WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal-optical carbon methods

  1. Evaluation of thermal optical analysis method of elemental carbon for marine fuel exhaust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lappi, Maija K; Ristimäki, Jyrki M

    2017-12-01

    The awareness of black carbon (BC) as the second largest anthropogenic contributor in global warming and an ice melting enhancer has increased. Due to prospected increase in shipping especially in the Arctic reliability of BC emissions and their invented amounts from ships is gaining more attention. The International Maritime Organization (IMO) is actively working toward estimation of quantities and effects of BC especially in the Arctic. IMO has launched work toward constituting a definition for BC and agreeing appropriate methods for its determination from shipping emission sources. In our study we evaluated the suitability of elemental carbon (EC) analysis by a thermal-optical transmittance (TOT) method to marine exhausts and possible measures to overcome the analysis interferences related to the chemically complex emissions. The measures included drying with CaSO 4, evaporation at 40-180ºC, H 2 O treatment, and variation of the sampling method (in-stack and diluted) and its parameters (e.g., dilution ratio, Dr). A reevaluation of the nominal organic carbon (OC)/EC split point was made. Measurement of residual carbon after solvent extraction (TC-C SOF ) was used as a reference, and later also filter smoke number (FSN) measurement, which is dealt with in a forthcoming paper by the authors. Exhaust sources used for collecting the particle sample were mainly four-stroke marine engines operated with variable loads and marine fuels ranging from light to heavy fuel oils (LFO and HFO) with a sulfur content range of engines will be implemented in the future, a well-defined and at best unequivocal method of BC determination is required for coherent and comparable emission inventories and estimating BC effects. As the aerosol from marine emission sources may be very heterogeneous and low in BC, special attention to the effects of sampling conditions and sample pretreatments on the validity of the results was paid in developing the thermal-optical analysis methodology

  2. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burning of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, optical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. L. Soto-García

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia – Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate. Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (Dp ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 μm. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, ECa, and OC were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA methods. A light transmission method (LTM was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BCe or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples.

    During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (Dp<2.5 μm: average 59.8 μg m−3 were higher than coarse aerosols (Dp> 2.5 μm: 4.1 μg m−3. Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC × 1.8 plus BCe, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of ECa (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring and BCe (estimated by LTM averaged 5.2 ± 1.3 and 3.1 ± 0.8 μg m−3, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption Ångström exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0

  3. Evaluation of the carbon content of aerosols from the burn- ing of biomass in the Brazilian Amazon using thermal, op- tical and thermal-optical analysis methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soto-Garcia, Lydia L.; Andreae, Meinrat O.; Andreae, Tracey W.; taxo, Paulo Ar-; Maenhaut, Willy; Kirchstetter, Thomas; Novakov, T.; Chow, Judith C.; Mayol-Bracero, Olga L.

    2011-06-03

    Aerosol samples were collected at a pasture site in the Amazon Basin as part of the project LBA-SMOCC-2002 (Large-Scale Biosphere-Atmosphere Experiment in Amazonia - Smoke Aerosols, Clouds, Rainfall and Climate: Aerosols from Biomass Burning Perturb Global and Regional Climate). Sampling was conducted during the late dry season, when the aerosol composition was dominated by biomass burning emissions, especially in the submicron fraction. A 13-stage Dekati low-pressure impactor (DLPI) was used to collect particles with nominal aerodynamic diameters (D{sub p}) ranging from 0.03 to 0.10 m. Gravimetric analyses of the DLPI substrates and filters were performed to obtain aerosol mass concentrations. The concentrations of total, apparent elemental, and organic carbon (TC, EC{sub a}, and OC) were determined using thermal and thermal-optical analysis (TOA) methods. A light transmission method (LTM) was used to determine the concentration of equivalent black carbon (BC{sub e}) or the absorbing fraction at 880 nm for the size-resolved samples. During the dry period, due to the pervasive presence of fires in the region upwind of the sampling site, concentrations of fine aerosols (D{sub p} < 2.5 {mu}m: average 59.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}) were higher than coarse aerosols (D{sub p} > 2.5 {mu}m: 4.1 {mu}g m{sup -3}). Carbonaceous matter, estimated as the sum of the particulate organic matter (i.e., OC x 1.8) plus BC{sub e}, comprised more than 90% to the total aerosol mass. Concentrations of EC{sub a} (estimated by thermal analysis with a correction for charring) and BCe (estimated by LTM) averaged 5.2 {+-} 1.3 and 3.1 {+-} 0.8 {mu}g m{sup -3}, respectively. The determination of EC was improved by extracting water-soluble organic material from the samples, which reduced the average light absorption {angstrom} exponent of particles in the size range of 0.1 to 1.0 {mu}m from > 2.0 to approximately 1.2. The size-resolved BC{sub e} measured by the LTM showed a clear maximum between 0.4 and

  4. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-10-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive and nondestructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FT-IR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed: one developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a uniform distribution of Low EC mass samples (EC normalized error (21 %). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision and accuracy to collocated TOR measurements. Only the normalized error is higher for the FT-IR EC measurements than for collocated TOR. FT-IR spectra are also divided into calibration and test sets by the ratios OC/EC and ammonium/EC to determine the impact of OC and ammonium on EC prediction. We conclude that FT-IR analysis with

  5. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-03-01

    Organic carbon (OC) can constitute 50% or more of the mass of atmospheric particulate matter. Typically, organic carbon is measured from a quartz fiber filter that has been exposed to a volume of ambient air and analyzed using thermal methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR). Here, methods are presented that show the feasibility of using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters to accurately predict TOR OC. This work marks an initial step in proposing a method that can reduce the operating costs of large air quality monitoring networks with an inexpensive, non-destructive analysis technique using routinely collected PTFE filter samples which, in addition to OC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the composition of organic aerosol. This feasibility study suggests that the minimum detection limit and errors (or uncertainty) of FT-IR predictions are on par with TOR OC such that evaluation of long-term trends and epidemiological studies would not be significantly impacted. To develop and test the method, FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least-squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to TOR OC. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets by sampling site and date. The calibration produces precise and accurate TOR OC predictions of the test set samples by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), low bias (0.02 μg m-3, the nominal IMPROVE sample volume is 32.8 m3), low error (0.08 μg m-3) and low normalized error (11%). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment (e.g., including or excluding substrate contributions to the absorbances) and are comparable in precision to collocated TOR measurements. FT-IR spectra are also

  6. Predicting ambient aerosol Thermal Optical Reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: elemental carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillner, A. M.; Takahama, S.

    2015-06-01

    Elemental carbon (EC) is an important constituent of atmospheric particulate matter because it absorbs solar radiation influencing climate and visibility and it adversely affects human health. The EC measured by thermal methods such as Thermal-Optical Reflectance (TOR) is operationally defined as the carbon that volatilizes from quartz filter samples at elevated temperatures in the presence of oxygen. Here, methods are presented to accurately predict TOR EC using Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from atmospheric particulate matter collected on polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE or Teflon) filters. This method is similar to the procedure tested and developed for OC in prior work (Dillner and Takahama, 2015). Transmittance FT-IR analysis is rapid, inexpensive, and non-destructive to the PTFE filter samples which are routinely collected for mass and elemental analysis in monitoring networks. FT-IR absorbance spectra are obtained from 794 filter samples from seven Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environment (IMPROVE) sites collected during 2011. Partial least squares regression is used to calibrate sample FT-IR absorbance spectra to collocated TOR EC measurements. The FTIR spectra are divided into calibration and test sets. Two calibrations are developed, one which is developed from uniform distribution of samples across the EC mass range (Uniform EC) and one developed from a~uniform distribution of low EC mass samples (EC TOR EC samples in the same mass range and an estimate of the minimum detection limit (MDL) that is on par with TOR EC MDL. For all samples, this hybrid approach leads to precise and accurate TOR EC predictions by FT-IR as indicated by high coefficient of variation (R2; 0.96), no bias (0.00 μg m-3, concentration value based on the nominal IMPROVE sample volume of 32.8 m-3), low error (0.03 μg m-3) and reasonable normalized error (21 %). These performance metrics can be achieved with various degrees of spectral pretreatment

  7. Comparison Between Elemental Carbon Measured Using Thermal-Optical Analysis and Black Carbon Measurements Using A Novel Cellphone-Based System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanathan, N.; Khan, B.; Leong, I.; Lukac, M.

    2011-12-01

    Black carbon (BC) is produced through the incomplete combustion of fossil and solid fuels. Current BC emissions inventories have large uncertainties of factors of 2 or more due to sparse measurements and because BC is often emitted by local sources that vary over time and space (Bond et al, 2004). Those uncertainties are major sources of error in air pollution models. Emissions from a variety of improved cookstove/fuel/combustion conditions were collected on pre-conditioned 47 mm quartz-fiber filters and analyzed for organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) using thermal-optical analysis (TOA). The samples were then analyzed for BC concentration by using cellphone-based instrumentation developed by Ramanathan et al., 2011. The cellphone-based monitoring system (CBMS) is a wireless, low-cost, low-power system that monitors BC emissions. The CBMS is comprised of an aerosol filter sampler containing a battery-powered air pump and a 25mm filter holder that draws air in through a quartz-fiber filter. As black carbon deposits increase, the filter darkens--the darkest color representing the highest loading. A cellphone photograph of the filter with the black carbon deposit is taken and relayed to an analytics unit for comparison to a reference scale to estimate airborne BC concentration. The BC concentration can then be compared to the thermally derived EC concentration. TOA was conducted on a Sunset Laboratory Dual Optics Carbon Analyzer using a modified version of the Birch and Cary (1996) NIOSH 5040 protocol. The dual-optical instrument permitted simultaneous monitoring of the transmission (TOT) and reflectance (TOR). 619 samples were collected; EC was obtained using NIOSH TOT and NIOSH TOR methods, and BC was obtained using the CBMS analytics unit. The mean BC value reported by the CBMS agrees within 20% of the reference values for EC, confirming the findings in Ramanathan et al. (2011) based on samples from India. Given this accuracy, we conclude that the CBMS

  8. MODELING REFLECTANCE AND TRANSMITTANCE OF QUARTZ-FIBER FILTER SAMPLES CONTAINING ELEMENTAL CARBON PARTICLES: IMPLICATIONS FOR THERMAL/OPTICAL ANALYSIS. (R831086)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A radiative transfer scheme that considers absorption, scattering, and distribution of light-absorbing elemental carbon (EC) particles collected on a quartz-fiber filter was developed to explain simultaneous filter reflectance and transmittance observations prior to and during...

  9. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, optical dispersion and dielectric ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-08-26

    Aug 26, 2016 ... Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 1. Synthesis, spectral, thermal, optical dispersion and dielectric properties of nanocrystalline dimer complex (PEPyr–diCd) thin films as novel organic semiconductor. Ahmed Farouk Al-Hossainy. Volume 39 Issue 1 February 2016 pp 209-222 ...

  10. Method for synthesizing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hongyou

    2012-09-04

    A method for preparing a precursor solution for synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, where a polar solvent is added to at least one block copolymer and at least one carbohydrate compound, and the precursor solution is processed using a self-assembly process and subsequent heating to form nanoporous carbon films, porous carbon nanotubes, and porous carbon nanoparticles.

  11. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Jonathan [Santa Fe, NM; Perry, William L [Jemez Springs, NM; Chen, Chun-Ku [Albuquerque, NM

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  12. Method for making carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Ming X.

    1999-01-01

    A method for treating an organic polymer material, preferably a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer (Saran) to produce a flat sheet of carbon film material having a high surface area (.apprxeq.1000 m.sup.2 /g) suitable as an electrode material for super capacitor applications. The method comprises heating a vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride copolymer film disposed between two spaced apart graphite or ceramic plates to a first temperature of about 160.degree. C. for about 14 hours to form a stabilized vinylidene chloride/vinyl chloride polymer film, thereafter heating the stabilized film to a second temperature of about 750.degree. C. in an inert atmosphere for about one hour to form a carbon film; and finally activating the carbon film to increase the surface area by heating the carbon film in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 750-850.degree. C. for between 1-6 hours.

  13. Carbon 14 dating method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortin, Ph.

    2000-01-01

    This document gives a first introduction to 14 C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the 14 C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of 14 C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  14. Method for carbon dioxide sequestration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifeng; Bryan, Charles R.; Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.

    2017-12-05

    A method for geo-sequestration of a carbon dioxide includes selection of a target water-laden geological formation with low-permeability interbeds, providing an injection well into the formation and injecting supercritical carbon dioxide (SC-CO.sub.2) and water or bine into the injection well under conditions of temperature, pressure and density selected to cause the fluid to enter the formation and splinter and/or form immobilized ganglia within the formation.

  15. Thermal optical effect in axisymmetric structural laser resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yonggen; Li, Yude

    2012-02-01

    In order to study the thermal optical effect (TOE) resulting from the axisymmetrical sources of thermal energy at the output mirror of CO 2 laser, the Heat Conduction Poisson Equation (HCPE) has been solved in the output mirror. Then the temperature distribution is given. The temperature variations will cause the surface distortion and the phase shift at the output mirror. Therefore, the output laser beam will be subject to thermal optical distortion and phase change. The numerical examples are to confirm our calculated results.

  16. Comparison of two carbon analysis methods for monitoring diesel particulate levels in mines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, M E; Dahmann, D; Fricke, H H

    1999-12-01

    Two carbon analysis methods are currently being applied to the occupational monitoring of diesel particulate matter. Both methods are based on thermal techniques for the determination of organic and elemental carbon. In Germany, method ZH 1/120.44 has been published. This method, or a variation of it, is being used for compliance measurements in several European countries, and a Comité Européen de Normalization Working Group was formed recently to address the establishment of a European measurement standard. In the USA, a 'thermal-optical' method has been published as Method 5040 by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. As with ZH 1/120.44, organic and elemental carbon are determined through temperature and atmosphere control, but different instrumentation and analysis conditions are used. Although the two methods are similar in principle, they gave statistically different results in a previous interlaboratory comparison. Because different instruments and operating conditions are used, between-method differences can be expected in some cases. Reasonable agreement is expected when the sample contains no other (i.e., non-diesel) sources of carbonaceous particulate and the organic fraction is essentially removed below about 500 degrees C. Airborne particulate samples from some mines may meet these criteria. Comparison data on samples from mines are important because the methods are being applied in this workplace for occupational monitoring and epidemiological studies. In this paper, results of a recent comparison on samples collected in a Canadian mine are reported. As seen in a previous comparison, there was good agreement between the total carbon results found by the two methods, with ZH 1/120.44 giving about 6% less carbon than Method 5040. Differences in the organic and elemental carbon results were again seen, but they were much smaller than those obtained in the previous comparison. The relatively small differences in the split between

  17. Method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagliostro, D. E.; Lerner, N. R. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    This invention relates to a method of carbonizing polyacrylonitrile fibers by exposing the fibers at an elevated temperature to an oxidizing atmosphere; then exposing the oxidized fibers to an atmosphere of an inert gas such as nitrogen containing a carbonaceous material such as acetylene. The fibers are preferably treated with an organic compound, for example benzoic acid, before the exposure to an oxidizing atmosphere. The invention also relates to the resulting fibers. The treated fibers have enhanced tensile strength.

  18. Method for production of carbon nanofiber mat or carbon paper

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.

    2015-08-04

    Method for the preparation of a non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers, the method comprising carbonizing a non-woven mat or paper preform (precursor) comprised of a plurality of bonded sulfonated polyolefin fibers to produce said non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fibers. The preforms and resulting non-woven mat or paper made of carbon fiber, as well as articles and devices containing them, and methods for their use, are also described.

  19. Dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in coupled ring resonators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chenguang Huang

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the dynamic nonlinear thermal optical effects in a photonic system of two coupled ring resonators. A bus waveguide is used to couple light in and out of one of the coupled resonators. Based on the coupling from the bus to the resonator, the coupling between the resonators and the intrinsic loss of each individual resonator, the system transmission spectrum can be classified by three different categories: coupled-resonator-induced absorption, coupled-resonator-induced transparency and over coupled resonance splitting. Dynamic thermal optical effects due to linear absorption have been analyzed for each category as a function of the input power. The heat power in each resonator determines the thermal dynamics in this coupled resonator system. Multiple “shark fins” and power competition between resonators can be foreseen. Also, the nonlinear absorption induced thermal effects have been discussed.

  20. Method for Extracting and Sequestering Carbon Dioxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rau, Gregory H.; Caldeira, Kenneth G.

    2005-05-10

    A method and apparatus to extract and sequester carbon dioxide (CO2) from a stream or volume of gas wherein said method and apparatus hydrates CO2, and reacts the resulting carbonic acid with carbonate. Suitable carbonates include, but are not limited to, carbonates of alkali metals and alkaline earth metals, preferably carbonates of calcium and magnesium. Waste products are metal cations and bicarbonate in solution or dehydrated metal salts, which when disposed of in a large body of water provide an effective way of sequestering CO2 from a gaseous environment.

  1. Gyroidal mesoporous carbon materials and methods thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiesner, Ulrich B.; Werner, Joerg G.

    2017-07-25

    The present invention relates to, inter alia, gyroidal mesoporous carbon materials and methods of use and manufacture thereof. In one embodiment, the present invention relates to a mesoporous carbon composition comprising a gyroidal mesoporous carbon having an ordered gyroidal structure and mesopores having a pore size of greater than 2 nanometers (nm) in diameter, and more particularly greater than 11 nm in diameter.

  2. Carbon nanohoops and methods of making

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jasti, Ramesh; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    2015-10-20

    The present invention provides cycloparaphenylene compounds, their macrocyclic precursors, and methods for making the compounds. The cycloparaphenylene compounds can be used to prepare armchair carbon nanotubes.

  3. Carbon nanohoops and methods of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasti, Ramesh; Bertozzi, Carolyn

    2013-06-11

    The present invention provides cycloparaphenylene compounds, their macrocyclic precursors, and methods for making the compounds. The cycloparaphenylene compounds can be used to prepare armchair carbon nanotubes.

  4. Comparison of elemental carbon in lake sediments measured by three different methods and 150-year pollution history in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Y M; Cao, J J; Yan, B Z; Kenna, T C; Jin, Z D; Cheng, Y; Chow, Judith C; An, Z S

    2011-06-15

    Concentrations of elemental carbon (EC) were measured in a 150 yr sediment record collected from Lake Chaohu in Anhui Province, eastern China, using three different thermal analytical methods: IMPROVE_A thermal optical reflectance (TOR), STN_thermal optical transmittance (TOT), and chemothermal oxidation (CTO). Distribution patterns for EC concentrations are different among the three methods, most likely due to the operational definition of EC and different temperature treatments prescribed for each method. However, similar profiles were found for high-temperature EC fractions among different methods. Historical soot(TOR) (high-temperature EC fractions measured by the IMPROVE_A TOR method) from Lake Chaohu exhibited stable low concentrations prior to the late 1970s and a sharp increase thereafter, corresponding well with the rapid industrialization of China in the last three decades. This may suggest that high-temperature thermal protocols are suitable for differentiating between soot and other carbon fractions. A similar soot(TOR) record was also obtained from Lake Taihu (~200 km away), suggesting a regional source of soot. The ratio of char(TOR) (low-temperature EC fraction measured by the IMPROVE_A TOR method, after correction for pyrolysis) to soot(TOR) in Lake Chaohu shows an overall decreasing trend, consistent with gradual changes in fuel use from wood burning to increasing fossil fuel combustions. Average higher char(TOR)/soot(TOR) was observed in Lake Taihu than in Lake Chaohu in the past 150 years, consistent with the longer and more extensive industrialization around the Taihu region.

  5. Methods of analyzing carbon nanostructures, methods of preparation of analytes from carbon nanostructures, and systems for analyzing carbon nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Da Costa, Pedro Miquel Ferreira Joaquim

    2016-09-09

    Provided herein is a method determining the concentration of impurities in a carbon material, comprising: mixing a flux and a carbon material to form a mixture, wherein the carbon material is selected from the group consisting of graphene, carbon nanotubes, fullerene, carbon onions, graphite, carbon fibers, and a combination thereof; heating the mixture using microwave energy to form fused materials; dissolution of the fused materials in an acid mixture; and measuring the concentration of one or more impurities.

  6. Method of making carbon nanotube composite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2014-05-20

    The present invention is a method of making a composite polymeric material by dissolving a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes and optionally additives in a solvent to make a solution and removing at least a portion of the solvent after casting onto a substrate to make thin films. The material has enhanced conductivity properties due to the blending of the un-functionalized and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes.

  7. Carbon nanotubes and methods of making carbon nanotubes

    KAUST Repository

    Basset, Jean-Marie

    2017-04-27

    Embodiments of the present disclosure provide for methods that can be used to produce carbon nanotubes (hereinafter CNT) having an inner diameter about 5-55 nm, methods of tuning the inner diameter of CNTs (e.g., by adjusting reaction pressure), CNTs having an inner diameter of greater than 20 nm or more, and the like.

  8. Method for making thin carbon foam electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pekala, Richard W.; Mayer, Steven T.; Kaschmitter, James L.; Morrison, Robert L.

    1999-01-01

    A method for fabricating thin, flat carbon electrodes by infiltrating highly porous carbon papers, membranes, felts, metal fibers/powders, or fabrics with an appropriate carbon foam precursor material. The infiltrated carbon paper, for example, is then cured to form a gel-saturated carbon paper, which is subsequently dried and pyrolyzed to form a thin sheet of porous carbon. The material readily stays flat and flexible during curing and pyrolyzing to form thin sheets. Precursor materials include polyacrylonitrile (PAN), polymethylacrylonitrile (PMAN), resorcinol/formaldehyde, catechol/formaldehyde, phenol/formaldehyde, etc., or mixtures thereof. These thin films are ideal for use as high power and energy electrodes in batteries, capacitors, and fuel cells, and are potentially useful for capacitive deionization, filtration and catalysis.

  9. Covalently functionalized carbon nanostructures and methods for their separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, YuHuang; Brozena, Alexandra H; Deng, Shunliu; Zhang, Yin

    2015-03-17

    The present invention is directed to carbon nanostructures, e.g., carbon nanotubes, methods of covalently functionalizing carbon nanostructures, and methods of separating and isolating covalently functionalized carbon. In some embodiments, carbon nanotubes are reacted with alkylating agents to provide water soluble covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes. In other embodiments, carbon nanotubes are reacted with a thermally-responsive agent and exposed to light in order to separate carbon nanotubes of a specific chirality from a mixture of carbon nanotubes.

  10. Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Zhifen [Newton, MA; Wen, Jian Guo [Newton, MA; Lao, Jing Y [Chestnut Hill, MA; Li, Wenzhi [Brookline, MA

    2008-10-28

    Methods for producing reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials are disclosed. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  11. Modified carbon nanotubes and methods of forming carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heintz, Amy M.; Risser, Steven; Elhard, Joel D.; Moore, Bryon P.; Liu, Tao; Vijayendran, Bhima R.

    2016-06-14

    In this invention, processes which can be used to achieve stable doped carbon nanotubes are disclosed. Preferred CNT structures and morphologies for achieving maximum doping effects are also described. Dopant formulations and methods for achieving doping of a broad distribution of tube types are also described.

  12. Predicting ambient aerosol thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) measurements from infrared spectra: extending the predictions to different years and different sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reggente, Matteo; Dillner, Ann M.; Takahama, Satoshi

    2016-02-01

    Organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) are major components of atmospheric particulate matter (PM), which has been associated with increased morbidity and mortality, climate change, and reduced visibility. Typically OC and EC concentrations are measured using thermal-optical methods such as thermal-optical reflectance (TOR) from samples collected on quartz filters. In this work, we estimate TOR OC and EC using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorbance spectra from polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE Teflon) filters using partial least square regression (PLSR) calibrated to TOR OC and EC measurements for a wide range of samples. The proposed method can be integrated with analysis of routinely collected PTFE filter samples that, in addition to OC and EC concentrations, can concurrently provide information regarding the functional group composition of the organic aerosol. We have used the FT-IR absorbance spectra and TOR OC and EC concentrations collected in the Interagency Monitoring of PROtected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) network (USA). We used 526 samples collected in 2011 at seven sites to calibrate the models, and more than 2000 samples collected in 2013 at 17 sites to test the models. Samples from six sites are present both in the calibration and test sets. The calibrations produce accurate predictions both for samples collected at the same six sites present in the calibration set (R2 = 0.97 and R2 = 0.95 for OC and EC respectively), and for samples from 9 of the 11 sites not included in the calibration set (R2 = 0.96 and R2 = 0.91 for OC and EC respectively). Samples collected at the other two sites require a different calibration model to achieve accurate predictions. We also propose a method to anticipate the prediction error; we calculate the squared Mahalanobis distance in the feature space (scores determined by PLSR) between new spectra and spectra in the calibration set. The squared Mahalanobis distance provides a crude method for assessing the

  13. Magneto-carbonization method for production of carbon fiber, and high performance carbon fibers made thereby

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Ozcan, Soydan; Eberle, Claude C.; Abdallah, Mohamed Gabr; Mackiewicz, Ludtka Gail; Ludtka, Gerard Michael; Paulauskas, Felix Leonard; Rivard, John Daniel Kennedy

    2017-08-08

    Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from fiber precursor, wherein the fiber precursor is subjected to a magnetic field of at least 3 Tesla during a carbonization process. The carbonization process is generally conducted at a temperature of at least 400.degree. C. and less than 2200.degree. C., wherein, in particular embodiments, the carbonization process includes a low temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 400.degree. C. or 500.degree. C. and less than or up to 1000.degree. C., 1100.degree. C., or 1200.degree. C., followed by a high temperature carbonization step conducted at a temperature of at least or above 1200.degree. C. In particular embodiments, particularly in the case of a polyacrylonitrile (PAN) fiber precursor, the resulting carbon fiber may possess a minimum tensile strength of at least 600 ksi, a tensile modulus of at least 30 Msi, and an ultimate elongation of at least 1.5%.

  14. Carbon footprint: current methods of estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Divya; Agrawal, Madhoolika; Pandey, Jai Shanker

    2011-07-01

    Increasing greenhouse gaseous concentration in the atmosphere is perturbing the environment to cause grievous global warming and associated consequences. Following the rule that only measurable is manageable, mensuration of greenhouse gas intensiveness of different products, bodies, and processes is going on worldwide, expressed as their carbon footprints. The methodologies for carbon footprint calculations are still evolving and it is emerging as an important tool for greenhouse gas management. The concept of carbon footprinting has permeated and is being commercialized in all the areas of life and economy, but there is little coherence in definitions and calculations of carbon footprints among the studies. There are disagreements in the selection of gases, and the order of emissions to be covered in footprint calculations. Standards of greenhouse gas accounting are the common resources used in footprint calculations, although there is no mandatory provision of footprint verification. Carbon footprinting is intended to be a tool to guide the relevant emission cuts and verifications, its standardization at international level are therefore necessary. Present review describes the prevailing carbon footprinting methods and raises the related issues.

  15. Carbon quantum dots and a method of making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zidan, Ragaiy; Teprovich, Joseph A.; Washington, Aaron L.

    2017-08-22

    The present invention is directed to a method of preparing a carbon quantum dot. The carbon quantum dot can be prepared from a carbon precursor, such as a fullerene, and a complex metal hydride. The present invention also discloses a carbon quantum dot made by reacting a carbon precursor with a complex metal hydride and a polymer containing a carbon quantum dot made by reacting a carbon precursor with a complex metal hydride.

  16. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate wettability. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  17. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-07-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have conducted adsorption, phase behavior, interfacial tension (IFT) and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases IFT with a minimum at about 0.2 M. Addition of surfactant decreases IFT further. In the absence of surfactant the minerals are oil-wet after aging with crude oil. Addition of surfactant solution decreases the contact angle to intermediate-wet for many surfactants and water-wet for one surfactant. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Plans for the next quarter include conducting core adsorption, phase behavior, wettability and mobilization studies.

  18. DILUTE SURFACTANT METHODS FOR CARBONATE FORMATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2003-01-01

    There are many carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil and fracture pressure below its minimum miscibility pressure (or reservoir may be naturally fractured). Many carbonate reservoirs are naturally fractured. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). Thermal and miscible tertiary recovery techniques are not effective in these reservoirs. Surfactant flooding (or huff-n-puff) is the only hope, yet it was developed for sandstone reservoirs in the past. The goal of this research is to evaluate dilute (hence relatively inexpensive) surfactant methods for carbonate formations and identify conditions under which they can be effective. We have acquired field oil and core samples and field brine compositions from Marathon. We have conducted preliminary adsorption and wettability studies. Addition of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3} decreases anionic surfactant adsorption on calcite surface. Receding contact angles increase with surfactant adsorption. Plans for the next quarter include conducting adsorption, phase behavior and wettability studies.

  19. CARBON SEQUESTRATION: A METHODS COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christopher J. Koroneos; Dimitrios C. Rovas

    2008-01-01

    All human activities are related with the energy consumption. Energy requirements will continue to rise, due to the modern life and the developing countries growth. Most of the energy demand emanates from fossil fuels. Fossil fuels combustion has negative environmental impacts, with the CO 2 production to be dominating. The fulfillment of the Kyoto protocol criteria requires the minimization of CO 2 emissions. Thus the management of the CO 2 emissions is an urgent matter. The use of appliances with low energy use and the adoption of an energy policy that prevents the unnecessary energy use, can play lead to the reduction of carbon emissions. A different route is the introduction of ''clean'' energy sources, such as renewable energy sources. Last but not least, the development of carbon sequestration methods can be promising technique with big future potential. The objective of this work is the analysis and comparison of different carbon sequestration and deposit methods. Ocean deposit, land ecosystems deposit, geological formations deposit and radical biological and chemical approaches will be analyzed

  20. Carbon Dioxide Capture Adsorbents: Chemistry and Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Byun, Jeehye; Yavuz, Cafer T

    2017-04-10

    Excess carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) emissions and their inevitable consequences continue to stimulate hard debate and awareness in both academic and public spaces, despite the widespread lack of understanding on what really is needed to capture and store the unwanted CO 2 . Of the entire carbon capture and storage (CCS) operation, capture is the most costly process, consisting of nearly 70 % of the price tag. In this tutorial review, CO 2 capture science and technology based on adsorbents are described and evaluated in the context of chemistry and methods, after briefly introducing the current status of CO 2 emissions. An effective sorbent design is suggested, whereby six checkpoints are expected to be met: cost, capacity, selectivity, stability, recyclability, and fast kinetics. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. The foil equilibration method for carbon in sodium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borgstedt, H.; Frees, G.; Peric, Z.

    1980-01-01

    Among the non-metallic impurities in sodium, carbon plays an important role since at high temperatures the structural materials exposed to sodium are subject to carburization and decarburization depending on the carbon activity of the sodium. Carburization of austenitic stainless steels leads to reduction in ductility and fatigue properties whereas decarburization results in a decrease in the high temperature creep strength. A knowledge of the carbon activities in sodium will help understanding of the carbon transfer phenomena in operating sodium systems of the fast reactors, and also carbon diffusion, microstructural stability and mechanical behaviour of materials under different service conditions. An understanding of the carbon behaviour in sodium becomes difficult in view of the complexities of the different species present as elemental carbon, carbide, acetylide, carbonate, and cyanide. Carbon estimation techniques for sodium presently in use are: chemical analytical methods, on-line carbon monitors, and oil equilibration method. Various chemical methods have been developed for the estimation of different species like acetylide, cyanide, carbonate, elemental carbon, and total carbon in sodium. All these methods are time consuming and subject to various errors. The on-line monitors developed for carbon in sodium are able to give continuous indication of carbon activities and have higher sensitivity than the chemical methods. A still more simple method for the determination of carbon activities is by the foil equilibration first published by Natesan et al. Because of its simplicity like the vanadium wire equilibration for oxygen it is being used widely for the estimation of carbon activities in sodium systems. Carbon concentrations in operating sodium systems estimated by this procedure by applying solubility relation to carbon activities have yielded very low values of carbon, lower than the sensitivity limits of the chemical estimation methods. Foil

  2. Methods for Gas Sensing with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Anupama B. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods for gas sensing with single-walled carbon nanotubes are described. The methods comprise biasing at least one carbon nanotube and exposing to a gas environment to detect variation in temperature as an electrical response.

  3. Pyrolytic carbon black composite and method of making the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit K.; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Bi, Zhonghe

    2016-09-13

    A method of recovering carbon black includes the step of providing a carbonaceous source material containing carbon black. The carbonaceous source material is contacted with a sulfonation bath to produce a sulfonated material. The sulfonated material is pyrolyzed to produce a carbon black containing product comprising a glassy carbon matrix phase having carbon black dispersed therein. A method of making a battery electrode is also disclosed.

  4. Mesoporous carbonates and method of making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryxell, Glen; Liu, Jun; Zemanian, Thomas S.

    2004-06-15

    Mesoporous metal carbonate structures are formed by providing a solution containing a non-ionic surfactant and a calcium acetate salt, adding sufficient base to react with the acidic byproducts to be formed by the addition of carbon dioxide, and adding carbon dioxide, thereby forming a mesoporous metal carbonate structure containing the metal from said metal salt.

  5. Carbon Fiber Foam Composites and Methods for Making the Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leseman, Zayd Chad (Inventor); Atwater, Mark Andrew (Inventor); Phillips, Jonathan (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Exemplary embodiments provide methods and apparatus of forming fibrous carbon foams (FCFs). In one embodiment, FCFs can be formed by flowing a fuel rich gas mixture over a catalytic material and components to be encapsulated in a mold to form composite carbon fibers, each composite carbon fiber having a carbon phase grown to encapsulate the component in situ. The composite carbon fibers can be intertwined with one another to form FCFs having a geometry according to the mold.

  6. Modelling, structural, thermal, optical and vibrational studies of a ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tant class of low-dimensional materials displays distinctive optical properties such as strong and sharp photolumines- .... The glassy carbon electrode was the working electrode, a platinum electrode was an ..... appear as a spike pointing towards the lower left of the plot. (figure 4b). Complementary regions are visible in the ...

  7. Methods of making carbon fiber from asphaltenes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2017-02-28

    Making carbon fiber from asphaltenes obtained through heavy oil upgrading. In more detail, carbon fiber is made from asphaltenes obtained from heavy oil feedstocks undergoing upgrading in a continuous coking reactor.

  8. Method for intercalating alkali metal ions into carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doeff, Marca M.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard

    1995-01-01

    A low cost, relatively flexible, carbon electrode for use in a secondary battery is described. A method is provided for producing same, including intercalating alkali metal salts such as sodium and lithium into carbon.

  9. Method for obtaining more precise measures of excreted organic carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    A new method for concentrating and measuring excreted organic carbon by lyophilization and scintillation counting is efficient, improves measurable radioactivity, and increases precision for estimates of organic carbon excreted by phytoplankton and macrophytes

  10. The research of a method for determination of total carbon, combination carbon and free carbon in beryllium metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Xingzhong; Zhu Xiaohong

    1996-02-01

    A method for determination of total carbon, combination carbon and free carbon in beryllium metal with LECO CS-344 carbon/sulphur determinant has been studied. Tungsten-copper mixed pellets are used as flux to the determination of total carbon. Ratio of weight of the flux to the sample is greater than 20:1. Good analytical results are got. By this method the relative standard deviation is <10% when the content of total carbon in the range of 0.050%∼0.080% in beryllium. A standard steel sample of carbon is added into beryllium, the recoveries are 94%∼106%. For determination of free carbon, the sample are decomposed with 3 mol/L HCl, filtered and followed determination. By this method the relative standard deviation is ≤10% when the content of free carbon in the range of 0.006%∼0.020% in beryllium. the balance of total carbon and free carbon is equal to combination carbon. The method is used to determine the sample of content of total carbon in the range of 0.050%∼1.00%, free carbon in the range of 0.006%∼0.500% in metal beryllium. (6 refs., 1 fig., 13 tabs.)

  11. Comparison of methods for the quantification of the different carbon fractions in atmospheric aerosol samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, Teresa; Mirante, Fátima; Almeida, Elza; Pio, Casimiro

    2010-05-01

    Atmospheric carbon consists of: organic carbon (OC, including various organic compounds), elemental carbon (EC, or black carbon [BC]/soot, a non-volatile/light-absorbing carbon), and a small quantity of carbonate carbon. Thermal/optical methods (TOM) have been widely used for quantifying total carbon (TC), OC, and EC in ambient and source particulate samples. Unfortunately, the different thermal evolution protocols in use can result in a wide elemental carbon-to-total carbon variation. Temperature evolution in thermal carbon analysis is critical to the allocation of carbon fractions. Another critical point in OC and EC quantification by TOM is the interference of carbonate carbon (CC) that could be present in the particulate samples, mainly in the coarse fraction of atmospheric aerosol. One of the methods used to minimize this interference consists on the use of a sample pre-treatment with acid to eliminate CC prior to thermal analysis (Chow et al., 2001; Pio et al., 1994). In Europe, there is currently no standard procedure for determining the carbonaceous aerosol fraction, which implies that data from different laboratories at various sites are of unknown accuracy and cannot be considered comparable. In the framework of the EU-project EUSAAR, a comprehensive study has been carried out to identify the causes of differences in the EC measured using different thermal evolution protocols. From this study an optimised protocol, the EUSAAR-2 protocol, was defined (Cavali et al., 2009). During the last two decades thousands of aerosol samples have been taken over quartz filters at urban, industrial, rural and background sites, and also from plume forest fires and biomass burning in a domestic closed stove. These samples were analysed for OC and EC, by a TOM, similar to that in use in the IMPROVE network (Pio et al., 2007). More recently we reduced the number of steps in thermal evolution protocols, without significant repercussions in the OC/EC quantifications. In order

  12. Method for making carbon super capacitor electrode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firsich, David W.; Ingersoll, David; Delnick, Frank M.

    1998-01-01

    A method for making near-net-shape, monolithic carbon electrodes for energy storage devices. The method includes the controlled pyrolysis and activation of a pressed shape of methyl cellulose powder with pyrolysis being carried out in two stages; pre-oxidation, preferably in air at a temperature between 200.degree.-250.degree. C., followed by carbonization under an inert atmosphere. An activation step to adjust the surface area of the carbon shape to a value desirable for the application being considered, including heating the carbon shape in an oxidizing atmosphere to a temperature of at least 300.degree. C., follows carbonization.

  13. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A novel method of purification for single-walled carbon nanotubes, prepared by an arc-discharge method, is described. The method involves a combination of acid washing followed by high temperature hydrogen treatment to remove the metal nanoparticles and amorphous carbon present in the as-synthesized singlewalled ...

  14. Method of immobilizing carbon dioxide from gas streams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holladay, D.W.; Haag, G.L.

    1979-01-01

    This invention comprises a method for rapidly and continuously immobilizing carbon dioxide contained in various industrial off-gas streams, the carbon dioxide being immobilized as dry, stable, and substantially water-insoluble particulates. Briefly, the method comprises passing the gas stream through a fixed or fluidized bed of hydrated barium hydroxide to remove and immobilize the carbon dioxide by converting the bed to barium carbonate. The method has several important advantages: it can be conducted effectively at ambient temperature; it provides a very rapid reaction rate over a wide range of carbon dioxide concentrations; it provides high decontamination factors; and it has a high capacity for carbon dioxide. The invention is especially well suited for the removal of radioactive carbon dioxide from off-gases generated by nuclear-fuel reprocessing facilities and nuclear power plants

  15. Carbon composition with hierarchical porosity, and methods of preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, Richard T; Dai, Sheng

    2014-10-21

    A method for fabricating a porous carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity, the method comprising subjecting a precursor composition to a curing step followed by a carbonization step, the precursor composition comprising: (i) a templating component comprised of a block copolymer, (ii) a phenolic component, (iii) a dione component in which carbonyl groups are adjacent, and (iv) an acidic component, wherein said carbonization step comprises heating the precursor composition at a carbonizing temperature for sufficient time to convert the precursor composition to a carbon material possessing a hierarchical porosity comprised of mesopores and macropores. Also described are the resulting hierarchical porous carbon material, a capacitive deionization device in which the porous carbon material is incorporated, as well as methods for desalinating water by use of said capacitive deionization device.

  16. Organometallic Methods for Forming and Cleaving Carbon-Carbon Bonds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Stig Holden

    alkylmagnesium halides. Carbohydrates with protecting groups on all alcohol groups except the primary alcohol were prepared and subjected to the iridium catalyzed dehydrogenative decarbonylation reaction where primary alcohols are converted into the corresponding one carbon shorter products. Modest conversions...... the iridium catalyzed dehydrogenative decarbonylation reaction was consumed in a palladium catalyzed reductive carbonylation reaction in a two-chamber system setup. Carbohydrates were not found to be a viable syngas source because they did not liberate sufficient syngas. Carbohydrates were attached to several...

  17. Dilute Surfactant Methods for Carbonate Formations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishore K. Mohanty

    2006-02-01

    There are many fractured carbonate reservoirs in US (and the world) with light oil. Waterflooding is effective in fractured reservoirs, if the formation is water-wet. Many fractured carbonate reservoirs, however, are mixed-wet and recoveries with conventional methods are low (less than 10%). The process of using dilute anionic surfactants in alkaline solutions has been investigated in this work for oil recovery from fractured oil-wet carbonate reservoirs both experimentally and numerically. This process is a surfactant-aided gravity drainage where surfactant diffuses into the matrix, lowers IFT and contact angle, which decrease capillary pressure and increase oil relative permeability enabling gravity to drain the oil up. Anionic surfactants have been identified which at dilute concentration of 0.05 wt% and optimal salinity can lower the interfacial tension and change the wettability of the calcite surface to intermediate/water-wet condition as well or better than the cationic surfactant DTAB with a West Texas crude oil. The force of adhesion in AFM of oil-wet regions changes after anionic surfactant treatment to values similar to those of water-wet regions. The AFM topography images showed that the oil-wetting material was removed from the surface by the anionic surfactant treatment. Adsorption studies indicate that the extent of adsorption for anionic surfactants on calcite minerals decreases with increase in pH and with decrease in salinity. Surfactant adsorption can be minimized in the presence of Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. Laboratory-scale surfactant brine imbibition experiments give high oil recovery (20-42% OOIP in 50 days; up to 60% in 200 days) for initially oil-wet cores through wettability alteration and IFT reduction. Small (<10%) initial gas saturation does not affect significantly the rate of oil recovery in the imbibition process, but larger gas saturation decreases the oil recovery rate. As the core permeability decreases, the rate of oil recovery reduces

  18. Approved parallel methods for characterisation of solid carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitzer, E.

    1976-01-01

    The contribution gives instructions for the work routine for 1) qualitative radiographic characterization of the microstructural order of solid carbon specimens, 2) X-ray determination of the mean interlattice plane distance anti c/2 of carbons, 3) determination of the helium density of carbons by means of the reference pycnometer, 4) determination of the specific surface area of carbon samples from nitrogen absorption. These instructions for the characterization of solid carbons are the first step towards a collection and comparison of the methods used in the participating countries. The international carbon groups (carbon societies) plan to supplement this collection for every international carbon conference. This collection will serve as a basis for the establishment of international working instructions. (orig./IHOE) [de

  19. Carbon-accounting methods and reforestation incentives

    OpenAIRE

    Cacho, Oscar J.; Hean, Robyn L.; Wise, Russell M.

    2003-01-01

    The emission of greenhouse gases, particularly carbon dioxide, and the consequent potential for climate change are the focus of increasing international concern. Eventually, an international agreement will likely be enacted to reduce greenhouse gas emission levels and assign rules for emission trading within and between countries. Temporary land-use change and forestry projects (LUCF) can be implemented to offset permanent emissions of carbon dioxide from the energy sector. Several approaches...

  20. Comparison of methods for estimating carbon in harvested wood products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudia Dias, Ana; Louro, Margarida; Arroja, Luis; Capela, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    There is a great diversity of methods for estimating carbon storage in harvested wood products (HWP) and, therefore, it is extremely important to agree internationally on the methods to be used in national greenhouse gas inventories. This study compares three methods for estimating carbon accumulation in HWP: the method suggested by Winjum et al. (Winjum method), the tier 2 method proposed by the IPCC Good Practice Guidance for Land Use, Land-Use Change and Forestry (GPG LULUCF) (GPG tier 2 method) and a method consistent with GPG LULUCF tier 3 methods (GPG tier 3 method). Carbon accumulation in HWP was estimated for Portugal under three accounting approaches: stock-change, production and atmospheric-flow. The uncertainty in the estimates was also evaluated using Monte Carlo simulation. The estimates of carbon accumulation in HWP obtained with the Winjum method differed substantially from the estimates obtained with the other methods, because this method tends to overestimate carbon accumulation with the stock-change and the production approaches and tends to underestimate carbon accumulation with the atmospheric-flow approach. The estimates of carbon accumulation provided by the GPG methods were similar, but the GPG tier 3 method reported the lowest uncertainties. For the GPG methods, the atmospheric-flow approach produced the largest estimates of carbon accumulation, followed by the production approach and the stock-change approach, by this order. A sensitivity analysis showed that using the ''best'' available data on production and trade of HWP produces larger estimates of carbon accumulation than using data from the Food and Agriculture Organization. (author)

  1. [Research methods of carbon sequestration by soil aggregates: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao-Xia; Liang, Ai-Zhen; Zhang, Xiao-Ping

    2012-07-01

    To increase soil organic carbon content is critical for maintaining soil fertility and agricultural sustainable development and for mitigating increased greenhouse gases and the effects of global climate change. Soil aggregates are the main components of soil, and have significant effects on soil physical and chemical properties. The physical protection of soil organic carbon by soil aggregates is the important mechanism of soil carbon sequestration. This paper reviewed the organic carbon sequestration by soil aggregates, and introduced the classic and current methods in studying the mechanisms of carbon sequestration by soil aggregates. The main problems and further research trends in this study field were also discussed.

  2. Method of making molten carbonate fuel cell ceramic matrix tape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maricle, Donald L.; Putnam, Gary C.; Stewart, Jr., Robert C.

    1984-10-23

    A method of making a thin, flexible, pliable matrix material for a molten carbonate fuel cell is described. The method comprises admixing particles inert in the molten carbonate environment with an organic polymer binder and ceramic particle. The composition is applied to a mold surface and dried, and the formed compliant matrix material removed.

  3. Method for nano-pumping using carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insepov, Zeke [Darien, IL; Hassanein, Ahmed [Bolingbrook, IL

    2009-12-15

    The present invention relates generally to the field of nanotechnology, carbon nanotubes and, more specifically, to a method and system for nano-pumping media through carbon nanotubes. One preferred embodiment of the invention generally comprises: method for nano-pumping, comprising the following steps: providing one or more media; providing one or more carbon nanotubes, the one or more nanotubes having a first end and a second end, wherein said first end of one or more nanotubes is in contact with the media; and creating surface waves on the carbon nanotubes, wherein at least a portion of the media is pumped through the nanotube.

  4. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Robert James; O'Brien, Michael Joseph

    2014-06-10

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  5. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Robert James; O' Brien, Michael Joseph

    2015-12-29

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides a composition which contains the amino-siloxane structures I, or III, as described herein. The composition is useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from process streams. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane composition. Another aspect of the present invention provides methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention, as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide.

  6. Carbon nanotubes grown on bulk materials and methods for fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menchhofer, Paul A [Clinton, TN; Montgomery, Frederick C [Oak Ridge, TN; Baker, Frederick S [Oak Ridge, TN

    2011-11-08

    Disclosed are structures formed as bulk support media having carbon nanotubes formed therewith. The bulk support media may comprise fibers or particles and the fibers or particles may be formed from such materials as quartz, carbon, or activated carbon. Metal catalyst species are formed adjacent the surfaces of the bulk support material, and carbon nanotubes are grown adjacent the surfaces of the metal catalyst species. Methods employ metal salt solutions that may comprise iron salts such as iron chloride, aluminum salts such as aluminum chloride, or nickel salts such as nickel chloride. Carbon nanotubes may be separated from the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species by using concentrated acids to oxidize the carbon-based bulk support media and the metal catalyst species.

  7. Synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube from different grades of carbon black using arc discharge method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Neha, E-mail: n4neha31@gmail.com [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (India); Sharma, N. N. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Birla Institute of Technology and Science, Pilani (India); Director, School of Automobile, Mechanical & Mechatronics, Manipal University,Jaipur,India (India)

    2016-04-13

    This paper describes the synthesis of nanotube from different grades (Tread * A(non-ASTM), N134,N121,N660 and N330)of carbon black using DC arc discharge method at 40A current for 60sec. Carbon black samples of different grades were procured from industry (Aditya Birla Science and Technology Limited, India). Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM) of the deposited carbon nanostructures suggests that MWCNTs are formed at 40A and for a minimal exposure time of 60sec.The result formed indicates the N330 grade of carbon black gets converted to MWCNTs (Multiwall Carbon nanotube) as compared to other grades.

  8. Plant factory: A new method for reducing carbon emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Rong; Liu, Tong; Ma, Jianshe

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, climate change has become a focus issue all over the world. Many scientific studies have confirmed the relationship between the emission of greenhouse gas such as carbon dioxide and global climate change. Reducing the emission of greenhouse gas is an effective way to solve the problem of climate change. This paper presents a new method for reducing carbon emissions: using the photosynthesis of plants to achieve carbon fixation in plant factory. In order to verify the feasibility of this method, we built a closed artificial light plant factory adopting LED lighting to conduct the experiment of carbon dioxide enrichment. The results shows that the production of the plants increased by 20%-25% and the plants fixed a considerable amount of carbon dioxide by increasing the concentration of carbon dioxide in the environment to 1000 ppm.

  9. Carbon dioxide absorbent and method of using the same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perry, Robert James [Niskayuna, NY; Lewis, Larry Neil [Scotia, NY; O' Brien, Michael Joseph [Clifton Park, NY; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev [Latham, NY; Kniajanski, Sergei [Clifton Park, NY; Lam, Tunchiao Hubert [Clifton Park, NY; Lee, Julia Lam [Niskayuna, NY; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona [Ballston Spa, NY

    2011-10-04

    In accordance with one aspect, the present invention provides an amino-siloxane composition comprising at least one of structures I, II, III, IV or V said compositions being useful for the capture of carbon dioxide from gas streams such as power plant flue gases. In addition, the present invention provides methods of preparing the amino-siloxane compositions are provided. Also provided are methods for reducing the amount of carbon dioxide in a process stream employing the amino-siloxane compositions of the invention as species which react with carbon dioxide to form an adduct with carbon dioxide. The reaction of the amino-siloxane compositions provided by the present invention with carbon dioxide is reversible and thus, the method provides for multicycle use of said compositions.

  10. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G.; Resasco, Daniel E.; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2016-11-29

    Compositions for detecting and/or destroying cancer tumors and/or cancer cells via photodynamic therapy are disclosed, as well as methods of use thereof. The compositions comprise a linking protein or peptide attached to or otherwise physically associated with a carbon nanotube to form a targeted protein-carbon nanotube complex.

  11. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Irvin; Fernandez, Miguel; Patterson, Joshua; Devenney, Martin

    2015-06-16

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  12. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Patterson, Joshua [Freedom, CA; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew [Los Gatos, CA; Yaccato, Karin [San Jose, CA; Stagnaro, John [Santa Clara, CA; Devenney, Martin [Mountain View, CA; Ries, Justin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2011-11-22

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  13. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Chen, Irvin [San Jose, CA

    2011-04-12

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  14. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Chen, Irvin [Santa Clara, CA; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew [Los Gatos, CA; Fernandez, Miguel [San Jose, CA

    2012-05-15

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  15. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Patterson, Joshua [Freedom, CA; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew [Los Gatos, CA; Yaccato, Karin [San Jose, CA; Stagnaro, John [Santa Clara, CA; Devenney, Martin [Mountain View, CA; Ries, Justin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2012-03-20

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  16. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantz, Brent R [Portola Valley, CA; Farsad, Kasra [San Jose, CA; Camire, Chris [San Jose, CA; Patterson, Joshua [Freedom, CA; Fernandez, Miguel [San Jose, CA; Yaccato, Karin [San Jose, CA; Thatcher, Ryan [Sunnyvale, CA; Stagnaro, John [Santa Clara, CA; Chen, Irvin [Santa Clara, CA; Omelon, Sidney [Willowdale, CA; Hodson, Keith [Palo Alto, CA; Clodic, Laurence [Sunnyvale, CA; Geramita, Katharine [Seattle, CA; Holland, Terence C [Auburn Township, OH; Ries, Justin [Chapel Hill, NC

    2012-02-14

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  17. Methods and compositions using calcium carbonate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Irvin; Fernandez, Miguel; Patterson, Joshua; Devenney, Martin

    2015-01-13

    Provided herein are compositions and methods including hydraulic cement, supplementary cementitious material, and/or self-cementing material. Methods for making the compositions and using the compositions are provided.

  18. Methods for selective functionalization and separation of carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor); Marek, legal representative, Irene Marie (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  19. Methods and systems for the formation of cyclic carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatton, Trevor Alan; Jamison, Timothy F; Kozak, Jennifer Aiden; Simeon, Fritz; Wu, Jie

    2014-12-30

    Described herein are inventive methods for synthesis of cyclic carbonates from CO.sub.2 and epoxide. In some embodiments, the methods are carried out in the presence of a catalyst comprising an electrophilic halogen. In some embodiments, the methods are carried out in a flow reactor.

  20. Corona method and apparatus for altering carbon containing compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Amit K.; Camaioni, Donald M.; Josephson, Gary B.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for altering a carbon containing compound in an aqueous mixture. According to a first aspect of the present invention, it has been discovered that for an aqueous mixture having a carbon containing compound with an ozone reaction rate less than the ozone reaction rate of pentachlorophenol, use of corona discharge in a low or non-oxidizing atmosphere increases the rate of destruction of the carbon containing compound compared to corona discharge an oxidizing atmosphere. For an aqueous mixture containing pentachlorphenol, there was essentially no difference in destruction between atmospheres. According to a second aspect of the present invention, it has been further discovered that an aqueous mixture having a carbon containing compound in the presence of a catalyst and oxygen resulted in an increased destruction rate of the carbon containing compound compared to no catalyst.

  1. Selection criteria for oxidation method in total organic carbon measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, GeunSeok; Park, Sang-Min; Yang, Heuiwon; Tsang, Daniel C W; Alessi, Daniel S; Baek, Kitae

    2018-05-01

    During the measurement of total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon is converted into CO 2 by using high temperature combustion (HTC) or wet chemical oxidation (WCO). However, the criteria for selecting the oxidation methods are not clear. In this study, the chemical structures of organic material were considered as a key factor to select the oxidation method used. Most non-degradable organic compounds showed a similar oxidation efficiency in both methods, including natural organic compounds, dyes, and pharmaceuticals, and thus both methods are appropriate to measure TOC in waters containing these compounds. However, only a fraction of the carbon in the halogenated compounds (perfluorooctanoic acid and trifluoroacetic acid) were oxidized using WCO, resulting in measured TOC values that are considerably lower than those determined by HTC. This result is likely due to the electronegativity of halogen elements which inhibits the approach of electron-rich sulfate radicals in the WCO, and the higher bond strength of carbon-halogen pairs as compared to carbon-hydrogen bonds, which results in a lower degree of oxidation of the compounds. Our results indicate that WCO could be used to oxidize most organic compounds, but may not be appropriate to quantify TOC in organic carbon pools that contain certain halogenated compounds. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Paintable Carbon-Based Perovskite Solar Cells with Engineered Perovskite/Carbon Interface Using Carbon Nanotubes Dripping Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Jaehoon; Lee, Kisu; Yun, Juyoung; Yu, Haejun; Lee, Jungsup; Jang, Jyongsik

    2017-10-01

    Paintable carbon electrode-based perovskite solar cells (PSCs) are of particular interest due to their material and fabrication process costs, as well as their moisture stability. However, printing the carbon paste on the perovskite layer limits the quality of the interface between the perovskite layer and carbon electrode. Herein, an attempt to enhance the performance of the paintable carbon-based PSCs is made using a modified solvent dripping method that involves dripping of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs), which is dispersed in chlorobenzene solution. This method allows CNTs to penetrate into both the perovskite film and carbon electrode, facilitating fast hole transport between the two layers. Furthermore, this method is results in increased open circuit voltage (V oc ) and fill factor (FF), providing better contact at the perovskite/carbon interfaces. The best devices made with CNT dripping show 13.57% power conversion efficiency and hysteresis-free performance. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Carbon nanotubes and methods of forming same at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Dervishi, Enkeleda

    2017-05-02

    In one aspect of the invention, a method for growth of carbon nanotubes includes providing a graphitic composite, decorating the graphitic composite with metal nanostructures to form graphene-contained powders, and heating the graphene-contained powders at a target temperature to form the carbon nanotubes in an argon/hydrogen environment that is devoid of a hydrocarbon source. In one embodiment, the target temperature can be as low as about 150.degree. C. (.+-.5.degree. C.).

  4. Carbon Nanotubes: Classification, Method of Preparation and Pharmaceutical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rode, Anuja; Sharma, Sanjay; Mishra, Dinesh K

    2017-12-21

    Nanoscience and nanotechnology are emerging area in pharmaceutical sciences and need of modernizing world. Nanoscience is the world of atoms, macromolecular assemblies, macromolecules, quantum dots, and molecules. Nanoscience is the study, and understanding control of phenomena and manipulation of material at the nanoscale. A carbon nanotubes are tube like the material mainly made up of carbon. Only a carbon nanotubes are the macromolecules of graphite consisting of sheets of carbon, which is weaved into the cylinder. Graphite sheets look like a hexagonal in form. Nano carbon tubes are about 2 millimetres long and these are one hundred times as stiff as steel. The arrangement of atom in a carbon nanotube is in a form of hexagonal as like as graphite. Carrying capacity of carbon nanotube is 1000 times higher than that of copper thermal stability of it is 4000k, it can be semiconducting or metallic, depending on their diameter and chirality of the atom. These carbon nanotubes having various classifications like single walled CNT's, Multiwalled CNT's, Nano horns, Nano buds, polymerized single walled nanotubes. The review is more focused towards the methods of preparation of nanotubes and their general various applications in pharmacy and medicine along with toxicity. These carbon Nano tubes can be prepared by using various methods with successful ease or application in pharmaceuticals, i.e. gas storage, adsorption, catalyst supported, delivery of drug through targeted system, electrochemistry, bio sensing, fuel cell, photodynamic cells, etc. CNT's are advanced technology in the era of nanotechnology in pharmaceutical sciences which are more emphasizing on patient's compliance and safety. Possessing a broad area of application along with targeted drug delivery. The Scientist is still exploring the various applications of it. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Calcification–carbonation method for red mud processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ruibing [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Laboratory for Simulation and Modelling of Particulate Systems, Department of Chemical Engineering, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, 3800 (Australia); Zhang, Tingan, E-mail: zhangta@smm.neu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Liu, Yan; Lv, Guozhi; Xie, Liqun [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2016-10-05

    Highlights: • A new approach named calcification–carbonation method for red mud processing is proposed. • The method can prevent emission of red mud from alumina production and is good for the environment. • Thermodynamics characteristics were investigated. • The method was verified experimentally using a jet-flow reactor. - Abstract: Red mud, the Bayer process residue, is generated from alumina industry and causes environmental problem. In this paper, a novel calcification–carbonation method that utilized a large amount of the Bayer process residue is proposed. Using this method, the red mud was calcified with lime to transform the silicon phase into hydrogarnet, and the alkali in red mud was recovered. Then, the resulting hydrogarnet was decomposed by CO{sub 2} carbonation, affording calcium silicate, calcium carbonate, and aluminum hydroxide. Alumina was recovered using an alkaline solution at a low temperature. The effects of the new process were analyzed by thermodynamics analysis and experiments. The extraction efficiency of the alumina and soda obtained from the red mud reached 49.4% and 96.8%, respectively. The new red mud with <0.3% alkali can be used in cement production. Using a combination of this method and cement production, the Bayer process red mud can be completely utilized.

  6. Calcification-carbonation method for red mud processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruibing; Zhang, Tingan; Liu, Yan; Lv, Guozhi; Xie, Liqun

    2016-10-05

    Red mud, the Bayer process residue, is generated from alumina industry and causes environmental problem. In this paper, a novel calcification-carbonation method that utilized a large amount of the Bayer process residue is proposed. Using this method, the red mud was calcified with lime to transform the silicon phase into hydrogarnet, and the alkali in red mud was recovered. Then, the resulting hydrogarnet was decomposed by CO2 carbonation, affording calcium silicate, calcium carbonate, and aluminum hydroxide. Alumina was recovered using an alkaline solution at a low temperature. The effects of the new process were analyzed by thermodynamics analysis and experiments. The extraction efficiency of the alumina and soda obtained from the red mud reached 49.4% and 96.8%, respectively. The new red mud with process red mud can be completely utilized. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 115; Issue 5-6. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes ... Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur PO, Bangalore 560 064, India; Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore 560 012, ...

  8. A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    A new method of preparing single-walled carbon nanotubes. ¶. S R C VIVEKCHAND1 and A GOVINDARAJ1,2,*. 1Chemistry and Physics of Materials Unit, Jawaharlal Nehru Centre for. Advanced Scientific Research, Jakkur PO, Bangalore 560 064, India. 2Solid State and Structural Chemistry Unit, Indian Institute of Science ...

  9. A study of the effect of gamma and laser irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of CR-39 nuclear track detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nouh, S. A.; Atta, M. R.; El-Melleegy, W. M.

    2004-08-01

    A comparative study of the effect of gamma and laser irradiation on the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 diglycol carbonate solid state nuclear track detector has been carried out. Samples from CR-39 polymer were classified into two main groups: the first group was irradiated by gamma rays with doses at levels between 20 and 300 kGy, whereas the second group was exposed to infrared laser radiation with energy fluences at levels between 0.71 and 8.53 J/cm(2). Non-isothermal studies were carried out using thermogravimetry, differential thermogravimetry and differential thermal analysis to obtain activation energy of decomposition and transition temperatures for the non-irradiated and all irradiated CR-39 samples. In addition, optical and structural property studies were performed on non-irradiated and irradiated CR-39 samples using refractive index and X-ray diffraction measurements. Variation in the onset temperature of decomposition T-o, activation energy of decomposition E-a, melting temperature T-m, refractive index n and the mass fraction of the amorphous phase after gamma and laser irradiation were studied. It was found that many changes in the thermal, optical and structural properties of the CR-39 polymer could be produced by gamma irradiation via degradation and cross-linking mechanisms. Also, the gamma dose has an advantage of increasing the correlation between thermal stability of the CR-39 polymer and bond formation created by the ionizing effect of gamma radiation. On the other hand, higher laser-energy fluences in the range 4.27-8.53 J/cm(2) decrease the melting temperature of the CR-39 polymer and this is most suitable for applications requiring molding of the polymer at lower temperatures.

  10. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional carbon structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    A method for fabricating a three-dimensional carbon structure (4) is disclosed. A mould (1) defining a three-dimensional shape is provided, and natural protein containing fibres are packed in the mould (1) at a predetermined packing density. The packed natural protein containing fibre structure (3......) undergoes pyrolysis, either while still in the mould (1) or after having been removed from the mould (1). Thereby a three-dimensional porous and electrically conducting carbon structure (4) having a three-dimensional shape defined by the three-dimensional shape of the mould (1) and a porosity defined...

  11. Method for creating high carbon content products from biomass oil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Reginald; Seames, Wayne

    2012-12-18

    In a method for producing high carbon content products from biomass, a biomass oil is added to a cracking reactor vessel. The biomass oil is heated to a temperature ranging from about 100.degree. C. to about 800.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to crack the biomass oil. Tar is separated from the cracked biomass oil. The tar is heated to a temperature ranging from about 200.degree. C. to about 1500.degree. C. at a pressure ranging from about vacuum conditions to about 20,700 kPa for a time sufficient to reduce the tar to a high carbon content product containing at least about 50% carbon by weight.

  12. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S.; Souza Filho, A.G.

    2010-01-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm -1 in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  13. Method of Preventing Shrinkage of Aluminum Foam Using Carbonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nakamura

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Metallic foams are commonly produced using titanium hydride as a foaming agent. Carbonates produce aluminum foam with a fine and homogenous cell structure. However, foams produced using carbonates show marked shrinkage, which is clearly different from those produced using titanium hydride. It is essential for practical applications to clarify foam shrinkage and establish a method of preventing it. In this research, cell structures were observed to study the shrinkage of aluminum foam produced using carbonates. The cells of foam produced using dolomite as a foaming agent connected to each other with maximum expansion. It was estimated that foaming gas was released through connected cells to the outside. It was assumed that cell formation at different sites is effective in preventing shrinkage induced by cell connection. The multiple additions of dolomite and magnesium carbonate, which have different decomposition temperatures, were applied. The foam in the case with multiple additions maintained a density of 0.66 up to 973 K, at which the foam produced using dolomite shrank. It was verified that the multiple additions of carbonates are effective in preventing shrinkage.

  14. Interleaved Carbon Minibeams: An Experimental Radiosurgery Method With Clinical Potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham, E-mail: dilmanian@bnl.gov [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Department of Neurology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Rusek, Adam [NASA Space Radiation Laboratory, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Fois, Giovanna R. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Physics Department, University of Cagliari, Sardinia (Italy); Olschowka, John [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Desnoyers, Nicolle R. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Ross University School of Veterinary Medicine, Basseterre, St. Kitts, West Indies (Country Unknown); Park, Jane Y. [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); College of Veterinary Medicine, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Dioszegi, Istvan [Nonproliferation and National Security Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Dane, Bari; Wang Ruiliang [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Tomasi, Dardo [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); National Institute on Alcoholism and Alcohol Abuse, Bethesda, MD (United States); Lee, Hedok [Medical Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States); Hurley, Sean D. [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States); Coyle, Patricia K. [Department of Neurology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); Meek, Allen G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University Medical Center, NY (United States); O' Banion, M. Kerry [Department of Neurobiology and Anatomy, University of Rochester, Rochester, NY (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of 'interleaved carbon minibeams' for ablating a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain with little damage to the surrounding brain. The method is based on the well-established tissue-sparing effect of arrays of thin planes of radiation. Methods and Materials: Broad carbon beams from the National Aeronautics and Space Agency Space Radiation Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory were segmented into arrays of parallel, horizontal, 0.3-mm-thick planar beams (minibeams). The minibeams' gradual broadening in tissues resulted in 0.525-mm beam thickness at the target's proximal side in the spread-out Bragg peak. Interleaving was therefore implemented by choosing a 1.05 mm beam spacing on-center. The anesthetized rabbit, positioned vertically on a stage capable of rotating about a vertical axis, was exposed to arrays from four 90 Degree-Sign angles, with the stage moving up by 0.525 mm in between. This produced a solid radiation field at the target while exposing the nontargeted tissues to single minibeam arrays. The target 'physical' absorbed dose was 40.2 Gy. Results: The rabbit behaved normally during the 6-month observation period. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging and hematoxylin and eosin histology at 6 months showed substantial focal target damage with little damage to the surrounding brain. Conclusion: We plan to evaluate the method's therapeutic efficacy by comparing it with broad-beam carbon therapy in animal models. The method's merits would combine those of carbon therapy (i.e., tight target dose because of the carbon's Bragg-peak, sharp dose falloff, and high relative biological effectiveness at the target), together with the method's low impact on the nontargeted tissues. The method's smaller impact on the nontargeted brain might allow carbon therapy at higher target doses and/or lower normal tissue impact, thus leading to a more effective treatment of radioresistant

  15. Functionalization of Carbon Nanofibres Obtained by Floating Catalyst Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adolfo Fernández

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The excellent physicochemical and electrical properties of carbon nanofibres (CNF combined with the possibility of being produced at industrial scale at reasonable costs have promoted the interest in their use in very diverse areas. However, there are still some drawbacks that must be solved in order to optimize their set of properties such as the presence of impurities or the imperfections in the crystalline structure. In this work, different modification treatments of CNFs produced by the floating catalyst method have been studied. Three types of modification processes have been explored that can be grouped as mechanical, thermal, and chemical functionalization processes. Mechanical processing has allowed solving the agglomeration problem related to CNFs produced by floating catalyst method and the resulting modified product ensures the secure handling of carbon nanofibres. Thermal and chemical treatments lead to purer and more crystalline products by removing catalyst impurities and amorphous carbon. Functionalization processes explored in this work open the possibility of customized posttreatment of carbon nanofibres according to the desired requirements.

  16. Sensitive method for dosing carboxylic functions of carbons and its application to the study of thermally processed carbon blacks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardin, Jacques

    1968-01-01

    This research thesis reports the development of a sensitive method for the dosing of carboxylic functions present at the surface of carbon blacks, and the use of this method to study the evolution of a carbon black during heat treatments. After a brief description of modes of fabrication of carbon blacks and of their structure, the author proposes an overview of knowledge on their oxidation and functional analysis. After having outlined that existing methods do not allow the measurement of function quantities less than ten micro-equivalent per gram of carbon, the author reports the development of a method which allows such measurements. By using this method, the author shows that carboxylic groups of a carbon black, oxidized by air or not, decompose during degassing by forming carbon dioxide, and that, reciprocally, the released carbon dioxide is exclusively produced by the decomposition of carboxylic groups [fr

  17. Nitrogen doped silicon-carbon multilayer protective coatings on carbon obtained by TVA method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupina, Victor; Vasile, Eugeniu; Porosnicu, Corneliu; Lungu, Cristian P.; Vladoiu, Rodica; Jepu, Ionut; Mandes, Aurelia; Dinca, Virginia; Caraiane, Aureliana; Nicolescu, Virginia; Cupsa, Ovidiu; Dinca, Paul; Zaharia, Agripina

    2017-08-01

    Protective nitrogen doped Si-C multilayer coatings on carbon, used to improve the oxidation resistance of carbon, were obtained by Thermionic Vacuum Arc (TVA) method. The initial carbon layer having a thickness of 100nm has been deposed on a silicon substrate in the absence of nitrogen, and then a 3nm Si thin film to cover carbon layer was deposed. Further, seven Si and C layers were alternatively deposed in the presence of nitrogen ions, each having a thickness of 40nm. In order to form silicon carbide at the interface between silicon and carbon layers, all carbon, silicon and nitrogen ions energy has increased up to 150eV . The characterization of microstructure and electrical properties of as-prepared N-Si-C multilayer structures were done using Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM, STEM) techniques, Thermal Desorption Spectroscopy (TDS) and electrical measurements. Oxidation protection of carbon is based on the reaction between oxygen and silicon carbide, resulting in SiO2, SiO and CO2, and also by reaction involving N, O and Si, resulting in silicon oxynitride (SiNxOy) with a continuously variable composition, and on the other hand, since nitrogen acts as a trapping barrier for oxygen. To perform electrical measurements, 80% silver filled two-component epoxy-based glue ohmic contacts were attached on the N-Si-C samples. Electrical conductivity was measured in constant current mode. The experimental data show the increase of conductivity with the increase of the nitrogen content. To explain the temperature behavior of electrical conductivity we assumed a thermally activated electric transport mechanism.

  18. Compositions and methods for cancer treatment using targeted carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Jr., Roger G; Resasco, Daniel E; Neves, Luis Filipe Ferreira

    2013-08-27

    The present invention is a method for detecting and destroying cancer tumors. The method is based on the concept of associating a linking protein or linking peptide such as, but not limited to, annexin V or other annexins to carbon nanotubes such as single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) to form a protein-CNT complex. Said linking protein or peptide can selectively bind to cancerous cells, especially tumor vasculature endothelial cells, rather than to healthy ones by binding to cancer-specific external receptors such as anionic phospholipids including phosphatidylserine expressed on the outer surfaces of cancer cells only. Irradiation of bound CNTs with one or more specific electromagnetic wavelengths is then used to detect and destroy those cells to which the CNTs are bound via the linking protein or peptide thereby destroying the tumor or cancer cells and preferably an immunostimulant is provided to the patient to enhance the immune response against antigens released from the tumor or cancer cells.

  19. Adsortion-catalytic method for removing carbon monoxide from gas streams and catalysts for that method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vlasenko, V.M.; Solov`ev, S.A.; Belokleitseva, G.M.

    1992-07-20

    Effective catalysts have been developed for the adsorption-catalytic removal of carbon monoxide from gases; a method of adsorption-catalytic removal of carbon monoxide from gases over a manganese oxide catalyst on a mordenite carrier which permits purification with almost no increase in gas temperature. A procedure for regeneration of the catalyst which ensures reproducibility of the adsorption process. 11 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  20. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2017-11-28

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  1. Evaluation of Four Methods for Predicting Carbon Stocks of Korean Pine Plantations in Heilongjiang Province, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huilin; Dong, Lihu; Li, Fengri; Zhang, Lianjun

    2015-01-01

    A total of 89 trees of Korean pine (Pinus koraiensis) were destructively sampled from the plantations in Heilongjiang Province, P.R. China. The sample trees were measured and calculated for the biomass and carbon stocks of tree components (i.e., stem, branch, foliage and root). Both compatible biomass and carbon stock models were developed with the total biomass and total carbon stocks as the constraints, respectively. Four methods were used to evaluate the carbon stocks of tree components. The first method predicted carbon stocks directly by the compatible carbon stocks models (Method 1). The other three methods indirectly predicted the carbon stocks in two steps: (1) estimating the biomass by the compatible biomass models, and (2) multiplying the estimated biomass by three different carbon conversion factors (i.e., carbon conversion factor 0.5 (Method 2), average carbon concentration of the sample trees (Method 3), and average carbon concentration of each tree component (Method 4)). The prediction errors of estimating the carbon stocks were compared and tested for the differences between the four methods. The results showed that the compatible biomass and carbon models with tree diameter (D) as the sole independent variable performed well so that Method 1 was the best method for predicting the carbon stocks of tree components and total. There were significant differences among the four methods for the carbon stock of stem. Method 2 produced the largest error, especially for stem and total. Methods 3 and Method 4 were slightly worse than Method 1, but the differences were not statistically significant. In practice, the indirect method using the mean carbon concentration of individual trees was sufficient to obtain accurate carbon stocks estimation if carbon stocks models are not available.

  2. Carbon 14 dating method; Methode de datation par le carbone 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, Ph

    2000-07-01

    This document gives a first introduction to {sup 14}C dating as it is put into practice at the radiocarbon dating centre of Claude-Bernard university (Lyon-1 univ., Villeurbanne, France): general considerations and recalls of nuclear physics; the {sup 14}C dating method; the initial standard activity; the isotopic fractioning; the measurement of samples activity; the liquid-scintillation counters; the calibration and correction of {sup 14}C dates; the preparation of samples; the benzene synthesis; the current applications of the method. (J.S.)

  3. Compositional dependence of thermal, optical and mechanical properties of oxyfluoride glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, I. Z.; Othman, H. A.; Valiev, D. T.

    2017-05-01

    Tungsten oxyfluoride glasses are characterized by low phonon energy. This is due to the presence of fluoride ions that have low phonon energy and formation of low phonon energy WO6 units. Oxyfluoride glasses based on WO3-BaF2-RF, where RF = LiF, NaF or mixed (LiF-NaF) have been prepared by melt quenching technique. The density and molar volume of the prepared glasses show a decrease with the increase of RF instead of WO3 content. The glass transition temperature Tg is found to decrease with increasing RF content. The refractive index increases with the addition of heavy polarizable fluorides. The decrease of the elastic moduli and microhardness of these glasses may be due to the decrease in density and the depolymrization effect. The Poisson’s ratio increases with increasing RF content due to the structural changes and formation of (NBOs) and (NBF) units. The aim of this work is to prepare a glass host with low phonon energy to be an efficient host with good luminescence properties, when doped with rare earth ions, and to study its structural, thermal, optical and mechanical properties.

  4. Interleaved Carbon Minibeams: An Experimental Radiosurgery Method With Clinical Potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dilmanian, F. Avraham; Rusek, Adam; Fois, Giovanna R.; Olschowka, John; Desnoyers, Nicolle R.; Park, Jane Y.; Dioszegi, Istvan; Dane, Bari; Wang Ruiliang; Tomasi, Dardo; Lee, Hedok; Hurley, Sean D.; Coyle, Patricia K.; Meek, Allen G.; O’Banion, M. Kerry

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of “interleaved carbon minibeams” for ablating a 6.5-mm target in a rabbit brain with little damage to the surrounding brain. The method is based on the well-established tissue-sparing effect of arrays of thin planes of radiation. Methods and Materials: Broad carbon beams from the National Aeronautics and Space Agency Space Radiation Facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory were segmented into arrays of parallel, horizontal, 0.3-mm-thick planar beams (minibeams). The minibeams’ gradual broadening in tissues resulted in 0.525-mm beam thickness at the target’s proximal side in the spread-out Bragg peak. Interleaving was therefore implemented by choosing a 1.05 mm beam spacing on-center. The anesthetized rabbit, positioned vertically on a stage capable of rotating about a vertical axis, was exposed to arrays from four 90° angles, with the stage moving up by 0.525 mm in between. This produced a solid radiation field at the target while exposing the nontargeted tissues to single minibeam arrays. The target “physical” absorbed dose was 40.2 Gy. Results: The rabbit behaved normally during the 6-month observation period. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging and hematoxylin and eosin histology at 6 months showed substantial focal target damage with little damage to the surrounding brain. Conclusion: We plan to evaluate the method’s therapeutic efficacy by comparing it with broad-beam carbon therapy in animal models. The method’s merits would combine those of carbon therapy (i.e., tight target dose because of the carbon’s Bragg-peak, sharp dose falloff, and high relative biological effectiveness at the target), together with the method’s low impact on the nontargeted tissues. The method’s smaller impact on the nontargeted brain might allow carbon therapy at higher target doses and/or lower normal tissue impact, thus leading to a more effective treatment of radioresistant tumors. It should also make the method more

  5. Methods for Shortening and Extending the Carbon Chain in Carbohydrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Monrad, Rune Nygaard

    2008-01-01

    in this thesis focuses on the development and application of transition metal mediated methods for shortening and extending the carbon chain in carbohydrates thereby providing access to lower and higher sugars.A new catalytic procedure for shortening unprotected sugars by one carbon atom has been developed....... The procedure has been employed as the key step in a short five-step synthesis of the unnatural sugar L-threose in 74% overall yield from D-glucose. A zinc-mediated one-pot fragmentation-allylation reaction has been used to elongate D-glucose and D-ribose by three carbon atoms thereby producing carbohydrate......-derived α,ω-dienes, which have been converted into the natural products calystegine A3 and gabosine A. The glycosidase inhibitor calystegine A3 was produced by two similar routes from commercially available methyl α-D-glucopyranoside in 13 and 14 steps with 8.3 and 5.3% overall yield, respectively...

  6. THERMODYNAMIC ANALYSIS OF CARBON SEQUESTRATION METHODS IN LIGNITE POWER PLANTS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koroneos J. Christopher; Sakiltzis Christos; Rovas C. Dimitrios

    2008-01-01

    The green house effect is a very pressing issue of our times due to the big impact it will have in the future of life in our planet. The temperature increase of the earth which is the major impact of the greenhouse effect may change forever the climate and the way of life in many countries. It may lead to the reduction of agricultural production and at the end to famine, in several nations. The minimization of CO2 emissions and the introduction of new energy sources is the only solution to the catastrophe that is coming if inaction prevails. The objective of this work is to analyze the methods of the CO2 removal from the flue gases of power plants that use solid fuels. It is especially fit to the Greek conditions where the main fuel used is lignite. Three methods have been examined and compared thermodynamically. These are: (a) Removal of CO2 from the flue gas stream by absorption, (b) The combustion of lignite with pure oxygen and (c) The gasification of lignite. The lignite used in the analysis is the Greek lignite, produced at the Western Macedonia mines. The power plant, before carbon sequestration, has an efficiency of 39%, producing 330MW of electric power. After sequestration, the CO2 is compressed to pressures between 80-110 atm, before its final disposal. In the first method, the sequestration of CO2 is done utilizing a catalyst. The operation requires electricity and high thermal load which is received from low pressure steam extracted from the turbines. Additionally, electricity is required for the compression of the CO2 to 100 bars. This leads to a lower efficiency of the power plant by by 13%. In the second method, the lignite combustion is done with pure O2 produced at an air separation unit. The flue gasses are made up of CO2 and water vapor. This method requires electricity for carbon dioxide compression and the Air Separation unit, thus, the power plant efficiency is lowered by 26%. In the lignite gasification method, the products are a mixture of

  7. Method of producing carbon coated nano- and micron-scale particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, W. Lee; Weigle, John C; Phillips, Jonathan

    2013-12-17

    A method of making carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles comprising entraining particles in an aerosol gas, providing a carbon-containing gas, providing a plasma gas, mixing the aerosol gas, the carbon-containing gas, and the plasma gas proximate a torch, bombarding the mixed gases with microwaves, and collecting resulting carbon-coated nano- or micron-scale particles.

  8. Carbon nanotube synthesis via the catalytic CVD method: a review on the effect of reaction parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Öncel, Çınar; Oncel, Cinar; Yürüm, Yuda; Yurum, Yuda

    2006-01-01

    This review covers the results obtained in carbon nanotube synthesis by chemical vapor deposition. Parameters such as catalysts, supports, carbon precursors, reaction time, temperature and gas flow rates that are used in the production of carbon nanotubes are discussed throughout the text. Purification of the synthesized carbon nanotubes and methods utilized for cost reduction were also explored.

  9. Quantification methods of Black Carbon: Comparison of Rock-Eval analysis with traditional methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poot, A.; Quik, J.T.K.; Veld, H.; Koelmans, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    Black Carbon (BC) quantification methods are reviewed, including new Rock-Eval 6 data on BC reference materials. BC has been reported to have major impacts on climate, human health and environmental quality. Especially for risk assessment of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) it is important to

  10. The Detailed Evolution of Carbon Spheres by Hydrothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trevor Mwenya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon spheres (CSs can be synthesized easily by hydrothermal method using various solutions and a lot of mechanisms have been employed to explain their formation. In our work, some special phenomena such as the uniform size and surface corruption have been found as the reaction time increased. However, less attention has been focused on the detailed evolution phenomena of CSs. In order to understand these special phenomena well, classical nucleation theory was employed to study the reaction dynamics of CSs during the evolution processes. This work not only deeply reveals the evolution mechanism of CSs, but also opens a possible way for the control of size and morphologies of CSs through hydrothermal methods.

  11. Method to produce carbon-cladded nuclear fuel particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sturge, D.W.; Meaden, G.W.

    1978-01-01

    In the method charges of micro-spherules of fuel element are designed to have two carbon layers, whereby a one aims to achieve a uniform granulation (standard measurement). Two drums are used for this purpose connected behind one another. The micro-spherules coated with the first layer (phenolformaldehyde resin coated graphite particles) leave the first drum and enter the second one. Following the coating with a second layer, the micro-spherules are introduced into a grain size separator. The spherules that are too small are directly recycled into the second drum and those ones that are too large are recycled into the first drum after removing the graphite layers. The method may also be applied to metal cladded particles to manufacture cermet fuels. (RW) [de

  12. Approaches to greenhouse gas accounting methods for biomass carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Downie, Adriana; Lau, David; Cowie, Annette; Munroe, Paul

    2014-01-01

    This investigation examines different approaches for the GHG flux accounting of activities within a tight boundary of biomass C cycling, with scope limited to exclude all other aspects of the lifecycle. Alternative approaches are examined that a) account for all emissions including biogenic CO 2 cycling – the biogenic method; b) account for the quantity of C that is moved to and maintained in the non-atmospheric pool – the stock method; and c) assume that the net balance of C taken up by biomass is neutral over the short-term and hence there is no requirement to include this C in the calculation – the simplified method. This investigation demonstrates the inaccuracies in both emissions forecasting and abatement calculations that result from the use of the simplified method, which is commonly accepted for use. It has been found that the stock method is the most accurate and appropriate approach for use in calculating GHG inventories, however short-comings of this approach emerge when applied to abatement projects, as it does not account for the increase in biogenic CO 2 emissions that are generated when non-CO 2 GHG emissions in the business-as-usual case are offset. Therefore the biogenic method or a modified version of the stock method should be used to accurately estimate GHG emissions abatement achieved by a project. This investigation uses both the derivation of methodology equations from first principles and worked examples to explore the fundamental differences in the alternative approaches. Examples are developed for three project scenarios including; landfill, combustion and slow-pyrolysis (biochar) of biomass. -- Highlights: • Different approaches can be taken to account for the GHG emissions from biomass. • Simplification of GHG accounting methods is useful, however, can lead to inaccuracies. • Approaches used currently are often inadequate for practises that store carbon. • Accounting methods for emissions forecasting can be inadequate for

  13. Hierarchical porous carbon derived from Allium cepa for supercapacitors through direct carbonization method with the assist of calcium acetate

    KAUST Repository

    Xu, Jinhui

    2017-11-02

    In this paper, a direction carbonization method was used to prepare porous carbon from Allium cepa for supercapacitor applications. In this method, calcium acetate was used to assist carbonization process. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and N2 adsorption/desorption method were used to characterize the morphology, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) specific surface area and pore size distribution of porous carbon derived from Allium cepa (onion derived porous carbon, OPC). OPC is of hierarchical porous structure with high specific surface area and relatively high specific capacitance. OPC possesses relatively high specific surface area of 533.5 m2/g. What’s more, OPC possesses a specific capacitance of 133.5 F/g at scan rate of 5 mV/s.

  14. Evaluation of methods for cleaning low carbon uranium metal and alloy samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirchner, K.; Dixon, M.

    1979-01-01

    Several methods for cleaning uranium samples prior to carbon analysis, using a Leco Carbon Analyzer, were evaluated. Use of Oakite Aluminum NST Cleaner followed by water and acetone rinse was found to be the best overall technique

  15. Standard Test Method for Thermal Oxidative Resistance of Carbon Fibers

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1982-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the apparatus and procedure for the determination of the weight loss of carbon fibers, exposed to ambient hot air, as a means of characterizing their oxidative resistance. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values given in parentheses are mathematical conversions to inch-pound units which are provided for information only and are not considered standard. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use. For specific hazard information, see Section 8.

  16. Hard carbon nitride and method for preparing same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haller, E.E.; Cohen, M.L.; Hansen, W.L.

    1992-05-05

    Novel crystalline [alpha](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride and [beta](silicon nitride-like)-carbon nitride are formed by sputtering carbon in the presence of a nitrogen atmosphere onto a single crystal germanium or silicon, respectively, substrate. 1 figure.

  17. Methods for determining assimilable organic carbon and some factors affecting the van der Kooij method. [EUROPE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huck, P.M.; Fedorak, P.M.; Anderson, W.B. (Univ. of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada))

    It has been demonstrated in many advanced European drinking water facilities that the application of ozone in conjunction with a subsequent granular activated carbon (GAC) treatment step results in reduced distribution system disinfectant demand. This is due, in large measure, to the removal of biodegradable organic substances by miroorganisms colonizing the activated carbon. The concentration of easily biodegradable or assimilable caron (AOC) can be measured in various ways. This paper compares available methods for measuring AOC or bacterial regrowth, and presents pilot plant results showing some factors affecting the van der Kooij method. Difficulties with the survival of Pseudomonas aeruginosa P17 strain following sedimentation are attributed to the use of polyaluminum chloride as a coagulant. This effect was, however, not evident at low doses of polyaluminum chloride. Incidents of inhibition of P17 following ozonation have been observed but, as of yet, not explained. Filtration of samples through cellulose/acetate filters will increase the concentration of AOC determined significantly.

  18. Facile preparation of porous carbon from coffee bean waste using low temperature solvothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baroroh, L. A. Al; Fitria, D.; Amal, M. I.; Wismogroho, A. S.; Widayatno, W. B.

    2018-03-01

    In this study, porous carbon made from coffee bean waste (CBW) was carbonized at 500 °C, 600 °C, and 700 °C to find effective temperature. It is verified from the IR spectrum that carbonization process at certain temperature can effectively break cellulose bonding and make aromatics functional group while preserving its carbon structure. The TG-DTA curve shows four stages of decomposition process and confirms most effective carbonization temperature. Activation process of as-carbonized CBW was carried out using solvothermal method in KOH and NH4OH steam environment at 200 °C with variation of 30%, 40%, and 50% solvothermal volume. Scanning electron micrographs reveals significant increase of porosity on the carbon surface and differences of structural pores between the variations. The results show the possible potential of utilizing low temperature-solvothermal method for nanoporous carbon material.

  19. Evaluation of estimation methods for organic carbon normalized sorption coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, James R.; Mihelcic, James R.; Luehrs, Dean C.; Hickey, James P.

    1997-01-01

    A critically evaluated set of 94 soil water partition coefficients normalized to soil organic carbon content (Koc) is presented for 11 classes of organic chemicals. This data set is used to develop and evaluate Koc estimation methods using three different descriptors. The three types of descriptors used in predicting Koc were octanol/water partition coefficient (Kow), molecular connectivity (mXt) and linear solvation energy relationships (LSERs). The best results were obtained estimating Koc from Kow, though a slight improvement in the correlation coefficient was obtained by using a two-parameter regression with Kow and the third order difference term from mXt. Molecular connectivity correlations seemed to be best suited for use with specific chemical classes. The LSER provided a better fit than mXt but not as good as the correlation with Koc. The correlation to predict Koc from Kow was developed for 72 chemicals; log Koc = 0.903* log Kow + 0.094. This correlation accounts for 91% of the variability in the data for chemicals with log Kow ranging from 1.7 to 7.0. The expression to determine the 95% confidence interval on the estimated Koc is provided along with an example for two chemicals of different hydrophobicity showing the confidence interval of the retardation factor determined from the estimated Koc. The data showed that Koc is not likely to be applicable for chemicals with log Kow < 1.7. Finally, the Koc correlation developed using Kow as a descriptor was compared with three nonclass-specific correlations and two 'commonly used' class-specific correlations to determine which method(s) are most suitable.

  20. Dustiness of 14 carbon nanotubes using the vortex shaker method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazon, Claire; Witschger, Olivier; Bau, Sébastien; Payet, Raphaël; Beugnon, Karine; Petit, Geneviève; Garin, Thibaut; Martinon, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    The handling of carbon nanotube (CNT) powders is a plausible scenario during the course of the CNT life-cycle. However, related exposure data remain limited. In this context, information about the dustiness of CNT is therefore of great interest, for example for control banding or exposure modelling. Here, we investigate the dustiness of fourteen CNT powders using the Vortex Shaker (VS) method. The central component of the VS method is a stainless steel cylindrical tube, continuously shaken in a circular orbital motion, in which a small volume (0.5 cm3) of the powder to be tested is placed. All samples were obtained through the NANoREG Nanomaterials Information and Web-Order system. The test procedure that we have developed is based on four principal components: (i) a respirable cyclone for gravimetric sampling, (ii) a CPC as a reference instrument for number concentration measurement, (iii) an MPS for collection of particles for EM observations/analysis, and (iv) an ELPI for size-resolved aerosol measurement. In this paper, the data were evaluated using two parameters: (i) the mass-based dustiness index in the respirable fraction; and (ii) the number-based dustiness index in the respirable fraction. The results indicate that the method leads to relatively accurate mass- and number-based dustiness indices. The indices obtained span wide ranges, of 2 and 3 orders of magnitude variation for mass and number respectively, suggesting a corresponding significant difference in terms of potential exposure. EM observations reveal that airborne CNTs are mostly released as bundles of different shapes ranging from a few tens of nanometers up to tens of micrometers in size.

  1. Brown and black carbon in Beijing aerosol: Implications for the effects of brown coating on light absorption by black carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yuan; He, Ke-Bin; Engling, Guenter; Weber, Rodney; Liu, Jiu-Meng; Du, Zhen-Yu; Dong, Shu-Ping

    2017-12-01

    Brown carbon (BrC) is increasingly included in climate models as an emerging category of particulate organic compounds that can absorb solar radiation efficiently at specific wavelengths. Water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) has been commonly used as a surrogate for BrC; however, it only represents a limited fraction of total organic carbon (OC) mass, which could be as low as about 20% in urban atmosphere. Using methanol as the extraction solvent, up to approximately 90% of the OC in Beijing aerosol was isolated and measured for absorption spectra over the ultraviolet-to-visible wavelength range. Compared to methanol-soluble OC (MSOC), WSOC underestimated BrC absorption by about 50% at 365nm. The mass absorption efficiencies measured for BrC in Beijing aerosol were converted to the imaginary refractive indices of BrC and subsequently used to compute BrC coating-induced enhancement of light absorption (E abs ) by black carbon. E abs attributed to lensing was reduced in the case of BrC coating relative to that caused by purely-scattering coating. However, this reduction was overwhelmed by the effect of BrC shell absorption, indicating that the overall effect of BrC coating was an increase in E abs . Methanol extraction significantly reduced charring of OC during thermal-optical analysis, leading to a large increase in the measured elemental carbon (EC) mass and an apparent improvement in the consistency of EC measurements by different thermal-optical methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. On the collaborative design and simulation of space camera: stop structural/thermal/optical) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Pengfei; Lei, Wenping

    2017-11-01

    A number of disciplines (mechanics, structures, thermal, and optics) are needed to design and build Space Camera. Separate design models are normally constructed by each discipline CAD/CAE tools. Design and analysis is conducted largely in parallel subject to requirements that have been levied on each discipline, and technical interaction between the different disciplines is limited and infrequent. As a result a unified view of the Space Camera design across discipline boundaries is not directly possible in the approach above, and generating one would require a large manual, and error-prone process. A collaborative environment that is built on abstract model and performance template allows engineering data and CAD/CAE results to be shared across above discipline boundaries within a common interface, so that it can help to attain speedy multivariate design and directly evaluate optical performance under environment loadings. A small interdisciplinary engineering team from Beijing Institute of Space Mechanics and Electricity has recently conducted a Structural/Thermal/Optical (STOP) analysis of a space camera with this collaborative environment. STOP analysis evaluates the changes in image quality that arise from the structural deformations when the thermal environment of the camera changes throughout its orbit. STOP analyses were conducted for four different test conditions applied during final thermal vacuum (TVAC) testing of the payload on the ground. The STOP Simulation Process begins with importing an integrated CAD model of the camera geometry into the collaborative environment, within which 1. Independent thermal and structural meshes are generated. 2. The thermal mesh and relevant engineering data for material properties and thermal boundary conditions are then used to compute temperature distributions at nodal points in both the thermal and structures mesh through Thermal Desktop, a COTS thermal design and analysis code. 3. Thermally induced structural

  3. Integration of rock typing methods for carbonate reservoir characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliakbardoust, E; Rahimpour-Bonab, H

    2013-01-01

    Reservoir rock typing is the most important part of all reservoir modelling. For integrated reservoir rock typing, static and dynamic properties need to be combined, but sometimes these two are incompatible. The failure is due to the misunderstanding of the crucial parameters that control the dynamic behaviour of the reservoir rock and thus selecting inappropriate methods for defining static rock types. In this study, rock types were defined by combining the SCAL data with the rock properties, particularly rock fabric and pore types. First, air-displacing-water capillary pressure curues were classified because they are representative of fluid saturation and behaviour under capillary forces. Next the most important rock properties which control the fluid flow and saturation behaviour (rock fabric and pore types) were combined with defined classes. Corresponding petrophysical properties were also attributed to reservoir rock types and eventually, defined rock types were compared with relative permeability curves. This study focused on representing the importance of the pore system, specifically pore types in fluid saturation and entrapment in the reservoir rock. The most common tests in static rock typing, such as electrofacies analysis and porosity–permeability correlation, were carried out and the results indicate that these are not appropriate approaches for reservoir rock typing in carbonate reservoirs with a complicated pore system. (paper)

  4. Research of carbon composite material for nonlinear finite element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jung Ho; Garg, Mohit; Kim, Ji Hoon

    2012-04-01

    Works on the absorption of collision energy in the structural members are carried out widely with various material and cross-sections. And, with ever increasing safety concerns, they are presently applied in various fields including railroad trains, air crafts and automobiles. In addition to this, problem of lighting structural members became important subject by control of exhaust gas emission, fuel economy and energy efficiency. CFRP(Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics) usually is applying the two primary structural members because of different result each design parameter as like stacking thickness, stacking angle, moisture absorption ect. We have to secure the data for applying primary structural members. But it always happens to test design parameters each for securing the data. So, it has much more money and time. We can reduce the money and the time, if can ensure the CFRP material properties each design parameters. In this study, we experiment the coupon test each tension, compression and shear using CFRP prepreg sheet and simulate non-linear analyze at the sources - test result, Caron longitudinal modulus and matrix poisson's ratio using GENOAMQC is specialized at Composite analysis. And then we predict the result that specimen manufacture changing stacking angle and experiment in such a way of test method using GENOA-MCQ.

  5. Effect of different catalyst preparation methods on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes with the flame pyrolysis method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghong Guo

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available The Flame pyrolysis method used to synthesize carbon nanotubes was studied in this work. In order to improve the quality of synthesized carbon nanotubes, it is important to change the corresponding natures of the catalyst. Two catalyst preparation methods, namely, the sol-gel method and the impregnation method, were compared in this experiment. The properties of the catalyst are analyzed in depth by energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS, x-ray diffraction (XRD, temperature program reduction (TPR. The generation of carbon nanotubes was systematically analysed through scanning electron microscope (SEM, molecule dynamics (MD, raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM. The results show that the catalysts prepared by the impregnation method are stickier, dispersed and easier to dip onto the probe or substrate, which is beneficial for the large-scale production of carbon tubes. The specific surface area of alumina is larger and the iron and molybdenum oxide are more evenly dispersed on the surface of alumina. The carbon nanotubes produced by the catalysts prepared by impregnation method are flatter and have less impurities. The ratio of ID/IG+ is 29.7% lower than that of the sol-gel method in the Raman spectra. The TEM statistics show that the average diameter of the carbon tubes decreases by 23.3%. Therefore, the impregnation method can improve the quality of carbon nanotubes in the case of a similar degree of difficulty in the preparation of the catalyst.

  6. Effect of different catalyst preparation methods on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes with the flame pyrolysis method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yonghong; Zhai, Gang; Ru, Yu; Wu, Chuyu; Jia, Xiaowei; Sun, Yaping; Yu, Jiawen; Kang, Zhizhong; Sun, Baomin

    2018-03-01

    The Flame pyrolysis method used to synthesize carbon nanotubes was studied in this work. In order to improve the quality of synthesized carbon nanotubes, it is important to change the corresponding natures of the catalyst. Two catalyst preparation methods, namely, the sol-gel method and the impregnation method, were compared in this experiment. The properties of the catalyst are analyzed in depth by energy dispersive spectrometer (EDS), x-ray diffraction (XRD), temperature program reduction (TPR). The generation of carbon nanotubes was systematically analysed through scanning electron microscope (SEM), molecule dynamics (MD), raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscope (TEM). The results show that the catalysts prepared by the impregnation method are stickier, dispersed and easier to dip onto the probe or substrate, which is beneficial for the large-scale production of carbon tubes. The specific surface area of alumina is larger and the iron and molybdenum oxide are more evenly dispersed on the surface of alumina. The carbon nanotubes produced by the catalysts prepared by impregnation method are flatter and have less impurities. The ratio of ID/IG+ is 29.7% lower than that of the sol-gel method in the Raman spectra. The TEM statistics show that the average diameter of the carbon tubes decreases by 23.3%. Therefore, the impregnation method can improve the quality of carbon nanotubes in the case of a similar degree of difficulty in the preparation of the catalyst.

  7. Gas chromatographic method fr determination of carbon in metallic uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikol'skij, V.A.; Markov, V.K.; Evseeva, T.I.; Cherstvenkova, E.P.

    1983-01-01

    Gas chromatographic device to determine carbon in metal uranium is developed. Burnout unite, permitting to load in the burnout tube simultaneously quite a few (up to 20) weight amounts of materials to be burned is a characteristic feature of the device. As a result amendments for control experiment and determination limit are decreased. The time of a single determination is also reduced. Conditions of carbon burn out from metal uranium are studied and temperature and time of complete extraction of carbon in the form of dioxide from weight amount into gaseous phase are established

  8. Small Carbon-Carbon Couplings in Monosubstituted Benzenes - Their Signs and Magnitudes Determined by HCSE Method

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Blechta, Vratislav; Schraml, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 6 (2013), s. 378-381 ISSN 0749-1581 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TA01010646 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : HCSE * carbon-carbon coupling sign * monosubstituted benzenes Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.559, year: 2013

  9. Integral measurements using the 'sphere method'. The case of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haouat, G.; Lachkar, J.; Patin, Y.; Cocu, F.; Sigaud, J.; Cotten, D.

    1977-01-01

    The time-of-flight spectrum of direct and scattered neutrons with a 10cm diameter carbon sphere. (The direct neutron energy is 14.81MeV, the basic time-of-flight being 6m). The time-of-flight spectrum of the neutrons from T(d,n) 4 He is given in the same experimental conditions (without the carbon sphere) [fr

  10. Carbon-graphite component for an electrochemical cell and method for making the component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stewart, R.C. Jr.

    1987-06-02

    A method is described for making a carbon-graphite component suited for use in an electrochemical cell, comprising: forming a precursor sheet structure consisting essentially of a mixture of cellulose fibers, purified graphite particles and a carbonizable, thermosetting resin wherein the cellulose fibers support and position the purified graphite particles; heating the sheet structure to a first temperature range to carbonize the cellulose fibers and thermosetting resin wherein the carbonized resin bonds the carbonized cellulose fibers and graphite particles together; and heating the sheet structure to a second, higher temperature range to graphitize the carbonized cellulose fibers and resin.

  11. Study of factors affecting a combustion method for determining carbon in lithium hydride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barringer, R.E.; Thornton, R.E.

    1975-09-01

    An investigation has been made of the factors affecting a combustion method for the determination of low levels (300 to 15,000 micrograms/gram) of carbon in highly reactive lithium hydride. Optimization of the procedure with available equipment yielded recoveries of 90 percent, with a limit of error (0.95) of +-39 percent relative for aliquants containing 35 to 55 micrograms of carbon (500 to 800 micrograms of carbon per gram of lithium hydride sample). Sample preparation, thermal decomposition of the hydride, final ignition of the carbon, and carbon-measurement steps were studied, and a detailed procedure was developed. (auth)

  12. Advantages of the Biomimetic Nanostructured Films as an Immobilization Method vs. the Carbon Paste Classical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luz Rodríguez-Méndez

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Tyrosinase-based biosensors containing a phthalocyanine as electron mediator have been prepared by two different methods. In the first approach, the enzyme and the electron mediator have been immobilized in carbon paste electrodes. In the second method, they have been introduced in an arachidic acid Langmuir-Blodgett nanostructured film that provides a biomimetic environment. The sensing properties of non-nanostructured and nanostructured biosensors towards catechol, catechin and phenol have been analyzed and compared. The enzyme retains the biocatalytic properties in both matrixes. However, the nanostructured biomimetic films show higher values of maximum reaction rates and lowest apparent Michaelis-Menten constants. In both types of sensors, the sensitivity follows the decreasing order catechol > catechin > phenol. The detection limits observed are in the range of 1.8–5.4 μM for Langmuir-Blodgett biosensors and 8.19–8.57 μM for carbon paste biosensors. In summary, it has been demonstrated that the Langmuir-Blodgett films provide a biomimetic environment and nanostructured biosensors show better performances in terms of kinetic, detection limit and stability.

  13. Influence of sample composition on aerosol organic and black carbon determinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novakov, T.; Corrigan, C.E.

    1995-07-01

    In this paper we present results on characterization of filter-collected redwood (Sequoia sempevirens)-needle and eucalyptus smoke particles by thermal, optical, and solvent extraction methods. Our results demonstrate that organic and black carbon concentrations determined by thermal and optical methods are not only method dependent, but also critically influenced by the overall chemical composition of the samples. These conclusions are supported by the following: (1) the organic fraction of biomass smoke particles analyzed includes a component, ranging in concentration from about 6-20% of total carbon or from 16-30% of organic carbon, that is relatively non-volatile and has a combustion temperature close to that of black carbon; (2) presence of K or Na in biomass smoke samples lowers the combustion temperatures of this organic component and of black carbon, making their combustion properties indistinguishable; (3) about 20% of total organic material is nonvolatile when heated to 550 degrees C in an inert atmosphere. Consequently, thermal methods that rely on a specific temperature to separate organic from black carbon may either underestimate or overestimate the black and organic carbon concentrations, depending on the amounts of Na and K and on the composition and concentration of organic material present in a sample. These analytical uncertainties and, under some conditions, absorption by organic material may contribute to the variability of empirically derived proportionality between light transmission through filter deposits and black carbon concentrations

  14. System and method for coproduction of activated carbon and steam/electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasachar, Srivats [Sturbridge, MA; Benson, Steven [Grand Forks, ND; Crocker, Charlene [Newfolden, MN; Mackenzie, Jill [Carmel, IN

    2011-07-19

    A system and method for producing activated carbon comprising carbonizing a solid carbonaceous material in a carbonization zone of an activated carbon production apparatus (ACPA) to yield a carbonized product and carbonization product gases, the carbonization zone comprising carbonaceous material inlet, char outlet and carbonization gas outlet; activating the carbonized product via activation with steam in an activation zone of the ACPA to yield activated carbon and activation product gases, the activation zone comprising activated carbon outlet, activation gas outlet, and activation steam inlet; and utilizing process gas comprising at least a portion of the carbonization product gases or a combustion product thereof; at least a portion of the activation product gases or a combustion product thereof; or a combination thereof in a solid fuel boiler system that burns a solid fuel boiler feed with air to produce boiler-produced steam and flue gas, the boiler upstream of an air heater within a steam/electricity generation plant, said boiler comprising a combustion zone, a boiler-produced steam outlet and at least one flue gas outlet.

  15. Systems and Methods for Implementing Robust Carbon Nanotube-Based Field Emitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Kristof, Valerie (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement carbon nanotube-based field emitters. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube field emitter includes: patterning a substrate with a catalyst, where the substrate has thereon disposed a diffusion barrier layer; growing a plurality of carbon nanotubes on at least a portion of the patterned catalyst; and heating the substrate to an extent where it begins to soften such that at least a portion of at least one carbon nanotube becomes enveloped by the softened substrate.

  16. Carbon nanotube oscillator surface profiling device and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, Adrian [Tampa, FL; Woods, Lilia M [Tampa, FL; Bondarev, Igor V [Fuquay Varina, NC

    2011-11-15

    The proposed device is based on a carbon nanotube oscillator consisting of a finite length outer stationary nanotube and a finite length inner oscillating nanotube. Its main function is to measure changes in the characteristics of the motion of the carbon nanotube oscillating near a sample surface, and profile the roughness of this surface. The device operates in a non-contact mode, thus it can be virtually non-wear and non-fatigued system. It is an alternative to the existing atomic force microscope (AFM) tips used to scan surfaces to determine their roughness.

  17. Method and device for secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wertsching, Alan Kevin; Trantor, Troy Joseph; Ebner, Matthias Anthony; Norby, Brad Curtis

    2016-04-05

    A method and device for producing secure, high-density tritium bonded with carbon. A substrate comprising carbon is provided. A precursor is intercalated between carbon in the substrate. The precursor intercalated in the substrate is irradiated until at least a portion of the precursor, preferably a majority of the precursor, is transmutated into tritium and bonds with carbon of the substrate forming bonded tritium. The resulting bonded tritium, tritium bonded with carbon, produces electrons via beta decay. The substrate is preferably a substrate from the list of substrates consisting of highly-ordered pyrolytic graphite, carbon fibers, carbon nanotunes, buckministerfullerenes, and combinations thereof. The precursor is preferably boron-10, more preferably lithium-6. Preferably, thermal neutrons are used to irradiate the precursor. The resulting bonded tritium is preferably used to generate electricity either directly or indirectly.

  18. Fabrication And Properties Of Silver Based Multiwall Carbon Nanotube Composite Prepared By Spark Plasma Sintering Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lis M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of investigations of the obtained nanocomposite materials based on silver with addition of multiwall carbon nanotubes. The powder of carbon nanotubes content from 0.1 to 3 wt. % was produced by application of powder metallurgy methods, through mixing and high-energetic milling, and also chemical methods. Modification of carbon nanotubes included electroless deposition of silver particles on the carbon nanotube active surfaces and chemical reduction with strong reducing agent – sodium borohydride (NaBH4. The obtained powder mixtures were consolidated by SPS – Spark Plasma Sintering method. The formed composites were subjected to tests of relative density, electrical conductivity and electro-erosion properties. Detailed examinations of the structure with application of X-ray microanalysis, with consideration of carbon nanotubes distribution, were also carried out. The effect of manufacturing methods on properties of the obtained composites was observed.

  19. Local hardening evaluation of carbon steels by using frequency sweeping excitation and spectrogram method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchida, Yuji; Kudo, Yuki; Enokizono, Masato

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents our proposed frequency sweeping excitation and spectrogram method (FSES method) by a magnetic sensor for non-destructive testing of hardened low carbon steels. This method can evaluate the magnetic properties of low carbon steels which were changed after induction heating treatment. It was examined by our proposed method that the degrees of yield strength of low carbon steels were varied depending on hardened conditions. Moreover, it was made clear that the maximum magnetic field strength, Hmax, derived from the measured B-H loops was very sensitive to the hardening if the surface of the samples were flat.

  20. Polynomial fitting of tight-binding method in carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haa, Wai Kang; Yeak, Su Hoe

    2017-04-01

    Carbon is very unique in among the elements and its ability to form strong chemical bonds with a variety number such as two carbons (graphene) and four carbons (diamond). This combination of strong bonds with tight mass and high melting point makes them technologically and scientifically important in nanoscience development. Tight-binding model (TB) is one of the semi-empirical approximations used in quantum mechanical world which is restricted to the Linear Combinations of Localized Atomic Orbitals (LCAO). Currently, there are many approaches in tight-binding calculation. In this paper, we have reproduced a polynomial scaling function by fitting to the TB model. The model is then applied into carbon molecules and obtained the energy bands of the system. The elements of the overlap Hamiltonian matrix in the model will be depending on the parameter of the polynomials. Our purpose is to find out a set of parameters in the polynomial which were commonly fit to an independently calculated band structure. We used minimization approach to calculate the polynomial coefficients which involves differentiation of eigenvalues in the eigensystem. The algorithm of fitting the parameters is carried out in FORTRAN.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Oscillator Surface Profiling Device and Method of Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    system. The carbon nanotube oscillator in accor- dance with the present invention can achieve in-plane reso- lution -1 nm as compared to 20-30 nm in...following phenomenologi - cal expression: (13) where m is the mass of the moving tube and y is the appro- priate friction coefficient. E>(z) is the

  2. Apparatus and method for removing solvent from carbon dioxide in resin recycling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W [Harrisonville, MO; Hand, Thomas E [Lee's Summit, MO; DeLaurentiis, Gary M [Jamestown, CA

    2009-01-06

    A two-step resin recycling system and method solvent that produces essentially contaminant-free synthetic resin material. The system and method includes one or more solvent wash vessels to expose resin particles to a solvent, the solvent contacting the resin particles in the one or more solvent wash vessels to substantially remove contaminants on the resin particles. A separator is provided to separate the solvent from the resin particles after removal from the one or more solvent wash vessels. The resin particles are next exposed to carbon dioxide in a closed loop carbon dioxide system. The closed loop system includes a carbon dioxide vessel where the carbon dioxide is exposed to the resin, substantially removing any residual solvent remaining on the resin particles after separation. A separation vessel is also provided to separate the solvent from the solvent laden carbon dioxide. Both the carbon dioxide and the solvent are reused after separation in the separation vessel.

  3. Regional allocation of carbon emission quotas in China: Evidence from the Shapley value method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Yue-Jun; Wang, Ao-Dong; Da, Ya-Bin

    2014-01-01

    It is an important task for China to allocate carbon emission quotas among regions so as to realize its carbon reduction targets and establish the national cap-and-trade carbon market. Meanwhile, it is supposed to be cost-effective to jointly reduce China's carbon emissions through some collaborative activities among regions. Then a natural question is how to allocate the quotas among regions in light of the collaboration. For this purpose, the Shapley value method is adopted and the results show that, first, the regions with higher GDP, higher carbon outflow and higher carbon reduction connection should be allocated more carbon quotas. Moreover, when the collaboration is considered, the optimal allocation of carbon quotas among regions will change significantly compared to the basic quotas by the entropy method; and the Central region is allocated the largest proportion of carbon quota among regions, which indicates its largest radiation effect. Besides, the collaboration between the Central region and Northern coast region, and that between the Central region and the Eastern region should be paid close attention. These results may provide insightful support for decision makers to promote collaborative carbon reduction and allocate carbon quotas in China. - Highlights: • The paper allocates carbon quotas given the collaboration among regions in China. • The Shapley value method coupled with the entropy and gravity models is adopted. • The regions with higher GDP, carbon outflow and reduction connection allocate more. • The Central region has the largest radiation effect on others among all regions. • The collaboration of the Central and Northern coast regions should have priority

  4. Inventory-based estimates of forest biomass carbon stocks in China: A comparison of three methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhaodi Guo; Jingyun Fang; Yude Pan; Richard. Birdsey

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have reported different estimates for forest biomass carbon (C) stocks in China. The discrepancy among these estimates may be largely attributed to the methods used. In this study, we used three methods [mean biomass density method (MBM), mean ratio method (MRM), and continuous biomass expansion factor (BEF) method (abbreviated as CBM)] applied to...

  5. Development of a thermal method for the measurement of elemental carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lavanchy, V.M.H. [Bern Univ. (Switzerland); Baltensperger, U.; Gaeggeler, H.W. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    A thermal method was developed to measure the organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) content of atmospheric aerosols. OC is first oxidized under an O{sub 2} flow during a precombustion step and measured with an Non-Dispersive Infrared Analyzer (NDIR). The remaining carbon, defined as EC, is then oxidized at 650{sup o}C. (author) 1 fig., 1 tab., 3 refs.

  6. Monitoring Methods and its Application of Carbon Sinks Based on GPRS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Songwei Zeng

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Scientific and effective monitoring of forest carbon emissions and carbon sinks can provide a scientific basis for national development of low-carbon economy. Due to the limitations of technical conditions and cost, it is very difficult to obtain accurate data of the regional carbon sink by using the existing common means. First, this paper discusses the benefit and weakness of kinds of monitoring methods of forest carbon emissions and carbon sinks. Then, it mainly proposes the way based on carbon flux measurement model, which is based on wireless network technology, combined with the continuing dynamic perceived information needs of carbon flux tower. In addition, the article develops the smart sensor nodes to meet the multi-scale, multi-objective time and space requirements. The node and the system had successfully accomplished the online auto-monitoring of the CO2 concentration, temperature and humid value of the monitoring area of Taihu town in Linan, Zhejiang Provice of China, which lays the foundation for building carbon emissions, carbon quantitative monitoring comprehensive platform, real-time release carbon balance regional information.

  7. Large-diameter carbon-composite monofilaments. [production method and characteristics of carbon composite monofilaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, W. G.; Pinoli, P. C.; Karlak, R. F.

    1974-01-01

    Large-diameter carbon composite monofilaments with high strength and high modulus were produced by pregging multifiber carbon bundles with suitable organic resins and pyrolysing them together. Two approaches were developed to increase the utilization of fiber tensile strength by minimizing stress concentration defects induced by dissimilar shrinkage during pyrolysis. These were matrix modification to improve char yield and strain-to-failure and fiber-matrix copyrolysis to alleviate matrix cracking. Highest tensile strength and modulus were obtained by heat treatments to 2873 K to match fiber and matrix strain-to-failure and develop maximum monofilament tensile-strength and elastic modulus.

  8. Method for producing fluorinated diamond-like carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakovirta, Marko J.; Nastasi, Michael A.; Lee, Deok-Hyung; He, Xiao-Ming

    2003-06-03

    Fluorinated, diamond-like carbon (F-DLC) films are produced by a pulsed, glow-discharge plasma immersion ion processing procedure. The pulsed, glow-discharge plasma was generated at a pressure of 1 Pa from an acetylene (C.sub.2 H.sub.2) and hexafluoroethane (C.sub.2 F.sub.6) gas mixture, and the fluorinated, diamond-like carbon films were deposited on silicon substrates. The film hardness and wear resistance were found to be strongly dependent on the fluorine content incorporated into the coatings. The hardness of the F-DLC films was found to decrease considerably when the fluorine content in the coatings reached about 20%. The contact angle of water on the F-DLC coatings was found to increase with increasing film fluorine content and to saturate at a level characteristic of polytetrafluoroethylene.

  9. Photovoltaic device using single wall carbon nanotubes and method of fabricating the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biris, Alexandru S.; Li, Zhongrui

    2012-11-06

    A photovoltaic device and methods for forming the same. In one embodiment, the photovoltaic device has a silicon substrate, and a film comprising a plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes disposed on the silicon substrate, wherein the plurality of single wall carbon nanotubes forms a plurality of heterojunctions with the silicon in the substrate.

  10. Selective extraction methods for aluminium, iron and organic carbon from montane volcanic ash soils

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, B.; Tonneijck, F.H.; Verstraten, J.M.

    2011-01-01

    Montane volcanic ash soils contain disproportionate amounts of soil organic carbon and thereby play an often underestimated role in the global carbon cycle. Given the central role of Al and Fe in stabilizing organic matter in volcanic ash soils, we assessed various extraction methods of Al, Fe, and

  11. A novel method for preparation of hollow and solid carbon spheres

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Wintec

    Hollow and solid carbon spheres were prepared by the reaction of ferrocene and ammonium carbo- nate in a sealed quartz ... for the formation of carbon spheres and its amount also influences the morphology of the product. The method may be ... product were recorded by Hitachi S-4700 field emission scanning electron ...

  12. Determination of total carbonates in soil archaeometry using a new pressure method with temperature compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barouchas, Pantelis; Koulos, Vasilios; Melfos, Vasilios

    2017-04-01

    For the determination of total carbonates in soil archaeometry a new technique was applied using a multi-sensor philosophy, which combines simultaneous measurement of pressure and temperature. This technology is innovative and complies with EN ISO 10693:2013, ASTM D4373-02(2007) and Soil Science Society of America standard test methods for calcium carbonate content in soils and sediments. The total carbonates analysis is based on a pressure method that utilizes the FOGII Digital Soil CalcimeterTM, which is a portable apparatus. The total carbonate content determined by treating a 1.000 g (+/- 0.001 g) dried sample specimens with 6N hydrochloric acid (HCL) reagent grade, in an enclosed reaction vessel. Carbon dioxide gas evolved during the reaction between the acid and carbonate fraction of the specimen, was measured by the resulting pressure generated, taking in account the temperature conditions during the reaction. Prior to analysis the procedure was validated with Sand/Soil mixtures from BIPEA proficiency testing program with soils of different origins. For applying this new method in archaeometry a total number of ten samples were used from various rocks which are related with cultural constructions and implements in Greece. They represent a large range of periods since the Neolithic times, and were selected because there was an uncertainty about their accurate mineralogical composition especially regarding the presence of carbonate minerals. The results were compared to the results from ELTRA CS580 inorganic carbon analyzer using an infrared cell. The determination of total carbonates for 10 samples from different ancient sites indicated a very good correlation (R2 >0.97) between the pressure method with temperature compensation and the infrared method. The proposed method is quickly and accurate in archaeometry and can replace easily other techniques for total carbonates testing. The FOGII Digital Soil CalcimeterTM is portable and easily can be carried for

  13. Using a cut-paste method to prepare a carbon nanotube fur electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H; Cao, G P; Yang, Y S [Research Institute of Chemical Defense, West building, No. 35 Huayuanbeilu Road, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-05-16

    We describe and realize an aligned carbon nanotube array based 'carbon nanotube fur (CNTF)' electrode. We removed an 800 {mu}m long aligned carbon nanotube array from the silica substrate, and then pasted the array on a nickel foam current collector to obtain a CNTF electrode. CNTF's characteristics and electrochemical properties were studied systemically in this paper. The cut-paste method is simple, and does not damage the microstructure of the aligned carbon nanotube array. The CNTF electrode obtained a specific capacitance of 14.1 F g{sup -1} and excellent rate capability.

  14. Method for fabricating carbon/lithium-ion electrode for rechargeable lithium cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chen-Kuo (Inventor); Surampudi, Subbarao (Inventor); Attia, Alan I. (Inventor); Halpert, Gerald (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    The method includes steps for forming a carbon electrode composed of graphitic carbon particles adhered by an ethylene propylene diene monomer binder. An effective binder composition is disclosed for achieving a carbon electrode capable of subsequent intercalation by lithium ions. The method also includes steps for reacting the carbon electrode with lithium ions to incorporate lithium ions into graphitic carbon particles of the electrode. An electrical current is repeatedly applied to the carbon electrode to initially cause a surface reaction between the lithium ions and to the carbon and subsequently cause intercalation of the lithium ions into crystalline layers of the graphitic carbon particles. With repeated application of the electrical current, intercalation is achieved to near a theoretical maximum. Two differing multi-stage intercalation processes are disclosed. In the first, a fixed current is reapplied. In the second, a high current is initially applied, followed by a single subsequent lower current stage. Resulting carbon/lithium-ion electrodes are well suited for use as an anode in a reversible, ambient temperature, lithium cell.

  15. Disk Inoculum-Solid Medium Method To Test Carbon and Nitrogen Assimilation by Yeast Isolates

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, Kerry J.; Johnson, Michael G.; McClary, Shane P.

    1988-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen assimilation for 50 yeasts isolated from White Riesling fermentation were tested by using a disk inoculum-solid medium method. This method was quicker and gave results comparable to the conventional liquid medium methods. Yeast characteristics (growth response, pigment production, morphology) could also be compared with this method.

  16. Analytical Method for Carbon and Oxygen Isotope of Small Carbonate Samples with the GasBench Ⅱ-IRMS Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIANG Cui-cui

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An analytical method for measuring carbon and oxygen isotopic compositions of trace amount carbonate (>15 μg was established by Delta V Advantage isotope Ratio MS coupled with GasBench Ⅱ. Different trace amount (5-50 μg carbonate standard samples (IAEA-CO-1 were measured by GasBench Ⅱ with 12 mL and 3.7 mL vials. When the weight of samples was less than 40 μg and it was acidified in 12 mL vials, most standard deviations of the δ13C and δ18O were more than 0.1‰, which couldn’t satisfied high-precision measurements. When the weight of samples was greater than 15 μg and it was acidified in 3.7 mL vials, standard deviations for the δ13C and δ18O were 0.01‰-0.07‰ and 0.01‰-0.08‰ respectively, which satisfied high-precision measurements. Therefore, small 3.7 mL vials were used to increase the concentration of carbon dioxide in headspace, carbonate samples even less as 15 μg can be analyzed routinely by a GasBench Ⅱ continuous-flow IRMS. Meanwhile, the linear relationship between sample’s weight and peak’s area was strong (R2>0.993 2 and it can be used to determine the carbon content of carbonate samples.

  17. Effects of drying method, storage period and carbon: nitrogen ratio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Taghwo

    2012-12-03

    Dec 3, 2012 ... Clay. Clay. Clay. pH water. 5.9. 5.8. 5.8. %N. 0.17. 0.14. 0.18. %C. 2.29. 2.11. 2.81. C:N ratio. 13.5. 15.1. 15.6. K cmol (+) kg -1. 0.4. 0.3. 0.6. Mg cmol (+) kg -1. 11.3. 12.3 ... texture, pH, total N, organic carbon, exchangeable bases and cation exchange ... excavated using a PVC cylinder 20, 10, and 1. 5 cm in ...

  18. Embedded arrays of vertically aligned carbon nanotube carpets and methods for making them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung Jong; Nicholas, Nolan Walker; Kittrell, W. Carter; Schmidt, Howard K.

    2015-06-30

    According to some embodiments, the present invention provides a system and method for supporting a carbon nanotube array that involve an entangled carbon nanotube mat integral with the array, where the mat is embedded in an embedding material. The embedding material may be depositable on a carbon nanotube. A depositable material may be metallic or nonmetallic. The embedding material may be an adhesive material. The adhesive material may optionally be mixed with a metal powder. The embedding material may be supported by a substrate or self-supportive. The embedding material may be conductive or nonconductive. The system and method provide superior mechanical and, when applicable, electrical, contact between the carbon nanotubes in the array and the embedding material. The optional use of a conductive material for the embedding material provides a mechanism useful for integration of carbon nanotube arrays into electronic devices.

  19. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube Dispersion Methods Affect Their Aggregation, Deposition, and Biomarker Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    To systematically evaluate how dispersion methods affect the environmental behaviors of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), MWNTs were dispersed in various solutions (e.g., surfactants, natural organic matter (NOM), and etc.) via ultrasonication (SON) and long-term stirring (LT...

  20. EVALUATION OF THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF INNOVATIVE WATER MAIN REHABILITATION TECHNOLOGIES VS. OPEN CUT METHODS

    Science.gov (United States)

    A major benefit of trenchless rehabilitation technologies touted by many practitioners when comparing their products with tradition open cut construction methods is lower carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions. In an attempt to verify these claims, multiple tools have been dev...

  1. Methods and compositions for removing carbon dioxide from a gaseous mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Wu, Haohan

    2014-06-24

    Provided is a method for adsorbing or separating carbon dioxide from a mixture of gases by passing the gas mixture through a porous three-dimensional polymeric coordination compound having a plurality of layers of two-dimensional arrays of repeating structural units, which results in a lower carbon dioxide content in the gas mixture. Thus, this invention provides useful compositions and methods for removal of greenhouse gases, in particular CO.sub.2, from industrial flue gases or from the atmosphere.

  2. Systems and Methods for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube-Based Vacuum Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor); Del Castillo, Linda Y. (Inventor); Murthy, Rakesh (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention proficiently produce carbon nanotube-based vacuum electronic devices. In one embodiment a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube-based vacuum electronic device includes: growing carbon nanotubes onto a substrate to form a cathode; assembling a stack that includes the cathode, an anode, and a first layer that includes an alignment slot; disposing a microsphere partially into the alignment slot during the assembling of the stack such that the microsphere protrudes from the alignment slot and can thereby separate the first layer from an adjacent layer; and encasing the stack in a vacuum sealed container.

  3. Performance of separation processes for precipitated calcium carbonate produced with an innovative method from steelmaking slag and carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian eTeir

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, experiments were performed to determine the filterability of calcium carbonate produced with an alternative calcium carbonate production concept. The concept uses steelmaking slag as raw material and has potential to fix CO2 emissions and utilize steelmaking slag, simultaneously. As calcium carbonate is precipitated in a solution containing ammonium chloride, calcium chloride and ammonia, the product needs to be washed and hence filtered. In this work different separation processes, including washing, filtering and drying, were tested on two calcium carbonate slurries produced from steel converter slag and CO2 by a laboratory-scale pilot facility, with the aim of obtaining a solid product with a low chloride content using a minimum amount of washing water. The order of maximum filtration rates achievable of the calcium carbonate slurries was determined by experimental work. The tests included pressure filtration and vacuum filtration and the test series contained altogether 21 different filtration cycles with varying combinations of filtering, washing, and drying steps. The filtered cakes were analyzed by their residual moisture content, chloride content and conductivity, and the filtrates by their residual solids content, chloride content and conductivity. Pressure filtration gave a high capacity (400-460 kg/m2h and a low cake residual moisture content (12-14 wt-%. Vacuum filtration gave slightly higher filtration rates (500-610 kg/m2h at the lowest residual chloride contents of the cakes, but the cake residual moisture also stayed higher (25-26 wt-%. As the vacuum filtration tests used a filter cloth with higher permeability than that of the pressure filtration tests, a slightly higher filtration rate was expected. However, both filtration technologies seem suitable for filtering and washing calcium carbonate prepared with the studied method as a residual chloride content as low as 10 ppm of the filtered solids can be achieved

  4. Biological properties of carbon powders synthesized using chemical vapour deposition and detonation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batory, M; Batory, D; Grabarczyk, J; Kaczorowski, W; Kupcewicz, B; Mitura, K; Nasti, T H; Yusuf, N; Niedzielski, P

    2012-12-01

    Carbon powders can be synthesized using variety of CVD and detonation methods. Several interesting properties of carbon powder particles make them a very attractive material examined in many laboratories all over the world. However there is a lack of information discussing investigation of carbon powders directed to its application in pharmaceutical-cosmetic industry and medicine. Earlier investigation results proved that diamond powders present properties fighting free radicals. Presented work discusses the influence of carbon powder particles manufactured using MW/RF PACVD, RF PACVD and detonation methods onto hydro-lipid skin coat. Before the biological examinations physicochemical properties of carbon powders were determined. Grain size, shape and chemical composition of carbon powders were determined using the scanning electron microscopy. Surface functional groups were characterized by IR Fourier-transform spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Structure and phase composition were investigated by means of the Raman spectroscopy. Results of allergy tests performed on laboratory mice proved that carbon powder particles synthesized using different methods do not cause allergy. In the following stage, the group of 20 patients applied the formula including carbon powder on their face skin. The influence of carbon powder onto hydro-lipid skin coat was determined by measurement of such parameters as: pH reaction, skin temperature, lipid fotometry and level of hydration. Additionally, macro pictures of places where the cream had been applied were registered. As the result of the investigation it was found that powders synthesized using various methods present different physicochemical properties which may individually affect the face skin parameters. The noticeable improvement of hydro-lipid skin coat kilter was observed.

  5. Synthesis of amorphous carbon from bio-products by drying method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pamungkas, Diajeng I.; Haikal, Anas; Baqiya, Malik A.; Cahyono, Yoyok; Darminto

    2018-04-01

    Amorphous carbon (a-C) has extensively been studied in the last two decades due to many superior properties. Amorphous carbon was successfully prepared by carbonization of organic compounds exposed up to 200°C. Organic compounds that used in this research were coconut sap, lontar palm sap and their derivatives. The X-ray diffraction pattern shows that carbonization of organic compounds produce amorphous carbon phase at 2θ =20°. The infrared absorption in the region from 500 to 4000 cm-1 were resolved into several peaks, which were assigned to C-H, C=C, C-O, C=O and O-H. Four point probe method was also used to measure the conductivity and band gap of each material, resulting in 1.73 - 29.6 S/m and 0.08 - 0.49 eV respectively.

  6. The effects of hydrogen proportion on the synthesis of carbon nanomaterials with gaseous detonation (deflagration) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Tiejun; Li, Xiaojie; Lee, John H. S.; Yan, Honghao

    2018-02-01

    Using ferrocene, H2 and O2, Carbon nanomaterials were prepared with gaseous detonation (deflagration) method. The effects of H2 on the phase and morphology of carbon nanomaterials were studied by various proportions of H2 in the reaction. The prepared samples were characterized by x-ray diffractometer, transmission electron microscope and Raman spectrometer. The results show that hydrogen proportion has a great influence on the phase and morphology of carbon nanomaterials. The high hydrogen proportion leads to much unreacted hydrogen, which could protect the iron atom from oxidation of carbon and dilute the reactants contributing to uniform particle size. In addition, the graphitization degree of multi-walled carbon nanotubes, observed in samples with high H2 proportion, is high enough to see the lattice fringes, but the degree of graphitization of whole sample is lower than which fabricated with low H2 proportion, and it may result from the low energy generation.

  7. Industrial ecology: Quantitative methods for exploring a lower carbon future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Valerie M.

    2015-03-01

    Quantitative methods for environmental and cost analyses of energy, industrial, and infrastructure systems are briefly introduced and surveyed, with the aim of encouraging broader utilization and development of quantitative methods in sustainable energy research. Material and energy flow analyses can provide an overall system overview. The methods of engineering economics and cost benefit analysis, such as net present values, are the most straightforward approach for evaluating investment options, with the levelized cost of energy being a widely used metric in electricity analyses. Environmental lifecycle assessment has been extensively developed, with both detailed process-based and comprehensive input-output approaches available. Optimization methods provide an opportunity to go beyond engineering economics to develop detailed least-cost or least-impact combinations of many different choices.

  8. Carbon dioxide titration method for soil respiration measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Martín Rubio, Luis

    2017-01-01

    This thesis was commissioned by Tampere University of Applied Sciences, which was interested in studying and developing a titration measurement method for soil respiration and biodegradability. Some experiments were carried out measuring soil respiration for testing the method and others adding some biodegradable material like polylactic acid compressed material and 100% biodegradable plastic bags to test its biodegradability and the possibility to measure it via titration. The thesi...

  9. Comparing the NIOSH Method 5040 to a Diesel Particulate Matter Meter for Elemental Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayers, David Matthew

    Introduction: The sampling of elemental carbon has been associated with monitoring exposures in the trucking and mining industries. Recently, in the field of engineered nanomaterials, single wall and muti-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are being produced in ever increasing quantities. The only approved atmospheric sampling for multi-wall carbon nanotubes in NIOSH Method 5040. These results are accurate but can take up to 30 days for sample results to be received. Objectives: Compare the results of elemental carbon sampling from the NIOSH Method 5040 to a Diesel Particulate Matter (DPM) Meter. Methods: MWCNTs were transferred and weighed between several trays placed on a scale. The NIOSH Method 5040 and DPM sampling train was hung 6 inches above the receiving tray. The transferring and weighing of the MWCNTs created an aerosol containing elemental carbon. Twenty-one total samples using both meters type were collected. Results: The assumptions for a Two-Way ANOVA were violated therefore, Mann-Whitney U Tests and a Kruskal-Wallis Test were performed. The hypotheses for both research questions were rejected. There was a significant difference in the EC concentrations obtained by the NIOSH Method 5040 and the DPM meter. There were also significant differences in elemental carbon level concentrations when sampled using a DPM meter versus a sampling pump based upon the three concentration levels (low, medium and high). Conclusions: The differences in the EC concentrations were statistically significant therefore, the two methods (NIOSH Method 5040 and DPM) are not the same. The NIOSH Method 5040 should continue to be the only authorized method of establishing an EC concentration for MWCNTs until a MWCNT specific method or an instantaneous meter is invented.

  10. Development of a Method for Measuring Carbon Balance in Chemical Sequestration of CO2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Zhongxian; Pan, Wei-Ping; Riley, John T.

    2006-09-09

    Anthropogenic CO2 released from fossil fuel combustion is a primary greenhouse gas which contributes to “global warming.” It is estimated that stationary power generation contributes over one-third of total CO2 emissions. Reducing CO2 in the atmosphere can be accomplished either by decreasing the rate at which CO2 is emitted into the atmosphere or by increasing the rate at which it is removed from it. Extensive research has been conducted on determining a fast and inexpensive method to sequester carbon dioxide. These methods can be classified into two categories, CO2 fixation by natural sink process for CO2, or direct CO2 sequestration by artificial processes. In direct sequestration, CO2 produced from sources such as coal-fired power plants, would be captured from the exhausted gases. CO2 from a combustion exhaust gas is absorbed with an aqueous ammonia solution through scrubbing. The captured CO2 is then used to synthesize ammonium bicarbonate (ABC or NH4HCO3), an economical source of nitrogen fertilizer. In this work, we studied the carbon distribution after fertilizer is synthesized from CO2. The synthesized fertilizer in laboratory is used as a “CO2 carrier” to “transport” CO2 from the atmosphere to crops. After biological assimilation and metabolism in crops treated with ABC, a considerable amount of the carbon source is absorbed by the plants with increased biomass production. The majority of the unused carbon source percolates into the soil as carbonates, such as calcium carbonate (CaCO3) and magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). These carbonates are environmentally benign. As insoluble salts, they are found in normal rocks and can be stored safely and permanently in soil. This investigation mainly focuses on the carbon distribution after the synthesized fertilizer is applied to soil. Quantitative examination of carbon distribution in an ecosystem is a challenging task since the carbon in the soil may come from various sources. Therefore synthesized 14C

  11. Dynamic Raman Spectroelectrochemistry of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes modified electrodes using a Langmuir-Schaefer method

    OpenAIRE

    Ibáñez, David; Romero, Edna Cecilia; Colina, Álvaro; Heras, Aránzazu

    2014-01-01

    Raman spectroelectrochemistry is a fundamental technique to characterize single walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films. In this work, we have performed the study of SWCNT films transferred to a glassy carbon electrode using a Langmuir-Schaefer method. Langmuir balance has allowed us to control the characteristics of the film that can be easily transferred to the electrode support. Time-resolved Raman spectroelectrochemistry experiments at scan rates between 20 and 400 mV s−1 were done in two di...

  12. Tailoring the surface chemistry of zeolite templated carbon by electrochemical methods

    OpenAIRE

    Berenguer Betrián, Raúl; Morallón Núñez, Emilia; Cazorla Amorós, Diego; Nishihara, Hirotomo; Itoi, Hiroyuki; Ishii, Takafumi; Kyotani, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    One option to optimize carbon materials for supercapacitor applications is the generation of surface functional groups that contribute to the pseudocapacitance without losing the designed physical properties. This requires suitable functionalization techniques able to selectively introduce a given amount of electroactive oxygen groups. In this work, the influence of the chemical and electrochemical oxidation methods, on the chemical and physical properties of a zeolite templated carbon (ZTC),...

  13. System and method for controlling hydrogen elimination during carbon nanotube synthesis from hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2010-03-23

    A system and method for producing carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition includes a catalyst support having first and second surfaces. The catalyst support is capable of hydrogen transport from the first to the second surface. A catalyst is provided on the first surface of the catalyst support. The catalyst is selected to catalyze the chemical vapor deposition formation of carbon nanotubes. A fuel source is provided for supplying fuel to the catalyst.

  14. New Method Developed To Purify Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Single wall carbon nanotubes have attracted considerable attention because of their remarkable mechanical properties and electrical and thermal conductivities. Use of these materials as primary or secondary reinforcements in polymers or ceramics could lead to new materials with significantly enhanced mechanical strength and electrical and thermal conductivity. Use of carbon-nanotube-reinforced materials in aerospace components will enable substantial reductions in component weight and improvements in durability and safety. Potential applications for single wall carbon nanotubes include lightweight components for vehicle structures and propulsion systems, fuel cell components (bipolar plates and electrodes) and battery electrodes, and ultra-lightweight materials for use in solar sails. A major barrier to the successful use of carbon nanotubes in these components is the need for methods to economically produce pure carbon nanotubes in large enough quantities to not only evaluate their suitability for certain applications but also produce actual components. Most carbon nanotube synthesis methods, including the HiPCO (high pressure carbon monoxide) method developed by Smalley and others, employ metal catalysts that remain trapped in the final product. These catalyst impurities can affect nanotube properties and accelerate their decomposition. The development of techniques to remove most, if not all, of these impurities is essential to their successful use in practical applications. A new method has been developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center to purify gram-scale quantities of single wall carbon nanotubes. This method, a modification of a gas phase purification technique previously reported by Smalley and others, uses a combination of high-temperature oxidations and repeated extractions with nitric and hydrochloric acid. This improved procedure significantly reduces the amount of impurities (catalyst and nonnanotube forms of carbon) within the nanotubes, increasing

  15. A new manometric method for measuring carbon dioxide production ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The volume of CO2 produced by Leuconostoc in milk was highly correlated with the D-lactate production (r = 0.995). This method could be used routinely for the evaluation and the selection of bacteria having potential ability for CO2 production. Keywords: Leuconostoc sp., CO2 production, lactic acid, milk ...

  16. Effects of drying method, storage period and carbon: nitrogen ratio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is the need for appropriate drying of Vertisol samples to facilitate thorough mixing and storage to retain mineral N content reflective of field status. We determined the effects of drying method, storage period and C:N ratio on inorganic N contents of tropical Vertisols. The treatments comprised of three soils with different ...

  17. A novel fabrication method of carbon electrodes using 3D printing and chemical modification process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Pan; Chen, Chaoyang; Hu, Jie; Qi, Jin; Wang, Qianghua; Chen, Jimmy Ching-Ming; Cavanaugh, John; Peng, Yinghong; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng

    2017-11-23

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing is an emerging technique in the field of biomedical engineering and electronics. This paper presents a novel biofabrication method of implantable carbon electrodes with several advantages including fast prototyping, patient-specific and miniaturization without expensive cleanroom. The method combines stereolithography in additive manufacturing and chemical modification processes to fabricate electrically conductive carbon electrodes. The stereolithography allows the structures to be 3D printed with very fine resolution and desired shapes. The resin is then chemically modified to carbon using pyrolysis to enhance electrochemical performance. The electrochemical characteristics of 3D printing carbon electrodes are assessed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The specific capacitance of 3D printing carbon electrodes is much higher than the same sized platinum (Pt) electrode. In-vivo electromyography (EMG) recording, 3D printing carbon electrodes exhibit much higher signal-to-noise ratio (40.63 ± 7.73) than Pt electrodes (14.26 ± 6.83). The proposed biofabrication method is envisioned to enable 3D printing in many emerging applications in biomedical engineering and electronics.

  18. Ecosystem Carbon Budgets under Contrasting Land Use Histories Using Eddy Covariance and Deep Core Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraha, M.; Gelfand, I.; Hamilton, S. K.; Shao, C.; Su, Y. J.; Robertson, G. P.; Chen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Increasing demand for agricultural production could be met through conversion of uncultivated lands and/or intensification of production on existing agricultural lands, each with distinct implications for ecosystem carbon budgets. We investigated the carbon budget of two intensively managed continuous no-till corn fields with contrasting land use histories over six years using eddy covariance (EC) and deep core methods. One treatment had been managed as Conservation Reserve Program (CRP) grassland for 22 years before conversion, thus representing conversion of uncultivated lands into agriculture, and the other treatment had been managed as conventional agriculture (AGR) in a corn-soybean rotation for several decades before conversion, thus representing agricultural intensification. We hypothesized that the AGR land would sequester more carbon or at least remain neutral owing to the reduced soil disturbance and increased overall productivity of the land following conversion. Accordingly, we expected soil carbon to either increase or remain unchanged compared to its pre-conversion status. We also hypothesized that the CRP grassland converted to no-till would lose carbon to the atmosphere until a new equilibrium is reached owing to the decomposition of the large below- and above-ground plant biomass and soil organic matter that had accumulated during the 22 years of CRP management. Consequently, we anticipated the soil carbon to decrease compared to its pre-conversion status. The EC-derived carbon budget supported our hypothesis in that the former AGR land was on average carbon neutral (-8 g C m-2 yr-1) while the former CRP land emitted 301 g C m-2 yr-1 to the atmosphere over the six year period. In contradiction to the hypothesis, the deep core method indicated that the former AGR land emitted 167 g C m-2 yr-1 to the atmosphere while the former CRP land sequestered 127 g C m-2 yr-1 over the same time period. This could be due to pre-conversion plant biomass and soil

  19. Simply scan--optical methods for elemental carbon measurement in diesel exhaust particulate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forder, James A

    2014-08-01

    This article describes a performance assessment of three optical methods, a Magee Scientific OT21 Transmissometer, a Hach-Lange Microcolor II difference gloss meter, and a combination of an office scanner with Adobe Photoshop software. The optical methods measure filter staining as a proxy for elemental carbon in diesel exhaust particulate (DEP) exposure assessment and the suitability of each as a replacement for the existing Bosch meter optical method. Filters loaded with DEP were produced from air in a non-coal mine and the exhaust gases from a mobile crane. These were measured with each apparatus and then by combustion to obtain a reference elemental carbon value. The results from each apparatus were then plotted against both the Bosch number and reference elemental carbon values. The equations of the best fit lines for these plots were derived, and these gave functions for elemental carbon and Bosch number from the output of each new optical method. For each optical method, the range of DEP loadings which can be measured has been determined, and conversion equations for elemental carbon and Bosch number have been obtained. All three optical methods studied will effectively quantify blackness as a measure of elemental carbon. Of these the Magee Scientific OT21 transmissometer has the best performance. The Microcolor II and scanner/photoshop methods will in addition allow conversion to Bosch number which may be useful if historical Bosch data are available and functions for this are described. The scanner/photoshop method demonstrates a technique to obtain measurements of DEP exposure without the need to purchase specialized instrumentation. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Occupational Hygiene Society.

  20. Determination of fossil carbon content in Swedish waste fuel by four different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Frida C; Blomqvist, Evalena W; Bisaillon, Mattias; Lindberg, Daniel K; Hupa, Mikko

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to determine the content of fossil carbon in waste combusted in Sweden by using four different methods at seven geographically spread combustion plants. In total, the measurement campaign included 42 solid samples, 21 flue gas samples, 3 sorting analyses and 2 investigations using the balance method. The fossil carbon content in the solid samples and in the flue gas samples was determined using (14)C-analysis. From the analyses it was concluded that about a third of the carbon in mixed Swedish waste (municipal solid waste and industrial waste collected at Swedish industry sites) is fossil. The two other methods (the balance method and calculations from sorting analyses), based on assumptions and calculations, gave similar results in the plants in which they were used. Furthermore, the results indicate that the difference between samples containing as much as 80% industrial waste and samples consisting of solely municipal solid waste was not as large as expected. Besides investigating the fossil content of the waste, the project was also established to investigate the usability of various methods. However, it is difficult to directly compare the different methods used in this project because besides the estimation of emitted fossil carbon the methods provide other information, which is valuable to the plant owner. Therefore, the choice of method can also be controlled by factors other than direct determination of the fossil fuel emissions when considering implementation in the combustion plants.

  1. Methods for continuous direct carbon fuel cell operation with a circulating electrolyte slurry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harjes, Daniel I.; Dineen, Jr., D. Andrew; Guo, Liang; Calo, Joseph M.; Bloomfield, Valerie J.

    2017-02-07

    The present invention relates to methods and systems related to fuel cells, and in particular, to direct carbon fuel cells. The methods and systems relate to cleaning and removal of components utilized and produced during operation of the fuel cell, regeneration of components utilized during operation of the fuel cell, and generating power using the fuel cell.

  2. EVALUATION OF THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF AN INNOVATIVE SEWER REHABILITATION METHOD - abstract

    Science.gov (United States)

    A benefit of trenchless methods touted by many practitioners when compared to open cut construction is lower carbon dioxide emissions. In an attempt to verify these claims, tools have been developed that calculate the environmental impact of traditional open cut methods and commo...

  3. EVALUATION OF THE CARBON FOOTPRINT OF AN INNOVATIVE SEWER REHABILITATION METHOD

    Science.gov (United States)

    A benefit of trenchless methods touted by many practitioners when compared to open cut construction is lower carbon dioxide emissions. In an attempt to verify these claims, tools have been developed that calculate the environmental impact of traditional open cut methods and commo...

  4. Alternative mannosylation method for nanomaterials: application to oxidized debris-free multiwalled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Marcelo de, E-mail: marcelosousap2@yahoo.com.br [University of Campinas (Unicamp), Solid State Chemistry Laboratory (LQES) and NanoBioss Laboratory, Institute of Chemistry (Brazil); Martinez, Diego Stéfani Teodoro, E-mail: diego.martinez@lnnano.cnpem.br [Brazilian Center for Research in Energy and Materials (CNPEM), Brazilian Nanotechnology National Laboratory (LNNano) (Brazil); Alves, Oswaldo Luiz, E-mail: oalves@iqm.unicamp.br [University of Campinas (Unicamp), Solid State Chemistry Laboratory (LQES) and NanoBioss Laboratory, Institute of Chemistry (Brazil)

    2016-06-15

    Mannosylation is a method commonly used to deliver nanomaterials to specific organs and tissues via cellular macrophage uptake. In this work, for the first time, we proposed a method that involves the binding of d-mannose to ethylenediamine to form mannosylated ethylenediamine, which is then coupled to oxidized and purified multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The advantage of this approach is that mannosylated ethylenediamine precipitates in methanol, which greatly facilitates the separation of this product in the synthesis process. Carbon nanotubes were oxidized using concentrated H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HNO{sub 3} by conventional reflux method. However, during this oxidation process, carbon nanotubes generated carboxylated carbonaceous fragments (oxidation debris). These by-products were removed from the oxidized carbon nanotubes to ensure that the functionalization would occur only on the carbon nanotube surface. The coupling of mannosylated ethylenediamine to debris-free carbon nanotubes was accomplished using n-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)-n-ethylcarbodiimide and n-hydroxysuccinimide. Deconvoluted N1s spectra obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy gave binding energies of 399.8 and 401.7 eV, which we attributed to the amide and amine groups, respectively, of carbon nanotubes functionalized with mannosylated ethylenediamine. Deconvoluted O1s spectra showed a binding energy of 532.4 eV, which we suggest is caused by an overlap in the binding energies of the aliphatic CO groups of d-mannose and the O=C group of the amide bond. The functionalization degree was approximately 3.4 %, according to the thermogravimetric analysis. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated that an extended carbon nanotube morphology was preserved following the oxidation, purification, and functionalization steps.

  5. The influence of temperature calibration on the OC–EC results from a dual-optics thermal carbon analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Sunset Laboratory Dual-Optical Carbonaceous Analyzer that simultaneously measures transmission and reflectance signals is widely used in thermal-optical analysis of particulate matter samples. Most often this instrument is used to measure total carbon (TC), organic carbon (O...

  6. Continuous production of carbon nanotubes and diamond films by swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.E. Iyuke

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Various techniques for the synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs are being developed to meet an increasing demand as a result of their versatile applications. Swirled floating catalyst chemical vapour deposition (SFCCVD is one of these techniques. This method was used to synthesise CNTs on a continuous basis using acetylene gas as a carbon source, ferrocene dissolved in xylene as a catalyst precursor, and both hydrogen and argon as carrier gases. Transmission electron microscopy analyses revealed that a mixture of single and multi-wall carbon nanotubes and other carbon nanomaterials were produced within the pyrolytic temperature range of 900–1 100°C and acetylene flow rate range of 118–370 ml min–1. Image comparison of raw and purified products showed that low contents of iron particles and amorphous carbon were contained in the synthesised carbon nanotubes. Diamond films were produced at high ferrocene concentration, hydrogen flow rate and pyrolysis temperatures, while carbon nanoballs were formed and attached to the surface of theCNTs at low ferrocene content and low pyrolysis temperature.

  7. Structural, thermal, optical and nonlinear optical properties of ethylenediaminium picrate single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indumathi, C.; T. C., Sabari Girisun; Anitha, K.; Alfred Cecil Raj, S.

    2017-07-01

    A new organic optical limiting material, ethylenediaminium picrate (EDAPA) was synthesized through acid base reaction and grown as single crystals by solvent evaporation method. Single crystal XRD analysis showed that EDAPA crystallizes in orthorhombic system with Cmca as space group. The formation of charge transfer complex during the reaction of ethylenediamine and picric acid was strongly evident through the recorded Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR), Raman and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectrum. Thermal (TG-DTA and DSC) curves indicated that the material possesses high thermal stability with decomposition temperature at 243 °C. Optical (UV-Visible-NIR) analysis showed that the grown crystal was found to be transparent in the entire visible and NIR region. Z-scan studies with intense short pulse (532 nm, 5 ns, 100 μJ) excitations, revealed that EDAPA exhibited two photon absorption behaviour and the nonlinear absorption coefficient was found to be two orders of magnitude higher than some of the known optical limiter like Cu nano glasses. EDAPA exhibited a strong optical limiting action with low limiting threshold which make them a potential candidate for eye and photosensitive component protection against intense short pulse lasers.

  8. Coupled thermal-optic effects and electrical modulation mechanism of birefringence crystal with Gaussian laser incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Ji; He Zhi-Hong; Ma Yu; Dong Shi-Kui

    2015-01-01

    We study the Gaussian laser transmission in lithium niobate crystal (LiNbO 3 ) by using the finite element method to solve the electromagnetic field’s frequency domain equation and energy equation. The heat generated is identified by calculating the transmission loss of the electromagnetic wave in the birefringence crystal, and the calculated value of the heat generated is substituted into the energy equation. The electromagnetic wave’s energy losses induced by its multiple refractions and reflections along with the resulting physical property changes of the lithium niobate crystal are considered. Influences of ambient temperature and heat transfer coefficient on refraction and walk-off angles of O-ray and E-ray in the cases of different incident powers and crystal thicknesses are analyzed. The E-ray electrical modulation instances, in which the polarized light waveform is adjusted to the rated condition via an applied electrical field in the cases of different ambient temperatures and heat transfer coefficients, are provided to conclude that there is a correlation between ambient temperature and applied electrical field intensity and a correlation between surface heat transfer coefficient and applied electrical field intensity. The applicable electrical modulation ranges without crystal breakdown are proposed. The study shows that the electrical field-adjustable heat transfer coefficient range becomes narrow as the incident power decreases and wide as the crystal thickness increases. In addition, it is pointed out that controlling the ambient temperature is easier than controlling the heat transfer coefficient. The results of the present study can be used as a quantitative theoretical basis for removing the adverse effects induced by thermal deposition due to linear laser absorption in the crystal, such as depolarization or wave front distortion, and indicate the feasibility of adjusting the refractive index in the window area by changing the heat transfer

  9. Method of synthesizing small-diameter carbon nanotubes with electron field emission properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jie (Inventor); Du, Chunsheng (Inventor); Qian, Cheng (Inventor); Gao, Bo (Inventor); Qiu, Qi (Inventor); Zhou, Otto Z. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube material having an outer diameter less than 10 nm and a number of walls less than ten are disclosed. Also disclosed are an electron field emission device including a substrate, an optionally layer of adhesion-promoting layer, and a layer of electron field emission material. The electron field emission material includes a carbon nanotube having a number of concentric graphene shells per tube of from two to ten, an outer diameter from 2 to 8 nm, and a nanotube length greater than 0.1 microns. One method to fabricate carbon nanotubes includes the steps of (a) producing a catalyst containing Fe and Mo supported on MgO powder, (b) using a mixture of hydrogen and carbon containing gas as precursors, and (c) heating the catalyst to a temperature above 950.degree. C. to produce a carbon nanotube. Another method of fabricating an electron field emission cathode includes the steps of (a) synthesizing electron field emission materials containing carbon nanotubes with a number of concentric graphene shells per tube from two to ten, an outer diameter of from 2 to 8 nm, and a length greater than 0.1 microns, (b) dispersing the electron field emission material in a suitable solvent, (c) depositing the electron field emission materials onto a substrate, and (d) annealing the substrate.

  10. Nanoporous carbon tunable resistor/transistor and methods of production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biener, Juergen; Baumann, Theodore F; Dasgupta, Subho; Hahn, Horst

    2014-04-22

    In one embodiment, a tunable resistor/transistor includes a porous material that is electrically coupled between a source electrode and a drain electrode, wherein the porous material acts as an active channel, an electrolyte solution saturating the active channel, the electrolyte solution being adapted for altering an electrical resistance of the active channel based on an applied electrochemical potential, wherein the active channel comprises nanoporous carbon arranged in a three-dimensional structure. In another embodiment, a method for forming the tunable resistor/transistor includes forming a source electrode, forming a drain electrode, and forming a monolithic nanoporous carbon material that acts as an active channel and selectively couples the source electrode to the drain electrode electrically. In any embodiment, the electrolyte solution saturating the nanoporous carbon active channel is adapted for altering an electrical resistance of the nanoporous carbon active channel based on an applied electrochemical potential.

  11. Underwater measurements of carbon dioxide evolution in marine plant communities: A new method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, João; Feijóo, Pedro; Santos, Rui

    2008-07-01

    We developed a new methodology to determine CO 2 fluxes in intertidal and shallow subtidal plant communities, namely seagrasses, both when the plants are submerged and when they are air-exposed. The apparatus comprises closed incubation chambers and a gas exchange column, designed to remove carbon dioxide from the water. Different types of incubation chambers were designed and built to adapt the system to distinct environments and incubation requirements. The methodology was tested under a comprehensive range of situations and its advantages and limitations are discussed. Overall, the method provides precise measurements of community carbon dioxide fluxes, through a fast and non-intrusive process, allowing repeatable in situ measurements of carbon uptake both in submerged and air-exposed conditions. As the experimental apparatus is identical, directly comparable measurements of air-exposed and submerged community production may be obtained, allowing sound estimates of daily carbon budgets of intertidal and shallow subtidal communities.

  12. Study on effective laser cleaning method to remove carbon layer from a gold surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Amol; Modi, Mohammed H; Lodha, G S; Choubey, A K; Upadhyaya, B N

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon cracking and carbon contamination is a common problem in soft x-ray Synchrotron Radiation (SR) beamlines. Carbon contamination on optics is known to absorb and scatter radiation close to the C K-edge (284 eV) spectral region. The purpose of this work is to study and develop a laser cleaning method that can effectively remove the carbon contaminations without damaging the underneath gold-coated optics. The laser cleaning process is a non-contact, accurate, efficient and safe. Nd:YAG laser of 100 ns pulse duration is used for carbon cleaning. The effect of laser pulse duration, laser fluence, number of laser passes, angle of incidence and spot overlapping on the cleaning performance is studied. Cleaning effect and subsequent film quality after laser irradiation is analyzed using x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and soft x-ray reflectivity (SXR) techniques.

  13. The assessment of water vapour and carbon dioxide fluxes above arable crops - a comparison of methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaaf, S.; Daemmgen, U.; Burkart, S. [Federal Agricultural Research Centre, Inst. of Agroecology, Braunschweig (Germany); Gruenhage, L. [Justus-Liebig-Univ., Inst. for Plant Ecology, Giessen (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    Vertical fluxes of water vapour and carbon dioxide obtained from gradient, eddy covariance (closed and open path systems) and chamber measurements above arable crops were compared with the directly measured energy balance and the harvested net biomass carbon. The gradient and chamber measurements were in the correct order of magnitude, whereas the closed path eddy covariance system showed unacceptably small fluxes. Correction methods based on power spectra analysis yielded increased fluxes. However, the energy balance could not be closed satisfactorily. The application of the open path system proved to be successful. The SVAT model PLATIN which had been adapted to various arable crops was able to depict the components of the energy balance adequately. Net carbon fluxes determined with the corrected closed path data sets, chamber, and SVAT model equal those of the harvested carbon. (orig.)

  14. COMPARISON OF THREE METHODS TO PROJECT FUTURE BASELINE CARBON EMISSIONS IN TEMPERATE RAINFOREST, CURINANCO, CHILE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patrick Gonzalez; Antonio Lara; Jorge Gayoso; Eduardo Neira; Patricio Romero; Leonardo Sotomayor

    2005-07-14

    Deforestation of temperate rainforests in Chile has decreased the provision of ecosystem services, including watershed protection, biodiversity conservation, and carbon sequestration. Forest conservation can restore those ecosystem services. Greenhouse gas policies that offer financing for the carbon emissions avoided by preventing deforestation require a projection of future baseline carbon emissions for an area if no forest conservation occurs. For a proposed 570 km{sup 2} conservation area in temperate rainforest around the rural community of Curinanco, Chile, we compared three methods to project future baseline carbon emissions: extrapolation from Landsat observations, Geomod, and Forest Restoration Carbon Analysis (FRCA). Analyses of forest inventory and Landsat remote sensing data show 1986-1999 net deforestation of 1900 ha in the analysis area, proceeding at a rate of 0.0003 y{sup -1}. The gross rate of loss of closed natural forest was 0.042 y{sup -1}. In the period 1986-1999, closed natural forest decreased from 20,000 ha to 11,000 ha, with timber companies clearing natural forest to establish plantations of non-native species. Analyses of previous field measurements of species-specific forest biomass, tree allometry, and the carbon content of vegetation show that the dominant native forest type, broadleaf evergreen (bosque siempreverde), contains 370 {+-} 170 t ha{sup -1} carbon, compared to the carbon density of non-native Pinus radiata plantations of 240 {+-} 60 t ha{sup -1}. The 1986-1999 conversion of closed broadleaf evergreen forest to open broadleaf evergreen forest, Pinus radiata plantations, shrublands, grasslands, urban areas, and bare ground decreased the carbon density from 370 {+-} 170 t ha{sup -1} carbon to an average of 100 t ha{sup -1} (maximum 160 t ha{sup -1}, minimum 50 t ha{sup -1}). Consequently, the conversion released 1.1 million t carbon. These analyses of forest inventory and Landsat remote sensing data provided the data to

  15. Synthesis of carbon nanowall by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rulin; Chi, Yaqing; Fang, Liang; Tang, Zhensen; Yi, Xun

    2014-02-01

    Plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) is widely used for the synthesis of carbon materials, such as diamond-like carbons (DLCs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and carbon nanowalls (CNWs). Advantages of PECVD are low synthesis temperature compared with thermal CVD and the ability to grow vertically, free-standing structures. Due to its self-supported property and high specific surface area, CNWs are a promising material for field emission devices and other chemical applications. This article reviews the recent process on the synthesis of CNW by the PECVD method. We briefly introduce the structure and properties of CNW with characterization techniques. Growth mechanism is also discussed to analyze the influence of plasma conditions, substrates, temperature, and other parameters to the final film, which will give a suggestion on parameter modulation for desired film.

  16. Investigation of thermochemistry associated with the carbon-carbon coupling reactions of furan and furfural using ab initio methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Cong; Assary, Rajeev S; Curtiss, Larry A

    2014-06-26

    Upgrading furan and small oxygenates obtained from the decomposition of cellulosic materials via formation of carbon-carbon bonds is critical to effective conversion of biomass to liquid transportation fuels. Simulation-driven molecular level understanding of carbon-carbon bond formation is required to design efficient catalysts and processes. Accurate quantum chemical methods are utilized here to predict the reaction energetics for conversion of furan (C4H4O) to C5-C8 ethers and the transformation of furfural (C5H6O2) to C13-C26 alkanes. Furan can be coupled with various C1 to C4 low molecular weight carbohydrates obtained from the pyrolysis via Diels-Alder type reactions in the gas phase to produce C5-C8 cyclic ethers. The computed reaction barriers for these reactions (∼25 kcal/mol) are lower than the cellulose activation or decomposition reactions (∼50 kcal/mol). Cycloaddition of C5-C8 cyclo ethers with furans can also occur in the gas phase, and the computed activation energy is similar to that of the first Diels-Alder reaction. Furfural, obtained from biomass, can be coupled with aldehydes or ketones with α-hydrogen atoms to form longer chain aldol products, and these aldol products can undergo vapor phase hydrocycloaddition (activation barrier of ∼20 kcal/mol) to form the precursors of C26 cyclic hydrocarbons. These thermochemical studies provide the basis for further vapor phase catalytic studies required for upgrading of furans/furfurals to longer chain hydrocarbons.

  17. Correlation between thermal, optical and morphological properties of heterogeneous blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene) and thermoplastic polyurethane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PatrIcio, PatrIcia S O; Calado, Hallen D R; Oliveira, Flavio A C de; Righi, Ariete; Neves, Bernardo R A; Silva, Glaura G; Cury, Luiz A

    2006-01-01

    A correlation between thermal, optical and morphological properties of self-sustained films formed from blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU), with 1, 10 and 20 wt% of P3HT in TPU, is established. Images of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) show the formation of domains of P3HT into the TPU matrix, characterizing the blend material as heterogeneous. The heat capacity (C p ) dependence on P3HT contents was investigated in a large temperature interval. In the region of the TPU glass transition, the difference between the experimental and predicted ΔC p values is more pronounced for the 1 wt% case, which strongly suggests that in this case there is a higher influence of the P3HT chains on the TPU matrix. The SEM images for the 1 wt% blended film present the formation of the smallest P3HT domains in the TPU matrix. The relatively high reduction of the PL intensity of the pure electronic transition peak in the 1 wt% blended film, in comparison to the other blended films and also to a pure P3HT film, favours the assumption that the smallest P3HT domains are at the origin of a more structural disordered character. This fact is in agreement with the results obtained by Raman spectroscopy and also by photoluminescence resolved by polarization in stretched self-sustained films, showing an ample correlation between morphological, thermal and optical properties of these blended materials. In addition, the thermoplastic properties of the polyurethane configure very good conditions for tensile drawing of P3HT and other conjugated polymer molecules

  18. Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) Model Development and Analysis of a Field-widened Michelson Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scola, Salvatore J.; Osmundsen, James F.; Murchison, Luke S.; Davis, Warren T.; Fody, Joshua M.; Boyer, Charles M.; Cook, Anthony L.; Hostetler, Chris A.; Seaman, Shane T.; Miller, Ian J.; hide

    2014-01-01

    An integrated Structural-Thermal-Optical-Performance (STOP) model was developed for a field-widened Michelson interferometer which is being built and tested for the High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) project at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). The performance of the interferometer is highly sensitive to thermal expansion, changes in refractive index with temperature, temperature gradients, and deformation due to mounting stresses. Hand calculations can only predict system performance for uniform temperature changes, under the assumption that coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) mismatch effects are negligible. An integrated STOP model was developed to investigate the effects of design modifications on the performance of the interferometer in detail, including CTE mismatch, and other three- dimensional effects. The model will be used to improve the design for a future spaceflight version of the interferometer. The STOP model was developed using the Comet SimApp'TM' Authoring Workspace which performs automated integration between Pro-Engineer®, Thermal Desktop®, MSC Nastran'TM', SigFit'TM', Code V'TM', and MATLAB®. This is the first flight project for which LaRC has utilized Comet, and it allows a larger trade space to be studied in a shorter time than would be possible in a traditional STOP analysis. This paper describes the development of the STOP model, presents a comparison of STOP results for simple cases with hand calculations, and presents results of the correlation effort to bench-top testing of the interferometer. A trade study conducted with the STOP model which demonstrates a few simple design changes that can improve the performance seen in the lab is also presented.

  19. A Comparative study of two RVE modelling methods for chopped carbon fiber SMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhangxing; Li, Yi; Shao, Yimin; Huang, Tianyu; Xu, Hongyi; Li, Yang; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Danielle; Avery, Katherine; Kang, HongTae; Su, Xuming

    2017-04-06

    To achieve vehicle light-weighting, the chopped carbon fiber sheet molding compound (SMC) is identified as a promising material to replace metals. However, there are no effective tools and methods to predict the mechanical property of the chopped carbon fiber SMC due to the high complexity in microstructure features and the anisotropic properties. In this paper, the Representative Volume Element (RVE) approach is used to model the SMC microstructure. Two modeling methods, the Voronoi diagram-based method and the chip packing method, are developed for material RVE property prediction. The two methods are compared in terms of the predicted elastic modulus and the predicted results are validated using the Digital Image Correlation (DIC) tensile test results. Furthermore, the advantages and shortcomings of these two methods are discussed in terms of the required input information and the convenience of use in the integrated processing-microstructure-property analysis.

  20. [Size distributions of organic carbon and elemental carbon in Nanjing aerosol particles].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Long; Guo, Zhao-Bing; Liu, Feng-Ling; Liu, Jie; Lu, Xi; Jiang, Lin-Xian

    2014-02-01

    The concentrations and size distributions of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in particles collected in Nanjing Normal University representing urban area and in Nanjing College of Chemical Technology standing for industrial area were analyzed using Model 2001A Thermal Optical Carbon Analyzer. The mass concentrations were the highest with the size below 0.43 microm in urban and industrial area. OC accounted for 20.9%, 21.9%, 29.6%, 27.9% respectively and those were 24.0%, 23.5%, 31.4%, 22.6% respectively for EC in the four seasons in urban area. In the industrial area, OC accounted for 18.6%, 45.8%, 26.6%, 25.9% respectively and the proportions of EC were 16.7%, 60.9%, 26.3%, 24.3% respectively. Overall, OC and EC were enriched in fine particles below 2.1 microm and they accounted for the highest proportion in summer in urban area while it did not show significant seasonal variation for industrial area. SOC in fine particles achieved high values in summer while the unobvious seasonal variation in coarse particles might be attributed to the contribution of different pollution sources and meteorological factors. Correlations and OC/EC ratio method implied that OC and EC mainly came from vehicles exhaust and coal combustion in fine particles while they were also related to biomass combustion and cooking in coarse particles.

  1. Study of corrosion behavior of carbon steel under seawater film using the wire beam electrode method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Zaijian; Wang, Wei; Wang, Jia; Peng, Xin; Wang, Yanhua; Zhang, Penghui; Wang, Haijie; Gao, Congjie

    2014-01-01

    Corrosion behavior of carbon steel under seawater film with various thickness was investigated by the wire beam electrode (WBE) method. It was found that the corrosion rate of carbon steel increased significantly under thin seawater film than it was immersed in seawater. The current variation under seawater film indicated that the thickness of diffusion layer of oxygen was about 500 μm, and the maximal current appeared around 40 μm, at which corrosion rate transited from cathodic control to anodic control. The results suggest that WBE method is helpful to study the corrosion process under thin electrolyte film

  2. Improved method for producing catalytic carbon and the potential for increasing its use in commercial applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruse, C.W.; Lizzio, A.A.; DeBarr, J.A.; Feizoulof, C.A.

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an improved method for producing a catalytic carbon, which was first produced in the late 1960s. The new activated carbon (AC) removes and destroys organic pollutants in aqueous solutions. To determine the effects of altering the pore structure and surface chemistry of activated carbons, carbons differing in the amount of functional groups on their surfaces were prepared in three steps: (1) oxidizing AC with boiling nitric acid, (2) washing oxidized AC with water to remove the acid, and (3) heating oxidized AC to temperatures beteween 100 and 925 ??C. The surfaces of the products were characterized by determining the amount of CO2 and CO evolved during temperature-programmed desorption. Depending on the desorption temperature, these modified carbons showed enhanced adsorptive and/or catalytic properties that included (1) carbon molecular sieves for separating oxygen from nitrogen, (2) increased capacity for adsorbing sulfur dioxide, (3) stronger adsorption of p-nitrophenol from water, and (4) catalysis of dehydrochlorination reactions. A dehydrohalogenation catalyst produced by the oxidation/ desorption steps was found to be similar to one prepared in the 1960s by oxidizing AC with air at 500-700 ??C. The dehydrohalogenation catalyst produced by either the old method or the new method involves an oxidized surface that has been exposed to a 500-700 ??C temperature range. This carbon catalyst retains modified adsorptive properties of the AC from which it is produced. It can be used both to adsorb pollutants from liquid or gaseous streams and to convert them to recyclable products.

  3. Research developments in methods to reduce the carbon footprint of the food system: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhongyue; Sun, Da-Wen; Zeng, Xin-An; Liu, Dan; Pu, Hongbin

    2015-01-01

    Global warming is a worldwide issue with its evident impact across a wide range of systems and sectors. It is caused by a number of greenhouse gases (GHGs) emissions, in which food system has made up of a large part. Recently, reduction of GHG emissions has become an urgent issue to be resolved in the food system. Many governments and organizations are making great endeavors to alleviate the adverse effect of this phenomenon. In this review, methods to reduce the carbon footprint within the life cycle of a food system are presented from the technical, consumption behavior and environmental policies perspectives. The whole food system including raw material acquisition, processing, packaging, preservation, transportation, consumption, and disposal are covered. Improving management techniques, and adopting advanced technology and equipment are critical for every stage of a food system. Rational site selection is important to alleviate the influence of land use change. In addition, environmental choices of packaging stage, reduction in refrigeration dependence, and correct waste treatment are essential to reduce the total carbon footprint of the production. However, only technical methods cannot radically reverse the trend of climate change, as consumption behaviors present a great deal of influence over climate change. Appropriate purchase patterns and substitution within food product categories by low carbon products can reduce GHG emissions. Development of methods to calculate the carbon footprint of every kind of food and its processing technology enable people to make environmental choice. Policy can shape and cultivate the new code of consumption and influence the direction of emerging technology and science. From political perspectives, government intervention and carbon offset are common tools, especially for carbon tax and a real or implicit price of carbon. Finally, by mitigating the methodologies described above, the rate and magnitude of climate changes

  4. Fabrication of carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite by sol-gel method for anode in lithium ion battery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bae, Joonwon

    2011-01-01

    Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT-C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method followed by a carbonization process. Silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes (Si-CNT) nanohybrids were produced by a wet-type beadsmill method. To obtain Si-CNT nanocomposites with spherical morphologies, a silica precursor (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS) and polymer (PMMA) mixture was employed as a structure-directing medium. Thus the Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer microspheres were prepared by an acid catalyzed sol-gel method. Then a carbon precursor such as polypyrrole (PPy) was incorporated onto the surfaces of pre-existing Si-CNT/silica-polymer to generate Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer-PPy microspheres. Subsequent thermal treatment of the precursor followed by wet etching of silica produced Si-CNT-C microcapsules. The intermediate silica/polymer must disappear during the carbonization and etching process resulting in the formation of an internal free space. The carbon precursor polymer should transform to carbon shell to encapsulate remaining Si-CNT nanocomposites. Therefore, hollow carbon microcapsules containing Si-CNT nanocomposites could be obtained (Si-CNT-C). The successful fabrication was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These final materials were employed for anode performance improvement in lithium ion battery. The cyclic performances of these Si-CNT-C microcapsules were measured with a lithium battery half cell tests. - Graphical Abstract: Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT-C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method. Highlights: → Polymeric microcapsules containing Si-CNT transformed to carbon microcapsules. → Accommodate volume changes of Si NPs during Li ion charge/discharge. → Sizes of microcapsules were controlled by experimental parameters.

  5. Carbon dioxide emissions due to Swedish imports and consumption: estimates using different methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson-Kanyama, Annika; Assefa, Getachew; Wadeskog, Anders

    2007-04-01

    Global trade of products and services challenges the traditional way in which emissions of carbon dioxide are declared and accounted for. Instead of only considering territorial emissions there are now strong reasons to determine how the carbon dioxide emitted in the production of imports are partitioned around the world and how the total emissions change for a country's final consumption compared to final production. In this report results from four different methods of calculating the total carbon dioxide emissions from Sweden's overall consumption are presented. Total carbon dioxide emissions for Sweden's final consumption vary from 57 to 109 M tons during one year depending on the methodology. The four methods used for estimating these emissions give results of 57, 61, 68 and 109 Mton of carbon dioxide. Two methods are based on information concerning Sweden's imports and our national production of goods and services excluding production that is exported while two methods are based on final consumer expenditures. Three of the methods use mainly emission data from Sweden while one method depends entirely upon emission data from Sweden's trading partners. The last method also gives the highest emissions level, 109 Mton of carbon dioxide. The calculations performed here can be compared to the emissions reported by Sweden, 54 Mton of carbon dioxide per year. Our estimates give per capita emission levels of between 6,3 and 12 tons of carbon dioxide per year. The estimate of 12 tons per capita is a result of using emissions data from Sweden's trading partners. The total emissions as a result of Sweden's imports are 26 or 74 M tons of carbon dioxide depending on how they are calculated. The lower figure is based upon the imports of today but with emissions as if everything was produced as in Sweden. The higher level is based upon using existing but partly inadequate international emission statistics. These levels can be compared to the about 35 M tons of carbon dioxide

  6. Method of operating a molten carbonate fuel cell, a fuel cell, a fuel cell stack and an apparatus provided therewith

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemmes, K.; Dijkema, G.P.J.

    1998-01-01

    A method of operating a molten carbonate fuel cell having an anode and a cathode and in between a matrix comprising molten carbonate. Carbon dioxide is introduced into the matrix at a distance from the cathode. This greatly reduces the cathode's deterioration and in the system design increases the

  7. Fabrication of carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes nanocomposite by sol-gel method for anode in lithium ion battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bae, Joonwon

    2011-07-01

    Carbon microcapsules containing silicon nanoparticles (Si NPs)-carbon nanotubes (CNTs) nanocomposite (Si-CNT@C) have been fabricated by a surfactant mediated sol-gel method followed by a carbonization process. Silicon nanoparticles-carbon nanotubes (Si-CNT) nanohybrids were produced by a wet-type beadsmill method. To obtain Si-CNT nanocomposites with spherical morphologies, a silica precursor (tetraethylorthosilicate, TEOS) and polymer (PMMA) mixture was employed as a structure-directing medium. Thus the Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer microspheres were prepared by an acid catalyzed sol-gel method. Then a carbon precursor such as polypyrrole (PPy) was incorporated onto the surfaces of pre-existing Si-CNT/silica-polymer to generate Si-CNT/Silica-Polymer@PPy microspheres. Subsequent thermal treatment of the precursor followed by wet etching of silica produced Si-CNT@C microcapsules. The intermediate silica/polymer must disappear during the carbonization and etching process resulting in the formation of an internal free space. The carbon precursor polymer should transform to carbon shell to encapsulate remaining Si-CNT nanocomposites. Therefore, hollow carbon microcapsules containing Si-CNT nanocomposites could be obtained (Si-CNT@C). The successful fabrication was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). These final materials were employed for anode performance improvement in lithium ion battery. The cyclic performances of these Si-CNT@C microcapsules were measured with a lithium battery half cell tests.

  8. Method of preparation of carbon materials for use as electrodes in rechargeable batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doddapaneni, Narayan; Wang, James C. F.; Crocker, Robert W.; Ingersoll, David; Firsich, David W.

    1999-01-01

    A method of producing carbon materials for use as electrodes in rechargeable batteries. Electrodes prepared from these carbon materials exhibit intercalation efficiencies of .apprxeq.80% for lithium, low irreversible loss of lithium, long cycle life, are capable of sustaining a high rates of discharge and are cheap and easy to manufacture. The method comprises a novel two-step stabilization process in which polymeric precursor materials are stabilized by first heating in an inert atmosphere and subsequently heating in air. During the stabilization process, the polymeric precursor material can be agitated to reduce particle fusion and promote mass transfer of oxygen and water vapor. The stabilized, polymeric precursor materials can then be converted to a synthetic carbon, suitable for fabricating electrodes for use in rechargeable batteries, by heating to a high temperature in a flowing inert atmosphere.

  9. The effect of empirical potential functions on modeling of amorphous carbon using molecular dynamics method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Longqiu; Xu, Ming; Song, Wenping; Ovcharenko, Andrey; Zhang, Guangyu; Jia, Ding

    2013-01-01

    Empirical potentials have a strong effect on the hybridization and structure of amorphous carbon and are of great importance in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In this work, amorphous carbon at densities ranging from 2.0 to 3.2 g/cm 3 was modeled by a liquid quenching method using Tersoff, 2nd REBO, and ReaxFF empirical potentials. The hybridization, structure and radial distribution function G(r) of carbon atoms were analyzed as a function of the three potentials mentioned above. The ReaxFF potential is capable to model the change of the structure of amorphous carbon and MD results are in a good agreement with experimental results and density function theory (DFT) at low density of 2.6 g/cm 3 and below. The 2nd REBO potential can be used when amorphous carbon has a very low density of 2.4 g/cm 3 and below. Considering the computational efficiency, the Tersoff potential is recommended to model amorphous carbon at a high density of 2.6 g/cm 3 and above. In addition, the influence of the quenching time on the hybridization content obtained with the three potentials is discussed.

  10. Separation and determination of high-carbon alcohols using method of column chromatographic and gas-chromatographic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang Zhongrong; Li Biping; Zeng Yongchang

    1988-01-01

    This paper describes the separation and determination of high-carbon alcohols from amine extractant by using the method of column chromatography of aluminium oxide and gas-chromatographic analysis. The total conent of high-carbon alcohols is determined by the method of column chromatography, while the components of the high-carbon alcohols and their relative contents are determined by the method of gas-chromatography. A simple reliable and practical method is provided for the analysis of high-carbon alcohol from the amine extractant in this paper

  11. Carbonated hydrocalumite synthesized by the microwave method as a possible antacid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linares, Carlos F., E-mail: clinares@uc.edu.ve [Unidad de Síntesis de Materiales y Metales de Transición, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnología, Departamento de Química, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia, Edo, Carabobo Apartado Postal 3336 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Moscosso, Joel; Alzurutt, Victor; Ocanto, Freddy; Bretto, Pablo [Unidad de Síntesis de Materiales y Metales de Transición, Facultad de Ciencias y Tecnología, Departamento de Química, Universidad de Carabobo, Valencia, Edo, Carabobo Apartado Postal 3336 (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); González, Gema [Laboratorio de Materiales, Centro Tecnológico, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas (IVIC), Carretera Panamericana Km 11 Altos de Pipe, Los Teques (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2016-04-01

    A carbonated hydrocalumite was synthesized by the microwave method for being used as antacid. The gel was formed using Ca and Al nitrate solutions in a basic medium (NaOH + Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}), then, this gel was aged and heated in a domestic microwave for 2.5 min (1250 W). The obtained white solid was washed with distilled water, dried in an oven at 100 °C for 18 h and characterized by different techniques such as: X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), BET surface area measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX). Finally, the carbonated hydrocalumite was tested as antacid by using a synthetic gastric juice and its activity was compared with a commercial antacid formulated with hydrotalcite. Results showed that the carbonated hydrocalumite was more effective than that commercial antacid. - Highlights: • Carbonated hydrocalumite was synthesized by the microwave method. • The aging time was drastically reduced. • Carbonated hydrocalumite was more active as antacid than a commercial antacid based on hydrotalcites.

  12. A facile method of synthesizing uniform resin colloidal and microporous carbon spheres with high nitrogen content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Jing-Chuan; Lu, Zhong-Yuan; Sun, Zhao-Yan

    2014-10-01

    3-Aminophenol/formaldehyde (AF) resin colloidal spheres with narrow size distribution and high nitrogen content are synthesized in the presence of urea. The obtained particles that indicated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) are spherical morphology and uniform. It can be further carbonized into carbon spheres preserving high nitrogen percent. The particle size is tunable from 300 nm to 850 nm by appropriately varying the concentration of precursor or water/ethanol volume ratio. Even using the water as an only solvent, we can also obtain spherical particles with different size. Typically, the nitrogen percent in the obtained polymer and carbon particles is as high as 10.39 wt% and 8.95 wt%, respectively. The typical surface area of resulted carbon particles obtained from nitrogen adsorption measurement is 459 m(2) g(-1). X-ray diffraction demonstrates the obtained carbon spheres are amorphous, which are expected to have practical application in the field of energy devices. The method can be considered as a low cost and facile method for mass production. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Forest carbon accounting methods and the consequences of forest bioenergy for national greenhouse gas emissions inventories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKechnie, Jon; Colombo, Steve; MacLean, Heather L.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Forest carbon accounting influences the national GHG inventory impacts of bioenergy. • Current accounting rules may overlook forest carbon trade-offs of bioenergy. • Wood pellet trade risks creating an emissions burden for exporting countries. - Abstract: While bioenergy plays a key role in strategies for increasing renewable energy deployment, studies assessing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from forest bioenergy systems have identified a potential trade-off of the system with forest carbon stocks. Of particular importance to national GHG inventories is how trade-offs between forest carbon stocks and bioenergy production are accounted for within the Agriculture, Forestry and Other Land Use (AFOLU) sector under current and future international climate change mitigation agreements. Through a case study of electricity produced using wood pellets from harvested forest stands in Ontario, Canada, this study assesses the implications of forest carbon accounting approaches on net emissions attributable to pellets produced for domestic use or export. Particular emphasis is placed on the forest management reference level (FMRL) method, as it will be employed by most Annex I nations in the next Kyoto Protocol Commitment Period. While bioenergy production is found to reduce forest carbon sequestration, under the FMRL approach this trade-off may not be accounted for and thus not incur an accountable AFOLU-related emission, provided that total forest harvest remains at or below that defined under the FMRL baseline. In contrast, accounting for forest carbon trade-offs associated with harvest for bioenergy results in an increase in net GHG emissions (AFOLU and life cycle emissions) lasting 37 or 90 years (if displacing coal or natural gas combined cycle generation, respectively). AFOLU emissions calculated using the Gross-Net approach are dominated by legacy effects of past management and natural disturbance, indicating near-term net forest carbon increase but

  14. High Pressure Adsorption Isotherm of CO2 on Activated Carbon using Volumetric Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awaludin Martin

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Adsorption system is ones of the most effective methods for CO2 separating with other substances that produced from the burning of fossil fuels. In the design for that application, beside of characteristics of porous material (adsorbent data, CO2 adsorption data on the adsorbent (kinetic and thermodynamic are also needed. The aim of this research is resulting isothermal adsorption data at pressures up to 3.5 MPa by indirect methods (volumetric method at isothermal temperature of 300, 308, 318 and 338 K. Adsorbent that used in this research is activated carbon made from East of Kalimantan coals by physical activation method (CO2 which is the surface area of activated carbon is 668 m2/g and pore volume is 0.47 mL/g. Carbon dioxide (CO2 that used in this research is high purity carbon dioxide with a purity of 99.9%. Data from the experiment results then correlated using the Langmuir and Toth equations model. The results showed that the maximum adsorption capacity is 0.314 kg/kg at 300 K and 3384.69 kPa. The results of regression of experiment data using Langmuir and Toth models were 3.4% and 1.7%.

  15. Carbon footprint of five pig diets using three land use change accounting methods

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meul, M.; Ginneberge, C.; Middelaar, van C.E.; Boer, de I.J.M.; Fremaut, D.; Haesaert, G.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of our study was to estimate the carbon footprint (CFP) of five diets for fattening pigs in Europe, using three land use change accounting methods: (i) reference CFP excluding emissions from land use change (LUC); (ii) CFP taking into account emissions from direct LUC and (iii) CFP including

  16. Liquid carbon dioxide absorbents, methods of using the same, and related systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Michael Joseph; Perry, Robert James; Lam, Tunchiao Hubert; Soloveichik, Grigorii Lev; Kniajanski, Sergei; Lewis, Larry Neil; Rubinsztajn, Malgorzata Iwona; Hancu, Dan

    2016-09-13

    A carbon dioxide absorbent composition is described, including (i) a liquid, nonaqueous silicon-based material, functionalized with one or more groups that either reversibly react with CO.sub.2 or have a high-affinity for CO.sub.2; and (ii) a hydroxy-containing solvent that is capable of dissolving both the silicon-based material and a reaction product of the silicon-based material and CO.sub.2. The absorbent may be utilized in methods to reduce carbon dioxide in an exhaust gas, and finds particular utility in power plants.

  17. Crack Detection Method Applied to 3D Computed Tomography Images of Baked Carbon Anodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald Picard

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Carbon anodes used in the aluminium industry were imaged through destructive and non-destructive testing (NDT methods. For the latter case, computed tomography (CT, which has previously been used to map the 3D apparent density distribution, was extended to crack detection. Previous work has shown how to overcome technical hurdles related to crack detection by using percolation-based algorithms operating on low-resolution images of full-scale baked carbon anodes. The previous application to 2D images was extended here to the 3D case. The crack detection algorithm has been performed on anode slices containing several independent macro cracks with different morphologies.

  18. Carbon footprint of patient journeys through primary care: a mixed methods approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elizabeth; Pearson, David; Kelly, Charlotte; Stroud, Laura; Rivas Perez, Martin

    2013-09-01

    The NHS has a target of cutting its carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions by 80% below 1990 levels by 2050. Travel comprises 17% of the NHS carbon footprint. This carbon footprint represents the total CO2 emissions caused directly or indirectly by the NHS. Patient journeys have previously been planned largely without regard to the environmental impact. The potential contribution of 'avoidable' journeys in primary care is significant. To investigate the carbon footprint of patients travelling to and from a general practice surgery, the issues involved, and potential solutions for reducing patient travel. A mixed methods study in a medium-sized practice in Yorkshire. During March 2012, 306 patients completed a travel survey. GIS maps of patients' travel (modes and distances) were produced. Two focus groups (12 clinical and 13 non-clinical staff) were recorded, transcribed, and analysed using a thematic framework approach. The majority (61%) of patient journeys to and from the surgery were made by car or taxi; main reasons cited were 'convenience', 'time saving', and 'no alternative' for accessing the surgery. Using distances calculated via ArcGIS, the annual estimated CO2 equivalent carbon emissions for the practice totalled approximately 63 tonnes. Predominant themes from interviews related to issues with systems for booking appointments and repeat prescriptions; alternative travel modes; delivering health care; and solutions to reducing travel. The modes and distances of patient travel can be accurately determined and allow appropriate carbon emission calculations for GP practices. Although challenging, there is scope for identifying potential solutions (for example, modifying administration systems and promoting walking) to reduce 'avoidable' journeys and cut carbon emissions while maintaining access to health care.

  19. Method for imparting improved surface properties to carbon fibers and composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ueno, S.; Kamata, H.

    1984-01-01

    The invention provides a means for solving the problem of poor affinity between the surface of carbon fibers and a synthetic resin in a resin-based composite material reinforced with the carbon fibers. The method comprises subjecting the surface of the carbon fibers in advance to exposure to low temperature plasma in a low pressure atomosphere of an inorganic gas generated by applying an electric voltage between electrodes. It was unexpectedly discovered that the discharge voltage between the electrodes is very critical and satisfactory results can be obtained when the peak-to-peak value of the discharge voltage between electrodes is 4000 volts or higher. The composition of the atmospheric inorganic gas is also important and the gas is preferably oxygen gas or a gaseous mixture containing at least 10% by volume of oxygen

  20. Method for the preparation of high surface area high permeability carbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagasse, R.R.; Schroeder, J.L.

    1999-05-11

    A method for preparing carbon materials having high surface area and high macropore volume to provide high permeability. These carbon materials are prepared by dissolving a carbonizable polymer precursor, in a solvent. The solution is cooled to form a gel. The solvent is extracted from the gel by employing a non-solvent for the polymer. The non-solvent is removed by critical point drying in CO{sub 2} at an elevated pressure and temperature or evaporation in a vacuum oven. The dried product is heated in an inert atmosphere in a first heating step to a first temperature and maintained there for a time sufficient to substantially cross-link the polymer material. The cross-linked polymer material is then carbonized in an inert atmosphere. 3 figs.

  1. Method of Making an Electroactive Sensing/Actuating Material for Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ounaies, Zoubeida (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Holloway, Nancy M. (Inventor); Draughon, Gregory K. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    An electroactive sensing or actuating material comprises a composite made from a polymer with polarizable moieties and an effective amount of carbon nanotubes incorporated in the polymer for a predetermined electromechanical operation of the composite when such composite is affected by an external stimulus. In another embodiment, the composite comprises a, third component of micro -sized to nano-sized particles of an electroactive ceramic that is also incorporated in the polymer matrix. The method for making the three-phase composite comprises either incorporating the carbon nanotubes in the polymer matrix before incorporation of the particles of ceramic or mixing the carbon nanotubes and particles of ceramic together in a solution before incorporation in the polymer matrix.

  2. Nonlinear optical properties measurement of polypyrrole -carbon nanotubes prepared by an electrochemical polymerization method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahriari

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the optical properties dependence of Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (MWNT on concentration was discussed. MWNT samples were prepared in polypyrrole by an electrochemical polymerization of monomers, in the presence of different concentrations of MWNTs, using Sodium Dodecyl-Benzen-Sulfonate (SDBS as surfactant at room temperature. The nonlinear refractive and nonlinear absorbtion indices were measured using a low power CW laser beam operated at 532 nm using z-scan method. The results show that nonlinear refractive and nonlinear absorbtion indices tend to be increased with increasing the concentration of carbon nanotubes. Optical properties of  carbone nanotubes indicate that they are good candidates for nonlinear optical devices

  3. Large uncertainty in soil carbon modelling related to method of calculation of plant carbon input to agriculutral systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keel, S G; Leifeld, Jens; Mayer, Julius

    2017-01-01

    referred to as soil carbon inputs (C). The soil C inputs from plants are derived from measured agricultural yields using allometric equations. Here we compared the results of five previously published equations. Our goal was to test whether the choice of method is critical for modelling soil C and if so...... with the model C-TOOL showed that calculated SOC stocks were affected strongly by the choice of the allometric equation. With four equations, a decrease in SOC stocks was simulated, whereas with one equation there was no change. This considerable uncertainty in modelled soil C is attributable solely...... to the allometric equation used to estimate the soil C input. We identify the evaluation and selection of allometric equations and associated coefficients as critical steps when setting up a model-based soil C inventory for agricultural systems....

  4. A method for measuring element fluxes in an undisturbed soil: nitrogen and carbon from earthworms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, M.B.

    1984-01-01

    Data on chemical cycles, as nitrogen or carbon cycles, are extrapolated to the fields or ecosystems without the possibility for checking conclusions; i.e. from scientific knowledge (para-ecology). A new method, by natural introduction of an earthworm compartment into an undisturbed soil, with earthworms labelled both by isotopes ( 15 N, 14 C) and by staining is described. This method allows us to measure fluxes of chemicals. The first results, gathered during the improvement of the method in partly artificial conditions, are cross-checked with other data given by direct observation in the field. Measured flux (2.2 mg N/g fresh mass empty gut/day/15 0 C) is far more important than para-ecological estimations; animal metabolism plays directly an important role in nitrogen and carbon cycles. (author)

  5. A generally adoptable radiotracing method for tracking carbon nanotubes in animals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng Xiaoyong; Yang Shengtao; Nie Haiyu; Wang Haifang; Liu Yuanfang [Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Department of Chemical Biology, College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)], E-mail: haifangw@pku.edu.cn

    2008-02-20

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) mediated drug delivery systems have currently aroused a great deal of interest. Such delivery systems for drugs, proteins and genes have been preliminarily studied using cellular and animal models. For the further study of the pharmacokinetics and related biological behaviours of CNTs in vivo, a fast and convenient tracing method is particularly demanded. In this paper, we developed a generally adoptable tracing method for the biodistribution study of functionalized CNTs in vivo. Taurine covalently functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (tau-MWNTs) and Tween-80 wrapped MWNTs (Tween-MWNTs) were labelled with {sup 125}I, and then their distribution in mice was determined. It is interesting that Tween-80 can reduce the RES uptake of MWNTs remarkably. The resulting distribution of {sup 125}I-tau-MWNTs was very consistent with that using {sup 14}C-taurine-MWNTs as the CNTs tracer, which means the easy {sup 125}I labelling method is reliable and effective.

  6. On the selection of optimized carbon nano tube synthesis method using analytic hierarchy process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Besharati, M. K.; Afaghi Khatibi, A.; Akbari, M.

    2008-01-01

    Evidence from the early and late industrializes shows that technology, as the commercial application of scientific knowledge, has been a major driver of industrial and economic development. International technology transfer is now being recognized as having played an important role in the development of the most successful late industrializes of the second half of the twentieth Century. Our society stands to be significantly influenced by carbon nano tubes, shaped by nano tube applications in every aspect, just as silicon-based technology still shapes society today. Nano tubes can be formed in various structures using several different processing methods. In this paper, the synthesis methods used to produce nano tubes in industrial or laboratory scales are discussed and a comparison is made. A technical feasibility study is conducted by using the multi criteria decision-making model, namely Analytic Hierarchy Process. The article ends with a discussion of selecting the best method of Technology Transferring of Carbon Nano tubes to Iran

  7. Energy payback period and carbon dioxide emissions in different power generation methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kivistoe, A.

    1995-01-01

    The energy payback period, efficiency factor and carbon dioxide emissions in different power generation methods were studied. Nuclear, coal, peat, natural gas, wind and photovoltaic power were examined. To calculate the energy payback period of power generation, the energy inputs of different power generation methods were examined by using hybrid analysis, which is a combination of process analysis and the input-output method. The energy inputs of power generation were examined starting from raw material and fuel resources in the soil and ending up in the power station. The study also considered the handling of spent fuel and combustion residues. The energy payback periods were as follows: nuclear power 20-33 months, coal power 33 months, peat power 26-27 months, gas power 21-27 months, wind power 7 months and photovoltaic power 60-95 months. The energy payback period of nuclear power was strongly influenced by the uranium enrichment method. In natural gas power the energy payback period was influenced by the amount of natural gas used as fuel in compression stations and production fields and in photovoltaic power by the semiconductor material of the cells. The most significant carbon dioxide emissions were produced in the power generation methods based on combustion. Depending on the way of examination, both nuclear power, wind power and photovoltaic power produce carbon dioxide emissions, but on a significantly lower level. (author)

  8. Calibration method for carbon dioxide sensors to investigate direct methanol fuel cell efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stähler, M.; Burdzik, A.

    2014-09-01

    Methanol crossover is a process in direct methanol fuel cells which causes significant reduction of cell efficiency. Methanol permeates through the membrane electrode assembly and reacts at the cathode with oxygen to form carbon dioxide. This process is undesirable because it does not generate electric energy, but rather only increases heat production. Different procedures have been used for the investigation of this crossover. One method uses the detection of carbon dioxide in the exhaust gas of the cathode by means of a carbon dioxide sensor. This technique is inexpensive and enables real-time measurements but its disadvantage is the low accuracy. This paper demonstrates a simple method to generate gas mixtures for the calibration of the sensor in order to increase the accuracy. The advantages of this technique consist in the fact that only the existing devices of a direct methanol fuel cell test rig are needed and that the operator can adjust the carbon dioxide concentration for the calibration process. This is important for dealing with nonlinearities of the sensor. A detailed error analysis accompanies the experiments. At the end it is shown that the accuracy of the determined Faraday efficiency can be improved by using the presented calibration technique.

  9. Method-Dependent Variations in Oxygen Isotope Compositions Obtained for Structural Carbonate in Bone Bioapatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, J. Z.; Longstaffe, F. J.; White, C. D.

    2007-12-01

    The carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of structural carbonate contained in bioapatite can be obtained by reaction with ortho-phosphoric acid at various temperatures and reaction times, using off-line or automated sample preparation, and continuous-flow or dual-inlet isotope-ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS). Here, we compare the isotopic compositions obtained for structural carbonate in bone bioapatite using (1) conventional off- line gas extraction (25°C) and dual-inlet IRMS, (2) GasBench automated sampling (50°C) and continuous-flow IRMS, and (3) MultiPrep automated sampling (50°C, 90°C) and dual-inlet IRMS. On average, the stable carbon isotope compositions obtained for the same sample using different methods are within ±0.33 per mil (n=29). The reproducibility of oxygen isotope compositions using the different methods is much poorer (±3.18 per mil; n=29). The differences among these methods were most pronounced for samples analyzed using the MultiPrep at 90°C and dual-inlet IRMS. In the latter case, some samples consistently had extremely low oxygen isotope compositions, and also yielded a contaminant gas containing masses 47, 48, and 49, which was not separated from the normal reaction product (carbon dioxide) during cryogenic processing. Normal and anomalous samples do not systematically differ in their crystallinity indices, C/P ratios, gas yields, or total organic content. Anomalous samples have an additional peak in their deconvoluted FTIR spectra at 866 cm-1 and their ignition products lack β-TCP. They also contain slightly more Al and Si cations, and slightly fewer Na cations. It is not clear how these subtle structural and chemical differences relate to the production of the contaminant gas.

  10. Methods of Attaching or Grafting Carbon Nanotubes to Silicon Surfaces and Composite Structures Derived Therefrom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tour, James M. (Inventor); Chen, Bo (Inventor); Flatt, Austen K. (Inventor); Stewart, Michael P. (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Maya, Francisco (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of attaching or grafting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to silicon surfaces. In some embodiments, such attaching or grafting occurs via functional groups on either or both of the CNTs and silicon surface. In some embodiments, the methods of the present invention include: (1) reacting a silicon surface with a functionalizing agent (such as oligo(phenylene ethynylene)) to form a functionalized silicon surface; (2) dispersing a quantity of CNTs in a solvent to form dispersed CNTs; and (3) reacting the functionalized silicon surface with the dispersed CNTs. The present invention is also directed to the novel compositions produced by such methods.

  11. Recursive differentiation method to study the nature of carbon nanobeams: A numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagar, Priyanka; Tiwari, Parul

    2017-10-01

    This paper is concerned with the application of non-local elasticity theory to analyze the nature of carbon nanotubes/nanobeams embedded in an elastic medium. Winkler-type foundation is used as an elastic medium. The governing equations are investigated by finding the critical buckling load with aid of Recursive Differentiation Method. This method requires less computation time and thus the convergence is fast. The effects of small scale parameter and elastic foundation on buckling load are observed and outputs are plotted graphically. In addition, the accuracy of the present method is verified with the results available in literature.

  12. Study on adsorption of activated carbon fiber to background-level xenon in air by the method of 133Xe tracer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haitao; Wang Yalong; Zhang Lixing; Wang Xuhui; Zhang Xiaolin

    2001-01-01

    The adsorption behaviors of the different activated carbon fibers to ultra-trace xenon in air are studied using the method of 133 Xe as tracer. The efficiency equation of adsorption columns are determined. The comparison of adsorptive capacity between activated carbon fibers and activated carbon indicates that activated carbon fibers are better than activated carbon under low temperature

  13. Automatic Method for Controlling the Iodine Adsorption Number in Carbon Black Oil Furnaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zečević, N.

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available There are numerous of different inlet process factors in carbon black oil furnaces which must be continuously and automatically adjusted, due to stable quality of final product. The most important six inlet process factors in carbon black oil-furnaces are:1. volume flow of process air for combustion2. temperature of process air for combustion3. volume flow of natural gas for insurance the necessary heat for thermal reaction of conversionthe hydrocarbon oil feedstock in oil-furnace carbon black4. mass flow rate of hydrocarbon oil feedstock5. type and quantity of additive for adjustment the structure of oil-furnace carbon black6. quantity and position of the quench water for cooling the reaction of oil-furnace carbon black.The control of oil-furnace carbon black adsorption capacity is made with mass flow rate of hydrocarbon feedstock, which is the most important inlet process factor. Oil-furnace carbon black adsorption capacity in industrial process is determined with laboratory analyze of iodine adsorption number. It is shown continuously and automatically method for controlling iodine adsorption number in carbon black oil-furnaces to get as much as possible efficient control of adsorption capacity. In the proposed method it can be seen the correlation between qualitatively-quantitatively composition of the process tail gasses in the production of oil-furnace carbon black and relationship between air for combustion and hydrocarbon feedstock. It is shown that the ratio between air for combustion and hydrocarbon oil feedstock is depended of adsorption capacity summarized by iodine adsorption number, regarding to BMCI index of hydrocarbon oil feedstock.The mentioned correlation can be seen through the figures from 1. to 4. From the whole composition of the process tail gasses the best correlation for continuously and automatically control of iodine adsorption number is show the volume fraction of methane. The volume fraction of methane in the

  14. Evaluation of Lithofacies Up-Scaling Methods for Probabilistic Prediction of Carbon Dioxide Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J. Y.; Lee, S.; Lee, Y. I.; Kihm, J. H.; Kim, J. M.

    2017-12-01

    Behavior of carbon dioxide injected into target reservoir (storage) formations is highly dependent on heterogeneities of geologic lithofacies and properties. These heterogeneous lithofacies and properties basically have probabilistic characteristics. Thus, their probabilistic evaluation has to be implemented properly into predicting behavior of injected carbon dioxide in heterogeneous storage formations. In this study, a series of three-dimensional geologic modeling is performed first using SKUA-GOCAD (ASGA and Paradigm) to establish lithofacies models of the Janggi Conglomerate in the Janggi Basin, Korea within a modeling domain. The Janggi Conglomerate is composed of mudstone, sandstone, and conglomerate, and it has been identified as a potential reservoir rock (clastic saline formation) for geologic carbon dioxide storage. Its lithofacies information are obtained from four boreholes and used in lithofacies modeling. Three different up-scaling methods (i.e., nearest to cell center, largest proportion, and random) are applied, and lithofacies modeling is performed 100 times for each up-scaling method. The lithofacies models are then compared and analyzed with the borehole data to evaluate the relative suitability of the three up-scaling methods. Finally, the lithofacies models are converted into coarser lithofacies models within the same modeling domain with larger grid blocks using the three up-scaling methods, and a series of multiphase thermo-hydrological numerical simulation is performed using TOUGH2-MP (Zhang et al., 2008) to predict probabilistically behavior of injected carbon dioxide. The coarser lithofacies models are also compared and analyzed with the borehole data and finer lithofacies models to evaluate the relative suitability of the three up-scaling methods. Three-dimensional geologic modeling, up-scaling, and multiphase thermo-hydrological numerical simulation as linked methodologies presented in this study can be utilized as a practical

  15. A global carbon assimilation system based on a dual optimization method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, H.; Li, Y.; Chen, J. M.; Wang, T.; Huang, Q.; Huang, W. X.; Wang, L. H.; Li, S. M.; Yuan, W. P.; Zheng, X.; Zhang, S. P.; Chen, Z. Q.; Jiang, F.

    2015-02-01

    Ecological models are effective tools for simulating the distribution of global carbon sources and sinks. However, these models often suffer from substantial biases due to inaccurate simulations of complex ecological processes. We introduce a set of scaling factors (parameters) to an ecological model on the basis of plant functional type (PFT) and latitudes. A global carbon assimilation system (GCAS-DOM) is developed by employing a dual optimization method (DOM) to invert the time-dependent ecological model parameter state and the net carbon flux state simultaneously. We use GCAS-DOM to estimate the global distribution of the CO2 flux on 1° × 1° grid cells for the period from 2001 to 2007. Results show that land and ocean absorb -3.63 ± 0.50 and -1.82 ± 0.16 Pg C yr-1, respectively. North America, Europe and China contribute -0.98 ± 0.15, -0.42 ± 0.08 and -0.20 ± 0.29 Pg C yr-1, respectively. The uncertainties in the flux after optimization by GCAS-DOM have been remarkably reduced by more than 60%. Through parameter optimization, GCAS-DOM can provide improved estimates of the carbon flux for each PFT. Coniferous forest (-0.97 ± 0.27 Pg C yr-1) is the largest contributor to the global carbon sink. Fluxes of once-dominant deciduous forest generated by the Boreal Ecosystems Productivity Simulator (BEPS) are reduced to -0.78 ± 0.23 Pg C yr-1, the third largest carbon sink.

  16. Adsorptive performance of granular activated carbon in aquaculture and aquaria: a simplified method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Daniel; Kuhn, David D.; Smith, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    and aquaculture is not well-established due to innate heterogeneity of these waters. The means to completely characterize adsorption between carbon sources are generally not available to end users provided their level of expertise and/or resources at their disposal. This study introduces a relatively simple...... used to comparatively test adsorptive performance between two filter groups (i.e. sources of granular activated carbon) by tracking spectral absorbance with non-linear regression statistics, and validating removal trends against mature aquaculture water. Greater adsorptive capacities were consistently...... observed in one filter group throughout the indicator testing battery. Similar findings were observed between the two indicator tests, thereby confirming the method. This method can be adopted by commercial aquaculture operations or aquarists to assist in comparatively screening particular types, particle...

  17. Mechanical test method and properties of a carbon nanomaterial with a high aspect ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sang Koo; Jang, Hoon-Sik; Kwon, Oh Heon; Nahm, Seung Hoon

    2016-11-01

    Superior nanomaterials have been developed and applied to many fields, and improved characteristic of nanomaterials have been studied. Measurement of the mechanical properties for nanomaterials is important to ensure the reliability and predict the service life times of products containing nanomaterials. However, it is challenging to measure the mechanical properties of nanomaterials due to their very small dimensions. Moreover, macro-scale measurement systems are not suitable for use with nanomaterials. Therefore, various methods have been developed and used to in an effort to measure the mechanical properties of nanomaterials. This paper presents a review of various evaluation systems and the measurement methods which are used to determine the mechanical properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) and carbon nanofiber (CNF), representatively. In addition, we measured the tensile strength and elastic modulus of the CNT and CNF in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) installed the nano-manipulator and the force sensor and this measurement system and results would be introduced in detail.

  18. Assessment of Carbon Dioxide, Carbon Dioxide/Oxygen, Isoflurane and Pentobarbital Killing Methods in Adult Female Sprague-Dawley Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm, Jessica M; Pang, Daniel S J

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to carbon dioxide (CO2) gas as a killing method is aversive and exposure to high concentrations is likely to be painful. Bradycardia during exposure to CO2 is associated with nociception and pain. However, it is unclear if bradycardia occurs before loss of consciousness as definitions of loss of consciousness vary in the literature. The objectives of this study were to explore the relationship between recumbency, loss of righting reflex (LORR) and a quiescent electromyograph as measures of loss of consciousness, and identify the onset of bradycardia in relation to these measures. Our primary hypothesis was that CO2 exposure would result in bradycardia, which would precede LORR. Thirty-two adult, female Sprague-Dawley rats were instrumented with a telemetry device and randomly assigned to one of four killing methods (concentrations of 100% CO2, CO2 (70%)/O2 (30%), isoflurane (5%) and intraperitoneal pentobarbital (200 mg/kg). Time to achieve recumbency, LORR, quiescent electromyograph, isoelectric electrocorticograph, heart rate and apnea were recorded. The general order of progression was recumbency, LORR, quiescent electromyograph, isoelectric electrocorticograph and apnea. Recumbency preceded LORR in the majority of animals (CO2; 7/8, CO2/O2; 8/8, isoflurane; 5/8, pentobarbital; 4/8). Bradycardia occurred before recumbency in the CO2 (p = 0.0002) and CO2/O2 (p = 0.005) groups, with a 50% reduction in heart rate compared to baseline. The slowest (time to apnea) and least consistent killing methods were CO2/O2 (1180 ± 658.1s) and pentobarbital (875 [239 to 4680]s). Bradycardia, and consequently nociception and pain, occurs before loss of consciousness during CO2 exposure. Pentobarbital displayed an unexpected lack of consistency, questioning its classification as an acceptable euthanasia method in rats.

  19. Hydrogenolysis of 5-carbon sugars, sugar alcohols, and methods of making propylene glycol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werpy, Todd A [West Richland, WA; Zacher, Alan H [Kennewick, WA; Miller, Dennis J [Okemos, MI

    2006-05-02

    Methods and compositions for reactions of hydrogen over a Re-containing catalyst with compositions containing a 5-carbon sugar, sugar alcohol, or lactic acid are described. It has been surprisingly discovered that reaction with hydrogen over a Re-containing multimetallic catalyst resulted in superior conversion and selectivity to desired products such as propylene glycol. A process for the synthesis of PG from lactate or lactic acid is also described.

  20. Study of a method of detection for natural carbon-14 using a liquid scintillator, recent variations in the natural radio-activity due to artificial carbon-14 (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leger, C.

    1963-06-01

    Among the various natural isotopes of carbon, a radioactive isotope, carbon-14, is formed by the action of secondary neutrons from cosmic rays on nitrogen in the air. Until 1950, the concentration of this isotope in ordinary carbon underwent weak fluctuations of about 2-3 per cent. The exact measurement of this concentration 6 X 10 12 Ci/gm of carbon, and of its fluctuations, are difficult and in the first part of this report a highly sensitive method is given using a liquid scintillator. Since 1950 this natural activity has shown large fluctuations because of the carbon-14 formed during nuclear explosions, and in the second part, the evolution in France of this specific activity of carbon in the atmosphere and biosphere is examined. In the last part is studied the local increase in carbon activity in the atmosphere around the Saclay site, an increase caused by the carbon-14 given off as C 14 O 2 , by the reactors cooled partially with exterior air. (author) [fr

  1. Review of Methods for the Monitoring of Biomass and Vegetal Carbon in Tropical Forest Ecosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Fonseca

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The quantification of vegetal biomass is the key to know the carbon that forest ecosystems store, and therefore, its capacity to mitigate climatic change. There is a variety of methods to estimate biomass, many with small variations, such as size and shape of sampling units, inclusion or not of any reservoir component (leaves, branches, roots, necromasses, minimum diameter inventoried, among others. The objective of the paper is to explain the most important aspects to be considered in the inventory of removals, based on the inventory design (statistical design, size and shape of the sampling units, components of the biomass to be evaluated. A second point deals with the determination of aerial biomass and roots, referring to the direct or destructive method, and indirect methods, especially to the use of mathematical models for their easy application and low cost; besides, some models for natural forest and plantations are noted. Reference is also made to the study of carbon in soils, biomass expansion factors, and how to determine carbon in biomass. We hope that these notes will facilitate the understanding of the topic and be a reference for the establishment of monitoring, reporting and verification schemes.

  2. Molten metal reactor and method of forming hydrogen, carbon monoxide and carbon dioxide using the molten alkaline metal reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Dennis N.; Klingler, Kerry M.; Turner, Terry D.; Wilding, Bruce M.

    2012-11-13

    A molten metal reactor for converting a carbon material and steam into a gas comprising hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and carbon dioxide is disclosed. The reactor includes an interior crucible having a portion contained within an exterior crucible. The interior crucible includes an inlet and an outlet; the outlet leads to the exterior crucible and may comprise a diffuser. The exterior crucible may contain a molten alkaline metal compound. Contained between the exterior crucible and the interior crucible is at least one baffle.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of graphenated carbon nanotubes on IONPs using acetylene by chemical vapor deposition method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atchudan, Raji; Perumal, Suguna; Edison, Thomas Nesakumar Jebakumar Immanuel; Pandurangan, Arumugam; Lee, Yong Rok

    2015-11-01

    The graphenated carbon nanotubes (G-CNTs) were synthesized on monodisperse spherical iron oxide nanoparticles (IONPs) using acetylene as carbon precursor by simple chemical vapor deposition method. The reaction parameters such as temperature and flow of carbon source were optimized in order to achieve G-CNTs with excellent quality and quantity. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) clearly illustrated that the graphene flakes are forming along the whole length on CNTs. The degree of graphitization was revealed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis and Raman spectroscopic techniques. The intensity of D to G value was less than one which confirms the obtained G-CNTs have high degree of graphitization. The optimum reaction temperature for the IONPs to form metallic clusters which in turn lead to the formation of G-CNTs with high carbon deposition yield is at 900 °C. The TEM shows the CNTs diameter is 50 nm with foiled graphene flakes of diameter around 70 nm. Our results advocate for IONPs as a promising catalytic template for quantitative and qualitative productivity of nanohybrid G-CNTs. The produced G-CNTs with high degree of graphitization might be an ideal candidate for nanoelectronic application like super capacitors and so on.

  4. Modifications on Microporosity and Physical Properties of Cement Mortar Caused by Carbonation: Comparison of Experimental Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Son Tung Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The influence of carbonation on the microstructure of normalised CEM II mortar was studied using nitrogen adsorption and porosity accessible to water. Samples were prepared and subjected to accelerated carbonation at 20°C, 65% relative humidity, and 20% CO2 concentration. Conflicts in results were observed because while the pore size distributions calculated by BJH method from nitrogen adsorption provided evolution of the micro- and mesopores during carbonation, the porosity accessible to water showed changes in all three porous domains: macro-, meso- and micropores. Furthermore, the porous domains explored by water and nitrogen molecules are not the same because of the difference in the molecular sizes. These two techniques are therefore different and help to complementarily evaluate the effects of carbonation. We also examined the evolution of macrophysical properties such as the solid phase volume using helium pycnometry, gas permeability, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, and longitudinal and transverse ultrasonic velocities. This is a multiscale study where results on microstructural changes can help to explain the evolution of macro physical properties.

  5. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Günay, E. [Gazi University, Mechanical Engineering Department, 06570, Ankara (Turkey)

    2016-04-21

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  6. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay, E.

    2016-04-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  7. Modelling of single walled carbon nanotube cylindrical structures with finite element method simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Günay, E.

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the modulus of elasticity and shear modulus values of single-walled carbon nanotubes SWCNTs were modelled by using both finite element method and the Matlab code. Initially, cylindrical armchair and zigzag single walled 3D space frames were demonstrated as carbon nanostructures. Thereafter, macro programs were written by the Matlab code producing the space truss for zigzag and armchair models. 3D space frames were introduced to the ANSYS software and then tension, compression and additionally torsion tests were performed on zigzag and armchair carbon nanotubes with BEAM4 element in obtaining the exact values of elastic and shear modulus values. In this study, two different boundary conditions were tested and especially used in torsion loading. The equivalent shear modulus data was found by averaging the corresponding values obtained from ten different nodal points on the nanotube path. Finally, in this study it was determined that the elastic constant values showed proportional changes by increasing the carbon nanotube diameters up to a certain level but beyond this level these values remained stable.

  8. Optical properties of elemental carbon and water-soluble organic carbon in Beijing, China

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Y.; He, K.-B.; Zheng, M.; Duan, F.-K.; Ma, Y.-L.; Du, Z.-Y.; Tan, J.-H.; Liu, J.-M.; Zhang, X.-L.; Weber, R. J.; Bergin, M. H.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-01-01

    The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of elemental carbon (EC) in Beijing was quantified using a thermal-optical carbon analyzer and the influences of mixing state and sources of carbonaceous aerosol were investigated. The MAC measured at 632 nm was 29.0 and 32.0 m2 g−1 during winter and summer respectively. MAC correlated well with the organic carbon (OC) to EC ratio (R2 = 0.91) which includes important...

  9. A new method for rapid determination of carbohydrate and total carbon concentrations using UV spectrophotometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albalasmeh, Ammar A; Berhe, Asmeret Asefaw; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A

    2013-09-12

    A new UV spectrophotometry based method for determining the concentration and carbon content of carbohydrate solution was developed. This method depends on the inherent UV absorption potential of hydrolysis byproducts of carbohydrates formed by reaction with concentrated sulfuric acid (furfural derivatives). The proposed method is a major improvement over the widely used Phenol-Sulfuric Acid method developed by DuBois, Gilles, Hamilton, Rebers, and Smith (1956). In the old method, furfural is allowed to develop color by reaction with phenol and its concentration is detected by visible light absorption. Here we present a method that eliminates the coloration step and avoids the health and environmental hazards associated with phenol use. In addition, avoidance of this step was shown to improve measurement accuracy while significantly reducing waiting time prior to light absorption reading. The carbohydrates for which concentrations and carbon content can be reliably estimated with this new rapid Sulfuric Acid-UV technique include: monosaccharides, disaccharides and polysaccharides with very high molecular weight. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Estimating soil organic carbon stocks and spatial patterns with statistical and GIS-based methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhi, Junjun; Jing, Changwei; Lin, Shengpan; Zhang, Cao; Liu, Qiankun; DeGloria, Stephen D; Wu, Jiaping

    2014-01-01

    Accurately quantifying soil organic carbon (SOC) is considered fundamental to studying soil quality, modeling the global carbon cycle, and assessing global climate change. This study evaluated the uncertainties caused by up-scaling of soil properties from the county scale to the provincial scale and from lower-level classification of Soil Species to Soil Group, using four methods: the mean, median, Soil Profile Statistics (SPS), and pedological professional knowledge based (PKB) methods. For the SPS method, SOC stock is calculated at the county scale by multiplying the mean SOC density value of each soil type in a county by its corresponding area. For the mean or median method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated using provincial arithmetic mean or median. For the PKB method, SOC density value of each soil type is calculated at the county scale considering soil parent materials and spatial locations of all soil profiles. A newly constructed 1∶50,000 soil survey geographic database of Zhejiang Province, China, was used for evaluation. Results indicated that with soil classification levels up-scaling from Soil Species to Soil Group, the variation of estimated SOC stocks among different soil classification levels was obviously lower than that among different methods. The difference in the estimated SOC stocks among the four methods was lowest at the Soil Species level. The differences in SOC stocks among the mean, median, and PKB methods for different Soil Groups resulted from the differences in the procedure of aggregating soil profile properties to represent the attributes of one soil type. Compared with the other three estimation methods (i.e., the SPS, mean and median methods), the PKB method holds significant promise for characterizing spatial differences in SOC distribution because spatial locations of all soil profiles are considered during the aggregation procedure.

  11. SCREENING METHODS FOR SELECTION OF SURFACTANT FORMULATIONS FOR IOR FROM FRACTURED CARBONATE RESERVOIRS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    William A. Goddard III; Yongchun Tang; Patrick Shuler; Mario Blanco; Yongfu Wu; Seung Soon Jang

    2005-07-01

    This topical report presents details of the laboratory work performed to complete Task 1 of this project; developing rapid screening methods to assess surfactant performance for IOR (Improved Oil Recovery) from fractured carbonate reservoirs. The desired outcome is to identify surfactant formulations that increase the rate and amount of aqueous phase imbibition into oil-rich, oil-wet carbonate reservoir rock. Changing the wettability from oil-wet to water-wet is one key to enhancing this water-phase imbibition process that in turn recovers additional oil from the matrix portion of a carbonate reservoir. The common laboratory test to evaluate candidate surfactant formulations is to measure directly the aqueous imbibition rate and oil recovery from small outcrop or reservoir cores, but this procedure typically requires several weeks. Two methods are presented here for the rapid screening of candidate surfactant formulations for their potential IOR performance in carbonate reservoirs. One promising surfactant screening protocol is based on the ability of a surfactant solution to remove aged crude oil that coats a clear calcite crystal (Iceland Spar). Good surfactant candidate solutions remove the most oil the quickest from the chips, plus change the apparent contact angle of the remaining oil droplets on the surface that thereby indicate increased water-wetting. The other fast surfactant screening method is based on the flotation behavior of powdered calcite in water. In this test protocol, first the calcite power is pre-treated to make the surface oil-wet. The next step is to add the pre-treated powder to a test tube and add a candidate aqueous surfactant formulation; the greater the percentage of the calcite that now sinks to the bottom rather than floats, the more effective the surfactant is in changing the solids to become now preferentially water-wet. Results from the screening test generally are consistent with surfactant performance reported in the literature.

  12. Standard Test Method for Gel Time of Carbon Fiber-Epoxy Prepreg

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of gel time of carbon fiber-epoxy tape and sheet. The test method is suitable for the measurement of gel time of resin systems having either high or low viscosity. 1.2 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as standard. The values in parentheses are for reference only. 1.3 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  13. Carbonized asphaltene-based carbon-carbon fiber composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George; Lula, James; Bowen, III, Daniel E.

    2016-12-27

    A method of making a carbon binder-reinforced carbon fiber composite is provided using carbonized asphaltenes as the carbon binder. Combinations of carbon fiber and asphaltenes are also provided, along with the resulting composites and articles of manufacture.

  14. Estimation of Surface Temperature and Heat Flux by Inverse Heat Transfer Methods Using Internal Temperatures Measured While Radiantly Heating a Carbon/Carbon Specimen up to 1920 F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzo, Michelle; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Glass, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability to solve the heat conduction equation is needed when designing materials to be used on vehicles exposed to extremely high temperatures; e.g. vehicles used for atmospheric entry or hypersonic flight. When using test and flight data, computational methods such as finite difference schemes may be used to solve for both the direct heat conduction problem, i.e., solving between internal temperature measurements, and the inverse heat conduction problem, i.e., using the direct solution to march forward in space to the surface of the material to estimate both surface temperature and heat flux. The completed research first discusses the methods used in developing a computational code to solve both the direct and inverse heat transfer problems using one dimensional, centered, implicit finite volume schemes and one dimensional, centered, explicit space marching techniques. The developed code assumed the boundary conditions to be specified time varying temperatures and also considered temperature dependent thermal properties. The completed research then discusses the results of analyzing temperature data measured while radiantly heating a carbon/carbon specimen up to 1920 F. The temperature was measured using thermocouple (TC) plugs (small carbon/carbon material specimens) with four embedded TC plugs inserted into the larger carbon/carbon specimen. The purpose of analyzing the test data was to estimate the surface heat flux and temperature values from the internal temperature measurements using direct and inverse heat transfer methods, thus aiding in the thermal and structural design and analysis of high temperature vehicles.

  15. [Estimation of Topsoil Carbon Sequestration Potential of Cropland Through Different Methods: A Case Study in Zhuanglang County, Gansu Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Chen-di; Xu, Ming-xiang; Qiu, Yu-jie

    2016-03-15

    By analyzing the sampled data and the SOC data of the second national soil survey by the mid 80s and the national cultivated land quality evaluation in 2006 in Zhuanglang County, the article studied the cropland topsoil organic carbon sequestration potential estimation using several different methods. The results showed that: (1) There was no significant difference among different estimation methods about cropland carbon sequestration potential in the same region. Taking cropland carbon sequestration potential in Zhuanglang County for example, the theoretical values estimated by maximum value method and classification grading method were 1. 13 Mt and 1.09 Mt, respectively. (2) The real values estimated by classification grading method, saturation method, weighting method were 0.37 Mt, 0.32 Mt, 0.28 Mt, respectively, which were about 1/3 of the theoretical value. (3) The SOC density increments to reach the real level of carbon sequestration potential estimated by classification grading method, saturation method and weighting method were 6.76 t · hm⁻², 5.21 t · hm⁻², 4.56 t · hm⁻² respectively. According to the topsoil carbon sequestration rate of cropland in Zhuanglang county in the recent 30 a, it would need about 24-34 a to achieve the real level. (4) At the county scale, the weighted method was superior to the saturation value method, and the saturation value method was better than the classification grading method in the actual carbon sequestration potential estimation. The classification grading method was better than the maximum value method in the ideal carbon sequestration potential estimation.

  16. Surfactant Assisted Stabilization of Carbon Nanotubes Synthesized by a Spray Pyrolysis Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Mendoza-Cachú

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface modification of carbon nanotubes has been an interesting issue from a composites materials point of view. A nanotubes agglomeration has to be avoided to achieve a homogeneous dispersion in a composite matrix. In this research, we report on the synthesis of carbon nanotubes using a variant of the chemical vapor deposition technique known as spray pyrolysis method. X-ray diffraction (XRD, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies showed that the synthesized products had an aligned structure with low purity degree, high content of catalyst particles, and a smaller amount of amorphous carbon. A secondary method was applied, which involves an acidic treatment that dissolves contaminant particles to enhance the purity of the nanotubes. Microstructural analysis, which includes XRD and SEM, indicates an effective reduction of impurities. Dispersion of the nanotubes was assessed using different surfactants, such as sodium dodecyl-sulfate (SDS and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA. Finally, Raman spectroscopy, UV-Vis, and SEM techniques confirm that better results were obtained with EDTA. For EDTA and SDS surfactants, low concentrations of 0.3 mg/mL and 0.2 mg/mL were most efficient, respectively.

  17. Evaluation of Various Synthesis Methods for Calcite-Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) Formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ramakrishna, Chilakala [Hanil Cement Corporation, Danyang (Korea, Republic of); Thenepalli, Thriveni; Ahn, Ji Whan [Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    This review paper evaluates different kinds of synthesis methods for calcite precipitated calcium carbonates by using different materials. The various processing routes of calcite with different compositions are reported and the possible optimum conditions required to synthesize a desired particle sizes of calcite are predicted. This paper mainly focuses on that the calcite morphology and size of the particles by carbonation process using loop reactors. In this regard, we have investigated various parameters such as CO{sub 2} flow rate, Ca (OH){sub 2} concentration, temperature, pH effect, reaction time and loop reactor mechanism with orifice diameter. The research results illustrate the formation of well-defined and pure calcite crystals with controlled crystal growth and particle size, without additives or organic solvents. The crystal growth and particle size can be controlled, and smaller sizes are obtained by decreasing the Ca (OH){sub 2} concentration and increasing the CO{sub 2} flow rate at lower temperatures with suitable pH. The crystal structure of obtained calcite was characterized by using X-ray diffraction method and the morphology by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result of x-ray diffraction recognized that the calcite phase of calcium carbonate was the dominating crystalline structure.

  18. Evaluation of Various Synthesis Methods for Calcite-Precipitated Calcium Carbonate (PCC) Formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramakrishna, Chilakala; Thenepalli, Thriveni; Ahn, Ji Whan

    2017-01-01

    This review paper evaluates different kinds of synthesis methods for calcite precipitated calcium carbonates by using different materials. The various processing routes of calcite with different compositions are reported and the possible optimum conditions required to synthesize a desired particle sizes of calcite are predicted. This paper mainly focuses on that the calcite morphology and size of the particles by carbonation process using loop reactors. In this regard, we have investigated various parameters such as CO 2 flow rate, Ca (OH) 2 concentration, temperature, pH effect, reaction time and loop reactor mechanism with orifice diameter. The research results illustrate the formation of well-defined and pure calcite crystals with controlled crystal growth and particle size, without additives or organic solvents. The crystal growth and particle size can be controlled, and smaller sizes are obtained by decreasing the Ca (OH) 2 concentration and increasing the CO 2 flow rate at lower temperatures with suitable pH. The crystal structure of obtained calcite was characterized by using X-ray diffraction method and the morphology by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The result of x-ray diffraction recognized that the calcite phase of calcium carbonate was the dominating crystalline structure.

  19. X-ray fluorescence analysis of strontium in environmental water by using barium carbonate coprecipitation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishioka, Hiroshi; Yoneda, Akio; Maeda, Yoshimichi; Azumi, Takatugu

    1986-01-01

    Determination of strontium in environmental water was studied by a coprecipitation method with barium carbonate and the subsequent X-ray fluorescence analysis. Fifty mg of barium ion and 1 g of sodium carbonate were added to sample water, which was then mixed for one hour by a magnetic stirrer. Precipitate was gathered onto a membrane filter paper to measure its XF intensity. The amount of strontium from 2 to 150 μg could be repeatedly determined by means of the calibration curve method, and the limit of detection was found to be 0.6 μg of strontium. A large amount of calcium and magnesium ions was found to interfere with the coprecipitation of strontium ion. However, this interference could be eliminated by using a small amount of sample water. Strontium in several environmental waters was determined by the above method. The results obtained from the calibration curve method and the standard addition method agreed with each other, and also agreed with those from the atomic absorption spectrometry. (author)

  20. The constant composition method for crystallization of calcium carbonate at constant supersaturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, R.; Seiersten, M.; Andreassen, J.-P.

    2013-10-01

    The exact control of supersaturation is of great importance when studying the formation of crystalline and amorphous matter. The constant composition method is suitable for the study of crystallization processes at constant supersaturation by controlled addition of titrants to a crystallizer to maintain constant pH. Not all aspects necessary for successful operation of this method are obvious from the existing literature, and the method is often used in an incorrect way. The focus of the present work is to highlight pitfalls associated with the constant composition method. The method is assessed and described in detail to show that even if the solution pH is kept constant, the supersaturation may change. First and foremost, it is illustrated how crucial it is to use a chemical composition of the titrant solutions which is in accordance with the initially prepared aqueous solution. General rules are presented for carbonates as to how the composition of the titrant solutions should be calculated based on total alkalinity in order to maintain constant supersaturation. This has - to the knowledge of the authors - not been shown before. Then, it is shown how exchange of carbon dioxide with the atmosphere corrupts the constancy of the supersaturation level during an experiment. Third, it is pointed out that the ionic strength should be kept constant throughout crystallization experiments since a change in ionic strength alters the activity of the ions in solution. Here, the determination of the thermodynamic driving force (supersaturation) is explained based on the relevant chemical equilibria, total alkalinity and calculation of the activity coefficients. The calculations are presented for the least stable polymorph of calcium carbonate, vaterite, but can easily be extended to the other polymorphs and other pH-dependent systems allowing for crystallization studies at low and maintained supersaturation levels typical of naturally occurring processes in geology and

  1. Binder-Free and Carbon-Free Nanoparticle Batteries: A Method for Nanoparticle Electrodes without Polymeric Binders or Carbon Black

    KAUST Repository

    Ha, Don-Hyung

    2012-10-10

    In this work, we have developed a new fabrication method for nanoparticle (NP) assemblies for Li-ion battery electrodes that require no additional support or conductive materials such as polymeric binders or carbon black. By eliminating these additives, we are able to improve the battery capacity/weight ratio. The NP film is formed by using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) of colloidally synthesized, monodisperse cobalt NPs that are transformed through the nanoscale Kirkendall effect into hollow Co 3O 4. EPD forms a network of NPs that are mechanically very robust and electrically connected, enabling them to act as the Li-ion battery anode. The morphology change through cycles indicates stable 5-10 nm NPs form after the first lithiation remained throughout the cycling process. This NP-film battery made without binders and conductive additives shows high gravimetric (>830 mAh/g) and volumetric capacities (>2100 mAh/cm 3) even after 50 cycles. Because similar films made from drop-casting do not perform well under equal conditions, EPD is seen as the critical step to create good contacts between the particles and electrodes resulting in this significant improvement in battery electrode assembly. This is a promising system for colloidal nanoparticles and a template for investigating the mechanism of lithiation and delithiation of NPs. © 2012 American Chemical Society.

  2. The effects of PbZn1/3Nb2/3O3-doping on structural, thermal, optical, dielectric, and ferroelectric properties of BaTiO3 ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchanicz, J.; Świerczek, K.; Sitko, D.; Czaja, P.; Marchet, P.; Czternastek, H.; Majda, D.

    2017-09-01

    Low-lead (1-x)BT-xPZN (x = 0, 0.025, 0.05, 0.075, 0.10, 0.125, and 0.15) ceramics were successfully synthesized by the spark-plasma-sintering method for the first time. Their phase transition behavior as well as structural, thermal, optical, and electrical properties was investigated. These materials exhibit the structure of perovskite-type solid solutions and undergo a sequence of phase transitions, typical of pure BaTiO3 (BT). The dielectric test results revealed that with the increase in the PbZn1/3Nb2/3O3 (PZN) content, the frequency dispersion of electric permittivity increases, whilst the dielectric/ferroelectric properties tend to deteriorate, which is characteristic of relaxor-type behavior. Therefore, it is reasonable to suppose that these ceramics progressively lack long-range ordering. These effects are due to the competition between lone-pair electrons' induced changes in the A-O band upon Pb2+ addition and ionic size differences. In general, the transition temperatures observed by dielectric analyses are in good agreement with those obtained from X-ray diffraction and differential scanning calorimetry measurements. The BT-PZN system may help to understand why relaxor behavior appears in perovskite-based materials. It appears that these materials can become a good starting point for the development of new low-lead electronic ceramics.

  3. Diamond-like carbon layers grown by electrochemical method-structural study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulesza, S.; Szatkowski, J.; Lulinska, E.; Kozanecki, M.

    2008-01-01

    A simple method of production of diamond-like carbon (DLC) thin films on various substrates by means of electrolysis of liquid hydrocarbons under ambient conditions is described in the paper. The amount of sp 3 -hybridized carbon clusters within deposited films is a key parameter of their structural quality, and is investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and Raman spectroscopy. Obtained results indicate that although the electrolysis generally leads to granular DLC films contaminated with graphitic inclusions, providing current density larger than 520 mA cm -2 at 1700 V, sp 3 -rich microcrystals with sharp edges can be found as well. Micro-Raman spectroscopic data strongly suggest that these microcrystals are minute diamonds, which eventually opens up a new perspective for a low-temperature synthesis of diamond-related materials

  4. Conductivity enhancement of multiwalled carbon nanotube thin film via thermal compression method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wan-Lin; Wang, Kuang-Yu; Chang, Yao-Jen; Li, Yu-Ren; Yang, Po-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Neng; Cheng, Huang-Chung

    2014-08-01

    For the first time, the thermal compression method is applied to effectively enhance the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotube thin films (CNTFs). With the assistance of heat and pressure on the CNTFs, the neighbor multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) start to link with each other, and then these separated CNTs are twined into a continuous film while the compression force, duration, and temperature are quite enough for the reaction. Under the compression temperature of 400°C and the compression force of 100 N for 50 min, the sheet resistance can be reduced from 17 to 0.9 k Ω/sq for the CNTFs with a thickness of 230 nm. Moreover, the effects of compression temperature and the duration of thermal compression on the conductivity of CNTF are also discussed in this work.

  5. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate-sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/l uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluent (5% NaCl-0.5% Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  6. Separation of uranium from sodium carbonate - sodium bicarbonate eluate by ion exchange method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakane, Kohji; Hirotsu, Takahiro; Fujii, Ayako; Katoh, Shunsaku; Sugasaka, Kazuhiko

    1982-01-01

    The ion exchange method was used for separating uranium from the eluate (0.5 N Na 2 CO 3 -0.5 N NaHCO 3 ) that was obtained in the extraction process of uranium from natural sea water by using the titanium-activated carbon composite adsorbent. Uranium in the eluate containing 3 mg/1 uranium was adsorbed by ion exchange resin (Amberlite IRA-400), and was eluted with the eluant (5 % NaCl-0.5 % Na 2 CO 3 ). The concentration ratio of uranium in the final concentrated-eluate became more than 20 times. The eluting solution to the adsorbent and the eluant to the resin could be repeatedly used in the desorption-ion exchange process. Sodium carbonate was consumed at the desorption step, and sodium bicarbonate was consumed at the ion exchange step. The concentration ratio of uranium was found to decrease as chloride ion in the eluate increased. (author)

  7. Standard Test Methods for Properties of Continuous Filament Carbon and Graphite Fiber Tows

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    1999-01-01

    1.1 These test methods cover the preparation and tensile testing of resin-impregnated and consolidated test specimens made from continuous filament carbon and graphite yarns, rovings, and tows to determine their tensile properties. 1.2 These test methods also cover the determination of the density and mass per unit length of the yarn, roving, or tow to provide supplementary data for tensile property calculation. 1.3 These test methods include a procedure for sizing removal to provide the preferred desized fiber samples for density measurement. This procedure may also be used to determine the weight percent sizing. 1.4 These test methods include a procedure for determining the weight percent moisture adsorption of carbon or graphite fiber. 1.5 The values stated in SI units are to be regarded as the standard. The values in parentheses are for information only. 1.6 This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of t...

  8. Optimization of viral resuspension methods for carbon-rich soils along a permafrost thaw gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gareth Trubl

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Permafrost stores approximately 50% of global soil carbon (C in a frozen form; it is thawing rapidly under climate change, and little is known about viral communities in these soils or their roles in C cycling. In permafrost soils, microorganisms contribute significantly to C cycling, and characterizing them has recently been shown to improve prediction of ecosystem function. In other ecosystems, viruses have broad ecosystem and community impacts ranging from host cell mortality and organic matter cycling to horizontal gene transfer and reprogramming of core microbial metabolisms. Here we developed an optimized protocol to extract viruses from three types of high organic-matter peatland soils across a permafrost thaw gradient (palsa, moss-dominated bog, and sedge-dominated fen. Three separate experiments were used to evaluate the impact of chemical buffers, physical dispersion, storage conditions, and concentration and purification methods on viral yields. The most successful protocol, amended potassium citrate buffer with bead-beating or vortexing and BSA, yielded on average as much as 2-fold more virus-like particles (VLPs g−1 of soil than other methods tested. All method combinations yielded VLPs g−1 of soil on the 108 order of magnitude across all three soil types. The different storage and concentration methods did not yield significantly more VLPs g−1 of soil among the soil types. This research provides much-needed guidelines for resuspending viruses from soils, specifically carbon-rich soils, paving the way for incorporating viruses into soil ecology studies.

  9. The Kyoto protocol and payments for tropical forest: An interdisciplinary method for estimating carbon-offset supply and increasing the feasibility of a carbon market under the CDM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaff, Alexander S.P.; Kerr, Suzi; Hughes, R. Flint; Liu, Shuguang; Sanchez-Azofeifa, G. Arturo; Schimel, David; Tosi, Joseph; Watson, Vicente

    2000-01-01

    Protecting tropical forests under the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) could reduce the cost of emissions limitations set in Kyoto. However, while society must soon decide whether or not to use tropical forest-based offsets, evidence regarding tropical carbon sinks is sparse. This paper presents a general method for constructing an integrated model (based on detailed historical, remote sensing and field data) that can produce land-use and carbon baselines, predict carbon sequestration supply to a carbon-offsets market and also help to evaluate optimal market rules. Creating such integrated models requires close collaboration between social and natural scientists. Our project combines varied disciplinary expertise (in economics, ecology and geography) with local knowledge in order to create high-quality, empirically grounded, integrated models for Costa Rica.

  10. A Method for Improving Temporal and Spatial Resolution of Carbon Dioxide Emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, J. S.; Andres, R. J.

    2003-12-01

    Using United States data, a method is developed to estimate the monthly consumption of solid, liquid and gaseous fossil fuels for each state in the union. This technique employs monthly sales data to estimate the relative monthly proportions of the total annual national fossil fuel use. These proportions are then used to estimate the total monthly carbon dioxide emissions for each state. To assess the success of this technique, the results from this method are compared with the data obtained from other independent methods. To determine the temporal success of the method, the resulting national time series is compared to the model produced by Carbon Dioxide Information Analysis Center (CDIAC) and the current model being developed by T. J. Blasing and C. Broniak at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The University of North Dakota (UND) method fits well temporally with the results of the CDIAC and current ORNL research. To determine the success of the spatial component, the individual state results are compared to the annual state totals calculated by ORNL. Using ordinary least squares regression, the annual state totals of this method are plotted against the ORNL data. This allows a direct comparison of estimates in the form of ordered pairs against a one-to-one ideal correspondence line, and allows for easy detection of outliers in the results obtained by this estimation method. Analyzing the residuals of the linear regression model for each type of fuel permits an improved understanding of the strengths and shortcomings of the spatial component of this estimation technique. Spatially, the model is successful when compared to the current ORNL research. The primary advantages of this method are its ease of implementation and universal applicability. In general, this technique compares favorably to more labor-intensive methods that rely on more detailed data. The more detailed data is generally not available for most countries in the world. The methodology used

  11. Initial Provincial Allocation and Equity Evaluation of China’s Carbon Emission Rights—Based on the Improved TOPSIS Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Wang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available As the world’s largest carbon emitter, China considers carbon emissions trading to be an important measure in its national strategy for energy conservation and emissions reduction. The initial allocation of China’s carbon emissions rights at the provincial level is a core issue of carbon emissions trading. A scientific and reasonable distinction between the carbon emission rights of provinces is crucial for China to achieve emissions reduction targets. Based on the idea of multi-objective decision-making, this paper uses the improved Technique for Order Preference by Similarity to an Ideal Solution (TOPSIS method to allocate China’s initial carbon emission rights to the provinces and uses the Gini coefficient sub-group decomposition method to evaluate the fairness of the allocation results. First, the results of a theoretical distribution show that in the initial allocation of carbon emission rights, a large proportion of China’s provinces have large populations and high energy use, such as Shandong Province, Jiangsu Province, Hebei Province and Henan Province; the provinces with a small proportion of the initial allocation of carbon emissions consist of two municipalities, Beijing and Shanghai, as well as Hainan Province, which is dominated by tourism. Overall, the initial allocation of carbon emission rights in the northern and eastern regions constituted the largest proportion, with the south-central region and the northwest region being the second largest and the southwest region being the smallest. Second, the difference between the theoretical allocation and the actual allocation of carbon emission rights in China was clear. The energy consumption of large provinces and provinces dominated by industry generally had a negative difference (the theoretical allocation of carbon emissions was less than the actual value, while Qinghai, dominated by agriculture and animal husbandry, showed a positive balance (the theoretical allocation of

  12. Carbon-coated copper nanoparticles prepared by detonation method and their thermocatalysis on ammonium perchlorate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongwei An

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-coated copper nanoparticles (CCNPs were prepared by initiating a high-density charge pressed with a mixture of microcrystalline wax, hexahydro-1,3,5-trinitro-1,3,5-triazine (RDX, and copper nitrate hydrate (Cu(NO32·3H2O in an explosion vessel filled with nitrogen gas. The detonation products were characterized by transmission electron microcopy (TEM, high resolution transmission electron microcopy (HRTEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX, X-ray diffraction (XRD, and Raman spectroscopy. The effects of CCNPs on thermal decomposition of ammonium perchlorate (AP were also investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC. Results indicated that the detonation products were spherical, 25-40 nm in size, and had an apparent core-shell structure. In this structure, the carbon shell was 3-5 nm thick and mainly composed of graphite, C8 (a kind of carbyne, and amorphous carbon. When 5 wt.% CCNPs was mixed with 95 wt.% AP, the high-temperature decomposition peak of AP decreased by 95.97, 96.99, and 96.69 °Cat heating rates of 5, 10, and 20 °C/min, respectively. Moreover, CCNPs decreased the activation energy of AP as calculated through Kissinger’s method by 25%, which indicated outstanding catalysis for the thermal decomposition of AP.

  13. Constraints on primary and secondary particulate carbon sources using chemical tracer and 14C methods during CalNex-Bakersfield

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The present study investigates primary and secondary sources of organic carbon for Bakersfield, CA, USA as part of the 2010 CalNex study. The method used here...

  14. An integrated computational materials engineering method for woven carbon fiber composites preforming process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhao; Ren, Huaqing; Wang, Zequn; Liu, Wing K.; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Danielle; Su, Xuming; Cao, Jian

    2016-10-01

    An integrated computational materials engineering method is proposed in this paper for analyzing the design and preforming process of woven carbon fiber composites. The goal is to reduce the cost and time needed for the mass production of structural composites. It integrates the simulation methods from the micro-scale to the macro-scale to capture the behavior of the composite material in the preforming process. In this way, the time consuming and high cost physical experiments and prototypes in the development of the manufacturing process can be circumvented. This method contains three parts: the micro-scale representative volume element (RVE) simulation to characterize the material; the metamodeling algorithm to generate the constitutive equations; and the macro-scale preforming simulation to predict the behavior of the composite material during forming. The results show the potential of this approach as a guidance to the design of composite materials and its manufacturing process.

  15. An Integrated Computational Materials Engineering Method for Woven Carbon Fiber Composites Preforming Process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Weizhao; Ren, Huaqing; Wang, Zequn; Liu, Wing K.; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Danielle; Su, Xuming; Cao, Jian

    2016-10-19

    An integrated computational materials engineering method is proposed in this paper for analyzing the design and preforming process of woven carbon fiber composites. The goal is to reduce the cost and time needed for the mass production of structural composites. It integrates the simulation methods from the micro-scale to the macro-scale to capture the behavior of the composite material in the preforming process. In this way, the time consuming and high cost physical experiments and prototypes in the development of the manufacturing process can be circumvented. This method contains three parts: the micro-scale representative volume element (RVE) simulation to characterize the material; the metamodeling algorithm to generate the constitutive equations; and the macro-scale preforming simulation to predict the behavior of the composite material during forming. The results show the potential of this approach as a guidance to the design of composite materials and its manufacturing process.

  16. Technical note: An inverse method to relate organic carbon reactivity to isotope composition from serial oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemingway, Jordon D.; Rothman, Daniel H.; Rosengard, Sarah Z.; Galy, Valier V.

    2017-11-01

    Serial oxidation coupled with stable carbon and radiocarbon analysis of sequentially evolved CO2 is a promising method to characterize the relationship between organic carbon (OC) chemical composition, source, and residence time in the environment. However, observed decay profiles depend on experimental conditions and oxidation pathway. It is therefore necessary to properly assess serial oxidation kinetics before utilizing decay profiles as a measure of OC reactivity. We present a regularized inverse method to estimate the distribution of OC activation energy (E), a proxy for bond strength, using serial oxidation. Here, we apply this method to ramped temperature pyrolysis or oxidation (RPO) analysis but note that this approach is broadly applicable to any serial oxidation technique. RPO analysis directly compares thermal reactivity to isotope composition by determining the E range for OC decaying within each temperature interval over which CO2 is collected. By analyzing a decarbonated test sample at multiple masses and oven ramp rates, we show that OC decay during RPO analysis follows a superposition of parallel first-order kinetics and that resulting E distributions are independent of experimental conditions. We therefore propose the E distribution as a novel proxy to describe OC thermal reactivity and suggest that E vs. isotope relationships can provide new insight into the compositional controls on OC source and residence time.

  17. Rapid, high-temperature, field test method for evaluation of geothermal calcium carbonate scale inhibitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asperger, R.G.

    1986-09-01

    A new test method is described that allows the rapid field testing of calcium carbonate scale inhibitors at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). The method evolved from use of a full-flow test loop on a well with a mass flow rate of about 1 x 10/sup 6/ lbm/hr (126 kg/s). It is a simple, effective way to evaluate the effectiveness of inhibitors under field conditions. Five commercial formulations were chosen for field evaluation on the basis of nonflowing, laboratory screening tests at 500/sup 0/F (260/sup 0/C). Four of these formulations from different suppliers controlled calcium carbonate scale deposition as measured by the test method. Two of these could dislodge recently deposited scale that had not age-hardened. Performance-profile diagrams, which were measured for these four effective inhibitors, show the concentration interrelationship between brine calcium and inhibitor concentrations at which the formulations will and will not stop scale formation in the test apparatus. With these diagrams, one formulation was chosen for testing on the full-flow brine line. The composition was tested for 6 weeks and showed a dramatic decrease in the scaling occurring at the flow-control valve. This scaling was about to force a shutdown of a major, long-term flow test being done for reservoir economic evaluations. The inhibitor stopped the scaling, and the test was performed without interruption.

  18. Technical note: An inverse method to relate organic carbon reactivity to isotope composition from serial oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. D. Hemingway

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Serial oxidation coupled with stable carbon and radiocarbon analysis of sequentially evolved CO2 is a promising method to characterize the relationship between organic carbon (OC chemical composition, source, and residence time in the environment. However, observed decay profiles depend on experimental conditions and oxidation pathway. It is therefore necessary to properly assess serial oxidation kinetics before utilizing decay profiles as a measure of OC reactivity. We present a regularized inverse method to estimate the distribution of OC activation energy (E, a proxy for bond strength, using serial oxidation. Here, we apply this method to ramped temperature pyrolysis or oxidation (RPO analysis but note that this approach is broadly applicable to any serial oxidation technique. RPO analysis directly compares thermal reactivity to isotope composition by determining the E range for OC decaying within each temperature interval over which CO2 is collected. By analyzing a decarbonated test sample at multiple masses and oven ramp rates, we show that OC decay during RPO analysis follows a superposition of parallel first-order kinetics and that resulting E distributions are independent of experimental conditions. We therefore propose the E distribution as a novel proxy to describe OC thermal reactivity and suggest that E vs. isotope relationships can provide new insight into the compositional controls on OC source and residence time.

  19. Effects of surfactants on spinning carbon nanotube fibers by an electrophoretic method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ma, Jie Tang, Qian Cheng, Han Zhang, Norio Shinya and Lu-Chang Qin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thin fibers were spun from a colloidal solution of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs using an electrophoretic method. Sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDDBS was chosen as a surfactant and showed good performance owing to its special chemical structure. The highest spinning velocity reached 0.5 mm s−1. The resulting SWNT fibers had a tensile strength of 400 MPa and a conductivity of 355 S cm−1. Their mechanical and electrical properties were markedly improved after adding NaDDBS as the dispersant in water.

  20. A Method for Sustainable Carbon Dioxide Utilization Process Synthesis and Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frauzem, Rebecca; Fjellerup, Kasper; Roh, Kosan

    for the process synthesis, design and more sustainable design. Using a superstructure-based approach a network of utilization alternatives is created linking CO2 and other raw materials with various products using processing blocks. This will then be optimized and verified for sustainability. Detailed design has...... also been performed for various case studies. These case studies include multiple pathways for the production of methanol and the production of dimethyl carbonate (DMC). From detailed design and analysis, CO2 conversion processes show promise as an additional method for the sustainable reduction of CO2...

  1. Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with carbonate-containing solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Francis, Raymond

    2012-11-06

    Methods of pretreating comminuted cellulosic material with an acidic solution and then a carbonate-containing solution to produce a pretreated cellulosic material are provided. The pretreated material may then be further treated in a pulping process, for example, a soda-anthraquinone pulping process, to produce a cellulose pulp. The pretreatment solutions may be extracted from the pretreated cellulose material and selectively re-used, for example, with acid or alkali addition, for the pretreatment solutions. The resulting cellulose pulp is characterized by having reduced lignin content and increased yield compared to prior art treatment processes.

  2. Methods of analysis for complex organic aerosol mixtures from urban emission sources of particulate carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mazurek, M.A.; Hildemann, L.M.; Simoneit, B.R.T.

    1990-10-01

    Organic aerosols comprise approximately 30% by mass of the total fine particulate matter present in urban atmospheres. The chemical composition of such aerosols is complex and reflects input from multiple sources of primary emissions to the atmosphere, as well as from secondary production of carbonaceous aerosol species via photochemical reactions. To identify discrete sources of fine carbonaceous particles in urban atmospheres, analytical methods must reconcile both bulk chemical and molecular properties of the total carbonaceous aerosol fraction. This paper presents an overview of the analytical protocol developed and used in a study of the major sources of fine carbon particles emitted to an urban atmosphere. 23 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  3. Raman imaging of millimeter-long carbon nanotubes grown by a gas flow method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Katsuya; Ishitani, Akihiro; Koyama, Tomohiro; Fukasawa, Mamoru; Inaba, Takumi; Shimizu, Maki; Homma, Yoshikazu

    2017-02-01

    Growing long carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is an important prerequisite for practical applications of CNTs. Although gas-flow-guided chemical vapor deposition can be used to produce millimeter-long CNTs, little is known regarding the associated growth mechanism. In the present work, Raman imaging was employed to characterize individual CNTs grown by the gas flow method, and Raman images of a CNT over 1.6 mm long were obtained. Two radial breathing modes were observed and the associated Raman images exhibited exactly identical distributions, indicating that the long CNT most likely had a double-walled structure, in which the CNT diameter was uniform along the whole length.

  4. Boron carbide-coated carbon material, manufacturing method therefor and plasma facing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Takayuki; Kikuchi, Yoshihiro; Hyakki, Yasuo.

    1997-01-01

    The present invention concerns a plasma facing material suitable to a thermonuclear device. The material comprises a carbon material formed by converting the surface of a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material comprising a carbon matrix and carbon fibers to a boron carbide, the material has a surface comprising vertically or substantially vertically oriented carbon fibers, and the thickness of the surface converted to boron carbide is reduced in the carbon fiber portion than in the carbon matrix portion. Alternatively, a carbon fiber-reinforced carbon material containing carbon fibers having a higher graphitizing degree than the carbon matrix is converted to boron carbide on the surface where the carbon fibers are oriented vertically or substantially vertically. The carbon fiber-reinforced material is used as a base material, and a resin material impregnated into a shaped carbon fiber product is carbonized or thermally decomposed carbon is filled as a matrix. The material of the present invention has high heat conduction and excellent in heat resistance thereby being suitable to a plasma facing material for a thermonuclear device. Electric specific resistivity of the entire coating layer can be lowered, occurrence of arc discharge is prevented and melting can be prevented. (N.H.)

  5. Prediction method of unburnt carbon for coal fired utility boiler using image processing technique of combustion flame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimoda, M.; Sugano, A.; Kimura, T.; Watanabe, Y.; Ishiyama, K.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on a method predicting unburnt carbon in a coal fired utility boiler developed using an image processing technique. The method consists of an image processing unit and a furnace model unit. temperature distribution of combustion flames can be obtained through the former unit. The later calculates dynamics of the carbon reduction from the burner stages to the furnace outlet using coal feed rate, air flow rate, chemical and ash content of coal. An experimental study shows that the prediction error of the unburnt carbon can be reduced to 10%

  6. Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High-Throughput Combinatorial Methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewis, Amanda [Pall Corporation, Port Washington, NY (United States); Zhao, Hongbin [Pall Corporation, Port Washington, NY (United States); Hopkins, Scott [Pall Corporation, Port Washington, NY (United States)

    2014-12-01

    This report summarizes the work completed under the U.S. Department of Energy Project Award No.: DE-FE0001181 titled “Designing and Validating Ternary Pd Alloys for Optimum Sulfur/Carbon Resistance in Hydrogen Separation and Carbon Capture Membrane Systems Using High-Throughput Combinatorial Methods.” The project started in October 1, 2009 and was finished September 30, 2014. Pall Corporation worked with Cornell University to sputter and test palladium-based ternary alloys onto silicon wafers to examine many alloys at once. With the specialized equipment at Georgia Institute of Technology that analyzed the wafers for adsorbed carbon and sulfur species six compositions were identified to have resistance to carbon and sulfur species. These compositions were deposited on Pall AccuSep® supports by Colorado School of Mines and then tested in simulated synthetic coal gas at the Pall Corporation. Two of the six alloys were chosen for further investigations based on their performance. Alloy reproducibility and long-term testing of PdAuAg and PdZrAu provided insight to the ability to manufacture these compositions for testing. PdAuAg is the most promising alloy found in this work based on the fabrication reproducibility and resistance to carbon and sulfur. Although PdZrAu had great initial resistance to carbon and sulfur species, the alloy composition has a very narrow range that hindered testing reproducibility.

  7. Robust modelling of solubility in supercritical carbon dioxide using Bayesian methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasova, Anna; Burden, Frank; Gasteiger, Johann; Winkler, David A

    2010-04-01

    Two sparse Bayesian methods were used to derive predictive models of solubility of organic dyes and polycyclic aromatic compounds in supercritical carbon dioxide (scCO(2)), over a wide range of temperatures (285.9-423.2K) and pressures (60-1400 bar): a multiple linear regression employing an expectation maximization algorithm and a sparse prior (MLREM) method and a non-linear Bayesian Regularized Artificial Neural Network with a Laplacian Prior (BRANNLP). A randomly selected test set was used to estimate the predictive ability of the models. The MLREM method resulted in a model of similar predictivity to the less sparse MLR method, while the non-linear BRANNLP method created models of substantially better predictivity than either the MLREM or MLR based models. The BRANNLP method simultaneously generated context-relevant subsets of descriptors and a robust, non-linear quantitative structure-property relationship (QSPR) model for the compound solubility in scCO(2). The differences between linear and non-linear descriptor selection methods are discussed. (c) 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Fabrication method and microstructural characteristics of coal-tar-pitch-based 2D carbon/carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esmaeeli, Mohammad; Khosravi, Hamed; Mirhabibi, Alireza

    2015-02-01

    The lignin-cellulosic texture of wood was used to produce two-dimensional (2D) carbon/carbon (C/C) composites using coal tar pitch. Ash content tests were conducted to select two samples among the different kinds of woods present in Iran, including walnut, white poplar, cherry, willow, buttonwood, apricots, berry, and blue wood. Walnut and white poplar with ash contents of 1.994wt% and 0.351wt%, respectively, were selected. The behavior of these woods during pyrolysis was investigated by differential thermal analysis (DTA) and thermo gravimetric (TG) analysis. The bulk density and open porosity were measured after carbonization and densification. The microstructural characteristics of samples were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), and Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. The results indicate that the density of both the walnut and white poplar is increased, and the open porosity is decreased with the increasing number of carbonization cycles. The XRD patterns of the wood charcoal change gradually with increasing pyrolysis temperature, possibly as a result of the ultra-structural changes in the charcoal or the presence of carbonized coal tar pitch in the composite's body.

  9. Maximizing carbon storage in the Appalachians: A method for considering the risk of disturbance events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael R. Vanderberg; Kevin Boston; John. Bailey

    2011-01-01

    Accounting for the probability of loss due to disturbance events can influence the prediction of carbon flux over a planning horizon, and can affect the determination of optimal silvicultural regimes to maximize terrestrial carbon storage. A preliminary model that includes forest disturbance-related carbon loss was developed to maximize expected values of carbon stocks...

  10. Comparison of structure and yield of multiwall carbon nanotubes produced by the CVD technique and a water assisted method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansal, Malti; Lal, C.; Srivastava, Ritu; Kamalasanan, M.N.; Tanwar, L.S.

    2010-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) were synthesized using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique and a water assisted method. Both methods produced MWNTs, which were characterized by SEM, TEM and Raman studies. It was observed that as far as quality is concerned, MWNTs produced by water assisted method are superior as the method does not employ any metal catalyst. However, as far as yield is concerned, CVD is a better method. Multiwall carbon nanotubes produced by water assisted method suffer from the drawback of low yield but have an advantage of production of multiwall carbon nanotubes without using any metal catalyst, at ambient pressure, in an environment friendly manner and using a simple and cost-effective apparatus.

  11. Method for calculating carbon footprint of cattle feeds – including contribution from soil carbon changes and use of cattle manure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mogensen, Lisbeth; Kristensen, Troels; Nguyen, T Lan T

    2014-01-01

    Greenhouse gas emissions (GHG) related to feed production is one of the hotspots in livestock production. The aim of this paper was to estimate the carbon footprint of different feedstuffs for dairy cattle using life cycle assessment (LCA). The functional unit was ‘1 kg dry matter (DM) of feed...... fodder crop, an individual production scheme was set up as the basis for calculating the carbon footprint (CF). In the calculations, all fodder crops were fertilized by artificial fertilizer based on the assumption that the environmental burden of using manure is related to the livestock production...... ready to feed’. Included in the study were fodder crops that are grown in Denmark and typically used on Danish cattle farms. The contributions from the growing, processing and transport of feedstuffs were included, as were the changes in soil carbon (soil C) and from land use change (LUC). For each...

  12. The distribution and mechanism of pore formation in copper foams fabricated by Lost Carbonate Sintering method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shahzeydi, Mohammad Hosein; Parvanian, Amir Masoud; Panjepour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    In this research, utilizing X-ray computed tomography (XCT), geometrical characterization, and pore formation mechanisms of highly porous copper foams manufactured by powder metallurgical (PM) process are investigated. Open-cell copper foams with porosity percentages of 60% and 80% and with a pore size within the range of 300–600 μm were manufactured by using potassium carbonate as a space holder agent via the Lost Carbonate Sintering (LCS) technique. XCT and SEM were also employed to investigate the three-dimensional structure of foams and to find the effect of the parameters of the space holders on the structural properties of copper foams. The result showed an excellent correlation between the structural properties of the foams including the size and shape of the pores, porosity percentage, volume percentage, particle size, and the shape of the sacrificial agent used. Also, the advanced image analysis of XCT images indicated fluctuations up to ± 10% in porosity distribution across different cross-sections of the foams. Simultaneous thermal analysis (STA: DTA–TG) was also used to study the thermal history of the powders used during the manufacturing process of the foams. The results indicated that the melting and thermal decomposition of the potassium carbonate occurred simultaneously at 920 °C and created the porous structure of the foams. By combining the STA result with the result of the tension analysis of cell walls, the mechanisms of open-pore formation were suggested. In fact, most open pores in the samples were formed due to the direct contact of potassium carbonate particles with each other in green compact. Also, it was found that the thermal decomposition of potassium carbonate particles into gaseous CO 2 led to the production of gas pressure inside the closed pores, which eventually caused the creation of cracks on the cell walls and the opening of the pores in foam's structure. - Highlights: • Structural characterization of copper foam

  13. Excellent adsorption performance of dibenzothiophene on functionalized low-cost activated carbons with different oxidation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Zhan; Wang, Dan; Yang, Yue; Meng, Xuan; Liu, Naiwang; Shi, Li

    2018-02-12

    Low-cost activated carbon (KAC) was functionalized by HNO 3 , (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 and air oxidation, respectively, to remove dibenzothiophene (DBT) from model fuel. The changes in physical and chemical properties of these activated carbons were characterized by thermal analysis, elemental analysis, nitrogen adsorption apparatus, Raman spectra, scanning electron microscope and Boehm's titration method. HNO 3 and (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 oxidation result in a significant decrease in pore structure, while air oxidation only causes slight pore reduction due to the re-activation by O 2 . The oxygen-containing functional groups (OFGs) increase markedly after oxidative modification, in which (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 oxidation is considered as the most efficient method with respect to the introduction of OFGs. HNO 3 and (NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 oxidation are more selective to generate carboxyls and lactones, whereas air oxidation creates more phenols, carbonyls and ethers. The DBT adsorption capacity follows the order: NAC (HNO 3 -oxidized KAC) > OAC (air-oxidized KAC) > KAC > SAC ((NH 4 ) 2 S 2 O 8 -oxidized KAC), implying the introduction of OFGs is beneficial for the DBT adsorption process, especially for selectivity, but excessive OFGs have a negative effect on the removal of DBT. Thus, to achieve high DBT adsorption performance, there should be a trade-off between the micropore volume and the OFGs amount.

  14. High-yield Synthesis of Multiwalled Carbon Nanotube by Mechanothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manafi SA

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study reports on the mechanothermal synthesis of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNTs from elemental graphite powder. Initially, high ultra-active graphite powder can be obtained by mechanical milling under argon atmosphere. Finally, the mechanical activation product is heat-treated at 1350°C for 2–4 h under argon gas flow. After heat-treatment, active graphite powders were successfully changed into MWCNTs with high purity. The XRD analyses showed that in the duration 150 h of milling, all the raw materials were changed to the desired materials. From the broadening of the diffraction lines in the XRD patterns, it was concluded that the graphite crystallites were nanosized, and raising the milling duration resulted in the fineness of the particles and the increase of the strain. The structure and morphology of MWCNTs were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM. The yield of MWCNTs was estimated through SEM and TEM observations of the as-prepared samples was to be about 90%. Indeed, mechanothermal method is of interest for fundamental understanding and improvement of commercial synthesis of carbon nanotubes (CNTs. As a matter of fact, the method of mechanothermal guarantees the production of MWCNTs suitable for different applications.

  15. Vapor-Liquid Equilibrium of Carbon Dioxide + Ethanol: Experimental Measurements with Acoustic Method and Thermodynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Mehl

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase behavior of systems composed by supercritical carbon dioxide and ethanol is of great interest, especially in the processes involving supercritical extraction in which ethanol is used as a cosolvent. The development of an apparatus, which is able to perform the measurements of vapor-liquid equilibrium (VLE at high pressure using a combination of the visual and the acoustic methods, was successful and was proven to be suited for determining the isothermal VLE data of this system. The acoustic method, based on the variation of the amplitude of an ultra-sound signal passing through a mixture during a phase transition, was applied to investigate the phase equilibria of the system carbon dioxide + ethanol at temperatures ranging from 298.2 K to 323.2 K and pressures from 3.0 MPa to 9.0 MPa. The VLE data were correlated with Peng-Robinson equation of state combined with two different mixing rules and the SAFT equations of state as well. The compositions calculated with the models are in good agreement with the experimental data for the isotherms evaluated.

  16. Method for aqueous gold thiosulfate extraction using copper-cyanide pretreated carbon adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Courtney; Melashvili, Mariam; Gow, Nicholas V

    2013-08-06

    A gold thiosulfate leaching process uses carbon to remove gold from the leach liquor. The activated carbon is pretreated with copper cyanide. A copper (on the carbon) to gold (in solution) ratio of at least 1.5 optimizes gold recovery from solution. To recover the gold from the carbon, conventional elution technology works but is dependent on the copper to gold ratio on the carbon.

  17. A Novel Method to Decrease Micro-residual Stresses of Fibrous Composites by Adding Carbon Nanotube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Shokrieh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In this research, a novel method to decrease micro-residual stresses of fibrous composites by adding carbon nanotubes (CNTs is proposed in detail. The negative coefficient of thermal expansion and the high young’s modulus of CNTs can be utilized to counterbalance the process induced residual stresses in composites. To this end, first, the effects of adding CNTs to the matrix of fibrous composites in reducing the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE and increasing of young’s modulus of matrix are studied theoretically. Then, a three phase micromechanical model (the energy method is used to model the effect of CNT in reducing the residual stresses of fibrous composites. The results show that by addition of CNTs, enhancements in properties of matrix are obtained and lead to decrease in micro-residual stresses of matrix and fiber up to 72%.

  18. Methods to Reduce Forest Residue Volume after Timber Harvesting and Produce Black Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah S. Page-Dumroese

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Forest restoration often includes thinning to reduce tree density and improve ecosystem processes and function while also reducing the risk of wildfire or insect and disease outbreaks. However, one drawback of these restoration treatments is that slash is often burned in piles that may damage the soil and require further restoration activities. Pile burning is currently used on many forest sites as the preferred method for residue disposal because piles can be burned at various times of the year and are usually more controlled than broadcast burns. In many cases, fire can be beneficial to site conditions and soil properties, but slash piles, with a large concentration of wood, needles, forest floor, and sometimes mineral soil, can cause long-term damage. We describe several alternative methods for reducing nonmerchantable forest residues that will help remove excess woody biomass, minimize detrimental soil impacts, and create charcoal for improving soil organic matter and carbon sequestration.

  19. A new method for estimating carbon dioxide emissions from transportation at fine spatial scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shu Yuqin [School of Geographical Science, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510631 (China); Lam, Nina S N; Reams, Margaret, E-mail: gis_syq@126.com, E-mail: nlam@lsu.edu, E-mail: mreams@lsu.edu [Department of Environmental Sciences, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, 70803 (United States)

    2010-10-15

    Detailed estimates of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) emissions at fine spatial scales are useful to both modelers and decision makers who are faced with the problem of global warming and climate change. Globally, transport related emissions of carbon dioxide are growing. This letter presents a new method based on the volume-preserving principle in the areal interpolation literature to disaggregate transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission estimates from the county-level scale to a 1 km{sup 2} grid scale. The proposed volume-preserving interpolation (VPI) method, together with the distance-decay principle, were used to derive emission weights for each grid based on its proximity to highways, roads, railroads, waterways, and airports. The total CO{sub 2} emission value summed from the grids within a county is made to be equal to the original county-level estimate, thus enforcing the volume-preserving property. The method was applied to downscale the transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission values by county (i.e. parish) for the state of Louisiana into 1 km{sup 2} grids. The results reveal a more realistic spatial pattern of CO{sub 2} emission from transportation, which can be used to identify the emission 'hot spots'. Of the four highest transportation-related CO{sub 2} emission hotspots in Louisiana, high-emission grids literally covered the entire East Baton Rouge Parish and Orleans Parish, whereas CO{sub 2} emission in Jefferson Parish (New Orleans suburb) and Caddo Parish (city of Shreveport) were more unevenly distributed. We argue that the new method is sound in principle, flexible in practice, and the resultant estimates are more accurate than previous gridding approaches.

  20. Catalytic Oxidation of Propylene, Toluene, Carbon Monoxide, and Carbon Black over Au/CeO2 Solids: Comparing the Impregnation and the Deposition-Precipitation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboukaïs, Antoine; El-Ayadi, Houda; Skaf, Mira; Labaki, Madona; Cousin, Renaud; Abi-Aad, Edmond

    2013-01-01

    Au/CeO2 solids were prepared by two methods: deposition-precipitation (DP) and impregnation (Imp). The prepared solids were calcined under air at 400°C. Both types of catalysts have been tested in the total oxidation of propylene, toluene, carbon monoxide, and carbon black. Au/CeO2-DP solids were the most reactive owing to the high number of gold nanoparticles and Au+ species and the low concentration of Cl− ions present on its surface compared to those observed in Au/CeO2-Imp solids. PMID:24198730

  1. Vacuum infusion method for woven carbon/Kevlar reinforced hybrid composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, N.; Majid, D. L.; Uda, N.; Zahari, R.; Yidris, N.

    2017-12-01

    The vacuum assisted resin transfer moulding (VaRTM) or Vacuum Infusion (VI) is one of the fabrication methods used for composite materials. Compared to other methods, this process costs lower than using prepregs because it does not need to use the autoclave to cure. Moreover, composites fabricated using this VI method exhibit superior mechanical properties than those made through hand layup process. In this study, the VI method is used in fabricating woven carbon/Kevlar fibre cloth with epoxy matrix. This paper reports the detailed methods on fabricating the hybrid composite using VI process and several precautions that need to be taken to avoid any damage to the properties of the composite material. The result highlights that the successfully fabricated composite has approximately 60% of fibres weight fraction. Since the composites produced by the VI process have a higher fibre percentage, this process should be considered for composites used in applications that are susceptible to the conditions where the fibres need to be the dominant element such as in tension loading.

  2. A simple and rapid method to graft hydroxyapatite on carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neelgund, Gururaj M.; Olurode, Kehinde [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States); Luo Zhiping [Microscopy and Imaging Center, Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station TX 77843 (United States); Oki, Aderemi, E-mail: aroki@pvamu.edu [Department of Chemistry, Prairie View A and M University, Prairie View, TX 77446 (United States)

    2011-10-10

    Herein a simple and effective approach is introduced to functionalize single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by in-situ grafting of hydroxyapatite (HA). The pristine SWCNTs were chemically activated through introduction of carboxylic groups on their surfaces by refluxing in the mixture of H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and HNO{sub 3}. The resulting carboxylated SWCNTs were further utilized for grafting of HA. The Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopic studies demonstrated the formation of HA and its grafting over SWCNTs. The phase composition of HA and existence Ca{sup 2+} and PO{sub 4}{sup 3-} ions were studied using X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray analyses, respectively. The surface morphology of functionalized SWCNTs was analyzed using scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis confirmed the existence of HA on SWCNTs by exhibiting different thermogram for pure HA and functionalized SWCNTs. Overall, this method produced uniform grafting of low crystalline HA on carboxylated SWCNTs with strong interfacial bonding. - Graphical abstract: A facile approach is demonstrated for effective functionalization of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) by in-situ grafting of hydroxyapatite (HA) to improve hydrophilicity and biocompatibility of SWCNTs. This method produced uniform grafting of low crystalline HA on carboxylated SWCNTs with strong interfacial bonding. Research highlights: {yields} This method is facile and effective to graft HA on SWCNTs. {yields} As f-SWCNTs is a promising biomaterial to use without any further processing {yields} This technique is economic, easy to repeat and can be optimized for mass production. {yields} Ratio of Ca to P in f-SWCNTs was 1.65, which is near to ratio present in bone tissue.

  3. A method for the assessment of long-term changes in carbon stock by construction of a hydropower reservoir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Julio Werner Yoshioka; Mannich, Michael; Hilgert, Stephan; Fernandes, Cristovão Vicente Scapulatempo; Bleninger, Tobias

    2017-09-01

    Sustainability of hydropower reservoirs has been questioned since the detection of their greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions which are mainly composed of carbon dioxide and methane. A method to assess the impact on the carbon cycle caused by the transition from a natural river system into a reservoir is presented and discussed. The method evaluates the long term changes in carbon stock instead of the current approach of monitoring and integrating continuous short term fluxes. A case study was conducted in a subtropical reservoir in Brazil, showing that the carbon content within the reservoir exceeds that of the previous landuse. The average carbon sequestration over 43 years since damming was 895 mg C m[Formula: see text] and found to be mainly due to storage of carbon in sediments. These results demonstrate that reservoirs have two opposite effects on the balance of GHGs. By storing organic C in sediments, reservoirs are an important carbon sink. On the other hand, reservoirs increase the flux of methane into the atmosphere. If the sediments of reservoirs could be used for long term C storage, reservoirs might have a positive effect on the balance of GHGs.

  4. Optical properties of elemental carbon and water-soluble organic carbon in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; He, K.-B.; Zheng, M.; Duan, F.-K.; Ma, Y.-L.; Du, Z.-Y.; Tan, J.-H.; Liu, J.-M.; Zhang, X.-L.; Weber, R. J.; Bergin, M. H.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-02-01

    The mass absorption cross-section (MAC) of elemental carbon (EC) in Beijing was quantified using a thermal-optical carbon analyzer and the influences of mixing state and sources of carbonaceous aerosol were investigated. The MAC measured at 632 nm was 29.0 and 32.0 m2 g-1 during winter and summer respectively. MAC correlated well with the organic carbon (OC) to EC ratio (R2 = 0.91) which includes important information about the extent of secondary organic aerosol (SOA) production, indicating the enhancement of MAC by coating with SOA. The extrapolated MAC value was 10.5 m2 g-1 when the OC to EC ratio is zero, which was 5.6 m2 g-1 after correction by the enhancement factor (1.87) caused by the artifacts associated with the "filter-based" methods. The MAC also increased with sulphate (R2 = 0.84) when the sulphate concentration was below 10 μg m-3, whereas MAC and sulphate were only weekly related when the sulphate concentration was above 10 μg m-3, indicating the MAC of EC was also enhanced by coating with sulphate. Based on a converting approach that accounts for the discrepancy caused by measurements methods of both light absorption and EC concentration, previously published MAC values were converted to the "equivalent MAC", which is the estimated value if using the same measurement methods as used in this study. The "equivalent MAC" was found to be much lower in the regions heavily impacted by biomass burning (e.g., India), probably due to the influence of brown carbon. Optical properties of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in Beijing were also presented. Light absorption by WSOC exhibited strong wavelength (λ) dependence such that absorption varied approximately as λ-7, which was characteristic of the brown carbon spectra. The mass absorption efficiency (σabs) of WSOC (measured at 365 nm) was 1.83 and 0.70 m2 g-1 during winter and summer respectively. The seasonal pattern of σabs was attributed to the difference in the precursors of SOA, because WSOC in

  5. The realignment of carbon nanotubes in polymer/CNT composites by mechanical stretching method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jianfeng; Wang, Qing; Li, Weixue; Wei, Zhiqiang; Jiang, Jinlong

    2007-07-01

    A new convenient and simple technique for the realignment of carbon nanotubes in single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) reinforced polymer composites by stretching the semidried matrices in the same direction repeatedly is presented in this paper. Every SWNT in the matrices having an angular displacement tend to align in the stretching direction due to a torque exerting on it. Only when SWNT aligned along the stretching direction, the torque equal zero. CNT/polymer composites SWNT/epoxy resin and SWNT/PMMA were prepared by solution casting and in situ polymerization respectively. SEM demonstrates that SWNTs are well dispersed in the composite matrix and aligning in the stretching direction. The electrical and mechanical tests indicate that the composites prepared by this method present highly anisotropic properties. The mechanical properties of composites rise with the increase of SWNT concentration, composites showed higher mechanical properties such as the Young's modulus, tensile strength and elongation along the stretched direction than perpendicular to it. A sharp increase of the conductivity value was observed for both SWNT/epoxy and SWNT/PMMA composites just with low SWNT weight fractions. With respect to pure PMMA, the electrical conductivity of 3 wt. % aligned SWNT nanocomposite increased by 9 orders of magnitude, up to 10 -3 S/cm.

  6. Decomposing the Influencing Factors of Industrial Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Inner Mongolia Based on the LMDI Method

    OpenAIRE

    Rina Wu; Jiquan Zhang; Yuhai Bao; Quan Lai; Siqin Tong; Youtao Song

    2016-01-01

    Understanding of the influencing factors of industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions is essential to reduce natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, we applied the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI) decomposition method based on the extended Kaya identity to analyze the changes in industrial carbon dioxide emissions resulting from 39 industrial sectors in Inner Mongolia northeast of China over the period 2003–2012. The factors were divided into five types of eff...

  7. Evaluation of Three Field-Based Methods for Quantifying Soil Carbon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izaurralde, Roberto C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rice, Charles W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wielopolski, Lucien [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ebinger, Michael H. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Reeves, James B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Thomson, Allison M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Harris, Ron [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Francis, Barry [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Mitra, S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Rappaport, Aaron [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Etchevers, Jorge [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Sayre, Ken D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Govaerts, Bram [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCarty, G. W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2013-01-31

    Three advanced technologies to measure soil carbon (C) density (g C m22) are deployed in the field and the results compared against those obtained by the dry combustion (DC) method. The advanced methods are: a) Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), b) Diffuse Reflectance Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (DRIFTS), and c) Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS). The measurements and soil samples were acquired at Beltsville, MD, USA and at Centro International para el Mejoramiento del Maiz y el Trigo (CIMMYT) at El Bata´n, Mexico. At Beltsville, soil samples were extracted at three depth intervals (0–5, 5–15, and 15–30 cm) and processed for analysis in the field with the LIBS and DRIFTS instruments. The INS instrument determined soil C density to a depth of 30 cm via scanning and stationary measurements. Subsequently, soil core samples were analyzed in the laboratory for soil bulk density (kg m23), C concentration (g kg21) by DC, and results reported as soil C density (kg m22). Results from each technique were derived independently and contributed to a blind test against results from the reference (DC) method. A similar procedure was employed at CIMMYT in Mexico employing but only with the LIBS and DRIFTS instruments. Following conversion to common units, we found that the LIBS, DRIFTS, and INS results can be compared directly with those obtained by the DC method. The first two methods and the standard DC require soil sampling and need soil bulk density information to convert soil C concentrations to soil C densities while the INS method does not require soil sampling. We conclude that, in comparison with the DC method, the three instruments (a) showed acceptable performances although further work is needed to improve calibration techniques and (b) demonstrated their portability and their capacity to perform under field conditions.

  8. Investigation of test methods for measuring compressive strength and modulus of two-dimensional carbon-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlhorst, Craig W.; Sawyer, James Wayne; Yamaki, Y. Robert

    1989-01-01

    An experimental evaluation has been conducted to ascertain the the usefulness of two techniques for measuring in-plane compressive failure strength and modulus in coated and uncoated carbon-carbon composites. The techniques involved testing specimens with potted ends as well as testing them in a novel clamping fixture; specimen shape, length, gage width, and thickness were the test parameters investigated for both coated and uncoated 0/90 deg and +/-45 deg laminates. It is found that specimen shape does not have a significant effect on the measured compressive properties. The potting of specimen ends results in slightly higher measured compressive strengths than those obtained with the new clamping fixture. Comparable modulus values are obtained by both techniques.

  9. Composite Materials with Magnetically Aligned Carbon Nanoparticles Having Enhanced Electrical Properties and Methods of Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Haiping (Inventor); Peterson, G.P. (Bud) (Inventor); Salem, David R. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Magnetically aligned carbon nanoparticle composites have enhanced electrical properties. The composites comprise carbon nanoparticles, a host material, magnetically sensitive nanoparticles and a surfactant. In addition to enhanced electrical properties, the composites can have enhanced mechanical and thermal properties.

  10. A simple stable carbon isotope method for investigating changes in the use of recent versus old carbon in oak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarroll, Danny; Whitney, Matthew; Young, Giles H F; Loader, Neil J; Gagen, Mary H

    2017-08-01

    Stable carbon isotope ratios from early-wood (EW) and late-wood (LW) are used to test competing models of carbon storage and allocation, providing a cost-effective alternative to measuring and dating non-structural carbohydrates in mature temperate broad-leaf forest trees growing under natural conditions. Annual samples of EW and LW from seven mature oaks (Quercus robur L.) from Scotland, covering AD 1924-2012, were pooled, treated to isolate alpha-cellulose and pyrolysed to measure the carbon isotope ratios. Late-wood values are strongly correlated with summer temperature of the year of growth and EW contains the same signal offset by 1 year. After a warm summer, isotopic ratios of EW are similar to those of the preceding LW, but following cold summers they are relatively enriched. The results conflict with established models of isotopic variation within oak tree rings but support 'two-pool' models for storage of non-structural carbohydrates, with EW formation, which occurs prior to budburst, preferentially using young reserves accumulated in the previous summer. Under poor growing conditions trees access older reserves. Slight average isotopic enrichment of EW may be explained by preferential accumulation of reserves during warmer summers rather than by isotopic enrichment during starch formation in non-photosynthetic tissue. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Public Review Draft: A Method for Assessing Carbon Stocks, Carbon Sequestration, and Greenhouse-Gas Fluxes in Ecosystems of the United States Under Present Conditions and Future Scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Bernknopf, Richard; Clow, David; Dye, Dennis; Faulkner, Stephen; Forney, William; Gleason, Robert; Hawbaker, Todd; Liu, Jinxun; Liu, Shu-Guang; Prisley, Stephen; Reed, Bradley; Reeves, Matthew; Rollins, Matthew; Sleeter, Benjamin; Sohl, Terry; Stackpoole, Sarah; Stehman, Stephen; Striegl, Robert G.; Wein, Anne; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    2010-01-01

    The Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Section 712, authorizes the U.S. Department of the Interior to develop a methodology and conduct an assessment of the Nation's ecosystems focusing on carbon stocks, carbon sequestration, and emissions of three greenhouse gases (GHGs): carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The major requirements include (1) an assessment of all ecosystems (terrestrial systems, such as forests, croplands, wetlands, shrub and grasslands; and aquatic ecosystems, such as rivers, lakes, and estuaries), (2) an estimation of annual potential capacities of ecosystems to increase carbon sequestration and reduce net GHG emissions in the context of mitigation strategies (including management and restoration activities), and (3) an evaluation of the effects of controlling processes, such as climate change, land use and land cover, and wildlfires. The purpose of this draft methodology for public review is to propose a technical plan to conduct the assessment. Within the methodology, the concepts of ecosystems, carbon pools, and GHG fluxes used for the assessment follow conventional definitions in use by major national and international assessment or inventory efforts. In order to estimate current ecosystem carbon stocks and GHG fluxes and to understand the potential capacity and effects of mitigation strategies, the method will use two time periods for the assessment: 2001 through 2010, which establishes a current ecosystem GHG baseline and will be used to validate the models; and 2011 through 2050, which will be used to assess future potential conditions based on a set of projected scenarios. The scenario framework is constructed using storylines of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report Emission Scenarios (SRES), along with initial reference land-use and land-cover (LULC) and land-management scenarios. An additional three LULC and land-management mitigation scenarios will be constructed for each

  12. Improvement of mechanical and thermal properties of carbon nanotube composites through nanotube functionalization and processing methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahoo, Nanda Gopal; Cheng, Henry Kuo Feng; Cai Junwei; Li Lin; Chan, Siew Hwa; Zhao Jianhong; Yu Suzhu

    2009-01-01

    The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and processing methods on the morphological, dynamic mechanical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties of MWCNT/nylon 6 (PA6) composites has been investigated. The MWCNTs have been functionalized covalently and noncovalently for better dispersion in the polymer matrix. A homogeneous dispersion of MWCNTs was achieved in the PA6 matrix as evidenced by scanning electron microscopy. The strong interaction between the functionalized MWCNTs and the PA6 matrix greatly enhanced the dispersion as well as the interfacial adhesion. As a result, the overall mechanical performance of the composites could be improved. The incorporation of the MWCNTs effectively enhanced the crystallization of the PA6 matrix through heterogeneous nucleation. The present investigation revealed that the mechanical, thermal as well as electrical properties of MWCNT-filled polymer composites were strongly dependent on the state of dispersion, mixing and processing conditions, and interaction with the polymeric matrix.

  13. Strength Analysis of the Carbon-Fiber Reinforced Polymer Impeller Based on Fluid Solid Coupling Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinbao Lin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Carbon-fiber reinforced polymer material impeller is designed for the centrifugal pump to deliver corrosive, toxic, and abrasive media in the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. The pressure-velocity coupling fields in the pump are obtained from the CFD simulation. The stress distribution of the impeller couple caused by the flow water pressure and rotation centrifugal force of the blade is analyzed using one-way fluid-solid coupling method. Results show that the strength of the impeller can meet the requirement of the centrifugal pumps, and the largest stress occurred around the blades root on a pressure side of blade surface. Due to the existence of stress concentration at the blades root, the fatigue limit of the impeller would be reduced greatly. In the further structure optimal design, the blade root should be strengthened.

  14. Confident methods for the evaluation of the hydrogen content in nanoporous carbon microfibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culebras, Mario; Madroñero, Antonio; Cantarero, Andres; Amo, José Maria; Domingo, Concepción; López, Antonio

    2012-10-01

    Nanoporous carbon microfibers were grown by chemical vapor deposition in the vapor-liquid solid mode using different fluid hydrocarbons as precursors in different proportions. The as-grown samples were further treated in argon and hydrogen atmospheres at different pressure conditions and annealed at several temperatures in order to deduce the best conditions for the incorporation and re-incorporation of hydrogen into the microfibers through the nanopores. Since there are some discrepancies in the results on the hydrogen content obtained under vacuum conditions, in this work, we have measured the hydrogen content in the microfibers using several analytical methods in ambient conditions: surface tension, mass density, and Raman measurements. A discussion on the validity of the results obtained through the correlation between them is the purpose of the present work.

  15. Carbon nanotubes modification with polyaniline: Revealing mechanism by mathematical modeling method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukhov, Artem; Dyachkova, Tatyana; Anosova, Irina; Tugolukov, Evgeniy; Burakova, Elena; Galunin, Evgeniy

    2017-11-01

    The process of carboxylated carbon nanotubes (CNT) modification with polyaniline (PANI) has been studied by molecular dynamics methods. It is shown that the formation of dimers and phenazine oligomeric products takes place on the surface of CNT, after which desorption takes place, and the growth of macromolecular PANI chains occurs in the reaction mass bulk. Carboxylate groups have an orienting effect on the arrangement of PANI molecules in the formation of the modifying layer, therefore, the properties of synthesized composites are affected not only by the presence of functional groups on the CNT surface, but also by the degree of functionalization. An approach is proposed to determine the degree of preliminary functionalization of CNT by carboxylate groups, which ensures the formation of the uniform PANI coating and the highest electrical capacity and conductivity of the composites.

  16. A simple, gravimetric method to quantify inorganic carbon in calcareous soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Total carbon (TC) in calcareous soils has two components: inorganic carbon (IC) as calcite and or dolomite and organic carbon (OC) in the soil organic matter. The IC must be measured and subtracted from TC to obtain OC. Our objective was to develop a simple gravimetric technique to quantify IC. Th...

  17. Microscopic unravelling of nano-carbon doping in MgB{sub 2} superconductors fabricated by diffusion method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, D.C.K. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Yeoh, W.K. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); De Silva, K.S.B. [Institute for Superconducting & Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Institute for Nanoscale Technology, Faculty of Science, University of Technology Sydney, Ultimo, New South Wales 2007 (Australia); Kondyurin, A.; Bao, P. [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Li, W.X. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Shanghai University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Xu, X.; Peleckis, G.; Dou, S.X. [Institute for Superconducting & Electronic Materials, University of Wollongong, North Wollongong, New South Wales 2500 (Australia); Ringer, S.P. [School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Australian Centre for Microscopy & Microanalysis, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia); Zheng, R.K., E-mail: rongkun.zheng@sydney.edu.au [School of Physics, The University of Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2015-09-25

    Highlights: • First report on nano-carbon doped MgB{sub 2} superconductors synthesized by diffusion method. • Microstructure and superconducting properties of the superconductors are discussed. • B{sub 4}C region blocks the Mg from reacting with B in the 10% nano-carbon doped sample. • MgB{sub 2} with 2.5% nano-carbon doped showed the highest J{sub c}, ≈10{sup 4} A/cm{sup 2} for 20 K at 4 T. - Abstract: We investigated the effects of nano-carbon doping as the intrinsic (B-site nano-carbon substitution) and extrinsic (nano-carbon derivatives) pinning by diffusion method. The contraction of the in-plane lattice confirmed the presence of disorder in boron sublattice caused by carbon substitution. The increasing value in full width half maximum (FWHM) in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with each increment in the doping level reveal smaller grains and imperfect MgB{sub 2} crystalline. The strain increased across the doping level due to the carbon substitution in the MgB{sub 2} matrix. The broadening of the T{sub c} curves from low to high doping showed suppression of the connectivity of the bulk samples with progressive dirtying. At high doping, the presence of B{sub 4}C region blocked the Mg from reacting with crystalline B thus hampering the formation of MgB{sub 2}. Furthermore, the unreacted Mg acted as a current blocking phase in lowering down the grain connectivity hence depressing the J{sub c} of the 10% nano-carbon doped MgB{sub 2} bulk superconductor.

  18. Microscopic unravelling of nano-carbon doping in MgB2 superconductors fabricated by diffusion method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, D.C.K.; Yeoh, W.K.; De Silva, K.S.B.; Kondyurin, A.; Bao, P.; Li, W.X.; Xu, X.; Peleckis, G.; Dou, S.X.; Ringer, S.P.; Zheng, R.K.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • First report on nano-carbon doped MgB 2 superconductors synthesized by diffusion method. • Microstructure and superconducting properties of the superconductors are discussed. • B 4 C region blocks the Mg from reacting with B in the 10% nano-carbon doped sample. • MgB 2 with 2.5% nano-carbon doped showed the highest J c , ≈10 4 A/cm 2 for 20 K at 4 T. - Abstract: We investigated the effects of nano-carbon doping as the intrinsic (B-site nano-carbon substitution) and extrinsic (nano-carbon derivatives) pinning by diffusion method. The contraction of the in-plane lattice confirmed the presence of disorder in boron sublattice caused by carbon substitution. The increasing value in full width half maximum (FWHM) in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns with each increment in the doping level reveal smaller grains and imperfect MgB 2 crystalline. The strain increased across the doping level due to the carbon substitution in the MgB 2 matrix. The broadening of the T c curves from low to high doping showed suppression of the connectivity of the bulk samples with progressive dirtying. At high doping, the presence of B 4 C region blocked the Mg from reacting with crystalline B thus hampering the formation of MgB 2 . Furthermore, the unreacted Mg acted as a current blocking phase in lowering down the grain connectivity hence depressing the J c of the 10% nano-carbon doped MgB 2 bulk superconductor

  19. A standardized method for the determination of the intrinsic carbon and nitrogen mineralization capacity of natural organic matter sources

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grigatti, M.; Perez, M.D.; Blok, W.J.; Ciavatta, C.; Veeken, A.

    2007-01-01

    A new method was developed for the simultaneous determination of the intrinsic carbon and nitrogen mineralization capacity of organic matter (OM) sources by means of an aerobic incubation in suspension. The proposed method is based on determination of the oxygen consumption, monitored indirectly via

  20. Chemical method for determination of carbon dioxide content in egg yolk and egg albumen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keener, K M; LaCrosse, J D; Babson, J K

    2001-07-01

    The safety, quality, and shelf life of shell eggs is a function of carbon dioxide content. A commercial process was recently developed for rapidly cooling shell eggs by using cryogenic CO2. The benefit of this new process over existing cooling processes is that the CO2 addition during cryogenic cooling provides additional safety and quality enhancements. In order for these benefits to be fully developed into a process that can be adopted by the egg industry, and thus realized by the consumer, the amount of CO2 absorbed by the egg during this process needs to be quantified. Because the albumen pH of rapidly cooled eggs was reduced to pH neutralization. A simple and accurate method for determining CO2 content in acidified egg albumen and yolk samples was developed. This method involves the liberation of CO2 from an acidified egg sample into a standardized, dilute sodium hydroxide solution inside a sealed jar. The egg sample and a small beaker containing the standardized sodium hydroxide solution are placed in a glass jar and sealed. Next, a concentrated acid phosphate solution is injected through a rubber septum in the cap of the jar onto the egg sample, while avoiding contact with the sodium hydroxide solution. The sample is then stored at 37 C for 24 h. During this storage period, the carbon dioxide is released from the egg sample and is absorbed into the sodium hydroxide solution. Afterwards, the dilute sodium hydroxide solution is removed and titrated to the phenolphthalein endpoint using a dilute, standardized hydrochloric acid solution. The amount of hydrochloric acid solution required for neutralization can be directly related to CO2 content in the sample.

  1. Method and apparatus for recovering uranium from a carbonate solution containing uranium ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunin, R.; Laterra, T.

    1982-01-01

    A process and apparatus for recovering uranium from a carbonate solution containing uranium ions whereby the carbonate solution containing uranium ions is brought in contact with a cation exchanger so that a uranium cation is removed from solution and absorbed by the cation exchanger, and the uranium cation is then removed from the cation exchanger. The treated carbonate solution from which uranium ions have been removed by cation exchange is then further processed by removing carbon dioxide from the treated carbonate solution to produce a decarbonated solution, and passing the decarbonated solution through a membrane process to remove some remaining impurities

  2. A New Method for Carbon Isotopic Analysis of Nanogram Quantities of Carbon from Dissolved Chitin Using A Spooling-wire Microcombustion Interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Y.; Nelson, D. M.; Clegg, B. F.; Berry, J.; Hu, F.

    2016-12-01

    δ13C analysis of specific taxa or compounds is commonly used for investigating past environmental change, including methane dynamics in lakes. However, most analytical methods require large sample sizes, prohibiting routine analysis of fossils of individual taxa found in sediment deposits. For example, 10-100 individual head capsules of fossil midges are required for δ13C analysis using an elemental analyzer (EA) interfaced with an isotope-ratio mass spectrometer (IRMS). Here we present a new method that uses a spooling-wire microcombustion (SWiM) device interfaced with an IRMS for measuring δ13C values of carbon dissolved from individual head capsules of chitinous aquatic zooplankton. We extracted chitin (a major biochemical component of insect exoskeleton) from modern midge material obtained from four commercial suppliers. We first assessed the effects of sample treatments on carbon yields and δ13C values of dissolved chitin by varying the concentration of HCl used for dissolution, the duration of reaction in HCl, and the temperature of dissolution. We then investigated potential fractionation of carbon isotopes associated with chitin dissolution, by comparing δ13C values of dissolved chitin obtained via SWiM-IRMS with those from untreated head capsules obtained via a EA-IRMS. The average δ13C values of untreated head capsules varied between -25.1 and -30.1‰. Higher acid concentrations and temperatures, as well as longer reaction times, increased dissolution of carbon from the head capsules and the precision of δ13C values. For example, carbon yields from reaction of head capsules with 6N HCl at 25°C increased from 1 to 3 Vs as reaction times increased from 1 to 24 hours. Acid concentration and reaction time had the greatest influence on carbon yields and isotopic precision. The δ13C values of dissolved chitin mirrored the δ13C values of untreated head capsules with minimal offset of absolute values, which suggests no systematic fractionation

  3. [Preparation and characterization of activated carbon-silver composite with antibacterial behavior via vacuum impregnation method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zi-Qiang; Liu, Shou-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Activated carbon-silver composite (Ag/AC) for antibacterial performance by controlling silver release was prepared by silver acetate vacuum impregnation method. The antibacterial activity towards E. coil and resistance of water erosion was investigated through distilled water. Surface area and porosity analyzer, Scanning electron spectroscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize the surface morphology and pore properties. The results show that Ag0 was deposited on AC symmetrically. The content of silver supported and particle size were increased by the increasing of the concentration of CH3 COOAg, while specific surface area, total pore volume and average pore size were decreased. Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% which killed 10(7) CFU/mL concentration of E. coil in 120 min exhibited the similar antibacterial activity for E. coil with that prepared by traditional impregnation method. However, the silver loss of the Ag/AC prepared with silver content of 0.97% was 37.6%, showing much higher resistance to water erosion. High antibacterial activity and control silver release can be simultaneously realized by the silver acetate vacuum impregnation method.

  4. Chemical surface modification of calcium carbonate particles with stearic acid using different treating methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Zhi [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone (Ireland); Daly, Michael [Mergon International, Castlepollard, Westmeath (Ireland); Clémence, Lopez [Polytech Grenoble, Grenoble (France); Geever, Luke M.; Major, Ian; Higginbotham, Clement L. [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone (Ireland); Devine, Declan M., E-mail: ddevine@ait.ie [Materials Research Institute, Athlone Institute of Technology, Athlone (Ireland)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • The effects of stearic acid treatment for CaCO{sub 3} are highly influenced by the treatment method of application. • A new stearic acid treatment method, namely, combination treatment for CaCO{sub 3} was developed. • The combination treatment was compared with two of the existing methods dry and wet method. • The negative effects of void coalescence was minimised by the utilization of the combination method. - Abstract: Calcium carbonate (CaCO{sub 3}) is often treated with stearic acid (SA) to decrease its polarity. However, the method of application of the SA treatments has a strong influence on CaCO{sub 3} thermoplastic composite’s interfacial structure and distribution. Several of papers describe the promising effects of SA surface treatment, but few compare the treatment process and its effect on the properties of the final thermoplastic composite. In the current study, we assessed a new SA treatment method, namely, complex treatment for polymer composite fabrication with HDPE. Subsequently, a comparative study was performed between the “complex” process and the other existing methods. The composites were assessed using different experiments included scanning electron microscopy (SEM), void content, density, wettability, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and tensile tests. It was observed that the “complex” surface treatment yielded composites with a significantly lower voids content and higher density compared to other surface treatments. This indicates that after the “complex” treatment process, the CaCO{sub 3} particles and HDPE matrix are more tightly packed than other methods. DSC and wettability results suggest that the “wet” and “complex” treated CaCO{sub 3} composites had a significantly higher heat of fusion and moisture resistance compared to the “dry” treated CaCO{sub 3} composites. Furthermore, “wet” and “complex” treated CaCO{sub 3} composites have a significantly higher tensile

  5. The structure of carbon black-elastomer composites by small-angle neutron scattering and the method of contrast variation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hjelm, R.P.; Wampler, W.; Gerspacher, M.

    1996-01-01

    We have been exploring the use of small-angle neutron scattering and the method of contrast variation to give a new look at a very old problem: reinforcement of elastomers by carbon black in durable rubber products. Carbon black has a hierarchy of structures consisting of particles covalently bound into aggregates, which in turn associate by weak interactions into agglomerates. We found that in one carbon black, HSA, the aggregates are rodlike, containing an average of 4-6 particles. The aggregates have an outer graphitic shell and an inner core of lower density carbon. The core is continuous throughout the carbon black aggregate. Contrast variation of swollen HSA-polyisoprene gels shows that the HSA is completely embedded in polyisoprene and that the agglomerates are formed predominantly by end on associations of the rodlike aggregates. The surface structure of the carbon black appears smooth over length scales above about 10 angstrom. Further studies using production carbon blacks suggest that these structural characteristics are generally present in commercial rubber composites

  6. Deposition of platinum nanoparticles on carbon nanotubes by supercritical fluid method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Clive H; Cui, Xiaoli; Pan, Horng-Bin; Wang, Shaofen; Lin, Yuehe; Wai, Chien M

    2005-11-01

    Carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles with a 5-15 nm diameter size range can be synthesized by hydrogen reduction of platinum(ll) acetylacetonate in methanol modified supercritical carbon dioxide. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction spectra indicate that the carbon nanotubes contain zero-valent platinum metal and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images show that the visible lattice fringes of platinum nanoparticles are crystallites. Carbon nanotubes synthesized with 25% by weight of platinum nanoparticles exhibit a higher activity for hydrogenation of benzene compared with a commercial carbon black platinum catalyst. The carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanocatalyst can be reused at least six times for the hydrogenation reaction without losing activity. The carbon nanotube-supported platinum nanoparticles are also highly active for electrochemical oxidation of methanol and for reduction of oxygen suggesting their potential use as a new electrocatalyst for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications.

  7. Development of a Rapid, Nondestructive Method to Measure Aqueous Carbonate in High Salinity Brines Using Raman Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, L.; Phillips-Lander, C. M.; Elwood Madden, A. S.; Parnell, S.; Elwood Madden, M.

    2015-12-01

    Traditional methods of quantitative analysis are often ill-suited to determining the bulk chemistry of high salinity brines due to their corrosive and clogging properties. Such methods are also often difficult to apply remotely in planetary environments. However, Raman spectroscopy can be used remotely without physical contact with the fluid and is not affected by many ionic brines. Developing methods to study aqueous carbonates is vital to future study of brines on Mars and other planetary bodies, as they can reveal important information about modern and ancient near-surface aqueous processes. Both sodium carbonate standards and unknown samples from carbonate mineral dissolution experiments in high salinity brines were analyzed using a 532 nm laser coupled to an inVia Renishaw spectrometer to collect carbonate spectra from near-saturated sodium chloride and sodium sulfate brines. A calibration curve was determined by collecting spectra from solutions of known carbonate concentrations mixed with a pH 13 buffer and a near-saturated NaCl or Na2SO4 brine matrix. The spectra were processed and curve fitted to determine the height ratio of the carbonate peak at 1066 cm-1 to the 1640 cm-1 water peak. The calibration curve determined using the standards was then applied to the experimental data after accounting for dilutions. Concentrations determined based on Raman spectra were compared against traditional acid titration measurements. We found that the two techniques vary by less than one order of magnitude. Further work is ongoing to verify the method and apply similar techniques to measure aqueous carbonate concentrations in other high salinity brines.Traditional methods of quantitative analysis are often ill-suited to determining the bulk chemistry of high salinity brines due to their corrosive and clogging properties. Such methods are also often difficult to apply remotely in planetary environments. However, Raman spectroscopy can be used remotely without physical

  8. Using hybrid method to evaluate carbon footprint of Xiamen City, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jianyi; Liu, Yuan; Meng, Fanxin; Cui, Shenghui; Xu, Lilai

    2013-01-01

    For more holistic inventory estimation, this paper uses a hybrid approach to access the carbon footprint of Xiamen City in 2009. Besides carbon emissions from the end-use sector activities (called Scope 1+2 by WRI/WBCSD) in normal research, carbon emissions from the cross-boundary traffic and the embodied energy of key urban imported materials (namely Scope 3) were also included. The results are as follow: (1) Carbon emissions within Scope 1+2 only take up 66.14% of total carbon footprint, while emissions within Scope 3 which have usually been ignored account for 33.84%. (2) Industry is the most carbon-intensive end use sector which contributes 32.74% of the total carbon footprint and 55.13% of energy use emissions in Scope 1+2. (3) The per capita carbon footprint of Xiamen is just about one-third of that in Denver. (4) Comparing with Denver, the proportion of embodied emissions in Xiamen was 10.60% higher than Denver. Overall, Xiamen is relatively a low-carbon city with characters of industrial carbon-intensive and high embodied emissions. Further analysis indicates that the urbanization and industrialization in Xiamen might cause more material consumption and industrial emissions. These highlight the importance of management for Scope 3 emissions in the developing cities. - Highlights: • Carbon emissions from Scope 1+2+3 are calculated for Xiamen City, China. • Carbon footprint in Xiamen is industrial carbon-intensive and high embodied emissions. • Management for Scope 3 emissions in the developing cities is important

  9. Interaction of amidated single-walled carbon nanotubes with protein by multiple spectroscopic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lili [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); The Nursing College of Pingdingshan University, Pingdingshan 467000 (China); Lin, Rui [Yancheng Health Vocational and Technical College, Yancheng 224005 (China); He, Hua, E-mail: dochehua@163.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Key Laboratory of Drug Quality Control and Pharmacovigilance, Ministry of Education, China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Sun, Meiling, E-mail: sml-nir@sohu.com [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China); Jiang, Li; Gao, Mengmeng [China Pharmaceutical University, Nanjing 210009 (China)

    2014-01-15

    The aim of this work was to investigate the detailed interaction between BSA and amidated single walled carbon nanotubes (e-SWNTs) in vitro. Ethylenediamine (EDA) was successfully linked on the surface of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) via acylation to improve their dispersion and to introduce active groups. Bovine serum albumin (BSA) was selected as the template protein to inspect the interaction of e-SWNTs with protein. Decreases in fluorescence intensity of BSA induced by e-SWNTs demonstrated the occurrence of interaction between BSA and e-SWNTs. Quenching parameters and different absorption spectra for e-SWNTs–BSA show that the quenching effect of e-SWNTs was static quenching. Hydrophobic force had a leading contribution to the binding roles of BSA on e-SWNTs, which was confirmed by positive enthalpy change and entropy change. The interference of Na{sup +} with the quenching effect of e-SWNTs authenticated that electrostatic force existed in the interactive process simultaneously. The hydrophobicity of amino acid residues markedly increased with the addition of e-SWNTs viewed from UV spectra of BSA. The content of α-helix structure in BSA decreased by 6.8% due to the addition of e-SWNTs, indicating that e-SWNTs have an effect on the secondary conformation of BSA. -- Highlights: • The interaction between e-SWNTs and BSA was investigated by multiple spectroscopic methods. • Quenching mechanism was static quenching. • Changes in structure of BSA were inspected by synchronous fluorescence, UV–vis and CD spectrum.

  10. Several Methods to Increase Production from Carbonate Reservoirs, Developed by means of Horizontal Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.Kh. Akhmadullin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Market conditions during the economic crisis require the provision of high efficiency of capital investments at all stages of production in two main areas: increasing the flow rate of new wells, recovering production from highly-drained and inactive stock of wells, and reducing drilling and well site construction costs. The task is solved by improving the existing development systems, broadly implementing the already proven methods of increasing oil recovery, including the use of horizontal technology that provides more complete production of inter-well space and massive geological and technical measures to restore production from inactive and highly watered wells. Among the latter, there is little costly technology to restore oil production in open wells with a horizontal end, which operate carbonate reservoirs of the Lower and Middle Carboniferous deposits in the Republic of Tatarstan. The essence of the technology is to lower the suspension of the pump directly to the horizontal part of the well, if possible, to the lowest hypsometric mark of its trajectory in the oil-saturated part of the operational object. At the same time, the oil production rate increases, the watering of the well production decreases, its service life is extended, the design levels of production are maintained, the most complete production of oil reserves is achieved and the ultimate oil recovery factor is increased. Taking into account the positive results of the application of the technology, it is proposed to extend it to all fields of Tatarstan, where the carbonate reservoirs with wells with horizontal end are operated.

  11. Carbon Dioxide Sequestration Site Characterization and Time-lapse Monitoring Using Reflection Seismic Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshuhail, Abdullah A.

    2011-12-01

    Of the various disciplines involved in carbon capture and storage, seismic methods are critically important. In this dissertation, two case studies in west-central Alberta were investigated by employing reflection seismic methods, rock physics and numerical modelling. In the first case study, regional and local seismic site characterization was undertaken as part of the Wabamun Area CO2 Sequestration Project. The results show that P-wave reflection seismology can be an effective tool in regional and local mapping of the continuity of the carbonate Nisku aquifer as well as in delineating geologic discontinuities, such as karsting, that may compromise storage integrity. Furthermore, the information provided by the seismic data was valuable when integrated with petrophysical data in order to reduce the ambiguity in identifying CO 2 injection "sweet spots". Results from the fluid substitution and numerical forward seismic modelling suggest that CO2 anomalies in stiff carbonate aquifers like the Nisku Formation are small and so is the change in seismic response. For instance, the maximum change in reflection time and NRMS amplitude in time-lapse P-wave reflection surface seismic data was found to be ˜ 1.5 ms and ˜ 24%, respectively. Detection of these small changes depends on a number of factors, including data repeatability, frequency bandwidth and CO2 saturation scheme. The change in the S-wave properties is much smaller than in the acoustic properties suggesting that it is unlikely that PS-wave would be successful in identifying CO 2 anomaly. The second case study pertains to 4-D seismic monitoring at the Pembina-Cardium CO2 Pilot Project site where multi-component surface seismic and walk-away vertical seismic profile methods were implemented as part of the monitoring program. The quality of these data, in particular, was compromised by interference caused by infrastructure development which resulted in the loss of ˜ 20% of the seismic shot locations. The 4-D

  12. Impact of synthesis methods on the transport of single walled carbon nanotubes in the aquatic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Indranil; Duch, Mathew C; Gits, Colton C; Hersam, Mark C; Walker, Sharon L

    2012-11-06

    In this study, a systematic approach has been followed to investigate the fate and transport of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) from synthesis to environmentally relevant conditions. Three widely used SWCNT synthesis methods have been investigated in this study including high pressure carbon monoxide (HiPco), SWeNT CoMoCat, and electric arc discharge technique (EA). This study relates the transport of three SWCNTs (HiPco-D, SG65-D, and P2-D) with different synthesis methods and residual catalyst content revealing their influence on the subsequent fate of the nanotubes. To minimize nanotube bundling and aggregation, the SWCNTs were dispersed using the biocompatible triblock copolymer Pluronic, which allowed the comparison in the transport trends among these SWCNTs. After purification, the residual metal catalyst between the SWCNTs follows the trend: HiPco-D > SG65-D > P2-D. The electrophoretic mobility (EPM) and hydrodynamic diameter of SWCNTs remained insensitive to SWCNT type, pH, and presence of natural organic matter (NOM); but were affected by ionic strength (IS) and ion valence (K(+), Ca(2+)). In monovalent ions, the hydrodynamic diameter of SWCNTs was not influenced by IS, whereas larger aggregation was observed for HiPco-D with IS than P2-D and SG65-D in the presence of Ca(2+). Transport of HiPco-D in the porous media was significantly higher than SG65-D followed by P2-D. Release of HiPco-D from porous media was higher than SG65-D followed by P2-D, though negligible amount of all types of SWCNTs (transport and release patterns follow a similar trend to what was observed for residual metal catalysts in SWCNTs. Addition of NOM increased the transport of all SWCNTs primarily due to electrosteric repulsion. HiPco-D was notably more acidic than SG65-D followed by P2-D, which is similar to the transport trend. Overall, it was observed that the synthesis methods resulted in distinctive breakthrough trends, which were correlated to metal content. These

  13. Carbon dioxide nucleation as a novel cleaning method for ultrafiltration membranes

    KAUST Repository

    Al Ghamdi, Mohanned

    2016-12-08

    The use of low-pressure membranes, mainly ultrafiltration (UF), has emerged in the last decade and began to show acceptance as a novel pretreatment process for seawater reverse osmosis (SWRO) desalination. This is mainly due to the superior water quality provided by these membranes, in addition to reduction in chemicals consumption compared to conventional methods. However, membrane fouling remains the main drawback of this technology. Therefore, frequent cleaning of these membranes is required to maintain water flux and its quality. Usually, after a series of backwash using UF permeate chemical cleaning is required under some conditions to fully recover the operating flux. Frequent chemical cleaning will probably decrease the life time of the membrane, increase costs, and will have some effects on the environment. The new cleaning method proposed in this study consists of using a solution saturated with carbon dioxide (CO2) to clean UF membranes. Under the drop in pressure, this solution will become in a supersaturated state and bubbles will start to nucleate on the surface of the membrane and its pores from this solution resulting in the removal of the fouling material deposited on the membrane. Different compositions of fouling solutions including the use of organic compounds such as sodium alginate and colloidal 5 silica with different concentrations were studied using synthetic seawater with different concentrations. This cleaning method was then compared to the backwash using Milli-Q water and showed an improved performance compared to it. An operational modification to this cleaning technique was then investigated which includs a series of sudden pressure drop during the backwash process. This enhanced technique showed an even better performance in cleaning the membrane, especially at severe fouling conditions. In most cases, the membrane permeability was fully recovered even at harsh conditions where conventional backwash failed to maintain a stable

  14. Preparation of carbon 11-labelled radiopharmaceuticals by the use of HPLC method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berget, G.; Maziere, M.; Godot, J.M.; Sastre, J.; Prenant, C.; Comar, D.

    1982-06-01

    Various medical examinations and metabolic studies are carried out with carbon 11-labelled radiopharmaceuticals. This radioelement offers a number of advantages: it can be introduced into an organic molecule without changing its properties; the radiation dose delivered to the patient is low (T = 20 mn); since the specific activity obtained is high (0.5 to 2 Ci/μ mole) the injected masses are very small; finally, tomographic images of the distribution of the product in the body may be obtained by the use of positron cameras. However in view of the radioactivities handled on a routine basis the preparations must be carried out without manual intervention, in closed shielded hoods. Synthesis methods and special equipment have been developed. In all cases the reaction mixtures are purified by HPLC, a method chosen for its speed, efficiency, ease of automation and adaptation to any product with a suitable choice of column and eluant. The radiopharmaceuticals are obtained in injectable solution (ethanol-physiological serum, buffered physiological serum) or in a mixture of volatile solvents which are evaporated by nitrogen bubbling and finally sterilised by passage over millipore filter. About ten different radiopharmaceuticals are prepared in this way in the laboratory [fr

  15. Vibrational optical activity of chiral carbon nanoclusters treated by a generalized π-electron method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Péter R.; Surján, Péter R.; Szabados, Ágnes

    2014-01-01

    Cross sections of inelastic light scattering accompanied by vibronic excitation in large conjugated carbon structures is assessed at the π-electron level. Intensities of Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra of fullerenes are computed, relying on a single electron per atom. When considering only first neighbor terms in the Hamiltonian (a tight-binding (TB) type or Hückel-model), Raman intensities are captured remarkably well, based on comparison with frequency-dependent linear response of the self-consistent field (SCF) method. Resorting to π-electron levels when computing spectral intensities brings a beneficial reduction in computational cost as compared to linear response SCF. At difference with total intensities, the first neighbor TB model is found inadequate for giving the left and right circularly polarized components of the scattered light, especially when the molecular surface is highly curved. To step beyond first neighbor approximation, an effective π-electron Hamiltonian, including interaction of all sites is derived from the all-electron Fockian, in the spirit of the Bloch-equation. Chiroptical cross-sections computed by this novel π-electron method improve upon first-neighbor TB considerably, with no increase in computational cost. Computed VROA spectra of chiral fullerenes, such as C76 and C28, are reported for the first time, both by conventional linear response SCF and effective π-electron models.

  16. A new method for surface modifications of carbon steels and alloys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeriy Dondokovich Dugar-Zhabon

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional treatment method involving implantation of ions into solids immersed in a high voltage pulse discharge ignited on the left-hand-branch of the Paschen curve was elaborated about fifteen years ago. This method, named 3DII for short, has been used in the equipment JUPITER (Joint Universal Plasma and Ion Technologies Experimental Reactor for practical purposes. Hereafter, the need for better means to improve the metal surface protection against aggressive media prompted an elaboration of the MOSMET concept which is based on a hybrid treatment involving the processes of implantation and deposition. It is significant that the processes can be set into action simultaneously or separately. In this article, the conditions of hybrid treatment of AISI SAE 1010, 1020 y 1045 carbon steels, their subsequent electrochemical diagnostics and corrosion test results are described. The corrosion rate of the samples treated by titanium hybrid discharge is found approximately an order of magnitude smaller as compared to the non-treated samples.

  17. Multiwall Carbon Nanotubes Modified Carbon Paste Electrode for Determination of Copper(II by Potentiometric and Impedimetric Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mazloum-Ardakani

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available A chemically modified carbon paste electrode with multiwall carbon nanotube (MWCNT was prepared and used as a sensor for Cu2+  ion. The unique chemical and physical properties of CNT have paved the way  to  new  and  improved  sensing  devices.  A  central  composite chemometrics  design  was  applied  for  multivariate  optimization  of the  effects  of  three  significant  parameters  (Graphite  powder  (X1, MWCNT  (X2  and  Ionophre  (X3  influencing  the  response  of  the electrode.  In  the  optimized  conditions,  the  electrode  exhibits  a Nernstian  slope  of  30.1  mV/decade  in  a  linear  range  between 1.0×10-6   to1.0×10-1  M over a wide pH range (2.0-6.5. Importantly, the  effect  of  the  MWCNT  on  the  performance  of  electrode  was investigated  by  impedance  technique,  that  showed  the  MWCNT helps the transduction of the signal in carbon paste electrode and the charged  transfer  resistance  (Rct  was  reduced.  The  impedimetric results indicated that the linear concentrations range was 1.0×10−7  to 1.0×10−1  M  and  in  comparison  with  potentiometry,  the  pH  range increased to 2.0−7.5.

  18. A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration, and greenhouse-gas fluxes in ecosystems of the United States under present conditions and future scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergamaschi, Brian A.; Bernknopf, Richard; Clow, David; Dye, Dennis; Faulkner, Stephen; Forney, William; Gleason, Robert; Hawbaker, Todd; Liu, Jinxun; Liu, Shu-Guang; Prisley, Stephen; Reed, Bradley; Reeves, Matthew; Rollins, Matthew; Sleeter, Benjamin; Sohl, Terry; Stackpoole, Sarah; Stehman, Stephen; Striegl, Robert G.; Wein, Anne; Zhu, Zhi-Liang; Zhu, Zhi-Liang

    2010-01-01

    he Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA), Section 712, mandates the U.S. Department of the Interior to develop a methodology and conduct an assessment of the Nation’s ecosystems, focusing on carbon stocks, carbon sequestration, and emissions of three greenhouse gases (GHGs): carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide. The major requirements include (1) an assessment of all ecosystems (terrestrial systems, such as forests, croplands, wetlands, grasslands/shrublands; and aquatic ecosystems, such as rivers, lakes, and estuaries); (2) an estimate of the annual potential capacities of ecosystems to increase carbon sequestration and reduce net GHG emissions in the context of mitigation strategies (including management and restoration activities); and (3) an evaluation of the effects of controlling processes, such as climate change, land-use and land-cover change, and disturbances such as wildfires.The concepts of ecosystems, carbon pools, and GHG fluxes follow conventional definitions in use by major national and international assessment or inventory efforts. In order to estimate current ecosystem carbon stocks and GHG fluxes and to understand the potential capacity and effects of mitigation strategies, the method will use two time periods for the assessment: 2001 through 2010, which establishes a current ecosystem carbon and GHG baseline and will be used to validate the models; and 2011 through 2050, which will be used to assess potential capacities based on a set of scenarios. The scenario framework will be constructed using storylines of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Special Report on Emission Scenarios (SRES), along with both reference and enhanced land-use and land-cover (LULC) and land-management parameters. Additional LULC and land-management mitigation scenarios will be constructed for each storyline to increase carbon sequestration and reduce GHG fluxes in ecosystems. Input from regional experts and stakeholders will be

  19. Impact of carbonate on the efficiency of heavy metal removal from kaolinite soil by the electrokinetic soil remediation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ouhadi, V.R.; Yong, R.N.; Shariatmadari, N.; Saeidijam, S.; Goodarzi, A.R.; Safari-Zanjani, M.

    2010-01-01

    While the feasibility of using electrokinetics to decontaminate soils has been studied by several authors, the effects of soil composition on the efficiency of this method of decontamination has yet to be fully studied. This study focuses its attention on the effect of 'calcite or carbonate' (CaCO 3 ) on removal efficiency in electrokinetic soil remediation. Bench scale experiments were conducted on two soils: kaolinite and natural-soil of a landfill in Hamedan, Iran. Prescribed quantities of carbonates were mixed with these soils which were subsequently contaminated with zinc nitrate. After that, electrokinetic experiments were conducted to determine the efficiency of electrokinetic remediation. The results showed that an increase in the quantity of carbonate caused a noticeable increase on the contaminant retention of soil and on the resistance of soil to the contaminant removal by electrokinetic method. Because the presence of carbonates in the soil increases its buffering capacity, acidification is reduced, resulting in a decrease in the rate of heavy metal removed from the contaminant soil. This conclusion was validated by the evaluation of efficiency of electrokinetic method on a soil sample from the liner of a waste disposal site, with 28% carbonates.

  20. Estimating particulate black carbon concentrations using two offline light absorption methods applied to four types of filter media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davy, Pamela M.; Tremper, Anja H.; Nicolosi, Eleonora M. G.; Quincey, Paul; Fuller, Gary W.

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric particulate black carbon has been linked to adverse health outcomes. Additional black carbon measurements would aid a better understanding of population exposure in epidemiological studies as well as the success, or otherwise, of relevant abatement technologies and policies. Two light absorption measurement methods of particles collected on filters have been applied to four different types of filters to provide estimations of particulate black carbon concentrations. The ratio of transmittance (lnI0/I) to reflectance (lnR0/R) varied by filter type and ranged from close to 0.5 (as expected from simple theory) to 1.35 between the four filter types tested. The relationship between light absorption and black carbon, measured by the thermal EC(TOT) method, was nonlinear and differed between filter type and measurement method. This is particularly relevant to epidemiological studies that use light absorption as an exposure metric. An extensive archive of filters was used to derive loading factors and mass extinction coefficients for each filter type. Particulate black carbon time series were then calculated at locations where such measurements were not previously available. When applied to two roads in London, black carbon concentrations were found to have increased between 2011 and 2013, by 0.3 (CI: -0.1, 0.5) and 0.4 (CI: 0.1, 0.9) μg m-3 year-1, in contrast to the expectation from exhaust abatement policies. New opportunities using archived or bespoke filter collections for studies on the health effects of black carbon and the efficacy of abatement strategies are created.

  1. An XRF method for the determination of gold and silver in carbon samples from CIP plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baumgartner, F.C.; Jackson, B.E.; Van Zyl, C.

    1985-01-01

    The improvement in the recovery of gold, utilizing the carbon-in-pulp (CIP) and carbon-in-leach (CIL) processes, are major developments which have taken place in the South African gold Mining industry in recent years. In addition to gold, many other elements are either adsorbed onto or physically trapped by the carbon granules during the CIP and CIL processes. X-ray fluorescence, a technique which offers the possibility of a minimum of sample preparation, is used to determine gold and silver in carbon samples from CIP plants

  2. Understanding of carbon-based supercapacitors ageing mechanisms by electrochemical and analytical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yinghui; Soucaze-Guillous, Benoît; Taberna, Pierre-Louis; Simon, Patrice

    2017-10-01

    In order to shed light on ageing mechanisms of Electrochemical Double Layer Capacitor (EDLC), two kinds of activated carbons are studied in tetraethyl ammonium tetrafluoroborate (Et4NBF4) in acetonitrile. In floating mode, it turns out that two different ageing mechanisms are observed, depending on the activated carbon electrode materials used. On one hand, carbon A exhibits a continuous capacitance and series resistance fall-off; on the other hand, for carbon B, only the series resistance degrades after ageing while the capacitance keeps unchanged. Additional electrochemical characterizations (Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy - EIS - and diffusion coefficient calculations) were carried out showing that carbon A's ageing behavior is suspected to be primarily related to the carbon degradation while for carbon B a passivation occurs leading to the formation of a Solid Electrolyte Interphase-Like (SEI-L) film. These hypotheses are supported by TG-IR and Raman spectroscopy analysis. The outcome forms the latter is an increase of carbon defects on carbon A on positive electrode.

  3. Adaptation, validation and application of the chemo-thermal oxidation method to quantify black carbon in soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Tripti; Bucheli, Thomas D.

    2011-01-01

    The chemo-thermal oxidation method at 375 o C (CTO-375) has been widely used to quantify black carbon (BC) in sediments. In the present study, CTO-375 was tested and adapted for application to soil, accounting for some matrix specific properties like high organic carbon (≤39%) and carbonate (≤37%) content. Average recoveries of standard reference material SRM-2975 ranged from 25 to 86% for nine representative Swiss and Indian samples, which is similar to literature data for sediments. The adapted method was applied to selected samples of the Swiss soil monitoring network (NABO). BC content exhibited different patterns in three soil profiles while contribution of BC to TOC was found maximum below the topsoil at all three sites, however at different depths (60-130 cm). Six different NABO sites exhibited largely constant BC concentrations over the last 25 years, with short-term (6 months) prevailing over long-term (5 years) temporal fluctuations. - Research highlights: → The CTO-375 method was adapted and validated for BC analysis in soils. → Method validation figures of merit proofed satisfactory. → Application is shown with soil cores and topsoil temporal variability. → BC content can be elevated in subsurface soils. → BC contents in surface soils were largely constant over the last 25 years. - Although widely used also for soils, the chemo-thermal oxidation method at 375 o C to quantify black carbon has never been properly validated for this matrix before.

  4. Environmentally Friendly Method: Development and Application to Carbon Aerogel as Sorbent for Solid-Phase Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Sheying; Huang, Guiqi; Su, Meiling; Huang, Tinglin

    2015-10-14

    We developed two simple, fast, and environmentally friendly methods using carbon aerogel (CA) and magnetic CA (mCA) materials as sorbents for micro-solid-phase extraction (μ-SPE) and magnetic solid-phase extraction (MSPE) techniques. The material performances such as adsorption isotherm, adsorption kinetics, and specific surface area were discussed by N2 adsorption-desorption isotherm measurements, ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) spectrophotometry, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM). The experimental results proved that the heterogeneities of CA and mCA were well modeled with the Freundlich isotherm model, and the sorption process well followed the pseudo-second-order rate equation. Moreover, plant growth regulators (PGRs) such as kinetin (6-KT), 6-benzylaminopurine (6-BA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), and uniconazole (UN) in a reservoir raw water sample were selected as the evaluation of applicability for the proposed μ-SPE and MSPE techniques using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The experimental conditions of two methods such as the amount of sorbent, extraction time, pH, salt concentration, and desorption conditions were studied. Under the optimized conditions, two extraction methods provided high recoveries (89-103%), low the limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.2 μg L(-1)), and satisfactory analytical features in terms of precision (relative standard deviation, RSD, 1.7-5.1%, n=3). This work demonstrates the feasibility and the potential of CA and mCA materials as sorbents for μ-SPE and MSPE techniques. Besides, it also could serve as a basis for future development of other functional CAs in pretreatment technology and make them valuable for analysis of pollutants in environmental applications.

  5. Infiltrated carbon foam composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Rick D. (Inventor); Danford, Harry E. (Inventor); Plucinski, Janusz W. (Inventor); Merriman, Douglas J. (Inventor); Blacker, Jesse M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An infiltrated carbon foam composite and method for making the composite is described. The infiltrated carbon foam composite may include a carbonized carbon aerogel in cells of a carbon foam body and a resin is infiltrated into the carbon foam body filling the cells of the carbon foam body and spaces around the carbonized carbon aerogel. The infiltrated carbon foam composites may be useful for mid-density ablative thermal protection systems.

  6. Mass absorption efficiency of elemental carbon and water-soluble organic carbon in Beijing, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Y.; He, K.-B.; Zheng, M.; Duan, F.-K.; Du, Z.-Y.; Ma, Y.-L.; Tan, J.-H.; Yang, F.-M.; Liu, J.-M.; Zhang, X.-L.; Weber, R. J.; Bergin, M. H.; Russell, A. G.

    2011-11-01

    The mass absorption efficiency (MAE) of elemental carbon (EC) in Beijing was quantified using a thermal-optical carbon analyzer. The MAE measured at 632 nm was 8.45±1.71 and 9.41±1.92 m2 g-1 during winter and summer respectively. The daily variation of MAE was found to coincide with the abundance of organic carbon (OC), especially the OC to EC ratio, perhaps due to the enhancement by coating with organic aerosol (especially secondary organic aerosol, SOA) or the artifacts resulting from the redistribution of liquid-like organic particles during the filter-based absorption measurements. Using a converting approach that accounts for the discrepancy caused by measurements methods of both light absorption and EC concentration, previously published MAE values were converted to the equivalent-MAE, which is the estimated value if using the same measurement methods as used in this study. The equivalent-MAE was found to be much lower in the regions heavily impacted by biomass burning (e.g., below 2.7 m2 g-1 for two Indian cities). Results from source samples (including diesel exhaust samples and biomass smoke samples) also demonstrated that emissions from biomass burning would decrease the MAE of EC. Moreover, optical properties of water-soluble organic carbon (WSOC) in Beijing were presented. Light absorption by WSOC exhibited strong wavelength (λ) dependence such that absorption varied approximately as λ-7, which was characteristic of the brown carbon spectra. The MAE of WSOC (measured at 365 nm) was 1.79±0.24 and 0.71±0.20 m2 g-1 during winter and summer respectively. The large discrepancy between the MAE of WSOC during winter and summer was attributed to the difference in the precursors of SOA such that anthropogenic volatile organic compounds (AVOCs) should be more important as the precursors of SOA in winter. The MAE of WSOC in Beijing was much higher than results from the southeastern United States which were obtained using the same method as used in this study

  7. Advanced fire-resistant forms of activated carbon and methods of adsorbing and separating gases using same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Yongliang; Wang, Yifeng

    2015-02-03

    Advanced, fire-resistant activated carbon compositions useful in adsorbing gases; and having vastly improved fire resistance are provided, and methods for synthesizing the compositions are also provided. The advanced compositions have high gas adsorption capacities and rapid adsorption kinetics (comparable to commercially-available activated carbon), without having any intrinsic fire hazard. They also have superior performance to Mordenites in both adsorption capacities and kinetics. In addition, the advanced compositions do not pose the fibrous inhalation hazard that exists with use of Mordenites. The fire-resistant compositions combine activated carbon mixed with one or more hydrated and/or carbonate-containing minerals that release H.sub.2O and/or CO.sub.2 when heated. This effect raises the spontaneous ignition temperature to over 500.degree. C. in most examples, and over 800.degree. C. in some examples. Also provided are methods for removing and/or separating target gases, such as Krypton or Argon, from a gas stream by using such advanced activated carbons.

  8. Constraints on primary and secondary particulate carbon sources using chemical tracer and 14C methods during CalNex-Bakersfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheesley, Rebecca J.; Nallathamby, Punith Dev; Surratt, Jason D.; Lee, Anita; Lewandowski, Michael; Offenberg, John H.; Jaoui, Mohammed; Kleindienst, Tadeusz E.

    2017-10-01

    The present study investigates primary and secondary sources of organic carbon for Bakersfield, CA, USA as part of the 2010 CalNex study. The method used here involves integrated sampling that is designed to allow for detailed and specific chemical analysis of particulate matter (PM) in the Bakersfield airshed. To achieve this objective, filter samples were taken during thirty-four 23-hr periods between 19 May and 26 June 2010 and analyzed for organic tracers by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Contributions to organic carbon (OC) were determined by two organic tracer-based techniques: primary OC by chemical mass balance and secondary OC by a mass fraction method. Radiocarbon (14C) measurements of the total organic carbon were also made to determine the split between the modern and fossil carbon and thereby constrain unknown sources of OC not accounted for by either tracer-based attribution technique. From the analysis, OC contributions from four primary sources and four secondary sources were determined, which comprised three sources of modern carbon and five sources of fossil carbon. The major primary sources of OC were from vegetative detritus (9.8%), diesel (2.3%), gasoline (oil impacted motor vehicle exhaust (30%); measured secondary sources resulted from isoprene (1.5%), α-pinene (<1.0%), toluene (<1.0%), and naphthalene (<1.0%, as an upper limit) contributions. The average observed organic carbon (OC) was 6.42 ± 2.33 μgC m-3. The 14C derived apportionment indicated that modern and fossil components were nearly equivalent on average; however, the fossil contribution ranged from 32 to 66% over the five week campaign. With the fossil primary and secondary sources aggregated, only 25% of the fossil organic carbon could not be attributed. Whereas, nearly 80% of the modern carbon could not be attributed to primary and secondary sources accessible to this analysis, which included tracers of biomass burning, vegetative detritus and secondary

  9. Wet scavenging of organic and elemental carbon during summer monsoon and winter monsoon seasons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonwani, S.; Kulshrestha, U. C.

    2017-12-01

    In the era of rapid industrialization and urbanization, atmospheric abundance of carbonaceous aerosols is increasing due to more and more fossil fuel consumption. Increasing levels of carbonaceous content have significant adverse effects on air quality, human health and climate. The present study was carried out at Delhi covering summer monsoon (July -Sept) and winter monsoon (Dec-Jan) seasons as wind and other meteorological factors affect chemical composition of precipitation in different manner. During the study, the rainwater and PM10 aerosols were collected in order to understand the scavenging process of elemental and organic carbon. The Rain water samples were collected on event basis. PM10 samples were collected before rain (PR), during rain (DR) and after rain (AR) during 2016-2017. The collected samples were analysed by the thermal-optical reflectance method using IMPROVE-A protocol. In PM10, the levels of organic carbon (OC) and its fractions (OC1, OC2, OC3 and OC4) were found significantly lower in the AR samples as compared to PR and DR samples. A significant positive correlation was noticed between scavenging ratios of organic carbon and rain intensity indicating an efficient wet removal of OC. In contrast to OCs, the levels of elemental carbon and its fractions (EC1, EC2, and EC3) in AR were not distinct during PR and DR. The elemental carbon showed very week correlation with rain intensity in Delhi region which could be explained on the basis of hydrophobic nature of freshly emitted carbon soot. The detailed results will be discussed during the conference.

  10. Constraints on primary and secondary particulate carbon sources using chemical tracer and 14C methods during CalNex-Bakersfield

    Science.gov (United States)

    The present study investigates primary and secondary sources of organic carbon for Bakersfield, CA, USA as part of the 2010 CalNex study. The method used here involves integrated sampling that is designed to allow for detailed and specific chemical analysis of particulate matter ...

  11. Comparing methods for partitioning a decade of carbon dioxide and water vapor fluxes in a temperate forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin N. Sulman; Daniel Tyler Roman; Todd M. Scanlon; Lixin Wang; Kimberly A. Novick

    2016-01-01

    The eddy covariance (EC) method is routinely used to measure net ecosystem fluxes of carbon dioxide (CO2) and evapotranspiration (ET) in terrestrial ecosystems. It is often desirable to partition CO2 flux into gross primary production (GPP) and ecosystem respiration (RE), and to partition ET into evaporation and...

  12. Texture investigations of low carbon cold rolled steel using the X-ray and neutron diffraction methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordanova, I.; Vratislav, S.; Dlouha, M.; Kostova, M.

    1987-01-01

    The texture in low carbon cold rolled steel killed with aluminium is investigated using X-ray and neutron diffraction methods. The Roe's and Bunge's mathematical formalisms are used to describe the texture respectivelly. The results are discussed in terms of optimization of the technology

  13. A new approach combining analytical methods for workplace exposure assessment of inhalable multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, P.C.; Kuijpers, E.; Bekker, C.; Godderis, L.; Lan, Q.; Jedynska, A.D.; Vermeulen, R.; Pronk, A.

    2017-01-01

    To date there is no consensus about the most appropriate analytical method for measuring carbon nanotubes (CNTs), hampering the assessment and limiting the comparison of data. The goal of this study is to develop an approach for the assessment of the level and nature of inhalable multi-wall CNTs

  14. Determination of surface functional groups on mechanochemically activated carbon cloth by Boehm method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đukić Anđelka B.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve sorption properties of activated carbon cloth that can be used for wastewater purification, mechanochemical activation was performed in both inert and air atmosphere. Boehm method was used to follow the changes in the number and types of surface groups induced by mechanical milling. The number of the base groups of 0,2493 mmol/g is significantly smaller than the total amount of acidic functional groups, 2,5093 mmol/g. Among the acidic groups present on the surface, the most represented are phenolic groups (2.3846 mmol/g , ie . > 95 % , the carboxylic groups are present far less (0.1173 mmol /g, ie. 4.5 %, while the presence of the lactone group on the surface of ACC is negligible (0.0074 mmol/g ie. under 0.3 %. Mechanochemical activation lead to an increase in the number of acidic and basic groups on the surface of the ACC. The milling in inert atmosphere has dominant effect with respect to the changes in the total number of basic functional groups (compared to milling in an air atmosphere: the number of basic groups of the ACC was 0.8153 mmol/g milled under argon, 0.7933 mmol/g in the air; the number of acidic groups is 2.9807 mmol/g for a sample milled under argon and 3.5313 mmol/g for one milled in the air.

  15. Black carbon in airborne particulate matter by means of reflection method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin Yali; Zhang Haiqing; Zhang Guiying; Ni Bangfa; Wang Pingsheng; Nie Peng; Huang Donghui; Chen Zhe; Wu Weiming

    2011-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) is an important component in aerosol. At present, BC has exceeded CH 4 , and become the second most important factor influencing the global warming,next to CO 2 . In this work, the time series characteristics and influence factors of BC in aerosol in Fangshan District of Beijing were studied based on the BC concentrations in fine particle (PM2.5) air filter samples measured by reflection method using an Aethalometer and relevant meteorological data collected during the period of May 2007 to Oct.2009. PIXE was used to determine multielement in PM2.5 aerosol samples. The strong positive correlation between BC and S implies both are mainly from man-made pollution, while the very weak correlation between BC and dust-carrying Si indicates they are from different sources. The results from this work were compared with those of other cities and countries reported in literatures. Potential source directions of BC were also studied via the conditional probability function (CPF) and the Wind Rose software. (authors)

  16. Synthesis-condition dependence of carbon nanotube growth by alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhito Inami et al

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the dependence of growth yield of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs on heat-treatment time and catalyst film thickness by the alcohol catalytic chemical vapor deposition method. Three types of heat-treatment, synthesis of 30 min, synthesis of 30 min after annealing of 30 min, and synthesis of 60 min, were investigated. Thickness of Co catalyst film was varied from 1 to 10 nm. In the case of thinner Co film less than 3 nm, long synthesis time of 60 min is favorable for the effective SWNT growth, because of the small amount of Co catalyst. In the case of thicker Co film more than 3 nm, an amount of grown SWNTs by 30 min synthesis after 30 min annealing and by 60 min synthesis was much higher than that by 30 min synthesis without annealing, showing that total heat-treatment time of 60 min is important for the SWNT growth. Results suggest that the conversion from the thicker film of Co to nano-particle which acts as catalyst takes place during the first 30 min.

  17. Using the DDA (Discrete Dipole Approximation Method in Determining the Extinction Cross Section of Black Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Skorupski Krzysztof

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available BC (Black Carbon, which can be found in the atmosphere, is characterized by a large value of the imaginary part of the complex refractive index and, therefore, might have an impact on the global warming effect. To study the interaction of BC with light often computer simulations are used. One of the methods, which are capable of performing light scattering simulations by any shape, is DDA (Discrete Dipole Approximation. In this work its accuracy was estimated in respect to BC structures using the latest stable version of the ADDA (vr. 1.2 algorithm. As the reference algorithm the GMM (Generalized Multiparticle Mie-Solution code was used. The study shows that the number of volume elements (dipoles is the main parameter that defines the quality of results. However, they can be improved by a proper polarizability expression. The most accurate, and least time consuming, simulations were observed for IGT_SO. When an aggregate consists of particles composed of ca. 750 volume elements (dipoles, the averaged relative extinction error should not exceed ca. 4.5%.

  18. Molecular Simulations of Cyclic Loading Behavior of Carbon Nanotubes Using the Atomistic Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianfeng Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The potential applications of carbon nanotubes (CNT in many engineered bionanomaterials and electromechanical devices have imposed an urgent need on the understanding of the fatigue behavior and mechanism of CNT under cyclic loading conditions. To date, however, very little work has been done in this field. This paper presents the results of a theoretical study on the behavior of CNT subject to cyclic tensile and compressive loads using quasi-static molecular simulations. The Atomistic Finite Element Method (AFEM has been applied in the study. It is shown that CNT exhibited extreme cyclic loading resistance with yielding strain and strength becoming constant within limited number of loading cycles. Viscoelastic behavior including nonlinear elasticity, hysteresis, preconditioning (stress softening, and large strain have been observed. Chiral symmetry was found to have appreciable effects on the cyclic loading behavior of CNT. Mechanisms of the observed behavior have been revealed by close examination of the intrinsic geometric and mechanical features of tube structure. It was shown that the accumulated residual defect-free morphological deformation was the primary mechanism responsible for the cyclic failure of CNT, while the bond rotating and stretching experienced during loading/unloading played a dominant role on the strength, strain and modulus behavior of CNT.

  19. Recovery of alkali and alumina from Bayer red mud by the calcification-carbonation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-feng; Zhang, Ting-an; Wang, Yan-xiu; Lü, Guo-zhi; Zhang, Wei-guang

    2016-03-01

    Red mud produced in the Bayer process is a hazardous solid waste because of its high alkalinity; however, it is rich in valuable components such as titanium, iron, and aluminum. In this study, a novel calcification-carbonation method was developed to recover alkali and alumina from Bayer red mud under mild reaction conditions. Batch experiments were performed to evaluate the potential effects of important parameters such as temperature, amount of CaO added, and CO2 partial pressure on the recovery of alkali and alumina. The results showed that 95.2% alkali and 75.0% alumina were recovered from red mud with decreases in the mass ratios of Na2O to Fe2O3 and of Al2O3 to Fe2O3 from 0.42 and 0.89 to 0.02 and 0.22, respectively. The processed red mud with less than 0.5wt% Na2O can potentially be used as a construction material.

  20. A facile method of activating graphitic carbon nitride for enhanced photocatalytic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yongliang; Zhu, Shenmin; Chen, Zhixin; Lou, Xianghong; Zhang, Di

    2015-11-07

    Activated graphitic carbon nitride (g-C3N4) with enhanced photocatalytic capability under visible light irradiation was fabricated by using a facile chemical activation treatment method. In the chemical activation, a mixed solution of hydrogen peroxide and ammonia was employed. The yield can reach as high as 90% after the activation process. The activation process did not change the crystal structure, functional group, morphology and specific surface area of pristine g-C3N4, but it introduced H and O elements into the CN framework of g-C3N4, resulting in a broader optical absorption range, higher light absorption capability and more efficient separation of photogenerated electrons and holes. The photoactivity was investigated by the degradation of rhodamine B (RhB) under visible light irradiation. As compared to the pristine g-C3N4, the activated g-C3N4 exhibited a distinct and efficient two-step degradation process. It was found that the RhB dye in the activated g-C3N4 was mainly oxidized by the photogenerated holes. It is believed that sufficient holes account for the two-step degradation process because they would significantly improve the efficiency of the N-de-ethylation reaction of RhB.

  1. A novel method of fabricating carbon nanotubes-polydimethylsiloxane composite electrodes for electrocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Benyan; Chen, Yingmin; Luo, Zhangyuan; Zhang, Wenzan; Tu, Quan; Jin, Xun

    2015-01-01

    Polymer-based flexible electrodes are receiving much attention in medical applications due to their good wearing comfort. The current fabrication methods of such electrodes are not widely applied. In this study, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and conductive additives of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were employed to fabricate composite electrodes for electrocardiography (ECG). A three-step dispersion process consisting of ultrasonication, stirring, and in situ polymerization was developed to yield homogenous CNTs-PDMS mixtures. The CNTs-PDMS mixtures were used to fabricate CNTs-PDMS composite electrodes by replica technology. The influence of ultrasonication time and CNT concentration on polymer electrode performance was evaluated by impedance and ECG measurements. The signal amplitude of the electrodes prepared using an ultrasonication time of 12 h and CNT content of 5 wt% was comparable to that of commercial Ag/AgCl electrodes. The polymer electrodes were easily fabricated by conventional manufacturing techniques, indicating a potential advantage of reduced cost for mass production.

  2. Separation of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes for Flexible and Stretchable Electronics Using Polymer Removable Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Ting; Pochorovski, Igor; Bao, Zhenan

    2017-04-18

    Electronics that are soft, conformal, and stretchable are highly desirable for wearable electronics, prosthetics, and robotics. Among the various available electronic materials, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and their network have exhibited high mechanical flexibility and stretchability, along with comparable electrical performance to traditional rigid materials, e.g. polysilicon and metal oxides. Unfortunately, SWNTs produced en masse contain a mixture of semiconducting (s-) and metallic (m-) SWNTs, rendering them unsuitable for electronic applications. Moreover, the poor solubility of SWNTs requires the introduction of insulating surfactants to properly disperse them into individual tubes for device fabrication. Compared to other SWNT dispersion and separation methods, e.g., DNA wrapping, density gradient ultracentrifugation, and gel chromatography, polymer wrapping can selectively disperse s-SWNTs with high selectivity (>99.7%), high concentration (>0.1 mg/mL), and high yield (>20%). In addition, this method only requires simple sonication and centrifuge equipment with short processing time down to 1 h. Despite these advantages, the polymer wrapping method still faces two major issues: (i) The purified s-SWNTs usually retain a substantial amount of polymers on their surface even after thorough rinsing. The low conductivity of the residual polymers impedes the charge transport in SWNT networks. (ii) Conjugated polymers used for SWNT wrapping are expensive. Their prices ($100-1000/g) are comparable or even higher than those of SWNTs ($10-300/g). These utilized conjugated polymers represent a large portion of the overall separation cost. In this Account, we summarize recent progresses in polymer design for selective dispersion and separation of SWNTs. We focus particularly on removable and/or recyclable polymers that enable low-cost and scalable separation methods. First, different separation methods are compared to show the advantages of the polymer

  3. Static and free vibration analysis of carbon nano wires based on Timoshenko beam theory using differential quadrature method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maziar Janghorban

    Full Text Available Static and free vibration analysis of carbon nano wires with rectangular cross section based on Timoshenko beam theory is studied in this research. Differential quadrature method (DQM is employed to solve the governing equations. From the knowledge of author, it is the first time that free vibration of nano wires is investigated. It is also the first time that differential quadrature method is used for bending analysis of nano wires.

  4. Bootstrap Method for Detecting Damage in Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic Using a Macro Fiber Composite Sensor

    OpenAIRE

    DJANSENA, Alradix; 田中, 宏明; 工藤, 亮

    2015-01-01

    CFRP has been used in aircraft structures for decades. Although CFRP is light, its laminationis its main weakness. We have developed a new method to increase the probability of detectingdelamination in carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) by narrowing the confidence interval ofthe changes in natural frequency. The changes in the natural frequency in delaminated CFRPare tiny compared with measurement errors. We use the bootstrap method, a statisticaltechnique that increases the estimation ac...

  5. Microfluidic and micro-core methods for enhanced oil recovery and carbon storage applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Phong

    Injection of CO2 into the subsurface, for both storage and oil recovery, is an emerging strategy to mitigate atmospheric CO2 emissions and associated climate change. In this thesis microfluidic and micro-core methods were developed to inform combined CO2-storage and oil recovery operations and determine relevant fluid properties. Pore scale studies of nanoparticle stabilized CO2-in-water foam and its application in oil recovery to show significant improvement in oil recovery rate with different oils from around the world (light, medium, and heavy). The CO2 nanoparticle-stabilized CO2 foams generate a three-fold increase in oil recovery (an additional 15% of initial oil in place) as compared to an otherwise similar CO2 gas flood. Nanoparticle-stabilized CO2 foam flooding also results in significantly smaller oil-in-water emulsion sizes. All three oils show substantial additional oil recovery and a positive reservoir homogenization effect. A supporting microfluidic approach is developed to quantify the minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) -- a critical parameter for combined CO 2 storage and enhanced oil recovery. The method leverages the inherent fluorescence of crude oils, is faster than conventional technologies, and provides quantitative, operator-independent measurements. In terms of speed, a pressure scan for a single minimum miscibility pressure measurement required less than 30 min, in stark contrast to days or weeks with existing rising bubble and slimtube methods. In practice, subsurface geology also interacts with injected CO 2. Commonly carbonate dissolution results in pore structure, porosity, and permeability changes. These changes are measured by x-ray microtomography (micro-CT), liquid permeability measurements, and chemical analysis. Chemical composition of the produced liquid analyzed by inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) shows concentrations of magnesium and calcium. This work leverages established advantages of

  6. A simple and sensitive method for the determination of 4-n-octylphenol based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Qiaoli; Yang, Ping; Xu, He; Liu, Jianshe; Jin, Litong

    2012-01-01

    A simple and sensitive electroanalytical method was presented for the determination of 4-n-octylphenol (OP) based on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE). OP was directly oxidized on the MWCNTs/GCE, and the electrochemical oxidation mechanism was demonstrated by a one-electron and one-proton process in the reaction. The oxidation peak current of OP was significantly enhanced by the use of MWCNTs/GCE compared with those of bare glassy carbon electrode, suggesting that the modified electrode can remarkably improve the performance for OP determination. Factors influencing the detection processes were optimized. Under these optimal conditions, a linear relationship between concentration of OP and current response was obtained in the range of 5 x 10(-8) to 1 x 10(-5) mol/L with a detection limit of 1.5 x 10(-8) mol/L and correlation coefficient 0.9986. The modified electrode showed good selectivity, sensitivity, reproducibility and high stability.

  7. Decomposing the Influencing Factors of Industrial Sector Carbon Dioxide Emissions in Inner Mongolia Based on the LMDI Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rina Wu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of the influencing factors of industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions is essential to reduce natural and anthropogenic greenhouse gas emissions. In this paper, we applied the Logarithmic Mean Divisia Index (LMDI decomposition method based on the extended Kaya identity to analyze the changes in industrial carbon dioxide emissions resulting from 39 industrial sectors in Inner Mongolia northeast of China over the period 2003–2012. The factors were divided into five types of effects i.e., industrial growth effect, industrial structure effect, energy effect, energy intensity effect, population effect and comparative analysis of differential influences of various factors on industrial sector. Our results clearly show that (1 Industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions have increased from 134.00 million ton in 2003 to 513.46 million ton in 2012, with an annual average growth rate of 16.097%. The industrial carbon dioxide emissions intensity has decreased from 0.99 million ton/billion yuan to 0.28 million ton/billion yuan. Also, the energy structure has been dominated by coal; (2 Production and supply of electric power, steam and hot water, coal mining and dressing, smelting and pressing of ferrous metals, petroleum processing, coking and nuclear fuel processing, and raw chemical materials and chemical products account for 89.74% of total increased industrial carbon dioxide emissions; (3 The industrial growth effect and population effect are found to be a critical driving force for increasing industrial sector carbon dioxide emissions over the research period. The energy intensity effect is the crucial drivers of the decrease of carbon dioxide emissions. However, the energy structure effect and industrial structure effect have considerably varied over the study years without displaying any clear trend.

  8. Carbon/Clay nanostructured composite obtained by hydrothermal method; Compositos nanoestruturados carbono/argila obtidos por metodo hidotermico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barin, G.B.; Bispo, T.S.; Gimenez, I.F.; Barreto, L.S., E-mail: gabriela.borin@gmail.co [Universidade Federal de Sergipe (UFS), Aracaju, SE (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencia e Engenharia de Materiais; Souza Filho, A.G. [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica

    2010-07-01

    The development of strategies for converting biomass into useful materials, more efficient energy carrier and / or hydrogen storage is shown a key issue for the present and future. Carbon nanostructure can be obtained by severe processing techniques such as arc discharge, chemical deposition and catalyzed pyrolysis of organic compounds. In this study we used hydrothermal methods for obtaining nanostructured composites of carbon / clay. To this end, we used coir dust and special clays. The samples were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and Raman. The presence of the D band at 1350 cm{sup -1} in the Raman spectrum shows the formation of amorphous carbon with particle size of about 8.85 nm. (author)

  9. Thermal, optical and dielectric properties of phase stabilized δ - Dy-Bi2O3 ionic conductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Swagata; Dutta, Abhigyan

    2017-03-01

    In this work, we have investigated the thermal, structural, optical and dielectric properties of Bi1-xDyxO1.5-δ (0.10≤x≤0.40) ionic conductors prepared by citrate auto-ignition method. The Thermo gravimetric-DTA analysis and X-Ray Diffraction pattern confirm the single δ-phase stabilization of doped system beyond 25 mol% doping concentration. XRD analysis also indicates that average crystallite size is maximum and micro strain is minimum for Bi0.75Dy0.25O1.5-δ composition. The optical band gap of the prepared compositions is obtained from the Ultraviolet- Visible spectroscopy that shows a red shift with the increase in Dy content. The presence of different structural bonds is confirmed from FT-IR spectroscopy analysis. Ionic transport property of the prepared compositions has been analyzed using Nyquist plot for dc conduction and Nernst-Einstein relation for ac conduction mechanism. This analysis indicates that the composition Bi0.75Dy0.25O1.5-δ shows highest conductivity. The dielectric properties of these ionic conductors have been analyzed using Havriliak-Negami (HN) formalism. The dielectric permittivity ε' (ω) of all the prepared compositions is found to be within the range 1.61-3.63(x102) in S.I. unit. Analysis of electric modulus data reveals that dielectric and modulus relaxation follows same mechanism. The time-temperature superposition principle has been verified from the scaling of modulus spectra.

  10. Spectral, mechanical, thermal, optical and solid state parameters, of metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-CO(II) tetrahydrate crystal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandran, Senthilkumar [Centre for Crystal Growth, Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); Jagan, R. [Department of Chemistry, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai 600036 (India); Paulraj, Rajesh, E-mail: rajeshp@ssn.edu.in [Centre for Crystal Growth, Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India); Ramasamy, P. [Centre for Crystal Growth, Department of Physics, SSN College of Engineering, Kalavakkam 603110 (India)

    2015-10-15

    Metal-organic bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystals have been grown by slow evaporation solution growth technique at room temperature. The crystal structure and the unit cell parameters were analyzed from the X-ray diffraction studies. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that the grown crystal belongs to triclinic system with the space group P-1. Functional groups in bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate were identified by Fourier transform infrared spectral analysis. The peak observed at 663 cm{sup −1} is assigned to the (Co–O) stretching vibrations. The optical transmission of the crystal was studied by UV–vis–NIR spectral analysis. The photoluminescence emission studies were carried out for the title compound in a wide wavelength range between 350 nm and 550 nm at 303 K. Mechanical strength was tested by Vickers microhardness test. The laser damage threshold value has been determined using Nd:YAG laser operating at 1064 nm. At various frequencies and temperatures the dielectric behavior of the material was investigated. Solid state parameters such as plasma energy, Penn gap, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability were evaluated. Photoconductivity measurements were carried out for the grown crystal in the presence of DC electric field at room temperature. Thermal stability and decomposition of the crystal were studied by TG–DTA. The weight loss of the title compound occurs in different steps. - Graphical abstract: Molecular structure of the bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate drawn at 40% ellipsoid probability level. - Highlights: • Bis(hydrogenmaleate)-Co(II) tetrahydrate single crystal is grown by slow evaporation method. • Structural and optical properties were discussed. • The title complex crystal is thermally stable up to 91 °C. • Plasma energy, Fermi energy and electronic polarizability are evaluated. • It exhibits positive photoconductivity.

  11. Importance of the carbon surface chemistry: methods of characterization; Importance de la chimie de surface des materiaux carbones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burg, Ph. [Universite Paul Verlaine, Lab. de Chimie et Applications, UFR Sciences, 57 - Metz (France); Vix-Guterl, C. [Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Institut de Chimie des Surfaces et Interfaces (ICSI) UPR CNRS 9069, 68 - Mulhouse (France)

    2006-03-15

    The diversity of the carbonaceous materials in terms of chemical composition and porous texture explains their large field of applications. The performances of such materials are often influenced by their surface chemistry that is not easy to investigate. Thus a large range of complementary analytical methods is necessary. (authors)

  12. Gold nanoparticle formation in diamond-like carbon using two different methods: Gold ion implantation and co-deposition of gold and carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, M. C.; Teixeira, F. S.; Araújo, W. W. R.; Sgubin, L. G.; Cattani, M.; Spirin, R. E.; Brown, I. G.

    2012-01-01

    We describe work in which gold nanoparticles were formed in diamond-like carbon (DLC), thereby generating a Au-DLC nanocomposite. A high-quality, hydrogen-free DLC thin film was formed by filtered vacuum arc plasma deposition, into which gold nanoparticles were introduced using two different methods. The first method was gold ion implantation into the DLC film at a number of decreasing ion energies, distributing the gold over a controllable depth range within the DLC. The second method was co-deposition of gold and carbon, using two separate vacuum arc plasma guns with suitably interleaved repetitive pulsing. Transmission electron microscope images show that the size of the gold nanoparticles obtained by ion implantation is 3-5 nm. For the Au-DLC composite obtained by co-deposition, there were two different nanoparticle sizes, most about 2 nm with some 6-7 nm. Raman spectroscopy indicates that the implanted sample contains a smaller fraction of sp 3 bonding for the DLC, demonstrating that some sp 3 bonds are destroyed by the gold implantation.

  13. Product and corporate carbon footprint using the compound method based on financial accounts. The case of Osorio wind farms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez, Sergio; Sosa, María; Rubio, Agustín

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • We applied novel organisation-product-based-life-cycle assessment to Osorio Wind Farms. • This study includes sources, phases and areas previously unreported for the wind power sector. • MC3 assess carbon footprint in a practical and comprehensive manner. • MC3 is suitable for its application in major international projects. - Abstract: The challenge of developing clean and renewable energy sources is becoming ever more urgent. Over the last decade, the concept of carbon footprint has been used to report direct and indirect greenhouse gas emissions and as a support for sustainable consumption decisions. However, the discrepancies in the approaches based on either the product or corporate carbon footprint can seriously hinder its successful implementation. The so-called compound method based on financial accounts is a tiered hybrid method which enables the calculation of both the product and corporate carbon footprint. This work aims to assess this method as a tool for carbon footprint through its implementation in a comprehensive life-cycle assessment of the Osorio Wind Farms in Brazil. The total cumulative life-cycle emissions are 362.455 t CO 2 eq, representing 18.33 gr CO 2 eq per kW h delivered to the Brazilian national power grid. The difference with regard to previous works derives from its broader scope and different assumptions. In this study the comparable value from wind turbine manufacture, transport and construction is 8.42 gr CO 2 eq per kW h, 56% lower than the mean figure reported by Arvesen and Hertwich (2012). This study includes sources, phases and areas previously unreported in the carbon footprint reviews for the wind power sector. We conclude that the compound method based on financial accounts is a practical method that allows the definition of a more comprehensive goal and scope. Its implementation at Osorio Wind Farms demonstrates the method’s suitability for application in major international projects and

  14. Three-Dimensional Mapping of Soil Organic Carbon by Combining Kriging Method with Profile Depth Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chong; Hu, Kelin; Li, Hong; Yun, Anping; Li, Baoguo

    2015-01-01

    Understanding spatial variation of soil organic carbon (SOC) in three-dimensional direction is helpful for land use management. Due to the effect of profile depths and soil texture on vertical distribution of SOC, the stationary assumption for SOC cannot be met in the vertical direction. Therefore the three-dimensional (3D) ordinary kriging technique cannot be directly used to map the distribution of SOC at a regional scale. The objectives of this study were to map the 3D distribution of SOC at a regional scale by combining kriging method with the profile depth function of SOC (KPDF), and to explore the effects of soil texture and land use type on vertical distribution of SOC in a fluvial plain. A total of 605 samples were collected from 121 soil profiles (0.0 to 1.0 m, 0.20 m increment) in Quzhou County, China and SOC contents were determined for each soil sample. The KPDF method was used to obtain the 3D map of SOC at the county scale. The results showed that the exponential equation well described the vertical distribution of mean values of the SOC contents. The coefficients of determination, root mean squared error and mean prediction error between the measured and the predicted SOC contents were 0.52, 1.82 and -0.24 g kg(-1) respectively, suggesting that the KPDF method could be used to produce a 3D map of SOC content. The surface SOC contents were high in the mid-west and south regions, and low values lay in the southeast corner. The SOC contents showed significant positive correlations between the five different depths and the correlations of SOC contents were larger in adjacent layers than in non-adjacent layers. Soil texture and land use type had significant effects on the spatial distribution of SOC. The influence of land use type was more important than that of soil texture in the surface soil, and soil texture played a more important role in influencing the SOC levels for 0.2-0.4 m layer.

  15. Estimating Soil Organic Carbon Using VIS/NIR Spectroscopy with SVMR and SPA Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoting Peng

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available With 298 heterogeneous soil samples from Yixing (Jiangsu Province, Zhongxiang and Honghu (Hubei Province, this study aimed to combine a successive projections algorithm (SPA with a support vector machine regression (SVMR model (SPA-SVMR model to improve the estimation accuracy of soil organic carbon (SOC contents using the laboratory-based visible and near-infrared (VIS/NIR, 350−2500 nm spectroscopy of soils. The effects of eight spectra pre-processing methods, i.e., Log (1/R, Log (1/R coupled with Savitzky-Golay (SG smoothing (Log (1/R + SG, first derivative with SG smoothing (FD, second derivative with SG smoothing (SD, SG, standard normal variate (SNV, mean center (MC and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC, on SPA-based informative wavelength selection were explored. The SVMR model (i.e., SVMR without SPA and SPA-PLSR model (i.e., SPA combined with partial least squares regression (PLSR were developed and compared with the SPA-SVMR model in order to evaluate the performance of SPA-SVMR. The results indicated that the variables selected by SPA and their distributions were strongly affected by different pre-processing methods, and SG was the optimal pre-processing method for SPA-SVMR model development; the SPA-SVMR model using SG pre-processing and 28 SPA-selected wavelengths obtained a better result (R2V = 0.73, RMSEV = 2.78 g∙kg−1 and RPDV = 1.89 and outperformed the SVMR model (R2V = 0.72, RMSEV = 2.83 g∙kg−1 and RPDV = 1.86 and the SPA-PLSR model (R2V = 0.62, RMSEV = 3.23 g∙kg−1 and RPDV = 1.63. Most of the spectral bands used by the SPA-SVMR model over the near-infrared region were important wavelengths for SOC content estimation. This study demonstrated that the combination of SPA and SVMR is feasible and reliable for estimating SOC content from the VIS/NIR spectra of soils in regions with multiple soil and land-use types.

  16. Filamentous carbon particles for cleaning oil spills and method of production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muradov, Nazim

    2010-04-06

    A compact hydrogen generator is coupled to or integrated with a fuel cell for portable power applications. Hydrogen is produced via thermocatalytic decomposition (cracking, pyrolysis) of hydrocarbon fuels in oxidant-free environment. The apparatus can utilize a variety of hydrocarbon fuels, including natural gas, propane, gasoline, kerosene, diesel fuel, crude oil (including sulfurous fuels). The hydrogen-rich gas produced is free of carbon oxides or other reactive impurities, so it could be directly fed to any type of a fuel cell. The catalysts for hydrogen production in the apparatus are carbon-based or metal-based materials and doped, if necessary, with a sulfur-capturing agent. Additionally disclosed are two novel processes for the production of two types of carbon filaments, and a novel filamentous carbon product. The hydrogen generator can be conveniently integrated with high temperature fuel cells to produce an efficient and self-contained source of electrical power.

  17. Mesoscopic distinct element method-enabled multiscale computational design of carbon nanotube-based composite materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — There is a sustained effort to develop super-lightweight composites by using polymer impregnation of carbon nanotube (CNT) sheets. This promising area is still in...

  18. Conversion of Carbon Dioxide into Ethanol by Electrochemical Synthesis Method Using Cu-Zn Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riyanto; Ramadan, S.; Fariduddin, S.; Aminudin, A. R.; Hayatri, A. K.

    2018-01-01

    Research on conversion of carbon dioxide into ethanol has been done. The conversion process is carried out in a sodium bicarbonate electrolyte solution in an electrochemical synthesis reactor. As cathode was used Cu-Zn, while as anode carbon was utilized. Variations of voltage, concentration of sodium bicarbonate electrolyte solution and time of electrolysis were performed to determine the optimum conditions to convert carbon dioxide into ethanol. Sample of the electrochemical synthesis process was analyzed by gas chromatography. From the result, it is found that the optimum conditions of the electrochemical synthesis process of carbon dioxide conversion into ethanol are voltage, concentration of sodium bicarbonate electrolyte solution and time of electrolysis are 3 volts, 0.4 M and 90 minutes with the ethanol concentration of 10.44%.

  19. Carbon Nanotube-based Sensor and Method for Continually Sensing Changes in a Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffry D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between resistance of a carbon nanotube and carbon nanotube strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a change in electrical properties of the conductors.

  20. Greenhouse gases inventory and carbon balance of two dairy systems obtained from two methane-estimation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunha, C S; Lopes, N L; Veloso, C M; Jacovine, L A G; Tomich, T R; Pereira, L G R; Marcondes, M I

    2016-11-15

    The adoption of carbon inventories for dairy farms in tropical countries based on models developed from animals and diets of temperate climates is questionable. Thus, the objectives of this study were to estimate enteric methane (CH4) emissions through the SF6 tracer gas technique and through equations proposed by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Tier 2 and to calculate the inventory of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from two dairy systems. In addition, the carbon balance of these properties was estimated using enteric CH4 emissions obtained using both methodologies. In trial 1, the CH4 emissions were estimated from seven Holstein dairy cattle categories based on the SF6 tracer gas technique and on IPCC equations. The categories used in the study were prepubertal heifers (n=6); pubertal heifers (n=4); pregnant heifers (n=5); high-producing (n=6); medium-producing (n=5); low-producing (n=4) and dry cows (n=5). Enteric methane emission was higher for the category comprising prepubertal heifers when estimated by the equations proposed by the IPCC Tier 2. However, higher CH4 emissions were estimated by the SF6 technique in the categories including medium- and high-producing cows and dry cows. Pubertal heifers, pregnant heifers, and low-producing cows had equal CH4 emissions as estimated by both methods. In trial 2, two dairy farms were monitored for one year to identify all activities that contributed in any way to GHG emissions. The total emission from Farm 1 was 3.21t CO2e/animal/yr, of which 1.63t corresponded to enteric CH4. Farm 2 emitted 3.18t CO2e/animal/yr, with 1.70t of enteric CH4. IPCC estimations can underestimate CH4 emissions from some categories while overestimate others. However, considering the whole property, these discrepancies are offset and we would submit that the equations suggested by the IPCC properly estimate the total CH4 emission and carbon balance of the properties. Thus, the IPCC equations should be utilized with

  1. An Accelerated Test Method of Simultaneous Carbonation and Chloride Ion Ingress: Durability of Silica Fume Concrete in Severe Environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Ghahari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of simultaneous carbonation and chloride ion attack on mechanical characteristics and durability of concrete containing silica fume have been investigated through an accelerated test method. Specimens containing different amounts of silica fume were maintained in an apparatus in which carbon dioxide pressure and concentration and relative humidity were kept constant, and wetting and drying cycles in saline water were applied. Surface resistivity, sorptivity, CO2 consumption, and carbonation and chloride ion ingress depths measurements were taken. Phase change due to carbonation and chloride ion attack was monitored by XRD analysis, and microstructures and interfacial transition zones were studied by implementing SEM as well as mercury intrusion porosimetry. It was expected to have a synergistic effect in the tidal zone where simultaneous carbonation and chloride ion attack happen. However, the observed reduced surface resistivity, compared to specimens maintained in CO2 gas, could be due to the moisture that is available near the surface, hindering CO2 from penetrating into the pores of the specimens. Moreover, the porosity analysis of the specimens showed that the sample containing silica fume cured in the tidal zone had 50.1% less total porosity than the plain cement paste cured in the same condition.

  2. The Method of Coating Fe₃O₄ with Carbon Nanoparticles to Modify Biological Properties of Oxide Measured in Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemiec, Tomasz; Dudek, Mariusz; Dziekan, Natalia; Jaworski, Sławomir; Przewozik, Aleksandra; Soszka, Emilia; Koperkiewicz, Anna; Koczoń, Piotr

    2017-07-01

    The coating of nanoparticles on materials for medical application [e.g., the coating of Fe3O4 nanopowder (IONP) with a carbon nanolayer] serves to protect and modify the selected biological, physical, and chemical properties of the coated material. Increases in chemical stability, changes in biocompatibility, and a modified surface structure are examples of the effects caused by the formation of carbon coatings. In the current study, Fe3O4 nanoparticles were coated with a carbon nanolayer (IONP@C) in a plasmochemical reactor (using radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition methods) under various experimental conditions. Based on data from X-ray diffraction, Raman, and IR spectroscopy, the best processing parameters were determined in order to produce a carbon coating that would not change the structure of the IONP. The materials with the best cover, i.e., a uniform carbon nanolayer, were used in cytotoxic tests to investigate their biological properties using the human HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cell line and chicken embryo red blood cells as an in vitro model. The obtained results proved the low cytotoxicity of Fe3O4 micropowder and IONP in contrast to IONP@C, which reduced cell viability, increased hemolysis, and generally was more toxic than bare Fe3O4.

  3. Handbook of methods for the analysis of the various parameters of the carbon dioxide system in sea water. Version 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dickson, A.G.; Goyet, C. [eds.

    1994-09-01

    The collection of extensive, reliable, oceanic carbon data is a key component of the Joint Global Ocean Flux Study (JGOFS). A portion of the US JGOFS oceanic carbon dioxide measurements will be made during the World Ocean Circulation Experiment Hydrographic Program. A science team has been formed to plan and coordinate the various activities needed to produce high quality oceanic carbon dioxide measurements under this program. This handbook was prepared at the request of, and with the active participation of, that science team. The procedures have been agreed on by the members of the science team and describe well tested methods. They are intended to provide standard operating procedures, together with an appropriate quality control plan, for measurements made as part of this survey. These are not the only measurement techniques in use for the parameters of the oceanic carbon system; however, they do represent the current state-of-the-art for ship-board measurements. In the end, the editors hope that this handbook can serve widely as a clear and unambiguous guide to other investigators who are setting up to analyze the various parameters of the carbon dioxide system in sea water.

  4. A Novel Method for Analysis of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon Concentration and δ13C by Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, E.; Gonneea, M. E.; Boze, L. G.; Casso, M.; Pohlman, J.

    2017-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is the largest pool of carbon in the oceans and is where about half of anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions are being sequestered. Determining the concentration and stable carbon isotopic content (δ13C) of DIC allows us to delineate carbon sources that contribute to marine DIC. A simple and reliable method for measuring DIC concentration and δ13C can be used to apportion contributions from external sources and identify effects from biogeochemical reactions that contribute or remove DIC. The U.S. Geological Survey has developed a discrete sample analysis module (DSAM) that interfaces to a Picarro G-2201i cavity ring-down spectrometer (CRDS, Picarro Inc.) to analyze CO2 and methane concentrations and δ13C from discrete gas samples. In this study, we adapted the USGS DSAM-CRDS analysis system to include an AutoMate prep device (Automate FX, Inc.) for analysis of DIC concentration and δ13C from aqueous samples. The Automate prep device was modified to deliver CO2 extracted from DIC to the DSAM, which conditions and transfers the gas to the CRDS. LabVIEW software (National Instruments) triggers the Automate Prep device, controls the DSAM and collects data from the CRDS. CO2 mass concentration data are obtained by numerical integration of the CO2 volumetric concentrations output by the CRDS and subsequent comparison to standard materials. CO2 carbon isotope values from the CRDS (iCO2) are converted to δ13C values using a slope and offset correction calibration procedure. The system design and operation was optimized using sodium bicarbonate (NaHCO3) standards and a certified reference material. Surface water and pore water samples collected from Sage Lot Pond, a salt marsh in Cape Cod MA, have been analyzed for concentration by coulometry and δ13C by isotope ratio mass spectrometry and will be used to validate the DIC-DSAM-CRDS method for field applications.

  5. Decoration of carbon nanotubes with metal nanoparticles by wet chemical method: a small-angle neutron scattering study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahadur, J; Sen, D; Mazumder, S; Parkash, Jyoti; Sathiyamoorthy, D; Venugopalan, R

    2010-05-01

    Multi-wall carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by catalytic chemical vapour deposition method. Attempts have been made to decorate the walls of these nanotubes with various metal nanoparticles (Ni, Cu and Fe) after functionalizing the nanotubes walls by wet chemical method. Small-Angle Neutron Scattering data reveals chain cluster type morphology of the carbon nanotubes. Transmission electron microscopy, Energy dispersive analysis of X-rays and Small-Angle Neutron Scattering measurements show that decoration of nanotube walls by metallic nano-particles could be realized for Ni and Cu nano-particles. Further, wall decoration by nano-particles of Fe could not be achieved by wet chemical method due to strong agglomeration behavior of Fe nano-particles.

  6. Structure, thermal, optical and electrical investigation of the effect of heavy highly energetic ions irradiations in Bayfol DPF 5023 nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nouh, S.A.; Radwan, Y.E.; Elfiky, D.; Abutalib, M.M.; Bahareth, R.A.; Hegazy, T.M.; Fouad, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    The effects of 28 GeV 56 Fe ion irradiation on the structural, thermal, optical and electrical properties of Bayfol DPF 5023 have been investigated. Samples from Bayfol sheets have been irradiated using different Fe fluences in the range 1×10 12 to 5×10 15 ion/cm 2 . The total energy deposited is between (28×10 21 eV and 14×10 25 eV). The resultant effect of Fe ion irradiation on the properties of Bayfol has been investigated using FTIR spectroscopy, intrinsic viscosity, Thermogravimetric Analysis TGA, refractive index, color changes, and DC conductivity. The results indicate that the Fe ion irradiation in the fluence range 10 12 –10 15 ion/cm 2 led to a more compact structure of Bayfol polymer, which resulted in an improvement in its thermal stability with an increase in activation energy of thermal decomposition and crosslinking. This crosslinking enhanced the intrinsic viscosity of Bayfol from 0.58 to 0.89 at 35 °C, indicating an increase in the average molecular mass. This was accompanied with an increase in refractive index. Further, the transmission of Bayfol samples in the wavelength range of 370–780 nm, as well as any color changes, was studied. The color intensity ΔE was increased with increasing the Fe fluence, and was accompanied by a significant increase in the blue color component. - Highlights: • Fe ion irradiation led to a more compact structure of Bayfol with enhanced thermal stability. • Both average molecular mass and isotropic nature of Bayfol increased with irradiation. • The Bayfol samples showed significant color sensitivity toward Fe ion irradiation. • Fe ion irradiation provides mobile-free charge carriers that increase DC conductivity

  7. The Modification of Carbon with Iron Oxide Synthesized in Electrolysis Using the Arc Discharge Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endah Saraswati, Teguh; Dewi Indah Prasiwi, Oktaviana; Masykur, Abu; Handayani, Nestri; Anwar, Miftahul

    2017-02-01

    The modification of carbon-based nanomaterials with metals is widely studied due to its unique properties. Here, the modification of carbon nanomaterial with iron oxide has been successfully carried out. This modification was achieved using arc discharge in 50% ethanol liquid media. The anode used in the arc discharge was prepared from a mixture of carbon and iron oxide that was synthesized in electrolysis and was then calcined at 250°C with silicon binder with a mass ratio of 3:1:1, and the cathode used was graphite rod. Both electrodes were set in the nearest gap that could provide an arc during arc-discharging, leading to carbon-based nanoparticle formation. The diffractogram pattern of the X-ray diffraction of the fabricated nanoparticles confirmed the typical peak of carbon, iron oxide and iron. The magnetization value of the result analysis of the vibrating sample magnetometer was 9.9 emu/g. The bandgap energy measurement using diffuse reflectance ultra violet was estimated to be 2.18 eV. Using the transmission electron microscopy, the structure of the nanomaterial produced was observed as carbon-encapsulated iron compound nanoparticles.

  8. Method for determination of stable carbon isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Moukhtar

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available A technique for the measurement of the stable isotope ratio of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter is presented. Atmospheric samples from rural and suburban areas were collected for evaluation of the procedure. Particulate matter was collected on quartz fibre filters using dichotomous high volume air samplers. Methylnitrophenols were extracted from the filters using acetonitrile. The sample was then purified using a combination of high-performance liquid chromatography and solid phase extraction. The final solution was then divided into two aliquots. To one aliquot, a derivatising agent, Bis(trimethylsilyltrifluoroacetamide, was added for Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry analysis. The second half of the sample was stored in a refrigerator. For samples with concentrations exceeding 1 ng μl−1, the second half of the sample was used for measurement of stable carbon isotope ratios by Gas Chromatography-Isotope Ratio Mass Spectrometry.

    The procedure described in this paper provides a method for the analysis of methylnitrophenols in atmospheric particulate matter at concentrations as low as 0.3 pg m−3 and for stable isotope ratios with an accuracy of better than ±0.5‰ for concentrations exceeding 100 pg m−3.

    In all atmospheric particulate matter samples analysed, 2-methyl-4-nitrophenol was found to be the most abundant methylnitrophenol, with concentrations ranging from the low pg m−3 range in rural areas to more than 200 pg m−3 in some samples from a suburban location.

  9. Provincial carbon intensity abatement potential estimation in China: A PSO–GA-optimized multi-factor environmental learning curve method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Shiwei; Zhang, Junjie; Zheng, Shuhong; Sun, Han

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to estimate carbon intensity abatement potential in China at the regional level by proposing a particle swarm optimization–genetic algorithm (PSO–GA) multivariate environmental learning curve estimation method. The model uses two independent variables, namely, per capita gross domestic product (GDP) and the proportion of the tertiary industry in GDP, to construct carbon intensity learning curves (CILCs), i.e., CO 2 emissions per unit of GDP, of 30 provinces in China. Instead of the traditional ordinary least squares (OLS) method, a PSO–GA intelligent optimization algorithm is used to optimize the coefficients of a learning curve. The carbon intensity abatement potentials of the 30 Chinese provinces are estimated via PSO–GA under the business-as-usual scenario. The estimation reveals the following results. (1) For most provinces, the abatement potentials from improving a unit of the proportion of the tertiary industry in GDP are higher than the potentials from raising a unit of per capita GDP. (2) The average potential of the 30 provinces in 2020 will be 37.6% based on the emission's level of 2005. The potentials of Jiangsu, Tianjin, Shandong, Beijing, and Heilongjiang are over 60%. Ningxia is the only province without intensity abatement potential. (3) The total carbon intensity in China weighted by the GDP shares of the 30 provinces will decline by 39.4% in 2020 compared with that in 2005. This intensity cannot achieve the 40%–45% carbon intensity reduction target set by the Chinese government. Additional mitigation policies should be developed to uncover the potentials of Ningxia and Inner Mongolia. In addition, the simulation accuracy of the CILCs optimized by PSO–GA is higher than that of the CILCs optimized by the traditional OLS method. - Highlights: • A PSO–GA-optimized multi-factor environmental learning curve method is proposed. • The carbon intensity abatement potentials of the 30 Chinese provinces are estimated by

  10. An Alternative Method for Generating Arynes from ortho-Silylaryl Triflates: Activation by Cesium Carbonate in the Presence of a Crown Ether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suguru Yoshida

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available An alternative method for generating arynes from ortho-silylaryl triflates using cesium carbonate and 18-crown-6 is reported. The method was efficiently applied to a variety of reactions between several arynes and arynophiles. We also demonstrated that the efficiency of aryne generation is significantly affected by the alkali metal countercation of the carbonate.

  11. The effect of precursor on the optical properties of carbon quantum dots synthesized by hydrothermal/solvothermal method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdbar, Afsaneh; Nouralishahi, Amideddin; Fatemi, Shohreh; Mirakhori, Ghazaleh

    2018-01-01

    In the recent decade, Carbon Quantum Dots (CQDs) have attracted lots of attention due to their excellent properties such as tunable photoluminescence, high chemical stability, low toxicity, and biocompatibility. Among all synthesis methods, the hydrothermal/solvothermal rout has been considered as one of the most common and simplest method. The type of precursors can affect the size of CQDs and determine their surface functional groups, the essential properties that deeply influence the optical specifications. In this work, the effect of different precursors on the final properties of carbon quantum dots is investigated. The carbon quantum dots were synthesized by hydrothermal/solvothermal rout using citric acid, thiourea, ethylamine and monoethanolamine as precursors in almost the same conditions of time and temperature. Resultant CQDs were characterized by using FTIR, UV-Visible Spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) analysis. The results of UV-Vis spectroscopy showed that quantum dots synthesized from monoethanolamine have wider absorption band rather than the CQDs from other precursors and the absorption edge shifted from about 270 nm for ethylamine to about 470 nm in monoethanolamine. Furthermore, the results demonstrate that using citric acid and monoethanolamine as precursor improved production efficiency and emission quantum yield of the carbon dots.

  12. Ordered mesoporous carbons obtained by a simple soft template method as sulfur immobilizers for lithium-sulfur cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Noelia; Caballero, Alvaro; Hernán, Lourdes; Morales, Julián; Canales-Vázquez, Jesús

    2014-08-28

    Carbon materials with ordered mesoporous structures were synthesized using soft template methods and then activated by CO2 treatment. Sulfur was incorporated in these carbons via a simple chemical deposition method in aqueous solutions and the resulting composites were tested as electrodes in Li-S cells. The electrochemical results showed that well-ordered mesoporous carbons perform better than those with a random mesopore arrangement (wormhole-like mesoporous structure). The mesopore ordering yields a framework of well-connected empty sites that results in an enhancement of both the charge carrier mobility and the reversibility of the electrochemical reaction. Although the activation with CO2 partially destroys the mesopore arrangement, which adversely affects the electrode performance, it notably increases the surface area and the micropore content which improves the connectivity between the mesopores. The final observation was an irrelevant effect of the activation process at low current densities. However, at higher rates the activated carbon composite delivered higher capacities. The hierarchical pore structure formed by micro- and mesopores should guarantee the required fast mobility of the Li(+).

  13. Combined sonochemical/CVD method for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rasoulnezhad, Hossein [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Kavei, Ghassem, E-mail: kaveighassem@gmail.com [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ahmadi, Kamran [Semiconductor Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza [Ceramic Department, Materials and Energy Research Center (MERC), Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-06-30

    Highlights: • Combination of sonochemical and CVD methods for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin film on glass substrate, for the first time. • High transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity of the prepared thin films. • Preparation of the carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films with nanorod and nanosphere morphologies. - Abstract: The present work reports the successful synthesis of the nanostructured carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films on glass substrate by combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and ultrasonic methods, for the first time. In this method the ultrasound waves act as nebulizer for converting of sonochemically prepared TiO{sub 2} sol to the mist particles. These mist particles were thermally decomposed in subsequent CVD chamber at 320 °C to produce the carbon-doped TiO{sub 2} thin films. The obtained thin films were characterized by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the prepared thin films have anatase crystal structure and nanorod morphology, which calcination of them at 800 °C results in the conversion of nanorods to nanoparticles. In addition, the prepared samples have high transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity. The presence of the carbon element in the structure of the thin films causes the narrowing of the band-gap energy of TiO{sub 2} to about 2.8 eV, which results in the improvement of visible light absorption capabilities of the thin film.

  14. How does carbon dioxide permeate cell membranes? A discussion of concepts, results and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endeward, Volker; Al-Samir, Samer; Itel, Fabian; Gros, Gerolf

    2013-01-01

    We review briefly how the thinking about the permeation of gases, especially CO2, across cell and artificial lipid membranes has evolved during the last 100 years. We then describe how the recent finding of a drastic effect of cholesterol on CO2 permeability of both biological and artificial membranes fundamentally alters the long-standing idea that CO2—as well as other gases—permeates all membranes with great ease. This requires revision of the widely accepted paradigm that membranes never offer a serious diffusion resistance to CO2 or other gases. Earlier observations of “CO2-impermeable membranes” can now be explained by the high cholesterol content of some membranes. Thus, cholesterol is a membrane component that nature can use to adapt membrane CO2 permeability to the functional needs of the cell. Since cholesterol serves many other cellular functions, it cannot be reduced indefinitely. We show, however, that cells that possess a high metabolic rate and/or a high rate of O2 and CO2 exchange, do require very high CO2 permeabilities that may not be achievable merely by reduction of membrane cholesterol. The article then discusses the alternative possibility of raising the CO2 permeability of a membrane by incorporating protein CO2 channels. The highly controversial issue of gas and CO2 channels is systematically and critically reviewed. It is concluded that a majority of the results considered to be reliable, is in favor of the concept of existence and functional relevance of protein gas channels. The effect of intracellular carbonic anhydrase, which has recently been proposed as an alternative mechanism to a membrane CO2 channel, is analysed quantitatively and the idea considered untenable. After a brief review of the knowledge on permeation of O2 and NO through membranes, we present a summary of the 18O method used to measure the CO2 permeability of membranes and discuss quantitatively critical questions that may be addressed to this method. PMID

  15. A cost-efficient method to assess carbon stocks in tropical peat soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, M. W.; Kauffman, J. B.; Murdiyarso, D.; Anshari, G.; Hergoualc'h, K.; Kurnianto, S.; Purbopuspito, J.; Gusmayanti, E.; Afifudin, M.; Rahajoe, J.; Alhamd, L.; Limin, S.; Iswandi, A.

    2012-11-01

    Estimation of belowground carbon stocks in tropical wetland forests requires funding for laboratory analyses and suitable facilities, which are often lacking in developing nations where most tropical wetlands are found. It is therefore beneficial to develop simple analytical tools to assist belowground carbon estimation where financial and technical limitations are common. Here we use published and original data to describe soil carbon density (kgC m-3; Cd) as a function of bulk density (gC cm-3; Bd), which can be used to rapidly estimate belowground carbon storage using Bd measurements only. Predicted carbon densities and stocks are compared with those obtained from direct carbon analysis for ten peat swamp forest stands in three national parks of Indonesia. Analysis of soil carbon density and bulk density from the literature indicated a strong linear relationship (Cd = Bd × 495.14 + 5.41, R2 = 0.93, n = 151) for soils with organic C content > 40%. As organic C content decreases, the relationship between Cd and Bd becomes less predictable as soil texture becomes an important determinant of Cd. The equation predicted belowground C stocks to within 0.92% to 9.57% of observed values. Average bulk density of collected peat samples was 0.127 g cm-3, which is in the upper range of previous reports for Southeast Asian peatlands. When original data were included, the revised equation Cd = Bd × 468.76 + 5.82, with R2 = 0.95 and n = 712, was slightly below the lower 95% confidence interval of the original equation, and tended to decrease Cd estimates. We recommend this last equation for a rapid estimation of soil C stocks for well-developed peat soils where C content > 40%.

  16. Measurement of carbon dioxide flux from tropical peatland in Indonesia using the nocturnal temperature-inversion trap method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iriana, Windy; Tonokura, Kenichi; Kawasaki, Masahiro; Inoue, Gen; Kusin, Kitso; Limin, Suwido H.

    2016-09-01

    Evaluation of CO2 flux from peatland soil respiration is important to understand the effect of land use change on the global carbon cycle and climate change and particularly to support carbon emission reduction policies. However, quantitative estimation of emitted CO2 fluxes in Indonesia is constrained by existing field data. Current methods for CO2 measurement are limited by high initial cost, manpower, and the difficulties associated with construction issues. Measurement campaigns were performed using a newly developed nocturnal temperature-inversion trap method, which measures the amount of CO2 trapped beneath the nocturnal inversion layer, in the dry season of 2013 at a drained tropical peatland near Palangkaraya, Central Kalimantan, Indonesia. This method is cost-effective and data processing is easier than other flux estimation methods. We compared CO2 fluxes measured using this method with the published data from the existing eddy covariance and closed chamber methods. The maximum value of our measurement results was 10% lower than maximum value of eddy covariance method and average value was 6% higher than average of chamber method in drained tropical peatlands. In addition, the measurement results shows good correlation with groundwater table. The results of this comparison suggest that this methodology for the CO2 flux measurement is useful for field research in tropical peatlands.

  17. Assessment of the possibility of using data mining methods to predict sorption isotherms of selected organic compounds on activated carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dąbek Lidia

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyses the use of four data mining methods (Support Vector Machines. Cascade Neural Networks. Random Forests and Boosted Trees to predict sorption on activated carbons. The input data for statistical models included the activated carbon parameters, organic substances and equilibrium concentrations in the solution. The assessment of the predictive abilities of the developed models was made with the use of mean absolute error (MAE, mean absolute percentage error (MAPE, and root mean squared error (RMSE. The computations proved that methods of data mining considered in the study can be applied to predict sorption of selected organic compounds 011 activated carbon. The lowest values of sorption prediction errors were obtained with the Cascade Neural Networks method (MAE = 1.23 g/g; MAPE = 7.90% and RMSE = 1.81 g/g, while the highest error values were produced by the Boosted Trees method (MAE=14.31 g/g; MAPE = 39.43% and RMSE = 27.76 g/g.

  18. Carbon sequestration in wood products: a method for attribution to multiple parties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tonn, Bruce; Marland, Gregg

    2007-01-01

    When forest is harvested some of the forest carbon ends up in wood products. If the forest is managed so that the standing stock of the forest remains constant over time, and the stock of wood products is increasing, then carbon dioxide is being removed from the atmosphere in net and this should be reflected in accounting for greenhouse gas emissions. We suggest that carbon sequestration in wood products requires cooperation of multiple parties; from the forest owner to the product manufacturer to the product user, and perhaps others. Credit for sequestering carbon away from the atmosphere could acknowledge the contributions of these multiple parties. Accounting under a cap-and-trade or tax system is not necessarily an inventory system, it is a system designed to motivate and/or reward an environmental objective. We describe a system of attribution whereby credits for carbon sequestration would be shared among multiple, contributing parties. It is hoped that the methodology outlined herein proves attractive enough to parties concerned to spur them to address the details of such a system. The system of incentives one would choose for limiting or controlling greenhouse gas emissions could be quite different, depending on how the attribution for emissions and sequestration is chosen

  19. Conversion of Carbon Dioxide to Ethanol by Electrochemical Synthesis Method Using Brass as A Cathode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Septian Ramadan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The effect of potential and gas flow rate were investigated to determine the optimum conditions of the electrochemical synthesis process to convert carbon dioxide to ethanol. The conversion process is carried out using a NaHCO3 electrolyte solution in an electrochemical reactor equipped with a cathode and anode. As cathode is used brass, while as anode is used carbon. The result of the electrochemical synthesis process was analyzed by gas chromatography to determine the content of the compounds produced qualitatively and quantitatively. The optimum electrochemical synthesis conditions to convert carbon dioxide to ethanol are potential and gas flow rate are 3 volts and 0.5 L/minutes with ethanol concentration yielded 1.32%.

  20. Carbon nanotube-based sensor and method for detection of crack growth in a structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Jan M. (Inventor); Kite, Marlen T. (Inventor); Moore, Thomas C. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Ingram, JoAnne L. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony N. (Inventor); Williams, Phillip A. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A sensor has a plurality of carbon nanotube (CNT)-based conductors operatively positioned on a substrate. The conductors are arranged side-by-side, such as in a substantially parallel relationship to one another. At least one pair of spaced-apart electrodes is coupled to opposing ends of the conductors. A portion of each of the conductors spanning between each pair of electrodes comprises a plurality of carbon nanotubes arranged end-to-end and substantially aligned along an axis. Because a direct correlation exists between the resistance of a carbon nanotube and its strain, changes experienced by the portion of the structure to which the sensor is coupled induce a corresponding change in the electrical properties of the conductors, thereby enabling detection of crack growth in the structure.

  1. Carbon Ion Implantation: A Good Method to Enhance the Biocompatibility of Silicone Rubber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Chen, Xing; Mao, Tong-cun; Li, Xiang; Shi, Xiao-hua; Fan, Dong-li; Zhang, Yi-ming

    2016-04-01

    Silicone rubber and silicone rubber-based materials have been used as medical tissue implants in the field of plastic surgery for many years, but there are still some reports of adverse reactions to long-term implants. Earlier studies have shown that ion implantation could enhance the biocompatibility of biomaterials. However, whether ion implantation has a good effect on silicone rubber is unknown. Three types of carbon ion silicone rubber were obtained by implanting three doses of carbon ions. Then, the antibacterial adhesion properties and the in vivo host responses were evaluated. The antibacterial adhesion properties were examined by plate colony counting, fluorescence staining, and scanning electron microscopic observation. The host responses were evaluated by surveying inflammation and fiber capsule formation that developed after subcutaneous implantation in Sprague-Dawley rats for 7, 30, 90, and 180 days. In addition, the possible mechanism by which ion implantation enhanced the biocompatibility of the biomaterial was investigated and discussed. Carbon ion silicone rubber exhibits less bacterial adhesion, less collagen deposition, and thinner and weaker tissue capsules. Immunohistochemical staining results for CD4, tumor necrosis factor-α, α-smooth muscle actin, and elastin showed the possible mechanism enhancing the biocompatibility of silicone rubber. These data indicate that carbon ion silicone rubber exhibits good antibacterial adhesion properties and triggers thinner and weaker tissue capsules. In addition, high surface roughness and high zeta potential may be the main factors that induce the unique biocompatibility of carbon ion silicone rubber. Ion implantation should be considered for further investigation and application, and carbon ion silicone rubber could be a better biomaterial to decrease silicone rubber-initiated complications.

  2. Instrumentation and analytical methods in carbon balance studies - inorganic components in a marine environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skjelvan, I.; Johannessen, T.; Miller, L.; Stoll, M.

    1996-03-01

    This paper was read at the workshop ``The Norwegian Climate and Ozone Research Programme`` held on 11-12 March 1996. Substantial amounts of anthropogenic CO{sub 2} enters the atmosphere. The land biota acts as a sink for CO{sub 2}, with uncertain consequences. About 30% of the anthropogenic CO{sub 2} added to the atmosphere is absorbed by the ocean and how the ocean acts as a sink is central in understanding the carbon cycle. In their project the authors investigate the inorganic carbon in the ocean, especially total dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, and partial pressure of CO{sub 2} (pCO{sub 2}) in surface ocean and atmosphere. To determine total dissolved inorganic carbon, coulometric analysis is used in which an exact amount of sea water is acidified and the amount of carbon extracted is determined by a coulometer. Alkalinity is determined by potentiometric titration. In the pCO{sub 2} measurement, a small amount of air is circulated in a large amount of sea water and when after some time the amount of CO{sub 2} in the air reflects the CO{sub 2} concentration in the water, the pCO{sub 2} in the gas phase is determined by infra-red detection. The atmospheric pCO{sub 2} is also determined, and the difference between the two partial pressures gives information about source or sink activities. Total carbon and alkalinity measurements are done on discrete samples taken from all depths in the ocean, but for partial pressure detection an underway system is used, which determines the pCO{sub 2} in the surface ocean continuously

  3. Reactivity of cycloparaphenylenes: Studying the possible growth of single-walled carbon nanotubes with DFT methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reche-Tamayo, M.; Pérez-Guardiola, A.; Pérez-Jiménez, A. J.; Sancho-García, J. C.

    2018-04-01

    We perform a theoretical study on a set of carbon nanorings (CycloParaPhenylenes or CPP) envisioned as molecular templates for the selective synthesis of carbon nanotubes. The shape of these precursors, originating from bending n phenylene units in para position until forming the corresponding nanoring [n]CPP, may drive the growth of armchair single-walled nanotubes. This kinetic and thermodynamic study covers a set of molecules with different diameters, analyzing the exothermicity and the reaction path of a CPP-based radicaloid mechanism. The methodology employed is based on validated density functionals for mechanistic studies, shedding light on the viability of this synthetic pathway.

  4. Semiconducting, Magnetic or Superconducting Nanoparticles encapsulated in Carbon Shells by RAPET method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aharon Gedanken

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available An efficient, solvent-free, environmentally friendly, RAPET (Reactions under Autogenic Pressure at Elevated Temperaturesynthetic approach is discussed for the fabrication of core-shell nanostructures. The semiconducting, magnetic orsuperconducting nanoparticles are encapsulated in a carbon shell. RAPET is a one-step, thermal decomposition reaction ofchemical compound (s followed by the formation of core-shell nanoparticles in a closed stainless steel reactor. Therepresentative examples are discussed, where a variety of nanomaterials are trapped in situ in a carbon shell that offersfascinating properties.

  5. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Effects of surface treating on T700 grade high strength carbon fiber were discussed. • The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties are analyzed. • The surface treating significantly affect the properties of carbon fiber. • The composite with electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the highest mechanical properties. - Abstract: This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  6. Formation of Platinum Catalyst on Carbon Black Using an In‐Liquid Plasma Method for Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiyuki Show

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Platinum (Pt catalyst was formed on the surface of carbon black using an in‐liquid plasma method. The formed Pt catalyst showed the average particle size of 4.1 nm. This Pt catalyst was applied to a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC. The PEMFC showed an open voltage of 0.85 V and a maximum output power density of 216 mW/cm2.

  7. Test preparation and lifetime measurement of very thin carbon stripper foils made by a controlled DC arc-discharge method

    CERN Document Server

    Sugai, I; Oyaizu, M; Kawakami, H; Hattori, Y; Kawasaki, K; Hayashizaki, N

    2002-01-01

    We have prepared very thin plastic supported carbon stripper foils (1.2+-0.3 mu g/cm sup 2) using a controlled DC arc-discharge (CDAD) method. The lifetime of these foils was measured with 3.2 MeV Ne sup + ions. These foils recorded lifetimes about four times longer at the maximum and three times longer on the average than those commercially available foils produced by evaporation-condensation.

  8. A Study on the Interlaminar Shear Strength of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics Depending on the Lamination Methods

    OpenAIRE

    Min Sang Lee; Hee Jae Shin; In Pyo Cha; Sun Ho Ko; Hyun Kyung Yoon; Hong Gun Kim; Lee Ku Kwac

    2015-01-01

    The prepreg process among the CFRP (Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastic) forming methods is the short term of ‘Pre-impregnation’, which is widely used for aerospace composites that require a high quality property such as a fiber-reinforced woven fabric, in which an epoxy hardening resin is impregnated the reality. However, that this process requires continuous researches and developments for its commercialization because the delamination characteristically develops between th...

  9. Measurement of the Isotopic Signature of Soil Carbon Dioxide: Methods Development and Initial Field Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayler, Z.; Rugh, W.; Mix, A. C.; Bond, B. J.; Sulzman, E. W.

    2005-12-01

    Soil respiration is a significant component of ecosystem respiration and its isotopic composition is likely to lend insight into ecosystem processes. We have designed probes to determine the isotopic signature of soil-respired CO2 using a two end-member mixing model approach (i.e., Keeling plot). Each probe consists of three 35 ml PVC chambers cased in fiberglass mesh and connected to the soil surface via stainless steel tubing with a septa-lined swagelok fitting. Chambers are vertically connected such that they sample gases at depth intervals centered on 5, 15, and 30 cm. Gases are sampled via a hand vacuum pump equipped with a two-way valve, which allows vials pre-filled with N2 gas in the laboratory to be evacuated and re-filled with only a single septa puncture in the field. Data indicate samples can be stored reliably for up to three days if punctured septa are coated in silicone sealant. To test whether this field sampling method was robust, we constructed a carbon-free sand column out of PVC pipe into which we plumbed a tank of known CO2 concentration and isotopic composition. We have tested the effects of wetting and flow rate on our ability to reproduce tank values. A linear model (geometric mean regression) yielded a more negative isotopic value than the actual gas, but a simple polynomial curve fit the tank value. After laboratory testing, the probes were established in a steep drainage in the H.J. Andrews LTER site in the Cascade Mountains of western Oregon (as part of the Andrews Airshed project). We established a transect of five 10 m2 plots with four soil probes and a companion respiration collar and measured soil CO2 efflux and soil δ13CO2 values biweekly from June-Sept. Results indicate there is a clear difference in isotopic and respiration flux patterns between the north- and south-facing slopes, with the north facing slope exhibiting higher fluxes and more 13C enriched respiration. The temporal pattern of respiration correlates well with

  10. High Cycling Performance Cathode Material: Interconnected LiFePO4/Carbon Nanoparticles Fabricated by Sol-Gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhigao Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Interconnected LiFePO4/carbon nanoparticles for Li-ion battery cathode have been fabricated by sol-gel method followed by a carbon coating process involving redox reactions. The carbon layers coated on the LiFePO4 nanoparticles not only served as a protection layer but also supplied fast electrons by building a 3D conductive network. As a cooperation, LiFePO4 nanoparticles encapsulated in interconnected conductive carbon layers provided the electrode reactions with fast lithium ions by offering the lithium ions shortening and unobstructed pathways. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD tests showed optimized morphology. Electrochemical characterizations including galvanostatic charge/discharge, cyclic voltammetry (CV, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS tests, together with impedance parameters calculated, all indicated better electrochemical performance and excellent cycling performance at high rate (with less than 9.5% discharge capacity loss over 2000 cycles, the coulombic efficiency maintained about 100%.

  11. Carbon Stabilization by Clays in the Environment: Process and Characterization Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organic matter (OM) in soil plays vital roles with respect to global climate change, as the largest terrestrial reservoir of organic carbon, and with respect to soil quality through the stabilization of soil structure and the retention and cycling of plant nutrients. The interactions between clay mi...

  12. Quantification of Carbon Nanotubes in Different Environmental Matrices by a Microwave Induced Heating Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been incorporated into numerous consumer products, and have also been employed in various industrial areas because of their extraordinary properties. The large scale production and wide applications of CNTs make their release into the environment a ma...

  13. Analysis of unburned carbon in industrial ashes from biomass combustion by thermogravimetric method using Boudouard reaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Straka, Pavel; Náhunková, Jana; Žaloudková, Margit

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 575, JAN (2014), s. 188-194 ISSN 0040-6031 R&D Projects: GA MZe QI102A207 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 Keywords : unburned carbon * biomass * ash * thermogravimetry Subject RIV: GD - Fertilization, Irrigation, Soil Processing Impact factor: 2.184, year: 2014 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0040603113005455

  14. Exploring variability in methods and data sensitivity in carbon footprints of feed ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelaar, van C.E.; Cederberg, C.; Vellinga, Th.V.; Werf, H.M.G.; Boer, de I.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose - Production of feed is an important contributor to life cycle greenhouse gas emissions, or carbon footprints (CFPs), of livestock products. Consequences of methodological choices and data sensitivity on CFPs of feed ingredients were explored to improve comparison and interpretation of CFP

  15. Comparison of methods for estimating carbon dioxide storage by Sacramento's urban forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elena Aguaron; E. Gregory McPherson

    2012-01-01

    Limited open-grown urban tree species biomass equations have necessitated use of forest-derived equations with diverse conclusions on the accuracy of these equations to estimate urban biomass and carbon storage. Our goal was to determine and explain variability among estimates of CO2 storage from four sets of allometric equations for the same...

  16. Carbon Nanotube-Containing Structures, Methods Of Making, And Processes Using Same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Chin, Ya-Huei; Gao, Yufei; Aardahl, Christopher L.; Stewart, Terri L.

    2004-11-30

    Carbon nanotube structures are disclosed in which nanotubes are disposed over a porous support such as a foam, felt, mesh, or membrane. Techniques of making these structures are also disclosed. In some of these techniques, a support is pretreated with a templated surfactant composition to assist with the formation of a nanotube layer.

  17. A cost-efficient method to assess carbon stocks in tropical peat soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. W. Warren

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Estimation of belowground carbon stocks in tropical wetland forests requires funding for laboratory analyses and suitable facilities, which are often lacking in developing nations where most tropical wetlands are found. It is therefore beneficial to develop simple analytical tools to assist belowground carbon estimation where financial and technical limitations are common. Here we use published and original data to describe soil carbon density (kgC m−3; Cd as a function of bulk density (gC cm−3; Bd, which can be used to rapidly estimate belowground carbon storage using Bd measurements only. Predicted carbon densities and stocks are compared with those obtained from direct carbon analysis for ten peat swamp forest stands in three national parks of Indonesia. Analysis of soil carbon density and bulk density from the literature indicated a strong linear relationship (Cd = Bd × 495.14 + 5.41, R2 = 0.93, n = 151 for soils with organic C content > 40%. As organic C content decreases, the relationship between Cd and Bd becomes less predictable as soil texture becomes an important determinant of Cd. The equation predicted belowground C stocks to within 0.92% to 9.57% of observed values. Average bulk density of collected peat samples was 0.127 g cm−3, which is in the upper range of previous reports for Southeast Asian peatlands. When original data were included, the revised equation Cd = Bd × 468.76 + 5.82, with R2 = 0.95 and n = 712, was slightly below the lower 95% confidence interval of the original equation, and tended to decrease Cd estimates. We recommend this last equation for a rapid estimation of soil C stocks for well-developed peat soils where C content > 40%.

  18. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO3 layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO3 layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO3 coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L). Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Application and further development of an analytical method for the determination of biogenic total-non methane organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnery, Julia; Dindorf, Tamara; Kesselmeier, Juergen

    2010-05-01

    Most of the organic carbon which is present in the atmosphere is found as volatile organic compounds (VOCs). A known dominant source for these volatile organic compounds is the biosphere. Approximately 1.1 Gt of carbon is emitted from biogenic sources every year on a global scale. In comparison only app. 0.15 Gt are emitted from anthropogenic sources. The emission of VOCs has a high influence on the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere as they contribute to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosols (SOA). One major limitation in advancing the understanding of this ozone and aerosol generation is the technical ability to accurately measure these volatile organics. Previous studies focused on the detection of a defined set of NMOC (non-methane organic carbon) compounds. However, the integration of these single compound measurements to the sum of organic carbon might only represent a lower limit of atmospheric carbon concentrations, since none of these methods is able to analyze all organic compounds present in the atmosphere as a whole. A few studies are known that report on total NMOC concentration measurements in ambient air but measurements of the total NMOC exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere are missing. The analysis of the total NMOC concentrations is realized by collecting these compounds on a solid adsorbent material. Due to the special characteristics of the utilized adsorbents a separation of the stable gases CO, CO2 and CH4 from the volatile NMOC fraction is achieved. By subsequent heating of the NMOC adsorbent trap the volatiles are desorbed and converted to CO2 in an oxidation unit. The CO2 is collected on a second preconcentration unit followed by thermal desorption and is detected by an infrared gas analyzer. The system was tested with a set of single calibrated VOC species from permeation devices and compared with a data set obtained under field conditions.

  20. Effects of surface treating methods of high-strength carbon fibers on interfacial properties of epoxy resin matrix composite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Quansheng; Gu, Yizhuo; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to study the effects of surface treating methods, including electrolysis of anodic oxidation, sizing and heat treatment at 200 °C, on physical and chemical properties of T700 grade high-strength carbon fiber GQ4522. The fiber surface roughness, surface energy and chemical properties were analyzed for different treated carbon fibers, using atom force microscopy, contact angle, Fourier transformed infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The results show that the adopted surface treating methods significantly affect surface roughness, surface energy and active chemical groups of the studied carbon fibers. Electrolysis and sizing can increase the roughness, surface energy and chemical groups on surface, while heat treatment leads to decreases in surface energy and chemical groups due to chemical reaction of sizing. Then, unidirectional epoxy 5228 matrix composite laminates were prepared using different treated GQ4522 fibers, and interlaminar shear strength and flexural property were measured. It is revealed that the composite using electrolysis and sizing-fiber has the strongest interfacial bonding strength, indicating the important roles of the two treating processes on interfacial adhesion. Moreover, the composite using heat-treating fiber has lower mechanical properties, which is attributed to the decrease of chemical bonding between fiber surface and matrix after high temperature treatment of fiber.

  1. Combined sonochemical/CVD method for preparation of nanostructured carbon-doped TiO2 thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasoulnezhad, Hossein; Kavei, Ghassem; Ahmadi, Kamran; Rahimipour, Mohammad Reza

    2017-06-01

    The present work reports the successful synthesis of the nanostructured carbon-doped TiO2 thin films on glass substrate by combination of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) and ultrasonic methods, for the first time. In this method the ultrasound waves act as nebulizer for converting of sonochemically prepared TiO2 sol to the mist particles. These mist particles were thermally decomposed in subsequent CVD chamber at 320 °C to produce the carbon-doped TiO2 thin films. The obtained thin films were characterized by means of X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) techniques. The results show that the prepared thin films have anatase crystal structure and nanorod morphology, which calcination of them at 800 °C results in the conversion of nanorods to nanoparticles. In addition, the prepared samples have high transparency, monodispersity and homogeneity. The presence of the carbon element in the structure of the thin films causes the narrowing of the band-gap energy of TiO2 to about 2.8 eV, which results in the improvement of visible light absorption capabilities of the thin film.

  2. Global search for low-lying crystal structures using the artificial force induced reaction method: A case study on carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Makito; Taketsugu, Tetsuya; Kino, Hiori; Tateyama, Yoshitaka; Terakura, Kiyoyuki; Maeda, Satoshi

    2017-05-01

    We propose an approach to perform the global search for low-lying crystal structures from first principles, by combining the artificial force induced reaction (AFIR) method and the periodic boundary conditions (PBCs). The AFIR method has been applied extensively to molecular systems to elucidate the mechanism of chemical reactions such as homogeneous catalysis. The present PBC/AFIR approach found 274 local minima for carbon crystals in the C8 unit cell described by the generalized gradient approximation-Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof functional. Among many newly predicted structures, three low-lying structures, which exhibit somewhat higher energy compared with those previously predicted, such as Cco -C8 (Z -carbon) and M -carbon, are further discussed with calculations of phonon and band dispersion curves. Furthermore, approaches to systematically explore two- or one-dimensional periodic structures are proposed and applied to the C8 unit cell with the slab model. These results suggest that the present approach is highly promising for predicting crystal structures.

  3. Study on effects of carbon impurities and oxygen vacancies in amorphous alumina phosphor prepared via a solution method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakui, Yoshinori; Takahashi, Kanako [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Shan, Yue Jin, E-mail: shan@cc.utsunomiya-u.ac.jp [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Tezuka, Keitaro; Imoto, Hideo [Department of Material and Environmental Chemistry, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yoto, Utsunomiya-shi, Tochigi 321-8585 (Japan); Hosokawa, Shogo; Shinozaki, Norifumi [Tatsumori Ltd., 50 Minami-Kawada, Kami-Yukiai, Tamura-cho, Koriyama-shi, Fukushima 963-0724 (Japan); Ando, Mariko; Maekawa, Hideki [Graduate School of Engineering, Tohoku University, 6-6-04 Aramaki Aoba, Sendai-shi, Miyagi 980-8579 (Japan)

    2015-01-15

    The amorphous alumina phosphors without containing expensive or toxic elements were prepared via a solution method. The obtained sample indicates bluish-white emission centered at 390–430 nm by UV excitation. According to the measurement results of Electron Spin Resonance (ESR), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and organic microanalysis, it is found that the carbon impurities exist in the sample and they are essential for luminescence. On the other hand, {sup 27}Al NMR measurements indicate the presence of Al of 5-coordination. Moreover, there is good correspondence among the excitation spectra of the emission samples, the experimental optical properties of amorphous alumina, and the calculated oxygen vacancies levels in amorphous alumina model. Therefore, the new luminescence mechanism can be proposed as follows; the electrons in valence band are excited to oxygen vacancies bands by UV light and return to ground state through the carbon impurities band, being accompanied by the bluish-white emission. - Highlights: • The amorphous alumina prepared via solution method shows bluish-white emission. • According to the ESR results, carbon impurities are necessary for luminescence. • FT-IR, NMR and UV–vis measurements of the samples were conducted. • Our results indicated that oxygen vacancies play an important role. • We proposed the new luminescence mechanism for amorphous alumina phosphor.

  4. Controllable preparation of helical carbon nanofibers by CCVD method and their characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yongzhong; Ren, Jiao; Chen, Jian; Dai, Zuyang; Li, Binghong; Zhou, Xuesong

    2018-01-01

    Helical carbon nanofibers (HCNFs) with the diameter less than 80 nm were produced through catalytic chemical vapor deposition by acetylene pyrolysis with a catalyst derived from the decomposition of copper tartrate at 270 °C. Thermogravimetric and differential scanning calorimetry, x-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscope were used to characterize the reaction products. The results show that heating rate of copper tartrate has a significant effect on catalyst particle size and fiber morphology. Three different kinds of fiber morphologies can be obtained at the heating rate of 1–10 °C min‑1. The formation mechanism of carbon nanofibers indicates that catalyst particles with symmetric shape and small size were suitable for the growth of regular HCNFs.

  5. Carbon balance of the typical grain crop rotation in Moscow region assessed by eddy covariance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshalkina, Joulia; Yaroslavtsev, Alexis; Vassenev, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Croplands could have equal or even greater net ecosystem production than several natural ecosystems (Hollinger et al., 2004), so agriculture plays a substantial role in mitigation strategies for the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions. In Central Russia, where agricultural soils carbon loses are 9 time higher than natural (forest's) soils ones (Stolbovoi, 2002), the reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in agroecosystems must be the central focus of the scientific efforts. Although the balance of the CO2 mostly attributed to management practices, limited information exists regarding the crop rotation overall as potential of C sequestration. In this study, we present data on carbon balance of the typical grain crop rotation in Moscow region followed for 4 years by measuring CO2 fluxes by paired eddy covariance stations (EC). The study was conducted at the Precision Farming Experimental Fields of the Russian Timiryazev State Agricultural University, Moscow, Russia. The experimental site has a temperate and continental climate and situated in south taiga zone with Arable Sod-Podzoluvisols (Albeluvisols Umbric). Two fields of the four-course rotation were studied in 2013-2016. Crop rotation included winter wheat (Triticum sativum L.), barley (Hordeum vulgare L.), potato crop (Solanum tuberosum L.) and cereal-legume mixture (Vicia sativa L. and Avena sativa L.). Crops sowing occurred during the period from mid-April to mid-May depending on weather conditions. Winter wheat was sown in the very beginning of September and the next year it occurred from under the snow in the phase of tillering. White mustard (Sinapis alba) was sown for green manure after harvesting winter wheat in mid of July. Barley was harvested in mid of August, potato crop was harvested in September. Cereal-legume mixture on herbage was collected depending on the weather from early July to mid-August. Carbon uptake (NEE negative values) was registered only for the fields with winter wheat and white

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF A METHOD TO DESIGN A LOW-CARBON SOCIETY IN SMALL COMMUNITY AND ITS APPLICATION TO PUTRAJAYA, MALAYSIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Yuri; Simson, Janice. J.; Gomi, Kei; Matsuoka, Yuzuru

    In this study, we developed the method to design Low-carbon society for small communities almost without industry, with regarding of costs for countermeasures. Then we applied it to Putrajaya, Malaysia, and estimate Socio-economic indicators, energy demand, CO2 emission in year 2007 and 2025. For countermeasure case in 2025, we set three cases according to their priority; Transport, Renewable energy, Building, and calculated costs for countermeasures also. As a result, it was shown that it is possible to reduce 45% of CO2 emission by 2025 compared to 2007 level. Renewable energy priority case needs the highest cost, and Building and Transport was estimated to be the second and third highest. C-ExSS will help more realistic discussion on the policy and countermeasures for developing low-carbon society based on their costs.

  7. Application of finite elements heterogeneous multi-scale method to eddy currents non destructive testing of carbon composites material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khebbab, Mohamed; Feliachi, Mouloud; El Hadi Latreche, Mohamed

    2018-03-01

    In this present paper, a simulation of eddy current non-destructive testing (EC NDT) on unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced polymer is performed; for this magneto-dynamic formulation in term of magnetic vector potential is solved using finite element heterogeneous multi-scale method (FE HMM). FE HMM has as goal to compute the homogenized solution without calculating the homogenized tensor explicitly, the solution is based only on the physical characteristic known in micro domain. This feature is well adapted to EC NDT to evaluate defect in carbon composite material in microscopic scale, where the defect detection is performed by coil impedance measurement; the measurement value is intimately linked to material characteristic in microscopic level. Based on this, our model can handle different defects such as: cracks, inclusion, internal electrical conductivity changes, heterogeneities, etc. The simulation results were compared with the solution obtained with homogenized material using mixture law, a good agreement was found.

  8. Sequestration and utilization of carbon dioxide by chemical and biological methods for biofuels and biomaterials by chemoautotrophs: Opportunities and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakur, Indu Shekhar; Kumar, Manish; Varjani, Sunita J; Wu, Yonghong; Gnansounou, Edgard; Ravindran, Sindhu

    2018-05-01

    To meet the CO 2 emission reduction targets, carbon dioxide capture and utilization (CCU) comes as an evolve technology. CCU concept is turning into a feedstock and technologies have been developed for transformation of CO 2 into useful organic products. At industrial scale, utilization of CO 2 as raw material is not much significant as compare to its abundance. Mechanisms in nature have evolved for carbon concentration, fixation and utilization. Assimilation and subsequent conversion of CO 2 into complex molecules are performed by the photosynthetic and chemolithotrophic organisms. In the last three decades, substantial research is carry out to discover chemical and biological conversion of CO 2 in various synthetic and biological materials, such as carboxylic acids, esters, lactones, polymer biodiesel, bio-plastics, bio-alcohols, exopolysaccharides. This review presents an over view of catalytic transformation of CO 2 into biofuels and biomaterials by chemical and biological methods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots from biomass via simple one-pot method and exploration of their application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiming; Duan, Jialong; Yang, Wen; Li, Xueming; Mo, Jinghui; Yang, Peizhi; Tang, Qunwei

    2018-03-01

    Pursuit of low-cost and large-scale method to prepare carbon quantum dots (CQDs) is a persistent objective in recent years. In this work, we have successfully synthesized a series of nitrogen-doped carbon quantum dots (N-CQDs) under different hydrothermal temperature employing Eichhornia crassipes (ECs) as precursors. Considering the pollution ability to water and low-cost, this study may direct the novel path to convert waste material to useful quantum dots. After measurements such as TEM, XRD, Raman, XPS, PL as well as the UV-vis absorbance ability, outstanding optical properties have been discovered. In this fashion, solar cells are tentative to be fabricated, yielding the maximized solar-to-electrical conversion efficiency of 0.17% with a good fill factor of 67%. Meanwhile, the above-mentioned quantum dots also show the up-conversion ability, suggesting the potential application in infrared detection or broadening light-absorbing devices.

  10. A method for creating microporous carbon materials with excellent CO2-adsorption capacity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Dan; Lei, Cheng; Wang, En-Min; Li, Wen-Cui; Lu, An-Hui

    2014-01-01

    A new synthetic approach for the fabrication of microporous carbon materials (HCMs) by using discrete chelating zinc species as dynamic molecular porogens to create extra micropores that enhance their CO2-adsorption capacity and selectivity is reported. During the carbonization process, the evaporation of the in situ-formed Zn species would create additional nanochannels that contribute to the additional micropore volume for CO2 adsorption. The resultant HCMs show an increased number of micropores, with sizes in the range 0.7-1.0 nm and a high CO2 -adsorption capacity of 5.4 mmol g(-1) (23.8 wt%) at 273 K and 3.8 mmol g(-1) (16.7 wt%) at 298 K and 1 bar, which are superior to those of most carbon-based adsorbents with N-doping or high specific surface areas. Dynamic gas-separation measurements, by using 16% CO2 in N2 (v/v) as a feedstock, demonstrated that CO2 could be effectively separated from N2 under ambient conditions and shows a high separation factor (S(CO2)/N2=110) for CO2 over N2, thereby reflecting a strongly competitive CO2 -adsorption capacity. If the feedstock contained water vapor, the dynamic capacity of CO2 was almost identical to that measured under dry conditions, thus indicating that the carbon material had excellent tolerance to humidity. Easy CO2 release could be realized by purging an argon flow through the fixed-bed adsorber at 298 K, thus indicating good regeneration ability. Copyright © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Method of measuring interface area of activated carbons in condensed phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dmitriyev, D. S.; Agafonov, D. V.; Kiseleva, E. A.; Mikryukova, M. A.

    2018-01-01

    In this work, we investigated the correlation between the heat of wetting of super-capacitor electrode material (activated carbon) with condensed phases (electrolytes based on homologous series of phosphoric acid esters) and the capacity of the supercapacitor. The surface area of the electrode-electrolyte interface was calculated according to the obtained correlations using the conventional formula for calculating the capacitance of a capacitor.

  12. Method to assess the carbon footprint at product level in the dairy industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flysjö, Anna Maria; Thrane, Mikkel; Hermansen, John Erik

    2014-01-01

    associated with raw milk are allocated based on a weighted fat and protein content (1:1.4). Data from the dairy company Arla Foods give 1.1, 8.1, 6.5, 7.4 and 1.2 kg carbon dioxide equivalents per kg of fresh dairy product, butter and butter blend, cheese, milk powder and whey based product, and other...

  13. Passive Signals from Aggressive Methods: The Origin and Implications of Organic Material in a Carbonate Stromatolite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petryshyn, V.; Bailey, J.; Stamps, B. W.; Stevenson, B. S.; Corsetti, F. A.

    2017-12-01

    Microbial activity can play a role in the construction of carbonate features like stromatolites and thrombolites, but determining whether microbes were directly or indirectly involved in the formation can be difficult—an endeavor that becomes more difficult as geologic time passes and organic signals degrade. In order to assess our ability to decipher the role of microbes in stromatolite formation, DNA (geologically short-lived) and alkanes (potentially geologically long-lived) were extracted and analyzed from finely-laminated Holocene carbonate stromatolites of Walker Lake, Nevada. The stromatolitic laminations were typically between 50 and 100 microns thick. The surrounding sediment and lake water was also sampled, for comparison. SSU rRNA gene sequencing suggests that a large percentage (25-40 % relative abundance) of the microbial community found within the stromatolite is comprised of ambient lake algae, not known to form stromatolite-building mats given their size vs. stromatolite lamination thickness, rather than the usual taxa associated with the formation of stromatolites. Other minor taxa were identified, including the bacterial families Cyanobacteria, Flavobacteriaceae, and Rhodobacteraceae. Mirroring the DNA results, the carbon isotopic compositions of the alkanes were largely indistinguishable from the limnic biomass dominated by lake algae. The results suggest that organic matter was passively incorporated into the carbonate structure from the lake as it accreted. Although evidence of life was abundant in the stromatolite, a direct role (builders) or even an indirect role (tenants) is difficult to establish, as the 16S/18S and lipid biomarkers appear to simply originate from the water column (squatters) and not from a unique microbial mat. In the absence of in situ analyses during the formation of the stromatolite, it may be difficult to disentangle the builders from the tenants and/or squatters based solely on molecular or organic geochemical data

  14. A simple method to clamp end-tidal carbon dioxide during rest and exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olin, J Tod; Dimmen, Andrew C; Subudhi, Andrew W; Roach, Robert C

    2012-09-01

    Carbon dioxide regulates ventilation and cerebral blood flow during exercise. There are significant limitations in breathing systems designed to control end-tidal gas concentrations when used during high-intensity exercise. We designed a simple, inexpensive breathing system which controls end-tidal carbon dioxide (PET CO2) during exercise from rest to peak work capacity (W(max)). The system is operated by an investigator who, in response to breath-by-breath PET CO2, titrates flow of a 10 % CO(2), 21 % O(2) mixture into an open-ended 5-L inspiratory reservoir. To demonstrate system efficacy, nine fit male subjects performed two maximal, incremental exercise tests (25 W min(-1) ramp) on a cycle ergometer: a poikilocapnic control trial in which PET CO2 varied with work intensity, and an experimental trial, in which we planned to clamp PET CO2 at 50 mmHg. With our breathing system, we maintained PET CO2 at 51 ± 2 mmHg throughout exercise (rest, 50 ± 2; W(max), 52 ± 5 mmHg; mean ± SD) despite large changes in ventilation (range 27-65 at rest, 134-185 L min(-1) BTPS at W (max)) and carbon dioxide production (range 0.3-0.7 at rest, 4.5-5.5 L min(-1) at W (max)). This simple, inexpensive system achieves PET CO2 control at rest and throughout exercise.

  15. Improved electroless plating method through ultrasonic spray atomization for depositing silver nanoparticles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Qi; Xie, Ming; Liu, Yichun; Yi, Jianhong

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Electroless plating method assisted by ultrasonic spray atomization was developed. • This method leads to much more uniform silver coatings on MWCNTs. • The plating parameters affect the layer morphologies a lot. - Abstract: A novel method was developed to deposit nanosized silver particles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The electroless plating of silver on MWCNTs accomplished in small solution drops generated by ultrasonic spray atomization, which inhibited excessive growth of silver particles and led to much more uniform nanometer grain-sized coatings. The results showed that pretreatment was essential for silver particles to deposit on the MWCNTs, and the electrolyte concentration and reaction temperature were important parameters which had a great influence on the morphology and structure of the silver coatings. Possible mechanisms of this method are also discussed in the paper.

  16. Improved electroless plating method through ultrasonic spray atomization for depositing silver nanoparticles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Qi [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Xie, Ming [Kunming Institute of Precious Metals, Kunming 650106 (China); Liu, Yichun, E-mail: liuyichun@kmust.edu.cn [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China); Yi, Jianhong [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Kunming University of Science and Technology, Kunming 650093 (China)

    2017-07-01

    Highlights: • Electroless plating method assisted by ultrasonic spray atomization was developed. • This method leads to much more uniform silver coatings on MWCNTs. • The plating parameters affect the layer morphologies a lot. - Abstract: A novel method was developed to deposit nanosized silver particles on multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs). The electroless plating of silver on MWCNTs accomplished in small solution drops generated by ultrasonic spray atomization, which inhibited excessive growth of silver particles and led to much more uniform nanometer grain-sized coatings. The results showed that pretreatment was essential for silver particles to deposit on the MWCNTs, and the electrolyte concentration and reaction temperature were important parameters which had a great influence on the morphology and structure of the silver coatings. Possible mechanisms of this method are also discussed in the paper.

  17. A method for measuring losses of soil carbon by heterotrophic respiration from peat soils under oil palms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jenny; Manning, Frances; Smith, Jo; Arn Teh, Yit

    2017-04-01

    The effects of drainage and deforestation of South East Asian peat swamp forests for the development of oil palm plantations has received considerable attention in both mainstream media and academia, and is the source of significant discussion and debate. However, data on the long-term carbon losses from these peat soils as a result of this land use change is still limited and the methods with which to collect this data are still developing. Here we present the ongoing evolution and implementation of a method for separating autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration by sampling carbon dioxide emissions at increasing distance from palm trees. We present the limitations of the method, modelling approaches and results from our studies. In 2011 we trialled this method in Sumatra, Indonesia and collected rate measurements over a six day period in three ages of oil palm. In the four year oil palm site there were thirteen collars that had no roots present and from these the peat based carbon losses were recorded to be 0.44 g CO2 m2 hr-1 [0.34; 0.57] (equivalent to 39 t CO2 ha-1 yr-1 [30; 50]) with a mean water table depth of 0.40 m, or 63% of the measured total respiration across the plot. In the two older palm sites of six and seven years, only one collar out of 100 had no roots present, and thus a linear random effects model was developed to calculate heterotrophic emissions for different distances from the palm tree. This model suggested that heterotrophic respiration was between 37 - 59% of total respiration in the six year old plantation and 39 - 56% in the seven year old plantation. We applied this method in 2014 to a seven year old plantation, in Sarawak, Malaysia, modifying the method to include the heterotrophic contribution from beneath frond piles and weed covered areas. These results indicated peat based carbon losses to be 0.42 g CO2 m2 hr-1 [0.27;0.59] (equivalent to 37 t CO2 ha-1 yr-1 [24; 52]) at an average water table depth of 0.35 m, 47% of the measured

  18. Ultrasound-Assist Extrusion Methods for the Fabrication of Polymer Nanocomposites Based on Polypropylene/Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos A. Ávila-Orta

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP with different melt flow indexes (MFI were used to fabricate nanocomposites (NCs with 10 wt % loadings of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs using ultrasound-assisted extrusion methods to determine their effect on the morphology, melt flow, and electrical properties of the NCs. Three different types of iPPs were used with MFIs of 2.5, 34 and 1200 g/10 min. Four different NC fabrication methods based on melt extrusion were used. In the first method melt extrusion fabrication without ultrasound assistance was used. In the second and third methods, an ultrasound probe attached to a hot chamber located at the exit of the die was used to subject the sample to fixed frequency and variable frequency, respectively. The fourth method is similar to the first method, with the difference being that the carbon nanotubes were treated in a fluidized air-bed with an ultrasound probe before being used in the fabrication of the NCs with no ultrasound assistance during extrusion. The samples were characterized by MFI, Optical microscopy (OM, Scanning electron microscopy (SEM, Transmission electron microscopy (TEM, electrical surface resistivity, and electric charge. MFI decreases in all cases with addition of MWCNTs with the largest decrease observed for samples with the highest MFI. The surface resistivity, which ranged from 1013 to 105 Ω/sq, and electric charge, were observed to depend on the ultrasound-assisted fabrication method as well as on the melt flow index of the iPP. A relationship between agglomerate size and area ratio with electric charge was found. Several trends in the overall data were identified and are discussed in terms of MFI and the different fabrication methods.

  19. Comparison of cellulose extraction methods for analysis of stable-isotope ratios of carbon and oxygen in plant material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cullen, Louise E; Macfarlane, Craig

    2005-05-01

    The Jayme-Wise and diglyme-HCl methods for extracting cellulose from plant material for stable-isotope analysis differ considerably in ease of use, with the latter requiring significantly less time and specialized equipment. However, the diglyme-HCl method leaves a small lignin residue in the crude cellulose that may affect stable-isotope values, whereas alpha-cellulose produced by the Jayme-Wise method is relatively pure. We examined whether adding a bleaching step to the diglyme-HCl method could produce cellulose of comparable purity to alpha-cellulose by comparing the yield, percent carbon, and carbon (delta13C) and oxygen (delta18O) stable isotope ratios of the two celluloses. We tested each method on the wood of five species that differ in ease of delignification, Eucalyptus maculata Hook., E. botryoides Sm., E. resinifera Sm., Pinus pinaster Ait. and Callitris glaucophylla J. Thompson & L.A.S. Johnson, as well as the foliage of C. glaucophylla. For hardwoods such as the eucalypts, the diglyme-HCl method without bleaching produced cellulose with delta13C and delta18O ratios similar to alpha-cellulose. For the softwood, C. glaucophylla, 3 h of bleaching with acidified chlorite following treatment with diglyme-HCl produced cellulose with delta13C and delta18O ratios similar to alpha-cellulose. Bleached and unbleached crude celluloses and alpha-cellulose of P. pinaster were similar in delta18O, but not delta13C. Both types of crude cellulose produced from the foliage of C. glaucophylla had significantly different isotope ratios from alpha-cellulose. Overall, the diglyme-HCl method, with or without bleaching, appears to be a simple, fast method for extracting alpha-cellulose from hardwoods for stable-isotope analyses, but its suitability for softwoods and foliage needs to be evaluated depending on the species.

  20. Ultrasound-Assist Extrusion Methods for the Fabrication of Polymer Nanocomposites Based on Polypropylene/Multi-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ávila-Orta, Carlos A.; Quiñones-Jurado, Zoe V.; Waldo-Mendoza, Miguel A.; Rivera-Paz, Erika A.; Cruz-Delgado, Víctor J.; Mata-Padilla, José M.; González-Morones, Pablo; Ziolo, Ronald F.

    2015-01-01

    Isotactic polypropylenes (iPP) with different melt flow indexes (MFI) were used to fabricate nanocomposites (NCs) with 10 wt % loadings of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using ultrasound-assisted extrusion methods to determine their effect on the morphology, melt flow, and electrical properties of the NCs. Three different types of iPPs were used with MFIs of 2.5, 34 and 1200 g/10 min. Four different NC fabrication methods based on melt extrusion were used. In the first method melt extrusion fabrication without ultrasound assistance was used. In the second and third methods, an ultrasound probe attached to a hot chamber located at the exit of the die was used to subject the sample to fixed frequency and variable frequency, respectively. The fourth method is similar to the first method, with the difference being that the carbon nanotubes were treated in a fluidized air-bed with an ultrasound probe before being used in the fabrication of the NCs with no ultrasound assistance during extrusion. The samples were characterized by MFI, Optical microscopy (OM), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electrical surface resistivity, and electric charge. MFI decreases in all cases with addition of MWCNTs with the largest decrease observed for samples with the highest MFI. The surface resistivity, which ranged from 1013 to 105 Ω/sq, and electric charge, were observed to depend on the ultrasound-assisted fabrication method as well as on the melt flow index of the iPP. A relationship between agglomerate size and area ratio with electric charge was found. Several trends in the overall data were identified and are discussed in terms of MFI and the different fabrication methods. PMID:28793686

  1. An Isotope Dilution Method for High-frequency Measurements of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon concentration in the Surface Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, K.; Bender, M. L.; Wanninkhof, R. H.; Cassar, N.

    2013-12-01

    Dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) is one of the most important species in the ocean carbon system. An autonomous system using isotope dilution as its core method has been developed to obtain high-frequency measurements of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations in the surface ocean. This system accurately mixes a seawater sample and a 13C-labeled sodium bicarbonate solution (spike). The mixed solution is then acidified and sent through a gas permeable membrane contactor. CO2 derived from DIC in the mixture is extracted by a CO2-free gas stream, and is sent to a cavity ring-down spectrometer to analyze its 13C/12C ratio. [DIC] of the seawater can then be derived from the measured 13C/12C, the known mixing ratio and the [DI13C] of the spike. The method has been tested under a wide [DIC] range (1800-2800 μmol/kg) in the laboratory. It has also been deployed on a cruise that surveyed ocean waters to the south of Florida. At a sampling resolution of 4 minutes (15 samples per hour), the relative standard deviation of DIC determined from the laboratory tests and the field deployment is ×0.07% and ×0.09%, respectively. The accuracy of the method is better than 0.1% except where [DIC] varies faster than 5 μmol/kg per minute. Based on the laboratory and field evaluations, we conclude that this method can provide accurate underway [DIC] measurements at high resolution in most oceanic regions. Schematic illustration of the work flow.

  2. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Xiaoguang; Zhao, Xu; Li, Yi; Yang, Tao; Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke

    2015-01-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO 3 layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO 3 layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO 3 coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L). - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of enamel slices etched for 60 s and repaired by the two-step method with Glu concentration of 20.00 mmol/L. (A) The boundary (dotted line) of the repaired areas (b) and unrepaired areas (a). (Some selected areas of etched enamel slices were coated with a nail polish before the reaction, which was removed by acetone after the reaction); (B) high magnification image of Ga, (C) high magnification image of Gb. In situ fabrication of carbonated

  3. In situ synthesis carbonated hydroxyapatite layers on enamel slices with acidic amino acids by a novel two-step method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Xiaoguang [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Zhao, Xu [College of Chemistry, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Li, Yi, E-mail: lyi99@jlu.edu.cn [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China); Yang, Tao [Department of Stomatology, Children' s Hospital of Changchun, 130051 (China); Yan, Xiujuan; Wang, Ke [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, The Hospital of Stomatology, Jilin University, Changchun 130021 (China)

    2015-09-01

    In situ fabrication of carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) remineralization layer on an enamel slice was completed in a novel, biomimetic two-step method. First, a CaCO{sub 3} layer was synthesized on the surface of demineralized enamel using an acidic amino acid (aspartic acid or glutamate acid) as a soft template. Second, at the same concentration of the acidic amino acid, rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite was produced with the CaCO{sub 3} layer as a sacrificial template and a reactant. The morphology, crystallinity and other physicochemical properties of the crystals were characterized using field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), Fourier transform infrared spectrometry (FTIR), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and energy-dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX), respectively. Acidic amino acid could promote the uniform deposition of hydroxyapatite with rod-like crystals via absorption of phosphate and carbonate ions from the reaction solution. Moreover, compared with hydroxyapatite crystals coated on the enamel when synthesized by a one-step method, the CaCO{sub 3} coating that was synthesized in the first step acted as an active bridge layer and sacrificial template. It played a vital role in orienting the artificial coating layer through the template effect. The results show that the rod-like carbonated hydroxyapatite crystals grow into bundles, which are similar in size and appearance to prisms in human enamel, when using the two-step method with either aspartic acid or acidic glutamate (20.00 mmol/L). - Graphical abstract: FESEM images of enamel slices etched for 60 s and repaired by the two-step method with Glu concentration of 20.00 mmol/L. (A) The boundary (dotted line) of the repaired areas (b) and unrepaired areas (a). (Some selected areas of etched enamel slices were coated with a nail polish before the reaction, which was removed by acetone after the reaction); (B) high magnification image of Ga, (C) high magnification image of Gb. In situ fabrication of

  4. Towards optimized methods to study viral impacts on soil microbial carbon cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trubl, G. G.; Roux, S.; Jang, H. B.; Solonenko, N.; Sullivan, M. B.; Rich, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    Permafrost contains 50% of global soil carbon and is rapidly thawing. While the fate of this carbon is currently unknown, it will undoubtedly be shaped by microbes and their associated viruses, which modulate host activities via mortality and metabolic control. However, little is known about soil viruses generally and their impact on terrestrial biogeochemistry; this is partially due to the presence of inhibitory substances (e.g. humic acids) in soils that interfere with sample processing and sequence-based metagenomics surveys. To address this problem, we examined viral populations in three different peat soils along a permafrost thaw gradient. These samples yielded low viral DNA recoveries, and shallow metagenomic sequencing, but still resulted in the recovery of 40 viral genome fragments. Genome- and network-based classification suggested that these new references represented 11 viral clusters, and ecological patterns (based upon non-redundant fragment recruitment) showed that viral populations were distinct in each habitat. Although only 31% of the genes could be functionally classified, pairwise genome comparisons classified 63% of the viruses taxonomically. Additionally, comparison of the 40 viral genome fragments to 53 previously recovered fragments from the same site showed no overlap, suggesting only a small portion of the resident viral community has been sampled. A follow-up experiment was performed to remove more humics during extraction and thereby obtain better viral metagenomes. Three DNA extraction protocols were tested (CTAB, PowerSoil, and Wizard columns) and the DNA was further purified with an AMPure clean-up. The PowerSoil kit maximized DNA yield (3x CTAB and 6x Wizard), and yielded the purest DNA (based on NanoDrop 260:230 ratio). Given the important roles of viruses in biogeochemical cycles in better-studied systems, further research and humic-removal optimization on these thawing permafrost-associated viral communities is needed to clarify

  5. Methods and Tools for Measurement,Monitoring and Verification for Soil Carbon Sequestration (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, C. W.

    2009-12-01

    Agriculture, forests, and other working lands, when properly managed, provide low cost and viable options for reducing greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions while providing additional carbon (C) sinks. These lands in the United States (U.S.) have the capacity to sequester about 650 million metric tons of carbon dioxide (CO2) every year, offsetting up to 11 % of U.S. greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions annually. However to fully account for soil changes in soil c requires better measuring and monitoring sustems. To meet this interest a transparent and verifiable accounting system for estimating the amounts and uncertainties of soil carbon stock changes and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is needed at multiple scales. The accounting system must include climate, land use and management databases linked to ecological models and temporal and spatial scaling processes. Protocols need to be established for measurement of soil C stock changes and trace gas emissions and develop methodologies for monitoring soil C stock changes and trace gas emissions. The objective of this paper is to synthesize critical issues and methodological advances made to detect changes in soil C at the field and regional scales as a result of changes in management or land use. New technologies for soil C measurements can help reduce costs and time for C measurements. New technologies include Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS), Mid Infra Red Spectroscopy (MIRS), Inelastic Neutron Scattering (INS) and dry combustion. Elements of an accounting system must be based on the best science available to provide accurate estimates of GHG sources and sinks within resource constraints; be verifiable by an independent third party; and be able to incorporate new data at finer resolutions as becomes more readily available. At present the system could utilize sites for physical measurements, existing databases, and models and remote sensing to extrapolate to larger scales. International collaboration will help develop

  6. Carbon balance at represenative agroecosystems of Central European Russia with different crops assessed by eddy covariance method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavtsev, Alexis; Meshalkina, Joulia; Mazirov, Ilya

    2016-04-01

    Despite the fact that in Russia cropland's soils carbon loses 9 time higher than forest's soils ones (Stolbovoi, 2002), agroecosystems were not given sufficient attention and most of the papers are devoted to forestry and natural ecosystems. Carbon balance was calculated at the Precision Farming Experimental Fields of the Russian Timiryazev State Agricultural University, Moscow, Russia, for two agroecosystems with different crops from the same crop rotation studied for 2 years. The experimental site has a temperate and continental climate and situated in south taiga zone with Arable Sod-Podzoluvisols (Albeluvisols Umbric). Vertical fluxes of carbon dioxide were measured with eddy covariance technique, statistical method to measure and calculate turbulent fluxes within atmospheric boundary layers (Burba, 2013). Crop rotation included potato, winter wheat, barley and vetch and oat mix. Two fields of the same crop rotation were studied in 2013-2014. One of the fields (A) was used in 2013 for barley planting (Hordeum vulgare L.). The field B was in 2013 used for planting together vetch (Vicia sativa L.) and oats (Avena sativa L.). Inversely oats and vetch grass mixt was sown in 2014 on field A. Winter wheat was sown on field A in the very beginning of September. On the second field (B) in 2014 winter wheat occurred from under the snow in the phase of tillering, after harvesting it in mid of July, white mustard (Sinapis alba) was sown for green manure. Carbon uptake (NEE negative values) was registered only for the field with winter wheat and white mustard; perhaps because the two crops were cultivated on the field within one growing season. Three other cases showed CO2 emission. Great difference in 82 g C m-2 per year in NEE between two fields with vetch and oat mix was related to higher difference in grass yields. NEE for barley field was positive during the whole year; considering only the growing season, NEE for barley was 100 g C m-2 lower and was negative. Closed

  7. Nanoscale, conformal films of graphitic carbon nitride deposited at room temperature: a method for construction of heterojunction devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladva, Satyam A; Travis, William; Quesada-Cabrera, Raul; Rosillo-Lopez, Martin; Afandi, Abdulkareem; Li, Yaomin; Jackman, Richard B; Bear, Joseph C; Parkin, Ivan P; Blackman, Christopher; Salzmann, Christoph G; Palgrave, Robert G

    2017-11-09

    Graphitic carbon nitrides (GCNs) represent a family of 2D materials composed of carbon and nitrogen with variable amounts of hydrogen, used in a wide variety of applications. We report a method of room temperature thin film deposition which allows ordered GCN layers to be deposited on a very wide variety of substrates, including conductive glass, flexible plastics, nanoparticles and nano-structured surfaces, where they form a highly conformal coating on the nanoscale. Film thicknesses of below 20 nm are achievable. In this way we construct functional nanoscale heterojunctions between TiO 2 nanoparticles and GCN, capable of producing H 2 photocatalytically under visible light irradiation. The films are hydrogen rich, have a band gap around 1.7 eV, display transmission electron microscopy lattice fringes as well as X-ray diffraction peaks despite being deposited at room temperature, and show characteristic Raman and IR bands. We use cluster etching to reveal the chemical environments of C and N in GCN using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. We elucidate the mechanism of this deposition, which operates via sequential surface adsorption and reaction analogous to atomic layer deposition. The mechanism may have implications for current models of carbon nitride formation.

  8. Effect of pyrolysis temperature on the properties of carbon/nickel nanocomposites prepared by sol–gel method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mansour, N. Ben, E-mail: Nabil.Benmansour@fsg.rnu.tn [Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Gabès University, Faculty of Sciences in Gabès, Gabès (Tunisia); Najeh, I.; Mansouri, S. [Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Gabès University, Faculty of Sciences in Gabès, Gabès (Tunisia); El Mir, L. [Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Gabès University, Faculty of Sciences in Gabès, Gabès (Tunisia); Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), College of Sciences, Department of Physics, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Synthesis of nickel oxide nanoparticles in carbon structures. • Presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) around Ni nanoparticles for the sample treated at high pyrolysis temperature. • DC conductivity exhibited the presence of conduction percolation phenomenon and the dominance of conduction model 3D-GVRH in the studied materials. • From AC conductance PF/Ni nanocomposites have two behaviors: semiconductor and metal, depending on the pyrolysis temperature. • Appearance of a negative differential resistance (NDR) at room temperature in the sample treated at 600 °C. - Abstract: Carbon–nickel nanocomposites (C/Ni) were prepared by sol–gel method after the incorporation of nickel oxide (NiO) nanoparticles in organic matrix based on pyrogallol-formaldehyde (PF). The nanocomposites heated under inert atmosphere have been characterized by various techniques such as X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), and electrical analysis. The XRD spectra exhibited the presence of NiO or metallic Ni phase in amorphous carbon matrix at low pyrolysis temperature, while at 1000 °C the graphite structure line was observed. The TEM images indicate the presence of multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWNT) around Ni nanoparticles for the sample treated at high pyrolysis temperature. The AC conductance shows that our nanocomposites have two behaviors: semiconductor and metal, depending on the pyrolysis temperature. The voltage–current V(I) characteristics of the compound show two different regions: an Ohmic region at low current and a negative differential resistance (NDR) region at higher current. This switching phenomenal behavior has been explained by an electrothermal model.

  9. A survey of methods to immobilize tritium and carbon-14 arising from a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, P.

    1991-02-01

    This report reviews the literature on methods to separate and immobilize tritium ( 3 H) and carbon-14 ( 14 C) released from U0 2 fuel in a nuclear fuel reprocessing plant. It was prepared as part of a broader review of fuel reprocessing waste management methods that might find future application in Canada. The calculated inventories of both 3 H and 14 C in used fuel are low; special measures to limit releases of these radionuclides from reprocessing plants are not currently in place, and may not be necessary in future. If required, however, several possible approaches to the concentration and immobilization of both radionuclides are available for development. Technology to control these radionuclides in reactor process streams is in general more highly developed than for reprocessing plant effluent, and some control methods may be adaptable to reprocessing applications

  10. Chitosan Derivatives/Calcium Carbonate Composite Capsules Prepared by the Layer-by-Layer Deposition Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Sasaki

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Core/shell capsules composed of calcium carbonate whisker core (rod-like shape and chitosan/chitosansulfate shell were prepared by the layer-by-layer deposition technique. Two chitosan samples of different molecular weights (Mw=9.7×104 and 1.09×106g·mol-1 were used as original materials. Hollow capsules were also obtained by dissolution of the core in hydrochloric acid. Electron microscopy revealed that the surface of the shell is rather ragged associated with some agglomerates. The shell thickness l obeys a linear relation with respect to the number of deposited layers m as l=md+a(a>0. The values of d (thickness per layer were 4.0 and 1.0 nm for the higher and lower Mw chitosan materials, respectively, both of which are greater than the thickness of the monolayer. The results suggest that the feature of the deposition does not obey an ideal homogeneous monolayer-by-monolayer deposition mechanism. Shell crosslinked capsules were also prepared via photodimerization reaction of cinnamoyl groups after a deposition of cinnamoyl chitosan to the calcium carbonate whisker core. The degree of crosslink was not enough to stabilize the shell structure, and hollow capsule was not obtained.

  11. Development of the mitigation method for carbon steel corrosion with ceramics in PWR secondary system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamura, Masato; Shibasaki, Osamu; Miyazaki, Toyoaki; Kaneko, Tetsuji

    2012-09-01

    To verify the effect of depositing ceramic (TiO 2 , La 2 O 3 , and Y 2 O 3 ) on carbon steel to mitigate corrosion, corrosion tests were conducted under simulated chemistry conditions in a PWR secondary system. Test specimens (STPT410) were prepared with and without deposited ceramics. The ceramics were deposited on the specimens under high-temperature and high-pressure water conditions. Corrosion tests were conducted under high pH conditions (9.8) with a flow rate of 1.0-4.7 m/s at 185 deg. C for 200 hours. At a flow rate of 1.0 m/s, the amount of corrosion of the specimens with the ceramics was less than half of that of the specimens without the ceramics. As the flow rate increased, the amount of corrosion increased. However, even at a flow rate of 4.7 m/s, the amount of corrosion was reduced by approximately 30% by depositing the ceramics. After the corrosion tests, the surfaces of the specimens were analyzed with SEM and XRD. When the deposited ceramic was TiO 2 , the surface was densely covered with fine particles (less than 1 μm). From XRD analysis, these particles were identified as ilmenite (FeTiO 3 ). We consider that ilmenite may play an important role in mitigating the corrosion of carbon steel. (authors)

  12. Carbonized mix kerosene and water with cavitation method as an alternative energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casnan, Irzaman

    2017-03-01

    The world's population continuously grows at a quarter million people per day. This fast-growing population had raised the world energy consumption up to 474 × 1018 J per year with 80 to 90 percent derived from the combustion of fossil fuels. It is estimated that the fossil energy will be lasted in 42 years. Rice husk is an alternative of non-fossil energy that may be utilized in traditional way of cooking (burning it in a traditional stove). However, burning the husk produces some carbon gasses that may pollute the air. In order to reduce the gas pollution, the gas may be mixed with kerosene and water using sonochemical technique to produce dry steam. This steam is a good fuel for a traditional stove. It is confirmed that 1 liter of water can be boiled in 11 minutes when the temperature of the water is 95°C while the stove is 264°C. the sonochemical technique had successfully increased the efficiency of the energy consumption of the stove up to 17%. The carbonized fuel is also not expensive since its cost is only around 6 C (IDR 570) for boiling 1 liter of water.

  13. Feasibility study of various sulphonation methods for transforming carbon nanotubes into catalysts for the esterification of palm fatty acid distillate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shuit, Siew Hoong; Tan, Soon Huat

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • First report on the production of biodiesel from low-value industrial by-product using sulphonated MWCNTs as catalyst. • Various sulphonation methods were used to transform MWCNTs into catalysts. • SO 3 H were successfully grafted on the surface of MWCNTs, which resulted in a high biodiesel yield and reuse capacity. • The maximum FAME yield by sulphonated MWCNTs was higher than for other popular solid acid catalysts. - Abstract: Sulphonated multi-walled carbon nanotubes were synthesised and utilised as catalysts to transform palm fatty acid distillate, the low-value by-product of palm oil refineries, into the more valuable product of biodiesel. The most common method to prepare carbon-based solid acid catalysts is thermal treatment with concentrated sulphuric acid, which is a time-consuming and energy-intensive process. Therefore, the feasibility of other sulphonation methods, such as the in situ polymerisation of acetic anhydride and sulphuric acid, the thermal decomposition of ammonium sulphate and the in situ polymerisation of poly(sodium4-styrenesulphonate), were examined in this study. The esterification reaction was performed at 170 °C for 3 h at a methanol to palm fatty acid distillate ratio of 20 and catalyst loading of 2 wt% in a pressurised reactor. The fatty acid methyl esters yields achieved by the sulphonated multi-walled carbon nanotubes prepared via thermal treatment with concentrated sulphuric acid, the in situ polymerisation of acetic anhydride and sulphuric acid, the thermal decomposition of ammonium sulphate and the in situ polymerisation of poly(sodium4-styrenesulphonate) were 78.1%, 85.8%, 88.0% and 93.4%, respectively. All catalysts could maintain a high catalytic activity even during the fifth cycle. Among the sulphonation methods, the in situ polymerisation of poly(sodium4-styrenesulphonate) produced the catalyst with the highest acid group density. In addition, the resonance structures of the benzenesulphonic acid

  14. Novel method to prepare multiwalled carbon nanotube/poly(dimethyl siloxane) (MWCNT/PDMS) non-conducting composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goswami, Kaustav; Daugaard, Anders Egede; Skov, Anne Ladegaard

    In this study a new method of carbon nanotube (CNT) incorporation was employed for the preparation of ultraviolet (UV) curable CNT filled poly (dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) composites. The composites were designed to contain loadings of CNT above the percolation threshold without becoming conductive...... due to a localized distribution of CNT. Ultrasonicated and dispersed multiwalled CNTs were mixed with short chain ,- vinyl terminated PDMS. When the whole mixture containing dispersed CNT and short chain PDMS was irradiated with UV radiation in presence of deficient amount of hexa functional thiol...

  15. Super high-rate fabrication of high-purity carbon nanotube aerogels from floating catalyst method for oil spill cleaning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshnevis, Hamed; Mint, Sandar Myo; Yedinak, Emily; Tran, Thang Q.; Zadhoush, Ali; Youssefi, Mostafa; Pasquali, Matteo; Duong, Hai M.

    2018-02-01

    In this study, we apply an advanced floating catalyst method to fabricate carbon nanotube (CNT) aerogels at super high deposition rate for oil spill cleaning. The aerogels consist of 3D porous network of stacking double-walled CNT bundles with low catalyst impurity (9%) and high thermal stability (650 °C). With high porosity, surface areas, and water contact angles, the CNT aerogels exhibit a high oil adsorption of up to 107 g/g and good reusability of up to four adsorption-burning cycles. This work suggests that the lightweight, porous, and super hydrophobic CNT aerogels can be promising sorbent materials for environmental applications.

  16. Method for producing bio-fuel that integrates heat from carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions to drive biomass gasification reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortright, Randy D [Madison, WI; Dumesic, James A [Verona, WI

    2011-01-18

    A low-temperature catalytic process for converting biomass (preferably glycerol recovered from the fabrication of bio-diesel) to synthesis gas (i.e., H.sub.2/CO gas mixture) in an endothermic gasification reaction is described. The synthesis gas is used in exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reactions, such as Fischer-Tropsch, methanol, or dimethylether syntheses. The heat from the exothermic carbon-carbon bond-forming reaction is integrated with the endothermic gasification reaction, thus providing an energy-efficient route for producing fuels and chemicals from renewable biomass resources.

  17. Comparison of different methods for the determination of total organic carbon and humic substances in Brazilian soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Bragança Alves Fernandes

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACTAiming to compare three different methods for the determination of organic carbon (OC in the soil and fractions of humic substances, seventeen Brazilian soil samples of different classes and textures were evaluated. Amounts of OC in the soil samples and the humic fractions were measured by the dichromate-oxidation method, with and without external heating in a digestion block at 130 °C for 30 min; by the loss-on-ignition method at 450 °C during 5 h and at 600 °C during 6 h; and by the dry combustion method. Dry combustion was used as reference in order to measure the efficiency of the other methods. Soil OC measured by the dichromate-oxidation method with external heating had the highest efficiency and the best results comparing to the reference method. When external heating was not used, the mean recovery efficiency dropped to 71%. The amount of OC was overestimated by the loss-on-ignition methods. Regression equations obtained between total OC contents of the reference method and those of the other methods showed relatively good adjustment, but all intercepts were different from zero (p < 0.01, which suggests that more accuracy can be obtained using not one single correction factor, but considering also the intercept. The Walkley-Black method underestimated the OC contents of the humic fractions, which was associated with the partial oxidation of the humin fraction. Better results were obtained when external heating was used. For the organic matter fractions, the OC in the humic and fulvic acid fractions can be determined without external heating if the reference method is not available, but the humin fraction requires the external heating.

  18. Dual-shale-content method for total organic carbon content evaluation from wireline logs in organic shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nie Xin

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Organic shale is one of the most important unconventional resources all around the world. Total organic carbon (TOC content is an important evaluation parameter of reservoir hydrocarbon source quality. The regular evaluation methods have higher requirements of well logs and core experiment data for statistical regression. Through analyzing the resistivity and gamma ray logging response characteristics of shale content and organic matters, combined with digital rock physics experiment simulation, we put forward and improve the dual-shale-content method for TOC content logging evaluation. The accuracy of this method is verified by actual data processing. The result shows the dual-shale-content method is simple to use and the error is small. And by comparing with the calculation results by using the ΔLogR method, it is revealed that the trend of the TOC content calculated by our method agrees with the core results better. This new method is suitable for the evaluation of TOC content in the area or interval where there is only conventional logs.

  19. Comparing the applicability of some geostatistical methods to predict the spatial distribution of topsoil Calcium Carbonate in part of farmland of Zanjan Province

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarmadian, Fereydoon; Keshavarzi, Ali

    2010-05-01

    Most of soils in iran, were located in the arid and semi-arid regions and have high pH (more than 7) and high amount of calcium carbonate and this problem cause to their calcification.In calcareous soils, plant growing and production is difficult. Most part of this problem, in relation to high pH and high concentration of calcium ion that cause to fixation and unavailability of elements which were dependent to pH, especially Phosphorous and some micro nutrients such as Fe, Zn, Mn and Cu. Prediction of soil calcium carbonate in non-sampled areas and mapping the calcium carbonate variability in order to sustainable management of soil fertility is very important.So, this research was done with the aim of evaluation and analyzing spatial variability of topsoil calcium carbonate as an aspect of soil fertility and plant nutrition, comparing geostatistical methods such as kriging and co-kriging and mapping topsoil calcium carbonate. For geostatistical analyzing, sampling was done with stratified random method and soil samples from 0 to 15 cm depth were collected with auger within 23 locations.In co-kriging method, salinity data was used as auxiliary variable. For comparing and evaluation of geostatistical methods, cross validation were used by statistical parameters of RMSE. The results showed that co-kriging method has the highest correlation coefficient and less RMSE and has the higher accuracy than kriging method to prediction of calcium carbonate content in non-sampled areas.

  20. A novel method for determination of occurrence order of stabilization reactions in carbon fiber precursor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbab, S.; Mirbaha, H.; Zeinolebadi, A.; Nourpanah, P.

    2017-10-01

    Thermal stabilization is an important step in production of carbon fiber from polyacrylonitrile (PAN) precursors. During thermal stabilization step different thermochemical reactions take place almost simultaneously. Understanding the onset and temperature range of the stabilization reactions is a key for adjusting processing parameters such as tension, stretching, etc. However, stabilization reactions are very complex and overlap with each other. In order to separate the stabilization reactions, we combined the results of different thermal analysis techniques, namely Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermogravimetry (TGA) and Thermomechanical Analysis (TMA), to study behaviour of PAN precursors during stabilization. By means of combining the results of these techniques, we were able to determine the temperature range and occurrence order of each of stabilization reactions regardless of the composition of initial PAN fibers and history of fiber formation.

  1. Preparation of Multi-walled Carbon Nano tubes/ Natural Rubber Composite by Wet Mixing Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azira Abdul Aziz; Azira Abdul Aziz; Che Su Mat Saad; Mohamad Rusop Mahmood

    2011-01-01

    Natural rubber/multi-walled carbon nano tubes (Nr/MWCNTs) nanocomposite is formed by incorporating nano tubes in a polymer solution and subsequently evaporating the solvent. Using this technique, nano tubes will be dispersed homogeneously in the NR matrix in an attempt to increase the mechanical properties of these nano composites. Mechanical test results show an increase in the tensile strength for up to 19 times in relation to pure NR. In addition to mechanical testing, the morphology of the MWNTs into NR was studied by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) in order to understand the morphology of the resulting system. Slight shift noted from Raman analyses from each different wt. % of MWCNTs with the NR due to the stress transfer that indicates reinforcement of the nano tubes. (author)

  2. An evaluation of three methods for measuring black carbon in Alert, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sangeeta; Leaitch, W. Richard; Huang, Lin; Veber, Daniel; Kolonjari, Felicia; Zhang, Wendy; Hanna, Sarah J.; Bertram, Allan K.; Ogren, John A.

    2017-12-01

    Absorption of sunlight by black carbon (BC) warms the atmosphere, which may be important for Arctic climate. The measurement of BC is complicated by the lack of a simple definition of BC and the absence of techniques that are uniquely sensitive to BC (e.g., Petzold et al., 2013). At the Global Atmosphere Watch baseline observatory in Alert, Nunavut (82.5° N), BC mass is estimated in three ways, none of which fully represent BC: conversion of light absorption measured with an Aethalometer to give equivalent black carbon (EBC), thermal desorption of elemental carbon (EC) from weekly integrated filter samples to give EC, and measurement of incandescence from the refractory black carbon (rBC) component of individual particles using a single particle soot photometer (SP2). Based on measurements between March 2011 and December 2013, EBC and EC are 2.7 and 3.1 times higher than rBC, respectively. The EBC and EC measurements are influenced by factors other than just BC, and higher estimates of BC are expected from these techniques. Some bias in the rBC measurement may result from calibration uncertainties that are difficult to estimate here. Considering a number of factors, our best estimate of BC mass in Alert, which may be useful for evaluation of chemical transport models, is an average of the rBC and EC measurements with a range bounded by the rBC and EC combined with the respective measurement uncertainties. Winter-, spring-, summer-, and fall-averaged (± atmospheric variability) estimates of BC mass in Alert for this study period are 49 ± 28, 30 ± 26, 22 ± 13, and 29 ± 9 ng m-3, respectively. Average coating thicknesses estimated from the SP2 are 25 to 40 % of the 160-180 nm diameter rBC core sizes. For particles of approximately 200-400 nm optical diameter, the fraction containing rBC cores is estimated to be between 10 and 16 %, but the possibility of smaller undetectable rBC cores in some of the particles cannot be excluded. Mass absorption coefficients

  3. Development and application of an analytical method for the determination of total atmospheric biogenic non-methane organic carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regnery, J.; Dindorf, T.; Hacker, L.; Andres, S.; Kleist, E.; Wildt, J.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2012-04-01

    Most of the organic carbon which is present in the atmosphere is found as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) dominantly emitted by the biosphere. This biogenic emission has a major impact on the chemical and physical properties of the atmosphere by contributing to the formation of tropospheric ozone and secondary organic aerosol (SOA). One major limitation in advancing the understanding of this ozone and aerosol generation is the technical ability to accurately measure the sum of these volatile organics. Frequently used methods focus on the detection of a defined set of non-methane organic compounds (NMOC). However, adding these single compound concentrations might only represent a lower limit of atmospheric carbon concentrations, since no available method is able to analyze all organic compounds present in the atmosphere. A few studies are known that report on total NMOC concentration measurements in ambient air but measurements of the total NMOC exchange between vegetation and the atmosphere are missing. Therefore, we investigated the analysis of the total NMOC concentration by collecting these compounds on a solid adsorbent material for subsequent total carbon analysis. This first step is necessary to separate the stable gases CO, CO2 and CH4 from the volatile NMOC fraction. NMOC was desorbed and converted to CO2 by passing an oxidation unit. The CO2 is collected on a second preconcentration unit followed by thermal desorption and detection by an infrared gas analyzer. As major difficulties we identified the separation of CO2 from the NMOC compounds on the solid adsorbent unit and the choice of the catalytic material. The measurements were accompanied by GC analysis of single calibrated VOC species from permeation devices and measurements by a PTR-MS. Plant chamber measurements with Quercus ilex showed an expected diurnal course which was confirmed by the NMOC analyzer though with a discrepancy during the day of up to 40 %.

  4. A Universal Method to Engineer Metal Oxide-Metal-Carbon Interface for Highly Efficient Oxygen Reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lin; Zha, Dace; Ruan, Yunjun; Li, Zhishan; Ao, Xiang; Zheng, Jie; Jiang, Jianjun; Chen, Hao Ming; Chiang, Wei-Hung; Chen, Jun; Wang, Chundong

    2018-03-27

    Oxygen is the most abundant element in the Earth's crust. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) is also the most important reaction in life processes and energy converting/storage systems. Developing techniques toward high-efficiency ORR remains highly desired and a challenge. Here, we report a N-doped carbon (NC) encapsulated CeO 2 /Co interfacial hollow structure (CeO 2 -Co-NC) via a generalized strategy for largely increased oxygen species adsorption and improved ORR activities. First, the metallic Co nanoparticles not only provide high conductivity but also serve as electron donors to largely create oxygen vacancies in CeO 2 . Second, the outer carbon layer can effectively protect cobalt from oxidation and dissociation in alkaline media and as well imparts its higher ORR activity. In the meanwhile, the electronic interactions between CeO 2 and Co in the CeO 2 /Co interface are unveiled theoretically by density functional theory calculations to justify the increased oxygen absorption for ORR activity improvement. The reported CeO 2 -Co-NC hollow nanospheres not only exhibit decent ORR performance with a high onset potential (922 mV vs RHE), half-wave potential (797 mV vs RHE), and small Tafel slope (60 mV dec -1 ) comparable to those of the state-of-the-art Pt/C catalysts but also possess long-term stability with a negative shift of only 7 mV of the half-wave potential after 2000 cycles and strong tolerance against methanol. This work represents a solid step toward high-efficient oxygen reduction.

  5. A new empirical method to predict carbon dioxide evasion from boreal lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Adam; Lauerwald, Ronny; Weyhenmeyer, Gesa; Sobek, Sebastian; Regnier, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Carbon dioxide evasion from lakes (F CO2) is an important component of the global carbon budget. In this study, empirical models have been developed to predict CO2 partial pressure (pCO2) in boreal lakes at the 0.5° grid scale, with the aim of producing the first map of F CO2 from these high latitude aquatic systems. Approximately 57,000 samples of lake pCO2 from Sweden and Finland were used to train the models. Significant seasonality in pCO2 was identified and thus data were split into two categories based on water temperature; 0-4.5° C and >4.5° C. The lake pCO2 data and various globally available, environmental parameters such as elevation, terrestrial net primary production (NPP) and climate (temperature T, rainfall R) were spatially aggregated to a 0.5° resolution. Preliminary results from multiple regression analyses suggest that a significant proportion of the variability in boreal lake pCO2 can be explained using these globally available parameters. For water temperatures above 4.5° C, the explained proportion of the variability in lake pCO2 is particularly high (r2= 0.7). Following further refinement and validation, a map of estimated lake pCO2 for the entire boreal region will be established. This map will then be combined with lake surface area data from the GLObal WAter BOdies database (GLOWABO, Verpoorter et al., 2014), and a calculation of gas exchange velocity k to produce the first map of boreal lake F CO2. Finally, IPCC projections of the selected environmental predictors (T, NPP, and R) will be used to estimate future F CO2 from boreal lakes and their sensitivity to climate change.

  6. Nano-Reinforcement of Interfaces in Prepreg-Based Composites Using a Carbon Nanotubes Spraying Method

    KAUST Repository

    Almuhammadi, Khaled

    2012-11-01

    Multi-scale reinforcement of composite materials is a topic a great interest owing to the several advantages provided, e.g. increased stiffness, improved aging resistance, and fracture toughness. It is well known, that the fracture toughness of epoxy resins used as matrix materials for CFRP composites can be increased by the addition of nano-sized fillers such as Carbon nanotubes (CNTs). CNTs are particularly well suited for this purpose because of their nano-scale diameter and high aspect ratio which allow enhancing the contact area and adhesion to the epoxy matrix. On the other hand, CNTs can also be used to improve the interlaminar strength of composite, which is the resistance offered to delamination. Several fabrication techniques have been devised to this purpose, such as powder dispersion [51-53], spraying [54], roll coating [2] and electrospinning [55, 56]. The aim of this work is to extend the knowledge in this field. In particular, MWCNTs were dispersed throughout the interface of a carbon fiber composite laminate ([0o]16) through spraying and the resulting fracture toughness was investigated in detail. To this purpose, Double Cantilever Beam (DCB) specimens were fabricated by placing 0.5 wt.% CNTs at the interface of mid-plane plies and the fracture toughness was determined using the ASTM standard procedures. For comparison, baseline samples were prepared using neat prepregs. In order to corroborate the variation of fracture toughness to the modifications of interfacial damage mechanisms, Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) of the failed surfaces was also undertaken. The results of this work have shown that functionalized MWCNTs can enhance the interlaminar fracture toughness; indeed, compared to the neat case, an average increase around 17% was observed. The SEM analysis revealed that the improved fracture toughness was related to the ability of the Nano-reinforcement to spread the damage through crack bridging, i.e. CNTs pull-out and peeling.

  7. A method for assessing carbon stocks, carbon sequestration, and greenhouse-gas fluxes in ecosystems of the United States under present conditions and future scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhiliang Zhu; Brian Bergamaschi; Richard Bernknopf; David Clow; Dennis Dye; Stephen Faulkner; William Forney; Robert Gleason; Todd Hawbaker; Jinxun Liu; Shuguang Liu; Stephen Prisley; Bradley Reed; Matthew Reeves; Matthew Rollins; Benjamin Sleeter; Terry Sohl; Sarah Stackpoole; Stephen Stehman; Robert Striegl; Anne Wein

    2010-01-01

    This methodology was developed to fulfill a requirement by the Energy Independence and Security Act of 2007 (EISA). The EISA legislation mandates the U.S. Department of the Interior (DOI) to develop a methodology and conduct an assessment of carbon storage, carbon sequestration, and fluxes of three principal greenhouse gases (GHG) for the Nation's ecosystems. The...

  8. A method countries can use to estimate changes in carbon stored in harvested wood products and the uncertainty of such estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenneth E. Skog; Kim Pingoud; James E. Smith

    2004-01-01

    A method is suggested for estimating additions to carbon stored in harvested wood products (HWP) and for evaluating uncertainty. The method uses data on HWP production and trade from several decades and tracks annual additions to pools of HWP in use, removals from use, additions to solid waste disposal sites (SWDS), and decay from SWDS. The method is consistent with...

  9. Surface hardening of St41 low carbon steel by using the hot-pressing powder-pack boriding method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutrisno, Soegijono, Bambang

    2014-03-01

    This research describes a powder-pack boriding process by using hot-pressing technic for St41 low carbon steel which will improve the hardness on the substrate by forming boride layer solid solution. Those method can reduce the operational cost of the research if it is compared by the conventional method with the asmospheric condition both vacuum system and gas inert condition. The concept of boriding by hot-pressing technic was verified in a laboratory scale. Welldefined and reusedable technic was achieved by using the stainless steel 304 as the container and sealed with a 5 ton pressure. This container was filled boronizing powder consisting of 5%B4C, 90%SiC, and 5%KBF4 to close the St41 low carbon steel specimen inside the container. The St41 boriding specimen was treated at the temperature of 900°C for 8 hours. The boride layer on the substrate was found as FeB and Fe2B phase with the hardness about 1800 HV. This value was more than ten times if compared with the untreated specimen that only had the hardness of 123 HV. Depend on heat treatment temperature, heat treatment time, and powder-pack boriding pressure, the depth of boride layer range from 127 to 165 μm, leading to a diffusion controlled process.

  10. Method of fabricating electrode catalyst layers with directionally oriented carbon support for proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Di-Jia; Yang, Junbing

    2010-07-20

    A method of making a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) having an anode and a cathode and a proton conductive membrane there between. A bundle of longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated in the nanotubes forms at least one portion of the MEA and is in contact with the membrane. A combination selected from one or more of a hydrocarbon and an organometallic compound containing an catalytically active transition metal and a nitrogen containing compound and an inert gas and a reducing gas is introduced into a first reaction zone maintained at a first reaction temperature for a time sufficient to vaporize material therein. The vaporized material is transmitted to a second reaction zone maintained at a second reaction temperature for a time sufficient to grow longitudinally aligned carbon nanotubes with a catalytically active transition metal incorporated throughout the nanotubes. The nanotubes are in contact with a portion of the MEA at production or being positioned in contact thereafter. Methods of forming a PEMFC are also disclosed.

  11. Fabrication of nitrogen- and phosphorous-doped carbon dots by the pyrolysis method for iodide and iron(III) sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Soumen; Chowdhuri, Angshuman Ray; Laha, Dipranjan; Sahu, Sumanta Kumar

    2018-03-01

    A facile and novel strategy to synthesize nitrogen- and phosphorous-doped carbon dots (NPCDs) by single step pyrolysis method is described here. Citric acid is used as carbon source and di-ammonium hydrogen phosphate is used as both nitrogen and phosphorous sources, respectively. Through the extensive study on optical properties, morphology and chemical structures of the synthesized NPCDs, it is found that as-synthesized NPCDs exhibited good excitation-dependent luminescence property, spherical morphology and high stability. The obtained NPCDs are stable in aqueous medium and possess a quantum yield of 10.58%. In this work, a new assay method is developed to detect iodide ions using the synthesized NPCDs. Here, the inner filter effect is applied to detect the iodide ion and exhibited a wide linear response concentration range (10-60 μM) with a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.32 μM. Furthermore, the synthesized NPCDs are used for the selective detection of iron(III) (Fe 3+ ) ions and cell imaging. Fe 3+ ions sensing assay shows a detection range from 0.2 to 30 μM with a LOD of 72 nM. As an efficient photoluminescence sensor, the developed NPCDs have an excellent biocompatibility and low cytotoxicity, allowing Fe 3+ ion detection in HeLa cells. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Selective recovery of molybdenum from spent HDS catalyst using oxidative soda ash leach/carbon adsorption method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyung Ho; Mohapatra, D.; Reddy, B. Ramachandra

    2006-01-01

    The petroleum refining industry makes extensive use of hydroprocessing catalysts. These catalysts contain environmentally critical and economically valuable metals such as Mo, V, Ni and Co. In the present study, a simple hydrometallurgical processing of spent hydrodesulphurization (HDS) catalyst for the recovery of molybdenum using sodium carbonate and hydrogen peroxide mixture was investigated. Recovery of molybdenum was largely dependent on the concentrations of Na 2 CO 3 and H 2 O 2 in the reaction medium, which in turn controls the pH of leach liquor and the presence of Al and Ni as impurities. Under the optimum leaching conditions (40 g L -1 Na 2 CO 3 , 6 vol.% H 2 O 2 , room temperature, 1 h) about 85% recovery of Mo was achieved. The leach liquor was processed by the carbon adsorption method, which selectively adsorbs Mo at pH around 0.75. Desorption of Mo was selective at 15 vol.% NH 4 OH. With a single stage contact, it was found possible to achieve >99%, adsorption and desorption efficiency. Using this method, recovery of molybdenum as MoO 3 product of 99.4% purity was achieved

  13. Synthesis of carbon nanotubes by arc-discharge and chemical vapor deposition method with analysis of its morphology, dispersion and functionalization characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritu Sharma

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, multi-walled carbon nanotubes are synthesized by arc-discharge and chemical vapor decomposition methods. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes are synthesized on thin film of nickel sputtered on silicon substrate by thermal chemical vapor deposition of acetylene at a temperature of 750°C. The flow of current in arc-discharge method varies in the range 50–200 A. Further arc-synthesized carbon nanotubes are characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, and the results are compared with nanotubes grown by chemical vapor deposition method. XRD result shows a characteristic peak (0 0 2 at 26.54° corresponding to the presence of carbon nanotubes. SEM and TEM results give morphology of as-synthesized multi-walled nanotubes. TEM results indicate synthesis of well-graphitized carbon nanotubes by arc-discharge method. Dispersion of arc-synthesized nanotubes in SDS solution under the effect of different sonication times is studied. Dispersion of nanotubes in SDS solution is analyzed using UV–vis–NIR spectroscopy and it shows an absorption peak at 260 nm. It was found that with the increase in sonication time, the absorption peak in UV–vis–NIR spectra will increase and optimum sonication time was 2 hours. Functionalization of synthesized carbon nanotubes by H2SO4 and HNO3 acids has been studied and analysis of functionalized groups has been done using FT-IR spectroscopy and compared and the results are reported in this paper. FT-IR spectroscopy verifies the presence of carboxylic groups attached to carbon nanotubes. These functional groups may change properties of carbon nanotubes and may be used in vast applications of carbon nanotubes.

  14. Reproducibility of measurement of the environmental carbon-14 samples prepared by the gel suspension method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohura, Hirotaka; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Nakamura, Kouji; Okai, Tomio; Matoba, Masaru; Kakiuchi, Hideki; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Hidehisa.

    1997-01-01

    Simple liquid scintillation counting technique for the assay of 14 C in the environment was developed. This technique was done by using gel suspension method, in which sample preparation is very simple and requires no special equipments. The reproducibility of this technique was considered and it was shown that the gel suspension method had enough reproducibility to monitor the environmental 14 C. (author)

  15. A robustness analysis method with fast estimation of dose uncertainty distributions for carbon-ion therapy treatment planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakama, Makoto; Kanematsu, Nobuyuki; Inaniwa, Taku

    2016-08-07

    A simple and efficient approach is needed for robustness evaluation and optimization of treatment planning in routine clinical particle therapy. Here we propose a robustness analysis method using dose standard deviation (SD) in possible scenarios such as the robustness indicator and a fast dose warping method, i.e. deformation of dose distributions, taking into account the setup and range errors in carbon-ion therapy. The dose warping method is based on the nominal dose distribution and the water-equivalent path length obtained from planning computed tomography data with a clinically commissioned treatment planning system (TPS). We compared, in a limited number of scenarios at the extreme boundaries of the assumed error, the dose SD distributions obtained by the warping method with those obtained using the TPS dose recalculations. The accuracy of the warping method was examined by the standard-deviation-volume histograms (SDVHs) for varying degrees of setup and range errors for three different tumor sites. Furthermore, the influence of dose fractionation on the combined dose uncertainty, taking into consideration the correlation of setup and range errors between fractions, was evaluated with simple equations using the SDVHs and the mean value of SDs in the defined volume of interest. The results of the proposed method agreed well with those obtained with the dose recalculations in these comparisons, and the effectiveness of dose SD evaluations at the extreme boundaries of given errors was confirmed from the responsivity and DVH analysis of relative SD values for each error. The combined dose uncertainties depended heavily on the number of fractions, assumed errors and tumor sites. The typical computation time of the warping method is approximately 60 times less than that of the full dose calculation method using the TPS. The dose SD distributions and SDVHs with the fractionation effect will be useful indicators for robustness analysis in treatment planning, and the

  16. Methods and apparatus for measuring small leaks from carbon dioxide sequestration facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, Jr., David D.; Herndon, Scott C.

    2018-01-02

    In one embodiment, a CO.sub.2 leak detection instrument detects leaks from a site (e.g., a CO.sub.2 sequestration facility) using rapid concentration measurements of CO.sub.2, O.sub.2 and optionally water concentration that are achieved, for example, using laser spectroscopy (e.g. direct absorption laser spectroscopy). Water vapor in the sample gas may not be removed, or only partially removed. The sample gas may be collected using a multiplexed inlet assembly from a plurality of locations. CO.sub.2 and O.sub.2 concentrations may be corrected based on the water concentration. A resulting dataset of the CO.sub.2 and O.sub.2 concentrations is analyzed over time intervals to detect any changes in CO.sub.2 concentration that are not anti-correlated with O.sub.2 concentration, and to identify a potential CO.sub.2 leak in response thereto. The analysis may include determining eddy covariance flux measurements of sub-surface potential carbon.

  17. Suppression/reducing method for total organic carbon in feedwater/condensate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maeda, Katsuharu.

    1993-01-01

    The present invention suppresses/reduces the concentration of the total organic carbon before the startup of a reactor, to decrease (TOC) which is brought into the reactor upon startup of the operation and suppress/moderate degradation of water quality of reactor water. That is, in-service period of a condensate desalting tower is shortened, to avoid concentration increase of TOC in feed water/condensate which is leached out from the condensate desalting tower. The condensate desalting towers are put to in-service for the entire towers after increasing the vacuum degree of the condensator, to suppress leaching of TOC from the condensate desalting tower. Further, upon startup of a nuclear power plant, when the condensate desalting tower is put to in-service, condensate filters of the entire towers are previously back-washed and regenerated to remove TOC efficiently. By these procedures, TOC brought from a water supply system upon startup of the plant is thermally decomposed or radiolyzed in the reactor, thereby enabling to suppress/avoid worsening of water quality of reactor water caused by generated ion impurities. (I.S.)

  18. Comparison studies of surface cleaning methods for PAN-based carbon fibers with acetone, supercritical acetone and subcritical alkali aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Linghui; Fan, Dapeng; Huang, Yudong; Jiang, Zaixing; Zhang, Chunhua

    2012-11-01

    Four kinds of polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibers were cleaned by three methods and were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, monofilament tensile strength test and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Experimental results of these tests reveal that the method using supercritical acetone or subcritical potassium hydroxide aqueous solution act as the processing medium shows a better cleaning effect compared to the traditional method, Soxhlet extraction with acetone. The method using supercritical acetone is more appropriate to wipe off the oxygenated contaminants on carbon fibers' surfaces and causes a relatively smaller damage to the bulk strength of each carbon fiber. As far as treating method using the subcritical alkali aqueous solution, it can thoroughly remove silicious contaminants on the surfaces of treated fibers.

  19. Method and apparatus for forming a carbon-silicon bond in a silane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schattenmann, Florian Johannes

    2002-01-01

    A method for forming at least one product silane, comprising reacting a transition metal hydride with a starting silane in a presence of a catalyst and at a temperature that exceeds a threshold temperature associated with said reacting.

  20. Novel band gap-tunable K–Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride prepared by molten salt method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Jiannan [Institute of Eco-environmental Sciences, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Ma, Lin [School of Petrochemical Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Wang, Haoying; Zhao, Yanfeng [School of Environmental and Biological Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Zhang, Jian [School of Petrochemical Engineering, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China); Hu, Shaozheng, E-mail: hushaozhenglnpu@163.com [Institute of Eco-environmental Sciences, Liaoning Shihua University, Fushun 113001 (China)

    2015-03-30

    Graphical abstract: K and Na ions co-doped into g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} crystal lattice can tune the position of CB and VB potentials, influence the structural and optical properties, and thus improve the photocatalytic degradation and mineralization ability. - Highlights: • K, Na co-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} was prepared in KCl/NaCl molten salt system. • The structural and optical properties of g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} were greatly influenced by co-doping. • The position of VB and CB can be tuned by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. • Co-doped g-C{sub 3}N{sub 4} showed outstanding photodegradation ability, mineralization ability, and catalytic stability. - Abstract: Novel band gap-tunable K–Na co-doped graphitic carbon nitride was prepared by molten salt method using melamine, KCl, and NaCl as precursor. X-ray diffraction (XRD), N{sub 2} adsorption, Scanning electron microscope (SEM), UV–vis spectroscopy, Photoluminescence (PL), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the prepared catalysts. The CB and VB potentials of graphitic carbon nitride could be tuned from −1.09 and +1.55 eV to −0.29 and +2.25 eV by controlling the weight ratio of eutectic salts to melamine. Besides, ions doping inhibited the crystal growth of graphitic carbon nitride, enhanced the surface area, and increased the separation rate of photogenerated electrons and holes. The visible-light-driven Rhodamine B (RhB) photodegradation and mineralization performances were significantly improved after K–Na co-doping.

  1. Synthesis of carbon nanotube using camphor with SS 316 as catalytic substrate via oxidative heat treatment preparation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wulan, Praswasti Pembangun Dyah Kencana; Angelina, Dian

    2017-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) is a material that now often become the topic in nanotechnology research. CNT is widely used in the electronics industry especially for TV and computer flat panel displays, devices, automotives for car components, and batteries. Also for defense industries as well as other industries such as sports equipment. Camphor (C10H16O), a botanical hydrocarbon, can be used as a renewable and low cost carbon source for CNT synthesis. Synthesis was performed with stainless steel-316 (SS 316) as substrate, argon as carrier gas, and hydrogen as co-reactant. Preparation of the SS 316 was through a pretreatment by oxidative heat treatment method at a temperature of 850oC for 30 minutes, to remove the layer of chrome and make a rough surface as a growth media for CNT. The operating temperature of the synthesis used was 800oC with a reaction time of 60 minutes. Reactor, which made from stainless steel 316 (SS 316), was used for synthesis CNTs with maximum camphor mass of 20 grams. This research was conducted by varying the number of camphor mass by 5, 7, 10, 12, and 15 grams. The results showed that camphor decomposed into three compounds which are 40% benzene, 8% toluene, and 52% xylene. CNT grows on the surface of the SS 316 plate for each variation. CNTs have grown by follow tips growth model with deformations like buckling growth model and continuous growth model were also founded. The results of XRD showed that CNT were found in every camphor mass variation with high intensity at 2θ angle of 26° and 43°. The best quality and yield of CNT was obtained at camphor mass of 15 grams with carbon percentage of 87,1% and diameter 33 - 44 nm.

  2. Pollution characteristics of organic and elemental carbon in PM2.5 in Xiamen, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuwang; Zhao, Jinping; Chen, Jinsheng; Xu, Ya; Xu, Lingling

    2011-01-01

    Xiamen, located on the southeastern coastal line of China, is undergoing rapid urbanization and industrialization, so its air quality has a trend of degradation. However, studies on level, temporal and spatial changes of fine particles (PM2.5) and their carbonaceous fractions are scarce. In this article, abundance, sources, seasonal and spatial variations, distribution of organic carbon (OC) and elemental carbon (EC) in PM2.5, were studied at suburban, urban and industrial sites in Xiamen during four season-representative months in 2009-2010. PM2.5 samples were collected with middle volume sampler and were analyzed for OC and EC with thermal optical transmittance (TOT) method. Results showed that the annual average PM2.5 concentrations were 63.88-74.80 microg/m3 at three sites. While OC and EC concentrations were in the range of 15.81-19.73 microg/m3 and 2.74-3.49 microg/m3, respectively, and clearly presented the summer minima and winter maxima in this study. The carbonaceous aerosol accounted for 42.8%-47.3% of the mass of PM2.5. The annual average of secondary organic carbon (SOC) concentrations in Xiamen were 9.23-11.36 micro/m3, accounting for approximately 56% of OC. Strong correlations between OC and EC was found in spring (R2 = 0.50) and autumn (R2 = 0.73), suggesting that there were similar emission and transport processes for carbonaceous aerosols in these two seasons, while weak correlations were found in summer (R2 = 0.33) and winter (R2 = 0.41). The OC/EC ratios in PM2.5 varied from 2.1 to 8.7 with an annual average of 5.7, indicating that vehicle exhaust, coal smoke and biomass burning were main source apportionments of carbonaceous fractions in Xiamen.

  3. Synthesis of highly dispersed platinum particles on carbon nanotubes by an in situ vapor-phase method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mercado-Zúñiga, C. [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Vargas-García, J.R., E-mail: rvargasga@ipn.mx [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Hernández-Pérez, M.A. [Depto. Ing. Metalurgia y Materiales, Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico 07300 D.F. (Mexico); Figueroa-Torres, M.Z. [Depto. Eco-Materiales y Energia, Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico); Cervantes-Sodi, F. [Depto. Fisica y Matematicas, Univ. Iberoamericana, Mexico 01209 D.F. (Mexico); Torres-Martínez, L.M. [Depto. Eco-Materiales y Energia, Univ. Autonoma de Nuevo Leon, Nuevo Leon 66450 (Mexico)

    2014-12-05

    Highlights: • Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized carbon nanotubes. • A simple and competitive vapor-phase method was employed. • Carbonyl groups were assumed to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac. • Pt particles were highly dispersed because carbonyl groups served as reaction sites. • Particles of 2.3 nm in size were highly dispersed even the high loading (27 wt%Pt). - Abstract: Highly dispersed Pt nanoparticles were prepared on functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (f-MWCNTs) using a simple in situ vapor-phase method. The method consisted in two-step procedure in which an initial mixture of Pt precursor (Pt-acac) and f-MWCNTs was heated in a quartz tube reactor, first at 180 °C and then at 400 °C. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR–ATR), thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to follow the chemical and structural transformations of mixture components during heating steps. The functionalization of MWCNTs with HNO{sub 3}/H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution resulted in formation of surface carbonyl groups. The FTIR–ATR and XRD results indicated that individual Pt-acac withstood heating at 180 °C, whereas it was dissociated when heated in contact with f-MWCNTs at the same temperature. Thus, the functional carbonyl groups were found to be responsible for assisted decomposition of Pt-acac at 180 °C. Since carbonyl groups served as reaction sites for decomposition of Pt-acac, the resulting particles were highly and homogeneously dispersed on the surface of MWCNTs even the relatively high metallic loading of 27 wt%. TEM observations revealed that crystalline Pt particles exhibit narrow size distribution with a mean size of 2.3 nm.

  4. Revisiting the Stӧber method: Design of nitrogen-doped porous carbon spheres from molecular precursors of different chemical structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hao; Liu, Jian; O'Donnell, Kane; Liu, Tingting; Liu, Xinmei; Yan, Zifeng; Liu, Shaomin; Jaroniec, Mietek

    2016-08-15

    Porous polymer resins and carbon spheres have been successfully prepared by an extended Stӧber method using phenol derivatives of different functionality. Herein, the Stӧber method is revised and used for the preparation of phenolic resin spheres from a series of hetero-atoms containing phenol derivatives (such as nitrophenol, aminophenol and halide-substituted phenols), which upon carbonization are converted to heteroatom-doped carbon spheres. The use of 4-amino-3-nitrophenol affords monodispersed carbon spheres with unprecedentedly high nitrogen content of about 11.9wt%. In this synthesis phenolic resin is initially formed by polymerizing formaldehyde with one of the aforementioned phenol derivatives, which acts as a resin precursor and source of heteroatoms to be doped. When amino group in aminophenol is in meta position the monodisperse phenolic resin and subsequently converted-doped carbon spheres are obtained. The resultant carbon spheres were examined as potential CO2 adsorbents and electrode materials for supercapacitors, reaching CO2 uptake of 89cm(3) STP/g (at 273K and 1.0bar), and the electrochemical capacitance of 127 F/g under basic conditions, respectively. This study provides some guidelines for design of carbon spheres by selecting phenolic resin precursors with desired molecular structures and functionalities for specific applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A New Method to Obtain the Black Carbon Mixing State of Biomass and Combustion Aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, M.; Liu, D.; Joshi, R.; Allan, J. D.; Coe, H.; Flynn, M.; Olfert, J. S.; Broda, K.; Fu, P.; Sun, Y.; Ge, X.; Wang, J.

    2017-12-01

    Black carbon particles (BC) significantly contribute to warming effects in the atmosphere, altering weather systems, and pose significant health risks. These impacts are especially efficient at regional hotspots with high emissions of pollutants, such as in fast-developing megacities. These urban environments have the most population exposure, and improving the understanding of the sources and the processing of pollutants in these environments is critical in guiding policy making. Here we present the results of BC characterization in Beijing during the winter of 2016 (10th Nov-10th Dec), as part of a large joint UK-China field experiment. During this experiment, we successfully gathered 4 weeks of continuous measurements, including several severe pollution events in Beijing. MethodologyThe mixing state of BC, which is how BC is associated with non-BC material (its coating) within a particle, is crucial to determine its lifetime in the atmosphere and also its optical properties. However precisely quantifying the BC mixing state has posed a challenge, in part due to complex particle morphology. We have applied morphology-independent measurements of BC mixing state on a single-particle basis throughout this experiment: mono-dispersed particle mass (MP) is selected using a Centrifugal Particle Mass Analyser (CPMA, Cambustion Ltd) and a single particle soot photometer (SP2, DMT inc.) was used downstream of the CPMA to measure the refractory BC mass (MrBC). The full scan of CPMA masses (21 mass bins covering most of MP) are performed every half hour, following polydispersed particles measured without running CPMA.

  6. The preparation of nucleotides uniformly labelled with carbon-14 by biosinthetic methods. Isolation of adenilic, uridilic, cytidilic and guanlic acids, from the alkaline hydrolisate of escherichia coli RNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia Pineda, D.; Pacheco Lopez, J.

    1978-01-01

    A method is described for the preparation and analysis of adenilic, uridilic, cytidylic and guanilic acids, labelled with carbon 14. Escherichia coli cells have been labelled by growing them in media containing glucose-carbon 14 as their only source of carbon. RNA is isolated from the cells, and after hydrolisis of the molecule the resulting nucleotides are separated by gel filtration and exchange chromatography. Chemical and radiochemical purity of the isolated nucleotides is determined and also its specific radioactivity. The distribution of radioactivity incorporated in the cell among different groups of molecular species is analyse. (author)

  7. Development of scalable methods for the utilization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes in polymer and metal matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vennerberg, Danny Curtis

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) have received considerable attention as reinforcement for composites due to their high tensile strength, stiffness, electrical conductivity and thermal conductivity as well as their low coefficient of thermal expansion. However, despite the availability of huge quantities of low-cost, commercially synthesized nanotubes, the utilization of MWCNTs in engineering composites is extremely limited due to difficulties in achieving uniform dispersion and strong interfacial bonding with the matrix. A proven method of enhancing the nanotube-polymer interface and degree of MWCNT dispersion involves functionalizing the MWCNTs through oxidation with strong acids. While effective at laboratory scales, this technique is not well-suited for large-scale operations due to long processing times, poor yield, safety hazards, and environmental concerns. This work aims to find scalable solutions to several of the challenges associated with the fabrication of MWCNT-reinforced composites. For polymer matrix composite applications, a rapid, dry, and cost-effective method of oxidizing MWCNTs with O3 in a fluidized bed was developed as an alternative to acid oxidation. Oxidized MWCNTs were further functionalized with silane coupling agents using water and supercritical carbon dioxide as solvents in order to endow the MWCNTs with matrix-specific functionalities. The effect of silanization on the cure kinetics, rheological behavior, and thermo-mechanical properties of model epoxy nanocomposites were investigated. Small additions of functionalized MWCNTs were found to increase the glass transition temperature, strength, and toughness of the epoxy. In order to achieve composite properties approaching those of individual nanotubes, new approaches are needed to allow for high loadings of MWCNTs. One strategy involves making macroscopic mats of nanotubes called buckypaper (BP) and subsequently infiltrating the mats with resin in processes familiar to

  8. Characterization of carbon silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires by the STEM–EDX method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Hartomy, Omar A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Al Said, Said A. Farha [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, University of Tabuk, Tabuk 71491 (Saudi Arabia); Dishovsky, Nikolay, E-mail: dishov@uctm.edu [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Ward, Michael B. [LEMAS, Institute for Materials Research, SPEME, University of Leeds, LS2 9JT (United Kingdom); Mihaylov, Mihail; Ivanov, Milcho [Department of Polymer Engineering, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridski Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2015-03-15

    Dual phase carbon–silica hybrid fillers obtained by pyrolysis-cum-water vapor of waste green tires have been characterized by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy in a scanning transmission electron microscope, silicate analysis, weight analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy and by inductively coupled plasma–optical emission spectroscopy. The results achieved have shown that the location and distribution of the phases in the carbon silica hybrid fillers as well as their most essential characteristics are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions. The carbon phase of the filler thus obtained is located predominantly in the space among silica aggregates which have already been existing while it has been formed by elastomer destruction in the course of pyrolysis. The presence of ZnS also has been found in the hybrid fillers investigated. - Highlights: • Dual phase fillers obtained by pyrolysis of waste green tires have been characterized. • The STEM–EDX method was used for characterization. • The phase distributions in the fillers are influenced by the pyrolysis conditions.

  9. Nitrogen-Doped Carbon Nanoparticles for Oxygen Reduction Prepared via a Crushing Method Involving a High Shear Mixer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Shi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The disposal of agricultural wastes such as fresh banana peels (BPs is an environmental issue. In this work, fresh BPs were successfully transformed into nitrogen-doped carbon nanoparticles (N-CNPs by using a high shear mixer facilitated crushing method (HSM-FCM followed by carbonization under Ar atmosphere. Ammonia-activated N-CNPs (N-CNPs-NH3 were prepared via subsequent ammonia activation treatments at a high temperature. The as-prepared N-CNPs and N-CNPs-NH3 materials both exhibited high surface areas (above 700 m2/g and mean particle size of 50 nm. N-CNPs-NH3 showed a relatively higher content of pyridinic and graphitic N compared to N-CNPs. In alkaline media, N-CNPs-NH3 showed superior performances as an oxygen reduction reaction (ORR catalyst (E0 = −0.033 V, J = 2.4 mA/cm2 compared to N-CNPs (E0 = 0.07 V, J = 1.8 mA/cm2. In addition, N-CNPs-NH3 showed greater oxygen reduction stability and superior methanol crossover avoidance than a conventional Pt/C catalyst. This study provides a novel, simple, and scalable approach to valorize biomass wastes by synthesizing highly efficient electrochemical ORR catalysts.

  10. Cold storage as a method for the long-term preservation of tropical dissolved organic carbon (DOC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Cook

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Fluvial fluxes of dissolved organic carbon (DOC may represent an important loss for terrestrial carbon stores in the tropics. However, there is currently limited guidance on the preservation of tropical water samples for DOC analysis. Commonly employed preservation techniques such as freezing or acidification can limit degradation but may also alter sample properties, complicating DOC analysis. We examined the effects of cold storage at 4 °C on DOC concentration and quality in water samples collected from a tropical peat catchment. Samples were stored in the dark at 4 °C for periods of 6–12 weeks. Freeze/thaw experiments were also made. Mean DOC concentrations in samples stored for six weeks at 4 °C were 6.1 % greater than in samples stored at ambient room temperature (33 °C over the same period. Changes in DOC concentrations, in two sample sets, during cold storage were 2.25 ± 2.9 mg L-1 (8 % to 2.69 ± 1.4 mg L-1 (11 % over a 12-week period. Freeze/thaw resulted in alterations in the optical properties of samples, and this in turn altered the calculated DOC concentrations by an average of 10.9 %. We conclude that cold storage at 4 °C is an acceptable preservation method for tropical DOC water samples, for moderate time periods, and is preferable to freezing or storage at ambient temperatures.

  11. Inhibition of calcium carbonate crystal growth by organic additives using the constant composition method in conditions of recirculating cooling circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chhim, Norinda; Kharbachi, Chams; Neveux, Thibaut; Bouteleux, Céline; Teychené, Sébastien; Biscans, Béatrice

    2017-08-01

    The cooling circuits used in power plants are subject to mineral crystallization which can cause scaling on the surfaces of equipment and construction materials reducing their heat exchange efficiency. Precipitated calcium carbonate is the predominant mineral scale commonly observed in cooling systems. Supersaturation is the key parameter controlling the nucleation and growth of calcite in these systems. The present work focuses on the precipitation of calcite using the constant composition method at constant supersaturation, through controlled addition of reactants to a semi-batch crystallizer, in order to maintain constant solution pH. The determination of the thermodynamic driving force (supersaturation) was based on the relevant chemical equilibria, total alkalinity and calculation of the activity coefficients. Calcite crystallization rates were derived from the experiments performed at supersaturation levels similar to those found in industrial station cooling circuits. Several types of seeds particles were added into the aqueous solution to mimic natural river water conditions in terms of suspended particulate matters content, typically: calcite, silica or illite particles. The effect of citric and copolycarboxylic additive inhibitors added to the aqueous solution was studied. The calcium carbonate growth rate was reduced by 38.6% in the presence of the citric additive and a reduction of 92.7% was observed when the copolycarboxylic additive was used under identical experimental conditions. These results are explained by the location of the adsorbed inhibitor at the crystal surface and by the degree of chemical bonding to the surface.

  12. Method for uniformly distributing carbon flakes in a positive electrode, the electrode made thereby and compositions. [Patent application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mrazek, F.C.; Smaga, J.A.; Battles, J.E.

    1981-01-19

    A positive electrode for a secondary electrochemical cell is described wherein an electrically conductive current collector is in electrical contact with a particulate mixture of gray cast iron and an alkali metal sulfide and an electrolyte including alkali metal halides or alkaline earth metal halides. Also present may be a transition metal sulfide and graphite flakes from the conversion of gray cast iron to iron sulfide. Also disclosed is a method of distributing carbon flakes in a cell wherein there is formed an electrochemical cell of a positive electrode structure of the type described and a suitable electrolyte and a second electrode containing a material capable of alloying with alkali metal ions. The cell is connected to a source of electrical potential to electrochemically convert gray cast iron to an iron sulfide and uniformly to distribute carbon flakes formerly in the gray cast iron throughout the positive electrode while forming an alkali metal alloy in the negative electrode. Also disclosed are compositions useful in preparing positive electrodes.

  13. Conductivity mapping of underground flow channels and moisture anomalies in carbonate terrain using electromagnetic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pin, F.G.; Ketelle, R.H.

    1983-11-01

    Electromagnetic methods have been used to measure apparent terrain conductivity in the downstream portion of a watershed in which a waste disposal site is proposed. At that site, the pathways for waste migration in groundwater are controlled by subsurface channels. The identification and mapping of these subsurfaces channels constitutes an important contribution to the site characterization study. The channels are identified using isocurves of measured apparent conductivity. Two upstream channel branches are found to merge into a single downstream channel which constitutes the main drainage path out of the watershed. Electromagnetic terrain conductivity measurement methods are found to be inexpensive, rapid and efficient tools for subsurface investigations. Their contribution to site characterization studies and pathways analyses is particularly significant in planning of the monitoring program, the hydrogeological testing, and the modeling study. The results reported so far are very promising for use of the methods in several other applications related to the subgrade disposal of waste. 7 references, 5 figures

  14. Simple analytical technique for liquid scintillation counting of environmental carbon-14 using gel suspension method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okai, Tomio; Wakabayashi, Genichiro; Nagao, Kenjiro; Matoba, Masaru; Ohura, Hirotaka; Momoshima, Noriyuki; Kawamura, Hidehisa

    2000-01-01

    A simple analytical technique for liquid scintillation counting of environmental 14 C was developed. Commercially available gelling agent, N-lauroyl-L -glutamic -α,γ-dibutylamide, was used for the gel-formation of the samples (gel suspension method) and for the subsequent liquid scintillation counting of 14 C in the form of CaCO 3 . Our procedure for sample preparation is much simpler than that of the conventional methods and requires no special equipment. Self absorption, stability and reproducibility of gel suspension samples were investigated in order to evaluate the characteristics of the gel suspension method for 14 C activity measurement. The self absorption factor is about 70% and slightly decrease as CaCO 3 weight increase. This is considered to be mainly due to the absorption of β-rays and scintillation light by the CaCO 3 sample itself. No change of the counting rate for the gel suspension sample was observed for more than 2 years after the sample preparation. Four samples were used for checking the reproducibility of the sample preparation method. The same values were obtained for the counting rate of 24 C activity within the counting error. No change of the counting rate was observed for the 're-gelated' sample. These results show that the gel suspension method is appropriate for the 14 C activity measurement by the liquid scintillation counting method and useful for a long-term preservation of the sample for repeated measurement. The above analytical technique was applied to actual environmental samples in Fukuoka prefecture, Japan. Results obtained were comparable with those by other researchers and appear to be reasonable. Therefore, the newly developed technique is useful for the routine monitoring of environmental 14 C. (author)

  15. Photometric method for determination of nickel in hafnium-nickel-carbon alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ushakova, L.V.; Shishkina, Z.I.

    1978-01-01

    The photometric method based on the preparation of a red-coloured compound with dimethylglyoxime in ammoniacal solution in the presence of ammonium persulfate as an oxidizer Was used to determine Ni in hafnium base alloys. Hafnium hydrolysis is prevented by addition of tartaric acid. The accuracy of the method is confirmed by the analysis of imitating mixtures and also by comparing the results obtained with those of nickel Weight determination. Deviation between the results of two parallel determinations at the content of 0.2 and 10% of Ni does not exceed 0.05 and 0.5%, respectively, the duration of a determination run being 1 h

  16. Evaluation of allocation methods for calculation of carbon footprint of grass-based dairy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, P; O'Brien, D; Shalloo, L; Holden, N M

    2017-11-01

    A major methodological issue for life cycle assessment, commonly used to quantify greenhouse gas emissions from livestock systems, is allocation from multifunctional processes. When a process produces more than one output, the environmental burden has to be assigned between the outputs, such as milk and meat from a dairy cow. In the absence of an objective function for choosing an allocation method, a decision must be made considering a range of factors, one of which is the availability and quality of necessary data. The objective of this study was to evaluate allocation methods to calculate the climate change impact of the economically average (€/ha) dairy farm in Ireland considering both milk and meat outputs, focusing specifically on the pedigree of the available data for each method. The methods were: economic, energy, protein, emergy, mass of liveweight, mass of carcass weight and physical causality. The data quality for each method was expressed using a pedigree score based on reliability of the source, completeness, temporal applicability, geographical alignment and technological appropriateness. Scenario analysis was used to compare the normalised impact per functional unit (FU) from the different allocation methods, between the best and worst third of farms (in economic terms, €/ha) in the national farm survey. For the average farm, the allocation factors for milk ranged from 75% (physical causality) to 89% (mass of carcass weight), which in turn resulted in an impact per FU, from 1.04 to 1.22 kg CO 2 -eq/kg (fat and protein corrected milk). Pedigree scores ranged from 6.0 to 17.1 with protein and economic allocation having the best pedigree. It was concluded that when making the choice of allocation method, the quality of the data available (pedigree) should be given greater emphasis during the decision making process because the effect of allocation on the results. A range of allocation methods could be deployed to understand the uncertainty

  17. Carbon and nitrogen determination in Zr by photon or proton activation analysis. Comparison between the results obtained by this method and other analytical techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petit, J.; Gosset, J.; Engelmann, C.

    1977-01-01

    Carbon and nitrogen are determined by the following nuclear reactions: 12 C(γ,n) 11 C and 14 N(p,α) 11 C. The performances of the method and the main interferences are considered. The process developed for the separation of carbon-11 from zirconium is described and its efficiency evaluated. The results obtained are compared with those given by different laboratories using various analytical techniques [fr

  18. Producing Activated Carbon from Scrap Tires by Thermo-Chemical Method and Evaluation its Efficiency at Removal Racid Black1 Dye

    OpenAIRE

    A.R Rahmani; E Hoseinzadeh

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The disposal of waste tires has become an increasingly important issue worldwide in recent years. Tires not only take up large amounts of valuable landfill space, but also create fire hazards and provide a refuge for disease- carrying creatures. The goal of this study was to produce activated carbon from scrap tires .Adsorption of Acid Black1 (AB1) in aqueous solution as a pollutant by the activated carbon was also investigated.Materials and Methods: Activated carbo...

  19. Characterisation of Fractures and Fracture Zones in a Carbonate Aquifer Using Electrical Resistivity Tomography and Pricking Probe Methodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, Sandor; Kovacs, Attila; Kuslits, Lukács; Facsko, Gabor; Gribovszki, Katalin; Kalmar, Janos; Szarka, Laszlo

    2018-04-01

    Position, width and fragmentation level of fracture zones and position, significance and characteristic distance of fractures were aimed to determine in a carbonate aquifer. These are fundamental parameters, e.g. in hydrogeological modelling of aquifers, due to their role in subsurface water movements. The description of small scale fracture systems is however a challenging task. In the test area (Kádárta, Bakony Mts, Hungary), two methods proved to be applicable to get reasonable information about the fractures: Electrical Resistivity Tomography (ERT) and Pricking-Probe (PriP). PriP is a simple mechanical tool which has been successfully applied in archaeological investigations. ERT results demonstrated its applicability in this small scale fracture study. PriP proved to be a good verification tool both for fracture zone mapping and detecting fractures, but in certain areas, it produced different results than the ERT. The applicability of this method has therefore to be tested yet, although its problems most probably origin from human activity which reorganises the near-surface debris distribution. In the test site, both methods displayed fracture zones including a very characteristic one and a number of individual fractures and determined their characteristic distance and significance. Both methods prove to be able to produce hydrogeologically important parameters even individually, but their simultaneous application is recommended to decrease the possible discrepancies.

  20. Effective electrochemical method for investigation of hemoglobin unfolding based on the redox property of heme groups at glassy carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xianchan; Zheng, Wei; Zhang, Limin; Yu, Ping; Lin, Yuqing; Su, Lei; Mao, Lanqun

    2009-10-15

    This study demonstrates a facile and effective electrochemical method for investigation of hemoglobin (Hb) unfolding based on the electrochemical redox property of heme groups in Hb at bare glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. In the native state, the heme groups are deeply buried in the hydrophobic pockets of Hb with a five-coordinate high-spin complex and thus show a poor electrochemical property at bare GC electrodes. Upon the unfolding of Hb induced by the denaturant of guanidine hydrochloride (GdnHCl), the fifth coordinative bond between the heme groups and the residue of the polypeptides (His-F8) is broken, and as a result, the heme groups initially buried deeply in the hydrophobic pockets dissociate from the polypeptide chains and are reduced electrochemically at GC electrodes, which can be used to probe the unfolding of Hb. The results on the GdnHCl-induced Hb unfolding obtained with the electrochemical method described here well coincide with those studied with other methods, such as UV-vis spectroscopy, fluorescence, and circular dichroism. The application of the as-established electrochemical method is illustrated to study the kinetics of GdnHCl-induced Hb unfolding, the GdnHCl-induced unfolding of another kind of hemoprotein, catalase, and the pH-induced Hb unfolding/refolding.