence could be influenced by glucose starvation (GS. The migratory behaviour of the parasite and its capability to kill mammalian cells and to lyse erythrocytes is strongly enhanced following GS. In order to gain insights into the mechanism underlying the GS boosting effects on virulence, we analyzed differences in protein expression levels in control and glucose-starved trophozoites, by quantitative proteomic analysis. We observed that upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP, a transcription factor that modulates E.histolytica virulence, and the lysine-rich protein 1 (KRiP1 which is induced during liver abscess development, are upregulated by GS. We also analyzed E. histolytica membrane fractions and noticed that the Gal/GalNAc lectin light subunit LgL1 is up-regulated by GS. Surprisingly, amoebapore A (Ap-A and cysteine proteinase A5 (CP-A5, two important E. histolytica virulence factors, were strongly down-regulated by GS. While the boosting effect of GS on E. histolytica virulence was conserved in strains silenced for Ap-A and CP-A5, it was lost in LgL1 and in KRiP1 down-regulated strains. These data emphasize the unexpected role of GS in the modulation of E.histolytica virulence and the involvement of KRiP1 and Lgl1 in this phenomenon.

  6. How do trees die? A test of the hydraulic failure and carbon starvation hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevanto, Sanna; McDowell, Nate G; Dickman, L Turin; Pangle, Robert; Pockman, William T

    2014-01-01

    Despite decades of research on plant drought tolerance, the physiological mechanisms by which trees succumb to drought are still under debate. We report results from an experiment designed to separate and test the current leading hypotheses of tree mortality. We show that piñon pine (Pinus edulis) trees can die of both hydraulic failure and carbon starvation, and that during drought, the loss of conductivity and carbohydrate reserves can also co-occur. Hydraulic constraints on plant carbohydrate use determined survival time: turgor loss in the phloem limited access to carbohydrate reserves, but hydraulic control of respiration prolonged survival. Our data also demonstrate that hydraulic failure may be associated with loss of adequate tissue carbohydrate content required for osmoregulation, which then promotes failure to maintain hydraulic integrity. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  7. Impact of lactose starvation on the physiology of Lactobacillus casei GCRL163 in the presence or absence of tween 80.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Naseri, Ali; Bowman, John P; Wilson, Richard; Nilsson, Rolf E; Britz, Margaret L

    2013-11-01

    The global proteomic response of the nonstarter lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus casei strain GCRL163 under carbohydrate depletion was investigated to understand aspects of its survival following cessation of fermentation. The proteome of L. casei GCRL163 was analyzed quantitatively after growth in modified MRS (with and without Tween 80) with different levels of lactose (0% lactose, starvation; 0.2% lactose, growth limiting; 1% lactose, non-growth-limited control) using gel-free proteomics. Results revealed that carbohydrate starvation lead to suppression of lactose and galactose catabolic pathways as well as pathways for nucleotide and protein synthesis. Enzymes of the glycolysis/gluconeogenesis pathway, amino acid synthesis, and pyruvate and citrate metabolism become more abundant as well as other carbohydrate catabolic pathways, suggesting increased optimization of intermediary metabolism and scavenging. Tween 80 did not affect growth yield; however, proteins related to fatty acid biosynthesis were repressed in the presence of Tween 80. The data suggest that L. casei adeptly switches to a scavenging mode, using both citrate and Tween 80, and efficiently adjusts energetic requirements when carbohydrate starved and thus can sustain survival for weeks to months. Explaining the adaptation of L. casei during lactose starvation will assist efforts to maintain viability of L. casei and extend its utility as a beneficial dietary adjunct and fermentation processing aid.

  8. Starvation Based Differential Chemotherapy: A Novel Approach for Cancer Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidra Naveed

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment are advised to increase food intake to overcome the therapy-induced side effects, and weight loss. Dietary restriction is known to slow down the aging process and hence reduce age-related diseases such as cancer. Fasting or short-term starvation is more effective than dietary restriction to prevent cancer growth since starved cells switch off signals for growth and reproduction and enter a protective mode, while cancer cells, being mutated, are not sensitized by any external growth signals and are not protected against any stress. This phenomenon is known as differential stress resistance (DSR. Nutrient signaling pathways involving growth hormone/insulin-like growth factor-1 axis and its downstream effectors, play a key role in DSR in response to starvation controlling the other cell maintenance systems, such as autophagy and apoptosis, that are related to the tumorigenesis. Yeast cells lacking these effectors are better protected against oxidative stress compared to normal cells. In the same way, starvation protects many cell lines and mice against high-dose chemotherapeutic drugs. According to a series of studies, fasting results in overall reduction in chemotherapy side effects in cancer patients. Data shows that starvation-dependent differential chemotherapy is safe, feasible and effective in cancer treatment, but the possible side effects of starvation limit its efficacy. However, further studies and clinical trials may result in its implementation in cancer treatment.

  9. Biology of Triatoma sherlocki (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) Under Laboratory Conditions: Biological Cycle and Resistance to Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima-Neiva, Vanessa; Gonçalves, Teresa C M; Bastos, Leonardo S; Gumiel, Marcia; Correia, Nathália C; Silva, Catia C; Almeida, Carlos E; Costa, Jane

    2017-07-01

    Triatoma sherlocki Papa, Jurberg, Carcavallo, Cerqueira & Barata was described in 2002, based on specimens caught in the wild in the municipality of Gentio do Ouro, Bahia, Brazil. In 2009, nymphs and adults were detected inside homes and sylvatic specimens were positive for Trypanosoma cruzi (Chagas). No information on the bionomics of T. sherlocki exists, although such data are considered essential to estimate its vector and colonization potential in domestic environments. Herein, the biological cycle of T. sherlocki was studied based on 123 eggs, with nymphs and adults fed on Mus musculus (Linnaeus). Nymphal development time phases, number of meals consumed, and stage-specific mortality rates were analyzed. Survival time under starvation conditions was measured between ecdysis and death among 50 nymphs (first to fifth instar) and 50 male and female adults. The median development time from egg to adult was 621.0 (CI: 489-656) d. The number of meals consumed ranged from 1 to 20 for nymphs of the first to fifth instar. The fifth instar showed the greatest resistance to starvation, with a mean of 156.5 d. The high number of meals consumed by T. sherlocki favored infection with and transmission of T. cruzi. The full development of this species under laboratory conditions with a low mortality rate indicates that this vector presents biological characteristics that may contribute to its adaptation to artificial human ecotopes. Its high resistance to starvation emphasizes the importance of entomological surveillance for this species. © The Authors 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. A Phosphate Starvation-Inducible Ribonuclease of Bacillus licheniformis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thanh Trung; Nguyen, Minh Hung; Nguyen, Huy Thuan; Nguyen, Hoang Anh; Le, Thi Hoi; Schweder, Thomas; Jürgen, Britta

    2016-08-28

    The BLi03719 protein of Bacillus licheniformis DSM13 belongs to the most abundant extracellular proteins under phosphate starvation conditions. In this study, the function of this phosphate starvation inducible protein was determined. An amino-acid sequence analysis of the BLi03719-encoding gene showed a high similarity with genes encoding the barnase of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens FZB42 and binase-like RNase of Bacillus pumilus SARF-032. The comparison of the control strain and a BLi03719-deficient strain revealed a strongly reduced extracellular ribonuclease activity of the mutant. Furthermore, this knockout mutant exhibited delayed growth with yeast RNA as an alternative phosphate and carbon source. These results suggest that BLi03719 is an extracellular ribonuclease expressed in B. licheniformis under phosphate starvation conditions. Finally, a BLi03719 mutant showed an advantageous effect on the overexpression of the heterologous amyE gene under phosphate-limited growth conditions.

  11. Effects of Starvation on Lipid Metabolism and Gluconeogenesis in Yak

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiang Yu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to investigate the physiological consequences of undernourished yak. Twelve Maiwa yak (110.3±5.85 kg were randomly divided into two groups (baseline and starvation group. The yak of baseline group were slaughtered at day 0, while the other group of yak were kept in shed without feed but allowed free access to water, salt and free movement for 9 days. Blood samples of the starvation group were collected on day 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9 and the starved yak were slaughtered after the final blood sample collection. The liver and muscle glycogen of the starvation group decreased (p<0.01, and the lipid content also decreased while the content of moisture and ash increased (p<0.05 both in Longissimus dorsi and liver compared with the baseline group. The plasma insulin and glucose of the starved yak decreased at first and then kept stable but at a relatively lower level during the following days (p<0.01. On the contrary, the non-esterified fatty acids was increased (p<0.01. Beyond our expectation, the ketone bodies of β-hydroxybutyric acid and acetoacetic acid decreased with prolonged starvation (p<0.01. Furthermore, the mRNA expression of lipogenetic enzyme fatty acid synthase and lipoprotein lipase in subcutaneous adipose tissue of starved yak were down-regulated (p<0.01, whereas the mRNA expression of lipolytic enzyme carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 and hormone sensitive lipase were up-regulated (p<0.01 after 9 days of starvation. The phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and pyruvate carboxylase, responsible for hepatic gluconeogenesis were up-regulated (p<0.01. It was concluded that yak derive energy by gluconeogenesis promotion and fat storage mobilization during starvation but without ketone body accumulation in the plasma.

  12. Starvation can diversify the population structure and virulence strategies of an environmentally transmitting fish pathogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Lotta-Riina; Kunttu, Heidi M T; Valtonen, E Tellervo

    2014-03-14

    Generalist bacterial pathogens, with the ability for environmental survival and growth, often face variable conditions during their outside-host period. Abiotic factors (such as nutrient deprivation) act as selection pressures for bacterial characteristics, but their effect on virulence is not entirely understood. "Sit and wait" hypothesis expects that long outside-host survival selects for increased virulence, but maintaining virulence in the absence of hosts is generally expected to be costly if active investments are needed. We analysed how long term starvation influences bacterial population structure and virulence of an environmentally transmitting fish pathogen Flavobacterium columnare. F. columnare populations in distilled water and in lake water were monitored for 5 months. During the experiment, the population structure of F. columnare diversified by rough and soft colony morphotypes appearing among the ancestral rhizoid ones. After 5 months starvation in lake water, the virulence of the starved and ancestral bacterial isolates was tested. The starved rhizoid isolates had significantly higher virulence than the ancestral rhizoid, whereas the virulence of the rough isolates was low. We suggest that F. columnare population diversification is an adaptation to tolerate unpredictable environment, but may also have other biological significance. Maintaining and increasing virulence ensures efficient invasion into the host especially under circumstances when the host density is low or the outside-host period is long. Changing from rhizoid into a rough morphotype has trade-offs in making bacteria less virulent and unable to exploit the host, but may ensure bacterial survival under unpredictable conditions. Our study gives an example how abiotic selection can diversify virulence of environmentally transmitting bacterial pathogen.

  13. The Starvation Resistance and Biofilm Formation of Enterococcus faecalis in Coexistence with Candida albicans, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces viscosus, or Lactobacillus acidophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yan; Jiang, Xiaoqiong; Lin, Dongjia; Chen, Yanhuo; Tong, Zhongchun

    2016-08-01

    Enterococcus faecalis is the most frequently detected species in root canal-treated teeth, and it is able to survive under starvation conditions. However, persistent periapical disease is often caused by multispecies. The aim of this study was to explore the survival of E. faecalis in starvation conditions and biofilm formation with the 4 common pathogenic species. A dual-species model of Candida albicans, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces viscosus, or Lactobacillus acidophilus in combination with E. faecalis was established and allowed to grow in phosphate-buffered saline for the examination of starvation survival. Cefuroxime sodium and vancomycin at a concentration of 100 mg/L were added into brain-heart infusion plate agar to count the 2 bacteria separately in the dual species. Scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the dual species and multiple species on the root canal dentin of bovine teeth for 48 hours. A confocal laser scanning microscope was used to show the 4 groups of dual-species biofilms on substrates with glass bottoms for 48 hours. E. faecalis was more resistant to starvation in coexistence with C. albicans, S. gordonii, A. viscosus, or L. acidophilus, and S. gordonii was completely inhibited in coexistence with E. faecalis. The dual-species biofilm showed that E. faecalis formed thicker and denser biofilms on the root canal dentin and glass slides in coexistence with S. gordonii and A. viscosus than C. albicans and L. acidophilus. The multispecies community is conducive to the resistance to starvation of E. faecalis and biofilm formation in root canals. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Thirst beats hunger - declining hydration during drought prevents carbon starvation in Norway spruce saplings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, Henrik; Ziegler, Waldemar; Kolle, Olaf; Trumbore, Susan

    2013-10-01

    Drought-induced tree mortality results from an interaction of several mechanisms. Plant water and carbon relations are interdependent and assessments of their individual contributions are difficult. Because drought always affects both plant hydration and carbon assimilation, it is challenging to disentangle their concomitant effects on carbon balance and carbon translocation. Here, we report results of a manipulation experiment specifically designed to separate drought effects on carbon and water relations from those on carbon translocation. In a glasshouse experiment, we manipulated the carbon balance of Norway spruce saplings exposed to either drought or carbon starvation (CO2 withdrawal), or both treatments, and compared the dynamics of carbon exchange, allocation and storage in different tissues. Drought killed trees much faster than did carbon starvation. Storage C pools were not depleted at death for droughted trees as they were for starved, well-watered trees. Hence drought has a significant detrimental effect on a plant's ability to utilize stored carbon. Unless they can be transported to where they are needed, sufficient carbon reserves alone will not assure survival of a drought except under specific conditions, such as moderate drought, or in species that maintain plant water relations required for carbon re-mobilization. © 2013 No claim to original German goverment works New Phytologist © 2013 New Phytologist Trust.

  15. Extreme calorie restriction and energy source starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae represent distinct physiological states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boender, L.G.M.; Almering, M.J.H.; Dijk, M.; Van Maris, A.J.A.; De Winde, J.H.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran-Lapujade, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cultivation methods used to investigate microbial calorie restriction often result in carbon and energy starvation. This study aims to dissect cellular responses to calorie restriction and starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using retentostat cultivation. In retentostats, cells are

  16. Effects of pH and trace minerals on long-term starvation of Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, D S; Thomas, S; Fogler, H S

    2000-03-01

    Laboratory experiments have definitively shown that exopolymer-producing bacteria have the potential to modify the flow of fluids in oil reservoirs to enhance oil production. Once injected into the reservoir, they will be subjected to a wide range of pH values and to starvation resulting from nutrient depletion. For successful field implementation it is necessary to have a fundamental understanding of these effects on the viability of bacteria. This paper addresses the effects of pH and trace minerals on cell viability of Leuconostoc mesenteroides during carbon source depletion. Two different carbon sources were used to grow cells before transferring the cells to starvation conditions: sucrose and a combination of glucose and fructose. These substrates were chosen because L. mesenteroides produces a significant amount of water-insoluble exopolymers (dextran) under sucrose-fed conditions, which may enhance cell survival under harsh conditions. The effects of dextran on the cell viability were tested at different pH values with and without trace minerals. The rate of cell death followed an exponential-decay law for different values of the solution pH. The optimal solution pH for survival was pH 5, whereas cells died rapidly at pH 3 and below and at pH 13 and above. The sucrose-fed cells showed a greater viability than cells fed glucose and fructose for all pH ranges tested. The results indicated that water-insoluble exopolymers help cells survive for longer periods of time under starvation conditions. The effects of trace minerals on cell culturability were tested at two pH values, 4.5 and 7. For both cases, cells showed a greater culturability (smaller decay rate constant) in the presence of trace minerals than without trace minerals. It was also found that the effects of trace minerals on cell culturability were greater for glucose-fructose-fed cells than for sucrose-fed cells. The Michaelis pH function theory was used for comparing the relationships between the

  17. A mathematical model of weight loss under total starvation: evidence against the thrifty-gene hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Speakman

    2013-01-01

    The thrifty-gene hypothesis (TGH posits that the modern genetic predisposition to obesity stems from a historical past where famine selected for genes that promote efficient fat deposition. It has been previously argued that such a scenario is unfeasible because under such strong selection any gene favouring fat deposition would rapidly move to fixation. Hence, we should all be predisposed to obesity: which we are not. The genetic architecture of obesity that has been revealed by genome-wide association studies (GWAS, however, calls into question such an argument. Obesity is caused by mutations in many hundreds (maybe thousands of genes, each with a very minor, independent and additive impact. Selection on such genes would probably be very weak because the individual advantages they would confer would be very small. Hence, the genetic architecture of the epidemic may indeed be compatible with, and hence support, the TGH. To evaluate whether this is correct, it is necessary to know the likely effects of the identified GWAS alleles on survival during starvation. This would allow definition of their advantage in famine conditions, and hence the likely selection pressure for such alleles to have spread over the time course of human evolution. We constructed a mathematical model of weight loss under total starvation using the established principles of energy balance. Using the model, we found that fatter individuals would indeed survive longer and, at a given body weight, females would survive longer than males, when totally starved. An allele causing deposition of an extra 80 g of fat would result in an extension of life under total starvation by about 1.1–1.6% in an individual with 10 kg of fat and by 0.25–0.27% in an individual carrying 32 kg of fat. A mutation causing a per allele effect of 0.25% would become completely fixed in a population with an effective size of 5 million individuals in 6000 selection events. Because there have probably been about 24

  18. Effects of long-term starvation on a host bivalve (Codakia orbicularis, Lucinidae) and its symbiont population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caro, Audrey; Got, Patrice; Bouvy, Marc; Troussellier, Marc; Gros, Olivier

    2009-05-01

    The bivalve Codakia orbicularis, hosting sulfur-oxidizing gill endosymbionts, was starved (in artificial seawater filtered through a 0.22-mum-pore-size membrane) for a long-term experiment (4 months). The effects of starvation were observed using transmission electron microscopy, fluorescence in situ hybridization and catalyzed reporter deposition (CARD-FISH), and flow cytometry to monitor the anatomical and physiological modifications in the gill organization of the host and in the symbiotic population housed in bacteriocytes. The abundance of the symbiotic population decreased through starvation, with a loss of one-third of the bacterial population each month, as shown by CARD-FISH. At the same time, flow cytometry revealed significant changes in the physiology of symbiotic cells, with a decrease in cell size and modifications to the nucleic acid content, while most of the symbionts maintained a high respiratory activity (measured using the 5-cyano-2,3-ditolyl tetrazolium chloride method). Progressively, the number of symbiont subpopulations was reduced, and the subsequent multigenomic state, characteristic of this symbiont in freshly collected clams, turned into one and five equivalent genome copies for the two remaining subpopulations after 3 months. Concomitant structural modifications appeared in the gill organization. Lysosymes became visible in the bacteriocytes, while large symbionts disappeared, and bacteriocytes were gradually replaced by granule cells throughout the entire lateral zone. Those data suggested that host survival under these starvation conditions was linked to symbiont digestion as the main nutritional source.

  19. The effect of starvation on the larval behavior of two forensically important species of blow flies (Diptera: Calliphoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Devinder; Bala, Madhu

    2009-12-15

    The postfeeding larval stage in blow flies is generally an irreversible condition when the fully grown third instar larvae stop feeding and give no response towards food. The larvae of most species then disperse away from their feeding medium and pupariate. There are several cases reported about the use of postfeeding larvae as forensic evidence. It is a matter of common observation that the postfeeding stage can be reached earlier than the expected time if food becomes unavailable. However, no information is available on whether postfeeding stage induced by scarcity of food is also irreversible. Similarly, the minimum period of development required by the larvae of different blow flies species to enable their survival as postfeeding larvae and pupariation in the absence of food is unknown. It was observed during the present studies that the larvae of two Chrysomya species must feed for at least 35 h at 28 degrees C in order to be capable of reaching the postfeeding stage and subsequent pupariation. Duration of the starvation period required to induce postfeeding behavior decreases with increasing age of larvae. In the case of Chrysomya megacephala, 35, 45, 55 and 65 h old larvae attained irreversible postfeeding stage after 30, 20, 12 and 2 h of starvation, respectively. Similarly, larvae of Chrysomya rufifacies that were 35, 45, 55 and 60 h old attained irreversible postfeeding stage after 25, 16, 6 and 2 h of starvation, respectively.

  20. Agouti-related protein prevents self-starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kas, M.J.H.; van Dijk, G; Scheurink, AJW; Adan, RAH

    2003-01-01

    Food restriction leads to a paradoxical increase in physical activity and further suppression of food intake, such as observed in anorexia nervosa.(1,2) To understand this pathophysiological process, we induced physical hyperactivity and self-starvation in rats by restricting food in the presence of

  1. Carcass glycogen repletion on carbohydrate re-feeding after starvation.

    OpenAIRE

    Cox, D J; Palmer, T N

    1987-01-01

    In mice, the response of carcass glycogen to glucose re-feeding after starvation is biphasic. The initial repletive phase is followed by partial (greater than 50%) glycogen mobilization. This turnover of carcass glycogen in response to carbohydrate re-feeding may play an important role in the provision of C3 precursors for hepatic glycogen synthesis.

  2. Characterization of starvation-induced dispersion in Pseudomonas putida biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjermansen, Morten; Ragas, Paula Cornelia; Sternberg, Claus

    2005-01-01

    that they must be able to regulate their ability to form biofilm and to dissolve biofilm. We present an investigation of a biofilm dissolution process occurring in flow-chamber-grown Pseudomonas putida biofilms. Local starvation-induced biofilm dissolution appears to be an integrated part of P. putida biofilm...

  3. Biochemical evaluation of aestivation and starvation in two snail ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hope&shola

    2010-11-08

    Nov 8, 2010 ... aestivation and starvation on endogenous metabolic reserves in haemolymph of two snail species namely: Bulinus globosus (Morelet) ... food uptake ceases, water loss occurs and the snails are not able to rid themselves of their ..... Heart rate and body weight alteration in juvenile specimens of the tropical ...

  4. Iron starvation induces apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirazi, Fazal; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P; Ibrahim, Ashraf S

    2015-01-01

    Mortality associated with mucormycosis remains high despite current antifungals. Iron-starvation strategies have been shown to have promising activity against Mucorales. We hypothesized that iron starvation enhances apoptosis in Rhizopus oryzae. Apoptosis was characterized in R. oryzae transformed with RNAi plasmid targeting FTR1 expression (iron permease mutant) or empty plasmid grown in iron rich (0.125% FeCl3) and iron depleted media (YNB+1mM ferrozine and 1 mM ascorbic acid). Increased apoptosis was observed with dihydrorhodamine-123 and rhodamine-123 staining in the iron starved mutant FTR1 when compared to empty plasmid, followed by increased extracellular ATP levels. In addition, DNA fragmentation and metacaspase activity were prominent in FTR1. In contrast, Rhizopus strains grown in iron-rich medium displayed minimal apoptosis. Our results demonstrate a metacaspase dependent apoptotic process in iron deprived condition and further support the role of iron starvation strategies as an adjunct treatment for mucormycosis, a mechanism by which iron starvation affects R. oryzae.

  5. Metabolic response to human growth hormone during prolonged starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felig, P; Marliss, E B; Cahill, G F

    1971-02-01

    The metabolic response to human growth hormone (HGH) was studied in five obese subjects in the fed state and during prolonged (5-6 wk) starvation. In the fed state (three subjects), HGH induced an elevation in basal serum insulin concentration, a minimal increase in blood and urine ketone levels, and a marked reduction in urinary nitrogen and potassium excretion resulting in positive nitrogen and potassium balance. In prolonged fasting (four subjects), HGH administration resulted in a 2- to 3-fold increase in serum insulin which preceded a 50% elevation in blood glucose. Persistence of the lipolytic effects of HGH was indicated by a rise in free fatty acids and glycerol. The response differed markedly from the fed state in that blood beta-hydroxybutyrate and acetoacetate levels rose by 20-40%, resulting in total blood ketone acid concentrations of 10-12 mmoles/liter, ketonuria of 150-320 mmoles/day, and increased urinary potassium loss. The subjects complained of nausea, vomiting, weakness, and myalgias. Despite a 50% reduction in urea excretion during HGH administration, total nitrogen loss remained unchanged as urinary ammonia excretion rose by 50% and correlated directly with the degree of ketonuria. It is concluded that in prolonged starvation (a) HGH may have a direct insulinotropic effect on the beta cell independent of alterations in blood glucose concentration, (b) persistence of the lipolytic action of HGH results in severe exaggeration of starvation ketosis and interferes with its anticatabolic action by necessitating increased urinary ammonia loss, and (c) failure of HGH to reduce net protein catabolism in starvation suggests that this hormone does not have a prime regulatory role in conserving body protein stores during prolonged fasting.

  6. Fuel starvation. Irreversible degradation mechanisms in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Carmen M.; Silva, R.A.; Travassos, M.A.; Paiva, T.I.; Fernandes, V.R. [LNEG, National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisboa (Portugal). UPCH Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit

    2010-07-01

    PEM fuel cell operates under very aggressive conditions in both anode and cathode. Failure modes and mechanism in PEM fuel cells include those related to thermal, chemical or mechanical issues that may constrain stability, power and lifetime. In this work, the case of fuel starvation is examined. The anode potential may rise to levels compatible with the oxidization of water. If water is not available, oxidation of the carbon support will accelerate catalyst sintering. Diagnostics methods used for in-situ and ex-situ analysis of PEM fuel cells are selected in order to better categorize irreversible changes of the cell. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is found instrumental in the identification of fuel cell flooding conditions and membrane dehydration associated to mass transport limitations / reactant starvation and protonic conductivity decrease, respectively. Furthermore, it indicates that water electrolysis might happen at the anode. Cross sections of the membrane catalyst and gas diffusion layers examined by scanning electron microscopy indicate electrode thickness reduction as a result of reactions taking place during hydrogen starvation. Catalyst particles are found to migrate outwards and located on carbon backings. Membrane degradation in fuel cell environment is analyzed in terms of the mechanism for fluoride release which is considered an early predictor of membrane degradation. (orig.)

  7. Mammalian autophagy is essential for hepatic and renal ketogenesis during starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Ayano; Kume, Shinji; Kondo, Motoyuki; Nakazawa, Jun; Chin-Kanasaki, Masami; Araki, Hisazumi; Araki, Shin-ichi; Koya, Daisuke; Haneda, Masakazu; Chano, Tokuhiro; Matsusaka, Taiji; Nagao, Kenji; Adachi, Yusuke; Chan, Lawrence; Maegawa, Hiroshi; Uzu, Takashi

    2016-01-06

    Autophagy is an intracellular degradation system activated, across species, by starvation. Although accumulating evidence has shown that mammalian autophagy is involved in pathogenesis of several modern diseases, its physiological role to combat starvation has not been fully clarified. In this study, we analysed starvation-induced gluconeogenesis and ketogenesis in mouse strains lacking autophagy in liver, skeletal muscle or kidney. Autophagy-deficiency in any tissue had no effect on gluconeogenesis during starvation. Though skeletal muscle- and kidney-specific autophagy-deficiency did not alter starvation-induced increases in blood ketone levels, liver-specific autophagy-deficiency significantly attenuated this effect. Interestingly, renal as well as hepatic expression of HMG-CoA synthase 2 increased with prolonged starvation. Furthermore, during starvation, mice lacking autophagy both in liver and kidney showed even lower blood ketone levels and physical activity than mice lacking autophagy only in liver. Starvation induced massive lipid droplet formation in extra-adipose tissues including liver and kidney, which was essential for ketogenesis. Moreover, this process was impaired in the autophagy-deficient liver and kidney. These findings demonstrate that hepatic and renal autophagy are essential for starvation-induced lipid droplet formation and subsequent ketogenesis and, ultimately, for maintaining systemic energy homeostasis. Our findings provide novel biological insights into adaptive mechanisms to combat starvation in mammals.

  8. Phosphoproteome of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and its dynamics during nitrogen starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp eSpät

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Cyanobacteria have shaped the earth’s biosphere as the first oxygenic photoautotrophs and still play an important role in many ecosystems. The ability to adapt to changing environmental conditions is an essential characteristic in order to ensure survival. To this end, numerous studies have shown that bacteria use protein post-translational modifications such as Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in cell signalling, adaptation and regulation. Nevertheless, our knowledge of cyanobacterial phosphoproteomes and their dynamic response to environmental stimuli is relatively limited. In this study, we applied gel-free methods and high accuracy mass spectrometry towards the unbiased detection of Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation events in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. We could identify over 300 phosphorylation events in cultures grown on nitrate as exclusive nitrogen source. Chemical dimethylation labelling was applied to investigate proteome and phosphoproteome dynamics during nitrogen starvation. Our dataset describes the most comprehensive (phosphoproteome of Synechocystis to date, identifying 2,382 proteins and 183 phosphorylation events and quantifying 2,111 proteins and 148 phosphorylation events during nitrogen starvation. Global protein phosphorylation levels were increased in response to nitrogen depletion after 24 hours. Among the proteins with increased phosphorylation, the PII signalling protein showed the highest fold-change, serving as positive control. Other proteins with increased phosphorylation levels comprised functions in photosynthesis and in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. This study reveals dynamics of Synechocystis phosphoproteome in response to environmental stimuli and suggests an important role of protein Ser/Thr/Tyr phosphorylation in fundamental mechanisms of homeostatic control in cyanobacteria.

  9. The effect of starvation on growth and plasma growth hormone concentrations of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss

    OpenAIRE

    Sumpter, J.P.; Le Bail, Pierre-Yves; Pickering, A.D.; Pottinger, T.G.; Carragher, J.F.

    1991-01-01

    Two experiments, one using 0 + the other 1 + rainbow trout, were conducted to investigate the effect of prolonged starvation on plasma growth hormone levels. The results from both experiments were essentially the same. As expected, starvation resulted in cessation of growth and in a lower coefficient of condition, whereas fed fish continued to grow and remained in good condition. Starvation had relatively little effect on the plasma cortisol level; in one experiment levels were elevated tempo...

  10. Coprophagy of the Japanese Hare, Lepus brachyurus, under the Situation of Starvation

    OpenAIRE

    鳥居, 春己; 河合, 征彦

    1997-01-01

    The seven months old female Japanese hare, Lepus brachvurus, was kept for 22 days under the situation of starvation and feeding to examine the number and volume of feces, volume of rabbit pellets, and activities during a night. Number of feces in each starvation experiment was about one third of that in the feeding situation. Then, the hare consumed feees directly from the anus, and this coprophagy occurred more frequently during the starvation experiment. Killing this hare at 19 : 00 after t...

  11. Time to death from starvation and compulsive killing by the larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amalraj, D D; Das, P K

    1994-11-01

    Time to death from starvation and compulsive killing without eating of the prey by larvae of Toxorhynchites splendens were studied in the laboratory. The first and second instars survived without food for 3 days while third and fourth instars survived for 7.8 and 14 days, respectively. When the corresponding instars of Aedes aegypti, Anopheles stephensi or Culex quinquefasciatus were offered, the number of prey killed but not eaten ranged from 0 to 15 per 40 prey larvae. Compulsive killing of Ae. aegypti was mainly at its third instar by 9- and 10-day old T. splendens. Compulsive killing of An. stephensi was mainly at its second and third instars by young and older ages of T. splendens but older T. splendens also killed fourth instar of An. stephensi. Compulsive killing of Cx. quinquefasciatus was of all its instars and mainly by young T. splendens. There was a significant negative correlation between the amount of food eaten per predator and the number of prey killed compulsively. The number of larvae killed and eaten were much larger than number killed compulsively, except in the case of third instar Ae. aegypti and 9-10-day old T. splendens.

  12. Enhanced Sleep Is an Evolutionarily Adaptive Response to Starvation Stress in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocumb, Melissa E; Regalado, Josue M; Yoshizawa, Masato; Neely, Greg G; Masek, Pavel; Gibbs, Allen G; Keene, Alex C

    2015-01-01

    Animals maximize fitness by modulating sleep and foraging strategies in response to changes in nutrient availability. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation and desiccation resistance that differ in accordance with geographic location, nutrient availability, and evolutionary history. Further, flies potently modulate sleep in response to changes in food availability, and selection for starvation resistance enhances sleep, revealing strong genetic relationships between sleep and nutrient availability. To determine the genetic and evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient deprivation, we assessed sleep in flies selected for desiccation or starvation resistance. While starvation resistant flies have higher levels of triglycerides, desiccation resistant flies have enhanced glycogen stores, indicative of distinct physiological adaptations to food or water scarcity. Strikingly, selection for starvation resistance, but not desiccation resistance, leads to increased sleep, indicating that enhanced sleep is not a generalized consequence of higher energy stores. Thermotolerance is not altered in starvation or desiccation resistant flies, providing further evidence for context-specific adaptation to environmental stressors. F2 hybrid flies were generated by crossing starvation selected flies with desiccation selected flies, and the relationship between nutrient deprivation and sleep was examined. Hybrids exhibit a positive correlation between starvation resistance and sleep, while no interaction was detected between desiccation resistance and sleep, revealing that prolonged sleep provides an adaptive response to starvation stress. Therefore, these findings demonstrate context-specific evolution of enhanced sleep in response to chronic food deprivation, and provide a model for understanding the evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient availability.

  13. Effect of Different Starvation Levels on Cognitive Ability in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaobing; Zhi, Guoguo; Yu, Yi; Cai, Lingyu; Li, Peng; Zhang, Danhua; Bao, Shuting; Hu, Wenlong; Shen, Haiyan; Song, Fujuan

    2018-01-01

    Objective: To study the effect of different starvation levels on cognitive ability in mice. Method: Mice were randomly divided into four groups: normal group, dieting group A, dieting group B, dieting group C. The mice of normal group were given normal feeding amount, the rest of groups were given 3/4 of normal feeding amount, 2/4 of normal feeding amount and 1/4 of normal feeding amount. After feeding mice four days, the weight was observed and T-maze experiment, Morris water maze test, open field test and Serum Catalase activity were detected. Result: Compared with the normal group, the correct rate of the intervention group in the T-maze experiment was decreased and dieting group A> dieting group B> dieting group C. In the Morris water maze test, Compared with the normal group, the correct rate of the intervention group was increased. Among these three intervention groups, dieting group A had the highest correct rate and the difference of dieting group B and dieting group C were similar. In the open field test, Compared with the normal group, the exploration rate of the surrounding environment in the intervention group was increased. In the Serum Catalase test, Compared with the normal group, the activities of serum peroxidase in the intervention groups were decreased and dieting group A> dieting group B> dieting group C. Conclusion: A certain level of starvation could affect the cognitive ability of mice. In a certain range, the level of starvation is inversely proportional to cognitive ability in mice.

  14. The Politics of Starvation Deaths in West Bengal

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rubin, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    of chronic food insecurity into an acute hunger crisis, which was not mitigated by effective public policies at the local level due to extensive political patronage and a politicisation of the bureaucracy. Amlashol suffered disproportionally from this due to the village’s affiliation with a weak...... and politically marginalised panchayat. Within Amlashol, the casualties of starvation came primarily from one particular Scheduled tribe, the Sabars, due to issues of social stigmatisation, political exclusion and eroding livelihoods. The article provides a testament to the importance of addressing disaggregated...

  15. A phosphate-starvation-inducible outermembrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens Ag1 as an immunological phosphate-starvation marker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leopold, Kristine; Jacobsen, Susanne; Nybroe, Ole

    1997-01-01

    A phosphate-starvation-inducible outer-membrane protein of Pseudomonas fluorescens Ag1, expressed at phosphate concentrations below0.08-0.13 mM, was purified and characterized. The purification method involved separation of outer-membrane proteins by SDS-PAGE andextraction of the protein from...... nitrocellulose or PVDF membranes after electrotransfer of proteins to the membranes. The N-terminal amino acidsequence of the purified protein, called Psi1, did not show homology to any known proteins, and in contrast to the phosphate-specific porin OprP ofP. aeruginosa its mobility in SDS-PAGE was not affected...

  16. Pioneer round of translation occurs during serum starvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Nara; Kim, Kyoung Mi; Cho, Hana; Choe, Junho; Kim, Yoon Ki

    2007-01-01

    The pioneer round of translation plays a role in translation initiation of newly spliced and exon junction complex (EJC)-bound mRNAs. Nuclear cap-binding protein complex CBP80/20 binds to those mRNAs at the 5'-end, recruiting translation initiation complex. As a consequence of the pioneer round of translation, the bound EJCs are dissociated from mRNAs and CBP80/20 is replaced by the cytoplasmic cap-binding protein eIF4E. Steady-state translation directed by eIF4E allows for an immediate and rapid response to changes in physiological conditions. Here, we show that nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD), which restricts only to the pioneer round of translation but not to steady-state translation, efficiently occurs even during serum starvation, in which steady-state translation is drastically abolished. Accordingly, CBP80 remains in the nucleus and processing bodies are unaffected in their abundance and number in serum-starved conditions. These results suggest that mRNAs enter the pioneer round of translation during serum starvation and are targeted for NMD if they contain premature termination codons

  17. Genome-wide transcriptional responses to carbon starvation in nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Wels, M.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (µ = 0.0001 h-1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a

  18. Regulation of K uptake, water uptake, and growth of tomato during K starvation and recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amor, del F.M.; Marcelis, L.F.M.

    2004-01-01

    In order to analyze the dynamics of growth, water and K uptake, the effects of 1, 3 and 7 days of potassium starvation and the recovery capability during 7 days afterwards were investigated in vegetative tomato plants. After 7 days of K starvation, plant dry matter was reduced by 36% compared to

  19. Metabolic observations during the treatment of obese patients by periods of total starvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Riet, H.G. van; Schwarz, F.; Kinderen, P.J. der; Veeman, W.

    Ten very obese female patients were treated by periods of total starvation lasting 10 days each. In the interval between these starvation periods, a diet of 600 calories was given. Twenty-one periods were completed, 6 patients went through 3 periods each. The fasting was generally well tolerated;

  20. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Carbon Starvation in Nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Wels, M.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (? = 0.0001 h?1) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed by a

  1. Genome-Wide Transcriptional Responses to Carbon Starvation in Nongrowing Lactococcus lactis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ercan, O.; Wels, M.W.; Smid, E.J.; Kleerebezem, M

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes the transcriptional adaptations of nongrowing, retentostat cultures of Lactococcus lactis to starvation. Near-zero-growth cultures (mu = 0.0001 h(-1)) obtained by extended retentostat cultivation were exposed to starvation by termination of the medium supply for 24 h, followed

  2. The impact of food type, temperature and starvation on larval development of Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    The impact of diatom food species (Chaetoceros calcitrans and Skeletonema costatum), temperature and starvation on the larval development of Balanus amphitrite was evaluated. Starvation threshold levels for different ages of larvae (0- to 5-day...

  3. Adaptation of intestinal hydrolases to starvation in rats: effect of thyroid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galluser, M; Belkhou, R; Freund, J N

    1991-01-01

    The effects of long-term starvation on the activities of sucrase, lactase, and aminopeptidase, and on their respective mRNA were determined in the small intestine of thyroidectomized and sham-operated adult rats. Thyroidectomy reduced the protein loss at the level of the intestinal brush border...... membranes during starvation. Prolonged fasting caused a significant decrease in sucrase activity, but thyroidectomy partly prevented this effect. However, the amount of the corresponding mRNA dropped during long term starvation without incidence of thyroidectomy. Lactase activity in the brush border...... membranes was increased by starvation, and thyroidectomy caused a further elevation of the enzyme activity. Simultaneously, lactase mRNA content rose only slightly compared to the enzyme activity. Aminopeptidase activity and mRNA content decreased during starvation and thyroidectomy did not prevent...

  4. Nitrogen excretion in rats on a protein-free diet and during starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chwalibog, André; Sawosz, Ewa; Niemiec, Tomasz

    2008-01-01

    with protein, demonstrating a major influence of protein content in a diet on N excretion during starvation. Consequently, the impact of former protein supply on N losses during starvation ought to be considered when evaluating minimum N requirement necessary to sustain life.......Nitrogen balances (six days) were determined in male Wistar rats during feeding a diet with sufficient protein or a nearly protein-free diet (n = 2 x 24), and then during three days of starvation (n = 2 x 12). The objective was to evaluate the effect of protein withdrawal on minimum nitrogen...... excretion in urine (UN), corresponding to endogenous UN, during feeding and subsequent starvation periods. The rats fed the protein free-diet had almost the same excretion of urinary N during feeding and starvation (165 and 157 mg/kg W(0.75)), while it was 444 mg/kg W(0.75) in rats previously fed...

  5. A central regulatory system largely controls transcriptional activation and repression responses to phosphate starvation in Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regla Bustos

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Plants respond to different stresses by inducing or repressing transcription of partially overlapping sets of genes. In Arabidopsis, the PHR1 transcription factor (TF has an important role in the control of phosphate (Pi starvation stress responses. Using transcriptomic analysis of Pi starvation in phr1, and phr1 phr1-like (phl1 mutants and in wild type plants, we show that PHR1 in conjunction with PHL1 controls most transcriptional activation and repression responses to phosphate starvation, regardless of the Pi starvation specificity of these responses. Induced genes are enriched in PHR1 binding sequences (P1BS in their promoters, whereas repressed genes do not show such enrichment, suggesting that PHR1(-like control of transcriptional repression responses is indirect. In agreement with this, transcriptomic analysis of a transgenic plant expressing PHR1 fused to the hormone ligand domain of the glucocorticoid receptor showed that PHR1 direct targets (i.e., displaying altered expression after GR:PHR1 activation by dexamethasone in the presence of cycloheximide corresponded largely to Pi starvation-induced genes that are highly enriched in P1BS. A minimal promoter containing a multimerised P1BS recapitulates Pi starvation-specific responsiveness. Likewise, mutation of P1BS in the promoter of two Pi starvation-responsive genes impaired their responsiveness to Pi starvation, but not to other stress types. Phylogenetic footprinting confirmed the importance of P1BS and PHR1 in Pi starvation responsiveness and indicated that P1BS acts in concert with other cis motifs. All together, our data show that PHR1 and PHL1 are partially redundant TF acting as central integrators of Pi starvation responses, both specific and generic. In addition, they indicate that transcriptional repression responses are an integral part of adaptive responses to stress.

  6. A Shoot-Specific Hypoxic Response of Arabidopsis Sheds Light on the Role of the Phosphate-Responsive Transcription Factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE11[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klecker, Maria; Gasch, Philipp; Peisker, Helga; Dörmann, Peter; Schlicke, Hagen; Grimm, Bernhard; Mustroph, Angelika

    2014-01-01

    Plant responses to biotic and abiotic stresses are often very specific, but signal transduction pathways can partially or completely overlap. Here, we demonstrate that in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), the transcriptional responses to phosphate starvation and oxygen deficiency stress comprise a set of commonly induced genes. While the phosphate deficiency response is systemic, under oxygen deficiency, most of the commonly induced genes are found only in illuminated shoots. This jointly induced response to the two stresses is under control of the transcription factor PHOSPHATE STARVATION RESPONSE1 (PHR1), but not of the oxygen-sensing N-end rule pathway, and includes genes encoding proteins for the synthesis of galactolipids, which replace phospholipids in plant membranes under phosphate starvation. Despite the induction of galactolipid synthesis genes, total galactolipid content and plant survival are not severely affected by the up-regulation of galactolipid gene expression in illuminated leaves during hypoxia. However, changes in galactolipid molecular species composition point to an adaptation of lipid fluxes through the endoplasmic reticulum and chloroplast pathways during hypoxia. PHR1-mediated signaling of phosphate deprivation was also light dependent. Because a photoreceptor-mediated PHR1 activation was not detectable under hypoxia, our data suggest that a chloroplast-derived retrograde signal, potentially arising from metabolic changes, regulates PHR1 activity under both oxygen and phosphate deficiency. PMID:24753539

  7. Reciprocal leaf and root expression of AtAmt1.1 and root architectural changes in response to nitrogen starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineer, Cawas B; Kranz, Robert G

    2007-01-01

    Nitrogen is an essential macronutrient for plant growth and survival. Here, the temporal and spatial sensing of nitrogen starvation is analyzed in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The promoter for the high-affinity ammonium transporter, AtAmt1.1, is shown to be a valid indicator for nitrogen status in leaves and roots. An AtAmt1.1-Gal4 transgene using three 5x upstream activating sequence-driven reporters (luciferase, green fluorescent protein, and beta-glucuronidase) facilitated in vivo profiling at the whole-plant and cellular levels. The effects of nitrogen supply, light duration, light intensity, and carbon on the expression of the AtAmt1.1 gene in the roots and aerial tissues are reported. Under nitrogen starvation, high expression is observed in the roots and, under nitrogen-sufficient conditions, high expression is observed in the leaves. This reciprocal regulation of AtAmt1.1 was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, which was also used to quantitate expression of the five other Amt genes in Arabidopsis. Although some of these show tissue specificity (roots or leaves), none exhibit reciprocal regulation like the AtAmt1.1-encoded high-affinity transporter. This robust reciprocal expression suggests that Arabidopsis undergoes rapid resource reallocation in plants grown under different nitrogen supply regimens. Ultimately, nitrogen starvation-mediated reallocation results in root architectural restructuring. We describe the precise timing and cellular aspects of this nitrogen limitation response.

  8. Pheromonal regulation of starvation resistance in honey bee workers ( Apis mellifera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Patrick; Grozinger, Christina M.

    2008-08-01

    Most animals can modulate nutrient storage pathways according to changing environmental conditions, but in honey bees nutrient storage is also modulated according to changing behavioral tasks within a colony. Specifically, bees involved in brood care (nurses) have higher lipid stores in their abdominal fat bodies than forager bees. Pheromone communication plays an important role in regulating honey bee behavior and physiology. In particular, queen mandibular pheromone (QMP) slows the transition from nursing to foraging. We tested the effects of QMP exposure on starvation resistance, lipid storage, and gene expression in the fat bodies of worker bees. We found that indeed QMP-treated bees survived much longer compared to control bees when starved and also had higher lipid levels. Expression of vitellogenin RNA, which encodes a yolk protein that is found at higher levels in nurses than foragers, was also higher in the fat bodies of QMP-treated bees. No differences were observed in expression of genes involved in insulin signaling pathways, which are associated with nutrient storage and metabolism in a variety of species; thus, other mechanisms may be involved in increasing the lipid stores. These studies demonstrate that pheromone exposure can modify nutrient storage pathways and fat body gene expression in honey bees and suggest that chemical communication and social interactions play an important role in altering metabolic pathways.

  9. Role of glucocorticoids in increased muscle glutamine production in starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischler, Marc E.; Henriksen, Erik J.; Cook, Paul H.

    1988-01-01

    The role of glucocorticoids in the synthesis of muscle glutamine during starvation was investigated in adrenalectomized fasted rats injected with cortisol (1 mg/100 g body weight). It was found that administration of cortisol in vivo increased (compared to nontreated starved adrenalectomized controls) the glutamine/glutamate ratio and the activity of glutamine synthetase in the diaphragm and the extensor digitorum muscles, and that these effects were abolished by prior treatment with actinomycin D or proflavine. The results obtained in in vitro experiments, using fresh-frozen soleus, extensor digitorum longus, and diaphragm muscle preparations, supported the in vivo indications of the cortisol-enhanced glutamine synthesis and protein turnover in starved adrenalectomized animals.

  10. Starvation marrow – gelatinous transformation of bone marrow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Osgood

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gelatinous bone marrow transformation (GMT, also known as starvation marrow, represents a rare pathological entity of unclear etiology, in which bone marrow histopathology demonstrates hypoplasia, fat atrophy, and gelatinous infiltration. The finding of gelatinous marrow transformation lacks disease specificity; rather, it is an indicator of severe illness and a marker of poor nutritional status, found in patients with eating disorders, acute febrile illnesses, acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, alcoholism, malignancies, and congestive heart failure. We present a middle-aged woman with a history of alcoholism, depression, and anorexia nervosa who presented with failure to thrive and macrocytic anemia, with bone marrow examination demonstrative of gelatinous transformation, all of which resolved with appropriate treatment. To our knowledge, there are very few cases of GMT which have been successfully treated; thus, our case highlights the importance of proper supportive management.

  11. Regulation of neuronal APL-1 expression by cholesterol starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiese, Mary; Antebi, Adam; Zheng, Hui

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid plaques composed primarily of the amyloid-β peptide, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). While mutations in APP lead to the development of Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD), sporadic AD has only one clear genetic modifier: the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) gene. Cholesterol starvation in Caenorhabditis elegans leads to molting and arrest phenotypes similar to loss-of-function mutants of the APP ortholog, apl-1 (amyloid precursor-like protein 1), and lrp-1 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1), suggesting a potential interaction between apl-1 and cholesterol metabolism. Previously, we found that RNAi knock-down of apl-1 leads to aldicarb hypersensitivity, indicating a defect in synaptic function. Here we find the same defect is recapitulated during lrp-1 knock-down and by cholesterol starvation. A cholesterol-free diet or loss of lrp-1 directly affects APL-1 levels as both lead to loss of APL-1::GFP fluorescence in neurons. However, loss of cholesterol does not affect global transcription or protein levels as seen by qPCR and Western blot. Our results show that cholesterol and lrp-1 are involved in the regulation of synaptic transmission, similar to apl-1. Both are able to modulate APL-1 protein levels in neurons, however cholesterol changes do not affect global apl-1 transcription or APL-1 protein indicating the changes are specific to neurons. Thus, regulation of synaptic transmission and molting by LRP-1 and cholesterol may be mediated by their ability to control APL-1 neuronal protein expression.

  12. Regulation of neuronal APL-1 expression by cholesterol starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Wiese

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alzheimer's disease (AD is a neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the deposition of β-amyloid plaques composed primarily of the amyloid-β peptide, a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP. While mutations in APP lead to the development of Familial Alzheimer's Disease (FAD, sporadic AD has only one clear genetic modifier: the ε4 allele of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE gene. Cholesterol starvation in Caenorhabditis elegans leads to molting and arrest phenotypes similar to loss-of-function mutants of the APP ortholog, apl-1 (amyloid precursor-like protein 1, and lrp-1 (lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1, suggesting a potential interaction between apl-1 and cholesterol metabolism. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Previously, we found that RNAi knock-down of apl-1 leads to aldicarb hypersensitivity, indicating a defect in synaptic function. Here we find the same defect is recapitulated during lrp-1 knock-down and by cholesterol starvation. A cholesterol-free diet or loss of lrp-1 directly affects APL-1 levels as both lead to loss of APL-1::GFP fluorescence in neurons. However, loss of cholesterol does not affect global transcription or protein levels as seen by qPCR and Western blot. CONCLUSIONS: Our results show that cholesterol and lrp-1 are involved in the regulation of synaptic transmission, similar to apl-1. Both are able to modulate APL-1 protein levels in neurons, however cholesterol changes do not affect global apl-1 transcription or APL-1 protein indicating the changes are specific to neurons. Thus, regulation of synaptic transmission and molting by LRP-1 and cholesterol may be mediated by their ability to control APL-1 neuronal protein expression.

  13. Reduction of metal artifacts: beam hardening and photon starvation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadava, Girijesh K.; Pal, Debashish; Hsieh, Jiang

    2014-03-01

    The presence of metal-artifacts in CT imaging can obscure relevant anatomy and interfere with disease diagnosis. The cause and occurrence of metal-artifacts are primarily due to beam hardening, scatter, partial volume and photon starvation; however, the contribution to the artifacts from each of them depends on the type of hardware. A comparison of CT images obtained with different metallic hardware in various applications, along with acquisition and reconstruction parameters, helps understand methods for reducing or overcoming such artifacts. In this work, a metal beam hardening correction (BHC) and a projection-completion based metal artifact reduction (MAR) algorithms were developed, and applied on phantom and clinical CT scans with various metallic implants. Stainless-steel and Titanium were used to model and correct for metal beam hardening effect. In the MAR algorithm, the corrupted projection samples are replaced by the combination of original projections and in-painted data obtained by forward projecting a prior image. The data included spine fixation screws, hip-implants, dental-filling, and body extremity fixations, covering range of clinically used metal implants. Comparison of BHC and MAR on different metallic implants was used to characterize dominant source of the artifacts, and conceivable methods to overcome those. Results of the study indicate that beam hardening could be a dominant source of artifact in many spine and extremity fixations, whereas dental and hip implants could be dominant source of photon starvation. The BHC algorithm could significantly improve image quality in CT scans with metallic screws, whereas MAR algorithm could alleviate artifacts in hip-implants and dentalfillings.

  14. dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR Signaling Mediate Cell-Nonautonomous Effects of daf-16/FOXO on Starvation-Induced Developmental Arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplan, Rebecca E W; Chen, Yutao; Moore, Brad T; Jordan, James M; Maxwell, Colin S; Schindler, Adam J; Baugh, L Ryan

    2015-12-01

    Nutrient availability has profound influence on development. In the nematode C. elegans, nutrient availability governs post-embryonic development. L1-stage larvae remain in a state of developmental arrest after hatching until they feed. This "L1 arrest" (or "L1 diapause") is associated with increased stress resistance, supporting starvation survival. Loss of the transcription factor daf-16/FOXO, an effector of insulin/IGF signaling, results in arrest-defective and starvation-sensitive phenotypes. We show that daf-16/FOXO regulates L1 arrest cell-nonautonomously, suggesting that insulin/IGF signaling regulates at least one additional signaling pathway. We used mRNA-seq to identify candidate signaling molecules affected by daf-16/FOXO during L1 arrest. dbl-1/TGF-β, a ligand for the Sma/Mab pathway, daf-12/NHR and daf-36/oxygenase, an upstream component of the daf-12 steroid hormone signaling pathway, were up-regulated during L1 arrest in a daf-16/FOXO mutant. Using genetic epistasis analysis, we show that dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR steroid hormone signaling pathways are required for the daf-16/FOXO arrest-defective phenotype, suggesting that daf-16/FOXO represses dbl-1/TGF-β, daf-12/NHR and daf-36/oxygenase. The dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR pathways have not previously been shown to affect L1 development, but we found that disruption of these pathways delayed L1 development in fed larvae, consistent with these pathways promoting development in starved daf-16/FOXO mutants. Though the dbl-1/TGF-β and daf-12/NHR pathways are epistatic to daf-16/FOXO for the arrest-defective phenotype, disruption of these pathways does not suppress starvation sensitivity of daf-16/FOXO mutants. This observation uncouples starvation survival from developmental arrest, indicating that DAF-16/FOXO targets distinct effectors for each phenotype and revealing that inappropriate development during starvation does not cause the early demise of daf-16/FOXO mutants. Overall, this study shows

  15. MGL-1 on AIY neurons translates starvation to reproductive plasticity via neuropeptide signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Haelim; Paik, Young-Ki

    2017-10-01

    Reproductive plasticity is the ability of an animal to modulate its reproductive functions in response to environmental changes. For example, Caenorhabditis elegans, a free-living nematode, can adjust the onsets of oogenesis and embryogenesis under harsh environmental conditions, including starvation. However, the molecular mechanisms used to perceive and translate environmental signals into reproductive functional adjustments remain largely uncharacterized. We discovered that in C. elegans, the glutamate receptor homolog MGL-1 initiated reproductive plasticity in response to starvation. A genetic analysis of the mutant gene, mgl-1(tm1811), suggested that starvation delayed the onsets of oogenesis and embryogenesis via MGL-1. Cell-specific rescues of mgl-1 deletion mutants, which used transgenic lines designed to express MGL-1 in different neurons (e.g., RMD, AIA, AIY, and NSM), suggested that only AIY-rescued animals exhibited normal delays in oogenesis and embryogenesis equivalent to those of wild-type animals, suggesting recovery. Furthermore, in AIY neurons, MGL-1 appears to use neuropeptide signaling, rather than glutamate, to translate starvation stimuli into delayed oogenesis and embryogenesis. Our findings, which reveal molecular linkages between starvation signals and reproductive alterations, may provide a basis for understanding energy reallocation mechanisms, as the mgl-1 deletion mutant exhibited more severe reductions in lifespan and fat accumulation than did wild-type animals under starvation conditions. Taken together, MGL-1 is the molecular driver underlying the translation of starvation signals to reproduction plasticity in an AIY neuron-specific manner. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Western diamondback rattlesnakes demonstrate physiological and biochemical strategies for tolerating prolonged starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCue, Marshall D

    2007-01-01

    Because of the uncertainty in food resources in nature, all animals face the possibility of imposed periods of fasting (i.e., starvation) at some point in their lives. I investigated physiological and biochemical responses to starvation that occur in a species of rattlesnake known to tolerate successfully prolonged periods of starvation in the wild. Sixteen subadult Crotalus atrox were fasted for up to 24 wk under controlled conditions simulating their active season. Snakes exhibited significant reductions in plasma glucose but increased circulating ketone bodies. Fasting snakes lost mass at a linear rate and increased their relative moisture content during the experiment. The bodies of fasting snakes demonstrated an increase in their fatty acid (FA) unsaturation index and were apparently able to "spare" essential FAs effectively from beta -oxidation. Endogenous essential and nonessential amino acids were used indiscriminately to fuel energetic requirements, suggesting that essential amino acids are not preferentially spared during starvation. The (15)N signature of excreted nitrogenous waste increased significantly, presumably as a result of shifting amino acid source pools during starvation. Because our comparative knowledge of starvation physiology contains large taxonomic gaps, particularly with respect to amphibians and reptiles, an understanding of the biological responses exhibited by these animals may offer insight into the evolution of physiological strategies animals employ to cope with the pressures of starvation.

  17. Proximal gut mucosal epithelial homeostasis in aged IL-1 type I receptor knockout mice after starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Juquan; Wolf, Steven E; Wu, Xiao-Wu; Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Jeschke, Marc G

    2011-08-01

    Previous studies have shown that starvation induces small bowel atrophy, and that atrophy diminishes with aging. In this experiment, we assessed whether starvation-induced atrophy of proximal gut mucosa is associated with the Interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R) signaling pathway in aged mice. Thirty 26-month-old IL-1R knockout mice and age-matched wild-type C57BL/6 mice were randomly divided into two groups: ad libitum fed and fasted. Mice were euthanized 12 or 48 hours after starvation. The proximal small bowel was harvested for morphologic analysis. Gut epithelial cell proliferation was detected using immunohistochemical staining for proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and apoptosis was identified using terminal deoxyuridine nick-end labeling (TUNEL) staining. Aged IL-1R knockout mice were larger than aged-matched wild-type mice (P starvation (P starvation (P Starvation decreased cell proliferation in IL-1R knockout mice (P starvation increases atrophy and is associated with decreased cell proliferation rather than increased apoptosis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of starvation on the carbohydrate metabolism in Harmonia axyridis (Pallas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuo-Kun Shi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Trehalose plays an important role in energy storage, metabolism, and protection from extreme environmental conditions in insects. Trehalose is the main blood sugar in insects, and it can be rapidly used as an energy source in times of need. To elucidate the mechanisms of the starvation response, we observed the effects of starvation on trehalose and glycogen, trehalase activity, and the relative gene expression of genes in the trehalose and glycogen metabolic pathways in the invasive beetle Harmonia axyridis. Our results show that trehalose levels and the activities of two types of trehalases decreased significantly in the first 8 h of starvation, while the relative expression of HaTreh1-1 increased. While trehalose remained nearly constant at a relatively high level from 8 to 24 h, glycogen levels decreased significantly from 8 h to 24 h of starvation. Likewise, glycogen phosphorylase (HaGP expression was significantly higher at 12 to 24 h starvation than the first 8 h, while the expression of glycogen synthase (HaGS was relatively stable. Furthermore, trehalose decreased significantly from 24 h starvation to 72 h starvation, while trehalase activities and the relative expression of some HaTreh genes generally increased toward the end of the starvation period. The expression of trehalose-6-phosphate synthase (HaTPS increased significantly, supporting the increase in trehalose synthesis. These results show that trehalose plays a key role in the energy provided during the starvation process through the molecular and biochemical regulation of trehalose and glycogen metabolism.

  19. Enhanced Sleep Is an Evolutionarily Adaptive Response to Starvation Stress in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa E Slocumb

    Full Text Available Animals maximize fitness by modulating sleep and foraging strategies in response to changes in nutrient availability. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation and desiccation resistance that differ in accordance with geographic location, nutrient availability, and evolutionary history. Further, flies potently modulate sleep in response to changes in food availability, and selection for starvation resistance enhances sleep, revealing strong genetic relationships between sleep and nutrient availability. To determine the genetic and evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient deprivation, we assessed sleep in flies selected for desiccation or starvation resistance. While starvation resistant flies have higher levels of triglycerides, desiccation resistant flies have enhanced glycogen stores, indicative of distinct physiological adaptations to food or water scarcity. Strikingly, selection for starvation resistance, but not desiccation resistance, leads to increased sleep, indicating that enhanced sleep is not a generalized consequence of higher energy stores. Thermotolerance is not altered in starvation or desiccation resistant flies, providing further evidence for context-specific adaptation to environmental stressors. F2 hybrid flies were generated by crossing starvation selected flies with desiccation selected flies, and the relationship between nutrient deprivation and sleep was examined. Hybrids exhibit a positive correlation between starvation resistance and sleep, while no interaction was detected between desiccation resistance and sleep, revealing that prolonged sleep provides an adaptive response to starvation stress. Therefore, these findings demonstrate context-specific evolution of enhanced sleep in response to chronic food deprivation, and provide a model for understanding the evolutionary relationship between sleep and nutrient availability.

  20. Survival analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Badwe, R.A.

    1999-01-01

    The primary endpoint in the majority of the studies has been either disease recurrence or death. This kind of analysis requires a special method since all patients in the study experience the endpoint. The standard method for estimating such survival distribution is Kaplan Meier method. The survival function is defined as the proportion of individuals who survive beyond certain time. Multi-variate comparison for survival has been carried out with Cox's proportional hazard model

  1. [Research of Embryonic Mortality Stages of Drosophila melanogaster Depending on Age and Starvation of an Imago].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostenko, V V; Kolot, N V; Vorobyova, L I

    2015-01-01

    Influence of age of parents and duration of starvation on egg production and demonstration of embryonic mortality at different stages of egg development has been studied. It is shown that, with increasing age of organisms, the overall egg production reduces and the percentage of embryonic mortality increases at 0-5.5 and 5.5-17 h of development. An increase in the duration of starvation also promotes a reduction in egg production in 3- and 10-day-old adult D. melanogaster compared with short-term starvation. A statistically significant effect of factors, such as the allelic state of the white locus, the genetic background, the age of the parents, and the duration of starvation, on all studied parameters was established.

  2. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueper, Janina; Beyth, Shaul; Liebergall, Meir; Kaplan, Leon; Schroeder, Josh E.

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition and starvation's possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality. PMID:25810719

  3. Inititation and termination of chromosome replication in Escherichia coli subjected to amino acid starvation.

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, R C; Hepburn, M L

    1980-01-01

    Initiation and termination of chromosome replication in an Escherichia coli auxotroph subjected to amino acid starvation were examined by following the incorporation of [3H]thymidine into the EcoRI restriction fragments of the chromosome. The pattern of incorporation observed upon restoration of the amino acid showed that starvation blocks the process of initiation prior to deoxyribonucleic acid synthesis within any significant portion of the EcoRI fragment which contains the origin of replic...

  4. Enhanced Sleep Is an Evolutionarily Adaptive Response to Starvation Stress in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Slocumb, Melissa E.; Regalado, Josue M.; Yoshizawa, Masato; Neely, Greg G.; Masek, Pavel; Gibbs, Allen G.; Keene, Alex C.

    2015-01-01

    Animals maximize fitness by modulating sleep and foraging strategies in response to changes in nutrient availability. Wild populations of the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster, display highly variable levels of starvation and desiccation resistance that differ in accordance with geographic location, nutrient availability, and evolutionary history. Further, flies potently modulate sleep in response to changes in food availability, and selection for starvation resistance enhances sleep, reveal...

  5. Neonatal piglet traits of importance for survival in crates and indoor pens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lene Juul; Berg, Peer; Jørgensen, Grete

    2011-01-01

    related to crushing, starvation, and disease. Neither housing nor breeding value influenced mortality or traits of importance for the inborn viability of piglets. The results emphasize that the microclimate in the PN for newborn piglets and its heat-preserving properties are more important for survival...

  6. Identification of Genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that Are Haploinsufficient for Overcoming Amino Acid Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nancy S. Bae

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae responds to amino acid deprivation by activating a pathway conserved in eukaryotes to overcome the starvation stress. We have screened the entire yeast heterozygous deletion collection to identify strains haploinsufficient for growth in the presence of sulfometuron methyl, which causes starvation for isoleucine and valine. We have discovered that cells devoid of MET15 are sensitive to sulfometuron methyl, and loss of heterozygosity at the MET15 locus can complicate screening the heterozygous deletion collection. We identified 138 cases of loss of heterozygosity in this screen. After eliminating the issues of the MET15 loss of heterozygosity, strains isolated from the collection were retested on sulfometuron methyl. To determine the general effect of the mutations for a starvation response, SMM-sensitive strains were tested for the ability to grow in the presence of canavanine, which induces arginine starvation, and strains that were MET15 were also tested for growth in the presence of ethionine, which causes methionine starvation. Many of the genes identified in our study were not previously identified as starvation-responsive genes, including a number of essential genes that are not easily screened in a systematic way. The genes identified span a broad range of biological functions, including many involved in some level of gene expression. Several unnamed proteins have also been identified, giving a clue as to possible functions of the encoded proteins.

  7. Compensatory growth response of sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna (Lesueur, 1821 to starvation and refeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahid Morshedi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Compensatory growth response and body composition of male sailfin molly, Poecilia latipinna subjected to short-term starvation and subsequent feeding were studied for 54 days. Four feeding schedules were used in this study: C, Control (were fed to apparent satiation throughout the experiment; T1, Treatment 1 (3 days Starvation and 6 days refeeding; T2, Treatment 2 (6 days Starvation and 12 days refeeding; T3, Treatment 3 (9 days Starvation and 18 days refeeding. At the end of the experiment, the starved fish gained a body weight comparable to that of the control fish. There were no differences in condition factor, specific growth rate and weight gain between the starved and control fish at the end of the experiment. Daily feed intake was significantly higher in T3 than that in the control. Short-term starvation did not influence protein, lipid and ash contents. Moisture content of T2 and T3 fish were significantly higher than those of T1 and control fish. The results indicated that complete compensation occurred in the starved fish and that this species can tolerate to short term starvation without any significant effects on growth and feeding performance.

  8. Effect of starvation and refeeding on digestive enzyme activities in juvenile roach, Rutilus rutilus caspicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abolfathi, Marzieh; Hajimoradloo, Abdolmajid; Ghorbani, Rasool; Zamani, Abbas

    2012-02-01

    We evaluated the effects of starvation and refeeding on digestive enzyme activities in juvenile roach, Rutilus rutilus caspicus. Fish were divided into four feeding groups (mean mass 1.68 ± 0.12 g). The control group was fed to satiation twice a day throughout the experiment with formulated diet (SFK). The other three groups were deprived of feed for 1(S1), 2(S2), and 3(S3) weeks, respectively, and then fed to satiation during the refeeding period. The results showed that trypsin specific activity was not affected significantly either by starvation or refeeding, in all experimental groups. Chymotrypsin specific activity did not change significantly in S1 fish during the experimental period. In S2 and S3 fish no significant changes were observed during the starvation period. Upon refeeding, the activity increased in S2 fish, while it decreased in S3 fish. Amylase specific activity decreased significantly during the starvation period in all experimental groups. Upon refeeding, the activity increased. Alkaline phosphatase specific activity did not change significantly during the experiment period in S3 fish, while it showed significant changes during the starvation and refeeding period in the S1 and S2 fish. Starvation also had a significant effect on the structure of the intestine. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cell fasting: Cellular response and application of serum starvation (ahead of publication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoomeh Aghababazadeh

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Humans suffer transient or persistent starvation due to a lack of food intake, either because of fasting, voluntary dieting, or due to the scarcity of available food. At the cellular level it is possible to possess pathological starvation during ischemia and solid tumors. Blood provides many nutrients to our cells, and researchers provide these nutrients to cells in culture in the form of enriched culture medium plus serum from animal sources. In response to starvation, animals use hormonal cues to mobilize stored resources to provide nutrients to individual cells. Besides whole-body responses to nutrient deprivation, individual cells sense and react to lack of nutrients. At the cellular level, starvation triggers different responses such as cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Stop cycling for proliferating cells is the primary response to nutrient deprivation. Under certain conditions, the cell reacts to nutrient deprivation by engaging the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. Thus, serum starvation is regarded as a procedure to prepare cells for an experiment in serum-free conditions such as induction cell cycle synchronization. Several researchers have used serum starvation as a tool to study molecular mechanisms involved in different cellular process, metabolic researches and evaluation of a drug effect.

  10. Starvation Promotes Autophagy-Associated Maturation of the Ovary in the Giant Freshwater Prawn, Macrobrachium rosenbergii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilairat Kankuan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Limitation of food availability (starvation is known to influence the reproductive ability of animals. Autophagy is a lysosomal driven degradation process that protects the cell under metabolic stress conditions, such as during nutrient shortage. Whether, and how starvation-induced autophagy impacts on the maturation and function of reproductive organs in animals are still open questions. In this study, we have investigated the effects of starvation on histological and cellular changes that may be associated with autophagy in the ovary of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobachium rosenbergii. To this end, the female prawns were daily fed (controls or unfed (starvation condition for up to 12 days, and the ovary tissue was analyzed at different time-points. Starvation triggered ovarian maturation, and concomitantly increased the expression of autophagy markers in vitellogenic oocytes. The immunoreactivities for autophagy markers, including Beclin1, LC3-II, and Lamp1, were enhanced in the late oocytes within the mature ovaries, especially at the vitellogenic stages. These markers co-localized with vitellin in the yolk granules within the oocytes, suggesting that autophagy induced by starvation could drive vitellin utilization, thus promoting ovarian maturation.

  11. Infestation and hydraulic consequences of induced carbon starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderegg, William R L; Callaway, Elizabeth S

    2012-08-01

    Drought impacts on forests, including widespread die-off, are likely to increase with future climate change, although the physiological responses of trees to lethal drought are poorly understood. In particular, in situ examinations of carbon starvation and its interactions with and effects on infestation and hydraulic vulnerability are largely lacking. In this study, we conducted a controlled, in situ, repeated defoliation experiment to induce carbon stress in isolated trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides) ramets. We monitored leaf morphology, leaves per branch, and multitissue carbohydrate concentrations during canopy defoliation. We examined the subsequent effects of defoliation and defoliation-induced carbon stress on vulnerability to insect/fungus infestation and hydraulic vulnerability the following year. Defoliated ramets flushed multiple canopies, which coincided with moderate drawdown of nonstructural carbohydrate reserves. Infestation frequency greatly increased and hydraulic conductivity decreased 1 year after defoliation. Despite incomplete carbohydrate drawdown from defoliation and relatively rapid carbohydrate recovery, suggesting considerable carbohydrate reserves in aspen, defoliation-induced carbon stress held significant consequences for vulnerability to mortality agents and hydraulic performance. Our results indicate that multiyear consequences of drought via feedbacks are likely important for understanding forests' responses to drought and climate change over the coming decades.

  12. Starvation of cancer via induced ketogenesis and severe hypoglycemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapelner, Adam; Vorsanger, Matthew

    2015-03-01

    Neoplasms are highly dependent on glucose as their substrate for energy production and are generally not able to catabolize other fuel sources such as ketones and fatty acids. Thus, removing access to glucose has the potential to starve cancer cells and induce apoptosis. Unfortunately, other body tissues are also dependent on glucose for energy under normal conditions. However, in human starvation (or in the setting of diet-induced ketogenesis), the body "keto-adapts" and glucose requirements of most tissues drop to almost nil. Exceptions include the central nervous system (CNS) and various other tissues which have a small but obligatory requirement of glucose. Our hypothesized treatment takes keto-adaptation as a prerequisite. We then propose the induction of severe hypoglycemia by depressing gluconeogenesis while administering glucose to the brain. Although severe hypoglycemia normally produces adverse effects such as seizure and coma, it is relatively safe following keto-adaptation. We hypothesize that our therapeutic hypoglycemia treatment has potential to rapidly induce tumor cell necrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Limiting Accretion onto Massive Stars by Fragmentation-Induced Starvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peters, Thomas; /ZAH, Heidelberg; Klessen, Ralf S.; /ZAH, Heidelberg /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; /Amer. Museum Natural Hist.; Banerjee, Robi; /ZAH, Heidelberg

    2010-08-25

    Massive stars influence their surroundings through radiation, winds, and supernova explosions far out of proportion to their small numbers. However, the physical processes that initiate and govern the birth of massive stars remain poorly understood. Two widely discussed models are monolithic collapse of molecular cloud cores and competitive accretion. To learn more about massive star formation, we perform simulations of the collapse of rotating, massive, cloud cores including radiative heating by both non-ionizing and ionizing radiation using the FLASH adaptive mesh refinement code. These simulations show fragmentation from gravitational instability in the enormously dense accretion flows required to build up massive stars. Secondary stars form rapidly in these flows and accrete mass that would have otherwise been consumed by the massive star in the center, in a process that we term fragmentation-induced starvation. This explains why massive stars are usually found as members of high-order stellar systems that themselves belong to large clusters containing stars of all masses. The radiative heating does not prevent fragmentation, but does lead to a higher Jeans mass, resulting in fewer and more massive stars than would form without the heating. This mechanism reproduces the observed relation between the total stellar mass in the cluster and the mass of the largest star. It predicts strong clumping and filamentary structure in the center of collapsing cores, as has recently been observed. We speculate that a similar mechanism will act during primordial star formation.

  14. LKR/SDH plays important roles throughout the tick life cycle including a long starvation period.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banzragch Battur

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysine-ketoglutarate reductase/saccharopine dehydrogenase (LKR/SDH is a bifunctional enzyme catalyzing the first two steps of lysine catabolism in plants and mammals. However, to date, the properties of the lysine degradation pathway and biological functions of LKR/SDH have been very little described in arthropods such as ticks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated and characterized the gene encoding lysine-ketoglutarate reductase (LKR, EC 1.5.1.8 and saccharopine dehydrogenase (SDH, EC 1.5.1.9 from a tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis, cDNA library that encodes a bifunctional polypeptide bearing domains similar to the plant and mammalian LKR/SDH enzymes. Expression of LKR/SDH was detected in all developmental stages, indicating an important role throughout the tick life cycle, including a long period of starvation after detachment from the host. The LKR/SDH mRNA transcripts were more abundant in unfed and starved ticks than in fed and engorged ticks, suggesting that tick LKR/SDH are important for the starved tick. Gene silencing of LKR/SDH by RNAi indicated that the tick LKR/SDH plays an integral role in the osmotic regulation of water balance and development of eggs in ovary of engorged females. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Transcription analysis and gene silencing of LKR/SDH indicated that tick LKR/SDH enzyme plays not only important roles in egg production, reproduction and development of the tick, but also in carbon, nitrogen and water balance, crucial physiological processes for the survival of ticks. This is the first report on the role of LKR/SDH in osmotic regulation in animals including vertebrate and arthropods.

  15. Larval starvation to satiation: influence of nutrient regime on the success of Acanthaster planci.

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    Kennedy Wolfe

    Full Text Available High density populations of the crown-of-thorns seastar, Acanthaster planci, are a major contributor to the decline of coral reefs, however the causes behind periodic outbreaks of this species are not understood. The enhanced nutrients hypothesis posits that pulses of enhanced larval food in eutrophic waters facilitate metamorphic success with a flow-on effect for population growth. The larval resilience hypothesis suggests that A. planci larvae naturally thrive in tropical oligotrophic waters. Both hypotheses remain to be tested empirically. We raised A. planci larvae in a range of food regimes from starvation (no food to satiation (excess food. Algal cell concentration and chlorophyll levels were used to reflect phytoplankton conditions in nature for oligotrophic waters (0-100 cells ml(-1; 0-0.01 μg chl a L(-1, natural background levels of nutrients on the Great Barrier Reef (GBR (1,000-10,000 cells ml(-1; 0.1-1.0 μg chl a L(-1, and enhanced eutrophic conditions following runoff events (100,000 cells ml(-1; 10 μg chl a L(-1. We determine how these food levels affected larval growth and survival, and the metamorphic link between larval experience and juvenile quality (size in experiments where food ration per larvae was carefully controlled. Phytoplankton levels of 1 μg chl a L(-1, close to background levels for some reefs on the GBR and following flood events, were optimal for larval success. Development was less successful above and below this food treatment. Enhanced larval performance at 1 μg chl a L(-1 provides empirical support for the enhanced nutrients hypothesis, but up to a limit, and emphasizes the need for appropriate mitigation strategies to reduce eutrophication and the consequent risk of A. planci outbreaks.

  16. Manipulation of oil synthesis in Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145 with a phosphorus starvation-inducible promoter from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwai, Masako; Hori, Koichi; Sasaki-Sekimoto, Yuko; Shimojima, Mie; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae accumulate triacylglycerols (TAGs) under conditions of nutrient stress. Phosphorus (P) starvation induces the accumulation of TAGs, and the cells under P starvation maintain growth through photosynthesis. We recently reported that P starvation-dependent overexpression of type-2 diacylglycerol acyl-CoA acyltransferase (CrDGTT4) from Chlamydomonas reinhardtii using a sulfoquinovosyldiacylglycerol synthase 2 (SQD2) promoter, which has increased activity during P starvation, enhances TAG accumulation in C. reinhardtii cells. As a result, the content of C18:1 fatty acid, a preferred substrate of CrDGTT4, is increased in TAGs. Here we isolated genes encoding SQD2 from strain NIES-2145 of the eustigmatophyte Nannochloropsis and showed that their expression, like that in C. reinhardtii, was up-regulated during P starvation. To enhance oil accumulation under P starvation, we transformed pCrSQD2-CrDGTT4 into Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145. The transformants had a fatty acid composition that was more similar to that of C. reinhardtii, which resulted in enhanced TAG accumulation and higher 18:1(9) content. The results indicated that the P starvation-inducible promoter of C. reinhardtii was able to drive expression of the CrDGTT4 gene in Nannochloropsis strain NIES-2145 under P starvation. We conclude that the heterologous CrSQD2 promoter is effective in manipulating TAG synthesis in Nannochloropsis during P starvation.

  17. Role of the insulin/Tor signaling network in starvation-induced programmed cell death in Drosophila oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, T L; McCall, K

    2012-01-01

    Amino-acid starvation leads to an inhibition of cellular proliferation and the induction of programmed cell death (PCD) in the Drosophila ovary. Disruption of insulin signaling has been shown to inhibit the progression of oogenesis, but it is unclear whether this phenotype mimics starvation. Here, we investigate whether the insulin-mediated phosphoinositide kinase-3 pathway regulates PCD in mid oogenesis. We reasoned that under well-fed conditions, disruption of positive components of the insulin signaling pathway within the germline would mimic starvation and produce degenerating egg chambers. Surprisingly, mutants did not mimic starvation but instead produced many abnormal egg chambers in which the somatic follicle cells disappeared and the germline persisted. These abnormal egg chambers did not show an induction of caspases and lysosomes like that observed in wild-type (WT) degenerating egg chambers. Egg chambers from insulin signaling mutants were resistant to starvation-induced PCD, indicating that a complete block in insulin-signaling prevents the proper response to starvation. However, target of rapamycin (Tor) mutants did show a phenotype that mimicked WT starvation-induced PCD, indicating an insulin independent regulation of PCD via Tor signaling. These results suggest that inhibition of the insulin signaling pathway is not sufficient to regulate starvation-induced PCD in mid oogenesis. Furthermore, starvation-induced PCD is regulated by Tor signaling converging with the canonical insulin signaling pathway. PMID:22240900

  18. Impacts of strigolactone on shoot branching under phosphate starvation in chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xi, Lin; Wen, Chao; Fang, Shuang; Chen, Xiaoli; Nie, Jing; Chu, JinFang; Yuan, Cunquan; Yan, Cunyu; Ma, Nan; Zhao, Liangjun

    2015-01-01

    Chrysanthemum (Dendranthema grandiflorum cv. Jinba) shoot branching is determined by bud outgrowth during the vegetative growth stage. The degree of axillary bud outgrowth is highly influenced by environmental conditions, such as nutrient availability. Here, we demonstrated that phosphorus (Pi) starvation significantly reduces axillary bud outgrowth in chrysanthemum. A strigolactone (SL) biosynthesis gene, DgCCD7, was isolated and characterized as an ortholog of MAX3/DAD3/RMS5/D17. By using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS), three putative SLs were identified and levels of all three SLs showed strong increase under Pi starvation conditions. Determinations of the distribution of SLs and regulation of DgCCD7/8 in response to Pi changes in root indicate that SL acts systemically. However, temporal expression patterns of biosynthesis and signaling genes in nodes revealed that Pi starvation causes a local response of SL pathway. Treatment of node segments with or without auxin and Pi revealed that in the absence of exogenous auxin, Pi delayed axillary buds outgrowth and up-regulated local SL pathway genes. These data indicated that an auxin-SL regulatory loop responded to Pi starvation for delaying bud outgrowth locally, root biosynthesized SLs were transported acropetally and functioned in shoot branching inhibition under Pi starvation. We proposed that SLs contributed to chrysanthemum shoot branching control in response to Pi-limiting conditions in a systemic way. PMID:26442011

  19. The effect of short-term starvation or water deprivation on caffeine pharmacokinetics in calves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janus, K; Antoszek, J; Suszycki, S

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of short-term starvation or water deprivation on the pharmacokinetics of caffeine in calves. The experiment was carried out on 30 Holstein-Friesian calves (10 calves in a control group, 10 calves in a 'starved' group and 10 calves in a 'water-deprived' group) aged 24-25 days. Control group calves were given caffeine at 24-25 and 28-29 days of age. In the experimental groups caffeine studies were performed before and after 4 days of starvation or water deprivation. In the control group no significant differences between the pharmacokinetic parameters of caffeine in 24-25 and 28-29 day-old calves were observed. Starvation for 4 days was associated with an increase in the mean residence time (MRT) of caffeine in each subject. The increase was statistically significant (P starvation the total plasma clearance of caffeine decreased (about 20 per cent). The decrease was statistically significant (P starvation or water deprivation leads to a general inhibition of hepatic P450 enzymatic system and may impair the elimination of drugs that undergo metabolism by these enzymes. Copyright 2001 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  20. An optimal method of iron starvation of the obligate intracellular pathogen, Chlamydia trachomatis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C. Thompson

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Iron is an essential cofactor in a number of critical biochemical reactions, and as such, its acquisition, storage, and metabolism is highly regulated in most organisms. The obligate intracellular bacterium, Chlamydia trachomatis experiences a developmental arrest when iron within the host is depleted. The nature of the iron starvation response in Chlamydia is relatively uncharacterized because of the likely inefficient method of iron depletion, which currently relies on the compound deferoxamine mesylate (DFO. Inefficient induction of the iron starvation response precludes the identification of iron-regulated genes. This report evaluated DFO with another iron chelator, 2,2’-bipyridyl (Bpdl and presented a systematic comparison of the two across a range of criteria in a single-treatment time-of-infection regimen. We demonstrate that the membrane permeable Bpdl was superior to DFO in the inhibition of chlamydia development, the induction of aberrant morphology, and the induction of an iron starvation transcriptional response in both host and bacteria. Furthermore, iron starvation using Bpdl identified the periplasmic iron binding protein-encoding ytgA gene as iron- responsive. Overall, the data present a compelling argument for the use of Bpdl, rather than DFO, in future iron starvation studies of chlamydia and other intracellular bacteria.

  1. Autophagy is essential for the maintenance of amino acids and ATP levels during acute amino acid starvation in MDAMB231 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Mark; Davis, Tanja; Loos, Ben; Sishi, Balindiwe; Huisamen, Barbara; Strijdom, Hans; Engelbrecht, Anna-Mart

    2018-03-01

    Autophagy plays a major role in the adaptive metabolic response of cancer cells during adverse conditions such as nutrient deprivation. However, specific data that assess metabolite profiles in context with adenosine triphosphate (ATP) availability and cell death susceptibility remain limited. Human breast cancer cells, MDAMB231, and normal breast epithelial cells, MCF12A, were subjected to short-term amino acid starvation and the cellular apoptotic and autophagic responses assessed. The role of autophagy in the control of cellular amino acid, ATP, free fatty acid, and glucose levels during amino acid starvation were compared. We demonstrate that breast cancer cells have an increased metabolic demand contributing to significant amino acid and ATP depletion in a nutrient-poor environment. Upregulation of autophagy was important for the generation of amino acids and free fatty acids and maintenance of cellular ATP levels. In contrast to normal cells, breast cancer cells were unable to maintain the response after 12 hours of amino acid starvation. Regulation of autophagic activity in these environments had indirect consequences on cell death susceptibility. Overall, our data provide support for autophagy as an important survival mechanism capable of providing metabolic substrates when cancer cells are faced with nutrient-deprived environments. The results obtained in this study helps to expand our current knowledge on how cells respond to environmental changes; the biochemical and metabolic consequences and the physiological processes activated in response. The environmental stress applied in this study is relevant to tumour physiology, and results can be translated to cancer therapeutic and clinical research areas, ultimately assisting in the specific targeting of cancer cells while avoiding harm to normal cells. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Expressionof Drosophila FOXO regulates growth and can phenocopy starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lockyer Joseph M

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Components of theinsulin signaling pathway are important regulators of growth. TheFOXO (forkhead box, sub-group "O" transcriptionfactors regulate cellular processes under conditions of low levelsof insulin signaling. Studies in mammalian cell culture show thatactivation of FOXO transcription factors causes cell death or cellcycle arrest. The Caenorhabiditis elegans homologue ofFOXO, Daf-16, is required for the formation of dauer larvae in responseto nutritional stress. In addition, FOXO factors have been implicatedin stress resistance and longevity. Results We have identifiedthe Drosophila melanogaster homologue of FOXO (dFOXO,which is conserved in amino acid sequence compared with the mammalianFOXO homologues and Daf-16. Expression of dFOXO during early larvaldevelopment causes inhibition of larval growth and alterations infeeding behavior. Inhibition of larval growth is reversible upondiscontinuation of dFOXO expression. Expression of dFOXO duringthe third larval instar or at low levels during development leadsto the generation of adults that are reduced in size. Analysis ofthe wings and eyes of these small flies indicates that the reductionin size is due to decreases in cell size and cell number. Overexpressionof dFOXO in the developing eye leads to a characteristic phenotypewith reductions in cell size and cell number. This phenotype canbe rescued by co-expression of upstream insulin signaling components,dPI3K and dAkt, however, this rescue is not seen when FOXO is mutatedto a constitutively active form. Conclusions dFOXO is conservedin both sequence and regulatory mechanisms when compared with otherFOXO homologues. The establishment of Drosophila as a model forthe study of FOXO transcription factors should prove beneficialto determining the biological role of these signaling molecules.The alterations in larval development seen upon overexpression ofdFOXO closely mimic the phenotypic effects of starvation, suggestinga

  3. Survival strategies in arctic ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. J. C. Tyler

    1990-09-01

    Full Text Available Arctic ungulates usually neither freeze nor starve to death despite the rigours of winter. Physiological adaptations enable them to survive and reproduce despite long periods of intense cold and potential undernutrition. Heat conservation is achieved by excellent insulation combined with nasal heat exchange. Seasonal variation in fasting metabolic rate has been reported in several temperate and sub-arctic species of ungulates and seems to occur in muskoxen. Surprisingly, there is no evidence for this in reindeer. Both reindeer and caribou normally maintain low levels of locomotor activity in winter. Light foot loads are important for reducing energy expenditure while walking over snow. The significance and control of selective cooling of the brain during hard exercise (e.g. escape from predators is discussed. Like other cervids, reindeer and caribou display a pronounced seasonal cycle of appetite and growth which seems to have an intrinsic basis. This has two consequences. First, the animals evidently survive perfectly well despite enduring negative energy balance for long periods. Second, loss of weight in winter is not necessarily evidence of undernutrition. The main role of fat reserves, especially in males, may be to enhance reproductive success. The principal role of fat reserves in winter appears to be to provide a supplement to, rather than a substitute for, poor quality winter forage. Fat also provides an insurance against death during periods of acute starvation.

  4. Changes in carbon and nitrogen stable isotopes of chironomid larvae during growth, starvation and metamorphosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Kikuchi, Eisuke; Takagi, Shigeto; Shikano, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    We conducted experiments to determine isotope changes in the deposit-feeding chironomid larvae Chironomus acerbiphilus during feeding, starvation and metamorphosis. Isotope changes in chironomid larvae occurred mainly during growth and rarely afterward. This finding indicates that chironomid isotope turnover mainly occurs in conjunction with growth and suggests that chironomid larvae only break down newly assimilated food for energy during periods of no growth. Chironomid delta(13)C values significantly increased throughout the starvation experiment, indicating that chironomids preferentially break down components with lower delta(13)C content during starvation. We found significant changes in chironomid isotope ratios ((15)N enrichment) during pupation. This evidence suggests that the physiological condition of animals (such as during an active growth phase or pre- or post-molting) is important to their stable isotope ratios.

  5. miR-71b regulation of insulin/IGF-1 signaling during starvation in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y Y; Zhao, J M; Liu, Q; Guo, Q; Liu, Z; Wang, X X; Wang, C Y; Li, R Y; Zhang, Y Z; Zhang, S T

    2015-10-05

    Planarians, which have a large population of stem cells called neoblasts, are molecularly tractable model systems used in the study of regeneration. However, planarians have strong resistance to hunger and have developed growth arrest strategies. For example, they can change their size and undergo growth regression during starvation periods. The results of the current study show that the microRNA, miR-71b, and the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway have important functions in the development of starvation-induced planarians. We demonstrate tissue-specific expression of miR-71b using in situ hybridization. By employing real-time polymerase chain reaction, we provide evidence that miR-71b is upregulated in starvation-induced planarians. Furthermore, we validate and verify the target genes of miR-71b.

  6. Effect of Thymine Starvation on Messenger Ribonucleic Acid Synthesis in Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzati, Denise

    1966-01-01

    Luzzati, Denise (Institut de Biologie Physico-Chimique, Paris, France). Effect of thymine starvation on messenger ribonucleic acid synthesis in Escherichia coli. J. Bacteriol. 92:1435–1446. 1966.—During the course of thymine starvation, the rate of synthesis of messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA, the rapidly labeled fraction of the RNA which decays in the presence of dinitrophenol or which hybridizes with deoxyribonucleic acid) decreases exponentially, in parallel with the viability of the thymine-starved bacteria. The ability of cell-free extracts of starved bacteria to incorporate ribonucleoside triphosphates into RNA was determined; it was found to be inferior to that of extracts from control cells. The analysis of the properties of cell-free extracts of starved cells shows that their decreased RNA polymerase activity is the consequence of a modification of their deoxyribonucleic acid, the ability of which to serve as a template for RNA polymerase decreases during starvation. PMID:5332402

  7. Arabidopsis PECP1 and PS2 are phosphate starvation-inducible phosphocholine phosphatases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angkawijaya, Artik Elisa; Nakamura, Yuki

    2017-12-09

    Phosphate-starved plants reduce phosphatidylcholine content presumably to provide an internal phosphate source while replacing membrane phospholipids by galactolipids, a process termed membrane lipid remodeling. However, whether the metabolic fate of released phosphocholine is a phosphate source remains elusive because primary phosphocholine phosphatases in vivo are unknown in seed plants. Here, we show that PECP1 and PS2 are the primary phosphocholine phosphatases in Arabidopsis and function redundantly under phosphate starvation. Under phosphate starvation, the double knockout mutant of PECP1 and PS2 showed reduced content of choline but no severe growth phenotype, which suggests that phosphocholine dephosphorylation is not likely a major source of internal phosphate reserve. We identified primary phosphocholine phosphatases, demonstrated their involvement under phosphate starvation, and updated the metabolic map of membrane lipid remodeling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence for the Adverse Effect of Starvation on Bone Quality: A Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Kueper

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition and starvation’s possible adverse impacts on bone health and bone quality first came into the spotlight after the horrors of the Holocaust and the ghettos of World War II. Famine and food restrictions led to a mean caloric intake of 200–800 calories a day in the ghettos and concentration camps, resulting in catabolysis and starvation of the inhabitants and prisoners. Severely increased risks of fracture, poor bone mineral density, and decreased cortical strength were noted in several case series and descriptive reports addressing the medical issues of these individuals. A severe effect of severely diminished food intake and frequently concomitant calcium- and Vitamin D deficiencies was subsequently proven in both animal models and the most common cause of starvation in developed countries is anorexia nervosa. This review attempts to summarize the literature available on the impact of the metabolic response to Starvation on overall bone health and bone quality.

  9. Experimental Comparison of the Behavior between Base Oil and Grease Starvation Based on Inlet Film Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Kostal

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the experimental study of an elastohydrodynamic contact under conditions of insufficient lubricant supply. Starvation level of this type of the contact may be experimentally determined based on the position of the meniscus, but this way can't determine all levels of starvation. Consequent development in the field of tribology achieved theoretical model that can determine all levels of starvation by dependency on the thickness of the lubricant film entering the contact, but it is difficult for experimental verification. The main goal of this work is an experimental study and description of the behavior of the elastohydrodynamic contact with controlled thickness of the lubricant film at the contact input. Contact was lubricated by the base oil and the grease and compared. Results were surprising because the only differences between oil and grease were observed for more viscous lubricants at thicker film layer entering to the contact.

  10. Biochemical evaluation of aestivation and starvation in two snail ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is resurgence in incidence of schistosomiasis in Nigeria with attendant socio-economic and health impact. The agents transmitting this disease are the Bulinus snails which employ aestivation to survive conditions of unfavourable weather such as lack of food and water. The mechanism of aestivation under aridity and ...

  11. [Effect of starvation-induced autophagy on cell cycle of tumor cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jun-Na; Huang, Dan; Xiao, Tian; Wang, Zun; Li, Xiao-Lan; Xiao, Hui; Tao, De-Ding; Gong, Jian-Ping

    2008-08-01

    No serum starvation could induce autophagy and cell cycle arrest. Although autophagy and cell cycle have been widely explored, little is known about their relationship. This study was to observe the change of Cyclin expression during starvation-induced autophagy to discuss the effect of autophagy on cell cycle. In control group, HeLa cells were treated with d-Hanks solution (a medium with no serum). In experiment group, HeLa cells were treated with d-Hanks solution containing 3-methyladenine (3-MA, a specific inhibitor of autophagy). Cells were harvested after being starved for 0, 3, 6 and 12 h. Flow cytometry (FCM) and Weston blot were used to detect Cyclin and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3(LC-3) which marked autophagy specifically. In control group, the expression of LC-3 protein was detected early after being starved for 3 h, and gradually increased along with starvation; the expression of Cyclin D3 and Cyclin E was decreased evidently after a short-time starvation (3 h) and descended to the minimum when cells were being starved for 6 h; the expression of Cyclin A and Cyclin B1 were apparently decreased after being starved for 6 h. In experiment group, LC-3 protein could not be detected during starvation when cells were exposed to 3-MA and the down-regulation of Cyclins was suppressed. Autophagy is involved in starvation-induced hydrolysis of Cyclins. The hydrolysis of Cyclin D3 and Cyclin E is quicker than that of Cyclin A and Cyclin B1.

  12. Comparative studies on starvation - and indomethacin - induced ulcerations in albino rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elegbe, R A

    1978-01-01

    Experimental models of chronic and acute peptic ulcerations were produced in the albino rats by means of prolonged starvation and indomethacin administration. In the case of acute indomethacin-induced peptic ulceration, the effects of anticholinergic drugs on the ulcers produced were also studied. Starving the rats for a period of seven days produced gastric ulceration in all the rats used while indomethacin produced gastric ulceration within five hours in all the rats used. Severe ulceration of the degree found in human peptic ulcer disease was produced only by chronic starvation. Anticholinergic drugs ameliorated indomethacin-induced gastric ulceration, partly at least, by reducing intra-gastric acidity.

  13. Comparison of saline wastewater treatment performance of SBR with repeated starvation under aerobic and non-aerobic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, B H; Kim, S S; Yoon, C H; Park, K H

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of repeated starvation and feeding on the performance of a sequencing batch reactor (SBR) used for treating saline wastewater. The effects of aerobic and non-aerobic conditions on the sludge during starvation were evaluated to recover the performance of the SBR in terms of floc size and pollutant removal after resuming wastewater feeding. The floc size, fractal dimension, sludge volume index (SVI), specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR), and pollutant removal efficiency were monitored. Experiment results revealed that the floc size and fractal dimensions decreased during starvation under both aerobic and non-aerobic conditions and increased after re-feeding wastewater. However, the difference in floc physical characteristics and performance depended on the starvation condition and was pronounced as starvation and re-feeding were repeated. The floc size and fractal dimensions decreased from 152.7 to 72.2 and 1.98 to 1.79 at the end of the fourth starvation period, resulting in deterioration of the sludge settleability and effluent quality. On the other hand, the floc size and fractal dimensions decreased from 158.7 to 135.7 and 1.95 to 1.81 at the end of the fourth starvation period but remained relatively constant after sludge adaptation. Some correlations were observed between the parameters monitored in this study. The results showed that maintaining the sludge under non-aerobic conditions was an effective strategy for reducing the effects of repeated starvation.

  14. Multi-Axis Niche Examination of Ecological Specialization: Responses to Heat, Desiccation and Starvation Stress in Two Species of Pit-Building Antlions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotkopf, Ron; Barkae, Erez David; Bar-Hanin, Einav; Alcalay, Yehonatan; Ovadia, Ofer

    2012-01-01

    Classical ecological studies discussing specialization usually focus on species’ performance along one niche axis. This approach may overlook niche differentiation evident in another dimension which could explain species co-occurrence. The present research exemplifies a comprehensive approach to examining local adaptation. Specifically, we examined multiple niche axes by subjecting a model organism to various experimental conditions to monitor responses to extreme stress associated with heat, desiccation and starvation. Our model system comprised two pit-building antlions: the habitat generalist Myrmeleon hyalinus and the habitat specialist Cueta lineosa. Previous research has shown that the foraging performance of the generalist is better than that of the specialist, even in the latter’s characteristic habitat. We illustrate that this apparent superiority of the habitat generalist does not manifest itself along other niche axes; rather, the habitat specialist holds a set of traits that provide an advantage under harsh environmental conditions. Specifically, C. lineosa has an advantage over M. hyalinus at high temperatures, exhibiting a higher survival rate and improved foraging success (i.e., high-temperature specialist). C. lineosa is also more efficient in its energy budget, losing less mass during starvation and gaining mass more efficiently during feeding. This superior efficiency is a result of physiological adaptations as well as behavioural responses to harsh conditions. In conclusion, our results imply that the habitat specialization of C. lineosa has not led it towards an evolutionary dead-end. PMID:23209835

  15. Modelling survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashauer, Roman; Albert, Carlo; Augustine, Starrlight

    2016-01-01

    well GUTS, calibrated with short-term survival data of Gammarus pulex exposed to four pesticides, can forecast effects of longer-term pulsed exposures. Thirdly, we tested the ability of GUTS to estimate 14-day median effect concentrations of malathion for a range of species and use these estimates...

  16. Survival Analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Rupert G

    2011-01-01

    A concise summary of the statistical methods used in the analysis of survival data with censoring. Emphasizes recently developed nonparametric techniques. Outlines methods in detail and illustrates them with actual data. Discusses the theory behind each method. Includes numerous worked problems and numerical exercises.

  17. Do thyroid hormones mediate the effects of starvation on mood in adolescent girls with eating disorders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swenne, Ingemar; Rosling, Agneta

    2010-11-01

    In the eating disorders (ED) comorbid depression is common and clinical experience suggests that it is partly related to starvation. Starvation affects thyroid hormone status and thyroid hypofunction is in turn associated with depressed mood. We have therefore investigated the possibility that thyroid hormones and starvation are associated with mood in ED. Two-hundred and thirty-nine adolescent girls were examined at presentation of an ED. Analyses of thyroid hormones, documentation of weight and weight changes, self-reports of depressive symptomatology and clinical diagnoses of ED and depression were used in the analyses. Of the 239 girls 100 were diagnosed with depression. The girls with and without depression did not differ in age, weight, height, body mass index (BMI), weight loss or duration of disease. Plasma free thyroxine concentrations were lower in depressed girls (11.9±1.7 versus 12.8±1.9 pmol/L; pdepression. Low circulating thyroxine concentrations may provide a link between starvation and depression in adolescent girls with ED. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Silicon Promotes Growth of Brassica napus L. and Delays Leaf Senescence Induced by Nitrogen Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cylia Haddad

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Silicon (Si is the second most abundant element in soil and has several beneficial effects, especially in plants subjected to stress conditions. However, the effect of Si in preventing nitrogen (N starvation in plants is poorly documented. The aim of this work was to study the effect of a short Si supply duration (7 days on growth, N uptake, photosynthetic activity, and leaf senescence progression in rapeseed subjected (or not to N starvation. Our results showed that after 1 week of Si supply, Si improves biomass and increases N uptake and root expression of a nitrate transporter gene. After 12 days of N starvation, compared to -Si plants, mature leaf from +Si plants showed a high chlorophyll content, a maintain of net photosynthetic activity, a decrease of oxidative stress markers [hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 and malondialdehyde (MDA] and a significant delay in senescence. When N-deprived plants were resupplied with N, a greening again associated with an increase of photosynthetic activity was observed in mature leaves of plants pretreated with Si. Moreover, during the duration of N resupply, an increase of N uptake and nitrate transporter gene expression were observed in plants pretreated with Si. In conclusion, this study has shown a beneficial role of Si to alleviate damage associated with N starvation and more especially its role in delaying of leaf senescence.

  19. Expression stability of 13 housekeeping genes during carbon starvation of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alqarni, Budoor; Colley, Brendan; Klebensberger, Janosch; McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A

    2016-08-01

    Quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) is a reliable technique for quantifying mRNA levels when normalised by a stable reference gene/s. Many putative reference genes are known to be affected by physiological stresses, such as nutrient limitation and hence may not be suitable for normalisation. In this study of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the expression of 13 commonly used reference genes, rpoS, proC, recA, rpsL, rho, oprL, anr, tipA, nadB, fabD, ampC, algD and gyrA, were analysed for changes in expression under carbon starvation and nutrient replete conditions. The results showed that rpoS was the only stably expressed housekeeping gene during carbon starvation. In contrast, other commonly used housekeeping genes were shown to vary by as much as 10-100 fold under starvation conditions. This study has identified a suitable reference gene for qRT-PCR in P. aeruginosa during carbon starvation. The results presented here highlight the need to validate housekeeping genes under the chosen experimental conditions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Insertion-Sequence-Mediated Mutations Isolated During Adaptation to Growth and Starvation in Lactococcus lactis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, de J.A.G.M.; Akkermans, A.D.L.; Hoekstra, R.F.; Vos, de W.M.

    2004-01-01

    We studied the activity of three multicopy insertion sequence (IS) elements in 12 populations of Lactococcus lactis IL1403 that evolved in the laboratory for 1000 generations under various environmental conditions (growth or starvation and shaken or stationary). Using RFLP analysis of single-clone

  1. Long-distance movement of phosphate starvation-responsive microRNAs in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huen, A K; Rodriguez-Medina, C; Ho, A Y Y; Atkins, C A; Smith, P M C

    2017-07-01

    Plant microRNAs are small RNAs that are important for genetic regulation of processes such as plant development or environmental responses. Specific microRNAs accumulate in the phloem during phosphate starvation, and may act as long-distance signalling molecules. We performed quantitative PCR on Arabidopsis hypocotyl micrograft tissues of wild-type and hen1-6 mutants to assess the mobility of several phosphate starvation-responsive microRNA species. In addition to the previously confirmed mobile species miR399d, the corresponding microRNA* (miR399d*) was identified for the first time as mobile between shoots and roots. Translocation by phosphate-responsive microRNAs miR827 and miR2111a between shoots and roots during phosphate starvation was evident, while their respective microRNA*s were not mobile. The results suggest that long-distance mobility of microRNA species is selective and can occur without the corresponding duplex strand. Movement of miR399d* and root-localised accumulation of miR2111a* opens the potential for persisting microRNA*s to be mobile and functional in novel pathways during phosphate starvation responses. © 2017 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  2. Starvation induces FoxO-dependent mitotic-to-endocycle switch pausing during Drosophila oogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouandin, Patrick; Ghiglione, Christian; Noselli, Stéphane

    2014-08-01

    When exposed to nutrient challenge, organisms have to adapt their physiology in order to balance reproduction with adult fitness. In mammals, ovarian follicles enter a massive growth phase during which they become highly dependent on gonadotrophic factors and nutrients. Somatic tissues play a crucial role in integrating these signals, controlling ovarian follicle atresia and eventually leading to the selection of a single follicle for ovulation. We used Drosophila follicles as a model to study the effect of starvation on follicle maturation. Upon starvation, Drosophila vitellogenic follicles adopt an 'atresia-like' behavior, in which some slow down their development whereas others enter degeneration. The mitotic-to-endocycle (M/E) transition is a critical step during Drosophila oogenesis, allowing the entry of egg chambers into vitellogenesis. Here, we describe a specific and transient phase during M/E switching that is paused upon starvation. The Insulin pathway induces the pausing of the M/E switch, blocking the entry of egg chambers into vitellogenesis. Pausing of the M/E switch involves a previously unknown crosstalk between FoxO, Cut and Notch that ensures full reversion of the process and rapid resumption of oogenesis upon refeeding. Our work reveals a novel genetic mechanism controlling the extent of the M/E switch upon starvation, thus integrating metabolic cues with development, growth and reproduction. © 2014. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  3. The effect of starvation on the metabolic rate and microanatomy of Galumna elimata (Acari: Oribatida)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hubert, J.; Šustr, Vladimír

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 98, - (2001), s. 265-275 ISSN 1210-5759 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA206/97/0629 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z6066911 Keywords : Acari * starvation * mortality Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 0.802, year: 2001

  4. Altered metabolism and persistent starvation behaviors caused by reduced AMPK function in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik C Johnson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Organisms must utilize multiple mechanisms to maintain energetic homeostasis in the face of limited nutrient availability. One mechanism involves activation of the heterotrimeric AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK, a cell-autonomous sensor to energetic changes regulated by ATP to AMP ratios. We examined the phenotypic consequences of reduced AMPK function, both through RNAi knockdown of the gamma subunit (AMPKγ and through expression of a dominant negative alpha (AMPKα variant in Drosophila melanogaster. Reduced AMPK signaling leads to hypersensitivity to starvation conditions as measured by lifespan and locomotor activity. Locomotor levels in flies with reduced AMPK function were lower during unstressed conditions, but starvation-induced hyperactivity, an adaptive response to encourage foraging, was significantly higher than in wild type. Unexpectedly, total dietary intake was greater in animals with reduced AMPK function yet total triglyceride levels were lower. AMPK mutant animals displayed starvation-like lipid accumulation patterns in metabolically key liver-like cells, oenocytes, even under fed conditions, consistent with a persistent starved state. Measurements of O(2 consumption reveal that metabolic rates are greater in animals with reduced AMPK function. Lastly, rapamycin treatment tempers the starvation sensitivity and lethality associated with reduced AMPK function. Collectively, these results are consistent with models that AMPK shifts energy usage away from expenditures into a conservation mode during nutrient-limited conditions at a cellular level. The highly conserved AMPK subunits throughout the Metazoa, suggest such findings may provide significant insight for pharmaceutical strategies to manipulate AMPK function in humans.

  5. Seedling Establishment of Tall Fescue Exposed to Long-Term Starvation Stress

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pompeiano, Antonio; Damiani, C. R.; Stefanini, S.; Vernieri, S.; Reyes, T. H.; Volterrani, M.; Guglielminetti, L.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 11 (2016), č. článku e0166131. E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : seedling * Tall fescue * Tall fescue exposed * starvation Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 2.806, year: 2016

  6. Differences in swimming ability and its response to starvation among male and female Gambusia affinis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiangtao Li

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available To explore the differences in the swimming ability and environmental adaptive abilities between male and female Gambusia affinis, we assessed the differences in burst swimming speeds (Uburst, critical swimming speeds (Ucrit and their related fin areas, and consumption of energy substances after starvation at 0 (control group, 15, 30, 45, and 60 days, respectively. The results showed that the pectoral and caudal fin areas did not differ significantly between male and female G. affinis. However, the dry mass, condition factors, and absolute contents of glycogen, lipids, and proteins were significantly elevated in females in the control group (P<0.05, whereas Uburst and Ucrit were significantly low (P<0.05. After starvation of 60 days, the rate of consumption of lipids was significantly low in the females (P<0.05. Although Uburst and Ucrit decreased linearly with increased duration of starvation, the coefficient of linear equation between Ucrit and starvation time was significantly lower in females than males (P<0.05. These findings indicated that low body mass and condition factors reduce the relative bear load and moving resistance that causes high swimming performance in male G. affinis. High contents of energy substances and low rate of consumption of lipids result in stable Ucrit in females during hunger.

  7. Starvation Ketoacidosis: A Cause of Severe Anion Gap Metabolic Acidosis in Pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nupur Sinha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Pregnancy is a diabetogenic state characterized by relative insulin resistance, enhanced lipolysis, elevated free fatty acids and increased ketogenesis. In this setting, short period of starvation can precipitate ketoacidosis. This sequence of events is recognized as “accelerated starvation.” Metabolic acidosis during pregnancy may have adverse impact on fetal neural development including impaired intelligence and fetal demise. Short periods of starvation during pregnancy may present as severe anion gap metabolic acidosis (AGMA. We present a 41-year-old female in her 32nd week of pregnancy, admitted with severe AGMA with pH 7.16, anion gap 31, and bicarbonate of 5 mg/dL with normal lactate levels. She was intubated and accepted to medical intensive care unit. Urine and serum acetone were positive. Evaluation for all causes of AGMA was negative. The diagnosis of starvation ketoacidosis was established in absence of other causes of AGMA. Intravenous fluids, dextrose, thiamine, and folic acid were administered with resolution of acidosis, early extubation, and subsequent normal delivery of a healthy baby at full term. Rapid reversal of acidosis and favorable outcome are achieved with early administration of dextrose containing fluids.

  8. Bacterial symbionts, Buchnera, and starvation on wing dimorphism in English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae (F. (Homoptera: Aphididae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fangmei eZhang

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Wing dimorphism in aphids can be affected by multiple cues, including both biotic (nutrition, crowding, interspecific interactions, the presence of natural enemies, maternal and transgenerational effects, and alarm pheromone and abiotic factors (temperature, humidity, and photoperiod. The majority of the phloem-feeding aphids carry Buchnera, an obligate symbiotic proteobacteria. Buchnera has a highly reduced genome size, but encode key enzymes in the tryptophan biosynthetic pathway and is crucial for nutritional balance, development and reproduction in aphids. In this study, we investigated the impact of two nutritional-based biotic factors, symbionts and starvation, on the wing dimorphism in the English grain aphid, Sitobion avenae, a devastating insect pest of cereal crops (e.g., wheat worldwide. Elimination of Buchnera using the antibiotic rifampicin significantly reduced the formation of winged morphs, body mass and fecundity in S. avenae. Furthermore, the absence of this primary endosymbiont may disrupt the nutrient acquisition in aphids and alter transgenerational phenotypic expression. Similarly, both survival rate and the formation of winged morphs were substantially reduced after neonatal (< 24h old offspring were starved for a period of time. The combined results shed light on the impact of two nutritional-based biotic factors on the phenotypic plasticity in aphids. A better understanding of the wing dimorphism in aphids will provide the theoretical basis for the prediction and integrated management of these phloem-feeding insect pests.

  9. Combined effects of starvation and butyrate on autophagy-dependent gingival epithelial cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, M; Murofushi, T; Tsuda, H; Mikami, Y; Zhao, N; Ochiai, K; Kurita-Ochiai, T; Yamamoto, M; Otsuka, K; Suzuki, N

    2017-06-01

    Bacteria in the dental biofilm surrounding marginal gingival grooves cause periodontal diseases. Numerous bacteria within the biofilm consume nutrients from the gingival crevicular fluid. Furthermore, some gram-negative bacteria in mature dental biofilms produce butyrate. Thus, gingival epithelial cells in close proximity to mature dental biofilms are at risk of both starvation and exposure to butyrate. In the present study, we determined the combined effects of starvation and butyrate exposure on gingival epithelial cell death and the underlying mechanisms. The Ca9-22 cell line was used as an in vitro counterpart of gingival epithelial cells. Cell death was measured as the amount of total DNA in the dead cells using SYTOX Green dye, which penetrates through membranes of dead cells and emits fluorescence when it intercalates into double-stranded DNA. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity, the amount of autophagy, and acetylation of histone H3 were determined using western blot. Gene expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3b (lc3b) were determined using quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Butyrate-induced cell death occurred in a dose-dependent manner whether cells were starved or fed. However, the induction of cell death was two to four times higher when cells were placed under starvation conditions compared to when they were fed. Moreover, both starvation and butyrate exposure induced AMPK activity and autophagy. While AMPK inactivation resulted in decreased autophagy and butyrate-induced cell death under conditions of starvation, AMPK activation resulted in butyrate-induced cell death when cells were fed. Combined with the results of our previous report, which demonstrated butyrate-induced autophagy-dependent cell death, the results of this study suggest that the combination of starvation and butyrate exposure activates AMPK inducing autophagy and subsequent cell death. Notably, this combination markedly

  10. Effects of starvation on moult cycle and hepatopancreas of Stage I lobster (Homarus americanus) larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anger, K.; Storch, V.; Anger, V.; Capuzzo, J. M.

    1985-06-01

    Effects of feeding and starvation on the moult cycle and on the ultrastructure of hepatopancreas cells were studied in Stage I lobster larvae ( Homarus americanus Milne-Edwards). The relative significance of yolk and first food was quite different in larvae originating from two females. This difference was evident also in the amounts of stored lipid in the R-cells of the larval hepatopancreas. Most larvae from one hatch were, in principle, able to develop exclusively with yolk reserves (without food) to the second instar. The larvae from the second hatch showed lecithotrophic development only to the transition between late intermoult and early premoult (Stages C/D0 of Drachs's moult cycle) of the first larval instar. When initial starvation in this group lasted for 3 days or more, the point of no return (PNR) was exceeded. After the PNR, consumption of food was still possible, but development ceased in the transition C/D0 or in late premoult (D3 4). It is suggested that these stages of the moult cycle are critical points were cessation of development and increased mortality are particularly likely in early larval lobsters under nutritional stress. Examination of hepatopancreas R-cells suggested that the PNR is caused by an irreversible loss of the ability to restore lipid reserves depleted during initial starvation. Initial periods of starvation ending before the PNR prolonged mainly Stage D0 of the same instar (I). During this delay, structural changes in the R-cells caused by the preceding period of starvation were reversed: reduced lipid inclusions, swollen mitochondria, an increased number of residual bodies indicating autolysis, and a reduction of the microvillous processes. Continually starved larvae which showed lecithotrophic development throughout the first instar and were then re-fed after moulting successfully, had later a prolonged intermoult (Stage C) period in the second instar. This shows that, despite occasional lecithotrophy, food is an important

  11. The response and recovery of the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome to phosphate starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Jongchan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Over application of phosphate fertilizers in modern agriculture contaminates waterways and disrupts natural ecosystems. Nevertheless, this is a common practice among farmers, especially in developing countries as abundant fertilizers are believed to boost crop yields. The study of plant phosphate metabolism and its underlying genetic pathways is key to discovering methods of efficient fertilizer usage. The work presented here describes a genome-wide resource on the molecular dynamics underpinning the response and recovery in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana to phosphate-starvation. Results Genome-wide profiling by micro- and tiling-arrays (accessible from GEO: GSE34004 revealed minimal overlap between root and shoot transcriptomes suggesting two independent phosphate-starvation regulons. Novel gene expression patterns were detected for over 1000 candidates and were classified as either initial, persistent, or latent responders. Comparative analysis to AtGenExpress identified cohorts of genes co-regulated across multiple stimuli. The hormone ABA displayed a dominant role in regulating many phosphate-responsive candidates. Analysis of co-regulation enabled the determination of specific versus generic members of closely related gene families with respect to phosphate-starvation. Thus, among others, we showed that PHR1-regulated members of closely related phosphate-responsive families (PHT1;1, PHT1;7–9, SPX1-3, and PHO1;H1 display greater specificity to phosphate-starvation than their more generic counterparts. Conclusion Our results uncover much larger, staged responses to phosphate-starvation than previously described. To our knowledge, this work describes the most complete genome-wide data on plant nutrient stress to-date.

  12. The response and recovery of the Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptome to phosphate starvation

    KAUST Repository

    Woo, Jongchan

    2012-05-03

    Background: Over application of phosphate fertilizers in modern agriculture contaminates waterways and disrupts natural ecosystems. Nevertheless, this is a common practice among farmers, especially in developing countries as abundant fertilizers are believed to boost crop yields. The study of plant phosphate metabolism and its underlying genetic pathways is key to discovering methods of efficient fertilizer usage. The work presented here describes a genome-wide resource on the molecular dynamics underpinning the response and recovery in roots and shoots of Arabidopsis thaliana to phosphate-starvation.Results: Genome-wide profiling by micro- and tiling-arrays (accessible from GEO: GSE34004) revealed minimal overlap between root and shoot transcriptomes suggesting two independent phosphate-starvation regulons. Novel gene expression patterns were detected for over 1000 candidates and were classified as either initial, persistent, or latent responders. Comparative analysis to AtGenExpress identified cohorts of genes co-regulated across multiple stimuli. The hormone ABA displayed a dominant role in regulating many phosphate-responsive candidates. Analysis of co-regulation enabled the determination of specific versus generic members of closely related gene families with respect to phosphate-starvation. Thus, among others, we showed that PHR1-regulated members of closely related phosphate-responsive families (PHT1;1, PHT1;7-9, SPX1-3, and PHO1;H1) display greater specificity to phosphate-starvation than their more generic counterparts. Conclusion: Our results uncover much larger, staged responses to phosphate-starvation than previously described. To our knowledge, this work describes the most complete genome-wide data on plant nutrient stress to-date. 2012 Woo et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  13. Effect of Various Lengths of Single Phase Starvation on Compensatory Growth in Rainbow Trout under Summer Conditions (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    OpenAIRE

    Sevgili, Hüseyin; Hoşsu, * Belgin; Emre, Yılmaz; Kanyılmaz, Mahir

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the effects of various lengths of starvation periods on following compensatory growth (CG) in rainbow trout under summer conditions (18.1°C and day length of 12.5-14.5 hours). Five treatments with triplicate tanks were as follows: control (C) fed to satiation over 84 days; one (S1), two (S2), three (S3), and four (S4) weeks of starvation; and then refeeding for the remaining eight weeks of the experiment. Starvation periods induced hyperphagia during refe...

  14. Starvation effects on nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes of animals: an insight from meta-analysis of fasting experiments

    OpenAIRE

    Doi, Hideyuki; Akamatsu, Fumikazu; Gonz?lez, Ang?lica L.

    2017-01-01

    Nitrogen and carbon stable isotopic compositions (? 15N and ? 13C) of consumers have been used for physiological and food web studies. Previous studies have shown ? 15N and ? 13C values are affected by several biological and environmental factors during starvation, but the generality of the effect of starvation on ? 15N and ? 13C values has not yet been tested. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of starvation on ? 15N and ? 13C values of consumers, and the underlying f...

  15. Variation of the adhesion to polystyrene of phenotypic mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 during starvation conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappello, Simone

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this work was to analyse the effects of different growth conditions (phosphate and contemporary carbon-phosphate starvation) on polystyrene adhesion of a strain of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 and its four phenotypic mutants during experimental growth in starvation conditions. Bacterial adhesion was measured at 20, 40, 60 and 720 min. Data obtained showed that growth conditions are an important factor for the capacity of initial adhesion to inanimate surfaces. The analyses of adhesion of two phenotypic mutants (Mut-P-01 and Mut-P-02) isolated during growth on phosphate starvation is interesting. This kind of experiment yields important information on the prevention of nosocomial infections.

  16. Physiological and behavioral responses to intermittent starvation in C57BL/6J mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li-Na; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hambly, Catherine; Morgan, David G; Clapham, John C; Speakman, John R

    2012-01-18

    The dual intervention point model states that body mass is controlled by upper and lower intervention points, above and below which animals (and humans) intervene physiologically to bring their body mass back into the acceptable range. It has been further suggested that the lower intervention point may be defined by the risk of starvation, while the upper intervention point may be defined by the risk of predation. The objective of the present study was to test whether the risk of starvation determines the lower intervention point and to examine the physiological and behavioral mechanisms that underpin the regulation of body mass, when the risk of starvation is increased. Sixty-four mice were exposed to random days of complete fasting or 50% food restriction and their body mass and fat mass responses were measured. Food intake, physical activity and body temperature were measured throughout the experiment. In addition, plasma leptin and insulin, triglyceride and non-esterified fatty acids, along with hypothalamic neuropeptides gene expression in the arcuate nucleus were assessed after 13 and 42 days of treatment. We found that C57BL/6J mice increased body mass and fatness in response to a short-term (13 days) intermittent fasting, which was restored to baseline as the treatment was prolonged. In contrast, intermittently 50% food restricted mice showed no significant changes in body mass or fatness. Over the first 13 days of treatment the data were consistent with the dual intervention point model as the mice showed both increased body mass and adiposity over this period. Over the more protracted period of 42 days the effect waned and was therefore inconsistent with the model. The body mass and fat mass gains in intermittently fasted mice were mainly accounted for by increased food intake. Elevated NPY gene expression after 13 days (three 24 h fasting events) may have driven the increase in food intake. However, no changes were observed in such neuropeptides as POMC

  17. Impact of nutrient starvation on the biochemical composition of the marine diatom Thalassiosira weissflogii: from the whole cell to the frustule fraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler, C.; Claquin, P.; Goutx, M.; Ragueneau, O.; Moriceau, B.

    2010-08-01

    Interactions between carbon and silica in the diatom frustule play an important role in carbon export through their impact on diatom remineralization (carbon degradation and biogenic silica dissolution). To ameliorate model prediction of the fate of Si and organic matter during sedimentation, there is a need to first understand the origin and nature of Si-OC interactions, their impact on diatom remineralization and their variability with environmental conditions. In this study we focus on the impact of nutrient starvations on the formation and nature of these interactions in an ubiquitous diatom, Thalassiosira weissflogii. Fluorescence reveals the strong impact of all starvations on diatom metabolism while Fourier transformed infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy clearly showed that starvations altered the composition of the different diatom fractions. The relative compositions of whole cells were almost not impacted by starvations except Si(OH)4 starvation that slightly increased proteins relative contribution while decreasing carbohydrate. Starvation impacts became obvious looking at the composition of the different part of the diatom. The relative biochemical composition of the organic coating, protecting the frustule from the environment, was strongly affected by starvation. Under nitrate starvation, carbohydrate contribution increased while protein contribution decreased. Inversely, phosphate starvation increased the proportion of proteins and decreased carbohydrates contribution. Starvations also modified the different frustule phases. bSiO2 contribution decreased in the less reactive phase under silicate and phosphate starvation whereas nitrate starvation rather increased carbohydrate and protein pools. Phosphate starvation also led to an important shift of dominance among protein groups between amide I and amide II which compounds are suspected to play a key role in the frustule synthesis and architecture. Nutrient starvations affected the relative biochemical

  18. Stress physiology as a predictor of survival in Galapagos marine iguanas

    OpenAIRE

    Romero, L. Michael; Wikelski, Martin

    2010-01-01

    Although glucocorticoid hormones are considered important physiological regulators for surviving adverse environmental stimuli (stressors), evidence for such a role is sparse and usually extrapolated from glucocorticoid effects under laboratory, short-term and/or non-emergency conditions. Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) provide an excellent model for determining the ultimate function of a glucocorticoid response because susceptibility to starvation induced by El Niño condit...

  19. Survival and Recovery of Methanotrophic Bacteria Starved Under Oxic and Anoxic Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslev, Peter; King, Gary M.

    1994-01-01

    The effects of carbon deprivation on survival of methanotrophic bacteria were compared in cultures incubated in the presence and absence of oxygen in the starvation medium. Survival and recovery of the examined methanotrophs were generally highest for cultures starved under anoxic conditions as indicated by poststarvation measurements of methane oxidation, tetrazolium salt reduction, plate counts, and protein synthesis. Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b survived up to 6 weeks of carbon deprivation under anoxic conditions while maintaining a physiological state that allowed relatively rapid (hours) methane oxidation after substrate addition. A small fraction of cells starved under oxic and anoxic conditions (4 and 10%, respectively) survived more than 10 weeks but required several days for recovery on plates and in liquid medium. A non-spore-forming methanotroph, strain WP 12, displayed 36 to 118% of its initial methane oxidation capacity after 5 days of carbon deprivation. Oxidation rates varied with growth history prior to the experiments as well as with starvation conditions. Strain WP 12 starved under anoxic conditions showed up to 90% higher methane oxidation activity and 46% higher protein production after starvation than did cultures starved under oxic conditions. Only minor changes in biomass and niorpholow were seen for methanotrophic bacteria starved tinder anoxic conditions. In contrast, starvation under oxic conditions resulted in morphology changes and an initial 28 to 35% loss of cell protein. These data suggest that methanotrophic bacteria can survin,e carbon deprivation under anoxic conditions by using maintenance energy derived Solelyr from an anaerobic endogenous metabolism. This capability could partly explain a significant potential for methane oxidation in environments not continuously, supporting aerobic methanotrophic growth.

  20. Some effects of temperature and starvation on the bivalve @iDonax vittatus@@ (da Costa) in experimental laboratory populations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ansell, A.D.; Sivadas, P.

    temperatures and the increased rate is maintained even during periods of starvation by rapid utilization of reserves Such a response to environmental changes involves both the ability to exploit short-term favourable conditions, and vulnerability...

  1. Proteomic profiling of Mycobacterium tuberculosis identifies nutrient-starvation-responsive toxin-antitoxin systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albrethsen, Jakob; Agner, Jeppe; Piersma, Sander R

    2013-01-01

    In order to successfully enter the latent stage, Mycobacterium tuberculosis must adapt to conditions such as nutrient limitation and hypoxia. In vitro models that mimic latent infection are valuable tools for describing the changes in metabolism that occur when the bacterium exists in a non......-growing form. We used two complementary proteomic approaches, label-free LC-MS/MS analysis and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis, to determine the proteome profile of extracellular proteins from M. tuberculosis cultured under nutrient starvation. Through the label-free LC-MS/MS analysis......, significant differences in the overall metabolism during nutrient starvation were detected. Notably, members of the toxin-antitoxin systems were present in larger quantities in nutrient-starved cultures, supporting a role for these global modules as M. tuberculosis switches its metabolism into dormancy...

  2. Elemene Injection Induced Autophagy Protects Human Hepatoma Cancer Cells from Starvation and Undergoing Apoptosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Elemene, a compound found in an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has shown promising anticancer effects against a broad spectrum of tumors. In an in vivo experiment, we found that apatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits VEGFR2, combined with elemene injection (Ele for the treatment of H22 solid tumor in mice resulted in worse effectiveness than apatinib alone. Moreover, Ele could protect HepG2 cells from death induced by serum-free starvation. Further data on the mechanism study revealed that Ele induced protective autophagy and prevented human hepatoma cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. Proapoptosis effect of Ele was enhanced when proautophagy effect was inhibited by hydroxychloroquine. Above all, Ele has the effect of protecting cancer cells from death either in apatinib induced nutrient deficient environment or in serum-free induced starvation. A combination of elemene injection with autophagy inhibitor might thus be a useful therapeutic option for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  3. Elemene injection induced autophagy protects human hepatoma cancer cells from starvation and undergoing apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yan; Wang, Keming; Hu, Chunping; Lin, Lin; Qin, Shukui; Cai, Xueting

    2014-01-01

    Elemene, a compound found in an herb used in traditional Chinese medicine, has shown promising anticancer effects against a broad spectrum of tumors. In an in vivo experiment, we found that apatinib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor that selectively inhibits VEGFR2, combined with elemene injection (Ele) for the treatment of H22 solid tumor in mice resulted in worse effectiveness than apatinib alone. Moreover, Ele could protect HepG2 cells from death induced by serum-free starvation. Further data on the mechanism study revealed that Ele induced protective autophagy and prevented human hepatoma cancer cells from undergoing apoptosis. Proapoptosis effect of Ele was enhanced when proautophagy effect was inhibited by hydroxychloroquine. Above all, Ele has the effect of protecting cancer cells from death either in apatinib induced nutrient deficient environment or in serum-free induced starvation. A combination of elemene injection with autophagy inhibitor might thus be a useful therapeutic option for hepatocellular carcinoma.

  4. Durability test with fuel starvation using a Pt/CNF catalyst in PEMFC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Juhae; Park, Byungil; Kim, Junbom

    2012-01-05

    In this study, a catalyst was synthesized on carbon nanofibers [CNFs] with a herringbone-type morphology. The Pt/CNF catalyst exhibited low hydrophilicity, low surface area, high dispersion, and high graphitic behavior on physical analysis. Electrodes (5 cm2) were prepared by a spray method, and the durability of the Pt/CNF was evaluated by fuel starvation. The performance was compared with a commercial catalyst before and after accelerated tests. The fuel starvation caused carbon corrosion with a reverse voltage drop. The polarization curve, EIS, and cyclic voltammetry were analyzed in order to characterize the electrochemical properties of the Pt/CNF. The performance of a membrane electrode assembly fabricated from the Pt/CNF was maintained, and the electrochemical surface area and cell resistance showed the same trend. Therefore, CNFs are expected to be a good support in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

  5. Degradation of protein translation machinery by amino acid starvation-induced macroautophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretzmeier, Christine; Eiselein, Sven; Johnson, Gregory R; Engelke, Rudolf; Nowag, Heike; Zarei, Mostafa; Küttner, Victoria; Becker, Andrea C; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T G; Høyer-Hansen, Maria; Andersen, Jens S; Münz, Christian; Murphy, Robert F; Dengjel, Jörn

    2017-06-03

    Macroautophagy is regarded as a nonspecific bulk degradation process of cytoplasmic material within the lysosome. However, the process has mainly been studied by nonspecific bulk degradation assays using radiolabeling. In the present study we monitor protein turnover and degradation by global, unbiased approaches relying on quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics. Macroautophagy is induced by rapamycin treatment, and by amino acid and glucose starvation in differentially, metabolically labeled cells. Protein dynamics are linked to image-based models of autophagosome turnover. Depending on the inducing stimulus, protein as well as organelle turnover differ. Amino acid starvation-induced macroautophagy leads to selective degradation of proteins important for protein translation. Thus, protein dynamics reflect cellular conditions in the respective treatment indicating stimulus-specific pathways in stress-induced macroautophagy.

  6. Self-starvation through the ages: reflections on the pre-history of anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bemporad, J R

    1996-04-01

    Recent publications have indicated that voluntary self-starvation is not a recently developed syndrome and that it has been reported throughout history. These prior forms of inedia are summarized and related to their historical and cultural contexts. On the basis of these data, some hypotheses are proposed regarding social influences on the vulnerability to eating disorders. To document and describe forms of eating disorders occurring prior to the formal medical description of anorexia nervosa in the late 19th century. Review of historical references to self-starvation, of recent publications on the history of eating disorders, and of articles describing cases of eating disorders occurring in the past. Forms of eating disorders have existed since ancient times varying in frequency, manifestations, and possible motivation. Certain sociocultural factors appear to foster or inhibit the frequency and type of eating disorders.

  7. Starvation effects on nitrogen and carbon stable isotopes of animals: an insight from meta-analysis of fasting experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Hideyuki; Akamatsu, Fumikazu; González, Angélica L

    2017-08-01

    Nitrogen and carbon stable isotopic compositions ( δ 15 N and δ 13 C) of consumers have been used for physiological and food web studies. Previous studies have shown δ 15 N and δ 13 C values are affected by several biological and environmental factors during starvation, but the generality of the effect of starvation on δ 15 N and δ 13 C values has not yet been tested. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the effects of starvation on δ 15 N and δ 13 C values of consumers, and the underlying factors that may explain the observed variation. The δ 15 N and δ 13 C values were calculated as the differences between the final δ 15 N and δ 13 C values of consumers (post-starvation) and the pre-starvation values on each experiment. Our meta-analysis showed a large variation in the δ 15 N and δ 13 C values of consumers (δ 15 N range: -0.82 to 4.30‰; mean: 0.47‰ and δ 13 C range: -1.92 to 2.62‰; mean: 0.01‰). The δ 15 N values of most consumers increased along the length of the starvation period and were influenced by nitrogen excretion and thermoregulation types, probably because differences in nitrogen metabolism and thermoregulation affect nitrogen processing and excretion rates. None of our predictor variables accounted for the variation in δ 13 C values, which showed both increases and decreases due to fasting. Our findings suggest that starvation results in changes in consumer δ 15 N values which are mainly explained by the length of the fasting period and by nitrogen and energy metabolism, but the underlying mechanisms of the starvation effects on δ 13 C values seem to be more complex than previously thought.

  8. A CARBON STARVATION SURVIVAL GENE OF PSEUDOMONAS PUTIDA IS REGULATED BY S54. (R825689C071)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The perspectives, information and conclusions conveyed in research project abstracts, progress reports, final reports, journal abstracts and journal publications convey the viewpoints of the principal investigator and may not represent the views and policies of ORD and EPA. Concl...

  9. Starvation Selection Restores Elastase and Rhamnolipid Production in a Pseudomonas aeruginosa Quorum-Sensing Mutant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Delden, Christian; Pesci, Everett C.; Pearson, James P.; Iglewski, Barbara H.

    1998-01-01

    The las quorum-sensing system of Pseudomonas aeruginosa controls the expression of elastase and rhamnolipid. We report that starvation can select a mutant producing these virulence factors in spite of a lasR deletion. Expression of the autoinducer synthase gene rhlI was increased in this suppressor mutant, suggesting compensation by the rhl system. These data show that P. aeruginosa can restore elastase and rhamnolipid production in the absence of a functional las quorum-sensing system. PMID:9712807

  10. Selective charging of tRNA isoacceptors induced by amino-acid starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dittmar, K. A.; Sørensen, Michael Askvad; Elf, J.

    2005-01-01

    Aminoacylated (charged) transfer RNA isoacceptors read different messenger RNA codons for the same amino acid. The concentration of an isoacceptor and its charged fraction are principal determinants of the translation rate of its codons. A recent theoretical model predicts that amino-acid...... by isoacceptors that retain high charging can be used for efficient translation of genes that are essential during amino-acid starvation. Selective charging can explain anomalous patterns of codon usage in the genes for different families of proteins....

  11. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Neto, José F; Koide, Tie; Gomes, Suely L; Marques, Marilis V

    2010-08-28

    Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours) of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase), was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  12. Phage adsorption and lytic propagation in Lactobacillus plantarum: Could host cell starvation affect them?

    OpenAIRE

    Briggiler Marc?, Mari?ngeles; Reinheimer, Jorge; Quiberoni, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Bacteriophages constitute a great threat to the activity of lactic acid bacteria used in industrial processes. Several factors can influence the infection cycle of bacteriophages. That is the case of the physiological state of host cells, which could produce inhibition or delay of the phage infection process. In the present work, the influence of Lactobacillus plantarum host cell starvation on phage B1 adsorption and propagation was investigated. Result First, cell growth kinetics ...

  13. Dynamics of sequestered cryptophyte nuclei in Mesodinium rubrum during starvation and refeeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Miran; Drumm, Kirstine; Daugbjerg, Niels

    2017-01-01

    nucleus in M. rubrum. Here, we conducted starvation and refeeding studies to monitor the fate of prey nuclei acquired by M. rubrum when feeding on Teleaulax amphioxeia and to explore the influence of the retained prey nucleus on photosynthesis of M. rubrum. Results indicate that enlargement of the prey...... on rate of carbon fixation. We interpret results within the context of a model that considers the dynamics of ingested prey nuclei during division of M. rubrum....

  14. Global gene expression under nitrogen starvation in Xylella fastidiosa: contribution of the σ54 regulon

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    da Silva Neto José F

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Xylella fastidiosa, a Gram-negative fastidious bacterium, grows in the xylem of several plants causing diseases such as citrus variegated chlorosis. As the xylem sap contains low concentrations of amino acids and other compounds, X. fastidiosa needs to cope with nitrogen limitation in its natural habitat. Results In this work, we performed a whole-genome microarray analysis of the X. fastidiosa nitrogen starvation response. A time course experiment (2, 8 and 12 hours of cultures grown in defined medium under nitrogen starvation revealed many differentially expressed genes, such as those related to transport, nitrogen assimilation, amino acid biosynthesis, transcriptional regulation, and many genes encoding hypothetical proteins. In addition, a decrease in the expression levels of many genes involved in carbon metabolism and energy generation pathways was also observed. Comparison of gene expression profiles between the wild type strain and the rpoN null mutant allowed the identification of genes directly or indirectly induced by nitrogen starvation in a σ54-dependent manner. A more complete picture of the σ54 regulon was achieved by combining the transcriptome data with an in silico search for potential σ54-dependent promoters, using a position weight matrix approach. One of these σ54-predicted binding sites, located upstream of the glnA gene (encoding glutamine synthetase, was validated by primer extension assays, confirming that this gene has a σ54-dependent promoter. Conclusions Together, these results show that nitrogen starvation causes intense changes in the X. fastidiosa transcriptome and some of these differentially expressed genes belong to the σ54 regulon.

  15. [Predation on Myzus persicae by Propylaea japonica adults with different extents of starvation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, H; Cheng, X; Zou, Y

    2000-10-01

    The study showed that the functional response of predation on M. persicae by the female and male adults of P. japonica with different extents of starvation belonged to the type of Holling II. Female adults had a larger attacking rate than male adults, but the predacious amount of M. persicae by female and male adult predators of different extent of starvation within 24 hrs had no significant difference. The predacious amount by female adult was larger than that of male. The significant difference of predacious amount between female and male adults increased with the time of their starvation and the prey density. The predation by unstarved female and male adult predators on M. persicae in 24 hours was concentrated at 6:00-18:00 and the predation rate (V) between female and male adults had no significant difference. The predation by starved female and male adults for 48 h on the prey in 24 hours was at 0-4 hours after the experiment started, and the predation rate(V) between female and male starved adults had no significant difference either.

  16. Transcriptome landscape of Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 for nitrogen starvation responses using RNA-seq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sun Young; Park, Byeonghyeok; Choi, In-Geol; Sim, Sang Jun; Lee, Sun-Mi; Um, Youngsoon; Woo, Han Min

    2016-01-01

    The development of high-throughput technology using RNA-seq has allowed understanding of cellular mechanisms and regulations of bacterial transcription. In addition, transcriptome analysis with RNA-seq has been used to accelerate strain improvement through systems metabolic engineering. Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, a photosynthetic bacterium, has remarkable potential for biochemical and biofuel production due to photoautotrophic cell growth and direct CO2 conversion. Here, we performed a transcriptome analysis of S. elongatus PCC 7942 using RNA-seq to understand the changes of cellular metabolism and regulation for nitrogen starvation responses. As a result, differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified and functionally categorized. With mapping onto metabolic pathways, we probed transcriptional perturbation and regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolisms relating to nitrogen starvation responses. Experimental evidence such as chlorophyll a and phycobilisome content and the measurement of CO2 uptake rate validated the transcriptome analysis. The analysis suggests that S. elongatus PCC 7942 reacts to nitrogen starvation by not only rearranging the cellular transport capacity involved in carbon and nitrogen assimilation pathways but also by reducing protein synthesis and photosynthesis activities. PMID:27488818

  17. Perception of Arabidopsis AtPep peptides, but not bacterial elicitors, accelerates starvation-induced senescence

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    Kay eGully

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Members of the AtPep group of Arabidopsis endogenous peptides have frequently been reported to induce pattern-triggered immunity and to increase resistance to diverse pathogens by amplifying the innate immune response. Here, we made the surprising observation that dark-induced leaf senescence was accelerated by the presence of Peps. Adult leaves as well as leaf discs of Col-0 wild type plants showed a Pep-triggered early onset of chlorophyll breakdown and leaf yellowing whereas pepr1 pepr2 double mutant plants were insensitive. In addition, this response was dependent on ethylene signaling and inhibited by the addition of cytokinins. Notably, addition of the bacterial elicitors flg22 or elf18, both potent inducers of pattern-triggered immunity, did not provoke an early onset of leaf senescence.Continuous darkness leads to energy deprivation and starvation and therewith promotes leaf senescence. We found that continuous darkness also strongly induced PROPEP3 transcription. Moreover, Pep-perception led to a rapid induction of PAO, APG7 and APG8a, genes indispensable for chlorophyll degradation as well as autophagy, respectively, and all three hallmarks of starvation and senescence. Notably, addition of sucrose as a source of energy inhibited the Pep-triggered early onset of senescence. In conclusion, we report that Pep-perception accelerates dark/starvation-induced senescence via an early induction of chlorophyll degradation and autophagy. This represents a novel and unique characteristic of PEPR signaling, unrelated to pattern-triggered immunity.

  18. Theoretical lessons for increasing algal biofuel: Evolution of oil accumulation to avert carbon starvation in microalgae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akita, Tetsuya; Kamo, Masashi

    2015-09-07

    Microalgae-derived oil is considered as a feasible alternative to fossil-derived oil. To produce more algal biomass, both algal population size and oil accumulation in algae must be maximized. Most of the previous studies have concentrated on only one of these issues, and relatively little attention has been devoted to considering the tradeoff between them. In this paper, we first theoretically investigated evolutionary reasons for oil accumulation and then by coupling population and evolutionary dynamics, we searched for conditions that may provide better yields. Using our model, we assume that algae allocate assimilated carbon to growth, maintenance, and carbon accumulation as biofuel and that the amount of essential materials (carbon and nitrate) are strongly linked in fixed proportions. Such stoichiometrically explicit models showed that (i) algae with more oil show slower population growth; therefore, the use of such algae results in lower total yields of biofuel and (ii) oil accumulation in algae is caused by carbon and not nitrate starvation. The latter can be interpreted as a strategy for avoiding the risk of increased death rate by carbon starvation. Our model also showed that both strong carbon starvation and moderately limited nitrate will promote total biofuel production. Our results highlight considering the life-history traits for a higher total yields of biofuel, which leads to insight into both establishing a prolonged culture and collection of desired strains from a natural environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Foraging behavior under starvation conditions is altered via photosynthesis by the marine gastropod, Elysia clarki.

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    Michael L Middlebrooks

    Full Text Available It has been well documented that nutritional state can influence the foraging behavior of animals. However, photosynthetic animals, those capable of both heterotrophy and symbiotic photosynthesis, may have a delayed behavioral response due to their ability to photosynthesize. To test this hypothesis we subjected groups of the kleptoplastic sea slug, Elysia clarki, to a gradient of starvation treatments of 4, 8, and 12 weeks plus a satiated control. Compared to the control group, slugs starved 8 and 12 weeks displayed a significant increase in the proportion of slugs feeding and a significant decrease in photosynthetic capability, as measured in maximum quantum yield and [chl a]. The 4 week group, however, showed no significant difference in feeding behavior or in the metrics of photosynthesis compared to the control. This suggests that photosynthesis in E. clarki, thought to be linked to horizontally-transferred algal genes, delays a behavioral response to starvation. This is the first demonstration of a link between photosynthetic capability in an animal and a modification of foraging behavior under conditions of starvation.

  20. Induction of Rhizopus oryzae germination under starvation using host metabolites increases spore susceptibility to heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeman, Tidhar; Kakongi, Nathan; Schneider, Avishai; Vinokur, Yakov; Teper-Bamnolker, Paula; Carmeli, Shmuel; Levy, Maggie; Skory, Christopher D; Lichter, Amnon; Eshel, Dani

    2014-03-01

    Sweetpotato is a nutritional source worldwide. Soft rot caused by Rhizopus spp. is a major limiting factor in the storage of produce, rendering it potentially unsafe for human consumption. In this study, Rhizopus oryzae was used to develop a concept of postharvest disease control by weakening the pathogen through induction of spore germination under starvation conditions. We isolated the sweetpotato active fractions (SPAFs) that induce spore germination and used them at a low dose to enhance spore weakening caused by starvation. Germination in SPAF at 1 mg/ml weakened the pathogen spores by delaying their ability to form colonies on rich media and by increasing their sensitivity to heat stress. The weakening effect was also supported by reduced metabolic activity, as detected by Alarmar Blue fluorescent dye assays. Spores incubated with SPAF at 1 mg/ml showed DNA fragmentation in some of their nuclei, as observed by TUNEL assay. In addition, these spores exhibited changes in ultrastructural morphology (i.e., shrinkage of germ tubes, nucleus deformation, and vacuole formation) which are hallmarks of programmed cell death. We suggest that induction of spore germination under starvation conditions increases their susceptibility to stress and, therefore, might be considered a new strategy for pathogen control.

  1. Severe protein-calorie malnutrition in two brothers due to abuse by starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroso, Marcela Montenegro Braga; Salvador, Luiza Martins; Fagundes Neto, Ulysses

    2016-12-01

    To describe the case of two siblings with severe protein-calorie malnutrition due to abuse by starvation. The two patients were simultaneously referred from the Municipal Hospital, where they were admitted to the Pediatric Gastroenterology clinic of a university hospital for diagnostic investigation of the cause of severe malnutrition and screening tests for Celiac Disease, Cystic Fibrosis and Environmental enteropathy among others. The exams were all normal, and after detailed research on the interactions of this family, we reached the conclusion that the malnutrition was due to abuse by starvation. The children spent approximately two months in the hospital, receiving a high-protein and high-calorie diet, with significant nutritional recovery. Abuse by starvation, although rare, should always be considered of as one of the causes of child malnutrition and pediatrician should be aware of the child's development, as well as the family interactions, to prevent more severe nutritional and emotional consequences in the future. Copyright © 2016. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda.

  2. Starvation Promotes Autophagy-Associated Maturation of the Ovary in the Giant Freshwater Prawn,Macrobrachium rosenbergii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kankuan, Wilairat; Wanichanon, Chaitip; Titone, Rossella; Engsusophon, Attakorn; Sumpownon, Chanudporn; Suphamungmee, Worawit; Morani, Federica; Masini, Matilde; Novelli, Michela; Isidoro, Ciro; Sobhon, Prasert

    2017-01-01

    Limitation of food availability (starvation) is known to influence the reproductive ability of animals. Autophagy is a lysosomal driven degradation process that protects the cell under metabolic stress conditions, such as during nutrient shortage. Whether, and how starvation-induced autophagy impacts on the maturation and function of reproductive organs in animals are still open questions. In this study, we have investigated the effects of starvation on histological and cellular changes that may be associated with autophagy in the ovary of the giant freshwater prawn, Macrobachium rosenbergii . To this end, the female prawns were daily fed (controls) or unfed (starvation condition) for up to 12 days, and the ovary tissue was analyzed at different time-points. Starvation triggered ovarian maturation, and concomitantly increased the expression of autophagy markers in vitellogenic oocytes. The immunoreactivities for autophagy markers, including Beclin1, LC3-II, and Lamp1, were enhanced in the late oocytes within the mature ovaries, especially at the vitellogenic stages. These markers co-localized with vitellin in the yolk granules within the oocytes, suggesting that autophagy induced by starvation could drive vitellin utilization, thus promoting ovarian maturation.

  3. The Challenge of Appropriate Identification and Treatment of Starvation, Sarcopenia, and Cachexia: A Survey of Australian Dietitians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison Yaxley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Malnutrition is an umbrella term that includes starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia; however, differentiating between these terms is infrequent in clinical practice. Given that the effectiveness of treatment depends on the aetiology of unintentional weight loss, it is important that clinicians are aware of the defining characteristics. The aim of this study was to determine whether Australian dietitians understand and use the terms starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia and provide targeted treatment strategies accordingly. Members of the Dietitians Association of Australia were surveyed to gain information on practices and attitudes to diagnosis and treatment of adult malnutrition. In addition, three case studies were provided to examine understanding of starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia. 221 dietitians accessed the survey. 81 respondents (43% indicated the use of at least one alternate term (starvation, sarcopenia, and/or cachexia. Muscle wasting was the most commonly used diagnostic criterion. High-energy high-protein diet was the most common therapy prescribed. Correct diagnoses for case studies were recorded by 6% of respondents for starvation, 46% for sarcopenia, and 21% for cachexia. There is a need for increased awareness of the existence of starvation, sarcopenia, and cachexia amongst Australian dietitians and research into appropriate methods of identification and treatment for each condition.

  4. Effects of starvation on intermolt development in Calanus finmarchicus copepodites: a comparison between theoretical models and field studies1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, Jennifer A.; Miller, Charles B.

    Campbell et al . (Deep Sea Research II, 48 (2001) 531) have shown that there was a localized starvation event affecting Calanus finmarchicus on the southern flank of Georges Bank in April 1997. Growth and molting rates of this dominant copepod were reduced. We have used the morphology of tooth development in field-collected samples to show that this starvation affected animals living continuously in the field, as well as those in Campbell et al .'s experimental tanks. Assuming a point of reserve saturation (PRS) response of Calanus to food limitation, and correspondence between PRS and advance from the postmolt jaw facies, the proportion of individuals with postmolt jaws should increase in all copepodite stages under starvation. Individuals that have developed past PRS should molt to the next stage, acquiring postmolt facies. Thus, the fraction of postmolt jaws should increase, while the fraction of jaws in later phases should decrease. This was observed for a drifter-marked station over five days. Numerical simulations of jaw phase distributions expected under full nutrition, and both total and patchy starvation were generated from individual-based models of development. Proportions of copepodites in postmolt phase do not increase with full nutrition. A simulation of a total starvation event showed a marked increase in postmolts during food limitation, but the increase was more extreme than the field data. A modification of the starvation simulation, representing patchy feeding conditions, matched the level of increase of postmolt individuals in all stages that was observed in the field samples.

  5. Bacillus subtilis During Feast and Famine: Visualization of the Overall Regulation of Protein Synthesis During Glucose Starvation by Proteome Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Jörg; Weibezahn, Jimena; Scharf, Christian; Hecker, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Dual channel imaging and warping of two-dimensional (2D) protein gels were used to visualize global changes of the gene expression patterns in growing Bacillus subtilis cells during entry into the stationary phase as triggered by glucose exhaustion. The 2D gels only depict single moments during the cells' growth cycle, but a sequential series of overlays obtained at specific points of the growth curve facilitates visualization of the developmental processes at the proteomics scale. During glucose starvation a substantial reprogramming of the protein synthesis pattern was found, with 150 proteins synthesized de novo and cessation of the synthesis of almost 400 proteins. Proteins induced following glucose starvation belong to two main regulation groups: general stress/starvation responses induced by different stresses or starvation stimuli (ςB-dependent general stress regulon, stringent response, sporulation), and glucose-starvation-specific responses (drop in glycolysis, utilization of alternative carbon sources, gluconeogenesis). Using the dual channel approach, it was not only possible to identify those regulons or stimulons, but also to follow the fate of each single protein by the three-color code: red, newly induced but not yet accumulated; yellow, synthesized and accumulated; and green, still present, but no longer being synthesized. These green proteins, which represent a substantial part of the protein pool in the nongrowing cell, are not accessible by using DNA arrays. The combination of 2D gel electrophoresis and MALDI TOF mass spectrometry with the dual channel imaging technique provides a new and comprehensive view of the physiology of growing or starving bacterial cell populations, here for the case of the glucose-starvation response. [This is presented as a movie of B. subtilis's growth/glucose-starvation response, available at www.genome.org and also at http://microbio1.biologie.uni-greifswald.de/starv/movie.htm.] PMID:12566400

  6. Overexpression of GbWRKY1 positively regulates the Pi starvation response by alteration of auxin sensitivity in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Li; Jin, Li; Long, Lu; Liu, Linlin; He, Xin; Gao, Wei; Zhu, Longfu; Zhang, Xianlong

    2012-12-01

    Overexpression of a cotton defense-related gene GbWRKY1 in Arabidopsis resulted in modification of the root system by enhanced auxin sensitivity to positively regulate the Pi starvation response. GbWRKY1 was a cloned WRKY transcription factor from Gossypium barbadense, which was firstly identified as a defense-related gene and showed moderate similarity with AtWRKY75 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Overexpression of GbWRKY1 in Arabidopsis resulted in attenuated Pi starvation stress symptoms, including reduced accumulation of anthocyanin and impaired density of lateral roots (LR) in low Pi stress. The study also indicated that overexpression of GbWRKY1 caused plants constitutively exhibited Pi starvation response including increased development of LR, relatively high level of total P and Pi, high expression level of some high-affinity Pi transporters and phosphatases as well as enhanced accumulation of acid phosphatases activity during Pi-sufficient. It was speculated that GbWRKY1 may act as a positive regulator in the Pi starvation response as well as AtWRKY75. GbWRKY1 probably involves in the modulation of Pi homeostasis and participates in the Pi allocation and remobilization but do not accumulate more Pi in Pi-deficient condition, which was different from the fact that AtWRKY75 influenced the Pi status of the plant during Pi deprivation by increasing root surface area and accumulation of more Pi. Otherwise, further study suggested that the overexpression plants were more sensitive to auxin than wild-type and GbWRKY1 may partly influence the LPR1-dependent (low phosphate response 1) Pi starvation signaling pathway and was putatively independent of SUMO E3 ligase SIZ1 and PHR1 (phosphate starvation response 1) in response to Pi starvation.

  7. AMPK regulates metabolism and survival in response to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zannella, Vanessa E.; Cojocari, Dan; Hilgendorf, Susan; Vellanki, Ravi N.; Chung, Stephen; Wouters, Bradly G.; Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: AMPK is a metabolic sensor and an upstream inhibitor of mTOR activity. AMPK is phosphorylated by ionizing radiation (IR) in an ATM dependent manner, but the cellular consequences of this phosphorylation event have remained unclear. The objective of this study was to assess whether AMPK plays a functional role in regulating cellular responses to IR. Methods: The importance of AMPK expression for radiation responses was investigated using both MEFs (mouse embryo fibroblasts) double knockout for AMPK α1/α2 subunits and human colorectal carcinoma cells (HCT 116) with AMPK α1/α2 shRNA mediated knockdown. Results: We demonstrate here that IR results in phosphorylation of both AMPK and its substrate, ACC. IR moderately stimulated mTOR activity, and this was substantially exacerbated in the absence of AMPK. AMPK was required for IR induced expression of the mTOR inhibitor REDD1, indicating that AMPK restrains mTOR activity through multiple mechanisms. Likewise, cellular metabolism was deregulated following irradiation in the absence of AMPK, as evidenced by a substantial increase in oxygen consumption rates and lactate production. AMPK deficient cells showed impairment of the G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, and were unable to support long-term proliferation during starvation following radiation. Lastly, we show that AMPK proficiency is important for clonogenic survival after radiation during starvation. Conclusions: These data reveal novel functional roles for AMPK in regulating mTOR signaling, cell cycle, survival and metabolic responses to IR.

  8. Plastid-bearing sea slugs fix CO2 in the light but do not require photosynthesis to survive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christa, Gregor; Zimorski, Verena; Woehle, Christian; Tielens, Aloysius G. M.; Wägele, Heike; Martin, William F.; Gould, Sven B.

    2014-01-01

    Several sacoglossan sea slugs (Plakobranchoidea) feed upon plastids of large unicellular algae. Four species—called long-term retention (LtR) species—are known to sequester ingested plastids within specialized cells of the digestive gland. There, the stolen plastids (kleptoplasts) remain photosynthetically active for several months, during which time LtR species can survive without additional food uptake. Kleptoplast longevity has long been puzzling, because the slugs do not sequester algal nuclei that could support photosystem maintenance. It is widely assumed that the slugs survive starvation by means of kleptoplast photosynthesis, yet direct evidence to support that view is lacking. We show that two LtR plakobranchids, Elysia timida and Plakobranchus ocellatus, incorporate 14CO2 into acid-stable products 60- and 64-fold more rapidly in the light than in the dark, respectively. Despite this light-dependent CO2 fixation ability, light is, surprisingly, not essential for the slugs to survive starvation. LtR animals survived several months of starvation (i) in complete darkness and (ii) in the light in the presence of the photosynthesis inhibitor monolinuron, all while not losing weight faster than the control animals. Contrary to current views, sacoglossan kleptoplasts seem to be slowly digested food reserves, not a source of solar power. PMID:24258718

  9. Ensuring survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadik, N

    1992-12-01

    The global population growth rate has been 1.7% since 1975, while for developing countries it is 2.1%. UN projections are for population to grow from 5.5 billion in 1992 to 10 billion by 2050. Sustainable development is only possible when population growth is balanced with available resources. UN medium population projections of 7.8 billion by 2050 can be reached with 187 million more couples practicing family planning (FP) by the year 2000. Within the past 20 years, 1 billion people, mostly from developed countries, have enjoyed economic growth, but have contributed polluting technologies, excessive waste, and environmentally dangerous economic practices. The generations to come will be affected by the continuance of these practices by the 1 billion affluent population. The bottom billion are mired in poverty and high population growth and survival, needs that hinder their country's economic development, upset fragile ecosystems, and destroy the balance between human beings and the environment. International migration on a large scale could be the by-product of population growth. Progress has been made since the 1974 UN Conference on Population in Bucharest. There are still, however, vulnerable populations, the poorest households, the landless and small-holder families, urban squatters and slum dwellers, those living in low lying deltas and along coasts, and women. Women control family resources and their micro environment. Sustainable development is not possible without the elimination of prejudice against women. Reproductive freedom for women must be a priority. High quality, readily available FP services are also needed for those desiring this. The difficulty is in providing FP services that conform to a woman's social and cultural background and personal needs; success is dependent on involving women in the process and holding men more responsible for FP. Development means allowing for the legitimate aspirations of the majority not just the specialized

  10. Identification of genes associated with resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation and starvation in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thimgan, Matthew S; Seugnet, Laurent; Turk, John; Shaw, Paul J

    2015-05-01

    Flies mutant for the canonical clock protein cycle (cyc(01)) exhibit a sleep rebound that is ∼10 times larger than wild-type flies and die after only 10 h of sleep deprivation. Surprisingly, when starved, cyc(01) mutants can remain awake for 28 h without demonstrating negative outcomes. Thus, we hypothesized that identifying transcripts that are differentially regulated between waking induced by sleep deprivation and waking induced by starvation would identify genes that underlie the deleterious effects of sleep deprivation and/or protect flies from the negative consequences of waking. We used partial complementary DNA microarrays to identify transcripts that are differentially expressed between cyc(01) mutants that had been sleep deprived or starved for 7 h. We then used genetics to determine whether disrupting genes involved in lipid metabolism would exhibit alterations in their response to sleep deprivation. Laboratory. Drosophila melanogaster. Sleep deprivation and starvation. We identified 84 genes with transcript levels that were differentially modulated by 7 h of sleep deprivation and starvation in cyc(01) mutants and were confirmed in independent samples using quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Several of these genes were predicted to be lipid metabolism genes, including bubblegum, cueball, and CG4500, which based on our data we have renamed heimdall (hll). Using lipidomics we confirmed that knockdown of hll using RNA interference significantly decreased lipid stores. Importantly, genetically modifying bubblegum, cueball, or hll resulted in sleep rebound alterations following sleep deprivation compared to genetic background controls. We have identified a set of genes that may confer resilience/vulnerability to sleep deprivation and demonstrate that genes involved in lipid metabolism modulate sleep homeostasis. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  11. Early posthatch starvation decreases satellite cell proliferation and skeletal muscle growth in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halevy, O; Geyra, A; Barak, M; Uni, Z; Sklan, D

    2000-04-01

    The effect of posthatch starvation on skeletal muscle growth and satellite cell proliferation was examined in chicks. Chicks were either fed or starved for 48 h posthatch (d 0-d 2, d 2-d 4 or d 4-d 6) and then refed for 41 d. Body and breast muscle weights were significantly lower in starved chicks than in fed controls throughout the experiment. Histochemical staining revealed that skeletal muscle fiber development in the starved group lagged behind that of the fed group. Starvation from d 2 to 4 and d 4 to 6 posthatch had a progressively lesser effect than did immediate posthatch starvation (P < 0.05). In vitro culturing of breast muscle satellite cells revealed that DNA synthesis and number of cells per gram of muscle in the fed chicks peaked on d 2 and d 3, and then declined. In contrast, DNA synthesis in the cells of starved chicks declined on d 2 and increased on d 3 when chicks were refed. A similar pattern was seen for the number of cells per gram muscle; however, in general cell numbers tended to be higher in the starved group than in controls (P < 0.1). The results obtained with cultured cells were parallel with in situ immunostaining with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine and proliferating cell nuclear antigen in breast muscle from experimental chicks, and with growth hormone receptor expression. These results suggest that satellite cell cultures are a reliable tool for evaluating muscle growth in postnatal chickens. We conclude that sufficient feed in the immediate postnatal period is critical for satellite cell proliferation and skeletal muscle development and is thus important for optimal muscle growth.

  12. In vivo glucose utilization in rat tissues during the three phases of starvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cherel, Y.; Burnol, A.F.; Leturque, A.; Le Maho, Y.

    1988-01-01

    Three phases of starvation have been described from changes in protein and lipid utilization in birds and mammals. In the present study, tissue glucose utilization was measured in vivo during these three phases, using a 2-deoxy-[1-3H]glucose technique in the anesthetized rat. According to this technique, the term glucose utilization therefore refers to transport and phosphorylation of glucose in tissues, ie, whatever is the fate of glucose. Whole-body glucose turnover rate, which was determined by a continuous infusion of [3-3H]glucose, decreased by 40% during the first two days of starvation (phase 1); it did not change thereafter, neither in the protein-sparing phase 2 nor in phase 3, which is marked by an increase in net protein breakdown. Two days of starvation caused a marked decrease in the glucose utilization in skeletal muscles; this decrease was higher in oxidative muscles (65% in diaphragm, 66% in soleus) than in glycolytic muscles (31% in extensor digitorum longus, 34% in epitrochlearis). Glucose utilization also decreased in heart atria (75%), heart ventricles (93%), and white adipose tissue (54%); by contrast, there was a two-fold increase in glucose utilization in brown adipose tissue and no change in brain and skin. No variations were observed in glucose utilization in any of the tissues from phase 1 to phase 2. However, phase 3 was marked by a decrease in glucose utilization in extensor digitorum longus (45%), brown adipose tissue (76%), brain (29%), and skin (40%), whereas there was a 2.3- and 3.4-fold increase in glucose utilization in diaphragm and heart ventricles, respectively

  13. In vivo glucose utilization in rat tissues during the three phases of starvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherel, Y.; Burnol, A.F.; Leturque, A.; Le Maho, Y.

    1988-11-01

    Three phases of starvation have been described from changes in protein and lipid utilization in birds and mammals. In the present study, tissue glucose utilization was measured in vivo during these three phases, using a 2-deoxy-(1-3H)glucose technique in the anesthetized rat. According to this technique, the term glucose utilization therefore refers to transport and phosphorylation of glucose in tissues, ie, whatever is the fate of glucose. Whole-body glucose turnover rate, which was determined by a continuous infusion of (3-3H)glucose, decreased by 40% during the first two days of starvation (phase 1); it did not change thereafter, neither in the protein-sparing phase 2 nor in phase 3, which is marked by an increase in net protein breakdown. Two days of starvation caused a marked decrease in the glucose utilization in skeletal muscles; this decrease was higher in oxidative muscles (65% in diaphragm, 66% in soleus) than in glycolytic muscles (31% in extensor digitorum longus, 34% in epitrochlearis). Glucose utilization also decreased in heart atria (75%), heart ventricles (93%), and white adipose tissue (54%); by contrast, there was a two-fold increase in glucose utilization in brown adipose tissue and no change in brain and skin. No variations were observed in glucose utilization in any of the tissues from phase 1 to phase 2. However, phase 3 was marked by a decrease in glucose utilization in extensor digitorum longus (45%), brown adipose tissue (76%), brain (29%), and skin (40%), whereas there was a 2.3- and 3.4-fold increase in glucose utilization in diaphragm and heart ventricles, respectively.

  14. Starvation signals in yeast are integrated to coordinate metabolic reprogramming and stress response to ensure longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Nianshu; Cao, Lu

    2017-10-01

    Studies on replicative and chronological aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have greatly advanced our understanding of how longevity is regulated in all eukaryotes. Chronological lifespan (CLS) of yeast is defined as the age-dependent viability of non-dividing cell populations. A number of nutrient sensing and signal transduction pathways (mainly TOR and PKA) have been shown to regulate CLS, yet it is poorly understood how the starvation signals transduced via these pathways lead to CLS extension. Using reporters whose expressions are induced by glucose starvation, we have screened the majority of the 'signaling' mutants in the yeast genome and identified many genes that are necessary for stress response. Subsequent analyses of the 'signaling' mutants not only revealed novel regulators of CLS, such as the GSK-3 ortholog Mck1, but also demonstrated that starvation signals transmitted by SNF1/AMPK, PKC1 and those negatively regulated by TOR/PKA, including Rim15, Yak1 and Mck1 kinases, are integrated to enable metabolic reprogramming and the acquisition of stress resistance. Coordinated metabolic reprogramming ensures the accumulation of storage carbohydrates for quiescent cells to maintain viability. We provide new evidence that Yak1, Rim15 and Mck1 kinases cooperate to activate H 2 O 2 -scanvenging activities, thus limiting the levels of ROS in cells entering quiescence. These findings support the recent advances in higher organisms that the flexibility of metabolic reprogramming and the balance between energetics and stress resistance are the unifying principles of lifespan extension. Future work to reveal how the metabolic switch and stress response is coordinated will help delineate the molecular mechanisms of aging in yeast and shed novel insight into aging/anti-aging principles in higher organisms.

  15. Probing Phosphorus Efficient Low Phytic Acid Content Soybean Genotypes with Phosphorus Starvation in Hydroponics Growth System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Varun; Singh, Tiratha Raj; Hada, Alkesh; Jolly, Monica; Ganapathi, Andy; Sachdev, Archana

    2015-10-01

    Phosphorus is an essential nutrient required for soybean growth but is bound in phytic acid which causes negative effects on both the environment as well as the animal nutrition. Lowering of phytic acid levels is associated with reduced agronomic characteristics, and relatively little information is available on the response of soybean plants to phosphorus (P) starvation. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different P starvation concentrations on the phytic acid content, growth, and yield of seven mutant genotypes along with the unirradiated control, JS-335, in a hydroponics growth system. The low phytic acid containing mutant genotypes, IR-JS-101, IR-DS-118, and IR-V-101, showed a relatively high growth rate in low P concentration containing nutrient solution (2 μM), whereas the high P concentration (50 μM) favored the growth of IR-DS-111 and IR-DS-115 mutant genotypes containing moderate phytate levels. The mutant genotypes with high phytic acid content, IR-DS-122, IR-DS-114, and JS-335, responded well under P starvation and did not have any significant effect on the growth and yield of plants. Moreover, the reduction of P concentration in nutrient solution from 50 to 2 μM also reduced the phytic acid content in the seeds of all the soybean genotypes under study. The desirable agronomic performance of low phytic acid containing mutant genotype IR-DS-118 reported in this study suggested it to be a P-efficient genotype which could be considered for agricultural practices under P limiting soils.

  16. NblA1/A2-Dependent Homeostasis of Amino Acid Pools during Nitrogen Starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiyota, Hiroshi; Hirai, Masami Yokota; Ikeuchi, Masahiko

    2014-06-30

    Nutrient balance is important for photosynthetic growth and biomass production in microalgae. Here, we investigated and compared metabolic responses of amino acid pools to nitrogen and sulfur starvation in a unicellular model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and its mutant nblA1/A2. It is known that NblA1/A2-dependent and -independent breakdown of abundant photosynthetic phycobiliproteins and other cellular proteins supply nutrients to the organism. However, the contribution of the NblA1/A2-dependent nutrient supply to amino acid pool homeostasis has not been studied. Our study demonstrates that changes in the pool size of many amino acids during nitrogen starvation can be categorized as NblA1/A2-dependent (Gln, Glu, glutathione, Gly, Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Pro, Ser, Thr, Tyr and Val) and NblA1/A2-independent (Ala, Asn, Lys, and Trp). We also report unique changes in amino acid pool sizes during sulfur starvation in wild type and the mutant and found a generally marked increase in the Lys pool in cyanobacteria during nutrient starvation. In conclusion, the NblA1/A2-dependent protein turnover contributes to the maintenance of many amino acid pools during nitrogen starvation.

  17. NblA1/A2-Dependent Homeostasis of Amino Acid Pools during Nitrogen Starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kiyota

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Nutrient balance is important for photosynthetic growth and biomass production in microalgae. Here, we investigated and compared metabolic responses of amino acid pools to nitrogen and sulfur starvation in a unicellular model cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and its mutant nblA1/A2. It is known that NblA1/A2-dependent and -independent breakdown of abundant photosynthetic phycobiliproteins and other cellular proteins supply nutrients to the organism. However, the contribution of the NblA1/A2-dependent nutrient supply to amino acid pool homeostasis has not been studied. Our study demonstrates that changes in the pool size of many amino acids during nitrogen starvation can be categorized as NblA1/A2-dependent (Gln, Glu, glutathione, Gly, Ile, Leu, Met, Phe, Pro, Ser, Thr, Tyr and Val and NblA1/A2-independent (Ala, Asn, Lys, and Trp. We also report unique changes in amino acid pool sizes during sulfur starvation in wild type and the mutant and found a generally marked increase in the Lys pool in cyanobacteria during nutrient starvation. In conclusion, the NblA1/A2-dependent protein turnover contributes to the maintenance of many amino acid pools during nitrogen starvation.

  18. Insulin Signaling in the Peripheral and Central Nervous System Regulates Female Sexual Receptivity during Starvation in Drosophila

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    Sébastien Lebreton

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Many animals adjust their reproductive behavior according to nutritional state and food availability. Drosophila females for instance decrease their sexual receptivity following starvation. Insulin signaling, which regulates many aspects of insect physiology and behavior, also affects reproduction in females. We show that insulin signaling is involved in the starvation-induced reduction in female receptivity. More specifically, females mutant for the insulin-like peptide 5 (dilp5 were less affected by starvation compared to the other dilp mutants and wild-type flies. Knocking-down the insulin receptor, either in all fruitless-positive neurons or a subset of these neurons dedicated to the perception of a male aphrodisiac pheromone, decreased the effect of starvation on female receptivity. Disrupting insulin signaling in some parts of the brain, including the mushroom bodies even abolished the effect of starvation. In addition, we identified fruitless-positive neurons in the dorso-lateral protocerebrum and in the mushroom bodies co-expressing the insulin receptor. Together, our results suggest that the interaction of insulin peptides determines the tuning of female sexual behavior, either by acting on pheromone perception or directly in the central nervous system.

  19. Involvement of AMP - activated protein kinase in fat depot-specific metabolic changes during starvation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šponarová, Jana; Mustard, K. J.; Horáková, Olga; Flachs, Pavel; Rossmeisl, Martin; Brauner, Petr; Bardová, Kristina; Thomason-Hughes, M.; Braunerová, Radka; Janovská, Petra; Hardie, D. G.; Kopecký, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 579, č. 27 (2005), s. 6105-6110 ISSN 0014-5793 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA303/05/2580; GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB5011303 Grant - others:Wellcome Trust(GB) 02760; European Commission(XE) LSHM-CT-2004-005272; Diabetes UK(GB) Project Grant; Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council(GB) Research Studentship; GA-(GB) Novo-Nordisk Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : lipid metabolism * AMPK * starvation Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 3.415, year: 2005

  20. Why were "starvation diets" promoted for diabetes in the pre-insulin period?

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    Mazur Allan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the decade before the discovery of insulin, the prominent American physicians Frederick Allen and Elliott Joslin advocated severe fasting and undernutrition to prolong the lives of diabetic patients. Detractors called this "starvation dieting," and some patients did indeed starve to death. Allen and Joslin promoted the therapy as a desperate application of animal experimentation to clinical treatment, and texts still describe it that way. This justification was exaggerated. The public record contains only the briefest account of relevant animal experiments, and clinical experience at the time provided little indication that severe undernutrition had better outcomes than low carbohydrate diets then in use.

  1. Adaptation of intestinal hydrolases to starvation in rats: effect of thyroid function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galluser, M; Belkhou, R; Freund, J N

    1991-01-01

    this process. These results indicate that intestinal hydrolases respond non-coordinately to long-term food deprivation. In addition, the thyroid status of the animals has a direct influence on the adaptation of several brush border hydrolases to starvation. This suggests that the drop in plasma thyroid...... hormones during fasting allows a better maintenance of protein content and of hydrolase activities in the brush border membranes of the small intestine. These adaptive processes seemed to be partly controlled at a post-transcriptional level....

  2. Interaction of starvation and gamma radiation on the fecundity of tribolium castaneum (Herbst) (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khattak, S.U.K.; Shafique, M. (Nuclear Inst. for Agriculture and Biology, Faisalabad (Pakistan))

    Starved and unstarved beetles of Tribolium castaneum (Herbst) were irradiated with low doses of gamma radiation viz:-4, 6, 8, 12 krad and their fecundity was studied up to 8 days under controlled laboratory conditions. It was recorded that fecundity decreased immediately following irradiation, but the subsequent recovery was dose dependent. The rate of oviposition increased with an increased period of starvation. Pre-irradiation starved beetles were less fecunditive than the post-irradiation ones. Irradiated individuals, though, laid eggs, but none of the eggs hatched at 8 and 12 krad.

  3. Self-hypnosis training and captivity survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, D P; Sexton, J L

    1997-01-01

    In February and March, 1973, 566 U.S. military prisoners (POWs) were released from North Vietnam. These men had been POWs for a period of time between 2 months and 9 years, with a mean incarceration of 4.44 years. They had faced physical and psychological stress similar to that experienced by POWs from previous wars: starvation, disease, inadequate shelter, lack of medical care, interrogations and torture (Deaton, Burge, Richlin & Latrownik, 1977; Mitchell, 1991). By definition, such prison conditions constituted a traumatic experience (Deaton et al., 1977). However, a unique stress for our POWs in North Vietnam was the additional trauma of solitary confinement. This paper reviews the coping and "time killing" activities of U.S. Navy Vietnam POWs who experienced solitary confinement and tortuous interrogation. This paper also reports the physical and psychological adjustment of our POWs following their release from captivity. Suggestions are made regarding the revision of the curriculum for captivity survival training programs such as Survival, Evasion, Resistance, and Escape (SERE) school.

  4. Increased bioplastic production with an RNA polymerase sigma factor SigE during nitrogen starvation in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osanai, Takashi; Numata, Keiji; Oikawa, Akira; Kuwahara, Ayuko; Iijima, Hiroko; Doi, Yoshiharu; Tanaka, Kan; Saito, Kazuki; Hirai, Masami Yokota

    2013-12-01

    Because cyanobacteria directly harvest CO2 and light energy, their carbon metabolism is important for both basic and applied sciences. Here, we show that overexpression of the sigma factor sigE in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 widely changes sugar catabolism and increases production of the biodegradable polyester polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) during nitrogen starvation. sigE overexpression elevates the levels of proteins implicated in glycogen catabolism, the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and polyhydroxyalkanoate biosynthesis. PHB accumulation is enhanced by sigE overexpression under nitrogen-limited conditions, yet the molecular weights of PHBs synthesized by the parental glucose-tolerant and sigE overexpression strain are similar. Although gene expression induced by nitrogen starvation is changed and other metabolites (such as GDP-mannose and citrate) accumulate under sigE overexpression, genetic engineering of this sigma factor altered the metabolic pathway from glycogen to PHB during nitrogen starvation.

  5. Influence of Starvation on the Structure of Gut-Associated Bacterial Communities in the Chinese White Pine Beetle (Dendroctonus armandi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xia Hu

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the influence of starvation on the structure of the gut bacterial community in the Chinese white pine beetle (Dendroctonus armandi. A total of 14 operational taxonomic units (OTUs0.03 clusters belonging to nine genera were identified. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE profiles of bacterial PCR-amplified 16S rRNA gene fragments from the guts of starved male and female adults revealed that the bacterial community diversity increased after starvation. The dominant genus Citrobacter decreased significantly, whereas the genus Serratia increased in both starved female and starved male adults. The most predominant bacterial genus in D. armandi adults was Citrobacter, except for starved male adults, in which Serratia was the most abundant genus (27%. Our findings reveal that starvation affects gut bacterial dynamics in D. armandi, as has been observed in other insect species.

  6. Ultrastructural Changes in the Epithelium of the Stomach of Aphanius dispar (Cyprinodontidae, Due to Stress from Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taher A. Ba-Omar

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrastructural changes in the epithelium of the stomach  of Aphanius dispar, a cyprinodont fish, due to starvation have been described.  The changes in the epithelium after 24, 48, 72, 96, and 120 hours have been discussed.  The  degeneration of the epithelial cells commenced after 24 hours and steadily progressed till 96 hours at which the maximum change was observed. Changes in response to starvation include the disappearance of lipid droplets, mitochondrial damage, goblet cells degeneration, morphological aberration of the nuclei  and overall abnormalities  in the structural integrity of the rugae.  This study confirms that stress due to starvation causes significant pathomorphological changes in the stomach in four days.

  7. Lactate promotes resistance to glucose starvation via upregulation of Bcl-2 mediated by mTOR activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen; Sheng, Shile; Li, Rui; Sun, Xiaoguang; Liu, Jianju; Huang, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Solid tumors grow faster and need more glucose than normal tissue; however, due to poor angiogenesis and excessive growth, tumors remote from blood vessels are always under glucose starvation. Even so, cancer cells remain alive in vivo. Thus, making cancer cells sensitive to glucose depletion may potentially provide an effective strategy for cancer intervention. Tumors that obtain sufficient glucose generate a large amount of lactate. Therefore, we proposed that lactate, a tumor microenvironment factor, may allow cancer cells to develop resistance to glucose starvation-induced death. We cultured cancer cells in no-glucose medium and added lactate to the medium. During the experiment, lactate helped cancer cells to escape from glucose starvation-induced cell death, without using lactate as an energy substrate, resulting in activation of Akt through PI3K. Akt activation plays a central role in cell growth through the activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Alteration of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway by inhibiting apoptosis induced specific upregulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) through translational control. In conclusion, this study showed that lactate rescues cancer cells from glucose starvation-induced cell death through regulation of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/Bcl-2 signaling pathway. These data suggest that lactate is an important determinant of the sensitivity of tumors to glucose starvation, and reducing lactate or inhibiting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR/Bcl-2 signaling pathway may influence the response of cancers to glucose starvation.

  8. The Effects of Starvation of Honey Bee Larvae on Reproductive Quality and Wing Asymmetry of Honey Bee Drones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szentgyörgyi Hajnalka

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Starvation during larval development has a negative effect on adult worker honey bees (Apis mellifera L., but much less is known about the quality of drones starved during their development. We verified how starvation on the second day (early starvation or the sixth day (late starvation of larval development affects body mass, ejaculated semen volume and forewing size, shape, size asymmetry and shape asymmetry in drones after emergence. The larvae were starved for ten hours by being separated from nursing bees with a wire mash for 10 hours either early or late during larval development. Drones starved both early and late were smaller (254.1 ± 1.97 mg and 239.4 ± 2.12 mg, respectively than the control regularly fed individuals (260.9 ± 2.01 mg, and their wing size changed as well (control: 889.76 ± 1.06; early: 880.9 ± 1.17; late: 868.05 ± 1.48. Starvation at a later phase of larval development caused more pronounced effects than at an earlier phase. On the other hand, ejaculated semen volume (control: 0.7 ± 0.043 μl; early: 0.88 ± 0.040 μl; late: 1.08 ± 0.031 μl, wing size asymmetry (control: 0.49 ± 0.025; early: 0.51 ± 0.026; late: 0.52 ± 0.03 and wing shape asymmetry (control: 17.4 ± 0.47 x 10-3; early: 16.9 ± 0.41 x 10-3; late: 17.6 ± 0.43 x 10-3 were not affected by starvation. This suggests that drones attempt to preserve characters which are important for their future reproduction.

  9. Tumor necrosis factor-α attenuates starvation-induced apoptosis through upregulation of ferritin heavy chain in hepatocellular carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kou, Xingrui; Zhao, Qiudong; Zhao, Xue; Li, Rong; Wei, Lixin; Wu, Mengchao; Jing, Yingying; Deng, Weijie; Sun, Kai; Han, Zhipeng; Ye, Fei; Yu, Guofeng; Fan, Qingmin; Gao, Lu

    2013-01-01

    Tumor microenviroment is characteristic of inflammation, ischemia and starvation of nutrient. TNF-α, which is an extraordinarily pleiotropic cytokine, could be an endogenous tumor promoter in some tumor types. The basic objective of this study was to investigate the effects of TNF-α on the cell viability and apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells under serum starvation, and to identify the molecular mechanisms involved. For this purpose, five different concentrations of TNF-α and two different serum settings (serum-cultured and serum-deprived) were used to investigate the effects of TNF-α on the cell viability and apoptosis of Hep3B and SMMC-7721 cells. TNF-α (10 ng/ml) attenuated serum starvation-induced apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, and autophagy conferred this process. BAY11-7082, a specific inhibitor of NF-κB, reversed the suppression of serum starvation-induced apoptosis by TNF-α. Moreover, TNF-α-induced NF-κB transactivation was suppressed by autophagy inhibitor 3-MA. In addition, TNF-α up-regulated Ferritin heavy chain (FHC) transiently by NF-κB activation and FHC levels were correlated with the TNF-α-induced protection against serum starvation-mediated apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells. Furthermore, FHC-mediated inhibition of apoptosis depended on suppressing ROS accumulation. Our findings suggested that autophagy conferred the TNF-α protection against serum starvation-mediated apoptosis of hepatocellular carcinoma cells, the mechanism involved with the activation of the TNF-α/ NF-κB /FHC signaling pathway

  10. [Starvation metabolism in parent Chinese mitten-handed crab (Eriocheir sinensis)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Xiaobo; Chen, Liqiao; Ai, Chunxiang; Zhou, Zhongliang

    2002-11-01

    The experiment was conducted to study the influence of starvation on the metabolism of parent Chinese mitten-handed crab (Eriocheir sinensis) with weights of 54.59 (+/- 2.37) g under 20 (+/- 0.5) degree C during Oct. to Dec., 1998. The results showed oxygen consumption, CO2 production and ammonia-N excretion of the parent crab being starved for 30 days were 50.0%, 63.4%, and 59.1% of those of the fed crab, respectively. The course of oxygen consumption reduction could be divided into four phases: 1) from the 1st day to the 6th day, the metabolic rate decreased remarkably; 2) from the 7th day to the 15th day, the metabolic rate kept relatively stable; 3) from the 16th day to the 25th day, the metabolic rate decreased markedly again; and 4) from 26th day to 30th day (the end time of the experiment), the metabolic rate decreased most dramatically. There were only three phases during the course of CO2 production and ammonia-N excretion reduction. Meanwhile, the standard metabolism of the starved crab reduced from 4.45 to 2.36 J.g-1.h-1, and lipid was used as the first energy source in the course of starvation.

  11. Leptin suppresses semi-starvation induced hyperactivity in rats: implications for anorexia nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Exner, C; Hebebrand, J; Remschmidt, H; Wewetzer, C; Ziegler, A; Herpertz, S; Schweiger, U; Blum, W F; Preibisch, G; Heldmaier, G; Klingenspor, M

    2000-09-01

    Semi-starvation induced hyperactivity (SIH) occurs in rodents upon caloric restriction. We hypothesized that SIH is triggered by the decline in leptin secretion associated with food restriction. To test this hypothesis, rats, which had established a stable level of activity, were treated with leptin or vehicle via implanted minipumps concomitantly to initiation of food restriction for 7 days. In a second experiment treatment was initiated after SIH had already set in. In contrast to the vehicle-treated rats, which increased their baseline activity level by 300%, the development of SIH was suppressed by leptin. Furthermore, leptin was able to stop SIH, after it had set in. These results underscore the assumed major role of leptin in the adaptation to semi-starvation. Because SIH has been viewed as a model for anorexia nervosa, we also assessed subjective ratings of motor restlessness in 30 patients with this eating disorder in the emaciated state associated with hypoleptinemia and after increments in leptin secretion brought upon by therapeutically induced weight gain. Hypoleptinemic patients ranked their motor restlessness higher than upon attainment of their maximal leptin level during inpatient treatment. Thus, hypoleptinemia might also contribute to the hyperactivity frequently associated with anorexia nervosa.

  12. Changes in Hematological, Biochemical and Non-specific Immune Parameters of Olive Flounder, , Following Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jong-Hyun Kim

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Triplicate groups of fed and starved olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus (body weight: 119.8±17.46 g, were examined over 42 days for physiological changes using hematological, biochemical, and non-specific immune parameters. No significant differences in concentrations of blood hemoglobin and hematocrit and plasma levels of total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glucose, and cortisol were detected between fed and starved groups at any sampling time throughout the experiment. In contrast, plasma total protein concentrations were significantly lower in starved fish than in fed fish from day 7 onwards. Moreover, plasma lysozyme concentrations were significantly higher in starved flounder from day 21 onwards. This result confirms that the response of olive flounder to short-term (less than about 1.5 months starvation consists of a readjustment of metabolism rather than the activation of an alarm-stress response. The present results indicate that starvation does not significantly compromise the health status of fish despite food limitation.

  13. Candida albicans Hap43 Domains Are Required under Iron Starvation but Not Excess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volha Skrahina

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Iron availability is a central factor in infections, since iron is a critical micronutrient for all living organisms. The host employs both iron limitation and toxicity strategies to control microbial growth, and successful pathogens are able to tightly coordinate iron homeostasis in response to changing iron levels. As a commensal and opportunistic pathogen, Candida albicans copes with both iron deficiency and excess via the precise regulation of iron acquisition, consumption and storage. The C. albicans transcription factor Hap43 is known to be required for the iron starvation response, while specific domains of its ortholog, HapX, in Aspergillus fumigatus, were recently shown to regulate iron uptake and consumptions genes under both low and high iron levels. Therefore, we investigated the contribution of C. albicans Hap43 domains in response to changing iron levels. We found the C-terminus of Hap43 to be essential for the activation of iron uptake genes during iron starvation, whereas, in contrast to A. fumigatus, Hap43 was not required in mediating adaptation to iron resistance. These data indicate that the generally conserved metal acquisition systems in fungal pathogens can show individual adaptations to the host environment.

  14. Secreted 3-isopropylmalate methyl ester signals invasive growth during amino acid starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumlao, Darren S; Hertz, Nicholas; Clarke, Steven

    2008-01-15

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae methyltransferase encoded by TMT1 catalyzes the AdoMet-dependent monomethylation of 3-isopropylmalate, an intermediate of the leucine biosynthetic pathway. The biological significance of methylating 3-isopropylmalate and the relationship between Tmt1 and the leucine biosynthetic pathway is not yet established. We present evidence here showing that methylation of 3-isopropylmalate functions to extracellularly signal yeast to grow invasively. We show that methyl esterification generates 3-isopropylmalate-1-methyl ester. We find that the Tmt1 methyltransferase functions independently of the biosynthetic pathway but is induced when cells are starved for amino acids; the largest induction is observed with the removal of leucine from the media. This amino acid starvation stress response is controlled by the transcriptional activator Gcn4. After methylation, 3-isopropylmalate methyl ester is secreted into the media within 3 h. Thin layer chromatography and gas chromatography mass spectroscopy confirm that the intact molecule is secreted. Finally, we show that purified 3-isopropylmalate methyl ester can enhance the ability of the haploid yeast strain 10560-23C to grow invasively. Our data identifies 3-isopropylmalate methyl ester as an autoinductive molecule that provides a signal to yeast to switch from vegetative to invasive growth in response to amino acid starvation.

  15. Conformational Flexibility Enables the Function of a BECN1 Region Essential for Starvation-Mediated Autophagy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mei, Yang; Ramanathan, Arvind; Glover, Karen; Stanley, Christopher; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Yang, Zhongyu; Colbert, Christopher L.; Sinha, Sangita C.

    2016-04-05

    BECN1 is essential for autophagy, a critical eukaryotic cellular homeostasis pathway. Here we delineate a highly conserved BECN1 domain located between previously characterized BH3 and coiled-coil domains and elucidate its structure and role in autophagy. The 2.0 angstrom sulfur-single-wavelength anomalous dispersion X-ray crystal structure of this domain demonstrates that its N-terminal half is unstructured while its C-terminal half is helical; hence, we name it the flexible helical domain (FHD). Circular dichroism spectroscopy, double electron electron resonance electron paramagnetic resonance, and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) analyses confirm that the FHD is partially disordered, even in the context of adjacent BECN1 domains. Molecular dynamic simulations fitted to SAXS data indicate that the FHD transiently samples more helical conformations. FHD helicity increases in 2,2,2-trifluoroethanol, suggesting it may become more helical upon binding. Lastly, cellular studies show that conserved FHD residues are required for starvation-induced autophagy. Thus, the FHD likely undergoes a binding-associated disorder to-helix transition, and conserved residues critical for this interaction are essential for starvation-induced autophagy.

  16. Involvement of miR169 in the nitrogen-starvation responses in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Ding, Hong; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Zhang, Fusuo; Li, Wen-Xue

    2013-01-01

    Summary Recent studies have revealed that microRNAs (miRNAs) regulate plant adaptive responses to nutrient deprivation. However, the functional significance of miRNAs in adaptive responses to nitrogen (N) limitation remains to be explored. The Arabidopsis miR169 was strongly down-regulated, whereas its targets, NFYA (Nuclear Factor Y, subunit A) family members, were strongly induced by nitrogen N starvation. Analysis of the expression of miR169 precursors showed that MIR169a was substantially down-regulated in both roots and shoots by N starvation. Accumulation of the NFYA family members was suppressed in transgenic Arabidopsis with constitutive expression of MIR169a. Transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing MIR169a accumulated less N and were more sensitive to N stress than the wild type. N sensitivity of 35S::MIR169a might be attributable to impaired uptake systems. These results provide evidence that miRNAs have functional roles in helping plants to cope with fluctuations in N availability in the soil. PMID:21348874

  17. Regional brain glucose use in unstressed rats after two days of starvation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mans, A.M.; Davis, D.W.; Hawkins, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Regional brain glucose use was measured in conscious, unrestrained, fed rats and after 2 days of starvation, using quantitative autoradiography and [6- 14 C]glucose. Plasma glucose, lactate, and ketone body concentrations and brain glucose and lactate content were measured in separate groups of rats. Glucose concentrations were lower in starved rats in both plasma and brain; plasma ketone body concentrations were elevated. Glucose use was found to be lower throughout the brain by about 12%. While some areas seemed to be affected more than others, statistical analysis showed that none were exceptionally different. The results could not be explained by increased loss of 14 C as lactate or pyruvate during the experimental period, because the arteriovenous differences of these species were insignificant. The calculated contribution by ketone bodies to the total energy consumption was between 3 and 9% for the brain as a whole in the starved rats and could, therefore, partially account for the depression seen in glucose use. It was concluded that glucose oxidation is slightly depressed throughout the brain after 2 days of starvation

  18. Resistance to Starvation of Triatoma rubrofasciata (De Geer, 1773 under Laboratory Conditions (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rojas Cortéz Mirko G

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available The present work aims at learning the period of resistance to starvation (molting/death of Triatoma rubrofasciata in different stages of development and the respective loss of weight until death. Eggs of specimens from the greater area of the city of São Luis in the State of Maranhão, Brazil, yielded approximately 300 nymphs. These nymphs were placed in labelled Borrel glasses, in which they were weekly fed on rats (Rattus norvegicus, until reaching the stage to be observed. The experiments were conducted in a climatic chamber regulated at 29 ± 1° C, 70% relative humidity and 12 hr photoperiod. The resistance to starvation increased according to the stage of development, except for adult bugs, whose results were similar to the 3rd stage nymphs. In all these development stages there was an abrupt loss of weight in the first week, followed by a gradual loss until death. Comparing this work with those of other authors, it was observed that T. rubrofasciata is among the less resistant triatomine species.

  19. Resistance to starvation of Rhodnius neivai Lent, 1953 (Hemiptera: Reduviidae: Triatominae under experimental conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Cabello

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The period of resistance to starvation and the loss of weight until death of Rhodnius neivai in all stages of development were studied. Work was based on experiments conducted under controlled laboratory conditions. One hundred specimens of each nymphal instar were observed: 50 were fed on chicken and 50 on rabbit. Adult females and males were kept together and fed on each host. All bugs were weighed weekly until death. Laid eggs were collected weekly and observed during five weeks to obtain hatchability. Resistance to starvation was similar with both hosts and increased with the evolutionary stage, excepting the 5th nymphal instar and adults. With both hosts, loss of weight was abrupt in the first week and steady in the following weeks. In adults, on the first weeks after eating, there was little or no mortality, after which mortality increased rapidly with the starving time. Reproductive output was higher in the bugs fed on rabbit. R. neivai is among the least resistant triatomine species.

  20. Food searching strategy of amoeboid cells by starvation induced run length extension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter J M Van Haastert

    Full Text Available Food searching strategies of animals are key to their success in heterogeneous environments. The optimal search strategy may include specialized random walks such as Levy walks with heavy power-law tail distributions, or persistent walks with preferred movement in a similar direction. We have investigated the movement of the soil amoebae Dictyostelium searching for food. Dictyostelium cells move by extending pseudopodia, either in the direction of the previous pseudopod (persistent step or in a different direction (turn. The analysis of approximately 4000 pseudopodia reveals that step and turn pseudopodia are drawn from a probability distribution that is determined by cGMP/PLA2 signaling pathways. Starvation activates these pathways thereby suppressing turns and inducing steps. As a consequence, starved cells make very long nearly straight runs and disperse over approximately 30-fold larger areas, without extending more or larger pseudopodia than vegetative cells. This 'win-stay/lose-shift' strategy for food searching is called Starvation Induced Run-length Extension. The SIRE walk explains very well the observed differences in search behavior between fed and starving organisms such as bumble-bees, flower bug, hoverfly and zooplankton.

  1. p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced liver metabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Zhaoyue; Agostini, Massimiliano; Liu, He; Melino, Gerry; Simon, Hans-Uwe

    2015-10-20

    As a member of the p53 gene family, p73 regulates cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, neurogenesis, immunity and inflammation. Recently, p73 has been shown to transcriptionally regulate selective metabolic enzymes, such as cytochrome c oxidase subunit IV isoform 1, glucose 6-phosphate dehydrogenase and glutaminase-2, resulting in significant effects on metabolism, including hepatocellular lipid metabolism, glutathione homeostasis and the pentose phosphate pathway. In order to further investigate the metabolic effect of p73, here, we compared the global metabolic profile of livers from p73 knockout and wild-type mice under both control and starvation conditions. Our results show that the depletion of all p73 isoforms cause altered lysine metabolism and glycolysis, distinct patterns for glutathione synthesis and Krebs cycle, as well as an elevated pentose phosphate pathway and abnormal lipid accumulation. These results indicate that p73 regulates basal and starvation-induced fuel metabolism in the liver, a finding that is likely to be highly relevant for metabolism-associated disorders, such as diabetes and cancer.

  2. Decreasing transcription elongation rate in Escherichia coli exposed to amino acid starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, U.; Sørensen, M.A.; Pedersen, Steen

    1992-01-01

    length of the transcribed sequence were used to calculate the lacZ mRNA chain growth-rate. The transcription elongation rate was c. 43 nucleotides s-1 during exponential growth and decreased abruptly to c. 20 nucleotides s-1 in a relA+ strain after the onset of isoleucine starvation, when massive......% of the initiated lacZ mRNA' chains were continued into full-length mRNAs, but for the relA strain the polarity was so strong that no completed lacZ mRNA could be detected. The protein chain elongation rates decreased from 13 amino acids (aa) s-1 in the unperturbed growth phase to approximately 6 aa s-1, when......The time required for transcription of the lacZ gene in Escherichia coli was determined during exponential growth and under conditions, when the bacterium was exposed to partial isoleucine starvation. To do this, RNA was extracted from the cells at 10 s intervals following induction and quantified...

  3. [The effect of taurine derivative of change the biochemical parameters carbohidrate and lipide status by starvation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khnychenko, L K; Sapronov, N S

    2010-01-01

    The results obtained on the model of starvation shows that nutritional dropsy led to the significant decrease of glucose, total cholesterol (TCh) and triglycerides (TC), as well as increase of non-estherified fatty acids (NEFA) in blood serum. In the rats with nutritional dropsy after treatment fed with standard diet enriched with soybean protein body weight returned to normal values as well as levels of Glucose, TCh and TC. However, concentration of NEFA remained increased. In the experimental group received additionally taurepar or taurhythman the level of NEFA decreased up to the normal one. It is necessary to mention that taurine derivatives did not change the biochemical parameters in blood of normal non-starved rats. We suppose that these new substances promote reduction of intensity of hyperlipidemic processes. It is known, that during starvation incomplete oxidation of fatty acids leads to acidosis with following destruction of mitochondria membraine. Finding property of taurine derivatives to decrease the concentration of non-estherified fatty acids points at their ability for restoration of tricarboxilic acid's cycle and prevention of accumulation of suboxidized molecules of NEFA and acidosis development.

  4. Nutrient starvation leading to triglyceride accumulation activates the Entner Doudoroff pathway in Rhodococcus jostii RHA1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juarez, Antonio; Villa, Juan A; Lanza, Val F; Lázaro, Beatriz; de la Cruz, Fernando; Alvarez, Héctor M; Moncalián, Gabriel

    2017-02-27

    Rhodococcus jostii RHA1 and other actinobacteria accumulate triglycerides (TAG) under nutrient starvation. This property has an important biotechnological potential in the production of sustainable oils. To gain insight into the metabolic pathways involved in TAG accumulation, we analysed the transcriptome of R jostii RHA1 under nutrient-limiting conditions. We correlate these physiological conditions with significant changes in cell physiology. The main consequence was a global switch from catabolic to anabolic pathways. Interestingly, the Entner-Doudoroff (ED) pathway was upregulated in detriment of the glycolysis or pentose phosphate pathways. ED induction was independent of the carbon source (either gluconate or glucose). Some of the diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes involved in the last step of the Kennedy pathway were also upregulated. A common feature of the promoter region of most upregulated genes was the presence of a consensus binding sequence for the cAMP-dependent CRP regulator. This is the first experimental observation of an ED shift under nutrient starvation conditions. Knowledge of this switch could help in the design of metabolomic approaches to optimize carbon derivation for single cell oil production.

  5. The effects of starvation on digestive tract function and structure in juvenile southern catfish (Silurus meridionalis Chen).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Ling-Qing; Li, Feng-Jie; Li, Xiu-Ming; Cao, Zhen-Dong; Fu, Shi-Jian; Zhang, Yao-Guang

    2012-07-01

    The size and functional capacity of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and associated organs vary in response to environmental cues. The GI tract and associated organs are also very metabolically active in animals. Hence, animals may reduce the size and function of their GI tract to conserve energy when deprived of food. The main aims of this study were to investigate how Silurus meridionalis regulates the function and structure of its GI tract and associated organs during starvation. Starvation induced a decrease in both maintenance metabolism (MO(2rest), decreased by approximately 50%) and respiratory frequency (indicated by double side gill activity and notated as f(R), decreased by 29%). Lipase, trypsin and aminopeptidase-A showed a similar reduction in mass-specific activities during starvation, but pepsin and α-amylase did not. The starvation of experimental fish resulted in a significant reduction in body weight, the wet mass of the liver and the digestive-somatic system, the hepato-somatic index and the condition factor whereas the wet masses of the GI tract, pancreas, gall bladder and the relative intestinal length did not vary significantly during starvation. The reduction in liver wet mass was the main reason for the decrease in the wet mass of digestive-somatic system in this species. Only the mucosal area of the PI was affected significantly by starvation, decreasing by 34% at the end of the experiment. S. meridionalis displayed a decreasing intestinal mucosal area towards the distal intestine, and this gradient was not affected by starvation. The morphology and structure of both the GI tract and the liver were greatly down-regulated, as indicated by decreases in liver cell size, the mucosal thickness of the stomach and intestine, the density of goblet cells and microvilli surface area (MVSA), implying that food deprivation greatly impaired the digestive and absorptive functions of the GI tract in S. meridionalis. When deprived of food, S. meridionalis

  6. Ethylene signalling is involved in regulation of phosphate starvation-induced gene expression and production of acid phosphatases and anthocyanin in Arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, Mingguang

    2010-11-30

    With the exception of root hair development, the role of the phytohormone ethylene is not clear in other aspects of plant responses to inorganic phosphate (Pi) starvation. The induction of AtPT2 was used as a marker to find novel signalling components involved in plant responses to Pi starvation. Using genetic and chemical approaches, we examined the role of ethylene in the regulation of plant responses to Pi starvation. hps2, an Arabidopsis mutant with enhanced sensitivity to Pi starvation, was identified and found to be a new allele of CTR1 that is a key negative regulator of ethylene responses. 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC), the precursor of ethylene, increases plant sensitivity to Pi starvation, whereas the ethylene perception inhibitor Ag+ suppresses this response. The Pi starvation-induced gene expression and acid phosphatase activity are also enhanced in the hps2 mutant, but suppressed in the ethylene-insensitive mutant ein2-5. By contrast, we found that ethylene signalling plays a negative role in Pi starvation-induced anthocyanin production. These findings extend the roles of ethylene in the regulation of plant responses to Pi starvation and will help us to gain a better understanding of the molecular mechanism underlying these responses. © 2010 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2010 New Phytologist Trust.

  7. Role of environmental survival in transmission of Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronowski, Christina; James, Chloe E; Winstanley, Craig

    2014-07-01

    Campylobacter species are the most common cause of bacterial gastroenteritis, with C. jejuni responsible for the majority of these cases. Although it is clear that livestock, and particularly poultry, are the most common source, it is likely that the natural environment (soil and water) plays a key role in transmission, either directly to humans or indirectly via farm animals. It has been shown using multilocus sequence typing that some clonal complexes (such as ST-45) are more frequently isolated from environmental sources such as water, suggesting that strains vary in their ability to survive in the environment. Although C. jejuni are fastidious microaerophiles generally unable to grow in atmospheric levels of oxygen, C. jejuni can adapt to survival in the environment, exhibiting aerotolerance and starvation survival. Biofilm formation, the viable but nonculturable state, and interactions with other microorganisms can all contribute to survival outside the host. By exploiting high-throughput technologies such as genome sequencing and RNA Seq, we are well placed to decipher the mechanisms underlying the variations in survival between strains in environments such as soil and water and to better understand the role of environmental persistence in the transmission of C. jejuni directly or indirectly to humans. © 2014 The Authors. FEMS Microbiology Letters published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of Federation of European Microbiological Societies.

  8. Growth Phase, Oxygen, Temperature and Starvation Affect the Development of Viable but Non-Culturable State of Vibrio cholerae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin eWu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available AbstractVibrio cholerae can enter into a viable but non-culturable (VBNC state in order to survive in unfavourable environments. In this study, we studied the roles of five physicochemical and microbiological factors or states, namely, different strains, growth phases, oxygen, temperature, and starvation, on the development of VBNC of V. cholerae in artificial sea water (ASW. Different strains of the organism, the growth phase, and oxygen levels affected the progress of VBNC development. It was found that the VBNC state was induced faster in V. cholerae serogroup O1 classical biotype strain O395 than in O1 El Tor biotype strains C6706 and N16961. When cells in different growth phases were used for VBNC induction, stationary-phase cells lost their culturability more quickly than exponential-phase cells, while induction of a totally non-culturable state took longer to achieve for stationary-phase cells in all three strains, suggesting that heterogeneity of cells should be considered. Aeration strongly accelerated the loss of culturability. During the development of the VBNC state, the culturable cell count under aeration conditions was almost 106-fold lower than under oxygen-limited conditions for all three strains. The other two factors, temperature and nutrients-rich environment, may prevent the induction of VBNC cells. At 22°C or 37°C in ASW, most of the cells rapidly died and the culturable cell count reduced from about 108 CFU/mL to 106–105 CFU/mL. The total cell counts showed that cells that lost viability were decomposed, and the viable cell counts were the same as culturable cell counts, indicating that the cells did not reach the VBNC state. VBNC state development was blocked when ASW was supplied with Luria-Bertani broth (LB, but it was not affected in ASW with M9, suggesting that specific nutrients in LB may prevent the development of VBNC state. These results revealed that the five factors evaluated in this study had different

  9. MIR376A is a regulator of starvation-induced autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gozde Korkmaz

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a vesicular trafficking process responsible for the degradation of long-lived, misfolded or abnormal proteins, as well as damaged or surplus organelles. Abnormalities of the autophagic activity may result in the accumulation of protein aggregates, organelle dysfunction, and autophagy disorders were associated with various diseases. Hence, mechanisms of autophagy regulation are under exploration.Over-expression of hsa-miR-376a1 (shortly MIR376A was performed to evaluate its effects on autophagy. Autophagy-related targets of the miRNA were predicted using Microcosm Targets and MIRanda bioinformatics tools and experimentally validated. Endogenous miRNA was blocked using antagomirs and the effects on target expression and autophagy were analyzed. Luciferase tests were performed to confirm that 3' UTR sequences in target genes were functional. Differential expression of MIR376A and the related MIR376B was compared using TaqMan quantitative PCR.Here, we demonstrated that, a microRNA (miRNA from the DLK1/GTL2 gene cluster, MIR376A, played an important role in autophagy regulation. We showed that, amino acid and serum starvation-induced autophagy was blocked by MIR376A overexpression in MCF-7 and Huh7 cells. MIR376A shared the same seed sequence and had overlapping targets with MIR376B, and similarly blocked the expression of key autophagy proteins ATG4C and BECN1 (Beclin 1. Indeed, 3' UTR sequences in the mRNA of these autophagy proteins were responsive to MIR376A in luciferase assays. Antagomir tests showed that, endogenous MIR376A was participating to the control of ATG4C and BECN1 transcript and protein levels. Moreover, blockage of endogenous MIR376A accelerated starvation-induced autophagic activity. Interestingly, MIR376A and MIR376B levels were increased with different kinetics in response to starvation stress and tissue-specific level differences were also observed, pointing out to an overlapping but miRNA-specific biological role

  10. ENERGETICS OF FATTENING AND STARVATION IN THE LONG-DISTANCE MIGRATORY GARDEN WARBLER, SYLVIA BORIN, DURING THE MIGRATORY PHASE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KLAASSEN, M; BIEBACH, H

    1994-01-01

    Garden warblers (Sylvia borin) were subjected to starvation trials during their autumnal migratory phase in order to simulate a period of non-stop migration. Before, during and after this treatment the energy expenditure, activity, food intake and body mass of the subjects were monitored.

  11. Uniform Variation in Genetic-Traits of a Marine Bivalve Related to Starvation, Pollution and Geographic Clines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hummel, H.; Bogaards, R.H.; Amiard-Triquet, C.; Bachelet, G.; Desprez, M.; Marchand, J.; Rybarczyk, H.; Sylvand, B.; De Wit, Y.; De Wolf, L.

    1995-01-01

    Consistent patterns of genetic variation in the marine bivalve Macoma balthica (L.) were found after exposure to low levels of copper, starvation, and along geographic dines. The geographic dines were related to temperature and salinity. Genetic differences were primarily found in the LAP (Leucine

  12. Responses of barley root and shoot proteomes to long‐term nitrogen deficiency, short‐term nitrogen starvation and ammonium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laurell Blom Møller, Anders; Pedas, Pai; Andersen, Birgit

    2011-01-01

    plants grown hydroponically for 33 d with 5 mm nitrate, plants grown under N deficiency (0.5 mm nitrate, 33 d) or short‐term N starvation (28 d with 5 mm nitrate followed by 5 d with no N source) were compared. N deficiency caused changes in C and N metabolism and ascorbate‐glutathione cycle enzymes...

  13. Induction of Arabidopsis tryptophan pathway enzymes and camalexin by amino acid starvation, oxidative stress, and an abiotic elicitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J; Williams, C C; Last, R L

    1998-03-01

    The tryptophan (Trp) biosynthetic pathway leads to the production of many secondary metabolites with diverse functions, and its regulation is predicted to respond to the needs for both protein synthesis and secondary metabolism. We have tested the response of the Trp pathway enzymes and three other amino acid biosynthetic enzymes to starvation for aromatic amino acids, branched-chain amino acids, or methionine. The Trp pathway enzymes and cytosolic glutamine synthetase were induced under all of the amino acid starvation test conditions, whereas methionine synthase and acetolactate synthase were not. The mRNAs for two stress-inducible enzymes unrelated to amino acid biosynthesis and accumulation of the indolic phytoalexin camalexin were also induced by amino acid starvation. These results suggest that regulation of the Trp pathway enzymes under amino acid deprivation conditions is largely a stress response to allow for increased biosynthesis of secondary metabolites. Consistent with this hypothesis, treatments with the oxidative stress-inducing herbicide acifluorfen and the abiotic elicitor alpha-amino butyric acid induced responses similar to those induced by the amino acid starvation treatments. The role of salicylic acid in herbicide-mediated Trp and camalexin induction was investigated.

  14. Effects of starvation and mating status on the activity of the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oku, K.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Verbaarschot, P.; Jong, de P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flea beetles are characterized by their tendency to jump. They can also fly. First, the effects of starvation on flight activity in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were determined. After starving P. nemorum for five days a greater number of individuals of both

  15. Evidence for PII with NAGK interaction that regulates Arg synthesis in the microalga Myrmecia incisa in response to nitrogen starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan; Liu, Wei; Sun, Li-Ping; Zhou, Zhi-Gang

    2017-11-24

    To understand why most eukaryotic microalgae accumulate lipids during nitrogen starvation stress, a gene, MiglnB, encoding PII, a signal transduction protein, was cloned from the arachidonic acid-rich microalga Myrmecia incisa Reisigl. Similarly to its homologues, MiPII contains three conserved T-, B-, and C-loops. In the presence of abundant Mg 2+ , ATP, and Gln, MiPII upregulates Arg biosynthesis by interacting with the rate-limiting enzyme, MiNAGK, as evidenced by yeast two-hybrid, co-immunoprecipitation assays, and kinetics analysis of enzyme-catalyzed reactions. However, this interaction of MiPII with MiNAGK is reversed by addition of 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG). Moreover, this interaction is present in the chloroplasts of M. incisa, as illustrated cytologically by both immunoelectron microscopy and agroinfiltration of Nicotiana benthamiana leaves to determine the subcellular localization of MiPII with MiNAGK. During the process of nitrogen starvation, soluble Arg levels in M. incisa are modulated by a change in MiNAGK enzymatic activity, both of which are significantly correlated (r = 0.854). A model for the manipulation of Arg biosynthesis via MiPII in M. incisa chloroplasts in response to nitrogen starvation is proposed. The ATP and 2-OG saved from Arg biosynthesis is thus suggested to facilitate the accumulation of fatty acids and triacylglycerol in M. incisa during exposure to nitrogen starvation.

  16. STARVATION RESISTANCE IN DROSOPHILA-MELANOGASTER IN RELATION TO THE POLYMORPHISMS AT THE ADH AND ALPHA-GPDH LOCI

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OUDMAN, L; VANDELDEN, W; KAMPING, A; BIJLSMA, R

    In view of the world-wide latitudinal cline of the Adh and alpha Gpdh allozyme frequencies of Drosophila melanogaster and the interactions between these loci, experiments were performed to study the phenotypic effects of these loci. Starvation resistance, oxygen consumption, body weight, protein

  17. Comparison of nutritional status of field and laboratory reared Balanus amphitrite Darwin (Cirripedia: Thoracica) larvae and implication of starvation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Desai, D.V.; Anil, A.C.

    Experiments were carried out to evaluate the influence of rearing temperature and food concentration (20 and 30 degrees C, 1x10 sup(5) and 2x10 sup(5) cells ml sup(-1)) on the starvation threshold and nucleic acid content of the larvae of Balanus...

  18. Antioxidative and immunological responses in the haemolymph of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) exposed to starvation and dimethoate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stalmach, Monika; Wilczek, Grażyna; Homa, Joanna; Szulinska, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the intensity of enzymatic antioxidative parameters [catalase (CAT), glutathione peroxidase (GSTPx), glutathione reductase (GR), total antioxidant capacity (TAC)] and percentage of high granularity cells as well as low to medium granularity cells in haemolymph of wolf spiders Xerolycosa nemoralis exposed to starvation and dimethoate under laboratory conditions. Only in starved males, haemolymph included a lower percentage of high granularity cells, accompanied by high activity of CAT and GSTPx, than in the control. Exposure of males to dimethoate increased CAT activity, after single application, and significantly enhanced GR activity, after five-time application. In females, five-time contact with dimethoate elevated the percentage of high granularity cells. As in comparison to females, male X. nemoralis were more sensitive to the applied stressing factors, it may be concluded that in natural conditions both food deficiency and chemical stress may diminish the immune response of their organisms. - Highlights: • Starvation of males diminishes their immunological potential. • Females, compared with males, are less sensitive to starvation and dimethoate. • Antioxidative responses are stronger in starvation than after dimethoate intoxication. - The level of antioxidative response and quantitative changes of haemocytes in the haemolymph of wolf spider Xerolycosa nemoralis (Lycosidae) depend on the stressor and gender.

  19. Effects of absolute fasting on reproduction and survival of the invasive apple snailPomacea canaliculatain its native range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburi, Nicolás E; Martín, Pablo R

    2016-08-01

    A South American freshwater gastropod, the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata, has become a driver of ecosystemic changes in wetlands and an important rice pest after its introduction to various parts of the world, mainly Asia. The objective of this study was to study the effect of an abrupt interruption in food availability in the short term (up to 4 weeks) and long term (up to 8 months) on survival and reproductive activity. The main results indicate that short-term fasting mainly affects the survival of males, but only when they are raised together with females, probably due to a greater mate-searching activity that increases mortality in the individuals with lower reserves. The number of copulating snails or egg-laying females shows an abrupt drop when fasting and a rapid recovery after the food supply is restored. The strategy of discontinuing reproductive activity prioritizes energy conservation for the survival of the females. Interpopulation variation in resistance to starvation was observed in adults, which can be explained to some extent by the food availability that they experienced in their natural environment. No interpopulational differences in survival were seen in hatchlings. The mean maximum values of survival under starvation were 52.6 days in hatchlings and the 3.3% of adults survive over than 200 days, which may be a relevant trait in dispersal and establishment in new habitats.

  20. Effects of absolute fasting on reproduction and survival of the invasive apple snail Pomacea canaliculata in its native range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamburi, Nicolás E.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A South American freshwater gastropod, the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata, has become a driver of ecosystemic changes in wetlands and an important rice pest after its introduction to various parts of the world, mainly Asia. The objective of this study was to study the effect of an abrupt interruption in food availability in the short term (up to 4 weeks) and long term (up to 8 months) on survival and reproductive activity. The main results indicate that short-term fasting mainly affects the survival of males, but only when they are raised together with females, probably due to a greater mate-searching activity that increases mortality in the individuals with lower reserves. The number of copulating snails or egg-laying females shows an abrupt drop when fasting and a rapid recovery after the food supply is restored. The strategy of discontinuing reproductive activity prioritizes energy conservation for the survival of the females. Interpopulation variation in resistance to starvation was observed in adults, which can be explained to some extent by the food availability that they experienced in their natural environment. No interpopulational differences in survival were seen in hatchlings. The mean maximum values of survival under starvation were 52.6 days in hatchlings and the 3.3% of adults survive over than 200 days, which may be a relevant trait in dispersal and establishment in new habitats. PMID:29491925

  1. Starvation of children in Syria--sanctions and the politics of revenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Kasturi

    2014-01-01

    As Syria completes two years of western sanctions (2011-13), their dramatic effects on health are being highlighted with first reports of starvation deaths among children in the suburbs of Damascus. Although heavy fighting has taken place in this area, experts had predicted for some time the unworkability of sanctions for regime change, arguing that only civilians would pay the price in a country (Syria in this case) which was once well on the way to meeting the Millennium Development Goals 4 targets on reducing child mortality. In this, as in the case of other "sanctioned" countries, it is not just "civilians" but the most vulnerable among them--children, who are experiencing the tragic consequences of sanctions.

  2. EFFECT OF STARVATION AND INFESTATION BEHAVIOR OF LARVAE KHAPRA BEETLE, Trogoderma granarium Everts (COLEOPTERA : DERMESTIDAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haris Setyaningrum

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Khapra beetle Trogoderma granarium Everts is very destructive pest in various stored product and nominated as one of the hundred worst invasive species in the world. The study of starvation and infestation behaviors are important for improvement of insect control method. This study represent the number of molting as fact of regressive molting in starved condition, the larva of T. granarium within 68 days periods can be molted 1-3 times. The infestation behavior on three diets treatment presented. In grain wheat their larva are laid off the casting skin over the surface of product and distributed randomly in whole part of stored product. Respectively in flour casting skin are laid down in bottom of the container as effect of feeding. In flour the casting skin are laid on mostly over surface of the flour mixed with frass. In toilet tissue the infestation is present in hole over the surface and randomly position of casting skin.

  3. The effect of starvation on plastid number and photosynthetic performance in the kleptoplastidic dinoflagellate Amylax triacantha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Miran; Kim, Kwang Young; Nam, Seung Won; Shin, Woongghi; Yih, Wonho; Park, Myung Gil

    2014-01-01

    The dinoflagellate Amylax triacantha is known to retain plastids of cryptophyte origin by engulfing the mixotrophic ciliate Mesodinium rubrum, itself a consumer of cryptophytes. However, there is no information on the fate of the prey's organelles and the photosynthetic performance of the newly retained plastids in A. triacantha. In this study, we conducted a starvation experiment to observe the intracellular organization of the prey's organelles and temporal changes in the photosynthetic efficiency of acquired plastids in A. triacantha. The ultrastructural observations revealed that while the chloroplast-mitochondria complexes and nucleus of cryptophyte were retained by A. triacantha, other ciliate organelles were digested in food vacuoles. Acquired plastids were retained in A. triacantha for about 1 mo and showed photosynthetic activities for about 18 d when measured by a pulse-amplitude modulation fluorometer. © 2014 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2014 International Society of Protistologists.

  4. Development of photosynthetic activity in Porphyridium purpureum (Rhodophyta) following nitrogen starvation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, I.; Gantt, E. (Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC (USA))

    1990-03-01

    The effects of nitrogen limitation on laboratory cultures of Porphyridium purpureum Bory, Drew and Ross were studied under continuous white light illumination (35 {mu}E {times} m{sup {minus}2} {times} s{sup {minus}1}). Growth ceased, respiration exceeded photosynthesis, chlorophyll content was reduced by 80%, and phycoerythrin content was reduced by 99% over a period of 14 days under nitrogen limitation. Recovery upon addition of nitrogen resulted in increased phycobiliprotein content, appearance of phycobilisomes attached to the thylakoids, increased oxygen evolution, and increased fluorescence emission from photosystem 1 (720 nm) and photosystem 2 (685 nm) upon excitation by green light. Growth resumes after 72 h and was concomitant with an increase of chlorophyll, phycoerythrin and phycobilisomes per thylakoid area. The results suggest that photosystem 1 was less affected by nitrogen starvation than photosystem 2 and that the recovery was largely dependent on the restoration of phycobilisomes and other photosystem components.

  5. Effect of starvation on vein preference of whitefly (Bemisia tabaci) on chilli as host plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siti Sakinah, A.; Mohamad Roff M., N.; Idris, A. B.

    2014-09-01

    The whitefly, Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius), is a cosmopolitan pest of horticultural crops. It caused serious damaged to the plants by feeding on plant saps as direct damage and transmit virus as indirect damage. Vein preferences of both female and male whitefly (WF) on chilli plant were recorded using Dinolite, a portable microscope, under laboratory conditions. WF adults of both sexes were starved for 2 and 4 hours before used for observation while no starvation for control individual (treatment). Results showed that both female and male preferred to feed on secondary veins rather than lamina, midrib and vein. From the result of whitefly preferred target site, hopefully this information will help to improve control tactics in WF management.

  6. Differences in swimming ability and its response to starvation among male and femaleGambusia affinis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangtao; Lin, Xiaotao; Xu, Zhongneng; Sun, Jun

    2017-05-15

    To explore the differences in the swimming ability and environmental adaptive abilities between male and female Gambusia affinis , we assessed the differences in burst swimming speeds ( U burst ), critical swimming speeds ( U crit ) and their related fin areas, and consumption of energy substances after starvation at 0 (control group), 15, 30, 45, and 60 days, respectively. The results showed that the pectoral and caudal fin areas did not differ significantly between male and female G. affinis However, the dry mass, condition factors, and absolute contents of glycogen, lipids, and proteins were significantly elevated in females in the control group ( P bear load and moving resistance that causes high swimming performance in male G. affinis High contents of energy substances and low rate of consumption of lipids result in stable U crit in females during hunger. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  7. Transcriptional profiling of Bacillus anthracis Sterne (34F2 during iron starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul E Carlson

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Lack of available iron is one of many environmental challenges that a bacterium encounters during infection and adaptation to iron starvation is important for the pathogen to efficiently replicate within the host. Here we define the transcriptional response of B. anthracis Sterne (34F(2 to iron depleted conditions. Genome-wide transcript analysis showed that B. anthracis undergoes considerable changes in gene expression during growth in iron-depleted media, including the regulation of known and candidate virulence factors. Two genes encoding putative internalin proteins were chosen for further study. Deletion of either gene (GBAA0552 or GBAA1340 resulted in attenuation in a murine model of infection. This attenuation was amplified in a double mutant strain. These data define the transcriptional changes induced during growth in low iron conditions and illustrate the potential of this dataset in the identification of putative virulence determinants for future study.

  8. Does starvation influence the antioxidant status of the digestive gland of Nacella concinna in experimental conditions?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansaldo, Martín; Sacristán, Hernan; Wider, Eva

    2007-01-01

    In a previous study we analysed the effect of diesel seawater contamination in the digestive gland of the Antarctic limpet Nacella concinna. We observed that antioxidant enzyme activities decreased after one-week starvation prior to the experiment, and this was considered in the analysis of the obtained results. To know whether the digestive gland oxidant-antioxidant status may be altered by starvation and experimental conditions, we evaluated the food deprivation effect in limpets from the nearshore shallow waters of Potter Cove, Antarctica. Organisms were acclimated to laboratory conditions and were divided in fed and starved groups, and maintained in these conditions during one month. Every week 20 limpets were sampled from each group. Digestive glands were dissected and kept frozen until they were processed. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione S-transferase (GST) activities, as well as lipid peroxidation (LPO) measured as thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS), protein oxidation (PO) and reduced glutathione (GSH) were measured. For both groups of limpets, SOD increased its activity in the first week of the exposure period, with a maximum in the second week. CAT activity increased significantly in the second week, only for the starved group. Similarly, GST activity also increased for starved group in the second week; but maintained this tendency for both groups until the fourth week. In fed and starved limpets, TBARS values increased significantly, during the first week and then returned to normal values. The PO levels in the starved group increased only during the first week. The GSH content, for the fed group, increased significantly after the third week. The obtained results indicate that biochemical or physiological studies conducted with N. concinna should consider the effects of food deprivation and time spent under experimental conditions.

  9. A Conserved Carbon Starvation Response Underlies Bud Dormancy in Woody and Herbaceous Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarancón, Carlos; González-Grandío, Eduardo; Oliveros, Juan C.; Nicolas, Michael; Cubas, Pilar

    2017-01-01

    Plant shoot systems give rise to characteristic above-ground plant architectures. Shoots are formed from axillary meristems and buds, whose growth and development is modulated by systemic and local signals. These cues convey information about nutrient and water availability, light quality, sink/source organ activity and other variables that determine the timeliness and competence to maintain development of new shoots. This information is translated into a local response, in meristems and buds, of growth or quiescence. Although some key genes involved in the onset of bud latency have been identified, the gene regulatory networks (GRNs) controlled by these genes are not well defined. Moreover, it has not been determined whether bud dormancy induced by environmental cues, such as a low red-to-far-red light ratio, shares genetic mechanisms with bud latency induced by other causes, such as apical dominance or a short-day photoperiod. Furthermore, the evolution and conservation of these GRNs throughout angiosperms is not well established. We have reanalyzed public transcriptomic datasets that compare quiescent and active axillary buds of Arabidopsis, with datasets of axillary buds of the woody species Vitis vinifera (grapevine) and apical buds of Populus tremula x Populus alba (poplar) during the bud growth-to-dormancy transition. Our aim was to identify potentially common GRNs induced during the process that leads to bud para-, eco- and endodormancy. In Arabidopsis buds that are entering eco- or paradormancy, we have identified four induced interrelated GRNs that correspond to a carbon (C) starvation syndrome, typical of tissues undergoing low C supply. This response is also detectable in poplar and grapevine buds before and during the transition to dormancy. In all eukaryotes, C-limiting conditions are coupled to growth arrest and latency like that observed in dormant axillary buds. Bud dormancy might thus be partly a consequence of the underlying C starvation syndrome

  10. Cellular trafficking of thymosin beta-4 in HEPG2 cells following serum starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppina Pichiri

    Full Text Available Thymosin beta-4 (Tβ4 is an ubiquitous multi-functional regenerative peptide, related to many critical biological processes, with a dynamic and flexible conformation which may influence its functions and its subcellular distribution. For these reasons, the intracellular localization and trafficking of Tβ4 is still not completely defined and is still under investigation in in vivo as well as in vitro studies. In the current study we used HepG2 cells, a human hepatoma cell line; cells growing in normal conditions with fetal bovine serum expressed high levels of Tβ4, restricted to the cytoplasm until 72 h. At 84 h, a diffuse Tβ4 cytoplasmic immunostaining shifted to a focal perinuclear and nuclear reactivity. In the absence of serum, nuclear reactivity was localized in small granules, evenly dispersed throughout the entire nuclear envelop, and was observed as earlier as at 48 h. Cytoplasmic immunostaining for Tβ4 in HepG2 cells under starvation appeared significantly lower at 48 h and decreased progressively at 72 and at 84 h. At these time points, the decrease in cytoplasmic staining was associated with a progressive increase in nuclear reactivity, suggesting a possible translocation of the peptide from the cytoplasm to the nuclear membrane. The normal immunocytochemical pattern was restored when culture cells submitted to starvation for 84 h received a new complete medium for 48 h. Mass spectrometry analysis, performed on the nuclear and cytosolic fractions of HepG2 growing with and without serum, showed that Tβ4 was detectable only in the cytosolic and not in the intranuclear fraction. These data suggest that Tβ4 is able to translocate from different cytoplasmic domains to the nuclear membrane and back, based on different stress conditions within the cell. The punctuate pattern of nuclear Tβ4 immunostaining associated with Tβ4 absence in the nucleoplasm suggest that this peptide might be localized in the nuclear pores, where it could

  11. Nitrogen starvation of cyanobacteria results in the production of β-N-methylamino-L-alanine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downing, S; Banack, S A; Metcalf, J S; Cox, P A; Downing, T G

    2011-08-01

    β-N-Methylamino-L-alanine, an unusual amino acid implicated in neurodegenerative disease, has been detected in cultures of nearly all genera of environmentally ubiquitous cyanobacteria tested. The compound is present within cyanobacterial cells in free and protein-associated forms, with large variations occurring in the concentration of these pools between species as well as within single strains. With a lack of knowledge and supporting data on the regulation of BMAA production and the role of this compound in cyanobacteria, the association between BMAA and cyanobacteria is still subject to debate. In this study we investigated the biosynthesis of BMAA in axenic non-diazotrophic cyanobacterial cultures using the stable isotope ¹⁵N. Nitrogen starvation of nutritionally replete cells resulted in an increase in free cellular ¹⁵N BMAA suggesting that BMAA may be the result of catabolism to provide nitrogen or that BMAA is synthesised to serve a functional role in the cell in response to nitrogen deprivation. The addition of NO₃⁻ and NH₄⁺ to the culture medium following starvation resulted in a decrease of free cellular BMAA without a corresponding increase in the protein-associated fraction. The use of ammonia as a nitrogen source resulted in a more rapid reduction of BMAA when compared to nitrate. This study provides the first data regarding the regulation of intracellular BMAA concentrations in cyanobacteria with results conclusively showing the production of ¹⁵N BMAA by an axenic cyanobacterial culture. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Stochastic feeding of fish larvae and their metabolic handling of starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augustine, S.; Litvak, M. K.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.

    2011-11-01

    Developmental patterns of yolk-sac larvae are well captured by the standard DEB model: (i) when feeding is delayed post birth the size at which post-feeding growth begins is reduced but the rate of growth post-feeding is unaffected and (ii) maternal effects (initial energy in egg) show up as differences in condition at birth and maximum length of non fed individuals. We extended the standard DEB model in two ways to account for starvation. (I): if somatic maintenance can no longer be paid structure is also mobilized to cover the costs, but at an extra cost-conversion efficiency of structure to energy. Death occurs if structure reaches a fraction of the maximum at the onset of shrinking. (II): if maturity maintenance can no longer be paid then maturity level decays exponentially (rejuvenation). Hazard due to rejuvenation is proportional to the difference between maturity and the maximum maturity at the onset of rejuvenation. We performed Monte Carlo simulation studies which treat feeding as a random process to evaluate the contribution of the metabolic handling of starvation to early teleost life history. The simulations suggest that food density strongly impacts growth, energy reserves, mineral fluxes, hazard and mortality from shrinking. Environmental factors can soon override maternal induced differences between individuals. Moreover in the low food density, simulated individuals from eggs of lower caloric content experience mortality from shrinking earlier than their counterparts issued from higher energy eggs. Empirically observed patterns of real data, i.e. high scatter in respiration in combination with low scatter in lengths, can be expected when the metabolism is treated as a deterministic system while behaviourally controlled input is stochastic. At low food densities where mortality from shrinking reaches 10% almost all individuals experience hazard due to rejuvenation. This hazard is difficult to access experimentally but represents moments of heightened

  13. A Conserved Carbon Starvation Response Underlies Bud Dormancy in Woody and Herbaceous Species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Tarancón

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Plant shoot systems give rise to characteristic above-ground plant architectures. Shoots are formed from axillary meristems and buds, whose growth and development is modulated by systemic and local signals. These cues convey information about nutrient and water availability, light quality, sink/source organ activity and other variables that determine the timeliness and competence to maintain development of new shoots. This information is translated into a local response, in meristems and buds, of growth or quiescence. Although some key genes involved in the onset of bud latency have been identified, the gene regulatory networks (GRNs controlled by these genes are not well defined. Moreover, it has not been determined whether bud dormancy induced by environmental cues, such as a low red-to-far-red light ratio, shares genetic mechanisms with bud latency induced by other causes, such as apical dominance or a short-day photoperiod. Furthermore, the evolution and conservation of these GRNs throughout angiosperms is not well established. We have reanalyzed public transcriptomic datasets that compare quiescent and active axillary buds of Arabidopsis, with datasets of axillary buds of the woody species Vitis vinifera (grapevine and apical buds of Populus tremula x Populus alba (poplar during the bud growth-to-dormancy transition. Our aim was to identify potentially common GRNs induced during the process that leads to bud para-, eco- and endodormancy. In Arabidopsis buds that are entering eco- or paradormancy, we have identified four induced interrelated GRNs that correspond to a carbon (C starvation syndrome, typical of tissues undergoing low C supply. This response is also detectable in poplar and grapevine buds before and during the transition to dormancy. In all eukaryotes, C-limiting conditions are coupled to growth arrest and latency like that observed in dormant axillary buds. Bud dormancy might thus be partly a consequence of the underlying C

  14. Phosphate starvation triggers production and secretion of an extracellular lipoprotein in Caulobacter crescentus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Le Blastier

    Full Text Available Life in oligotrophic environments necessitates quick adaptive responses to a sudden lack of nutrients. Secretion of specific degradative enzymes into the extracellular medium is a means to mobilize the required nutrient from nearby sources. The aquatic bacterium Caulobacter crescentus must often face changes in its environment such as phosphate limitation. Evidence reported in this paper indicates that under phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces a membrane surface-anchored lipoprotein named ElpS subsequently released into the extracellular medium. A complete set of 12 genes encoding a type II secretion system (T2SS is located adjacent to the elpS locus in the C. crescentus genome. Deletion of this T2SS impairs release of ElpS in the environment, which surprisingly remains present at the cell surface, indicating that the T2SS is not involved in the translocation of ElpS to the outer membrane but rather in its release. Accordingly, treatment with protease inhibitors prevents release of ElpS in the extracellular medium suggesting that ElpS secretion relies on a T2SS-secreted protease. Finally, secretion of ElpS is associated with an increase in alkaline phosphatase activity in culture supernatants, suggesting a role of the secreted protein in inorganic phosphate mobilization. In conclusion, we have shown that upon phosphate starvation, C. crescentus produces an outer membrane bound lipoprotein, ElpS, which is further cleaved and released in the extracellular medium in a T2SS-dependent manner. Our data suggest that ElpS is associated with an alkaline phosphatase activity, thereby allowing the bacterium to gather inorganic phosphates from a poor environment.

  15. Growth and survival of larval and early juvenile lesser sandeel in patchy prey field in the North Sea: An examination using individual-based modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gürkan, Zeren; Christensen, Asbjørn; Deurs, Mikael van

    2012-01-01

    -stages in the North Sea. Simulations of patchiness related starvation mortality are able to explain observed patterns of variation in sandeel growth. Reduced prey densities within patches decrease growth and survival rate of larvae and match–mismatch affect growth and survival of larvae with different hatch time due...... by modeling copepod size spectra dynamics and patchiness based on particle count transects and Continuous Plankton Recorder time series data. The study analyzes the effects of larval hatching time, presence of zooplankton patchiness and within patch abundance on growth and survival of sandeel early life...

  16. [Functional state of a sphingomyeline cycle and free radical lipid oxidation activity of a rat's liver during different phases of starvation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuz'menko, D I; Burov, P G; Serebrov, V Iu; Faĭt, E A; Perevozchikova, T V

    2012-01-01

    The functional state of a sphingomyeline cycle and character of its mutual relations with the processes of free radical lipid oxidation during starvation of animals without any restriction of access to drinking water at 1, 2, 3 day (I phase) and 6 day (II phase of starvation) were studied at the liver of rats. The maximal values of the ceramide/sphingomyeline ratio and activity neutral sphingomyelinase and executive caspase-3 were reached in a liver of animals at the 3rd day of starvation. From the 3rd day of starvation the concentration of the tumour necrosis factor-alpha which is one of activators neutral sphingomyelinase was increase in rats blood serum. During the extent of large part of the I phase of starvation the intensity of free radical lipid peroxidation in a liver had almost the same level as in control group--that was a result of the high-grade functioning of antioxidant defense system. After transition the I phase of starvation into the II phase (6 day of experiment) the oxidative stress was developed as result of an exhaustion of system antioxidant defense potential in a liver. The results of this data can testify that during I phase of starvation in a liver the conditions was raised for display of the ceramide-mediated proapoptotic signalling. We assume that ceramide-mediated apoptosis is one of mechanisms of optimization of liver cellular population at the frames of metabolic adaptation. The I phase of starvation in a liver proves by the ceramide-mediated proapoptotic signaling developing. During the II phase of starvation the oxidative stress process were prevailed.

  17. Photosynthate accumulation in solar-powered sea slugs - starving slugs survive due to accumulated starch reserves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laetz, Elise M J; Moris, Victoria C; Moritz, Leif; Haubrich, André N; Wägele, Heike

    2017-01-01

    Solar-powered sea slugs are famed for their ability to survive starvation due to incorporated algal chloroplasts. It is well established that algal-derived carbon can be traced in numerous slug-derived compounds, showing that slugs utilize the photosynthates produced by incorporated plastids. Recently, a new hypothesis suggests that the photosynthates produced are not continuously made available to the slug. Instead, at least some of the plastid's photosynthetic products are stored in the plastid itself and only later become available to the slug. The long-term plastid-retaining slug, Elysia timida and its sole food source, Acetabularia acetabulum were examined to determine whether or not starch, a combination of amylose and amylopectin and the main photosynthate produced by A. acetabulum , is produced by the stolen plastids and whether it accumulates within individual kleptoplasts, providing an energy larder, made available to the slug at a later time. Histological sections of Elysia timida throughout a starvation period were stained with Lugol's Iodine solution, a well-known stain for starch granules in plants. We present here for the first time, an increase in amylose concentration, within the slug's digestive gland cells during a starvation period, followed by a sharp decrease. Chemically blocking photosynthesis in these tissues resulted in no observable starch, indicating that the starch in untreated animals is a product of photosynthetic activity. This suggests that kleptoplasts function as both, a nutritive producer and storage device, holding onto the polysaccharides they produce for a certain time until they are finally available and used by the starving slug to withstand extended starvation periods.

  18. Survival pathways under stress

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    First page Back Continue Last page Graphics. Survival pathways under stress. Bacteria survive by changing gene expression. pattern. Three important pathways will be discussed: Stringent response. Quorum sensing. Proteins performing function to control oxidative damage.

  19. Stress physiology as a predictor of survival in Galapagos marine iguanas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, L Michael; Wikelski, Martin

    2010-10-22

    Although glucocorticoid hormones are considered important physiological regulators for surviving adverse environmental stimuli (stressors), evidence for such a role is sparse and usually extrapolated from glucocorticoid effects under laboratory, short-term and/or non-emergency conditions. Galápagos marine iguanas (Amblyrhynchus cristatus) provide an excellent model for determining the ultimate function of a glucocorticoid response because susceptibility to starvation induced by El Niño conditions is essentially their only major natural stressor. In a prospective study, we captured 98 adult male marine iguanas and assessed four major components of their glucocorticoid response: baseline corticosterone titres; corticosterone responses to acute stressors (capture and handling); the maximal capacity to secrete corticosterone (via adrenocorticotropin injection); and the ability to terminate corticosterone responses (negative feedback). Several months after collecting initial measurements, weak El Niño conditions affected the Galápagos and 23 iguanas died. The dead iguanas were typified by a reduced efficacy of negative feedback (i.e. poorer post-stress suppression of corticosterone release) compared with surviving iguanas. We found no prior differences between dead and alive iguanas in baseline corticosterone concentrations, responses to acute stressors, nor in capacity to respond. These data suggest that a greater ability to terminate a stress response conferred a survival advantage during starvation.

  20. To favor survival under food shortage, the brain disables costly memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plaçais, Pierre-Yves; Preat, Thomas

    2013-01-25

    The brain regulates energy homeostasis in the organism. Under resource shortage, the brain takes priority over peripheral organs for energy supply. But can the brain also down-regulate its own consumption to favor survival? We show that the brain of Drosophila specifically disables the costly formation of aversive long-term memory (LTM) upon starvation, a physiological state required for appetitive LTM formation. At the neural circuit level, the slow oscillations normally triggered in two pairs of dopaminergic neurons to enable aversive LTM formation were abolished in starved flies. Transient artificial activation of these neurons during training restored LTM formation in starved flies but at the price of a reduced survival. LTM formation is thus subject to adaptive plasticity that helps survival under food shortage.

  1. Proteomic analysis of iron acquisition, metabolic and regulatory responses of Yersinia pestis to iron starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fleischmann Robert D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Gram-negative bacterium Yersinia pestis is the causative agent of the bubonic plague. Efficient iron acquisition systems are critical to the ability of Y. pestis to infect, spread and grow in mammalian hosts, because iron is sequestered and is considered part of the innate host immune defence against invading pathogens. We used a proteomic approach to determine expression changes of iron uptake systems and intracellular consequences of iron deficiency in the Y. pestis strain KIM6+ at two physiologically relevant temperatures (26°C and 37°C. Results Differential protein display was performed for three Y. pestis subcellular fractions. Five characterized Y. pestis iron/siderophore acquisition systems (Ybt, Yfe, Yfu, Yiu and Hmu and a putative iron/chelate outer membrane receptor (Y0850 were increased in abundance in iron-starved cells. The iron-sulfur (Fe-S cluster assembly system Suf, adapted to oxidative stress and iron starvation in E. coli, was also more abundant, suggesting functional activity of Suf in Y. pestis under iron-limiting conditions. Metabolic and reactive oxygen-deactivating enzymes dependent on Fe-S clusters or other iron cofactors were decreased in abundance in iron-depleted cells. This data was consistent with lower activities of aconitase and catalase in iron-starved vs. iron-rich cells. In contrast, pyruvate oxidase B which metabolizes pyruvate via electron transfer to ubiquinone-8 for direct utilization in the respiratory chain was strongly increased in abundance and activity in iron-depleted cells. Conclusions Many protein abundance differences were indicative of the important regulatory role of the ferric uptake regulator Fur. Iron deficiency seems to result in a coordinated shift from iron-utilizing to iron-independent biochemical pathways in the cytoplasm of Y. pestis. With growth temperature as an additional variable in proteomic comparisons of the Y. pestis fractions (26°C and 37°C, there was

  2. Dynamic metabolomics differentiates between carbon and energy starvation in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting xylose

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergdahl Basti

    2012-05-01

    , a reduced GTP/GDP ratio and accumulation of PEP and aromatic amino acids. These changes are strong indicators of carbon starvation. The XR/XDH-strain displayed few such traits. The coexistence of these traits and a stable adenylate charge indicates that xylose supplies energy to the cells but does not suppress a response similar to carbon starvation. Particular signals may play a role in the latter, of which the GTP/GMP ratio could be a candidate as it decreased significantly in both strains.

  3. Fed-batch cultivation of baker's yeast followed by nitrogen or carbon starvation: effects on fermentative capacity and content of trehalose and glycogen

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henning; Olsson, Lisbeth; Rønnow, B.

    2002-01-01

    An industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (DGI 342) was cultivated in fed-batch cultivations at a specific growth rate of 0.2 h(-1). The yeast was then exposed to carbon or nitrogen starvation for up to 8 h, to study the effect of starvation on fermentative capacity and content of protein...... of the yeast cells, and the fermentative capacity per gram dry-weight decreased by 40%. The protein content in the carbon-starved yeast increased as a result of starvation due to the fact that the content of glycogen was reduced. The fermentative capacity per gram dry-weight was, however, unaltered....... increased from 45 to 64 mg (g dry-weight)(-1), whereas the glycogen content in the same period was reduced from 55 to 5 mg (g dry-weight)(-1). Glycogen was consumed faster than trehalose during storage of the starved yeast for 1 month. Nitrogen starvation resulted in a decrease in the protein content...

  4. Short-term starvation and realimentation helps stave off Edwardsiella tarda infection in red sea bream (Pagrus major).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Sipra; Chakraborty, Tapas; Reza, Mohammad Ali Noman; Shimizu, Sonoko; Matsubara, Takahiro; Ohta, Kohei

    2017-04-01

    Dietary regime modifications have been an integral part of health and healing practices throughout the animal kingdom. Thus, to assess the effects of periodic starvation and refeeding schedule on the physiological and immunological perturbations in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream, we conducted a 20day experiment using 4 treatment groups, namely, pre-fed placebo (PFP); pre-starved placebo (PSP); pre-fed infected (PFI); and pre-starved infected (PSI), wherein a 5h E. tarda infection was done on the 11th day. In the present investigation, the pre-starved groups showed significant (Pstarvation and refeeding schedule, preferably short-term starvation prior to an infection, in order to obtain better capability to battle against E. tarda infection in red sea bream. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Starvation beneficially influences the liver physiology and nutrient metabolism in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream (Pagrus major).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohapatra, Sipra; Chakraborty, Tapas; Shimizu, Sonoko; Urasaki, Shintaro; Matsubara, Takahiro; Nagahama, Yoshitaka; Ohta, Kohei

    2015-11-01

    Dietary compromises, especially food restrictions, possess species-specific effects on the health status and infection control in several organisms, including fish. To understand the starvation-mediated physiological responses in Edwardsiella tarda infected red sea bream, especially in the liver, we performed a 20-day starvation experiment using 4 treatment (2 fed and 2 starved) groups, namely, fed-placebo, starved-placebo, fed-infected, and starved-infected, wherein bacterial exposure was done on the 11th day. In the present study, the starved groups showed reduced hepatosomatic index and drastic depletion in glycogen storage and vacuole formation. The fed-infected fish showed significant (Pstarvation exerts multidirectional responses, which allows for better physiological adaptations during any infectious period, in red sea bream. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Changes in Hematological, Biochemical and Non-specific Immune Parameters of Olive Flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus, Following Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hyun; Jeong, Min Hwan; Jun, Je-Cheon; Kim, Tae-Ik

    2014-09-01

    Triplicate groups of fed and starved olive flounder, Paralichthys olivaceus (body weight: 119.8±17.46 g), were examined over 42 days for physiological changes using hematological, biochemical, and non-specific immune parameters. No significant differences in concentrations of blood hemoglobin and hematocrit and plasma levels of total cholesterol, aspartate aminotransferase, alanine aminotransferase, glucose, and cortisol were detected between fed and starved groups at any sampling time throughout the experiment. In contrast, plasma total protein concentrations were significantly lower in starved fish than in fed fish from day 7 onwards. Moreover, plasma lysozyme concentrations were significantly higher in starved flounder from day 21 onwards. This result confirms that the response of olive flounder to short-term (less than about 1.5 months) starvation consists of a readjustment of metabolism rather than the activation of an alarm-stress response. The present results indicate that starvation does not significantly compromise the health status of fish despite food limitation.

  7. Microbial population dynamics in continuous anaerobic digester systems during start up, stable conditions and recovery after starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Nadieh; Moset, Veronica; Møller, Henrik Bjarne; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund

    2017-05-01

    The evolution and population dynamics of complex anaerobic microbial communities in anaerobic digesters were investigated during stable operation and recovery after prolonged starvation. Three thermophilic reactor systems fed with cattle manure were operated continuously in parallel for 167days. Significant changes in the microbial communities were observed for both the bacterial and archaeal populations as the reactor systems were subjected to changing feeding regimes. The ecosystems developed from being relatively similar in structure to more specialised communities, with large population shifts within the acetogenic and methanogenic communities, which appeared to shift towards the hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis pathway. All reactor systems showed signs of adaptation to a harsher environment under high VFA, H 2 S and ammonia concentrations, but remained at a lower degree of stability after 45days of recovery compared to stable period of operation before starvation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Induction of a bZIP Type Transcription Factor and Amino Acid Catabolism-Related Genes in Soybean Seedling in Response to Starvation Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yuasa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To address roles of bZIP transcription factors on regulation of amino acid catabolism under autophagy-induced plant cells, we examined the effect of nutrient starvation on the expression of low energy stress-related transcription factor homologs, GmbZIP53A and GmbZIP53B, and amino acid catabolism-related genes in soybean (Glycine max (L. Merr.. Sucrose starvation treatment significantly enhanced the expressions of GmbZIP53A, but not GmbZIP53B asparagine synthase (GmASN1, proline dehydrogenase1 (GmProDH, and branched chain amino acid transaminase 3 (GmBCAT3. GmbZIP53-related immunoreactive signals were upregulated under severe starvation with sucrose starvation and protease inhibitors, while 3% sucrose and sucrose starvation had no or marginal effects on the signal. Profiles of induction of GmASN1, GmProDH and GmBCAT3 under various nutrient conditions were consistent with the profiles of GmbZIP53 protein levels but not with those of GmbZIP mRNA levels. These results indicate that GmbZIP53 proteins levels are regulated by posttranslational mechanism in response to severe starvation stress and that the increased protein of GmbZIP53 under severe starvation accelerates transcriptional induction of GmASN1, GmProDH, and GmBCAT3. Furthermore, it is conceivable that decrease of branched chain amino acid level by the BCAT-mediated degradation eventually enhances autophagy under severe starvation.

  9. An evolutionarily significant unicellular strategy in response to starvation in Dictyostelium social amoebae [v2; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/4kb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darja Dubravcic

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The social amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum is widely studied for its multicellular development program as a response to starvation. Aggregates of up to 106 cells form fruiting bodies containing (i dormant spores (~80% that can persist for months in the absence of nutrients, and (ii dead stalk cells (~20% that promote the dispersion of the spores towards nutrient-rich areas. It is often overlooked that not all cells aggregate upon starvation. Using a new quantitative approach based on time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and a low ratio of reporting cells, we have quantified this fraction of non-aggregating cells. In realistic starvation conditions, up to 15% of cells do not aggregate, which makes this third cell fate a significant component of the population-level response of social amoebae to starvation. Non-aggregating cells have an advantage over cells in aggregates since they resume growth earlier upon arrival of new nutrients, but have a shorter lifespan under prolonged starvation. We find that phenotypic heterogeneities linked to cell nutritional state bias the representation of cells in the aggregating vs. non-aggregating fractions, and thus affect population partitioning. Next, we report that the fraction of non-aggregating cells depends on genetic factors that regulate the timing of starvation, signal sensing efficiency and aggregation efficiency. In addition, interactions between clones in mixtures of non-isogenic cells affect the partitioning of each clone into both fractions. We further build a numerical model to test the evolutionary significance of the non-aggregating cell fraction. The partitioning of cells into aggregating and non-aggregating fractions is optimal in fluctuating environments with an unpredictable duration of starvation periods. Our study highlights the unicellular component of the response of social amoebae to starvation, and thus extends its evolutionary and ecological framework.

  10. Short Period Starvation in Rat: The Effect of Aloe Vera Gel Extract on Oxidative Stress Status Ion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laleh SHAHRAKI MOJAHED

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main aim of this experiment was to evaluate the effect of Aloe vera gel extract on oxidative stress status during starvation. For this purpose, twenty-four mature male albino Wistar rats were housed in standard cages. In this study starvation cycle (rats were starved for two days and then were fed for one day was used. This study was performed during short period (20 days. Animals were divided into four experimental groups (six rats in each group: 1 normal control; 2 starved rats+water/ethanol; 3 starved rats+hydro-alcoholic Aloe vera gel extract (100 mg/kg; 4 starved rats+hydro-alcoholic Aloe vera gel extract (200 mg/kg. Blood samples were obtained using cardiac puncture. In blood samples, antioxidant enzymes including superoxide dismutase (SOD, glutathione peroxidase (GPx and catalase (CAT, antioxidant trace elements including copper, zinc and manganese and antioxidant vitamins including vitamin A, vitamin E and vitamin C were measured. Plasma levels of antioxidant enzymes (SOD, GPx and catalase significantly decreased in starved rats+water/ethanol group (P0.05. Plasma levels of vitamin A and E in normal control group had no significant difference with starved rats+water/ethanol and starved rats+hydro-alcoholic Aloe vera gel extract in the 100 and 200 mg/kg dose groups (P>0.05. Plasma level of vitamin C significantly decreased in starved rats+water/ethanol group (P<0.05. Plasma level of vitamin C after treatment with hydro-alcoholic Aloe vera gel extract at doses 100 and 200 mg/kg were significantly increased (P<0.05. Our results shown that short term starvation caused an increase in oxidative stress via impairing of antioxidant defense and Aloe vera treatment is able to improve antioxidative defense induced by starvation.

  11. Growth at low ammonium concentrations and starvation response as potential factors involved in niche differentiation among ammonia-oxidizing bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollmann, Annette; Bär-Gilissen, Marie-José; Laanbroek, Hendrikus J

    2002-10-01

    In nature, ammonia-oxidizing bacteria have to compete with heterotrophic bacteria and plants for limiting amounts of ammonium. Previous laboratory experiments conducted with Nitrosomonas europaea suggested that ammonia-oxidizing bacteria are weak competitors for ammonium. To obtain a better insight into possible methods of niche differentiation among ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, we carried out a growth experiment at low ammonium concentrations with N. europaea and the ammonia oxidizer G5-7, a close relative of Nitrosomonas oligotropha belonging to Nitrosomonas cluster 6a, enriched from a freshwater sediment. Additionally, we compared the starvation behavior of the newly enriched ammonia oxidizer G5-7 to that of N. europaea. The growth experiment at low ammonium concentrations showed that strain G5-7 was able to outcompete N. europaea at growth-limiting substrate concentrations of about 10 micro M ammonium, suggesting better growth abilities of the ammonia oxidizer G5-7 at low ammonium concentrations. However, N. europaea displayed a more favorable starvation response. After 1 to 10 weeks of ammonium deprivation, N. europaea became almost immediately active after the addition of fresh ammonium and converted the added ammonium within 48 to 96 h. In contrast, the regeneration time of the ammonia oxidizer G5-7 increased with increasing starvation time. Taken together, these results provide insight into possible mechanisms of niche differentiation for the ammonia-oxidizing bacteria studied. The Nitrosomonas cluster 6a member, G5-7, is able to grow at ammonium concentrations at which the growth of N. europaea, belonging to Nitrosomonas cluster 7, has already ceased, providing an advantage in habitats with continuously low ammonium concentrations. On the other hand, the ability of N. europaea to become active again after longer periods of starvation for ammonium may allow better exploitation of irregular pulses of ammonium in the environment.

  12. Phospho-Rasputin Stabilization by Sec16 Is Required for Stress Granule Formation upon Amino Acid Starvation

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; Zacharogianni, Margarita; van Oorschot, Marinke M; Genau, Heide; Grond, Rianne; Veenendaal, Tineke; Sinsimer, Kristina S; Gavis, Elizabeth R; Behrends, Christian; Rabouille, Catherine

    2017-01-01

    Most cellular stresses induce protein translation inhibition and stress granule formation. Here, using Drosophila S2 cells, we investigate the role of G3BP/Rasputin in this process. In contrast to arsenite treatment, where dephosphorylated Ser142 Rasputin is recruited to stress granules, we find that, upon amino acid starvation, only the phosphorylated Ser142 form is recruited. Furthermore, we identify Sec16, a component of the endoplasmic reticulum exit site, as a Rasputin interactor and sta...

  13. The role of carbon starvation in the induction of enzymes that degrade plant-derived carbohydrates in Aspergillus niger.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Munster, Jolanda M; Daly, Paul; Delmas, Stéphane; Pullan, Steven T; Blythe, Martin J; Malla, Sunir; Kokolski, Matthew; Noltorp, Emelie C M; Wennberg, Kristin; Fetherston, Richard; Beniston, Richard; Yu, Xiaolan; Dupree, Paul; Archer, David B

    2014-11-01

    Fungi are an important source of enzymes for saccharification of plant polysaccharides and production of biofuels. Understanding of the regulation and induction of expression of genes encoding these enzymes is still incomplete. To explore the induction mechanism, we analysed the response of the industrially important fungus Aspergillus niger to wheat straw, with a focus on events occurring shortly after exposure to the substrate. RNA sequencing showed that the transcriptional response after 6h of exposure to wheat straw was very different from the response at 24h of exposure to the same substrate. For example, less than half of the genes encoding carbohydrate active enzymes that were induced after 24h of exposure to wheat straw, were also induced after 6h exposure. Importantly, over a third of the genes induced after 6h of exposure to wheat straw were also induced during 6h of carbon starvation, indicating that carbon starvation is probably an important factor in the early response to wheat straw. The up-regulation of the expression of a high number of genes encoding CAZymes that are active on plant-derived carbohydrates during early carbon starvation suggests that these enzymes could be involved in a scouting role during starvation, releasing inducing sugars from complex plant polysaccharides. We show, using proteomics, that carbon-starved cultures indeed release CAZymes with predicted activity on plant polysaccharides. Analysis of the enzymatic activity and the reaction products, indicates that these proteins are enzymes that can degrade various plant polysaccharides to generate both known, as well as potentially new, inducers of CAZymes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Effects of starvation and mating status on the activity of the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae)

    OpenAIRE

    Oku, K.; Vermeer, K.M.C.A.; Verbaarschot, P.; Jong, de, P.W.

    2010-01-01

    Flea beetles are characterized by their tendency to jump. They can also fly. First, the effects of starvation on flight activity in the flea beetle, Phyllotreta nemorum L. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) were determined. After starving P. nemorum for five days a greater number of individuals of both sexes flew than when fed continuously for the same period. In addition, the effect of the mating status of females of P. nemorum on their movement was determined. Mated females were more active than v...

  15. Influence of toxic bait type and starvation on worker and queen mortality in laboratory colonies of Argentine ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Melissa; Toft, Richard; Lester, Philip J

    2012-08-01

    The efficacy of toxic baits should be judged by their ability to kill entire ant colonies, including the colony queen or queens. We studied the efficacy of four toxic baits to the Argentine ant, Linepithema humile (Mayr) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae). These baits were Xstinguish that has the toxicant fipronil, Exterm-an-Ant that contains both boric acid and sodium borate, and Advion ant gel and Advion ant bait arena that both have indoxacarb. Experimental nests contained 300 workers and 10 queen ants that were starved for either 24 or 48 h before toxic bait exposure. The efficacy of the toxic baits was strongly influenced by starvation. In no treatment with 24-h starvation did we observe 100% worker death. After 24-h starvation three of the baits did not result in any queen deaths, with only Exterm-an-Ant producing an average of 25% mortality. In contrast, 100% queen and worker mortality was observed in colonies starved for 48 h and given Xstinguish or Exterm-an-Ant. The baits Advion ant gel and Advion ant bait arena were not effective against Argentine ants in these trials, resulting in ants are likely to be starved. Our results suggest queen mortality must be assessed in tests for toxic bait efficacy. Our data indicate that of these four baits, Xstinguish and Exterm-an-Ant are the best options for control of Argentine ants in New Zealand.

  16. Identification and functional characterization of a sulfate transporter induced by both sulfur starvation and mycorrhiza formation in Lotus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giovannetti, Marco; Tolosano, Matteo; Volpe, Veronica; Kopriva, Stanislav; Bonfante, Paola

    2014-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizas (AMs) are one of the most widespread symbioses in the world. They allow plants to receive mineral nutrients from the symbiotic fungus which in turn gets back up to 20% of plant carbon and completes its life cycle. Especially in low-nutrient conditions, AM fungi are capable of significantly improving plant phosphate and nitrogen acquisition, but fewer data are available about sulfur (S) nutrition. We focused on S metabolism in Lotus japonicus upon mycorrhizal colonization under sulfur starvation or repletion. We investigated both tissue sulfate concentrations and S-related gene expression, at cell-type or whole-organ level. Gene expression and sulfate tissue concentration showed that Rhizophagus irregularis colonization can improve plant S nutritional status under S starvation. A group 1 sulfate transporter, LjSultr1;2, induced by both S starvation and mycorrhiza formation, was identified. Its transcript was localized in arbuscule-containing cells, which was confirmed with a promoter-GUS assay, and its function was verified through phenotyping of TILLING mutants in nonmycorrhizal seedlings. LjSultr1;2 thus appears to encode a key protein involved in plant sulfate uptake. In contrast to phosphate transporters, a single gene, LjSultr1;2, seems to mediate both direct and symbiotic pathways of S uptake in L. japonicus. © 2014 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2014 New Phytologist Trust.

  17. Effects of desiccation and starvation on thermal tolerance and the heat-shock response in forest ants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Andrew D; DeNovellis, Kerri; Resendez, Skyler; Pustilnik, Jeremy D; Gotelli, Nicholas J; Parker, Joel D; Cahan, Sara Helms

    2017-12-01

    Temperature increases associated with global climate change are likely to be accompanied by additional environmental stressors such as desiccation and food limitation, which may alter how temperature impacts organismal performance. To investigate how interactions between stressors influence thermal tolerance in the common forest ant, Aphaenogaster picea, we compared the thermal resistance of workers to heat shock with and without pre-exposure to desiccation or starvation stress. Knockdown (KD) time at 40.5 °C of desiccated ants was reduced 6% compared to controls, although longer exposure to desiccation did not further reduce thermal tolerance. Starvation, in contrast, had an increasingly severe effect on thermal tolerance: at 21 days, average KD time of starved ants was reduced by 65% compared to controls. To test whether reduction in thermal tolerance results from impairment of the heat-shock response, we measured basal gene expression and transcriptional induction of two heat-shock proteins (hsp70 and hsp40) in treated and control ants. We found no evidence that either stressor impaired the Hsp response: both desiccation and starvation slightly increased basal Hsp expression under severe stress conditions and did not affect the magnitude of induction under heat shock. These results suggest that the co-occurrence of multiple environmental stressors predicted by climate change models may make populations more vulnerable to future warming than is suggested by the results of single-factor heating experiments.

  18. Species-specific roles of sulfolipid metabolism in acclimation of photosynthetic microbes to sulfur-starvation stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Sato

    Full Text Available Photosynthetic organisms utilize sulfate for the synthesis of sulfur-compounds including proteins and a sulfolipid, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol. Upon ambient deficiency in sulfate, cells of a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, degrade the chloroplast membrane sulfolipid to ensure an intracellular-sulfur source for necessary protein synthesis. Here, the effects of sulfate-starvation on the sulfolipid stability were investigated in another green alga, Chlorella kessleri, and two cyanobacteria, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. The results showed that sulfolipid degradation was induced only in C. kessleri, raising the possibility that this degradation ability was obtained not by cyanobacteria, but by eukaryotic algae during the evolution of photosynthetic organisms. Meanwhile, Synechococcus disruptants concerning sqdB and sqdX genes, which are involved in successive reactions in the sulfolipid synthesis pathway, were respectively characterized in cellular response to sulfate-starvation. Phycobilisome degradation intrinsic to Synechococcus, but not to Synechocystis, and cell growth under sulfate-starved conditions were repressed in the sqdB and sqdX disruptants, respectively, relative to in the wild type. Their distinct phenotypes, despite the common loss of the sulfolipid, inferred specific roles of sqdB and sqdX. This study demonstrated that sulfolipid metabolism might have been developed to enable species- or cyanobacterial-strain dependent processes for acclimation to sulfate-starvation.

  19. Effect of starvation and hibernation on the values of five biomarkers of general and specific stress using the land snail Eobania vermiculata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschovaki-Filippidou, F; Itziou, A; Dimitriadis, V K

    2013-08-01

    Values of five biomarkers related to cell stress or pollution were evaluated in tissues of the land snail Eobania vermiculata under starvation or hibernation conditions. The biomarkers applied were lysosomal membrane stability in digestive gland cells (LMS) or in haemocytes (neutral red retention assay (NRR)), acetylcholinesterase activity (AchE; EC 3.1.1.7), metallothionein content (MTs), and cyclic AMP content (cAMP). Three groups of snails were studied that were kept under starvation, hibernation and normal conditions, respectively. The results indicated statistically lower values of LMS and NRR in snails kept under starvation or hibernation compared to control ones. Higher values of AChE activity were measured in snails under hibernation compared to controls. MT contents were statistically higher in snails under starvation compared to controls. Measurement of cAMP contents showed no significant differences among the tested groups. The values of the first four biomarkers may be affected by factors other than pollution, such as starvation or hibernation. Therefore, these factors should be taken into consideration when biomonitoring studies are performed in time intervals of hibernation or starvation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Enteropeptidase: a gene associated with a starvation human phenotype and a novel target for obesity treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandrine Braud

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Obesity research focuses essentially on gene targets associated with the obese phenotype. None of these targets have yet provided a viable drug therapy. Focusing instead on genes that are involved in energy absorption and that are associated with a "human starvation phenotype", we have identified enteropeptidase (EP, a gene associated with congenital enteropeptidase deficiency, as a novel target for obesity treatment. The advantages of this target are that the gene is expressed exclusively in the brush border of the intestine; it is peripheral and not redundant. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Potent and selective EP inhibitors were designed around a boroarginine or borolysine motif. Oral administration of these compounds to mice restricted the bioavailability of dietary energy, and in a long-term treatment it significantly diminished the rate of increase in body weight, despite ad libitum food intake. No adverse reactions of the type seen with lipase inhibitors, such as diarrhea or steatorrhea, were observed. This validates EP as a novel, druggable target for obesity treatment. CONCLUSIONS: In vivo testing of novel boroarginine or borolysine-based EP inhibitors validates a novel approach to the treatment of obesity.

  1. High-Efficient Transfection of Human Embryonic Stem Cells by Single-Cell Plating and Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Ren, Caiping; Zhu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Liu, Weidong; Shi, Jia; Lin, Jianxing; Xia, Xiaomeng; Zeng, Fei; Chen, Jiawen; Jiang, Xingjun

    2016-03-15

    Nowadays, the low efficiency of small interfering RNA (siRNA) or plasmid DNA (pDNA) transfection is a critical issue in genetic manipulation of human embryonic stem (hES) cells. Development of an efficient transfection method for delivery of siRNAs and plasmids into hES cells becomes more and more imperative. In this study, we tried to modify the traditional transfection protocol by introducing two crucial processes, single-cell plating and starvation, to increase the transfection efficiency in hES cells. Furthermore, we comparatively examined the transfection efficiency of some commercially available siRNA or pDNA transfection reagents in hES cells. Our results showed that the new developed method markedly enhanced the transfection efficiency without influencing the proliferation and pluripotency of hES cells. Lipofectamine RNAiMAX exhibited much higher siRNA transfection efficiency than the other reagents, and FuGENE HD was identified as the best suitable reagent for efficient pDNA transfection of hES cells among the tested reagents.

  2. Responses of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 to Long-Term Nitrogen Starvation and Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hong-Po; Williams, Ernest; Wang, Da-zhi; Xie, Zhang-Xian; Hsia, Ru-ching; Jenck, Alizée; Halden, Rolf; Li, Jing; Chen, Feng; Place, Allen R

    2013-06-01

    The Nannochloropsis genus contains oleaginous microalgae that have served as model systems for developing renewable biodiesel. Recent genomic and transcriptomic studies on Nannochloropsis species have provided insights into the regulation of lipid production in response to nitrogen stress. Previous studies have focused on the responses of Nannochloropsis species to short-term nitrogen stress, but the effect of long-term nitrogen deprivation remains largely unknown. In this study, physiological and proteomic approaches were combined to understand the mechanisms by which Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is able to endure long-term nitrate deprivation and its ability to recover homeostasis when nitrogen is amended. Changes of the proteome during chronic nitrogen starvation espoused the physiological changes observed, and there was a general trend toward recycling nitrogen and storage of lipids. This was evidenced by a global down-regulation of protein expression, a retained expression of proteins involved in glycolysis and the synthesis of fatty acids, as well as an up-regulation of enzymes used in nitrogen scavenging and protein turnover. Also, lipid accumulation and autophagy of plastids may play a key role in maintaining cell vitality. Following the addition of nitrogen, there were proteomic changes and metabolic changes observed within 24 h, which resulted in a return of the culture to steady state within 4 d. These results demonstrate the ability of N. oceanica IMET1 to recover from long periods of nitrate deprivation without apparent detriment to the culture and provide proteomic markers for genetic modification.

  3. Amino acid starvation has opposite effects on mitochondrial and cytosolic protein synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Johnson

    Full Text Available Amino acids are essential for cell growth and proliferation for they can serve as precursors of protein synthesis, be remodelled for nucleotide and fat biosynthesis, or be burnt as fuel. Mitochondria are energy producing organelles that additionally play a central role in amino acid homeostasis. One might expect mitochondrial metabolism to be geared towards the production and preservation of amino acids when cells are deprived of an exogenous supply. On the contrary, we find that human cells respond to amino acid starvation by upregulating the amino acid-consuming processes of respiration, protein synthesis, and amino acid catabolism in the mitochondria. The increased utilization of these nutrients in the organelle is not driven primarily by energy demand, as it occurs when glucose is plentiful. Instead it is proposed that the changes in the mitochondrial metabolism complement the repression of cytosolic protein synthesis to restrict cell growth and proliferation when amino acids are limiting. Therefore, stimulating mitochondrial function might offer a means of inhibiting nutrient-demanding anabolism that drives cellular proliferation.

  4. The Antimalarial Drug Quinine Disrupts Tat2p-mediated Tryptophan Transport and Causes Tryptophan Starvation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khozoie, Combiz; Pleass, Richard J.; Avery, Simon V.

    2009-01-01

    Quinine is a major drug of choice for the treatment of malaria. However, the primary mode of quinine action is unclear, and its efficacy is marred by adverse reactions among patients. To help address these issues, a genome-wide screen for quinine sensitivity was carried out using the yeast deletion strain collection. Quinine-sensitive mutants identified in the screen included several that were defective for tryptophan biosynthesis (trp strains). This sensitivity was confirmed in independent assays and was suppressible with exogenous Trp, suggesting that quinine caused Trp starvation. Accordingly, quinine was found to inhibit [3H]Trp uptake by cells, and the quinine sensitivity of a trp1Δ mutant could be rescued by overexpression of Trp permeases, encoded by TAT1 and TAT2. The site of quinine action was identified specifically as the high affinity Trp/Tyr permease, Tat2p, with which quinine associated in a Trp-suppressible manner. A resultant action also on Tyr levels was reflected by the Tyr-suppressible quinine hypersensitivity of an aro7Δ deletion strain, which is auxotrophic for Tyr (and Phe). The present genome-wide dataset provides an important resource for discovering modes of quinine toxicity. That potential was validated with our demonstration that Trp and Tyr uptake via Tat2p is a major target of cellular quinine toxicity. The results also suggest that dietary tryptophan supplements could help to avert the toxic effects of quinine. PMID:19416971

  5. Low light intensity and nitrogen starvation modulate the chlorophyll content of Scenedesmus dimorphus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, V S; Pinto, R F; Sant'Anna, C

    2016-03-01

    Chlorophyll is a photosynthetic pigment found in plants and algal organisms and is a bioproduct with human health benefits and a great potential for use in the food industry. The chlorophyll content in microalgae strains varies in response to environmental factors. In this work, we assessed the effect of nitrogen depletion and low light intensity on the chlorophyll content of the Scenedesmus dimorphus microalga. The growth of S. dimorphus under low light intensity led to a reduction in cell growth and volume as well as increased cellular chlorophyll content. Nitrogen starvation led to a reduction in cell growth and the chlorophyll content, changes in the yield and productivity of chlorophylls a and b. Transmission electron microscopy was used to investigate the ultrastructural changes in the S. dimorphus exposed to nitrogen and light deficiency. In contrast to nitrogen depletion, low light availability was an effective mean for increasing the total chlorophyll content of green microalga S. dimorphus. The findings acquired in this work are of great biotechnological importance to extend knowledge of choosing the right culture condition to stimulate the effectiveness of microalgae strains for chlorophyll production purposes. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  6. Analysis of the activated sludge process in an MBR under starvation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vukovic, M.; Briski, F. [Faculty of Chemical Engineering and Technology, University of Zagreb, Marulicev trg 19, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia); Matosic, M.; Mijatovic, I. [Faculty of Food Technology and Biotechnology, University of Zagreb, Pierottijeva 6, HR-10000 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-03-15

    An aerobic membrane bioreactor (MBR) at complete biomass retention was studied over a period of time under starvation conditions. Kinetic parameters were determined in a no-feed batch test. The decay rate of activated sludge, k{sub d} = 0.05 d{sup -1}, was determined by tracking the decrease of MLSS. The ratio of MLVSS/MLSS was in the range 0.76-0.85. The pH values were between 7.02 and 8.23. As a function of different initial concentrations of MLSS, specific nitrification rates q{sub N,} decreased from 4.23 to 0.02 mg-N/(g MLVSS d) and specific biodegradation rates q{sub b} increased from 0.23 to 1.90 mg-COD/(g MLVSS d). From experimental data the kinetic constants for respiration, which followed Monod kinetics, were determined as q{sub O2max} = 9.8 mg-O{sub 2}/(g MLVSS h), K{sub x} = 2.9 g/dm{sup 3}. Additionally, a linear correlation between MLSS and mean floc size was found to exist during the biodegradation process. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  7. Influence of molting and starvation on digestive enzyme activities and energy storage in Gammarus fossarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charron, Laetitia; Geffard, Olivier; Chaumot, Arnaud; Coulaud, Romain; Jaffal, Ali; Gaillet, Véronique; Dedourge-Geffard, Odile; Geffard, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic) and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity) in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin) decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar) increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities) and physiological (energy reserves) responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs.

  8. Influence of molting and starvation on digestive enzyme activities and energy storage in Gammarus fossarum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia Charron

    Full Text Available Among the many biological responses studied in ecotoxicology, energy-based biomarkers such as digestive enzyme activities and energy reserves appear to be useful predictive tools for detecting physiological disturbances in organisms. However, the use of these biological responses as biomarkers could be limited by the effects of confounding factors (biotic and abiotic and physiological processes, such as the reproductive cycle. Thus, the optimal use of these biomarkers will be facilitated by understanding the effects of these factors on the energy metabolism of the sentinel species being studied. We considered abiotic factors (temperature and conductivity in a previous study, whereas the present study investigated the effects of gender, the female reproductive stage, and food availability on the digestive enzyme activities and energy storage of Gammarus fossarum. The results indicated that, during the female reproductive cycle, the activities of digestive enzymes (amylase, cellulase, and trypsin decreased significantly, whereas the levels of reserves (proteins, lipids, and sugar increased until the last premolt stage. Restricted food diets only led to decreased amylase activities in both sexes. Food starvation also induced a decrease in the energy outcomes in females, whereas there were no effects in males. In general, the biochemical (digestive enzyme activities and physiological (energy reserves responses were more stable in males than in females. These results support the use of males fed ad libitum to limit the effects of confounding factors when using these energy biomarkers in Gammarus fossarum during biomonitoring programs.

  9. Transaldolase inhibition impairs mitochondrial respiration and induces a starvation-like longevity response in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher F Bennett

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction can increase oxidative stress and extend lifespan in Caenorhabditis elegans. Homeostatic mechanisms exist to cope with disruptions to mitochondrial function that promote cellular health and organismal longevity. Previously, we determined that decreased expression of the cytosolic pentose phosphate pathway (PPP enzyme transaldolase activates the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt and extends lifespan. Here we report that transaldolase (tald-1 deficiency impairs mitochondrial function in vivo, as evidenced by altered mitochondrial morphology, decreased respiration, and increased cellular H2O2 levels. Lifespan extension from knockdown of tald-1 is associated with an oxidative stress response involving p38 and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK MAPKs and a starvation-like response regulated by the transcription factor EB (TFEB homolog HLH-30. The latter response promotes autophagy and increases expression of the flavin-containing monooxygenase 2 (fmo-2. We conclude that cytosolic redox established through the PPP is a key regulator of mitochondrial function and defines a new mechanism for mitochondrial regulation of longevity.

  10. Protein synthesis and degradation during starvation-induced cardiac atrophy in rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarel, A.M.; Parmacek, M.S.; Magid, N.M.; Decker, R.S.; Lesch, M.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the relative importance of protein degradation in the development of starvation-induced cardiac atrophy, in vivo fractional synthetic rates of total cardiac protein, myosin heavy chain, actin, light chain 1, and light chain 2 were measured in fed and fasted rabbits by continuous infusion of [ 3 H] leucine. In addition, the rate of left ventricular protein accumulation and loss were assessed in weight-matched control and fasted rabbits. Rates of total cardiac protein degradation were then estimated as the difference between rates of synthesis and growth. Fasting produced left ventricular atrophy by decreasing the rate of left ventricular protein synthesis (34.8 +/- 1.4, 27.3 +/- 3.0, and 19.3 +/- 1.2 mg/day of left ventricular protein synthesized for 0-, 3-, and 7-day fasted rabbits, respectively). Inhibition of contractile protein synthesis was evident by significant reductions in the fractional synthetic rates of all myofibrillar protein subunits. Although fractional rates of protein degradation increased significantly within 7 days of fasting, actual amounts of left ventricular protein degraded per day were unaffected. Thus, prolonged fasting profoundly inhibits the synthesis of new cardiac protein, including the major protein constituents of the myofibril. Both this inhibition in new protein synthesis as well as a smaller but significant reduction in the average half-lives of cardiac proteins are responsible for atrophy of the heart in response to fasting

  11. Was the Chlamydial Adaptative Strategy to Tryptophan Starvation an Early Determinant of Plastid Endosymbiosis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenci, Ugo; Ducatez, Mathieu; Kadouche, Derifa; Colleoni, Christophe; Ball, Steven G

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydiales were recently proposed to have sheltered the future cyanobacterial ancestor of plastids in a common inclusion. The intracellular pathogens are thought to have donated those critical transporters that triggered the efflux of photosynthetic carbon and the consequent onset of symbiosis. Chlamydiales are also suspected to have encoded glycogen metabolism TTS (Type Three Secretion) effectors responsible for photosynthetic carbon assimilation in the eukaryotic cytosol. We now review the reasons underlying other chlamydial lateral gene transfers evidenced in the descendants of plastid endosymbiosis. In particular we show that half of the genes encoding enzymes of tryptophan synthesis in Archaeplastida are of chlamydial origin. Tryptophan concentration is an essential cue triggering two alternative modes of replication in Chlamydiales. In addition, sophisticated tryptophan starvation mechanisms are known to act as antibacterial defenses in animal hosts. We propose that Chlamydiales have donated their tryptophan operon to the emerging plastid to ensure increased synthesis of tryptophan by the plastid ancestor. This would have allowed massive expression of the tryptophan rich chlamydial transporters responsible for symbiosis. It would also have allowed possible export of this valuable amino-acid in the inclusion of the tryptophan hungry pathogens. Free-living single cell cyanobacteria are devoid of proteins able to transport this amino-acid. We therefore investigated the phylogeny of the Tyr/Trp transporters homologous to E. coli TyrP/Mre and found yet another LGT from Chlamydiales to Archaeplastida thereby considerably strengthening our proposal.

  12. Metabolic Changes in Synechocystis PCC6803 upon Nitrogen-Starvation: Excess NADPH Sustains Polyhydroxybutyrate Accumulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauf, Waldemar; Schlebusch, Maximilian; Hüge, Jan; Kopka, Joachim; Hagemann, Martin; Forchhammer, Karl

    2013-01-01

    Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) is a common carbon storage polymer among heterotrophic bacteria. It is also accumulated in some photoautotrophic cyanobacteria; however, the knowledge of how PHB accumulation is regulated in this group is limited. PHB synthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is initiated once macronutrients like phosphorus or nitrogen are limiting. We have previously reported a mutation in the gene sll0783 that impairs PHB accumulation in this cyanobacterium upon nitrogen starvation. In this study we present data which explain the observed phenotype. We investigated differences in intracellular localization of PHB synthase, metabolism, and the NADPH pool between wild type and mutant. Localization of PHB synthase was not impaired in the sll0783 mutant; however, metabolome analysis revealed a difference in sorbitol levels, indicating a more oxidizing intracellular environment than in the wild type. We confirmed this by directly measuring the NADPH/NADP ratio and by altering the intracellular redox state of wild type and sll0783 mutant. We were able to physiologically complement the mutant phenotype of diminished PHB synthase activity by making the intracellular environment more reducing. Our data illustrate that the NADPH pool is an important factor for regulation of PHB biosynthesis and metabolism, which is also of interest for potential biotechnological applications. PMID:24957892

  13. Metabolic Changes in Synechocystis PCC6803 upon Nitrogen-Starvation: Excess NADPH Sustains Polyhydroxybutyrate Accumulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waldemar Hauf

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB is a common carbon storage polymer among heterotrophic bacteria. It is also accumulated in some photoautotrophic cyanobacteria; however, the knowledge of how PHB accumulation is regulated in this group is limited. PHB synthesis in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 is initiated once macronutrients like phosphorus or nitrogen are limiting. We have previously reported a mutation in the gene sll0783 that impairs PHB accumulation in this cyanobacterium upon nitrogen starvation. In this study we present data which explain the observed phenotype. We investigated differences in intracellular localization of PHB synthase, metabolism, and the NADPH pool between wild type and mutant. Localization of PHB synthase was not impaired in the sll0783 mutant; however, metabolome analysis revealed a difference in sorbitol levels, indicating a more oxidizing intracellular environment than in the wild type. We confirmed this by directly measuring the NADPH/NADP ratio and by altering the intracellular redox state of wild type and sll0783 mutant. We were able to physiologically complement the mutant phenotype of diminished PHB synthase activity by making the intracellular environment more reducing. Our data illustrate that the NADPH pool is an important factor for regulation of PHB biosynthesis and metabolism, which is also of interest for potential biotechnological applications.

  14. Compensatory growth response of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss Walbaum following short starvation periods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azodi, Maryam; Ebrahimi, Eisa; Farhadian, Omidvar; Mahboobi-Soofiani, Nasrollah; Morshedi, Vahid

    2015-07-01

    This sixty-day study was performed to determine the effects of short-term starvation and re-feeding cycles on growth, feeding performances and body composition of rainbow trout ( Oncorhynchus mykiss). Three hundred trout fingerlings with an average initial weight of 17.5±0.06 g were randomly distributed in 15 circular fiberglass tanks. The fish were exposed to 5 different feeding regimes; control: continuously fed twice daily to apparent satiation; T1: starved for 1 day and re-fed for 2 days; T2: starved for 1 day and re-fed for 4 days; T3: starved for 3 days and re-fed for 12 days; T4: starved for 4 days and re-fed for 16 days. At the end of the experiment, growth performance, feed utilization, whole body ash and moisture contents were not significantly ( P>0.05) different among the treatments. However, whole body protein content in T3 was significantly higher than other treatments ( Ptrout culture.

  15. Effect of environmental stress factors on the uptake and survival of Campylobacter jejuni in Acanthamoeba castellanii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bui Xuan

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Campylobacter jejuni is a major cause of bacterial food-borne illness in Europe and North America. The mechanisms allowing survival in the environment and transmission to new hosts are not well understood. Environmental free-living protozoa may facilitate both processes. Pre-exposure to heat, starvation, oxidative or osmotic stresses encountered in the environment may affect the subsequent interaction of C. jejuni with free-living protozoa. To test this hypothesis, we examined the impact of environmental stress on expression of virulence-associated genes (ciaB, dnaJ, and htrA of C. jejuni and on its uptake by and intracellular survival within Acanthamoeba castellanii. Results Heat, starvation and osmotic stress reduced the survival of C. jejuni significantly, whereas oxidative stress had no effect. Quantitative RT-PCR experiments showed that the transcription of virulence genes was slightly up-regulated under heat and oxidative stresses but down-regulated under starvation and osmotic stresses, the htrA gene showing the largest down-regulation in response to osmotic stress. Pre-exposure of bacteria to low nutrient or osmotic stress reduced bacterial uptake by amoeba, but no effect of heat or oxidative stress was observed. Finally, C. jejuni rapidly lost viability within amoeba cells and pre-exposure to oxidative stress had no significant effect on intracellular survival. However, the numbers of intracellular bacteria recovered 5 h post-gentamicin treatment were lower with starved, heat treated or osmotically stressed bacteria than with control bacteria. Also, while ~1.5 × 103 colony forming unit/ml internalized bacteria could typically be recovered 24 h post-gentamicin treatment with control bacteria, no starved, heat treated or osmotically stressed bacteria could be recovered at this time point. Overall, pre-exposure of C. jejuni to environmental stresses did not promote intracellular survival in A. castellanii

  16. Feasibility of Using Gamma Irradiation for Inactivation of Starvation-, Heat-, and Cold-Stressed Salmonella in Tahini.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaili, Tareq M; Al-Nabulsi, Anas A; Abubakar, Salisu A; Alaboudi, Akram R; Al-Holy, Murad A

    2016-06-01

    Salmonella continues to be the leading cause of acute gastroenteritis and recently has been involved in infections related to edible seeds and their products, including tahini. This study investigated the (i) effectiveness of using gamma irradiation to inactivate starvation- and heat- or cold-stressed Salmonella in tahini, (ii) effect of storage on the sensitivity of stressed Salmonella to irradiation, and (iii) effect of irradiation on the chemical and physical characteristics of tahini. Tahini samples were inoculated with a cocktail of unstressed or stressed (starvation and heat or cold stress) Salmonella isolates and then exposed after storage at 21°C for 0, 7, and 30 days to gamma irradiation for up to 2.0 kGy. Additionally, the effect of irradiation on the color, peroxide, p-anisidine, and acid values of tahini were assessed. The initial level of unstressed and starvation- and heat-stressed Salmonella in tahini decreased by ca. 4.6 log CFU/g after exposure to 2.0 kGy, while cold-stressed cultures decreased by 4.5 log after exposure to 0.6 kGy. Irradiation doses of 1.0 kGy after 7 days of storage or 0.75 kGy after 30 days of storage decreased the populations of the unstressed and starvation- and heatstressed Salmonella by ca. 3.4 or 2.6 log, respectively. The D10-value of the unstressed Salmonella was 0.43 kGy. Starvation and heat stresses showed no significant effect (P > 0.05) on the calculated D10-value, whereas cold stress significantly (P D10-value to 0.14 kGy. Preirradiation storage for 7 and 30 days significantly decreased the D10-value to 0.31 and 0.28 kGy, respectively. An irradiation dose of 2.0 kGy did not significantly affect the color, peroxide, p-anisidine, and acid values of tahini when compared with nonirradiated samples. Therefore, this study lays the foundation for using irradiation as an effective means for minimizing the risk of Salmonella in tahini without compromising its quality.

  17. S.O.S. Surviving or Surviving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hersh, Richard H.; Whiteman, James

    1973-01-01

    A High School course, General Studies Survival Curriculum, was designed to aid students in problem solving in a complex society. Areas of concern were psychology, consumer economics, environmental studies, law and society, religion and values, ethnic studies, applied aesthetics, creative studies, occupations and futurism. (JB)

  18. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). PMID:29084901

  19. Gene Regulation and Survival under Hypoxia Requires Starch Availability and Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loreti, Elena; Valeri, Maria Cristina; Novi, Giacomo; Perata, Pierdomenico

    2018-02-01

    Plants respond to hypoxia, often caused by submergence, by expressing a specific set of genes that contribute to acclimation to this unfavorable environmental condition. Genes induced by low oxygen include those encoding enzymes for carbohydrate metabolism and fermentation, pathways that are required for survival. Sugar availability is therefore of crucial importance for energy production under hypoxia. Here, we show that Arabidopsis ( Arabidopsis thaliana ) plants require starch for surviving submergence as well as for ensuring the rapid induction of genes encoding enzymes required for anaerobic metabolism. The starchless pgm mutant is highly susceptible to submergence and also fails to induce anaerobic genes at the level of the wild type. Treating wild-type plants under conditions inducing sugar starvation results in a weak induction of alcohol dehydrogenase and other anaerobic genes. Induction of gene expression under hypoxia requires transcription factors belonging to group VII ethylene response factors (ERF-VII) that, together with plant Cys oxidases, act as an oxygen-sensing mechanism. We show that repression of this pathway by sugar starvation occurs downstream of the hypoxia-dependent stabilization of ERF-VII proteins and independently of the energy sensor protein kinases SnRK1.1 (SNF1-related kinase 1.1). © 2018 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  20. Biochemical Mechanisms and Energy Strategies of Geobacter sulfurreducens for Long- Term Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmus, R. A.; Liermann, L. J.; Brantley, S. L.; Tien, M.

    2008-12-01

    Numerous species of bacteria have been observed to exhibit a growth advantage in stationary phase (GASP) phenotype, indicating that microorganisms starved of an energy source may adapt to allow for long-term survival. Understanding how Geobacter sulfurreducens persists using various metal forms as energy sources and whether a GASP phenotype develops during long-term growth are important for efficient application of this bacterium to sites requiring engineered bioremediation of soluble metals. Thus, we investigated the growth kinetics and survival of G. sulfurreducens. The growth rate of G. sulfurreducens was highest when cultured with soluble iron and generally higher on iron oxide than manganese oxide, suggesting that soluble metal forms are more readily utilized as energy sources by G. sulfurreducens. By monitoring the abundance of G. sulfurreducens in batch cultures for >6 months, distinct growth, stationary, and prolonged starvation phases were observed and a cell density of 105- 106 cells/mL persisted under long-term starvation conditions. The outgrowth of an aged G. sulfurreducens strain co-cultured with a young strain was monitored as a measure of the existence of the GASP phenotype. As the strains aged, the rpoS gene was cloned and sequenced at different stages of growth to identify mutations corresponding to a growth advantage. The results of these studies provide insight into the use of various metal forms for growth by G. sulfurreducens and its ability to persist when starved of energy sources.

  1. Aircraft Survivability. Spring 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    panel exhibiting telltale signs and critical fragments were identified and collected. The weapon employed against the aircraft was correctly assessed...701C engines (for FCR- equipped Apache Longbows), and a fully integrated cockpit. In addition, the aircraft received improved survivability...sustained analytical contributions to improve the survivability and effectiveness of US military aircraft and weapon systems. These contributions

  2. Kibra and aPKC regulate starvation-induced autophagy in Drosophila

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Ahrum [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of); Neufeld, Thomas P. [Department of Genetics, Cell Biology and Development, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Choe, Joonho, E-mail: jchoe@kaist.ac.kr [Department of Biological Sciences, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 291 Daehak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 34141 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-04

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation system that functions in response to cellular stresses such as metabolic stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, and developmental processes. During autophagy, cytoplasmic components are captured in double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. The autophagosome fuses with the lysosome, producing a vacuole known as an autolysosome. The cellular components are degraded by lysosomal proteases and recycled. Autophagy is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and the process is evolutionarily conserved. Kibra is an upstream regulator of the hippo signaling pathway, which controls organ size by affecting cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Kibra is mainly localized in the apical membrane domain of epithelial cells and acts as a scaffold protein. We found that Kibra is required for autophagy to function properly. The absence of Kibra caused defects in the formation of autophagic vesicles and autophagic degradation. We also found that the well-known cell polarity protein aPKC interacts with Kibra, and its activity affects autophagy upstream of Kibra. Constitutively active aPKC decreased autophagic vesicle formation and autophagic degradation. We confirmed the interaction between aPKC and Kibra in S2 cells and Drosophila larva. Taken together, our data suggest that Kibra and aPKC are essential for regulating starvation-induced autophagy. - Highlights: • Loss of Kibra causes defects in autophagosome formation and autophagic degradation. • Constitutively-active aPKCs negatively regulate autophagy. • Kibra interacts with aPKC in vitro and in vivo. • Kibra regulates autophagy downstream of aPKC.

  3. Maternal Diet and Insulin-Like Signaling Control Intergenerational Plasticity of Progeny Size and Starvation Resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Hibshman

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Maternal effects of environmental conditions produce intergenerational phenotypic plasticity. Adaptive value of these effects depends on appropriate anticipation of environmental conditions in the next generation, and mismatch between conditions may contribute to disease. However, regulation of intergenerational plasticity is poorly understood. Dietary restriction (DR delays aging but maternal effects have not been investigated. We demonstrate maternal effects of DR in the roundworm C. elegans. Worms cultured in DR produce fewer but larger progeny. Nutrient availability is assessed in late larvae and young adults, rather than affecting a set point in young larvae, and maternal age independently affects progeny size. Reduced signaling through the insulin-like receptor daf-2/InsR in the maternal soma causes constitutively large progeny, and its effector daf-16/FoxO is required for this effect. nhr-49/Hnf4, pha-4/FoxA, and skn-1/Nrf also regulate progeny-size plasticity. Genetic analysis suggests that insulin-like signaling controls progeny size in part through regulation of nhr-49/Hnf4, and that pha-4/FoxA and skn-1/Nrf function in parallel to insulin-like signaling and nhr-49/Hnf4. Furthermore, progeny of DR worms are buffered from adverse consequences of early-larval starvation, growing faster and producing more offspring than progeny of worms fed ad libitum. These results suggest a fitness advantage when mothers and their progeny experience nutrient stress, compared to an environmental mismatch where only progeny are stressed. This work reveals maternal provisioning as an organismal response to DR, demonstrates potentially adaptive intergenerational phenotypic plasticity, and identifies conserved pathways mediating these effects.

  4. Effect of confinement and starvation on stress parameters in the American lobster (Homarus americanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edo D'Agaro

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The American lobster (Homarus americanus is one of the most important crustacean resources in North America. In Italy and Europe, this fishery product is available throughout the year and it has a high and increasing commercial demand. American lobsters are traditionally marketed live and stocked, without feed, in temperature controlled recirculating systems for several weeks before being sold in the market places. The current Italian legislation does not fix a maximum length of time for the crustacean confinement and specific welfare requirements. In the present research, a 4-week experiment was carried out using 42 adult H. americanus reared in 4 recirculating aquaculture tanks. After one month of confinement, mean glucose, protein and total haemocyte count levels in the hemolymph of H. americanus were stable and similar (P>0.05 to the values observed at the beginning of the experiment. Results of the proximate analysis of the abdominal muscles of H. americanus showed no significant differences in concentrations of crude protein, lipid and ash during the trial. At the end of the experiment, the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and Western blotting analysis revealed a marked degradation of the muscle myofibrillar proteins. A number of fragments, possibly from myosin, were evident in the range between 50 and 220 kDa between time t0 and t28. Results of this study show that the main hemolymphatic variables and degradation analysis of the muscle myofibrillar proteins can be used as sensitive indicators of the crustacean stress response to confinement and starvation.

  5. Starvation of Flavobacterium psychrophilum in broth, stream water and distilled water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsos, Ioannis N; Thompson, Kim D; Adams, Alexandra

    2003-09-24

    Physical changes in Flavobacterium psychrophilum, the causative agent of rainbow trout fry syndrome (RTFS), were examined over a 19 wk period of starvation. Bacteria were maintained in either Cytophaga broth, filtered stream water, or filtered distilled water, or were maintained in broth after disinfection as a negative control for dead bacteria. Culturability and viability of the bacterium were assessed using colony-forming units (CFUs) and a commercially available live/dead kit. Antigenic profiles and general morphology of the bacterium were also examined using Western blot analysis and electron microscopy, respectively. The bacterium appeared to stop multiplying and became smaller and rounded when maintained in stream water. Its culturability declined until it was no longer possible to obtain colonies on agar plates at the end of the trial at 19 wk, and results from the live/dead kit did not correspond with the viability obtained as CFUs in culture. However, it was still possible to obtain growth of the bacterium after 36 wk with a resuscitation step in Cytophaga broth. Bacteria maintained in distilled water or treated with a disinfectant appeared non-viable using the live/dead kit and were unable to grow on agar 1 h after setting up the experiment; no morphological changes were observed in the bacteria maintained under these conditions. Bacteria maintained in broth were present as long, slim rods, some of which developed into 'ring' formations. Small differences were observed in the antigen profiles of the bacteria maintained under the different treatments, possibly due to a reduction in the size and metabolism of the bacteria. There was also a marked decline in the sensitivity of the PCR with bacteria maintained under the different treatments 14 wk from the onset of the study.

  6. Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase in bovine tick Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) micro plus embryogenesis and starvation larvae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, J.G. de; Mentizingen, L.G.; Logullo, C. [Universidade Estadual do Norte Fluminense Darcy Ribeiro (UENF), Campos dos Goytacazes, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Biociencias e Biotecnologia. Lab.de Quimica e Funcao de Proteinas e Peptideos (LQFPP); Andrade, C.P. de; Vaz Junior, Itabajara [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Centro de Biotecnologia; Daffre, S.; Esteves, E. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Ciencias Biomedicas

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) is considered a key rate controlling enzyme in gluconeogenesis pathway. Gluconeogenesis is a highly regulated process, catalyzed by several enzymes subject to regulation by insulin. Normally, insulin rapidly and substantially inhibits PEPCK gene transcription and the PEPCK activity is proportional to the rate of gene transcription. The transcriptional regulation of the PEPCK gene has been extensively studied. CREM is the transcription factor that bind efficiently to the putative cyclic AMP response element (CRE) in PEPCK gene. Several other transcription factors can bind to this element and activate transcription. In oviparous animals, such as bovine tick R. microplus, the embryonic development occurs outside the maternal organism, implying that all the nutrients necessary for embryogenesis must be present in the oocytes. We observed the relationship between the main energy sources and the morphogenetic changes that occur during R. microplus tick embryogenesis. Energy homeostasis is maintained by glycogen mobilization in the beginning of embryogenesis, as its content is drastically decreased during the first five days of development. Afterwards, the activity of the gluconeogenesis enzyme PEPCK increases enormously, as indicated by a concomitant increase in glucose content (Moraes et al., 2007). Here, we analyzed PEPCK gene transcription by qPCR during the embryogenesis and starvation larvae. The PEPCK transcription was higher at first and 15th day eggs of the development. In larvae the levels of PEPCK transcripts is increased at fifth day after hatch. However, the activity is continuous increased in larvae the form first up to 15th day. Now we are investigating the involvement of CREM in the PEPCK gene transcription in these cells. In this sense, we obtained CREM sequence from TIGR ESTs R. microplus bank and designed the specific primers to qPCR. Taken together our results suggest the involvement of PEPCK to the

  7. Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 Preferentially Grows as Aggregates in Liquid Batch Cultures and Disperses upon Starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleheck, David; Barraud, Nicolas; Klebensberger, Janosch; Webb, Jeremy S.; McDougald, Diane; Rice, Scott A.; Kjelleberg, Staffan

    2009-01-01

    In both natural and artificial environments, bacteria predominantly grow in biofilms, and bacteria often disperse from biofilms as freely suspended single-cells. In the present study, the formation and dispersal of planktonic cellular aggregates, or ‘suspended biofilms’, by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in liquid batch cultures were closely examined, and compared to biofilm formation on a matrix of polyester (PE) fibers as solid surface in batch cultures. Plankton samples were analyzed by laser-diffraction particle-size scanning (LDA) and microscopy of aggregates. Interestingly, LDA indicated that up to 90% of the total planktonic biomass consisted of cellular aggregates in the size range of 10–400 µm in diameter during the growth phase, as opposed to individual cells. In cultures with PE surfaces, P. aeruginosa preferred to grow in biofilms, as opposed to planktonicly. However, upon carbon, nitrogen or oxygen limitation, the planktonic aggregates and PE-attached biofilms dispersed into single cells, resulting in an increase in optical density (OD) independent of cellular growth. During growth, planktonic aggregates and PE-attached biofilms contained densely packed viable cells and extracellular DNA (eDNA), and starvation resulted in a loss of viable cells, and an increase in dead cells and eDNA. Furthermore, a release of metabolites and infective bacteriophage into the culture supernatant, and a marked decrease in intracellular concentration of the second messenger cyclic di-GMP, was observed in dispersing cultures. Thus, what traditionally has been described as planktonic, individual cell cultures of P. aeruginosa, are in fact suspended biofilms, and such aggregates have behaviors and responses (e.g. dispersal) similar to surface associated biofilms. In addition, we suggest that this planktonic biofilm model system can provide the basis for a detailed analysis of the synchronized biofilm life cycle of P. aeruginosa. PMID:19436737

  8. Comparison of Methods to Assay Liver Glycogen Fractions: The Effects of Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mojibi, Nastaran; Rasouli, Mehdi

    2017-03-01

    There are several methods to extract and measure glycogen in animal tissues. Glycogen is extracted with or without homogenization by using cold Perchloric Acid (PCA). Three procedures were compared to determine glycogen fractions in rat liver at different physiological states. The present study was conducted on two groups of rats, one group of five rats were fed standard rodent laboratory food and were marked as controls, and another five rats were starved overnight (15 hour) as cases. The glycogen fractions were extracted and measured by using three methods: classical homogenization, total-glycogen-fractionation and homogenization-free protocols. The data of homogenization methods showed that following 15 hour starvation, total glycogen decreased (36.4±1.9 vs. 27.7±2.5, p=0.01) and the change occurred entirely in Acid Soluble Glycogen (ASG) (32.0±1.1 vs. 22.7±2.5, p=0.01), while Acid Insoluble Glycogen (AIG) did not change significantly (4.9±0.9 vs. 4.6±0.3, p=0.7). Similar results were achieved by using the method of total-glycogen-fractionation. Homogenization-free procedure indicated that ASG and AIG fractions compromise about 2/3 and 1/3 of total glycogen and the changes occurred in both ASG (24.4±2.6 vs. 16.7±0.4, pglycogen and is more metabolically active form. The same results were obtained by using 'total-glycogen-fractionation method'. 'Homogenization-free method' gave different results, because AIG has been contaminated with ASG fraction. In both 'homogenization' and 'homogenization-free' methods ASG must be extracted at least twice to prevent contamination of AIG with ASG.

  9. Kibra and aPKC regulate starvation-induced autophagy in Drosophila

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Ahrum; Neufeld, Thomas P.; Choe, Joonho

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is a bulk degradation system that functions in response to cellular stresses such as metabolic stress, endoplasmic reticulum stress, oxidative stress, and developmental processes. During autophagy, cytoplasmic components are captured in double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes. The autophagosome fuses with the lysosome, producing a vacuole known as an autolysosome. The cellular components are degraded by lysosomal proteases and recycled. Autophagy is important for maintaining cellular homeostasis, and the process is evolutionarily conserved. Kibra is an upstream regulator of the hippo signaling pathway, which controls organ size by affecting cell growth, proliferation, and apoptosis. Kibra is mainly localized in the apical membrane domain of epithelial cells and acts as a scaffold protein. We found that Kibra is required for autophagy to function properly. The absence of Kibra caused defects in the formation of autophagic vesicles and autophagic degradation. We also found that the well-known cell polarity protein aPKC interacts with Kibra, and its activity affects autophagy upstream of Kibra. Constitutively active aPKC decreased autophagic vesicle formation and autophagic degradation. We confirmed the interaction between aPKC and Kibra in S2 cells and Drosophila larva. Taken together, our data suggest that Kibra and aPKC are essential for regulating starvation-induced autophagy. - Highlights: • Loss of Kibra causes defects in autophagosome formation and autophagic degradation. • Constitutively-active aPKCs negatively regulate autophagy. • Kibra interacts with aPKC in vitro and in vivo. • Kibra regulates autophagy downstream of aPKC.

  10. The Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E Mucin Gene Influences Adult Size, Starvation Tolerance, and Cold Recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Micael; Silva, Ana C; Vieira, Cristina P; Vieira, Jorge

    2016-07-07

    Mucins have been implicated in many different biological processes, such as protection from mechanical damage, microorganisms, and toxic molecules, as well as providing a luminal scaffold during development. Nevertheless, it is conceivable that mucins have the potential to modulate food absorption as well, and thus contribute to the definition of several important phenotypic traits. Here we show that the Drosophila melanogaster Muc68E gene is 40- to 60-million-yr old, and is present in Drosophila species of the subgenus Sophophora only. The central repeat region of this gene is fast evolving, and shows evidence for repeated expansions/contractions. This and/or frequent gene conversion events lead to the homogenization of its repeats. The amino acid pattern P[ED][ED][ST][ST][ST] is found in the repeat region of Muc68E proteins from all Drosophila species studied, and can occur multiple times within a single conserved repeat block, and thus may have functional significance. Muc68E is a nonessential gene under laboratory conditions, but Muc68E mutant flies are smaller and lighter than controls at birth. However, at 4 d of age, Muc68E mutants are heavier, recover faster from chill-coma, and are more resistant to starvation than control flies, although they have the same percentage of lipids as controls. Mutant flies have enlarged abdominal size 1 d after chill-coma recovery, which is associated with higher lipid content. These results suggest that Muc68E has a role in metabolism modulation, food absorption, and/or feeding patterns in larvae and adults, and under normal and stress conditions. Such biological function is novel for mucin genes. Copyright © 2016 Reis et al.

  11. The off-host survival and viability of a native and non-native fish louse (Argulus, Crustacea: Branchiura

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P.D. WALKER, I.J. RUSSON, R. DUIJF, G. VAN DER VELDE,S.E. WENDELAAR BONGA

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Fish ectoparasites are introduced to water bodies or aquaculture systems along with their hosts. Argulid fish lice can survive off-host for a given time, and in spite of quarantine measures might also be introduced via the transfer of water. However, they must cope with varying abiotic conditions without access to food. We investigated the effect of temperature (5 to 28oC on the off-host survival time of Argulus japonicus, an invasive species which is apparently increasing its distribution, and compared this with the European A. foliaceus. A clear effect of temperature on the off-host survival time of all stages of both species was demonstrated. Larval and juvenile A. japonicus survived up to 9 days at 22oC and in the case of adults up to 13 days at 15oC. By comparison, larval A. foliaceus survived up to 5 days at 15oC, adults up to 14 days at 9oC and juveniles up to 7 days at 9oC and 15oC. Thus, A. japonicus is more resistant to starvation at higher temperatures under controlled off-host conditions and A. foliaceus is more resistant to starvation at lower temperatures. Infectivity of A. japonicus decreased linearly with the time spent off-host after 2 days for larvae and 4 days for adults. Temperature only had a significant effect on the infectivity of both developmental stages after 24 hours off-host between 13–23oC for larvae and 13–18oC for adults. In conclusion both species can potentially survive off-host periods in water transports for up to 13–14 days as adults. Their survival is shorter as larvae. This study demonstrates that transportation of water has the potential to introduce Argulus species [Current Zoology 57 (6: 828–835, 2011].

  12. Modulation of innate immunity and gene expressions in white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei following long-term starvation and re-feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yong-Chin; Chen, Jiann-Chu; C Man, Siti Nursafura; W Morni, Wan Zabidii; N A Suhaili, Awangku Shahrir; Cheng, Sha-Yen; Hsu, Chih-Hung

    2012-01-01

    The survival rate, weight loss, immune parameters, resistance against Vibrio alginolyticus and white-spot syndrome virus (WSSV), and expressions of lipopolysaccharide- and ß-glucan-binding protein (LGBP), peroxinectin (PX), prophenoloxidase-activating enzyme (ppA), prophenoloxidase (proPO) I, proPO II, α2-macroglobulin (α2-M), integrin ß, heat shock protein 70 (HSP70), cytosolic manganese superoxide dismutase (cytMnSOD), mitochondrial manganese superoxide dismutase (mtMnSOD), and extracellular copper and zinc superoxide dismutase (ecCuZnSOD) were examined in the white shrimp Litopenaeus vannamei (8.18 ± 0.86 g body weight) which had been denied food (starved) for up to 14-28 days. Among shrimp which had been starved for 7, 14, 21, and 28 days, 100%, 90%, 71%, and 59% survived, and they lost 3.2%, 7.3%, 9.2%, and 10.4% of their body weight, respectively. Hyaline cells (HCs), granular cells (GCs, including semi-granular cells), the total haemocyte count (THC), phenoloxidase (PO) activity, respiratory bursts (RBs), and SOD activity significantly decreased in shrimp which had been starved for 1, 1, 1, 5, 14, and 3 days, respectively. The expression of integrin ß significantly decreased after 0.5-5 days of starvation, whereas the expressions of LGBP, PX, proPO I, proPO II, ppA, and α2-M increased after 0.5-1 days. Transcripts of all genes except ecCuZnSOD decreased to the lowest level after 5 days, and tended to background values after 7 and 14 days. Cumulative mortality rates of 7-day-starved shrimp challenged with V. alginolyticus and WSSV were significantly higher than those of challenged control-shrimp for 1-7 and 1-4 days, respectively. In another experiment, immune parameters of shrimp which had been starved for 7 and 14 days and then received normal feeding (at 5% of their body weight daily) were examined after 3, 6, and 12 h, and 1, 3, and 5 days. All immune parameters of 7-day-starved shrimp were able to return to their baseline values after 5 days

  13. The effect of severe starvation and captivity stress on plasma thyroxine and triiodothyronine concentrations in an antarctic bird (emperor penguin).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groscolas, R; Leloup, J

    1989-01-01

    The effect of confinement and severe starvation on the plasma thyroxine (T4) and triiodothyronine (T3) concentrations was determined in emperor penguins (Aptenodytes forsteri). During their annual cycle, emperor penguins fast freely for periods of up to 4 months and may thus represent a unique subject to study endocrine adaptations to fasting. Plasma T4 concentrations progressively decreased following capture and confinement of naturally fasting penguins, and within 15-20 days stabilized at levels three times lower than in free-living penguins. A transient fourfold increase in plasma T3 concentration developed within the day following confinement in parallel with a rise in daily body mass loss. Both plasma T3 concentration and mass loss subsided to normal levels within 15 days. The decrease in plasma T4 concentration is in accordance with the well-known inhibitory effect of stress on thyroid function in birds and mammals, whereas the transient increase in plasma T3 concentration seems related to enhancement of energy expenditure as a consequence of restlessness. Starvation severe enough to exhaust fat stores and to activate protein catabolism induced a 6- and 5 to 10-fold fall in plasma T4 and T3, respectively. This is in marked contrast with maintenance of plasma thyroid levels during long-term natural fasting associated with protein sparing (R. Groscolas and J. Leloup (1986) Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 63, 264-274). Surprisingly, there was a final reincrease in plasma T4 concentration in very lean penguins. These results suggest that the effect of starvation on plasma thyroid hormones seems to depend on how much protein catabolism is activated and demonstrate the acute sensitivity of thyroid hormone balance to stress in penguins.

  14. Effects of short-term starvation on ghrelin, GH-IGF system, and IGF-binding proteins in Atlantic salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hevrøy, E M; Azpeleta, C; Shimizu, M; Lanzén, A; Kaiya, H; Espe, M; Olsvik, P A

    2011-03-01

    The effects of short-time fasting on appetite, growth, and nutrient were studied in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) smolts. Feed deprivation did change the energy metabolism with reduced plasma protein and muscle indispensible amino acid levels. Plasma levels of ghrelin were significantly higher in starved salmon compared with fed fish after 2 days, but no differences in circulating ghrelin were found between treatments after 14 days. Two mRNA sequences for ghrelin-1 and ghrelin-2, 430 and 533 bp long, respectively, were detected. In addition, the growth hormone secretagogues-receptor like receptor (GHSR-LR) 1a and 1b were identified. Ghrelin-1 but not ghrelin-2 mRNA levels were affected by starvation in the stomach. Lower ghrelin-1 mRNA levels were detected at day 2 in starved fish compared with fed fish. The mRNA levels of GHSR-LR1a were not affected by starvation. Fasting reduced the phenotypic growth and the transcription of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II together with IGF-IIR, but IGF-I mRNA were not regulated in fasted salmon after 14 days. Three IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP) at 23, 32, and 43 kDa were found in salmon, and circulating 23 kDa was significantly increased after 14 days of starvation compared with fed fish, indicating increased catabolism. The levels of IGFBP-1 mRNA were significantly higher in fed and starved fish after 14 days compared to those at the start of the experiment, but no significant difference was observed between the treatments. In conclusion, we have shown that circulating ghrelin and ghrelin-1 mRNA is related to changes in energy metabolism in Atlantic salmon.

  15. Responsibility of regulatory gene expression and repressed protein synthesis for triacylglycerol accumulation on sulfur-starvation in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eSato

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Triacylglycerol (TG synthesis is induced for energy and carbon storage in algal cells under nitrogen(N-starved conditions, and helps prevent reactive oxygen species production through fatty acid synthesis that consumes excessive reducing power. Here, the regulatory mechanism for the TG content in sulfur(S-starved cells of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii was examined, in comparison to that in N- or phosphorus(P-starved cells. S- and N-starved cells exhibited markedly increased TG contents with up-regulation of mRNA levels of diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes. S-Starvation also induced expression of the genes for phosphatidate synthesis. In contrast, P-starved cells exhibited little alteration of the TG content with almost no induction of these genes. The results implied deficient nutrient-specific regulation of the TG content. An arg9 disruptant defective in arginine synthesis, even without nutritional deficiencies, exhibited an increased TG content upon removal of supplemented arginine, which repressed protein synthesis. Repression of protein synthesis thus seemed crucial for TG accumulation in S- or N-starved cells. Meanwhile, the results of inhibitor experiments involving cells inferred that TG accumulation during S-starvation is supported by photosynthesis and de novo fatty acid synthesis. During S-starvation, sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants, which are defective in the response to the ambient S-status, accumulated TG at lower and higher levels, respectively, than the wild type. The sac1 and snrk2.2 disruptants showed no or much greater up-regulation of diacylglycerol acyltransferase genes, respectively. In conclusion, TG synthesis would be activated in S-starved cells, through the diversion of metabolic carbon-flow from protein to TG synthesis, and simultaneously through up-regulation of the expression of a particular set of genes for TG synthesis at proper levels through the actions of SAC1 and SNRK2.2.

  16. Lipid markers of diet history and their retention during experimental starvation in the Bering Sea euphausiid Thysanoessa raschii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pleuthner, Rachel L.; Shaw, C. Tracy; Schatz, Megan J.; Lessard, Evelyn J.; Harvey, H. Rodger

    2016-12-01

    Two extended pulsed feeding experiments, following the spring bloom period, investigated lipid retention in the prominent Bering Sea euphausiid (krill) Thysanoessa raschii. These experiments occurred during late spring and early summer of 2010. Concurrent taxonomic analysis of the natural algal community allowed prey type to be linked to lipid composition of the natural communities. In late spring, experimental periods of feeding followed by starvation showed an overall decrease in total lipid for T. raschii. In early summer, no consistent trend was observed for total lipid with the visible presence of storage lipid in some animals. Polar lipids, as phospholipids, were the dominant krill lipid class in both experiments constituting ≥88% of total lipid, and triacylglycerols reached a maximum of 5% of total lipid. The sterols cholesterol and brassicasterol+desmosterol comprised 98-99% of total sterol abundances in T. raschii throughout both experiments, even after feeding periods when alternative sterols (i.e. the algal sterol 24-methylenecholesterol) accounted for up to 39% of sterols in potential food particles. Cholesterol abundance and concentration increased during both incubations, likely due to the metabolism of dietary sterols. Major fatty acids observed in krill included C14:0n, C16:0n, C16:1(n-7), C18:1(n-7), C18:1(n-9), C20:5(n-3), and C22:6(n-3) with the diatom-attributed C16:1(n-7) decreasing in abundance and concentration during starvation. Low concentrations of the dinoflagellate-derived sterol and a novel C28:8 PUFA, typically found in dinoflagellates and prymnesiophytes, indicated predation on protozooplankton in early summer when diatom abundances were low. The stability of lipid distributions over periods of starvation and intermittent feeding suggest that fatty acid and sterol biomarkers present in this polar euphausiid principally reflect long-term diet history rather than short-term feeding episodes.

  17. Monitoring protein turnover during phosphate starvation-dependent autophagic degradation using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein aggregate in tobacco BY-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, Maiko; Asatsuma, Satoru; Matsuoka, Ken

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a system for quantitative monitoring of autophagic degradation in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells using an aggregate-prone protein comprised of cytochrome b5 (Cyt b5) and a tetrameric red fluorescent protein (RFP). Unfortunately, this system is of limited use for monitoring the kinetics of autophagic degradation because the proteins synthesized before and after induction of autophagy cannot be distinguished. To overcome this problem, we developed a system using kikume green-red (KikGR), a photoconvertible and tetrameric fluorescent protein that changes its fluorescence from green to red upon irradiation with purple light. Using the fusion protein of Cyt b5 and KikGR together with a method for the bulk conversion of KikGR, which we had previously used to convert the Golgi-localized monomeric KikGR fusion protein, we were able to monitor both the growth and de novo formation of aggregates. Using this system, we found that tobacco cells do not cease protein synthesis under conditions of phosphate (Pi)-starvation. Induction of autophagy under Pi-starvation, but not under sugar- or nitrogen-starvation, was specifically inhibited by phosphite, which is an analog of Pi with a different oxidation number. Therefore, the mechanism by which BY-2 cells can sense Pi-starvation and induce autophagy does not involve sensing a general decrease in energy supply and a specific Pi sensor might be involved in the induction of autophagy under Pi-starvation.

  18. Monitoring protein turnover during phosphate starvation-dependent autophagic degradation using a photoconvertible fluorescent protein aggregate in tobacco BY-2 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiko eTasaki

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a system for quantitative monitoring of autophagic degradation in transformed tobacco BY-2 cells using an aggregate-prone protein comprised of cytochrome b5 (Cyt b5 and a tetrameric red fluorescent protein (RFP. Unfortunately, this system is of limited use for monitoring the kinetics of autophagic degradation because the proteins synthesized before and after induction of autophagy cannot be distinguished. To overcome this problem, we developed a system using kikume green-red (KikGR, a photoconvertible and tetrameric fluorescent protein that changes its fluorescence from green to red upon irradiation with purple light. Using the fusion protein of Cyt b5 and KikGR together with a method for the bulk conversion of KikGR, which we had previously used to convert the Golgi-localized monomeric KikGR fusion protein, we were able to monitor both the growth and de novo formation of aggregates. Using this system, we found that tobacco cells do not cease protein synthesis under conditions of phosphate (Pi-starvation. Induction of autophagy under Pi-starvation, but not under sugar- or nitrogen-starvation, was specifically inhibited by phosphite, which is an analog of Pi with a different oxidation number. Therefore, the mechanism by which BY-2 cells can sense Pi-starvation and induce autophagy does not involve sensing a general decrease in energy supply and a specific Pi sensor might be involved in the induction of autophagy under Pi-starvation.

  19. The corticotropin-releasing factor-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and kinin neuropeptides modulate desiccation and starvation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, Elizabeth; Dornan, Anthony J; Halberg, Kenneth A; Terhzaz, Selim; Dow, Julian A T; Davies, Shireen-A

    2016-06-01

    Malpighian tubules are critical organs for epithelial fluid transport and stress tolerance in insects, and are under neuroendocrine control by multiple neuropeptides secreted by identified neurons. Here, we demonstrate roles for CRF-like diuretic hormone 44 (DH44) and Drosophila melanogaster kinin (Drome-kinin, DK) in desiccation and starvation tolerance. Gene expression and labelled DH44 ligand binding data, as well as highly selective knockdowns and/or neuronal ablations of DH44 in neurons of the pars intercerebralis and DH44 receptor (DH44-R2) in Malpighian tubule principal cells, indicate that suppression of DH44 signalling improves desiccation tolerance of the intact fly. Drome-kinin receptor, encoded by the leucokinin receptor gene, LKR, is expressed in DH44 neurons as well as in stellate cells of the Malpighian tubules. LKR knockdown in DH44-expressing neurons reduces Malpighian tubule-specific LKR, suggesting interactions between DH44 and LK signalling pathways. Finally, although a role for DK in desiccation tolerance was not defined, we demonstrate a novel role for Malpighian tubule cell-specific LKR in starvation tolerance. Starvation increases gene expression of epithelial LKR. Also, Malpighian tubule stellate cell-specific knockdown of LKR significantly reduced starvation tolerance, demonstrating a role for neuropeptide signalling during starvation stress. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Analysis of accelerated degradation of a HT-PEM fuel cell caused by cell reversal in fuel starvation condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2015-01-01

    This paper reports an accelerated degradation test of a high temperature PEM fuel cell under repeated H2 starvation condition. The H2 stoichiometry is cycled between 3.0 and 0.8 every 2 min during the test. The experimental results show that the polarity of the fuel cell is reversed under H2...... in the charge transfer resistance and ohmic resistance, respectively. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that there is an increase in the size of the platinum particle size on both anode and cathode....

  1. Regulation of ascorbic acid and of xylulose synthesis in liver extracts. The effect of starvation in various animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stirpe, F.; Comporti, M.; Della Corte, E.

    1965-01-01

    1. The effect of starvation on the synthesis of ascorbic acid and of xylulose from glucuronolactone and from gulonate has been studied with liver extracts from cats, rabbits, hamsters, mice and guinea pigs. 2. The synthesis of ascorbic acid from glucuronolactone is decreased in all species except cats, and that from gulonate is decreased in hamsters and mice only. 3. The synthesis of xylulose from glucuronolactone was decreased in all species except cats and mice, whereas from gulonate it was enhanced in all the species examined. PMID:14340085

  2. Surviving Sepsis Campaign

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rhodes, Andrew; Evans, Laura E; Alhazzani, Waleed

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To provide an update to "Surviving Sepsis Campaign Guidelines for Management of Sepsis and Septic Shock: 2012". DESIGN: A consensus committee of 55 international experts representing 25 international organizations was convened. Nominal groups were assembled at key international meeting...

  3. Occurrence of Shewanella algae in Danish coastal water and effects of water temperature and culture conditions on its survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gram, Lone; Bundvad, Anemone; Melchiorsen, Jette

    1999-01-01

    The marine bacterium Shewanella algae, which was identified as the cause of human cases of bacteremia and ear infections in Denmark in the summers of 1994 and 1995, was detected in seawater only during the months (July, August, September, and October) when the water temperature was above 13 degrees...... in 100% survival over a period of 1 to 2 months. The cold protection offered by this transition (starvation) probably explains the ability of the organism to persist in Danish seawater despite very low (0 to 1 degrees C) winter water temperatures. The culturable counts of samples kept at 2 degrees C...

  4. Analysis of p53 Transactivation Domain Mutants Reveals Acad11 as a Metabolic Target Important for p53 Pro-Survival Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadi Jiang

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The p53 tumor suppressor plays a key role in maintaining cellular integrity. In response to diverse stress signals, p53 can trigger apoptosis to eliminate damaged cells or cell-cycle arrest to enable cells to cope with stress and survive. However, the transcriptional networks underlying p53 pro-survival function are incompletely understood. Here, we show that in oncogenic-Ras-expressing cells, p53 promotes oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS and cell survival upon glucose starvation. Analysis of p53 transcriptional activation domain mutants reveals that these responses depend on p53 transactivation function. Using gene expression profiling and ChIP-seq analysis, we identify several p53-inducible fatty acid metabolism-related genes. One such gene, Acad11, encoding a protein involved in fatty acid oxidation, is required for efficient OXPHOS and cell survival upon glucose starvation. This study provides new mechanistic insight into the pro-survival function of p53 and suggests that targeting this pathway may provide a strategy for therapeutic intervention based on metabolic perturbation.

  5. Nondiabetic ketoacidosis in a pregnant woman due to acute starvation with concomitant influenza A (H1N1) and respiratory failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skalley, G; Rodríguez-Villar, S

    2018-02-27

    Threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to short-term starvation nondiabetic ketoacidosis is rarely reported. Severe ketoacidosis due to starvation itself is a rare occurrence, and more so in pregnancy with a concomitant stressful clinical situation. This case report presents a nondiabetic woman admitted in intensive care for respiratory failure type 1 during the third trimester of pregnancy with a severe metabolic acidosis refractory to medical treatment. We diagnosed the patient with acute starvation ketoacidosis based on her history and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis after doing a rigorous analysis of her acid-base disorder. Crown Copyright © 2018. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Survival strategies in semi-arid climate for isohydric and anisohydric species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerin, M. F.; Gentine, P.; Uriarte, M.

    2013-12-01

    The understanding of survival strategies in dry land remains a challenging problem aiming at the interrelationship between local hydrology, plant physiology and climate. Carbon starvation and hydraulic failure are thought to be the two main factors leading to drought-induced mortality beside biotic perturbation. In order to better comprehend mortality the understanding of abiotic mechanisms triggering mortality is being studied in a tractable model for soil-plant-atmosphere continuum emphasizing the role of soil hydraulic properties, photosynthesis, embolism, leaf-gas exchange and climate. In particular the role of the frequency vs. the intensity of droughts is highlighted within such model. The analysis of the model included a differentiation between isohydric and anisohydric tree regulation and is supported by an extensive dataset of Pinion and Juniper growing in a semi-arid ecosystem. An objective of reduced number of parameters was approached with allometric equations to characterize tree's main traits and their hydraulic controls. Leaf area, sapwood area and tree's height are used to derive capacitance, conductance and photosynthetic abilities of the plant. A parameter sensitivity is performed highlighting the role of root:shoot ratio, rooting depth, photosynthetic capacity, quantum efficiency, and most importantly water use efficiency. Analytic development emphasizes two regimes of transpiration/photosynthesis denoted as stage-I (no embolism) and stage-II (embolism dominated) in analogy with stage I-stage II treminology for evaporation (Phillip,1957). Anisohydric species tend to remain in stage-I during which they still can assimilate carbon at full potential thus avoiding carbon starvation. Isohydric species tend to remain longer in stage-II. The effects of drought intensity/frequency on those 2 stages are described. Figure: sensitivity of Piñons stage 1 (top left), stage 2 (top right), and total cavitation duration (sum of stage 1 and stage 2 - bottom left

  7. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeslin-Findeklee, Fabian; Becker, Martin A; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, Walter J

    2015-07-01

    Nitrogen (N) efficiency of winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) line-cultivars (cvs.), defined as high grain yield under N limitation, has been primarily attributed to maintained N uptake during reproductive growth (N uptake efficiency) in combination with delayed senescence of the older leaves accompanied with maintained photosynthetic capacity (functional stay-green). However, it is not clear whether genotypic variation in N starvation-induced leaf senescence is due to leaf-inherent factors and/or governed by root-mediated signals. Therefore, the N-efficient and stay-green cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex were reciprocally grafted with the N-inefficient and early-senescing cvs. NPZ-2 and Capitol, respectively and grown in hydroponics. The senescence status of older leaves after 12 days of N starvation assessed by SPAD, photosynthesis and the expression of the senescence-specific cysteine protease gene SAG12-1 revealed that the stay-green phenotype of the cvs. NPZ-1 and Apex under N starvation was primarily under the control of leaf-inherent factors. The same four cultivars were submitted to N starvation for up to 12 days in a time-course experiment. The specific leaf contents of biologically active and inactive cytokinins (CKs) and the expression of genes involved in CK homeostasis revealed that under N starvation leaves of early-senescing cultivars were characterized by inactivation of biologically active CKs, whereas in stay-green cultivars synthesis, activation, binding of and response to biologically active CKs were favoured. These results suggest that the homeostasis of biologically active CKs was the predominant leaf-inherent factor for cultivar differences in N starvation-induced leaf senescence and thus N efficiency. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. Phospho-Rasputin Stabilization by Sec16 Is Required for Stress Granule Formation upon Amino Acid Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Aguilera-Gomez

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Most cellular stresses induce protein translation inhibition and stress granule formation. Here, using Drosophila S2 cells, we investigate the role of G3BP/Rasputin in this process. In contrast to arsenite treatment, where dephosphorylated Ser142 Rasputin is recruited to stress granules, we find that, upon amino acid starvation, only the phosphorylated Ser142 form is recruited. Furthermore, we identify Sec16, a component of the endoplasmic reticulum exit site, as a Rasputin interactor and stabilizer. Sec16 depletion results in Rasputin degradation and inhibition of stress granule formation. However, in the absence of Sec16, pharmacological stabilization of Rasputin is not enough to rescue the assembly of stress granules. This is because Sec16 specifically interacts with phosphorylated Ser142 Rasputin, the form required for stress granule formation upon amino acid starvation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that stress granule formation is fine-tuned by specific signaling cues that are unique to each stress. These results also expand the role of Sec16 as a stress response protein.

  9. Phospho-Rasputin Stabilization by Sec16 Is Required for Stress Granule Formation upon Amino Acid Starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; Zacharogianni, Margarita; van Oorschot, Marinke M; Genau, Heide; Grond, Rianne; Veenendaal, Tineke; Sinsimer, Kristina S; Gavis, Elizabeth R; Behrends, Christian; Rabouille, Catherine

    2017-07-25

    Most cellular stresses induce protein translation inhibition and stress granule formation. Here, using Drosophila S2 cells, we investigate the role of G3BP/Rasputin in this process. In contrast to arsenite treatment, where dephosphorylated Ser142 Rasputin is recruited to stress granules, we find that, upon amino acid starvation, only the phosphorylated Ser142 form is recruited. Furthermore, we identify Sec16, a component of the endoplasmic reticulum exit site, as a Rasputin interactor and stabilizer. Sec16 depletion results in Rasputin degradation and inhibition of stress granule formation. However, in the absence of Sec16, pharmacological stabilization of Rasputin is not enough to rescue the assembly of stress granules. This is because Sec16 specifically interacts with phosphorylated Ser142 Rasputin, the form required for stress granule formation upon amino acid starvation. Taken together, these results demonstrate that stress granule formation is fine-tuned by specific signaling cues that are unique to each stress. These results also expand the role of Sec16 as a stress response protein. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Balancing the risks of hydraulic failure and carbon starvation: a twig scale analysis in declining Scots pine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Yann; Torres-Ruiz, José M; Poyatos, Rafael; Martinez-Vilalta, Jordi; Meir, Patrick; Cochard, Hervé; Mencuccini, Maurizio

    2015-12-01

    Understanding physiological processes involved in drought-induced mortality is important for predicting the future of forests and for modelling the carbon and water cycles. Recent research has highlighted the variable risks of carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in drought-exposed trees. However, little is known about the specific responses of leaves and supporting twigs, despite their critical role in balancing carbon acquisition and water loss. Comparing healthy (non-defoliated) and unhealthy (defoliated) Scots pine at the same site, we measured the physiological variables involved in regulating carbon and water resources. Defoliated trees showed different responses to summer drought compared with non-defoliated trees. Defoliated trees maintained gas exchange while non-defoliated trees reduced photosynthesis and transpiration during the drought period. At the branch scale, very few differences were observed in non-structural carbohydrate concentrations between health classes. However, defoliated trees tended to have lower water potentials and smaller hydraulic safety margins. While non-defoliated trees showed a typical response to drought for an isohydric species, the physiology appears to be driven in defoliated trees by the need to maintain carbon resources in twigs. These responses put defoliated trees at higher risk of branch hydraulic failure and help explain the interaction between carbon starvation and hydraulic failure in dying trees. © 2015 The Authors. Plant, Cell & Environment published by JohnWiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Drosophila tsRNAs preferentially suppress general translation machinery via antisense pairing and participate in cellular starvation response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Shiqi; He, Feng; Luo, Junjie; Dou, Shengqian; Wang, Yirong; Guo, Annan; Lu, Jian

    2018-03-14

    Transfer RNA-derived small RNAs (tsRNAs) are an emerging class of small RNAs, yet their regulatory roles have not been well understood. Here we studied the molecular mechanisms and consequences of tsRNA-mediated regulation in Drosophila. By analyzing 495 public small RNA libraries, we demonstrate that most tsRNAs are conserved, prevalent and abundant in Drosophila. By carrying out mRNA sequencing and ribosome profiling of S2 cells transfected with single-stranded tsRNA mimics and mocks, we show that tsRNAs recognize target mRNAs through conserved complementary sequence matching and suppress target genes by translational inhibition. The target prediction suggests that tsRNAs preferentially suppress translation of the key components of the general translation machinery, which explains how tsRNAs inhibit the global mRNA translation. Serum starvation experiments confirm tsRNAs participate in cellular starvation responses by preferential targeting the ribosomal proteins and translational initiation or elongation factors. Knock-down of AGO2 in S2 cells under normal and starved conditions reveals a dependence of the tsRNA-mediated regulation on AGO2. We also validated the repressive effects of representative tsRNAs on cellular global translation and specific targets with luciferase reporter assays. Our study suggests the tsRNA-mediated regulation might be crucial for the energy homeostasis and the metabolic adaptation in the cellular systems.

  12. Mutations in the NOT Genes or in the Translation Machinery Similarly Display Increased Resistance to Histidine Starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine A. Collart

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The NOT genes encode subunits of the conserved Ccr4-Not complex, a global regulator of gene expression, and in particular of mRNA metabolism. They were originally identified in a selection for increased resistance to histidine starvation in the yeast S. cerevisiae. Recent work indicated that the Not5 subunit, ortholog of mammalian CNOT3, determines global translation levels by defining binding of the Ccr4-Not scaffold protein Not1 to ribosomal mRNAs during transcription. This is needed for optimal translation of ribosomal proteins. In this work we searched for mutations in budding yeast that were resistant to histidine starvation using the same selection that originally led to the isolation of the NOT genes. We thereby isolated mutations in ribosome-related genes. This common phenotype of ribosome mutants and not mutants is in good agreement with the positive role of the Not proteins for translation. In this regard, it is interesting that frequent mutations in RPL5 and RPL10 or in CNOT3 have been observed to accumulate in adult T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL. This suggests that in metazoans a common function implicating ribosome subunits and CNOT3 plays a role in the development of cancer. In this perspective we suggest that the Ccr4-Not complex, according to translation levels and fidelity, could itself be involved in the regulation of amino acid biosynthesis levels. We discuss how this could explain why mutations have been identified in many cancers.

  13. Effective inhibition of lytic development of bacteriophages lambda, P1 and T4 by starvation of their host, Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łoś, Marcin; Golec, Piotr; Łoś, Joanna M; Weglewska-Jurkiewicz, Anna; Czyz, Agata; Wegrzyn, Alicja; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz; Neubauer, Peter

    2007-02-26

    Bacteriophage infections of bacterial cultures cause serious problems in genetic engineering and biotechnology. They are dangerous not only because of direct effects on the currently infected cultures, i.e. their devastation, but also due to a high probability of spreading the phage progeny throughout a whole laboratory or plant, which causes a real danger for further cultivations. Therefore, a simple method for quick inhibition of phage development after detection of bacterial culture infection should be very useful. Here, we demonstrate that depletion of a carbon source from the culture medium, which provokes starvation of bacterial cells, results in rapid inhibition of lytic development of three Escherichia coli phages, lambda, P1 and T4. Since the effect was similar for three different phages, it seems that it may be a general phenomenon. Moreover, similar effects were observed in flask cultures and in chemostats. Bacteriophage lytic development can be inhibited efficiently by carbon source limitation in bacterial cultures. Thus, if bacteriophage contamination is detected, starvation procedures may be recommended to alleviate deleterious effects of phage infection on the culture. We believe that this strategy, in combination with the use of automated and sensitive bacteriophage biosensors, may be employed in the fermentation laboratory practice to control phage outbreaks in bioprocesses more effectively.

  14. Biotin starvation causes mitochondrial protein hyperacetylation and partial rescue by the SIRT3-like deacetylase Hst4p

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, Christian T.; Sylvestersen, Kathrine B.; Young, Clifford; Larsen, Sara C.; Poulsen, Jon W.; Andersen, Marianne A.; Palmqvist, Eva A.; Hey-Mogensen, Martin; Jensen, Per B.; Treebak, Jonas T.; Lisby, Michael; Nielsen, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The essential vitamin biotin is a covalent and tenaciously attached prosthetic group in several carboxylases that play important roles in the regulation of energy metabolism. Here we describe increased acetyl-CoA levels and mitochondrial hyperacetylation as downstream metabolic effects of biotin deficiency. Upregulated mitochondrial acetylation sites correlate with the cellular deficiency of the Hst4p deacetylase, and a biotin-starvation-induced accumulation of Hst4p in mitochondria supports a role for Hst4p in lowering mitochondrial acetylation. We show that biotin starvation and knockout of Hst4p cause alterations in cellular respiration and an increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS). These results suggest that Hst4p plays a pivotal role in biotin metabolism and cellular energy homeostasis, and supports that Hst4p is a functional yeast homologue of the sirtuin deacetylase SIRT3. With biotin deficiency being involved in various metabolic disorders, this study provides valuable insight into the metabolic effects biotin exerts on eukaryotic cells. PMID:26158509

  15. Proteomic Analysis Provides New Insights in Phosphorus Homeostasis Subjected to Pi (Inorganic Phosphate Starvation in Tomato Plants (Solanum lycopersicum L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sowbiya Muneer

    Full Text Available Phosphorus is a major nutrient acquired by plants via high-affinity inorganic phosphate (Pi transporters. To determine the adaptation and homeostasis strategy to Pi starvation, we compared the proteome analysis of tomato leaves that were treated with and without Pi (as KH2PO4 for 10 days. Among 600 reproducible proteins on 2-DE gels 46 of them were differentially expressed. These proteins were involved in major metabolic pathways, including photosynthesis, transcriptional/translational regulations, carbohydrate/energy metabolism, protein synthesis, defense response, and other secondary metabolism. The results also showed that the reduction in photosynthetic pigments lowered P content under -Pi treatments. Furthermore, high-affinity Pi transporters (lePT1 and lePT2 expressed in higher amounts under -Pi treatments. Also, the accumulation of Pi transporters was observed highly in the epidermis and palisade parenchyma under +Pi treatments compared to -Pi treatments. Our data suggested that tomato plants developed reactive oxygen species (ROS scavenging mechanisms to cope with low Pi content, including the up-regulation of proteins mostly involved in important metabolic pathways. Moreover, Pi-starved tomato plants increased their internal Pi utilization efficiency by increasing the Pi transporter genes and their rational localization. These results thus provide imperative information about how tomato plants respond to Pi starvation and its homeostasis.

  16. Photo-acclimation of the hermatypic coral Stylophora pistillata while subjected to either starvation or food provisioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titlyanov, E A.; Titlyanova, T V.; Yamazato, K; van Woesik, R

    2001-03-15

    This study investigated the photo-acclimation capacity of the coral Stylophora pistillata (Esper). Outer branches of coral colonies, taken from 2 m, were subjected to 90, 20, or 3% of incident surface photosynthetic active radiation (PAR(0)), or kept in total darkness. The corals were maintained either in filtered seawater (i.e., under starvation), or in seawater that had daily additions of zooplankton (rotifers). The experiments were maintained for 31 days. Zooxanthellae population densities and chlorophyll concentrations increased in S. pistillata fragments subjected to 20 and 3% PAR(0). The zooxanthellae densities decreased after 6 days in corals kept in total darkness, although chlorophyll concentrations remained higher. Corals that were fed and subjected to 90% PAR(0) showed lower degrading zooxanthellae frequencies, higher photosynthetic and respiration rates, and higher chlorophyll concentrations than corals in the same light regime under starvation. Complete acclimation to dim (20% PAR(0)) and low (3% PAR(0)) light was only apparent for corals fed with zooplankton. Changes in zooxanthellae population densities occurred through differential rates of zooxanthellae division and degradation.

  17. Effective inhibition of lytic development of bacteriophages λ, P1 and T4 by starvation of their host, Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Węgrzyn Alicja

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bacteriophage infections of bacterial cultures cause serious problems in genetic engineering and biotechnology. They are dangerous not only because of direct effects on the currently infected cultures, i.e. their devastation, but also due to a high probability of spreading the phage progeny throughout a whole laboratory or plant, which causes a real danger for further cultivations. Therefore, a simple method for quick inhibition of phage development after detection of bacterial culture infection should be very useful. Results Here, we demonstrate that depletion of a carbon source from the culture medium, which provokes starvation of bacterial cells, results in rapid inhibition of lytic development of three Escherichia coli phages, λ, P1 and T4. Since the effect was similar for three different phages, it seems that it may be a general phenomenon. Moreover, similar effects were observed in flask cultures and in chemostats. Conclusion Bacteriophage lytic development can be inhibited efficiently by carbon source limitation in bacterial cultures. Thus, if bacteriophage contamination is detected, starvation procedures may be recommended to alleviate deleterious effects of phage infection on the culture. We believe that this strategy, in combination with the use of automated and sensitive bacteriophage biosensors, may be employed in the fermentation laboratory practice to control phage outbreaks in bioprocesses more effectively.

  18. Effects of starvation and refeeding on the hematological and serum parameters and body proximate composition of Caspian salmon (Salmo trutta caspius) fingerligs

    OpenAIRE

    Zaefarian, A.; Yeganeh, S.; Oraji, H.; Jani khalili, Kh.

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the effects of periods of starvation and refeeding on some hematological, serum parameters and whole body proximate composition in Caspian salmon (Salmo trutta caspius). 240 samples of the Caspian salmon with an average weight of 13.73 ± 0.63 g were kept in 300 liter polyethylene tanks. Samples were fed twice a day with Rainbow trout commercial feed to the point of satiation. This experiment lasted for 10 weeks with control (without starvation) and 3 st...

  19. N-Methylniphatyne A, a New 3-Alkylpyridine Alkaloid as an Inhibitor of the Cancer Cells Adapted to Nutrient Starvation, from an Indonesian Marine Sponge of Xestospongia sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Masayoshi; Kamiya, Kentaro; Shin, Dayoung; Matsumoto, Hirokazu; Hisa, Tomoya; Setiawan, Andi; Kotoku, Naoyuki; Kobayashi, Motomasa

    2016-01-01

    In the course of searching for selective growth inhibitors of the cancer cells adapted to nutrient starvation, a new 3-alkylpyridine alkaloid named N-methylniphatyne A (1) was isolated from an Indonesian marine sponge of Xestospongia sp. The chemical structure of 1 was determined on the basis of the spectroscopic analysis and comparison with the synthesized 1 and its analogues. Compound 1 showed the cytotoxic activity against PANC-1 cells under the condition of glucose starvation with IC50 value of 16 µM, whereas no growth-inhibition was observed up to 100 µM under the general culture conditions.

  20. First experimental evidence for carbon starvation at warm temperatures in epiphytic orchids of tropical cloud forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Guenter; Roemer, Helena; Fioroni, Tiffany; Olmedo, Inayat; Kahmen, Ansgar

    2017-04-01

    speed of the temperature increase. Most importantly, the decline of photosynthesis was accompanied by a rapid and complete depletion of leaf starch reserves followed by the prompt death of the plants. We therefore conclude, that temperature increases to 29 - 33°C lead to carbon starvation in epiphytic orchids of tropical cloud forests that is driven by the break-down of photosynthesis. The physiological reason for the observed dysfunction of photosynthesis at only moderately warm temperatures are currently not well understood. Within an ongoing phytotron study, we thus are aiming to confirm and deepen the findings in the genus Dracula in Masdevallia, another orchid genera native and endemic to tropical cloud forests.

  1. Unique Flexibility in Energy Metabolism Allows Mycobacteria to Combat Starvation and Hypoxia

    OpenAIRE

    Berney, Michael; Cook, Gregory M.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacteria are a group of obligate aerobes that require oxygen for growth, but paradoxically have the ability to survive and metabolize under hypoxia. The mechanisms responsible for this metabolic plasticity are unknown. Here, we report on the adaptation of Mycobacterium smegmatis to slow growth rate and hypoxia using carbon-limited continuous culture. When M. smegmatis is switched from a 4.6 h to a 69 h doubling time at a constant oxygen saturation of 50%, the cells respond through the dow...

  2. Network ties and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Acheampong, George; Narteh, Bedman; Rand, John

    2017-01-01

    of the SCPFs in Ghana. Distribution ties are associated with negative survival chances and this is not even reversed if the human capital of the owner increases although managers with higher human capital and higher distribution ties experience positive effects. Industry ties are associated with positive ties...

  3. Education for Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrich, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article provides a brief overview of current approaches to education and concludes that none of these is sufficient to meet the challenges that now face the human race. It argues instead for a new concept of education for survival. (Contains 1 note.)

  4. Multinationals and plant survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2010-01-01

    -parametric estimates show that domestic MNE plants are more likely to exit the market than other plants, also when controlling for plant-specific differences. Finally, foreign presence in the market seems to have had a negative impact on the survival rate of plants in non-exporting non- MNEs, but not to have affected...

  5. Artists’ Survival Rate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Trine; Jensen, Søren

    2017-01-01

    The literature of cultural economics generally finds that an artistic education has no significant impact on artists’ income and careers in the arts. In our research, we have readdressed this question by looking at the artists’ survival in the arts occupations. The results show that an artistic...... education has a significant impact on artists’ careers in the arts and we find important industry differences....

  6. Survivability via Control Objectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CAMPBELL,PHILIP L.

    2000-08-11

    Control objectives open an additional front in the survivability battle. A given set of control objectives is valuable if it represents good practices, it is complete (it covers all the necessary areas), and it is auditable. CobiT and BS 7799 are two examples of control objective sets.

  7. Flexible survival regression modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cortese, Giuliana; Scheike, Thomas H; Martinussen, Torben

    2009-01-01

    Regression analysis of survival data, and more generally event history data, is typically based on Cox's regression model. We here review some recent methodology, focusing on the limitations of Cox's regression model. The key limitation is that the model is not well suited to represent time-varyi...

  8. Education for Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, James E., Jr.

    In this address, James E. Allen, Jr., Assistant Secretary for Education and U.S. Commissioner of Education, discusses the relationship of education to the problem of ecological destruction. He states that the solutions to the problems of air, water, and soil pollution may be found in redirected education. This "education for survival" can serve to…

  9. A role for auxin redistribution in the responses of the root system architecture to phosphate starvation in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacry, Philippe; Canivenc, Geneviève; Muller, Bertrand; Azmi, Abdelkrim; Van Onckelen, Harry; Rossignol, Michel; Doumas, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    The changes in root system architecture (RSA) triggered by phosphate (P) deprivation were studied in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants grown for 14 d on 1 mM or 3 microM P. Two different temporal phases were observed in the response of RSA to low P. First, lateral root (LR) development was promoted between days 7 and 11 after germination, but, after day 11, all root growth parameters were negatively affected, leading to a general reduction of primary root (PR) and LR lengths and of LR density. Low P availability had contrasting effects on various stages of LR development, with a marked inhibition of primordia initiation but a strong stimulation of activation of the initiated primordia. The involvement of auxin signaling in these morphological changes was investigated in wild-type plants treated with indole-3-acetic acid or 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid and in axr4-1, aux1-7, and eir1-1 mutants. Most effects of low P on RSA were dramatically modified in the mutants or hormone-treated wild-type plants. This shows that auxin plays a major role in the P starvation-induced changes of root development. From these data, we hypothesize that several aspects of the RSA response to low P are triggered by local modifications of auxin concentration. A model is proposed that postulates that P starvation results in (1) an overaccumulation of auxin in the apex of the PR and in young LRs, (2) an overaccumulation of auxin or a change in sensitivity to auxin in the lateral primordia, and (3) a decrease in auxin concentration in the lateral primordia initiation zone of the PR and in old laterals. Measurements of local changes in auxin concentrations induced by low P, either by direct quantification or by biosensor expression pattern (DR5::beta-glucuronidase reporter gene), are in line with these hypotheses. Furthermore, the observation that low P availability mimicked the action of auxin in promoting LR development in the alf3 mutant confirmed that P starvation stimulates

  10. Phosphate starvation of maize inhibits lateral root formation and alters gene expression in the lateral root primordium zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Zhaoxia

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phosphorus (P is an essential macronutrient for all living organisms. Maize (Zea mays is an important human food, animal feed and energy crop throughout the world, and enormous quantities of phosphate fertilizer are required for maize cultivation. Thus, it is important to improve the efficiency of the use of phosphate fertilizer for maize. Results In this study, we analyzed the maize root response to phosphate starvation and performed a transcriptomic analysis of the 1.0-1.5 cm lateral root primordium zone. In the growth of plants, the root-to-shoot ratio (R/L was reduced in both low-phosphate (LP and sufficient-phosphate (SP solutions, but the ratio (R/L exhibited by the plants in the LP solution was higher than that of the SP plants. The growth of primary roots was slightly promoted after 6 days of phosphate starvation, whereas the numbers of lateral roots and lateral root primordia were significantly reduced, and these differences were increased when associated with the stress caused by phosphate starvation. Among the results of a transcriptomic analysis of the maize lateral root primordium zone, there were two highlights: 1 auxin signaling participated in the response and the modification of root morphology under low-phosphate conditions, which may occur via local concentration changes due to the biosynthesis and transport of auxin, and LOB domain proteins may be an intermediary between auxin signaling and root morphology; and 2 the observed retardation of lateral root development was the result of co-regulation of DNA replication, transcription, protein synthesis and degradation and cell growth. Conclusions These results indicated that maize roots show a different growth pattern than Arabidopsis under low-phosphate conditions, as the latter species has been observed to halt primary root growth when the root tip comes into contact with low-phosphate media. Moreover, our findings enrich our understanding of plant

  11. A multi-pronged investigation into the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on fed-batch CHO cell culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Yuzhou; Jimenez Del Val, Ioscani; Müller, Christian

    2015-01-01

    In this study, omics-based analysis tools were used to explore the effect of glucose starvation and culture duration on monoclonal antibody (mAb) production in fed-batch CHO cell culture to gain better insight into how these parameters can be controlled to ensure optimal mAb productivity and qual...

  12. Differences between winter oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.) cultivars in nitrogen starvation-induced leaf senescence are governed by leaf-inherent rather than root-derived signals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Koeslin-Findeklee, F.; Becker, M. A.; van der Graaff, E.; Roitsch, Thomas; Horst, W. J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 66, č. 13 (2015), s. 3669-3681 ISSN 0022-0957 Institutional support: RVO:67179843 Keywords : Brassica napus * cytokinins * genotypic differences * leaf senescence * nitrogen efficiency * nitrogen starvation * reciprocal grafting * stay-green Subject RIV: EH - Ecology, Behaviour Impact factor: 5.677, year: 2015

  13. Varying response of the concentration and content of soybean seed mineral elements, carbohydrates, organic acids, amino acids, protein, and oil to phosphorus starvation and CO2 enrichment

    Science.gov (United States)

    A detailed investigation of the concentration (g-1 seed weight) and content (g plant-1) of seed mineral elements and metabolic profile under phosphorus (P) starvation at ambient (aCO2) and elevated carbon dioxide (eCO2) in soybean is limited. Soybean plants were grown in a controlled environment at ...

  14. Effects of Starvation and Thermal Stress on the Thermal Tolerance of Silkworm, Bombyx mori: Existence of Trade-offs and Cross-Tolerances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mir, A H; Qamar, A

    2017-09-27

    Organisms, in nature, are often subjected to multiple stressors, both biotic and abiotic. Temperature and starvation are among the main stressors experienced by organisms in their developmental cycle and the responses to these stressors may share signaling pathways, which affects the way these responses are manifested. Temperature is a major factor governing the performance of ectothermic organisms in ecosystems worldwide and, therefore, the thermal tolerance is a central issue in the thermobiology of these organisms. Here, we investigated the effects of starvation as well as mild heat and cold shocks on the thermal tolerance of the larvae of silkworm, Bombyx mori (Linnaeus). Starvation acted as a meaningful or positive stressor as it improved cold tolerance, measured as chill coma recovery time (CCRT), but, at the same time, it acted as a negative stressor and impaired the heat tolerance, measured as heat knockdown time (HKT). In the case of heat tolerance, starvation negated the positive effects of both mild cold as well as mild heat shocks and thus indicated the existence of trade-off between these stressors. Both mild heat and cold shocks improved the thermal tolerance, but the effects were more prominent when the indices were measured in response to a stressor of same type, i.e., a mild cold shock improved the cold tolerance more than the heat tolerance and vice versa. This improvement in thermal tolerance by both mild heat as well as cold shocks indicated the possibility of cross-tolerance between these stressors.

  15. Glucose-induced and nitrogen-starvation-induced peroxisome degradation are distinct processes in Hansenula polymorpha that involve both common and unique genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bellu, Anna Rita; Kram, Anita M.; Kiel, Jan A. K. W.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.

    In the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha non-selective autophagy, induced by nitrogen starvation, results in the turnover of cytoplasmic components, including peroxisomes. We show that the uptake of these components occurs by invagination of the vacuolar membrane without their prior

  16. Polioencephalomalacia and Heart Failure Secondary to Presumptive Thiamine Deficiency, Hepatic Lipidosis, and Starvation in 2 Abandoned Siamese Cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anholt, H; Himsworth, C; Britton, A

    2016-07-01

    Two 4-year-old spayed female Siamese cats were seized by the British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals after confinement to an abandoned housing unit without food for 9 weeks. One cat was found dead, and the second was euthanized within 24 hours due to neurologic deterioration despite therapy. Polioencephalomalacia of the caudal colliculus, hepatic lipidosis, cachexia, and congestive heart failure with cardiomyocyte atrophy were identified in both cats through postmortem examination and attributed to a prolonged period of starvation. Brain lesions were likely the result of thiamine deficiency (Chastek paralysis), which can be associated with both malnutrition and liver disease. This case highlights the importance of thiamine supplementation during realimentation of cats with hepatic lipidosis. Heart failure resulting from cachexia may have contributed to the death of the first cat and the morbidity of the second cat. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. The frontline antibiotic vancomycin induces a zinc starvation response in bacteria by binding to Zn(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarkan, Ashraf; Macklyne, Heather-Rose; Truman, Andrew W.; Hesketh, Andrew R.; Hong, Hee-Jeon

    2016-01-01

    Vancomycin is a front-line antibiotic used for the treatment of nosocomial infections, particularly those caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Despite its clinical importance the global effects of vancomycin exposure on bacterial physiology are poorly understood. In a previous transcriptomic analysis we identified a number of Zur regulon genes which were highly but transiently up-regulated by vancomycin in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we show that vancomycin also induces similar zinc homeostasis systems in a range of other bacteria and demonstrate that vancomycin binds to Zn(II) in vitro. This implies that vancomycin treatment sequesters zinc from bacterial cells thereby triggering a Zur-dependent zinc starvation response. The Kd value of the binding between vancomycin and Zn(II) was calculated using a novel fluorometric assay, and NMR was used to identify the binding site. These findings highlight a new biologically relevant aspect of the chemical property of vancomycin as a zinc chelator. PMID:26797186

  18. A maize gene encoding an NADPH binding enzyme highly homologous to isoflavone reductases is activated in response to sulfur starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrucco, S; Bolchi, A; Foroni, C; Percudani, R; Rossi, G L; Ottonello, S

    1996-01-01

    we isolated a novel gene that is selectively induced both in roots and shoots in response to sulfur starvation. This gene encodes a cytosolic, monomeric protein of 33 kD that selectively binds NADPH. The predicted polypeptide is highly homologous ( > 70%) to leguminous isoflavone reductases (IFRs), but the maize protein (IRL for isoflavone reductase-like) belongs to a novel family of proteins present in a variety of plants. Anti-IRL antibodies specifically recognize IFR polypeptides, yet the maize protein is unable to use various isoflavonoids as substrates. IRL expression is correlated closely to glutathione availability: it is persistently induced in seedlings whose glutathione content is about fourfold lower than controls, and it is down-regulated rapidly when control levels of glutathione are restored. This glutathione-dependent regulation indicates that maize IRL may play a crucial role in the establishment of a thiol-independent response to oxidative stress under glutathione shortage conditions.

  19. Effects of starvation on protein synthesis and nucleic acid metabolism in the muscle of the barred sand bass Paralabrax nebulifer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lowery, M.S.

    1987-01-01

    Starvation induced different protein synthesis responses in red and white muscle of the barred sand bass Paralabrax nebulifer. Red muscle had /sup 14/C-leucine incorporation rates into total protein which were several times higher than white muscle in both the fed and starved states. Muscle was separated into a myofibrillar fraction consisting of the structural proteins and a sarcoplasmic fraction consisting of soluble proteins. Synthesis of the myofibrillar fraction of white muscle decreased by 90%, while red muscle myofibrillar synthesis remained essentially unchanged. Changes in the labeling of several enzymes purified from the sarcoplasmic fraction were different even though the overall loss of enzyme activity was similar, suggesting that changes in synthesis rates were important in maintaining appropriate relative enzyme concentrations.

  20. Does the expert witness fit the crime? Injury to a child by starvation--a dietitian's testimony.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloiber, Lydia L

    2004-01-01

    After the death of their four-month-old infant, the parents were charged with injury to a child by starvation. The medical examiner documented blunt force trauma and severe malnutrition at autopsy, but the cause of death was undetermined. The legal team hired a neonatal dietitian who was able to determine that impaired growth only occurred when the infant was in the care of his parents. This information, along with other testimony, established that the lack of nutrition compromised this infant's ability to grow and develop normally, and thus contributed to the infant's death. A jury found the father guilty of injury to a child with intent, and was sentenced to 50 years in prison. The mother agreed to a plea bargain serving 25 years. The purpose of this report is to offer insight, information, and facts from this case for the benefit of others.

  1. Experimental study of cell reversal of a high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell caused by H2 starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2015-01-01

    under different H2 stoichiometries below 1.0 and at different current loads. The experimental results show that the cell voltage decreases promptly when the H2 stoichiometry decreases to below 1.0. Negative cell voltage can be observed which indicates cell reversal. The local current density starts...... regions, decreasing along the flow channel direction, becoming the lowest in the downstream regions. In addition, the CO2 and even the O2 can be detected in the anode exhaust under fuel starvation conditions, confirming the occurring of carbon corrosion and water electrolysis reactions. With lower H2...... stoichiometry and higher current load, the cell voltage decrease rate is higher and the cell reversal is more severe. Higher CO2 concentration in anode exhaust is measured under these conditions, suggesting the degradation is more severe....

  2. Spectroscopic descriptors for dynamic changes of soluble microbial products from activated sludge at different biomass growth phases under prolonged starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Tahir; Cho, Jinwoo; Hur, Jin

    2017-10-15

    In this study, the spectroscopic indices of soluble microbial products (SMP) were explored using absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy to identify different distinctive biomass growth phases (i.e., exponential phase, pseudo-endogenous phase, and endogenous phase) and to describe the microbial activity of activated sludge in a batch type bioreactor under prolonged starvation. The optical descriptors, including UV absorption at 254 nm (UVA254), spectral slope, absorbance slope index (ASI), biological index (BIX), humification index (HIX), and the ratio of tryptophan-like to humic-like components (C1/C2), were examined to describe the dynamic changes in SMP. These indices were mostly associated with dissolved organic carbon (DOC) of SMPs and specific oxygen uptake rate (SOUR). Among those, ASI was the most strongly correlated with the SOUR data for the pseudo-endogenous and the endogenous periods. Although the three microbial phases were well discriminated using the spectral slope, BIX, and the C1/C2 ratio, the C1/C2 ratio can be suggested as the most preferable indicator as it can also trace the changes of the relative abundance of proteins to humic-like substances in SMPs. The suggested spectroscopic descriptors were reasonably explained by the general trends of decreased large-sized biopolymer fractions (e.g., proteins) and increased humic substrates (HS) with starvation time, which were detected by size exclusion chromatography. This study provides a novel insight into the strong potential of using optical descriptors to easily probe microbial status in biological treatment systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Capillary electrophoresis reveals polyamine metabolism modulation in Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis wild type and arginase knockout mutants under arginine starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castilho-Martins, Emerson A; Canuto, Gisele A B; Muxel, Sandra Marcia; da Silva, Maria Fernanda Laranjeira; Floeter-Winter, Lucile Maria; Del Aguila, Carmen; López-Gonzálvez, Ángeles; Barbas, Coral

    2015-07-23

    L-arginine is an essential amino acid in Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis metabolism. A key enzyme for parasite L-arginine metabolism is arginase (ARG) that uses arginine to produce urea and ornithine, a precursor of polyamine pathway guaranteeing parasite replication in both insect and mammal hosts. There is an alternative pathway to produce ornithine via L-proline and glutamate, but this mechanism is not described in Leishmania. In the mammal host, two enzymes can use L-arginine as substrate, the host ARG and the induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) that produces nitric oxide (NO). The competition between iNOS and both parasite and host ARG can favor the success of the infection or its control. Here, we established the metabolomic profile of the polyamine pathway of wild type (WT) L. (L.) amazonensis, submitted or not to L-arginine starvation, and compared to the ARG knockout mutant (arg - ). Our results indicated that arginine starvation induces a decrease in arginine, ornithine and putrescine, but we could not detect significative level changes of spermidine, spermidine or agmatine. However, the absence of ARG on the arg- mutant induced an increase of arginine and citrulline levels, but decreased the levels of ornithine and putrescine. Similarly to the WT arginine-starved parasites, the arg-parasites presented lower levels of proline when compared to the WT. This could be indicative of an alternative pathway to surpass the enzyme or its substrate absence. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  4. High flavonoid accompanied with high starch accumulation triggered by nutrient starvation in bioenergy crop duckweed (Landoltia punctata).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Xiang; Fang, Yang; Huang, Meng-Jun; Xiao, Yao; Liu, Yang; Ma, Xin-Rong; Zhao, Hai

    2017-02-15

    As the fastest growing plant, duckweed can thrive on anthropogenic wastewater. The purple-backed duckweed, Landoltia punctata, is rich in starch and flavonoids. However, the molecular biological basis of high flavonoid and low lignin content remains largely unknown, as does the best method to combine nutrients removed from sewage and the utilization value improvement of duckweed biomass. A combined omics study was performed to investigate the biosynthesis of flavonoid and the metabolic flux changes in L. punctata grown in different culture medium. Phenylalanine metabolism related transcripts were identified and carefully analyzed. Expression quantification results showed that most of the flavonoid biosynthetic transcripts were relatively highly expressed, while most lignin-related transcripts were poorly expressed or failed to be detected by iTRAQ based proteomic analyses. This explains why duckweed has a much lower lignin percentage and higher flavonoid content than most other plants. Growing in distilled water, expression of most flavonoid-related transcripts were increased, while most were decreased in uniconazole treated L. punctata (1/6 × Hoagland + 800 mg•L -1 uniconazole). When L. punctata was cultivated in full nutrient medium (1/6 × Hoagland), more than half of these transcripts were increased, however others were suppressed. Metabolome results showed that a total of 20 flavonoid compounds were separated by HPLC in L. punctata grown in uniconazole and full nutrient medium. The quantities of all 20 compounds were decreased by uniconazole, while 11 were increased and 6 decreased when grown in full nutrient medium. Nutrient starvation resulted in an obvious purple accumulation on the underside of each frond. The high flavonoid and low lignin content of L. punctata appears to be predominantly caused by the flavonoid-directed metabolic flux. Nutrient starvation is the best option to obtain high starch and flavonoid accumulation simultaneously

  5. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking achieved efficient cell cycle synchronization and altered the expression of p27, p53, bcl-2 in canine breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Jinjin; Sun, Dongdong; Yang, Chao; Wang, Yingxue; Sun, Sichao; Li, Qing; Bao, Jun; Liu, Yun

    2016-04-01

    Cell synchronization is an approach to obtain cell populations of the same stage, which is a prerequisite to studying the regulation of cell cycle progression in vivo. Serum starvation and thymidine double blocking (TdR) are two important practices in studying cell cycle synchronization. However, their effects on canine cancer cells as well as the regulatory mechanisms by these two methods are poorly understood. In this study, we determined the optimum conditions of serum starvation and TdR and their effects on cell cycle synchronization. We further explored the involvement of PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in the cell cycle synchronization by investigating the expression of three key genes (p27, p53 and bcl-2). Serum starvation resulted in a reversible cell cycle arrest and synchronously progress through G0/G1. The highest percentage of CHMm cells (87.47%) in G0/G1 stage was obtained after 42 h incubation with 0.5% fetal bovine serum (FBS). TdR double blocking could arrest 98.9% of CHMm cells in G1/S phase (0 h of release), and could arrest 93.74% of CHMm cells in S phase after 4h of release. We also found that the p27, p53, bcl-2 genes were most highly expressed in G0/G1 phase. Our current work revealed that serum starvation and TdR methods could achieve sufficient synchronization of CHMm cells. Moreover, the expression of p27, p53 and bcl-2 genes was related to cyclical movements and apoptosis. Our results will provide a new insight into cell cycle regulation and reprogramming of canine cancer cells induced by serum starvation and TdR blocking. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Antimicrobial efficacy of chlorine dioxide against Candida albicans in stationary and starvation phases in human root canal: An in-vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirur Krishnaraj Somayaji

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Candida albicans (C. albicans is the most commonly isolated fungal pathogen from dental root canal. C. albicans forms biofilm and develops resistance against root canal irrigants . This study determines the fungicidal efficacy of 13.8% chlorine dioxide in extracted human teeth at stationary and starvation phases of C. albicans. Materials and Methods: Teeth were decoronated and coronal portion of the roots were prepared into blocks, which were incubated at 37°C with C. albicans for five days. The samples were treated with chlorine dioxide for 12 and 20 minutes. Total of fifty blocks were taken in the study. Colony-forming units were counted in Sabourauds dextrose agar and scanning electron microscopic observation was done. Data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA and Bonferoni′s post hoc test. Results: Teeth at stationary phase (12 min showed mean colony count of 28,000 ± 1814 which is significantly (P < 0.001 less than control group. Teeth at starvation phase (12 min showed colony count of 65,600 ± 1912 which is also significantly (P < 0.001 less than control group. Teeth irrigated at stationary phase (20 min showed mean colony count of 23,400 ± 1776 (P < 0.001. Teeth irrigated at starvation phase (20 min showed mean colony count of 48,100 ± 1663 which is also significantly (P < 0.001 less than that of control group. Conclusion: Treatment of chlorine dioxide reduces the C. albicans count in root canals of extracted human teeth at stationary and starvation phases. Efficacy of chlorine dioxide against C. albicans is relatively higher in stationary phase than that of starvation phase.

  7. The Effect of Long Term Starvation on Galanin, Leptin, Thyroid Hormones, Insulin, Prolactin, Growth Hormone, Ghrelin and Factors Involved in Energy Metabolism in Adult Goats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neda ESKANDARZADE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Some hormonal disturbances have been demonstrated in starvation, but in ruminants such as goats, the role of galanin in adaptation to starvation or endocrine functions is not well studied. The present study was conducted to assess the effect of long term starvation on galanin, leptin, thyroid hormones, insulin, prolactin, growth hormone, ghrelin and factors involved in energy metabolism including HDL, Cholesterol, β-hydroxybutyrate, glucose, NEFA, TG and VLDL concentrations in adult goats. Eight non-lactating non-pregnant goats aged 4-5 years and BCS 3 were randomly divided to control and test groups. The animals were trained to eat their daily forage ration during a 10 day period. The experimental procedure was applied for 20 days, during which control group received 120% of maintenance energy, while the test group was supplied with 80% of maintenance energy for the first 10 days and with 40% of maintenance energy for another 10 days. Blood samples were collected at day 10 of training and 2, 4, 10, 12, 14 and 20 days after beginning of starvation. Blood parameters were measured according to standard procedures. No significant difference was observed in the concentrations of cholesterol, fT3, T4, T3, growth hormone, NEFA, insulin and ghrelin between control and test groups (P=0.05. There was significant difference in galanin, leptin, fT4, HDL, glucose, TG, VLDL and prolactin concentrations between control and test groups (P=0.05. Control of energy balance and the role of galanin in adaptation to long starvation or endocrine functions in goat are different from other species.

  8. How and When Do Insects Rely on Endogenous Protein and Lipid Resources during Lethal Bouts of Starvation? A New Application for 13C-Breath testing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marshall D McCue

    Full Text Available Most of our understanding about the physiology of fasting and starvation comes from studies of vertebrates; however, for ethical reasons, studies that monitor vertebrates through the lethal endpoint are scant. Insects are convenient models to characterize the comparative strategies used to cope with starvation because they have diverse life histories and have evolved under the omnipresent challenge of food limitation. Moreover, we can study the physiology of starvation through its natural endpoint. In this study we raised populations of five species of insects (adult grasshoppers, crickets, cockroaches, and larval beetles and moths on diets labeled with either 13C-palmitic acid or 13C-leucine to isotopically enrich the lipids or the proteins in their bodies, respectively. The insects were allowed to become postabsorptive and then starved. We periodically measured the δ13C of the exhaled breath to characterize how each species adjusted their reliance on endogenous lipids and proteins as energy sources. We found that starving insects employ a wide range of strategies for regulating lipid and protein oxidation. All of the insects except for the beetle larvae were capable of sharply reducing reliance on protein oxidation; however, this protein sparing strategy was usually unsustainable during the entire starvation period. All insects increased their reliance on lipid oxidation, but while some species (grasshoppers, cockroaches, and beetle larvae were still relying extensively on lipids at the time of death, other species (crickets and moth larvae allowed rates of lipid oxidation to return to prestarvation levels. Although lipids and proteins are critical metabolic fuels for both vertebrates and insects, insects apparently exhibit a much wider range of strategies for rationing these limited resources during starvation.

  9. Survival after blood transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamper-Jørgensen, Mads; Ahlgren, Martin; Rostgaard, Klaus

    2008-01-01

    of transfusion recipients in Denmark and Sweden followed for up to 20 years after their first blood transfusion. Main outcome measure was all-cause mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1,118,261 transfusion recipients were identified, of whom 62.0 percent were aged 65 years or older at the time of their first...... the SMR remained significantly 1.3-fold increased. CONCLUSION: The survival and relative mortality patterns among blood transfusion recipients were characterized with unprecedented detail and precision. Our results are relevant to assessments of the consequences of possible transfusion-transmitted disease......BACKGROUND: Long-term survival of transfusion recipients has rarely been studied. This study examines short- and long-term mortality among transfusion recipients and reports these as absolute rates and rates relative to the general population. STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS: Population-based cohort study...

  10. Caenorhabditis elegans battling starvation stress: low levels of ethanol prolong lifespan in L1 larvae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola V Castro

    Full Text Available The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans arrests development at the first larval stage if food is not present upon hatching. Larvae in this stage provide an excellent model for studying stress responses during development. We found that supplementing starved larvae with ethanol markedly extends their lifespan within this L1 diapause. The effects of ethanol-induced lifespan extension can be observed when the ethanol is added to the medium at any time between 0 and 10 days after hatching. The lowest ethanol concentration that extended lifespan was 1 mM (0.005%; higher concentrations to 68 mM (0.4% did not result in increased survival. In spite of their extended survival, larvae did not progress to the L2 stage. Supplementing starved cultures with n-propanol and n-butanol also extended lifespan, but methanol and isopropanol had no measurable effect. Mass spectrometry analysis of nematode fatty acids and amino acids revealed that L1 larvae can incorporate atoms from ethanol into both types of molecules. Based on these data, we suggest that ethanol supplementation may extend the lifespan of L1 larvae by either serving as a carbon and energy source and/or by inducing a stress response.

  11. Survival analysis models and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Xian

    2012-01-01

    Survival analysis concerns sequential occurrences of events governed by probabilistic laws.  Recent decades have witnessed many applications of survival analysis in various disciplines. This book introduces both classic survival models and theories along with newly developed techniques. Readers will learn how to perform analysis of survival data by following numerous empirical illustrations in SAS. Survival Analysis: Models and Applications: Presents basic techniques before leading onto some of the most advanced topics in survival analysis.Assumes only a minimal knowledge of SAS whilst enablin

  12. Unique flexibility in energy metabolism allows mycobacteria to combat starvation and hypoxia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Berney

    Full Text Available Mycobacteria are a group of obligate aerobes that require oxygen for growth, but paradoxically have the ability to survive and metabolize under hypoxia. The mechanisms responsible for this metabolic plasticity are unknown. Here, we report on the adaptation of Mycobacterium smegmatis to slow growth rate and hypoxia using carbon-limited continuous culture. When M. smegmatis is switched from a 4.6 h to a 69 h doubling time at a constant oxygen saturation of 50%, the cells respond through the down regulation of respiratory chain components and the F1Fo-ATP synthase, consistent with the cells lower demand for energy at a reduced growth rate. This was paralleled by an up regulation of molecular machinery that allowed more efficient energy generation (i.e. Complex I and the use of alternative electron donors (e.g. hydrogenases and primary dehydrogenases to maintain the flow of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain during conditions of severe energy limitation. A hydrogenase mutant showed a 40% reduction in growth yield highlighting the importance of this enzyme in adaptation to low energy supply. Slow growing cells at 50% oxygen saturation subjected to hypoxia (0.6% oxygen saturation responded by switching on oxygen scavenging cytochrome bd, proton-translocating cytochrome bc1-aa3 supercomplex, another putative hydrogenase, and by substituting NAD+-dependent enzymes with ferredoxin-dependent enzymes thus highlighting a new pattern of mycobacterial adaptation to hypoxia. The expression of ferredoxins and a hydrogenase provides a potential conduit for disposing of and transferring electrons in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. The use of ferredoxin-dependent enzymes would allow the cell to maintain a high carbon flux through its central carbon metabolism independent of the NAD+/NADH ratio. These data demonstrate the remarkable metabolic plasticity of the mycobacterial cell and provide a new framework for understanding their

  13. Unique flexibility in energy metabolism allows mycobacteria to combat starvation and hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berney, Michael; Cook, Gregory M

    2010-01-07

    Mycobacteria are a group of obligate aerobes that require oxygen for growth, but paradoxically have the ability to survive and metabolize under hypoxia. The mechanisms responsible for this metabolic plasticity are unknown. Here, we report on the adaptation of Mycobacterium smegmatis to slow growth rate and hypoxia using carbon-limited continuous culture. When M. smegmatis is switched from a 4.6 h to a 69 h doubling time at a constant oxygen saturation of 50%, the cells respond through the down regulation of respiratory chain components and the F1Fo-ATP synthase, consistent with the cells lower demand for energy at a reduced growth rate. This was paralleled by an up regulation of molecular machinery that allowed more efficient energy generation (i.e. Complex I) and the use of alternative electron donors (e.g. hydrogenases and primary dehydrogenases) to maintain the flow of reducing equivalents to the electron transport chain during conditions of severe energy limitation. A hydrogenase mutant showed a 40% reduction in growth yield highlighting the importance of this enzyme in adaptation to low energy supply. Slow growing cells at 50% oxygen saturation subjected to hypoxia (0.6% oxygen saturation) responded by switching on oxygen scavenging cytochrome bd, proton-translocating cytochrome bc1-aa3 supercomplex, another putative hydrogenase, and by substituting NAD+-dependent enzymes with ferredoxin-dependent enzymes thus highlighting a new pattern of mycobacterial adaptation to hypoxia. The expression of ferredoxins and a hydrogenase provides a potential conduit for disposing of and transferring electrons in the absence of exogenous electron acceptors. The use of ferredoxin-dependent enzymes would allow the cell to maintain a high carbon flux through its central carbon metabolism independent of the NAD+/NADH ratio. These data demonstrate the remarkable metabolic plasticity of the mycobacterial cell and provide a new framework for understanding their ability to survive

  14. Autophagy/Xenophagy as a survival strategy of cancer cells. The role of Cathepsins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malorni, W.; Matarrese, P.; Ascione, B.; Ciarlo, L.; Zakeri, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy, often referred as to autophagy (self-cannibalism), designates the genetically determined process by which portions of the cytoplasm, organelles and long-lived proteins are engulfed in double-membraned vacuoles (autophagosomes) and sent for lysosomal degradation. Basal levels of autophagy contribute to the maintenance of intracellular homoeostasis by ensuring the turnover of supernumerary, aged and/or damaged components. Under conditions of starvation, the autophagic pathway operates to supply cells with metabolic substrates, and thus represents an important pro-survival mechanism. In cultured cells, the withdrawal of growth factors, known to represent an experimental condition triggering autophagy, can also enhance xeno-cannibalism (xenophagy; xeno is from ancient greek=foreign)

  15. Applied survival analysis using R

    CERN Document Server

    Moore, Dirk F

    2016-01-01

    Applied Survival Analysis Using R covers the main principles of survival analysis, gives examples of how it is applied, and teaches how to put those principles to use to analyze data using R as a vehicle. Survival data, where the primary outcome is time to a specific event, arise in many areas of biomedical research, including clinical trials, epidemiological studies, and studies of animals. Many survival methods are extensions of techniques used in linear regression and categorical data, while other aspects of this field are unique to survival data. This text employs numerous actual examples to illustrate survival curve estimation, comparison of survivals of different groups, proper accounting for censoring and truncation, model variable selection, and residual analysis. Because explaining survival analysis requires more advanced mathematics than many other statistical topics, this book is organized with basic concepts and most frequently used procedures covered in earlier chapters, with more advanced topics...

  16. Consultant survival guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haque, Sahena

    2014-04-01

    Taking up a new consultant post can be both exciting and daunting. Once the elation of completing years of training and successfully securing a valued position has subsided, the reality of the task ahead becomes apparent. A new consultant needs to develop a number of skills to develop as a clinical leader and understand the processes within the National Health Service (NHS) that enable service development and innovation. In a programme packed with esteemed speakers, the Royal College of Physicians' one-day conference, Consultants' survival guide: how to succeed as a new consultant provided practical tips and advice for senior trainees and new consultants.

  17. Nuclear War Survival Skills

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kearny, C.H.

    2002-06-24

    The purpose of this book is to provide Americans with information and instructions that will significantly increase their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. It brings together field-tested instructions that, if followed by a large fraction of Americans during a crisis that preceded an attack, could save millions of lives. The author is convinced that the vulnerability of our country to nuclear threat or attack must be reduced and that the wide dissemination of the information contained in this book would help achieve that objective of our overall defense strategy.

  18. Survival curves for irradiated cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibson, D.K.

    1975-01-01

    The subject of the lecture is the probability of survival of biological cells which have been subjected to ionising radiation. The basic mathematical theories of cell survival as a function of radiation dose are developed. A brief comparison with observed survival curves is made. (author)

  19. Nuclear war survival skills

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kearney, C.H.

    1979-09-01

    This book includes chapters on psychological preparations, warning and communications, and evacuation. It describes the building of expedient shelters, their ventilation and cooling, the purification and storage of adequate water, the processing and cooking of whole grains and legumes, fallout meters, protection against fires and carbon monoxide, and expedient furnishings for shelters. Other chapters cover sanitation and preventive medicine, medical advice for nuclear survivors lacking the help of doctors, improvised footwear and clothing, and advice on minimum preparations that can be made at low cost and should be made before a crisis arises. One appendix of the handbook gives detailed, field-tested instructions for building six types of earth-covered expedient fallout shelters, with criteria to guide the choice of which shelter to build. Others contain instructions for making an efficient shelter-ventilating pump and a homemade fallout meter that is accurate and dependable with inexpensive materials found in most households. This report is primarily a compilation and summary of civil defense measures and inventions developed at ORNL over the past 14 years and field-tested in six states, from Florida to Utah. It is the first comprehensive handbook of survival information for use by untrained citizens who want to improve their chances of surviving a possible nuclear attack. Sections may be easily excerpted and reproduced for mass distribution through news media

  20. Mitochondrial ribosomal protein L41 mediates serum starvation-induced cell-cycle arrest through an increase of p21WAF1/CIP1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Mi Jin; Yoo, Young A.; Kim, Hyung Jung; Kang, Seongman; Kim, Yong Geon; Kim, Jun Suk; Yoo, Young Do

    2005-01-01

    Ribosomal proteins not only act as components of the translation apparatus but also regulate cell proliferation and apoptosis. A previous study reported that MRPL41 plays an important role in p53-dependent apoptosis. It also showed that MRPL41 arrests the cell cycle by stabilizing p27 Kip1 in the absence of p53. This study found that MRPL41 mediates the p21 WAF1/CIP1 -mediated G1 arrest in response to serum starvation. The cells were released from serum starvation-induced G1 arrest via the siRNA-mediated blocking of MRPL41 expression. Overall, these results suggest that MRPL41 arrests the cell cycle by increasing the p21 WAF1/CIP1 and p27 Kip1 levels under the growth inhibitory conditions

  1. Surviving relatives after suicide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørrelykke, Helle; Cohrt, Pernille

    We would like to focus on the surviving relatives after suicides, because it is generally accepted that it is especially difficult to recover after the loss from suicide and because we know as a fact that one suicide affects five persons on average. Every year approximately 700 people commit...... suicide in Denmark. This means that at least 400 people undergo the trauma it is when one of their near relatives commits suicide. We also know that the loss from suicide involves a lot of conflicting feelings - like anger, shame, guilt and loss and that the lack of therapy/treatment of these difficult...... for treatment for the relatives. In the wake of this policy document a national organization for relatives after suicide and a national network for those who attempt suicide occurred. Both organizations are formed by voluntary subscription and both organizations offer acute emergency relief, conversation groups...

  2. Bibliographical note on behavioral aspects: on the margin of the 50th anniversary of the Minnesota Starvation-Nutritional Rehabilitation experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozek, J

    1995-10-01

    The principal technical aim of this note is to bring together bibliographic information on the papers dealing with the behavioral aspects of the study and published both before and, in particular, after the appearance in print of the two-volume treatise on The Biology of Human Starvation by Keys, et al. in 1950, which provides a systematic, comprehensive account. The communications fall into three categories: methods, results, and overviews. The section on results is concerned primarily with the effects on personality.

  3. Heat and humidity induced plastic changes in body lipids and starvation resistance in the tropicalZaprionus indianusof wet - dry seasons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girish, T N; Pradeep, B E; Parkash, Ravi

    2018-03-28

    Insects from tropical wet or dry seasons are likely to cope starvation stress through plastic changes (developmental as well as adult acclimation) in energy metabolites. Control and experimental groups of flies of Zaprionus indianus were reared under wet or dry conditions but adults were acclimated at different thermal or humidity conditions. Adult flies of control group were acclimated at 27°C and low (50% RH) or high (60% RH) humidity. For experimental groups, adult flies were acclimated at 32℃ for 1 to 6 days and under low (40% RH) or high (70% RH). For humidity acclimation, adult flies were acclimated at 27°C but under low (40% RH) or high (70% RH) for 1 to 6 days. Plastic changes in experimental groups as compared to control group (developmental as well as adult acclimation) revealed significant accumulation of body lipids due to thermal or humidity acclimation of wet season flies but low humidity acclimation did not change the level of body lipids in dry season flies. Starvation resistance and body lipids were higher in the males of dry season but in the females of wet season. Adult acclimation under thermal or humidity conditions exhibited changes in the rate of utilization of body lipids, carbohydrates and proteins. Adult acclimation of wet or dry season flies revealed plastic changes in mean daily fecundity; and a reduction in fecundity under starvation. Thus, thermal or humidity acclimation of adults revealed plastic changes in energy metabolites to support starvation resistance of wet or dry seasons flies. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  4. Increased expression and secretion of recombinant hIFNγ through amino acid starvation-induced selective pressure on the adjacent HIS4 gene in Pichia pastoris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Razaghi Ali

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional co-regulation of adjacent genes has been observed for prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms, alike. High levels of gene adjacency were also found in a wide variety of yeast species with a high frequency of co-regulated gene sets. The aim of this research was to study how selective pressure on the Histidinol dehydrogenase gene (HIS4, using amino acid starvation, affects the level of expression and secretion of the adjacent human interferon gamma gene (hIFNγ in the recombinant Pichia pastoris GS115 strain, a histidine-deficient mutant. hIFNγ was cloned into the pPIC9 vector adjacent to the HIS4 gene, a gene essential for histidine biosynthesis, which was then transformed into P. pastoris. The transformed P. pastoris was cultured under continuous amino acid starvation in amino acid-free minimal medium for ten days, with five inoculations into unspent medium every second day. Under these conditions, only successfully transformed cells (hIFNγ -HIS4+ are able to synthesise histidine and therefore thrive. As shown by ELISA, amino acid starvation-induced selective pressure on HIS4 improved expression and secretion of the adjacent hIFNγ by 55% compared to unchallenged cells. RT-qPCR showed that there was also a positive correlation between duration of amino acid starvation and increased levels of the hIFNγ RNA transcripts. According to these results, it is suggested that these adjacent genes (hIFNγ and HIS4 in the transformed P. pastoris are transcriptionally co-regulated and their expression is synchronised. To the best of the knowledge of the authors; this is the first study demonstrating that amino acid starvationinduced selective pressure on HIS4 can alter the regulation pattern of adjacent genes in P. pastoris.

  5. Survival and weight change among adult individuals of Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus, 1758 (Blattaria, Blattidae subject to various stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelio Peter Duarte

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-7925.2015v28n2p103 Periplaneta americana is a species of great importance to public health, since it can act as a vector of many pathogens and it reaches large populations in urban environments. This is probably due to its ability to resist starvation and desiccation. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of absence of water and food on survival and weight change among adult P. americana individuals and check whether the initial weight of individuals influences on their survival. Four groups having twenty P. americana couples were formed and subject to: I no water or food; II no food; III no water; and IV control group. Insects were isolated according to the groups, which were weighed at the beginning and end of the stress conditions. They remained under these conditions until all individuals in each test group were dead. Stress conditions caused reduction in survival time when compared to the control group. Adults with higher body mass survived longer when deprived only of food, while among those lacking water, weight had no influence on survival. Total weight loss was greater among individuals deprived of water than those deprived only of food.

  6. Survival and weight change among adult individuals of Periplaneta americana (Linnaeus, 1758 (Blattaria, Blattidae subject to various stress conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jucelio Peter Duarte

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Periplaneta americana is a species of great importance to public health, since it can act as a vector of many pathogens and it reaches large populations in urban environments. This is probably due to its ability to resist starvation and desiccation. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of absence of water and food on survival and weight change among adult P. americana individuals and check whether the initial weight of individuals influences on their survival. Four groups having twenty P. americana couples were formed and subject to: I no water or food; II no food; III no water; and IV control group. Insects were isolated according to the groups, which were weighed at the beginning and end of the stress conditions. They remained under these conditions until all individuals in each test group were dead. Stress conditions caused reduction in survival time when compared to the control group. Adults with higher body mass survived longer when deprived only of food, while among those lacking water, weight had no influence on survival. Total weight loss was greater among individuals deprived of water than those deprived only of food.

  7. A phosphate starvation-driven bidirectional promoter as a potential tool for crop improvement and in vitro plant biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araceli, Oropeza-Aburto; Alfredo, Cruz-Ramírez; Javier, Mora-Macías; Luis, Herrera-Estrella

    2017-05-01

    Phosphate (Pi)-deficient soils are a major limitant factor for crop production in many regions of the world. Despite that plants have innovated several developmental and biochemical strategies to deal with this stress, there are still massive extensions of land which combine several abiotic stresses, including phosphate starvation, that limit their use for plant growth and food production. In several plant species, a genetic programme underlies the biochemical and developmental responses of the organism to cope with low phosphate (Pi) availability. Both protein- and miRNA-coding genes involved in the adaptative response are transcriptionally activated upon Pi starvation. Several of the responsive genes have been identified as transcriptional targets of PHR1, a transcription factor that binds a conserved cis-element called PHR1-binding site (P1BS). Our group has previously described and characterized a minimal genetic arrangement that includes two P1BS elements, as a phosphate-responsive enhancer (EZ2). Here, we report the engineering and successful use of a phosphate-dependent bidirectional promoter, which has been designed and constructed based on the palindromic sequences of the two P1BS elements present in EZ2. This bidirectional promoter has a potential use in both plant in vitro approaches and in the generation of improved crops adapted to Pi starvation and other abiotic stresses. © 2016 The Authors. Plant Biotechnology Journal published by Society for Experimental Biology and The Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Evidence that severe acute stress and starvation induce rapid atresia of ovarian vitellogenic follicles in Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus (L.) (Osteichthyes: Scombridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corriero, A; Zupa, R; Bello, G; Mylonas, C C; Deflorio, M; Genovese, S; Basilone, G; Buscaino, G; Buffa, G; Pousis, C; De Metrio, G; Santamaria, N

    2011-11-01

    The effects of different stressors on the atretic degeneration of ovarian vitellogenic follicles, as well as on the ovarian mass, were examined in female Atlantic bluefin tuna, Thunnus thynnus (L.), from the Mediterranean Sea. The stressors taken into consideration were short-term starvation (up to 14 days), long-term cage rearing (1 year) and crowding-induced severe panic frenzy. Wild-caught individuals were used as a control group. Fish subjected to either severe panic frenzy or starvation exhibited a decrease in gonad mass and had significantly higher intensity of α atresia in the vitellogenic follicles (means: 78% and 58%, respectively; range: 36-100%) than either wild or long-term caged individuals (means: 32% and 30%, respectively; range: 19-44%). The extensive atresia in fish stressed by severe panic frenzy was observed as early as 24 h after the stressing event. The present study represents the first evidence of the extreme susceptibility of Atlantic bluefin tuna to severe acute stress during vitellogenesis; it also shows that starvation is associated with progressive reabsorption of vitellogenic oocytes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  9. Short-term starvation with a near-fatal asthma attack induced ketoacidosis in a nondiabetic pregnant woman: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Shan-Yueh; Wang, Sheng-Huei; Su, Her-Young; Tsai, Chen-Liang

    2016-06-01

    Life-threatening refractory metabolic acidosis due to starvation ketoacidosis is rarely reported, even among nondiabetic pregnant women, and may be overlooked. Furthermore, stressful situations may increase the acidosis severity.In the present case, a nondiabetic multiparous woman was admitted for a near-fatal asthma attack and vomiting during the third trimester of pregnancy. She was intubated and rapidly developed high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We diagnosed the patient with starvation ketoacidosis based on vomiting with concomitant periods of stress during pregnancy and the absence of other causes of high anion gap metabolic acidosis. She responded poorly to standard treatment, although the ketoacidosis and asthma promptly resolved after an emergency caesarean section. The patient and her baby were safely discharged.Short-term starvation, if it occurs during periods of stress and medication, can result in life-threatening ketoacidosis, even among nondiabetic women during the third trimester of pregnancy. Awareness of this condition may facilitate prompt recognition and proactive treatment for dietary and stress control, and emergent interventions may also improve outcomes.

  10. Signaling through the primary cilium affects glial cell survival under a stressed environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshimura, Kentaro; Kawate, Toyoko; Takeda, Sen

    2011-02-01

    Sensing extracellular milieu is a fundamental requirement of cells. To facilitate and specify sensory reception, mammalian cells develop an antenna-like structure denoted as the primary cilia. Nearly all interphase and nondividing cells in vertebrates have a single, nonmotile seemingly unspecialized cilium (called a primary cilium). In the central nervous system, astrocytes express primary cilia, but their function in astrocytes has not been examined. Recent studies have shown that primary cilia unite receptors and the machinery of signal-transduction components, such as Wnt and Hedgehog (Hh) signaling cascades. Although, Hh signaling cascades are known to be activated in various cells during development, their physiological functions in the adult nervous system, especially in glial cells, are still unknown. In this study, we reveal that glial primary cilia receive the Hh signal and regulate the survival of astrocytes under stressed conditions such as starvation. Interestingly, increased astrocyte survival was reversed by knockdown of Ift20, which is one of the main components for building primary cilia. These results collectively indicate that the activation of Hh signaling in the primary cilia plays an important role in the survival of astrocytes under stressed conditions. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Fibronectin peptides that bind PDGF-BB enhance survival of cells and tissue under stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Fubao; Zhu, Jia; Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Taira, Breena R.; McClain, Steve A.; Singer, Adam J.; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2013-01-01

    Stressors after injury from a multitude of factors can lead to cell death. We have identified four fibronectin (FN) peptides, two from the first FN type III repeat (FNIII1), one from the 13th FN type III repeat (FNIII13), and one from FN variable region (IIICS), that when tethered to a surface acted as platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) enhancers to promote cell survival. One of the FNIII1 peptides and its smallest (14mer) bioactive form (P12) were also active in solution. Specifically, P12 bound PDGF-BB (KD = 200nM), enhanced adult human dermal fibroblast (AHDF) survival under serum starvation, oxidative or endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stressors, and limited burn injury progression in a rat hot comb model. Furthermore, P12 inhibited ER stress-induced c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) activation. Although many growth factors have been found to bind FN directly or indirectly, this is the first report to identify peptide sequences of growth factor-binding sites in FN. The finding of these novel peptides further delineated how the extracellular matrix protein FN can support cell survival. Since the peptide P12 is active in either soluble form or tethered to a substrate, it will have multifactorial uses as a bioactive in tissue engineering. PMID:24126844

  12. REP1 Modulates Autophagy and Macropinocytosis to Enhance Cancer Cell Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jungwon; Kim, Hyena; Bae, Young Ki; Cheong, Heesun

    2017-08-28

    Rab escort protein 1 (REP1), a component of the Rab geranyl-geranyltransferase 2 complex, plays a role in Rab protein recruitment in proper vesicles during vesicle trafficking. In addition to having well-known tissue degenerative phenotypes in the REP1 mutant, REP1 is tightly associated with cancer development and contributes to cell growth and survival. However, the functional mechanism of REP1 in cancer progression is largely uninvestigated. Here, we show that REP1 plays a crucial role in regulating mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling and its downstream pathways, as well as autophagy and macropinocytosis, which are essential for cancer cell survival during metabolic stresses including starvation. REP1 small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment downregulates mTORC1 activity in growing media, but blocks autophagosome formation under nutrient-depleted conditions. In contrast to the mild decrease of lysosomal enzyme activity seen in REP1 depletion, in REP1 knockdown the subcellular localization of lysosomes is altered, and localization of REP1 itself is modulated by intracellular nutrient levels and mTOR activity. Furthermore, REP1 depletion increases macro pinocytosis which may be a feedback mechanism to compensate autophagy inhibition. Concomitant treatment with macropinocytosis inhibitor and REP1siRNAresults in more significant cell death than autophagy blockade with REP1 knockdown. Therefore, REP1-mediated autophagy and lysosomal degradation processes act as novel regulatory mechanisms to support cancer cell survival, which can be further investigated as a potential cancer-targeting pathway.

  13. Survival in patchy landscapes: the interplay between dispersal, habitat loss and fragmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niebuhr, Bernardo B S; Wosniack, Marina E; Santos, Marcos C; Raposo, Ernesto P; Viswanathan, Gandhimohan M; da Luz, Marcos G E; Pie, Marcio R

    2015-07-07

    Habitat loss and fragmentation are important factors determining animal population dynamics and spatial distribution. Such landscape changes can lead to the deleterious impact of a significant drop in the number of species, caused by critically reduced survival rates for organisms. In order to obtain a deeper understanding of the threeway interplay between habitat loss, fragmentation and survival rates, we propose here a spatially explicit multi-scaled movement model of individuals that search for habitat. By considering basic ecological processes, such as predation, starvation (outside the habitat area), and competition, together with dispersal movement as a link among habitat areas, we show that a higher survival rate is achieved in instances with a lower number of patches of larger areas. Our results demonstrate how movement may counterbalance the effects of habitat loss and fragmentation in altered landscapes. In particular, they have important implications for conservation planning and ecosystem management, including the design of specific features of conservation areas in order to enhance landscape connectivity and population viability.

  14. Responses of Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 to Long-Term Nitrogen Starvation and Recovery1[C][W][OA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hong-Po; Williams, Ernest; Wang, Da-zhi; Xie, Zhang-Xian; Hsia, Ru-ching; Jenck, Alizée; Halden, Rolf; Li, Jing; Chen, Feng; Place, Allen R.

    2013-01-01

    The Nannochloropsis genus contains oleaginous microalgae that have served as model systems for developing renewable biodiesel. Recent genomic and transcriptomic studies on Nannochloropsis species have provided insights into the regulation of lipid production in response to nitrogen stress. Previous studies have focused on the responses of Nannochloropsis species to short-term nitrogen stress, but the effect of long-term nitrogen deprivation remains largely unknown. In this study, physiological and proteomic approaches were combined to understand the mechanisms by which Nannochloropsis oceanica IMET1 is able to endure long-term nitrate deprivation and its ability to recover homeostasis when nitrogen is amended. Changes of the proteome during chronic nitrogen starvation espoused the physiological changes observed, and there was a general trend toward recycling nitrogen and storage of lipids. This was evidenced by a global down-regulation of protein expression, a retained expression of proteins involved in glycolysis and the synthesis of fatty acids, as well as an up-regulation of enzymes used in nitrogen scavenging and protein turnover. Also, lipid accumulation and autophagy of plastids may play a key role in maintaining cell vitality. Following the addition of nitrogen, there were proteomic changes and metabolic changes observed within 24 h, which resulted in a return of the culture to steady state within 4 d. These results demonstrate the ability of N. oceanica IMET1 to recover from long periods of nitrate deprivation without apparent detriment to the culture and provide proteomic markers for genetic modification. PMID:23637339

  15. A review on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell catalyst degradation and starvation issues: Causes, consequences and diagnostic for mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousfi-Steiner, N.; Moçotéguy, Ph.; Candusso, D.; Hissel, D.

    In proton exchange membrane fuel cells, cost, reliability and durability are important issues that need to be solved before their commercialization. Their performance decrease during operation is attributed, amongst others, to the loss of electrochemical surface area occurring during long-term ageing, after transients or after an incident (faulty operation). These losses are mainly due to catalyst metal degradation and carbon-support corrosion, which are continuous irreversible processes that can dramatically reduce the fuel cell lifetime. In this paper, the phenomena linked to catalyst and carbon-support degradation are reviewed, focusing on those caused by fuel and oxidant starvation, since these faulty conditions are amongst the most critical for fuel cell durability. A description of reactions potentially involved in the catalyst degradation, associated with thermodynamic and kinetic considerations related to fuel cell operation are reviewed. This information is used to interpret the experimental results presented in the literature and reviewed in this paper. Based on these reviews, an analysis of the "reverse decay current mechanism" is performed and an alternative mechanism is suggested together with an experiment that would identify the most likely between them. Finally, some characterization methods or mitigation strategies are listed and an illustrative fault tree is built, pointing out the relationship between causes and symptoms in catalyst degradation.

  16. Effect of nutrient starvation on some aspects of nitrogen metabolism in substrate-grown strawberry plantings cv. Nyoho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrović Anamarija

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Three-week nitrogen (N supply restriction is a way to stimulate early and uniform flower induction in forced June-bearing nursery strawberry production in Japan. In the first weeks after planting into excessively-fertigated substrates, N-starved plantings undergo drastic changes in their N utilization and N metabolism, often facing symptoms of interveinal chlorosis in their young expanding leaves. Interveinal chlorosis is reflected in delayed plant development, and consequently in yield reduction. Characterizing variations in main parameters of N metabolism in plant tissues in N-fed and N-starved strawberry plantings cv. Nyoho, this report portrays the pattern of changes in N metabolism during the nursery period. Results show that foliar NH4-N and petiole NO3-N concentrations and N-assimilating enzymes activities in plant tissue were significantly reduced due to the N-starvation, making young plants unlikely to be adaptive to N rich nutrition after planting, and that subsequent NH4-N accumulation in plant tissues can lead to sever interveinal chlorosis.

  17. Revealing fosfomycin primary effect on Staphylococcus aureus transcriptome: modulation of cell envelope biosynthesis and phosphoenolpyruvate induced starvation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruden Kristina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Staphylococcus aureus is a highly adaptable human pathogen and there is a constant search for effective antibiotics. Fosfomycin is a potent irreversible inhibitor of MurA, an enolpyruvyl transferase that uses phosphoenolpyruvate as substrate. The goal of this study was to identify the pathways and processes primarily affected by fosfomycin at the genome-wide transcriptome level to aid development of new drugs. Results S. aureus ATCC 29213 cells were treated with sub-MIC concentrations of fosfomycin and harvested at 10, 20 and 40 minutes after treatment. S. aureus GeneChip statistical data analysis was complemented by gene set enrichment analysis. A visualization tool for mapping gene expression data into biological pathways was developed in order to identify the metabolic processes affected by fosfomycin. We have shown that the number of significantly differentially expressed genes in treated cultures increased with time and with increasing fosfomycin concentration. The target pathway - peptidoglycan biosynthesis - was upregulated following fosfomycin treatment. Modulation of transport processes, cofactor biosynthesis, energy metabolism and nucleic acid biosynthesis was also observed. Conclusions Several pathways and genes downregulated by fosfomycin have been identified, in contrast to previously described cell wall active antibiotics, and was explained by starvation response induced by phosphoenolpyruvate accumulation. Transcriptomic profiling, in combination with meta-analysis, has been shown to be a valuable tool in determining bacterial response to a specific antibiotic.

  18. Asymmetric dimethylarginine attenuates serum starvation-induced apoptosis via suppression of the Fas (APO-1/CD95)/JNK (SAPK) pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, H; Zhou, Y; Zhao, A; Qiu, Y; Xie, G; Jiang, Q; Zheng, X; Zhong, W; Sun, X; Zhou, Z; Jia, W

    2013-01-01

    Asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) is synthesized by protein arginine methyltransferases during methylation of protein arginine residues and released into blood upon proteolysis. Higher concentrations of ADMA in blood have been observed in patients with metabolic diseases and certain cancers. However, the role of ADMA in colon cancer has not been well investigated. ADMA serum levels in human patients diagnosed with colon cancer were found to be higher than those present in healthy subjects. ADMA treatment of LoVo cells, a human colon adenocarcinoma cell line, attenuated serum starvation-induced apoptosis and suppressed the activation of the Fas (APO-1/CD95)/JNK (SAPK) (c-Jun N terminal protein kinase/stress-activated protein kinase)pathway. ADMA also suppressed the activation of JNK triggered by death receptor ligand anti-Fas mAb and exogenous C2-ceramide. Moreover, we demonstrated that ADMA pretreatment protected LoVo cells from doxorubicin hydrochloride-induced cell death and activation of the Fas/JNK pathway. In summary, our results suggest that the elevated ADMA in colon cancer patients may contribute to the blocking of apoptosis of cancer cells in response to stress and chemotherapy. PMID:24091673

  19. A review on polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell catalyst degradation and starvation issues: Causes, consequences and diagnostic for mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousfi-Steiner, N. [EIFER, European Institute For Energy Research, Emmy-Noether Strasse 11, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); FEMTO-ST/ENISYS FCLAB, UMR CNRS 6174, University of Franche-Comte, rue Mieg, 90010 Belfort cedex (France); Mocoteguy, Ph. [EIFER, European Institute For Energy Research, Emmy-Noether Strasse 11, 76131 Karlsruhe (Germany); Candusso, D. [INRETS/FCLAB, The French National Institute for Transport and Safety Research, rue Mieg, 90010 Belfort cedex (France); FEMTO-ST/ENISYS FCLAB, UMR CNRS 6174, University of Franche-Comte, rue Mieg, 90010 Belfort cedex (France); Hissel, D. [FEMTO-ST/ENISYS FCLAB, UMR CNRS 6174, University of Franche-Comte, rue Mieg, 90010 Belfort cedex (France)

    2009-10-20

    In proton exchange membrane fuel cells, cost, reliability and durability are important issues that need to be solved before their commercialization. Their performance decrease during operation is attributed, amongst others, to the loss of electrochemical surface area occurring during long-term ageing, after transients or after an incident (faulty operation). These losses are mainly due to catalyst metal degradation and carbon-support corrosion, which are continuous irreversible processes that can dramatically reduce the fuel cell lifetime. In this paper, the phenomena linked to catalyst and carbon-support degradation are reviewed, focusing on those caused by fuel and oxidant starvation, since these faulty conditions are amongst the most critical for fuel cell durability. A description of reactions potentially involved in the catalyst degradation, associated with thermodynamic and kinetic considerations related to fuel cell operation are reviewed. This information is used to interpret the experimental results presented in the literature and reviewed in this paper. Based on these reviews, an analysis of the ''reverse decay current mechanism'' is performed and an alternative mechanism is suggested together with an experiment that would identify the most likely between them. Finally, some characterization methods or mitigation strategies are listed and an illustrative fault tree is built, pointing out the relationship between causes and symptoms in catalyst degradation. (author)

  20. Bidirectional single-longitudinal mode SOA-fiber ring laser based on optical filter assisted gain starvation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Kamal; Al-Arifi, Fares; Al-Otaibi, Mohammed; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2015-03-01

    Generation of a single-longitudinal mode (SLM) in bidirectional ring lasers has direct impact on the laser linewidth and dynamic range of operation, when used in rotation sensing applications. Besides, operating at a specific wavelength helps in optimizing the performance of the system components. In this work, we report a novel method for generating SLM in bidirectional SOA-fiber ring laser using mechanically tunable Fabry-Perot filter with 1-nm bandwidth. The method is based on gain starvation by tuning the central wavelength of the filter in the blue edge of the gain-wavelength response. By adjusting the SOA driving current, the oscillation condition is satisfied mainly for single mode and bidirectional operation can be achieved simultaneously. The SLM operation is verified by monitoring the beating signal between the modes on an RF spectrum analyzer. Using an SOA with a small-signal gain of 20 dB at 300 mA pumping current and a gain bandwidth of 100 nm centered around 1490 nm; the central wavelength of the ring laser could be tuned from 1440 nm to 1480 nm with a side-mode suppression ratio of 25 dB.

  1. Alkali production associated with malolactic fermentation by oral streptococci and protection against acid, oxidative, or starvation damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Jiangyun; Baldeck, Jeremiah D.; Nguyen, Phuong T.M.; Quivey, Robert G.; Marquis, Robert E.

    2011-01-01

    Alkali production by oral streptococci is considered important for dental plaque ecology and caries moderation. Recently, malolactic fermentation (MLF) was identified as a major system for alkali production by oral streptococci, including Streptococcus mutans. Our major objectives in the work described in this paper were to further define the physiology and genetics of MLF of oral streptococci and its roles in protection against metabolic stress damage. l-Malic acid was rapidly fermented to l-lactic acid and CO2 by induced cells of wild-type S. mutans, but not by deletion mutants for mleS (malolactic enzyme) or mleP (malate permease). Mutants for mleR (the contiguous regulator gene) had intermediate capacities for MLF. Loss of capacity to catalyze MLF resulted in loss of capacity for protection against lethal acidification. MLF was also found to be protective against oxidative and starvation damage. The capacity of S. mutans to produce alkali from malate was greater than its capacity to produce acid from glycolysis at low pH values of 4 or 5. MLF acted additively with the arginine deiminase system for alkali production by Streptococcus sanguinis, but not with urease of Streptococcus salivarius. Malolactic fermentation is clearly a major process for alkali generation by oral streptococci and for protection against environmental stresses. PMID:20651853

  2. Ship Systems Survivability Test Site

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Area for testing survivability of shipboard systems to include electrical, communications, and fire suppression. Multipurpose test range for supporting gun firing,...

  3. Acetic acid treatment in S.cerevisiae creates significant energy deficiency and nutrient starvation that is dependent on the activity of mitochondrial transcriptional complex Hap2-3-4-5.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana eKitanovic

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Metabolic pathways play an indispensable role in supplying cellular systems with energy and molecular building blocks for growth, maintenance and repair and are tightly linked with lifespan and systems stability of cells. For optimal growth and survival cells rapidly adopt to environmental changes. Accumulation of acetic acid in stationary phase budding yeast cultures is considered to be a primary mechanism of chronological aging and induction of apoptosis in yeast, which has prompted us to investigate the dependence of acetic acid toxicity on extracellular conditions in a systematic manner.Using an automated computer controlled assay system, we investigated and model the dynamic interconnection of biomass yield- and growth rate-dependence on extracellular glucose concentration, pH conditions and acetic acid concentration. Our results show that toxic concentrations of acetic acid inhibit glucose consumption and reduce ethanol production. In absence of carbohydrates uptake, cells initiate synthesis of storage carbohydrates, trehalose and glycogen, and upregulate gluconeogenesis. Accumulation of trehalose and glycogen, and induction of gluconeogenesis depends on mitochondrial activity, investigated by depletion of the Hap2-3-4-5 complex. Analyzing the activity of glycolytic enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH, pyruvate kinase (PYK and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH we found that while high acetic acid concentration increased their activity, lower acetic acids concentrations significantly inhibited these enzymes. With this study we determined growth and functional adjustment of metabolism to acetic acid accumulation in a complex range of extracellular conditions. Our results show that substantial acidification of the intracellular environment, resulting from accumulation of dissociated acetic acid in the cytosol, is required for acetic acid toxicity, which creates a state of energy deficiency and nutrient starvation.

  4. Acetic acid treatment in S. cerevisiae creates significant energy deficiency and nutrient starvation that is dependent on the activity of the mitochondrial transcriptional complex Hap2-3-4-5

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitanovic, Ana; Bonowski, Felix; Heigwer, Florian; Ruoff, Peter; Kitanovic, Igor; Ungewiss, Christin; Wölfl, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Metabolic pathways play an indispensable role in supplying cellular systems with energy and molecular building blocks for growth, maintenance and repair and are tightly linked with lifespan and systems stability of cells. For optimal growth and survival cells rapidly adopt to environmental changes. Accumulation of acetic acid in stationary phase budding yeast cultures is considered to be a primary mechanism of chronological aging and induction of apoptosis in yeast, which has prompted us to investigate the dependence of acetic acid toxicity on extracellular conditions in a systematic manner. Using an automated computer controlled assay system, we investigated and model the dynamic interconnection of biomass yield- and growth rate-dependence on extracellular glucose concentration, pH conditions and acetic acid concentration. Our results show that toxic concentrations of acetic acid inhibit glucose consumption and reduce ethanol production. In absence of carbohydrates uptake, cells initiate synthesis of storage carbohydrates, trehalose and glycogen, and upregulate gluconeogenesis. Accumulation of trehalose and glycogen, and induction of gluconeogenesis depends on mitochondrial activity, investigated by depletion of the Hap2-3-4-5 complex. Analyzing the activity of glycolytic enzymes, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), pyruvate kinase (PYK), and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PDH) we found that while high acetic acid concentration increased their activity, lower acetic acids concentrations significantly inhibited these enzymes. With this study we determined growth and functional adjustment of metabolism to acetic acid accumulation in a complex range of extracellular conditions. Our results show that substantial acidification of the intracellular environment, resulting from accumulation of dissociated acetic acid in the cytosol, is required for acetic acid toxicity, which creates a state of energy deficiency and nutrient starvation. PMID:23050242

  5. Climatic variation and tortoise survival: has a desert species met its match?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovich, Jeffrey E.; Yackulic, Charles B.; Freilich, Jerry; Agha, Mickey; Austin, Meaghan; Meyer, Katherine P.; Arundel, Terence R.; Hansen, Jered; Vamstad, Michael S.; Root, Stephanie A.

    2014-01-01

    While demographic changes in short-lived species may be observed relatively quickly in response to climate changes, measuring population responses of long-lived species requires long-term studies that are not always available. We analyzed data from a population of threatened Agassiz’s desert tortoises (Gopherus agassizii) at a 2.59 km2 study plot in the Sonoran Desert ecosystem of Joshua Tree National Park, California, USA from 1978 to 2012 to examine variation in apparent survival and demography in this long-lived species. Transect-based, mark-recapture surveys were conducted in 10 of those years to locate living and dead tortoises. Previous modeling suggested that this area would become unsuitable as tortoise habitat under a warming and drying climate scenario. Estimated adult population size declined greatly from 1996 to 2012. The population appeared to have high apparent survival from 1978 to 1996 but apparent survival decreased from 1997 to 2002, concurrent with persistent drought. The best model relating apparent survivorship of tortoises ≥18 cm over time was based on a three year moving average of estimated winter precipitation. The postures and positions of a majority of dead tortoises found in 2012 were consistent with death by dehydration and starvation. Some live and many dead tortoises found in 2012 showed signs of predation or scavenging by mammalian carnivores. Coyote (Canis latrans) scats and other evidence from the site confirmed their role as tortoise predators and scavengers. Predation rates may be exacerbated by drought if carnivores switch from preferred mammalian prey to tortoises during dry years. Climate modeling suggests that the region will be subjected to even longer duration droughts in the future and that the plot may become unsuitable for continued tortoise survival. Our results showing wide fluctuations in apparent survival and decreasing tortoise density over time may be early signals of that possible outcome.

  6. Global Activities and Plant Survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandick, Roger

    2014-01-01

    the highest exit rates. Moreover, the exit rates of globally engaged plants seem to be unaffected by increased foreign presence, whereas there appears to be a negative impact on the survival rates of non-exporting non-MNE plants. Finally, the result reveals that the survival ratio of plants of acquired...

  7. Radionuclide blood cell survival studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bentley, S.A.; Miller, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    Platelet and red cell survival studies are reviewed. The use of 51 Cr and di-isopropylfluoridate labelled with tritium or 32 P is discussed for red cell survival study and 51 Cr and 111 In-oxine are considered as platelet labels. (UK)

  8. The influence of starvation and Eurytrema coelomaticum infection on the nitrogenous products of degradation in the hemolymph of Bradybaena similaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosana M. de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The urea and uric acid contents in the hemolymph of Bradybaena similaris were analyzed under starvation and Eurytrema coelomaticum infection during 30 days. The urea and uric acid contents in the uninfected and fed snails were 15.090 mg/dl and 9.399 mg/dl, respectively, being the urea/uric acid ratio 1.6. The urea content in starved snails increased to a maximum of 363.237 mg/dl at 15 days, and the uric acid varied to a maximum of 11.470 mg/dl. The urea content in infected snails was reduced to a minimum of 2.123 mg/dl at 30 days of infection and the uric acid increased significatively at 25 days post exposure, being 13.820 mg/dl. A significative relation was not observed between the time of starvation and time of E. coelomaticum infection and the uric acid content in the hemolymph of B. similaris.O conteúdo de uréia e de ácido úrico na hemolnfa de Bradybaena similaris foi analisado em função da inanição e da infecção com Eurytrema coelomaticum ao longo de 30 dias. O conteúdo destas substâncias em moluscos não infectados e alimentados foi, respectivamente, 15.090 mg/dl e 9.399 mg/dl, sendo a relação uréia/ácido úrico 1.6. A concentração de uréia nos moluscos em inanição aumentou até um valor máximo de 363.237 mg/dl, aos 15 dias de inanição e o conteúdo de ácido úrico variou até um valor máximo de 11.761 mg/dl, aos 10 dias de jejum. A concentração de uréia em moluscos infectados foi reduzida até um valor mínimo 2.123 mg/dl, aos 30 dias de infecção, e o conteúdo de ácido úrico aumentou significativamente aos 25 dias de infecção, sendo 13.820 mg/dl. Não foram observadas relações significativas entre o tempo de inanição e o tempo de infecção com estágios larvais de E. coelomaticum e o conteúdo de ácido úrico na hemolinfa de B. similaris.

  9. Investment into defensive traits by anuran prey (Lithobates pipiens) is mediated by the starvation-predation risk trade-off.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Amanda M; Pereira, David; Murray, Dennis L

    2013-01-01

    Prey can invest in a variety of defensive traits when balancing risk of predation against that of starvation. What remains unknown is the relative costs of different defensive traits and how prey reconcile investment into these traits when energetically limited. We tested the simple allocation model of prey defense, which predicts an additive effect of increasing predation risk and resource availability, resulting in the full deployment of defensive traits under conditions of high risk and resource saturation. We collected morphometric, developmental, and behavioural data in an experiment using dragonfly larvae (predator) and Northern leopard frog tadpoles (prey) subject to variable levels of food availability and predation risk. Larvae exposed to food restriction showed limited response to predation risk; larvae at food saturation altered behaviour, development, and growth in response to predation risk. Responses to risk varied through time, suggesting ontogeny may affect the deployment of particular defensive traits. The observed negative correlation between body size and activity level for food-restricted prey--and the absence of a similar response among adequately-fed prey--suggests that a trade-off exists between behavioural and growth responses when energy budgets are limited. Our research is the first to demonstrate how investment into these defensive traits is mediated along gradients of both predation risk and resource availability over time. The interactions we demonstrate between resource availability and risk level on deployment of inducible defenses provide evidence that both internal condition and extrinsic risk factors play a critical role in the production of inducible defenses over time.

  10. Functional characterization of 14 Pht1 family genes in yeast and their expressions in response to nutrient starvation in soybean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Lu; Guo, Yongxiang; Chen, Liyu; Liang, Ruikang; Gu, Mian; Xu, Guohua; Zhao, Jing; Walk, Thomas; Liao, Hong

    2012-01-01

    Phosphorus (P) is essential for plant growth and development. Phosphate (Pi) transporter genes in the Pht1 family play important roles in Pi uptake and translocation in plants. Although Pht1 family genes have been well studied in model plants, little is known about their functions in soybean, an important legume crop worldwide. We identified and isolated a complete set of 14 Pi transporter genes (GmPT1-14) in the soybean genome and categorized them into two subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis. Then, an experiment to elucidate Pi transport activity of the GmPTs was carried out using a yeast mutant defective in high-affinity Pi transport. Results showed that 12 of the 14 GmPTs were able to complement Pi uptake of the yeast mutant with Km values ranging from 25.7 to 116.3 µM, demonstrating that most of the GmPTs are high-affinity Pi transporters. Further results from qRT-PCR showed that the expressions of the 14 GmPTs differed not only in response to P availability in different tissues, but also to other nutrient stresses, including N, K and Fe deficiency, suggesting that besides functioning in Pi uptake and translocation, GmPTs might be involved in synergistic regulation of mineral nutrient homeostasis in soybean. The comprehensive analysis of Pi transporter function in yeast and expression responses to nutrition starvation of Pht1 family genes in soybean revealed their involvement in other nutrient homeostasis besides P, which could help to better understand the regulation network among ion homeostasis in plants.

  11. Investment into defensive traits by anuran prey (Lithobates pipiens is mediated by the starvation-predation risk trade-off.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda M Bennett

    Full Text Available Prey can invest in a variety of defensive traits when balancing risk of predation against that of starvation. What remains unknown is the relative costs of different defensive traits and how prey reconcile investment into these traits when energetically limited. We tested the simple allocation model of prey defense, which predicts an additive effect of increasing predation risk and resource availability, resulting in the full deployment of defensive traits under conditions of high risk and resource saturation. We collected morphometric, developmental, and behavioural data in an experiment using dragonfly larvae (predator and Northern leopard frog tadpoles (prey subject to variable levels of food availability and predation risk. Larvae exposed to food restriction showed limited response to predation risk; larvae at food saturation altered behaviour, development, and growth in response to predation risk. Responses to risk varied through time, suggesting ontogeny may affect the deployment of particular defensive traits. The observed negative correlation between body size and activity level for food-restricted prey--and the absence of a similar response among adequately-fed prey--suggests that a trade-off exists between behavioural and growth responses when energy budgets are limited. Our research is the first to demonstrate how investment into these defensive traits is mediated along gradients of both predation risk and resource availability over time. The interactions we demonstrate between resource availability and risk level on deployment of inducible defenses provide evidence that both internal condition and extrinsic risk factors play a critical role in the production of inducible defenses over time.

  12. Functional characterization of 14 Pht1 family genes in yeast and their expressions in response to nutrient starvation in soybean.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Qin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Phosphorus (P is essential for plant growth and development. Phosphate (Pi transporter genes in the Pht1 family play important roles in Pi uptake and translocation in plants. Although Pht1 family genes have been well studied in model plants, little is known about their functions in soybean, an important legume crop worldwide. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We identified and isolated a complete set of 14 Pi transporter genes (GmPT1-14 in the soybean genome and categorized them into two subfamilies based on phylogenetic analysis. Then, an experiment to elucidate Pi transport activity of the GmPTs was carried out using a yeast mutant defective in high-affinity Pi transport. Results showed that 12 of the 14 GmPTs were able to complement Pi uptake of the yeast mutant with Km values ranging from 25.7 to 116.3 µM, demonstrating that most of the GmPTs are high-affinity Pi transporters. Further results from qRT-PCR showed that the expressions of the 14 GmPTs differed not only in response to P availability in different tissues, but also to other nutrient stresses, including N, K and Fe deficiency, suggesting that besides functioning in Pi uptake and translocation, GmPTs might be involved in synergistic regulation of mineral nutrient homeostasis in soybean. CONCLUSIONS: The comprehensive analysis of Pi transporter function in yeast and expression responses to nutrition starvation of Pht1 family genes in soybean revealed their involvement in other nutrient homeostasis besides P, which could help to better understand the regulation network among ion homeostasis in plants.

  13. Effects of abnormal temperature and starvation on the internal defense system of the schistosome-transmitting snail Biomphalaria glabrata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Molly K; Cruz, Brandon C; Buena, Kevin L; Nguyen, Hai; Sullivan, John T

    2016-07-01

    Climate change may affect the internal defense system (IDS) of freshwater snails, and as a result their capacity to transmit disease. We examined effects of short-term exposure to supra- and sub-optimal temperatures or starvation on 3 parameters of the IDS of the schistosome-resistant Salvador strain of Biomphalaria glabrata - hemocyte concentrations, cell division in the amebocyte-producing organ (APO), and resistance to infection with Schistosoma mansoni. Adult snails were exposed to 1 of 3 temperatures, 20°C, 27°C (controls), or 33°C, for 1 or 2weeks, with food. A fourth group was maintained at 27°C, but without food. Compared to the controls, starved snails had significantly higher hemocyte counts at both 1 and 2weeks, although mitotic activity in the APO was significantly lower at both time periods. Exposure to 20°C or 33°C for 1 or 2weeks did not affect hemocyte numbers. However, APO mitotic activity in snails exposed to 20°C was significantly higher at both 1 and 2weeks, whereas mitotic activity in snails exposed to 33°C was significantly lower at 1week but normal at 2weeks. None of the treatments altered the resistance phenotype of Salvador snails. In a follow-up experiment, exposure to 33°C for 4-5h, a treatment previously reported to both induce expression of heat shock proteins (Hsps) and abrogate resistance to infection, caused immediate upregulation of Hsp 70 and Hsp 90 expression, but did not alter resistance, and Hsp expression levels returned to baseline after 2weeks at 33°C. Results of this study indicate that abnormal environmental conditions can have both stimulatory and inhibitory effects on the IDS in adult B. glabrata, and that some degree of acclimation to abnormal temperatures may occur. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. De novo RNA-Seq based transcriptome analysis of Papiliotrema laurentii strain RY1 under nitrogen starvation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Soumyadev; Chakravorty, Somnath; Mukherjee, Avishek; Bhattacharya, Debanjana; Bhattacharya, Semantee; Gachhui, Ratan

    2018-03-01

    Nitrogen is a key nutrient for all cell forms. Most organisms respond to nitrogen scarcity by slowing down their growth rate. On the contrary, our previous studies have shown that Papiliotrema laurentii strain RY1 has a robust growth under nitrogen starvation. To understand the global regulation that leads to such an extraordinary response, we undertook a de novo approach for transcriptome analysis of the yeast. Close to 33 million sequence reads of high quality for nitrogen limited and enriched condition were generated using Illumina NextSeq500. Trinity analysis and clustered transcripts annotation of the reads produced 17,611 unigenes, out of which 14,157 could be annotated. Gene Ontology term analysis generated 44.92% cellular component terms, 39.81% molecular function terms and 15.24% biological process terms. The most over represented pathways in general were translation, carbohydrate metabolism, amino acid metabolism, general metabolism, folding, sorting, degradation followed by transport and catabolism, nucleotide metabolism, replication and repair, transcription and lipid metabolism. A total of 4256 Single Sequence Repeats were identified. Differential gene expression analysis detected 996 P-significant transcripts to reveal transmembrane transport, lipid homeostasis, fatty acid catabolism and translation as the enriched terms which could be essential for Papiliotrema laurentii strain RY1 to adapt during nitrogen deprivation. Transcriptome data was validated by quantitative real-time PCR analysis of twelve transcripts. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of Papiliotrema laurentii strain RY1 transcriptome which would play a pivotal role in understanding the biochemistry of the yeast under acute nitrogen stress and this study would be encouraging to initiate extensive investigations into this Papiliotrema system. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. DNA microarray analysis of the cyanotroph Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 in response to nitrogen starvation, cyanide and a jewelry wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luque-Almagro, V M; Escribano, M P; Manso, I; Sáez, L P; Cabello, P; Moreno-Vivián, C; Roldán, M D

    2015-11-20

    Pseudomonas pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 is an alkaliphilic bacterium that can use cyanide as nitrogen source for growth, becoming a suitable candidate to be applied in biological treatment of cyanide-containing wastewaters. The assessment of the whole genome sequence of the strain CECT5344 has allowed the generation of DNA microarrays to analyze the response to different nitrogen sources. The mRNA of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 cells grown under nitrogen limiting conditions showed considerable changes when compared against the transcripts from cells grown with ammonium; up-regulated genes were, among others, the glnK gene encoding the nitrogen regulatory protein PII, the two-component ntrBC system involved in global nitrogen regulation, and the ammonium transporter-encoding amtB gene. The protein coding transcripts of P. pseudoalcaligenes CECT5344 cells grown with sodium cyanide or an industrial jewelry wastewater that contains high concentration of cyanide and metals like iron, copper and zinc, were also compared against the transcripts of cells grown with ammonium as nitrogen source. This analysis revealed the induction by cyanide and the cyanide-rich wastewater of four nitrilase-encoding genes, including the nitC gene that is essential for cyanide assimilation, the cyanase cynS gene involved in cyanate assimilation, the cioAB genes required for the cyanide-insensitive respiration, and the ahpC gene coding for an alkyl-hydroperoxide reductase that could be related with iron homeostasis and oxidative stress. The nitC and cynS genes were also induced in cells grown under nitrogen starvation conditions. In cells grown with the jewelry wastewater, a malate quinone:oxidoreductase mqoB gene and several genes coding for metal extrusion systems were specifically induced. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Marketing child survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, J P

    1984-01-01

    Growth monitoring charts, packets of oral rehydration salts (ORS), and vaccines, are inexpensive, life-saving, growth-protecting technologies which can enable parents to protect their children against the worst effects of poverty. Similarly, a matrix of current and easily understandable information about pregnancy, breast feeding, weaning, feeding during and immediately after illness, child spacing, and preparing and using home-made oral rehydration solutions, also could empower parents to protect the lives and the health of their children. The question arises as to how can these technologies and this information be put at the disposal of millions of families in the low-income world. The initial task of the Child Survival and Development Revolution is the communication of what is now possible, yet little is known about how to communicate information whose principal value is to the poor. There are 2 large-scale precedents: the Green Revolution, which in many instances succeeded in putting into the hands of thousands of small and large farmers the techniques and the knowledge which enabled them to double and treble the yields from their lands; and the campaign to put the knowledge and the means of family planning at the disposal of many millions of people. There are 2 lessons to be learned from these precedents: they have shown that the way to promote a people's technology and to put information at the disposal of the majority is by mobilizing all possible resources and working through all possible channels both to create the demand and to meet it; and neither the Green Revolution nor the family planning movement rally took off until they were viewed as political and economic priorities and given the full support of the nation's political leadership. Nowhere are these 2 lessons more clearly illustrated than in present-day Indonesia. Because the campaign for family planning was given high personal and political priority by the President, and because 85% of all family

  17. Requirements Engineering for Survivable Systems. Networked Systems Survivability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mead, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    This report describes the current state of requirements engineering for survivable systems, that is, systems that are able to complete their mission in a timely manner, even if significant portions...

  18. Aircraft Survivability: Unmanned Aircraft Systems Survivability. Fall 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    airspace coordination, command and control, and reliability are driving UAS use and design. 25 JASP 2008 Survivability Short Courseby Dr. Mark Couch The...Mark Couch , Research Staff Member at the Institute for Defense Analyses. 27 Warfighters Need a Joint Survivability Libraryby Maj Trenton Alexander...best MAC conference in the past two years.” 1stLt James Stephenson, USAF, headed home in May 2008. During his tour, James did a great job

  19. Cardiovascular disease incidence and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byberg, Stine; Agyemang, Charles; Zwisler, Ann-Dorthe

    2016-01-01

    Studies on cardiovascular disease (CVD) incidence and survival show varying results between different ethnic groups. Our aim was to add a new dimension by exploring the role of migrant status in combination with ethnic background on incidence of-and survival from-CVD and more specifically acute...... of some types of cardiovascular disease compared to Danish-born. Family-reunified migrants on the other hand had lower rates of CVD. All migrants had better survival than Danish-born indicating that migrants may not always be disadvantaged in health....

  20. Molt cycle related changes and effect of short term starvation on the biochemical constituents of the blue swimmer crab Portunus pelagicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugumar, V; Vijayalakshmi, G; Saranya, K

    2013-01-01

    Synthesis and hardening of a new exoskeleton are essential to the arthropod molting process. The present study emphasizes the variations in the levels of hemolymph total free sugars, hepatopancreas glycogen and cuticular proteins during the molting stages of Portunus pelagicus. It also reports the effect of short-term starvation conditions on the biochemical constituents of the hemolymph. Intermolt crabs were subjected to 6 days of starvation and hemolymph samples were taken. Standard biochemical procedures were followed toward the quantification of total proteins, total free sugars and total lipids. The total free sugar level in the hemolymph of P. pelagicus was observed to increase during early premolt D0 (3.108 ± 0.032 g/ml) and a gradual decrease till late postmolt B stage (0.552 ± 0.124 g/ml), suggesting the need for total free sugars to provide energy for the apolysis process. Increase in the levels of hepatopancreas glycogen was observed from 1225 ± 0.04 μg/mg in early premolt D0 to 1700 ± 0.3 μg/mg in late premolt D2-3. This is in correlation with the decreased levels of free sugars during premolt stages, suggesting an increase in the storage of glycogen reserves in the hepatopancreas. Cuticular proteins increased during stage B (2.702 ± 0.093 g/ml) and stage C (3.065 ± 0.012 g/ml), indicating exoskeleton hardening and mineralization. Results of the starvation studies clearly showed a steady decline in the level of total free sugars till day 6 (0.099 ± 0.00 g/ml) when compared to the control (8.646 ± 0.08 g/ml). Gradual decrease of total lipids was also observed from the first day of the experiment (6.088 ± 2.44 g/ml) to the last day of the study (0.401 ± 0.20 g/ml) which was 85% lesser than the control (8.450 ± 0.49 g/ml)suggesting the efficient usage of total sugars to consolidate the loss of energy reserves during starvation. The knowledge of Molt-cycle events can be used as a tool for the evaluation of the

  1. Effects of starvation, refeeding, and insulin on energy-linked metabolic processes in catfish (Rhamdia hilarii) adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machado, C.R.; Garofalo, M.A.; Roselino, J.E.; Kettelhut, I.C.; Migliorini, R.H.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of starvation and of a short period of refeeding on energy-linked metabolic processes, as well as the effects of insulin administration, were investigated in an omnivorous fish (catfish, Rhamdia hilarii) previously adapted to a carbohydrate-rich diet. Following food deprivation blood sugar levels declined progressively to about 50% of fed values after 30 days. During the same period plasma free fatty acid (FFA) concentration increased twofold. Starvation resulted in reduced concentrations of lipid and glycogen in the liver and of glycogen, lipid, and protein in white muscle. However, taking into account the initial and final concentrations of tissue constituents, the liver weight, and the large fractions of body weight represented by muscle, it could be estimated that most of the energy utilized during starvation derived from the catabolism of muscle lipid and protein. Refeeding starved fishes for 48 hr induced several-fold increases in the rates of in vivo and in vitro incorporation of [14C]glucose into liver and muscle lipid and of [14C]glycine into liver and muscle protein. Incorporation of [14C]glucose into liver glycogen was also increased. However; refeeding did not affect the incorporation of labeled glucose into muscle glycogen, neither in vivo nor in vitro. Administration of pharmacological doses of insulin to normally fed catfishes resulted in marked increases in the in vivo incorporation of 14C from glucose into lipid and protein in both liver and muscle. In contrast, labeled glucose incorporation into muscle glycogen was not affected by insulin and label incorporation into liver glycogen was actually lower than that in noninjected controls

  2. Regional asymmetry of metabolic and antioxidant profile in the sciaenid fish shi drum (Umbrina cirrosa white muscle. Response to starvation and refeeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Carmen Hidalgo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present study is to characterize the metabolic and antioxidant profile of white muscle of shi drum in two sites of the body, anterior dorsal (AM and posterior dorsal (PM portions. In addition, it will be analyzed the possible effect of starvation and a subsequent refeeding, with two different protocols, pair feeding and ad libitum. Activities of key enzymes of intermediary metabolism and of antioxidant enzymes, as well as lipid peroxidation, as an index of oxidative stress, were evaluated. The results indicate the existence of a regional asymmetry of the metabolic capacities of the white muscle of shi drum, which is likely related to the different contribution to swimming of the body regions examined. Starvation induces a metabolic depression that is more marked in those activities that support burst swimming in PM, while those activities supporting maintenance requirements are conserved. The greatest energy demands during starvation appear to lie in AM, which showed the highest oxidative metabolism rate. The increased use of fatty acids as energy source for AM leads to oxidative stress. A period of more than four weeks of refeeding for full restoration of metabolic capacities in AM is needed, probably related to the higher muscle mass located in this region. On the contrary, all enzyme activities in PM returned to control levels in both refeeding protocols, but pair feeding seems to be advantageous since compensatory growth has been taking place without signs of oxidative stress. This work was addressed to gain knowledge on the physiology of a promising fish species in aquaculture like shi drum. The results displayed here show how the starving and further re-feeding events could generate oxidative stress situations characterized by high lipid peroxidation levels which may influence negatively on the quality of the edible part of the fish. This study opens an interesting field on this fish species which deserves being

  3. Granulation, control of bacterial contamination, and enhanced lipid accumulation by driving nutrient starvation in coupled wastewater treatment and Chlorella regularis cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Dandan; Li, Yunbao; Yang, Yang; Wang, Yao; Zhang, Chaofan; Wang, Di

    2015-02-01

    Bacterial contamination and biomass harvesting are still challenges associated with coupling of microalgae and wastewater treatment technology. This study investigated aggregation, bacterial growth, lipid production, and pollutant removal during bacteria contaminated Chlorella regularis cultivation under nutrient starvation stress, by supposing the C/N/P ratios of the medium to 14/1.4/1 (MB₂.₅) and 44/1.4/1 (MB₄.₀), respectively. Granules of 500-650 μm were formed in the bacteria contaminated inoculum; however, purified C. regularis were generally suspended freely in the medium, indicating that bacterial presence was a prerequisite for granulation. Extracellular polymeric substance (EPS) analysis showed that polysaccharides were dominant in granules, while protein mainly distributed in the outer layer. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) results revealed Sphingobacteriales bacterium and Sphingobacterium sp. are vital organisms involved in the flocculation of microalgae, and nitrifiers (Stenotrophomonas maltophilia) could co-exist in the granular. Both EPS and DGGE results further supported that bacteria played key roles in granulation. C. regularis was always dominant and determined the total biomass concentration during co-cultivation, but bacterial growth was limited owing to nutrient deficiency. Starvation strategy also contributed to enhancement of lipid accumulation, as lipid content in MB₄.₀ with a greater C/N/P led to the greatest increase in the starvation period, and the maximum lipid productivity reached 0.057 g/(L·day). Chemical oxygen demand and nitrogen removal in MB₄.₀ reached 92 and 96%, respectively, after 3 days of cultivation. Thus, cultivation of microalgae in high C/N/P wastewater enabled simultaneous realization of biomass granulation, bacterial overgrowth limitation, enhanced lipid accumulation, and wastewater purification.

  4. The Survival of the Wisest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salk, Jonas

    1975-01-01

    Suggests that humans differ from other living organisms in the ability to exercise learned behavior and the individual will, which may allow people to make the changes in values necessary to survive on this planet. (DW)

  5. Probabilistic Survivability Versus Time Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation documents Kennedy Space Center's Independent Assessment work completed on three assessments for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program to assist the Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer during key programmatic reviews and provided the GSDO Program with analyses of how egress time affects the likelihood of astronaut and ground worker survival during an emergency. For each assessment, a team developed probability distributions for hazard scenarios to address statistical uncertainty, resulting in survivability plots over time. The first assessment developed a mathematical model of probabilistic survivability versus time to reach a safe location using an ideal Emergency Egress System at Launch Complex 39B (LC-39B); the second used the first model to evaluate and compare various egress systems under consideration at LC-39B. The third used a modified LC-39B model to determine if a specific hazard decreased survivability more rapidly than other events during flight hardware processing in Kennedy's Vehicle Assembly Building.

  6. Autophagy Contributes to the Death/Survival Balance in Cancer PhotoDynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Dini

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is an important cellular program with a “double face” role, since it promotes either cell survival or cell death, also in cancer therapies. Its survival role occurs by recycling cell components during starvation or removing stressed organelles; when damage becomes extensive, autophagy provides another programmed cell death pathway, known as Autophagic Cell Death (ACD. The induction of autophagy is a common outcome in PhotoDynamic Therapy (PDT, a two-step process involving the irradiation of photosensitizer (PS-loaded cancer cells. Upon tissue oxygen interaction, PS provokes immediate and direct Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS-induced damage to Endoplasmic Reticulum (ER, mitochondria, plasma membrane, and/or lysosomes. The main biological effects carried out in cancer PDT are direct cytotoxicity to tumor cells, vasculature damage and induction of inflammatory reactions stimulating immunological responses. The question about the role of autophagy in PDT and its putative immunological impact is hotly controversial and largely studied in recent times. This review deals with the induction of autophagy in PDT protocols and its dual role, also considering its interrelationship with apoptosis, the preferential cell death program triggered in the photodynamic process.

  7. Developmental Ethanol Exposure Causes Reduced Feeding and Reveals a Critical Role for Neuropeptide F in Survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Guevara

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Food intake is necessary for survival, and natural reward circuitry has evolved to help ensure that animals ingest sufficient food to maintain development, growth, and survival. Drugs of abuse, including alcohol, co-opt the natural reward circuitry in the brain, and this is a major factor in the reinforcement of drug behaviors leading to addiction. At the junction of these two aspects of reward are alterations in feeding behavior due to alcohol consumption. In particular, developmental alcohol exposure (DAE results in a collection of physical and neurobehavioral disorders collectively referred to as Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD. The deleterious effects of DAE include intellectual disabilities and other neurobehavioral changes, including altered feeding behaviors. Here we use Drosophila melanogaster as a genetic model organism to study the effects of DAE on feeding behavior and the expression and function of Neuropeptide F. We show that addition of a defined concentration of ethanol to food leads to reduced feeding at all stages of development. Further, genetic conditions that reduce or eliminate NPF signaling combine with ethanol exposure to further reduce feeding, and the distribution of NPF is altered in the brains of ethanol-supplemented larvae. Most strikingly, we find that the vast majority of flies with a null mutation in the NPF receptor die early in larval development when reared in ethanol, and provide evidence that this lethality is due to voluntary starvation. Collectively, we find a critical role for NPF signaling in protecting against altered feeding behavior induced by developmental ethanol exposure.

  8. Effect of semolina-jaggery diet on survival and development of Drosophila melanogaster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chattopadhyay, Debarati; James, Joel; Roy, Debasish; Sen, Soumadeep; Chatterjee, Rishita; Thirumurugan, Kavitha

    2015-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster is an ideal model organism for developmental studies. This study tests the potential of semolina-jaggery (SJ) diet as a new formulation for bulk rearing of flies. Semolina and jaggery are organic products obtained from wheat endosperm and cane sugar, respectively. Semolina is a rich source of carbohydrates and protein. Jaggery has a high content of dietary sugars. Moreover, preparation of semolina jaggery diet is cost-effective and easy. Thus, the current study aimed to compare survival and developmental parameters of flies fed the SJ diet to flies fed the standard cornmeal-sugar-yeast (CSY) diet. SJ diet enhanced survival of flies without affecting fecundity; male flies showed increased resistance to starvation. A higher number of flies emerged at F2 and F3 generation when fed the SJ diet than when fed the control CSY diet. SJ diet did not increase fly body weight and lipid percentage. Therefore, SJ diet can be used for bulk rearing of healthy flies at par with the standard cornmeal-sugar-yeast diet. PMID:26252611

  9. Effect of the Biofilm Age and Starvation on Acid Tolerance of Biofilm Formed by Streptococcus mutans Isolated from Caries-Active and Caries-Free Adults

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Shan; Chen, Shuai; Zhang, Chengfei; Zhao, Xingfu; Huang, Xiaojing; Cai, Zhiyu

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans (S. mutans) is considered a leading cause of dental caries. The capability of S. mutans to tolerate low pH is essential for its cariogenicity. Aciduricity of S. mutans is linked to its adaptation to environmental stress in oral cavity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of biofilm age and starvation condition on acid tolerance of biofilm formed by S. mutans clinical isolates. S. mutans clinical strains isolated from caries-active (SM593) and caries-free (SM18) adu...

  10. Customer service skills for survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAtee, L F

    1999-11-01

    As APICS practitioners, we all must share a common goal. How can we contribute to our company's success? Success can be measured in positive terms of market share, growth, profitability, return on investment, or some combination thereof. Each company must establish its own definition of success. For the purposes of this article, success will be equated to one word that we can all readily identify with: survival. What skills do we need to survive in the marketplace of the next millennium?

  11. The Survival of Tuscan Firms

    OpenAIRE

    Filippo Randelli; Giorgio Ricchiuti

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we analyze the survival probability of firms in Tuscany (Italy) in the first decade of the $21^{st}$ century. Using the Official Register of Firms, held by Unioncamere Toscany, we build a panel for the period 1998-2010. Taking into account both individual and context variables, we find that a higher institutional complexity and a lower population density have a positive and significant effect on probability to survive. Moreover, both MAR and Jacob externalities have a nonlinear ...

  12. Culture, survival, and family size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-03-02

    Judith Jacobson, senior researcher at the Worldwatch Institute which analyzes economic and social issues, states that people have large families for about as many reasons as there are different cultures. The reasons include carrying on the family name, show of "macho" by the father, or force of habit, i.e., doing what their poverty stricken families and neighbors have always done. These traditions did not simply develop by chance. Throughout history, a high death rate coincided with the high birthrate. If a couple wanted 2 or 3 children, they had several more, assuming -- often correctly -- that at least a few of their children would die of any number of diseases. In addition there were and continue to be economic reasons for big families. Working children add to thefamily income, and they are a kind of pension plan, looked to for support during old age. Thus, the desire for big families is deeply rooted in many cultures. At present, in less developed nations, medicines and pesticides have eradicated many diseases and increased life expectancy. Infant mortality has dropped markedly in the last 25 years, but there has not been a matching drop in birthrates, especially in rural areas. The result is that poor nations' populations are growing about twice as fast as needed to replace those dying. The result in some rural areas has been hunger and even starvation. Rural people and their problems are often easier to ignore than the unrest of city dwellers. Many governments provide jobs and keep food prices low in cities where political opposition is more likely to start. This urban rural gap tends to widen as population grows. Low wages for the poorest rural residents drop when there are more available workers for the same amount of land. This creates another dimension of the population problem -- migration to the cities and to foreign countries.

  13. Micrograft size and subsequent survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, D J

    1997-09-01

    Micrograft survival rates in hair transplantation have been frequently described in private conversations by hair transplant doctors as variable at best. References in medical literature may grossly underestimate the prevalence and magnitude of poor growth. This is probably because most hair transplant surgeons are concerned that publication of a significant incidence of poor growth would reflect negatively on their practice. The purpose of this research was to study micrograft survival rates using microscopic dissection techniques. The author also presents a hypothesis regarding the relatively poor survival rates reported by hair transplant physicians. Two different groups of micrografts were prepared. One group, mainly single-haired with tissue trimmed close to the hair shaft, was planted into one test patch in the bald crown of a patient's scalp. Another group of intact follicular clumps, prepared with more dermis, subcutaneous fat, and intact sebaceous glands, was planted into another test patch. These test patches and their growth were documented with close-up photography. The micrografts prepared as existing follicular clumps had a much higher survival rate (over 100%) than the micrografts cut as slender single hairs. Extremely high survival rates of micrografts are obtainable by transplanting intact follicular clumps with protective tissue around the micrograft, and preserving the follicular clump's sebaceous gland. These survival rates were not achieved when micrografts were produced by splitting individual hairs away from a naturally occurring follicular clump.

  14. Novel Alleles of Phosphorus-Starvation Tolerance 1 Gene (PSTOL1 from Oryza rufipogon Confers High Phosphorus Uptake Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Neelam

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Limited phosphorus availability in the soil is one of the major constraints to the growth and productivity of rice across Asian, African and South American countries, where 50% of the rice is grown under rain-fed systems on poor and problematic soils. With an aim to determine novel alleles for enhanced phosphorus uptake efficiency in wild species germplasm of rice Oryza rufipogon, we investigated phosphorus uptake1 (Pup1 locus with 11 previously reported SSR markers and sequence characterized the phosphorus-starvation tolerance 1 (PSTOL1 gene. In the present study, we screened 182 accessions of O. rufipogon along with Vandana as a positive control with SSR markers. From the analysis, it was inferred that all of the O. rufipogon accessions undertaken in this study had an insertion of 90 kb region, including Pup1-K46, a diagnostic marker for PSTOL1, however, it was absent among O. sativa cv. PR114, PR121, and PR122. The complete PSTOL1 gene was also sequenced in 67 representative accessions of O. rufipogon and Vandana as a positive control. From comparative sequence analysis, 53 mutations (52 SNPs and 1 nonsense mutation were found in the PSTOL1 coding region, of which 28 were missense mutations and 10 corresponded to changes in the amino acid polarity. These 53 mutations correspond to 17 haplotypes, of these 6 were shared and 11 were scored only once. A major shared haplotype was observed among 44 accessions of O. rufipogon along with Vandana and Kasalath. Out of 17 haplotypes, accessions representing 8 haplotypes were grown under the phosphorus-deficient conditions in hydroponics for 60 days. Significant differences were observed in the root length and weight among all the genotypes when grown under phosphorus deficiency conditions as compared to the phosphorus sufficient conditions. The O. rufipogon accession IRGC 106506 from Laos performed significantly better, with 2.5 times higher root weight and phosphorus content as compared to the

  15. The Economics of Starvation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stahl, Rune Møller

    2016-01-01

    Stahl investigates the role of liberal economics in the formulation of the disastrous famine policy of the British colonial administration in nineteenth-century India, where millions of Indians starved to death in a series of famines. The chapter examines the influential debates around the Great....... The hegemonic position of free trade ideas and economic liberalism allowed for proponents of a hard laissez-faire line to mobilize considerable intellectual resources, from Adam Smith to Ricardo, to overcome humanitarian critiques....

  16. Probabilistic Survivability Versus Time Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyner, James J., Sr.

    2015-01-01

    This technical paper documents Kennedy Space Centers Independent Assessment team work completed on three assessments for the Ground Systems Development and Operations (GSDO) Program to assist the Chief Safety and Mission Assurance Officer (CSO) and GSDO management during key programmatic reviews. The assessments provided the GSDO Program with an analysis of how egress time affects the likelihood of astronaut and worker survival during an emergency. For each assessment, the team developed probability distributions for hazard scenarios to address statistical uncertainty, resulting in survivability plots over time. The first assessment developed a mathematical model of probabilistic survivability versus time to reach a safe location using an ideal Emergency Egress System at Launch Complex 39B (LC-39B); the second used the first model to evaluate and compare various egress systems under consideration at LC-39B. The third used a modified LC-39B model to determine if a specific hazard decreased survivability more rapidly than other events during flight hardware processing in Kennedys Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB).Based on the composite survivability versus time graphs from the first two assessments, there was a soft knee in the Figure of Merit graphs at eight minutes (ten minutes after egress ordered). Thus, the graphs illustrated to the decision makers that the final emergency egress design selected should have the capability of transporting the flight crew from the top of LC 39B to a safe location in eight minutes or less. Results for the third assessment were dominated by hazards that were classified as instantaneous in nature (e.g. stacking mishaps) and therefore had no effect on survivability vs time to egress the VAB. VAB emergency scenarios that degraded over time (e.g. fire) produced survivability vs time graphs that were line with aerospace industry norms.

  17. Agile Objects: Component-Based Inherent Survivability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Chien, Andrew

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a framework called Agile Objects which leverages component object models and enables the construction of survivable systems that support increased application survivability through elusive technologies...

  18. PHD2 Targeting Overcomes Breast Cancer Cell Death upon Glucose Starvation in a PP2A/B55α-Mediated Manner

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giusy Di Conza

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available B55α is a regulatory subunit of the PP2A phosphatase. We have recently found that B55α-associated PP2A promotes partial deactivation of the HIF-prolyl-hydroxylase enzyme PHD2. Here, we show that, in turn, PHD2 triggers degradation of B55α by hydroxylating it at proline 319. In the context of glucose starvation, PHD2 reduces B55α protein levels, which correlates with MDA-MB231 and MCF7 breast cancer cell death. Under these conditions, PHD2 silencing rescues B55α degradation, overcoming apoptosis, whereas in SKBR3 breast cancer cells showing resistance to glucose starvation, B55α knockdown restores cell death and prevents neoplastic growth in vitro. Treatment of MDA-MB231-derived xenografts with the glucose competitor 2-deoxy-glucose leads to tumor regression in the presence of PHD2. Knockdown of PHD2 induces B55α accumulation and treatment resistance by preventing cell apoptosis. Overall, our data unravel B55α as a PHD2 substrate and highlight a role for PHD2-B55α in the response to nutrient deprivation.

  19. The effect of starvation and total parenteral nutrition on skeletal muscle amino acid content and membrane potential difference in normal man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legaspi, A; Roberts, J P; Albert, J D; Tracey, K J; Shires, G T; Lowry, S F

    1988-03-01

    Skeletal muscle intracellular amino acids and transmembrane potential difference (Em) were measured in hospitalized volunteers during starvation and refeeding with total parenteral nutrition (TPN). Healthy volunteers underwent extremity amino acid flux measurement, percutaneous skeletal muscle biopsy and determination of skeletal muscle Em after ten days of starvation (ST), and after a subsequent ten day period of TPN. ST produced a significant (p less than 0.05) decrease in plasma essential amino acids when compared with normal ambulatory volunteers. Subsequent administration of TPN produced a significant extremity uptake of all essential amino acids except for threonine and uptake of the nonessential amino acids taurine, glutamate, tyrosine and arginine. ST produced a significant reduction in skeletal muscle free intracellular glutamine and a significant increase in isoleucine and leucine. These changes in free intracellular amino acids were not reversed by administration of TPN. At the conclusion of ten days of ST and ten days of TPN, there was a significant reduction (p less than 0.05) in skeletal muscle Em. The results demonstrate that abnormalities of intracellular amino acid concentrations and reduction of muscle Em are not specific to stress conditions, but rather they can be present during both unstressed ST and intravenous nutritional repletion.

  20. Intracerebroventricular administration of leptin increases anxiety-like behavior in female rats after semi-starvation--implications for anxiety in eating disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Tsuneo; Inoue, Koki; Iwasaki, Shinichi; Muramatsu, Tomohiro; Hayashi, Teruaki; Kiriike, Nosuo

    2009-06-01

    Patients with eating disorders often exhibit abnormal eating conditions like food restriction, adipocyte and body weight reduction, and pathologic anxiety-like behavior. The role of leptin, which is recognized as an adipocyte-derived hormone, on anxiety-like behavior in eating disorders is still unclear. We investigated the role of leptin on anxiety-like behavior with or without semi-starvation using the elevated plus-maze test in adolescent female rats. In our first experiment, anxiety-like behavior was evaluated with the elevated plus-maze test 30 min after intracerebroventricular administration of 3 microg of leptin or vehicle. In our second experiment, the rats were allowed access to food for only 2 hr each day for 7 days. Then, leptin or vehicle was administered to the rats after the last 2 hr feeding period, and anxiety-like behaviors were evaluated in the same way as in the first experiment. In the first experiment, there was no difference between the anxiety-like behaviors observed after leptin administration and those seen after vehicle administration. Under the conditions of semi-starvation, however, the percentage of time spent in the open arms in the rats given leptin was lower than that in rats given vehicle. These results suggest that leptin administration causes anxiety-like behavior only after semistarvation. Leptin might play an important role in pathologic anxiety-like behavior in eating disorders.

  1. Symmorphosis through dietary regulation: a combinatorial role for proteolysis, autophagy and protein synthesis in normalising muscle metabolism and function of hypertrophic mice after acute starvation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry Collins-Hooper

    Full Text Available Animals are imbued with adaptive mechanisms spanning from the tissue/organ to the cellular scale which insure that processes of homeostasis are preserved in the landscape of size change. However we and others have postulated that the degree of adaptation is limited and that once outside the normal levels of size fluctuations, cells and tissues function in an aberant manner. In this study we examine the function of muscle in the myostatin null mouse which is an excellent model for hypertrophy beyond levels of normal growth and consequeces of acute starvation to restore mass. We show that muscle growth is sustained through protein synthesis driven by Serum/Glucocorticoid Kinase 1 (SGK1 rather than Akt1. Furthermore our metabonomic profiling of hypertrophic muscle shows that carbon from nutrient sources is being channelled for the production of biomass rather than ATP production. However the muscle displays elevated levels of autophagy and decreased levels of muscle tension. We demonstrate the myostatin null muscle is acutely sensitive to changes in diet and activates both the proteolytic and autophagy programmes and shutting down protein synthesis more extensively than is the case for wild-types. Poignantly we show that acute starvation which is detrimental to wild-type animals is beneficial in terms of metabolism and muscle function in the myostatin null mice by normalising tension production.

  2. Expression of Magnaporthe oryzae genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins secreted during nitrogen starvation and interaction with its host, Oryza sativa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, J; Liang, M L; Yan, J L; Yang, Y Q; Liu, L; Liu, C; Yang, L J; L, C Y

    2015-12-16

    Previous studies have shown that the blast fungus, Magnaporthe oryzae, may experience nitrogen starvation during infection of its plant host (rice,Oryza sativa). Here, we studied the expression of seven genes encoding cysteine-rich proteins with N-terminal signal peptides during nitrogen limitation and throughout the infection process. Some genes were upregulated to a greater extent in weak pathogenic strains than in strong pathogenic strains when they were cultured in complete media, and the expression of some genes was higher in both weak and strong pathogenic strains cultured in 1/10-N and nitrogen starvation media. Furthermore, the expression of these genes was upregulated to different extents in the early stages of M. oryzae infection. These data demonstrate that the genes of interest are highly expressed in weak and strong pathogenic strains cultured under nitrogen limitation and at the early stage of the infection process. This indicates that cysteine-rich secreted proteins in the blast fungus might be involved in establishing disease in the host and that they are sensitive to nitrogen levels. Thus, their role in sensing nitrogen availability within the host is implied, which provides a basis for further functional identification of these genes and their products during plant infection.

  3. Cell Survival Signaling in Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megison, Michael L.; Gillory, Lauren A.; Beierle, Elizabeth A.

    2013-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor of childhood and is responsible for over 15% of pediatric cancer deaths. Neuroblastoma tumorigenesis and malignant transformation is driven by overexpression and dominance of cell survival pathways and a lack of normal cellular senescence or apoptosis. Therefore, manipulation of cell survival pathways may decrease the malignant potential of these tumors and provide avenues for the development of novel therapeutics. This review focuses on several facets of cell survival pathways including protein kinases (PI3K, AKT, ALK, and FAK), transcription factors (NF-κB, MYCN and p53), and growth factors (IGF, EGF, PDGF, and VEGF). Modulation of each of these factors decreases the growth or otherwise hinders the malignant potential of neuroblastoma, and many therapeutics targeting these pathways are already in the clinical trial phase of development. Continued research and discovery of effective modulators of these pathways will revolutionize the treatment of neuroblastoma. PMID:22934706

  4. Survival analysis II: Cox regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stel, Vianda S.; Dekker, Friedo W.; Tripepi, Giovanni; Zoccali, Carmine; Jager, Kitty J.

    2011-01-01

    In contrast to the Kaplan-Meier method, Cox proportional hazards regression can provide an effect estimate by quantifying the difference in survival between patient groups and can adjust for confounding effects of other variables. The purpose of this article is to explain the basic concepts of the

  5. Long-term haemodialysis survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heaf, James; Nielsen, Arne Høj; Hansen, Henrik Post

    2012-01-01

    Haemodialysis (HD) treatment for end-stage renal disease bears a poor prognosis. We present a case of a patient who, apart from two transplant periods lasting 8 months in all, was treated with conventional in-centre HD three times a week and who survived for 41 years. Patients should be aware tha...

  6. Survivability of SCADA Control Loop

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Camacho, José; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk; Remke, Anne Katharina Ingrid

    2009-01-01

    The endorsement of information technologies for critical infrastructures control introduces new threats in their security and surveillance. Along with certain level of protection against attacks, it is desirable for critical processes to survive even if they succeed. A stochastic Petri Nets-based

  7. Shell condition and survival of Puget Sound pteropods are impaired by ocean acidification conditions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Shallin Busch

    Full Text Available We tested whether the thecosome pteropod Limacina helicina from Puget Sound, an urbanized estuary in the northwest continental US, experiences shell dissolution and altered mortality rates when exposed to the high CO2, low aragonite saturation state (Ωa conditions that occur in Puget Sound and the northeast Pacific Ocean. Five, week-long experiments were conducted in which we incubated pteropods collected from Puget Sound in four carbon chemistry conditions: current summer surface (∼460-500 µatm CO2, Ωa≈1.59, current deep water or surface conditions during upwelling (∼760 and ∼1600-1700 µatm CO2, Ωa≈1.17 and 0.56, and future deep water or surface conditions during upwelling (∼2800-3400 µatm CO2, Ωa≈0.28. We measured shell condition using a scoring regime of five shell characteristics that capture different aspects of shell dissolution. We characterized carbon chemistry conditions in statistical analyses with Ωa, and conducted analyses considering Ωa both as a continuous dataset and as discrete treatments. Shell dissolution increased linearly as aragonite saturation state decreased. Discrete treatment comparisons indicate that shell dissolution was greater in undersaturated treatments compared to oversaturated treatments. Survival increased linearly with aragonite saturation state, though discrete treatment comparisons indicated that survival was similar in all but the lowest saturation state treatment. These results indicate that, under starvation conditions, pteropod survival may not be greatly affected by current and expected near-future aragonite saturation state in the NE Pacific, but shell dissolution may. Given that subsurface waters in Puget Sound's main basin are undersaturated with respect to aragonite in the winter and can be undersaturated in the summer, the condition and persistence of the species in this estuary warrants further study.

  8. Shell condition and survival of Puget Sound pteropods are impaired by ocean acidification conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, D Shallin; Maher, Michael; Thibodeau, Patricia; McElhany, Paul

    2014-01-01

    We tested whether the thecosome pteropod Limacina helicina from Puget Sound, an urbanized estuary in the northwest continental US, experiences shell dissolution and altered mortality rates when exposed to the high CO2, low aragonite saturation state (Ωa) conditions that occur in Puget Sound and the northeast Pacific Ocean. Five, week-long experiments were conducted in which we incubated pteropods collected from Puget Sound in four carbon chemistry conditions: current summer surface (∼460-500 µatm CO2, Ωa≈1.59), current deep water or surface conditions during upwelling (∼760 and ∼1600-1700 µatm CO2, Ωa≈1.17 and 0.56), and future deep water or surface conditions during upwelling (∼2800-3400 µatm CO2, Ωa≈0.28). We measured shell condition using a scoring regime of five shell characteristics that capture different aspects of shell dissolution. We characterized carbon chemistry conditions in statistical analyses with Ωa, and conducted analyses considering Ωa both as a continuous dataset and as discrete treatments. Shell dissolution increased linearly as aragonite saturation state decreased. Discrete treatment comparisons indicate that shell dissolution was greater in undersaturated treatments compared to oversaturated treatments. Survival increased linearly with aragonite saturation state, though discrete treatment comparisons indicated that survival was similar in all but the lowest saturation state treatment. These results indicate that, under starvation conditions, pteropod survival may not be greatly affected by current and expected near-future aragonite saturation state in the NE Pacific, but shell dissolution may. Given that subsurface waters in Puget Sound's main basin are undersaturated with respect to aragonite in the winter and can be undersaturated in the summer, the condition and persistence of the species in this estuary warrants further study.

  9. Modeling transitions in body composition: the approach to steady state for anthropometric measures and physiological functions in the Minnesota human starvation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargrove, James L; Heinz, Grete; Heinz, Otto

    2008-10-07

    This study evaluated whether the changes in several anthropometric and functional measures during caloric restriction combined with walking and treadmill exercise would fit a simple model of approach to steady state (a plateau) that can be solved using spreadsheet software (Microsoft Excel). We hypothesized that transitions in waist girth and several body compartments would fit a simple exponential model that approaches a stable steady-state. The model (an equation) was applied to outcomes reported in the Minnesota starvation experiment using Microsoft Excel's Solver function to derive rate parameters (k) and projected steady state values. However, data for most end-points were available only at t = 0, 12 and 24 weeks of caloric restriction. Therefore, we derived 2 new equations that enable model solutions to be calculated from 3 equally spaced data points. For the group of male subjects in the Minnesota study, body mass declined with a first order rate constant of about 0.079 wk-1. The fractional rate of loss of fat free mass, which includes components that remained almost constant during starvation, was 0.064 wk-1, compared to a rate of loss of fat mass of 0.103 wk-1. The rate of loss of abdominal fat, as exemplified by the change in the waist girth, was 0.213 wk-1.On average, 0.77 kg was lost per cm of waist girth. Other girths showed rates of loss between 0.085 and 0.131 wk-1. Resting energy expenditure (REE) declined at 0.131 wk-1. Changes in heart volume, hand strength, work capacity and N excretion showed rates of loss in the same range. The group of 32 subjects was close to steady state or had already reached steady state for the variables under consideration at the end of semi-starvation. When energy intake is changed to new, relatively constant levels, while physical activity is maintained, changes in several anthropometric and physiological measures can be modeled as an exponential approach to steady state using software that is widely available. The 3

  10. Effect of allowed grazing time, inert rumen bulk and length of starvation before grazing on the weight, composition and dermentative end-products of the rumen contents of lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chilibroste, P.; Tamminga, S.; Bruchem, van J.; Togt, van der P.L.

    1998-01-01

    The effect of length of the allowed grazing time (Experiment 1), length of starvation time and placement in the rumen of inert bulk material before grazing (Experiment 2) on liquid and particulate rumen pool sizes, composition and fermentability was investigated. In Experiment 1, four lengths of

  11. Effects of tryptophan starvation on levels of the trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP) and anti-TRAP regulatory protein and their influence on trp operon expression in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wen-Jen; Yanofsky, Charles

    2005-03-01

    The anti-TRAP protein (AT), encoded by the rtpA gene of Bacillus subtilis, can bind to and inhibit the tryptophan-activated trp RNA-binding attenuation protein (TRAP). AT binding can prevent TRAP from promoting transcription termination in the leader region of the trp operon, thereby increasing trp operon expression. We show here that AT levels continue to increase as tryptophan starvation becomes more severe, whereas the TRAP level remains relatively constant and independent of tryptophan starvation. Assuming that the functional form of AT is a trimer, we estimate that the ratios of AT trimers per TRAP molecule are 0.39 when the cells are grown under mild tryptophan starvation conditions, 0.83 under more severe starvation conditions, and approximately 2.0 when AT is expressed maximally. As the AT level is increased, a corresponding increase is observed in the anthranilate synthase level. When AT is expressed maximally, the anthranilate synthase level is about 70% of the level observed in a strain lacking TRAP. In a nutritional shift experiment where excess phenylalanine and tyrosine could potentially starve cells of tryptophan, both the AT level and anthranilate synthase activity were observed to increase. Expression of the trp operon is clearly influenced by the level of AT.

  12. Nitrogen starvation affects bacterial adhesion to soil Adesão de bactérias desnutridas por nitrogênio a solo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tereza Borges

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the main factors limiting the bioremediation of subsoil environments based on bioaugmentation is the transport of selected microorganisms to the contaminated zones. The characterization of the physiological responses of the inoculated microorganisms to starvation, especially the evaluation of characteristics that affect the adhesion of the cells to soil particles, is fundamental to anticipate the success or failure of bioaugmentation. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of nitrogen starvation on cell surface hydrophobicity and cell adhesion to soil particles by bacterial strains previously characterized as able to use benzene, toluene or xilenes as carbon and energy sources. The strains LBBMA 18-T (non-identified, Arthrobacter aurescens LBBMA 98, Arthrobacter oxydans LBBMA 201, and Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204-1 were used in the experiments. Cultivation of the cells in nitrogen-deficient medium caused a significant reduction of the adhesion to soil particles by all the four strains. Nitrogen starvation also reduced significantly the strength of cell adhesion to the soil particles, except for Klebsiella sp. LBBMA 204-1. Two of the four strains showed significant reduction in cell surface hydrophobicity. It is inferred that the efficiency of bacterial transport through soils might be potentially increased by nitrogen starvation.Um dos principais fatores limitantes da biorremediação in situ de solos subterrâneos, baseada na bioaumentação, é o transporte dos microrganismos selecionados até o local contaminado. A caracterização das respostas fisiológicas dos microrganismos introduzidos no subsolo a condições de escassez nutricional, notadamente a avaliação de características que afetam a adesão celular ao solo, é fundamental para se prever o sucesso da bioaumentação. O objetivo deste trabalho foi determinar o efeito da desnutrição em meio com escassez de nitrogênio sobre a hidrofobicidade celular e a

  13. Effects of starvation, re-feeding and timing of food supply on daily rhythm features of gut melatonin in carp (Catla catla).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sourav; Maitra, Saumen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Influences of starvation, re-feeding and time of food supply on daily rhythm features of melatonin (5-methoxy-N-acetyltryptamine) and its key regulator AANAT (arylalkylamine N-acetyltransferase) protein in the gut tissues were separately evaluated in carp Catla catla. The first experiment was aimed at demonstration of duration dependent effects of starvation and re-feeding after starvation on the daily profiles and rhythm features of gut melatonin and AANAT. Accordingly, juvenile carp were randomly distributed in three groups, which were (a) provided with balanced diet daily at a fixed time, that is, 10:00 clock hour or zeitgeber time (ZT) 4 (control), or (b) starved (for 2-, 4-, 6- or 8 days), or (c) initially starved for 8 days and then re-fed (for 2-, 4-, 6-, 8-, 12- or 16 days) daily with the same food and at the time (ZT4) used for control fish. The carp in each group were sampled for collection of gut tissues at six different time points at a regular interval of 4 h in a daily cycle. In another experiment, the influences of timing of food supply were separately examined in four fish groups, which were provided with a fixed amount of food once daily either at 06:00 or 12:00 or 18:00 or 24:00 clock hour corresponding to ZT0 or ZT6 or ZT12 or ZT18, respectively, for 7 days before sampling at 12 different time points with a regular interval of 2 h in a 24-h cycle. The study revealed a gradual increase in the mesor and amplitude values of melatonin and AANAT in gut with the progress of starvation till their values reached maximum at day-6 and remained steady thereafter. In contrast, re-feeding of 8-day starved fish resulted in a sharp decrease in their mesor and amplitude values after 2 days and then followed by a steady-state increase till re-attainment of their values close to control fish at the end of 16 days. The acrophase of these gut variables in each control, starved and re-fed fish was noted mostly at midday or ZT6. However, the results of another

  14. An unusual correlation between ppGpp pool size and rate of ribosome synthesis during partial pyrimidine starvation of Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vogel, Ulla; Pedersen, Steen; Jensen, Kaj Frank

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli was exposed to partial pyrimidine starvation by feeding a pyrBI strain orotate as the only pyrimidine source. Subsequently, differential rates of synthesis of rRNA and of a few ribosome-associated proteins as well as the pool sizes of nucleoside triphosphates and ppGpp were...... measured. As theorotate concentration in the medium was reduced, the growth rate decreased and the pools of pyrimidine nucleotides, particularly UTP, declined. We did not observe the normal inverse relation between concentration of ppGpp and growth rate; rather, we observed that the ppGpp pool was low...

  15. Individual social capital and survival

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ejlskov, Linda; Mortensen, Rikke N; Overgaard, Charlotte

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The concept of social capital has received increasing attention as a determinant of population survival, but its significance is uncertain. We examined the importance of social capital on survival in a population study while focusing on gender differences. METHODS: We used data from...... a Danish regional health survey with a five-year follow-up period, 2007-2012 (n = 9288, 53.5% men, 46.5% women). We investigated the association between social capital and all-cause mortality, performing separate analyses on a composite measure as well as four specific dimensions of social capital while...... controlling for covariates. Analyses were performed with Cox proportional hazard models by which hazard ratios and 95% confidence intervals were calculated. RESULTS: For women, higher levels of social capital were associated with lower all-cause mortality regardless of age, socioeconomic status, health...

  16. 51Cr - erythrocyte survival curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva Costa, J. de.

    1982-07-01

    Sixteen patients were studied, being fifteen patients in hemolytic state, and a normal individual as a witness. The aim was to obtain better techniques for the analysis of the erythrocytes, survival curves, according to the recommendations of the International Committee of Hematology. It was used the radiochromatic method as a tracer. Previously a revisional study of the International Literature was made in its aspects inherent to the work in execution, rendering possible to establish comparisons and clarify phonomena observed in cur investigation. Several parameters were considered in this study, hindering both the exponential and the linear curves. The analysis of the survival curves of the erythrocytes in the studied group, revealed that the elution factor did not present a homogeneous answer quantitatively to all, though, the result of the analysis of these curves have been established, through listed programs in the electronic calculator. (Author) [pt

  17. Saudi sands, SCUDS, and survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glendon, M P

    1993-01-01

    SCUD attacks were one of many challenges this pediatric nurse practitioner (NP) and Air Force Reserve flight nurse faced daily during Desert Shield and Desert Storm. Providing nursing care to sick and injured patients on board a C141 transport plane en route from Saudi Arabia to Germany was her primary responsibility. Additionally, many hours were spent filling sandbags, attending in-service classes, and practicing putting on a gas mask and protective suit. Although the war has been over for almost 3 years, the effects are long lasting. The author was able to use her wartime experience positively to gain insight into survival in today's violent society. As violence increases, NPs must reshape their focus and educate their clients about survival.

  18. Campylobacter virulence and survival factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolton, Declan J

    2015-06-01

    Despite over 30 years of research, campylobacteriosis is the most prevalent foodborne bacterial infection in many countries including in the European Union and the United States of America. However, relatively little is known about the virulence factors in Campylobacter or how an apparently fragile organism can survive in the food chain, often with enhanced pathogenicity. This review collates information on the virulence and survival determinants including motility, chemotaxis, adhesion, invasion, multidrug resistance, bile resistance and stress response factors. It discusses their function in transition through the food processing environment and human infection. In doing so it provides a fundamental understanding of Campylobacter, critical for improved diagnosis, surveillance and control. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Complexity for survival of livings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zak, Michail

    2007-01-01

    A connection between survivability of livings and complexity of their behavior is established. New physical paradigms-exchange of information via reflections, and chain of abstractions-explaining and describing progressive evolution of complexity in living (active) systems are introduced. A biological origin of these paradigms is associated with a recently discovered mirror neuron that is able to learn by imitation. As a result, an active element possesses the self-nonself images and interacts with them creating the world of mental dynamics. Three fundamental types of complexity of mental dynamics that contribute to survivability are identified. Mathematical model of the corresponding active systems is described by coupled motor-mental dynamics represented by Langevin and Fokker-Planck equations, respectively, while the progressive evolution of complexity is provided by nonlinear evolution of probability density. Application of the proposed formalism to modeling common-sense-based decision-making process is discussed

  20. Metabolome Analysis Reveals Betaine Lipids as Major Source for Triglyceride Formation, and the Accumulation of Sedoheptulose during Nitrogen-Starvation of Phaeodactylum tricornutum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Popko

    Full Text Available Oleaginous microalgae are considered as a promising resource for the production of biofuels. Especially diatoms arouse interest as biofuel producers since they are most productive in carbon fixation and very flexible to environmental changes in the nature. Naturally, triacylglycerol (TAG accumulation in algae only occurs under stress conditions like nitrogen-limitation. We focused on Phaeodactylum strain Pt4 (UTEX 646, because of its ability to grow in medium with low salinity and therefore being suited when saline water is less available or for wastewater cultivation strategies. Our data show an increase in neutral lipids during nitrogen-depletion and predominantly 16:0 and 16:1(n-7 accumulated in the TAG fraction. The molecular species composition of TAG suggests a remodeling primarily from the betaine lipid diacylglyceroltrimethylhomoserine (DGTS, but a contribution of the chloroplast galactolipid monogalactosyldiacylglycerol (MGDG cannot be excluded. Interestingly, the acyl-CoA pool is rich in 20:5(n-3 and 22:6(n-3 in all analyzed conditions, but these fatty acids are almost excluded from TAG. Other metabolites most obviously depleted under nitrogen-starvation were amino acids, lyso-phospholipids and tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle intermediates, whereas sulfur-containing metabolites as dimethylsulfoniopropionate, dimethylsulfoniobutyrate and methylsulfate as well as short acyl chain carnitines, propanoyl-carnitine and butanoyl-carnitine increased upon nitrogen-starvation. Moreover, the Calvin cycle may be de-regulated since sedoheptulose accumulated after nitrogen-depletion. Together the data provide now the basis for new strategies to improve lipid production and storage in Phaeodactylum strain Pt4.