WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal shields operating

  1. Thermal design of top shield for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajapathy, R.; Jalaludeen, S.; Selvaraj, A.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    India's Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor programme started with the construction of loop type 13MW(e) Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) which attained criticality in October 1985. With the experience of FBTR, the design work on pool type 500 MW(e) Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which will be a forerunner for future commercial fast breeder reactors, has been started. The Top Shield forms the cover for the main vessel which contains the primary circuit. Argon cover gas separates the Top Shield from the free level of hot sodium pool (803K). The Top Shield which is of box type construction consists of control plug, two rotatable plugs and roof slab, assembled together, which provide biological shielding, thermal shielding and leak tight containment at the top of the main vessel. Heat is transferred from the sodium pool to the Top Shield through argon cover gas and through components supported by it and dipped in the sodium pool. The Top Shield should be maintained at the desired operating temperature by incorporating a cooling system inside it. Insulation may be provided below the bottom plate to reduce the heat load to the cooling system, if required. The thermal design of Top Shield consists of estimation of heat transfer to the Top Shield, selection of operating temperature, assessment of insulation requirement, design of cooling system and evaluation of transient temperature changes

  2. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  3. Thermal design of top shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghupathy, S.; Velusamy, K.; Parthasarathy, U.; Ghosh, D.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a 500 MWe, sodium cooled, pool type fast reactor. The top shield forms the top cover for the main vessel (MV) and includes roof slab (RS), large rotatable plug (LRP), small rotatable plug (SRP) and control Plug (CP). RS, LRP and SRP are box type structures consisting of top and bottom plates stiffened by radial stiffeners and vertical penetration shells. TS is exposed to argon cover gas provided above sodium pool on the bottom side and reactor containment building air at the top. Heat transfer takes place through the argon cover gas to the bottom plate of TS. Annular gaps are formed between the components supported on TS and the component penetrations through which cellular convection takes place. A single thermal shield provided below TS reduces the heat flux to the bottom plate to 1.15 kW/m 2 . The MV (SS 316 LN) is welded to RS (carbon steel A48 P2) through a dissimilar metal weld. A step in RS and an anti convection barrier (ACB) outside RS are provided to limit the temperature at the MV-RS junction. The MV is surrounded by safety vessel (SV) and reactor vault made of concrete. Thermal insulation is provided outside SV to limit the heat transfer to the reactor vault. The design requirements of TS are to maintain the operating temperature at 383-393 K, limit the temperature difference (ΔT) across the height of TS to 20 / 100 K under normal operation/loss of cooling, provide minimum annular gap size at the component penetrations, provide a nearly linear temperature gradient in the CP portion within the height of TS, maintain the temperature of top plate of CP > 383 K, limit the ΔT across the top plate of CP to 2 K, limit the temperature near the inflatable / backup seal to 393 K, limit the temperature at the MV-RS junction and the heat flux to the reactor vault. The total heat transferred to TS is estimated to be 210 kW. A dedicated closed loop cooling system with a total flow rate of 10

  4. Dismantling system of concrete thermal shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Nobuhiro; Saiki, Yoshikuni; Ono, Yorimasa; Tokioka, Masatake; Ogino, Nobuyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety and efficient dismantling of concrete thermal shielding walls in nuclear reactors. Method: Concrete thermal shielding walls are cut and dismantled into dismantled blocks by a plasma cutting tool while sealing the top opening of bioshielding structures. The dismantled blocks are gripped and conveyed. The cutting tool is remote-handled while monitoring on a television receiver. Slugs and dusts produced by cutting are removed to recover. Since the dismantling work is carried out while sealing the working circumstance and by the remote control of the cutting tool, the operators' safety can be secured. Further, since the thermal sealing walls are cut and dismantled into blocks, dismantling work can be done efficiently. (Moriyama, K.)

  5. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  6. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  7. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Strychalski, Michał; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  8. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Meyrin 1211, Geneva 23, CH (Switzerland); Chrul, Anna [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul.Radzikowskiego 152, 31-324 Krakow (Poland); Damianoglou, Dimitrios [NTUA National Technical University of Athens, Heeron Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Strychalski, Michał [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, Wroclaw, 50-370 (Poland); Wright, Loren [Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-29

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  9. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  10. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  11. Thermal shield support degradation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Fry, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Damage to the thermal shield support structures of three pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to flow-induced vibrations was recently discovered during refueling. In two of the reactors, severe damage occurred to the thermal shield, and in one reactor the core support barrel (CSB) was damaged, necessitating extended outages for repairs. In all three reactors, several of the thermal shield supports were either loose, damaged, or missing. The three plants had been in operation for approximately 10 years before the damage was apparent by visual inspection. Because each of the three US PWR manufacturers have experienced thermal shield support degradation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyze ex-core neutron detector noise data to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient thermal shield support degradation. Results of the noise data analysis indicate that thermal shield support degradation probably began early in the life of both severely damaged plants. The degradation was characterized by shifts in the resonant frequencies of core internal structures and the appearance of new resonances in the ex-core neutron detector noise. Both the data analyses and the finite element calculations indicate that these changes in resonant frequencies are less than 3 Hz. 11 refs., 16 figs

  12. Thes - Website for Thermal Shields Upgrade Management

    CERN Document Server

    Micula, Adina

    2013-01-01

    There are a total of 1695 thermal shields (TS) in the interconnections between the superconducting magnets. During LHC Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) all of these TS are being upgraded with a new fixation design. This procedure involves the transport of all the TS from LHC to a workshop on the surface where they are being modified and the subsequent transport of the upgraded TS back to the tunnel where they are laid on the cryostats and await the closure of the interconnection. These operations have to be carefully coordinated in order to ensure that there are always enough modified TS to satisfy the demand in the tunnel and respect the time constraint imposed by the schedule of LS1. As part of my summer project, I developed a database driven website whose aim is to enable the TS upgrade monitoring.

  13. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  14. Piping structural design for the ITER thermal shield manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Chang Hyun, E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wooho, E-mail: whchung@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo; Kang, Kyoung-O. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jing Do; Cha, Jong Kook [Korea Marine Equipment Research Institute, Busan 606-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Kyu [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 660-843 (Korea, Republic of); Hamlyn-Harris, Craig; Hicks, Robby; Her, Namil; Jun, Chang-Hoon [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We finalized piping design of ITER thermal shield manifold for procurement. • Support span is determined by stress and deflection limitation. • SQP, which is design optimization method, is used for the pipe design. • Benchmark analysis is performed to verify the analysis software. • Pipe design is verified by structural analyses. - Abstract: The thermal shield (TS) provides the thermal barrier in the ITER tokamak to minimize heat load transferred by thermal radiation from the hot components to the superconducting magnets operating at 4.2 K. The TS is actively cooled by 80 K pressurized helium gas which flows from the cold valve box to the cooling tubes on the TS panels via manifold piping. This paper describes the manifold piping design and analysis for the ITER thermal shield. First, maximum allowable span for the manifold support is calculated based on the simple beam theory. In order to accommodate the thermal contraction in the manifold feeder, a contraction loop is designed and applied. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) method is used to determine the optimized dimensions of the contraction loop to ensure adequate flexibility of manifold pipe. Global structural behavior of the manifold is investigated when the thermal movement of the redundant (un-cooled) pipe is large.

  15. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the MICE Coupling Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Liu, X.K.; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Chen, A.B.; Guo, X.L.

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity indows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An ntermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two ryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for heir supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

  16. Thermal shielding device in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroshi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the soundness and earthquake proofness of mounting structures to a reactor vessel in a thermal shielding device comprising a plurality of tightly closed casings evacuated or shield with heat insulation gases, by reducing the wall thickness and weight of the casing. Constitution: the thermal shielding body comprises tightly closed casings and compressing core materials for preventing the deformation of the casings. The tightly closed casing is in the shape of a hollow vessel, completely sealed in gastight manner, and evacuated or sealed with heat insulation gases at a low pressure of about less than 0.5 kg/cm 2 G, such that the inner pressure is lower than the outer pressure. Compressing core materials made of porous metals or porous ceramics are contained to the inside of the casing. In this way, the wall thickness of the tightly closed casing can be reduced significantly as compared with the conventional case, whereby the mounting work on the site to the reactor container on the field can remarkably be improved and high reliability can be maintained at the mounting portion. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Method for limiting movement of a thermal shield for a nuclear reactor, and thermal shield displacement limiter therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Boyd, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method of limiting the movement of a thermal shield of a nuclear reactor. It comprises: machining at least four (4) pockets in upper portions of a thermal shield circumferentially about a core barrel of a nuclear reactor to receive key-wave inserts; tapping bolt holes in the pockets of the thermal shield to receive bolts; positioning key-wave inserts into the pockets of the thermal shield to be bolted in place with the bolt holes; machining dowel holes at least partially through the positioned key-way inserts and the thermal shield to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the key-way insert and thermal shield to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; sliding limiter keys into the key-way inserts and bolting the limiter keys to the core barrel to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative and the core barrel while allowing radial and axial movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; machining dowel holes through the limiter key and at least partially through the core barrel to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the limiter key and core barrel to restrain tangential movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel of the nuclear reactor

  18. Computer control of shielded cell operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffords, W.R. III.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes in detail a computer system to remotely control shielded cell operations. System hardware, software, and design criteria are discussed. We have designed a computer-controlled buret that provides a tenfold improvement over the buret currently in service. A computer also automatically controls cell analyses, calibrations, and maintenance. This system improves conditions for the operators by providing a safer, more efficient working environment and is expandable for future growth and development

  19. LS1 Report: Shielding operations

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2013-01-01

    At the LHC, the SMACC project’s consolidation train has just entered Sector 7-8, the third sector to be consolidated. It has moved on from Sector 6-7, which is now in the closure phase.   This week saw the start of the replacement campaign for the compensators on the LHC’s cryogenic distribution lines (QRL), involving all sectors of the machine. Nine compensators in total will be replaced between now and the end of the year (see the article in this week's Bulletin). Operations are advancing very quickly on the R2E (radiation to electronics) project. At Point 1, for example, the teams have successfully managed to get several weeks ahead of the activity schedule. Tests on the back-up electrical supply have also been completed. The diesel generators, designed to take over in the event of a failure of the main electrical supply, were put through their paces during a simulated power cut and passed with flying colours.   At the PS, 29 pillars have been ...

  20. Resonance shielding in thermal reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenstein, W.; Taviv, E.; Aminpour, M.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical foundations of a new methodology for the accurate treatment of resonance absorption in thermal reactor lattice analysis are presented. This methodology is based on the solution of the point-energy transport equation in its integral or integro-differential form for a heterogeneous lattice using detailed resonance cross-section profiles. The methodology is applied to LWR benchmark analysis, with emphasis on temperature dependence of resonance absorption during fuel depletion, spatial and mutual self-shielding, integral parameter analysis and treatment of cluster geometry. The capabilities of the OZMA code, which implements the new methodology are discussed. These capabilities provide a means against which simpler and more rapid resonance absorption algorithms can be checked. (author)

  1. Operating manual for the Tower Shielding Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1985-12-01

    This manual provides information necessary to operate and perform maintenance on the reactor systems and all equipment or systems which can affect their operation or the safety of personnel at the Tower Shielding Facility. The first four chapters consist of introductory and descriptive material of benefit to personnel in training, the qualifications required for training, the responsibilities of the personnel in the organization, and the procedures for reviewing proposed experiments. Chapter 8, Emergency Procedures, is also a necessary part of the indoctrination of personnel. The procedures for operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor (TSR-II), its water cooling system, and the main tower hoists are outlined in Chapters 5, 6, and 7. The Technical Specification surveillance requirements for the TSR-II are summarized in Chapter 9. The maintenance and calibration schedule is spelled out in Chapter 10. The procedures for assembly and disassembly of the TSR-II are outlined in Chapter 11

  2. Using the shield for thermal energy storage in pulsar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, G.T.; Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.P.C.; Bathke, C.G.; Blanchard, J.P.; Brimer, C.; Cheng, E.T.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Hasan, M.Z.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S.; Sviatoslavski, I.N.; Waganer, L.

    1995-01-01

    The PULSAR pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes the outboard shield for thermal energy storage to maintain full 1000MW(e) output during the dwell period of 200s. Thermal energy resulting from direct nuclear heating is accumulated in the shield during the 7200s fusion power production phase. The maximum shield temperature may be much higher than that for the blanket because radiation damage is significantly reduced. During the dwell period, thermal power discharged from the shield and coolant temperature are simultaneously regulated by controlling the coolant mass flow rate at the shield inlet. This is facilitated by throttled coolant bypass. Design concepts using helium and lithium coolant have been developed. Two-dimensional time-dependent thermal hydraulic calculations were performed to confirm performance capabilities required of the design concepts. The results indicate that the system design and performance can accommodate uncertainties in material limits or the length of the dwell period. (orig.)

  3. Removal, transportation and disposal of the Millstone 2 neutron thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snedeker, D.F.; Thomas, L.S.; Schmoker, D.S.; Cade, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Some PWR reactors equipped with neutron thermal shields (NTS) have experienced severe neutron shield degradation to the extent that removal and disposal of these shields has become necessary. Due to the relative size and activation levels of the thermal shield, disposal techniques, remote material handling and transportation equipment must be carefully evaluated to minimize plant down time and maintain disposal costs at a minimum. This paper describes the techniques, equipment and methodology employed in the removal, transportation and disposal of the NTS at the Millstone 2 Nuclear Generating Station, a PWR facility owned and operated by Northeast Utilities of Hartford, CT. Specific areas addressed include: (1) remote underwater equipment and tooling for use in segmenting and loading the thermal shield in a disposal liner; (2) adaptation of the General Electric IF-300 Irradiated Fuel Cask for transportation of the NTS for disposal; (3) equipment and techniques used for cask handling and liner burial at the Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) disposal facility

  4. Test of thermal shields for early warning station detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper

    1997-01-01

    The properties of thermal shields around NaI crystal scintillators for early warning stations have been checked in order to assure that external temperature variations cannot influence the stability of the measurements....

  5. TORE-SUPRA: design of thermal radiation shield at 80 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Cordier, J.J.; Deschamps, P.; Gauthier, A.; Perin, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    The TORE-SUPRA superconducting toroidal magnet operating at liquid helium temperature, must be protected against thermal radiation from the vessels. For this purpose, stainless steel heat shields, cooled at 80 K, are positioned between coil casings at 4.5 K and the vessels, and constitute a double stiff toroid which completely surrounds the magnet. Mockups have been manufactured to study their design and operating problems. Calculations have also been made to analyse the mechanical behaviour of these shields

  6. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Bosie; Stewart, Eric T.

    2007-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  7. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  8. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield

  9. Combination thermal and radiation shield for well logging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    A device for providing both thermal protection and radiation shielding for components such as radiation detectors within a well logging instrument comprises a thermally insulative flask containing a weldment filled with a mass of eutectic material which undergoes a change of state e.g. melting at a temperature which will provide an acceptable thermal environment for such components for extended time periods. The eutectic material which is preferably a bismuth (58%)/tin (42%) alloy has a specific gravity (> 8.5) facilitating its use as a radiation shield and is distributed around the radiation detectors so as to selectively impede the impinging of the detectors by radiation. The device is incorporated in a skid of a well logging instrument for measuring γ backscatter. A γ source is located either above or within the protective shielding. (author)

  10. Some problems raised by the operation of large nuclear turbo-generator sets. Cooling of shielded conductors. Precautionary steps for their thermal dimensioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nisol, R.

    1976-01-01

    The role of the shielded conductors as power dissipation feeder from the generator towards the network is recalled. Their natural cooling limits and the possibilities of forced cooling are examined. The known incidence of short-circuit currents upon the components of the generator-network connection is reported [fr

  11. Experiment on thermal insulation and sodium deposition of shield plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, K.; Honda, M.; Shiratori, H.; Ozaki, O.; Suzuki, M.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments on temperature distribution and thermal insulation characteristics was conducted using a reduced scale model of LMFBR shield plug. Observation and measurement of sodium deposition were also conducted on the model after the experiment. The effect of annulus natural convection was clarified for temperature and the thermal insulation characteristics from evaluating the result. Temperature distribution analysis was conducted successfully by combining the general purpose structural analysis program NASTRAN and vertical annulus natural convection analysis program VANAC. Moreover, significant effect was substantiated for the annulus convection barrier to increase the thermal insulation performance, narrow horizontal gap structure to prevent sodium deposition and thermal insulation plates. (author)

  12. Remote operation of a fully shielded electron probe microanalyser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowe, J.; Sparry, R.P.

    1977-11-01

    A 'Microscan 5' Cambridge Instrument Company electron probe micro-analyser has been equipped with full shielding to enable high radioactive materials to be examined. The transfer of controls for remote operation are described. (author)

  13. Thermal Degradation of Lead Monoxide Filled Polymer Composite Radiation Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, V.; Nagaiah, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead monoxide filled Isophthalate resin particulate polymer composites were prepared with different filler concentrations and investigated for physical, thermal, mechanical and gamma radiation shielding characteristics. This paper discusses about the thermo gravimetric analysis of the composites done to understand their thermal properties especially the effect of filler concentration on the thermal stability and degradation rate of composites. Pristine polymer exhibits single stage degradation whereas filled composites exhibit two stage degradation processes. Further, the IDT values as well as degradation rates decrease with the increased filler content in the composite.

  14. Thermal Analysis of a SHIELD Electromigration Test Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, David A.; Bowman, Duane J.; Mitchell, Robert T.

    1999-05-01

    The steady state and transient thermal behavior of an electromigration test structure was analyzed. The test structure was a Sandia SHIELD (Self-stressing HIgh fregquency rELiability Device) electromigration test device manufactured by an outside vendor. This device has a high frequency oscillator circuit, a buffer circuit to isolate and drive the metal line to the tested (DUT), the DUT to be electromigrated itself, a metal resistance thermometry monitor, and a heater elment to temperature accelerate the electromigration effect.

  15. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-04-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxillary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supercedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR

  16. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-03-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxiliary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supersedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR

  17. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-03-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxiliary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supersedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR.

  18. Operating manual for the Bulk Shielding Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1983-04-01

    The BSR is a pool-type reactor. It has the capabilities of continuous operation at a power level of 2 MW or at any desired lower power level. This manual presents descriptive and operational information. The reactor and its auxillary facilities are described from physical and operational viewpoints. Detailed operating procedures are included which are applicable from source-level startup to full-power operation. Also included are procedures relative to the safety of personnel and equipment in the areas of experiments, radiation and contamination control, emergency actions, and general safety. This manual supercedes all previous operating manuals for the BSR.

  19. Tests of a thermal acoustic shield with a supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickup, N.; Mangiarotty, R. A.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1981-10-01

    Fuel economy is a key element in the design of a future supersonic transport (SST). Variable cycle engines are being developed to provide the most economic combination of characteristics for a range of cruise speeds extending from subsonic speeds for overland flights to the supersonic cruise speeds. For one of these engines, the VCE-702, some form of noise suppression is needed for takeoff/sideline thrusts. The considered investigation is primarily concerned with scale model static tests of one particular concept for achieving that reduction, the thermal acoustic shield (TAS), which could also benefit other candidate SST engines. Other noise suppression devices being considered for SST application are the coannular nozzle, an internally ventilated nozzle, and mechanical suppressors. A test description is provided, taking into account the model configurations, the instrumentation, the test jet conditions, and aspects of screech noise control. Attention is given to shield thickness effects, a spectrum analysis, suppression and performance loss, and installed performance.

  20. Experimental validation of thermal design of top shield for a pool type SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aithal, Sriramachandra; Babu, V. Rajan; Balasubramaniyan, V.; Velusamy, K.; Chellapandi, P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Overall thermal design of top shield in a SFR is experimentally verified. • Air jet cooling is effective in ensuring the temperatures limits for top shield. • Convection patterns in narrow annulus are in line with published CFD results. • Wire mesh insulation ensures gradual thermal gradient at top portion of main vessel. • Under loss of cooling scenario, sufficient time is available for corrective action. - Abstract: An Integrated Top Shield Test Facility towards validation of thermal design of top shield for a pool type SFR has been conceived, constructed & commissioned. Detailed experiments were performed in this experimental facility having full-scale features. Steady state temperature distribution within the facility is measured for various heater plate temperatures in addition to simulating different operating states of the reactor. Following are the important observations (i) jet cooling system is effective in regulating the roof slab bottom plate temperature and thermal gradient across roof slab simulating normal operation of reactor, (ii) wire mesh insulation provided in roof slab-main vessel annulus is effective in obtaining gradual thermal gradient along main vessel top portion and inhibiting the setting up of cellular convection within annulus and (iii) cellular convection with four distinct convective cells sets in the annular gap between roof slab and small rotatable plug measuring ∼ϕ4 m in diameter & gap width varying from 16 mm to 30 mm. Repeatability of results is also ensured during all the above tests. The results presented in this paper is expected to provide reference data for validation of thermal hydraulic models in addition to serving as design validation of jet cooling system for pool type SFR.

  1. Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and Thermal Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, A.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the in 8 meter depth of water and for cutting through super alloyed moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR stainless steel up to 130 mm wall thickness. Depending on the research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the MZFR reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m 3 . Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (author)

  2. Thermal Operating Modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtel SAIC Company

    2002-01-01

    Higher and lower temperature operating modes (e.g., above and below the boiling point of water) are alternative approaches to managing the heat produced by the radioactive decay of spent nuclear fuel. Current analyses indicate that a repository at the Yucca Mountain site is likely to comply with applicable safety standards regardless of the particular thermal operating mode. Both modes have potential advantages and disadvantages. With a higher temperature operating mode (HTOM), waste packages (WPs) can be placed closer together. This reduces the number of drifts, the required emplacement area, construction costs, and occupational risks to construction workers. In addition, the HTOM would minimize the amount of water that might contact the waste for hundreds of years after closure. On the other hand, higher temperatures introduce uncertainties in the understanding of the long-term performance of the repository because of uncertainties in the thermal effects on WP lifetime and the near-field environment around the drifts. A lower temperature operating mode (LTOM) has the potential to reduce uncertainties in long-term performance of the repository by limiting the effects of temperature on WP lifetime and on the near-field environment around the drifts. Depending on the combination of operating parameters, a LTOM could require construction of additional drifts, a larger emplacement area, increased construction costs, increased occupational risks to construction works, and a longer period of ventilation than a HTOM. The repository design for the potential Yucca Mountain site is flexible and can be constructed and operated in various operating modes to achieve specific technical objectives, accommodate future policy decisions, and use of new information. For example, the flexible design can be operated across a range of temperatures and can be tailored to achieve specific thermal requirements in the future. To accommodate future policy decisions, the repository can be

  3. Thermal stress evaluation of the Viking RTG heat shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadter, J.T.; Weiss, R.O.

    1976-03-01

    Thermal stress analyses of the Viking RTG heat shield are presented. The primary purpose of the analyses was to determine the effects of the end cap and the finite length of the heat shield on the peak tensile stress in the barrel wall. The SAAS III computer code was used to calculate the thermal stresses; axisymmetric and plane section analyses were performed for a variety of temperature distributions. The study consisted of three parts. In the first phase, the influence of the end cap on the barrel wall stresses was examined by parametrically varying the modulus of elasticity of the contact zone between the end cap and the barrel. The second phase was concerned with stresses occurring as a result of an orbital decay reentry trajectory, and the effects of the magnitude and shape of the axial temperature gradient. The final part of the study was concerned with the circumferentially nonuniform temperature distribution which develops during a side-on stable reentry. The last part includes a comparison of stresses generated for a hexagonal cross section with those generated for a circular cross section

  4. Thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuation properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kany, A.M.I.; El-Gohary, M.I.; Kamal, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements were carried out to study the attenuation properties of low-energy neutrons transmitted through unheated and preheated barriers of heavy-weight, highly hydrated and heat-resistant concrete shields. The concrete shields under investigation have been prepared from naturally occurring ilmenite and serpentine Egyptian ores. A collimated beam obtained from an Am-Be source was used as a source of neutrons, while the measurements of total thermal, epithermal, and thermalized neutron fluxes were performed using a BF-3 detector, multichannel analyzer and Cd filter. Results show that the ilmenite-serpentine concrete proved to be a better thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuator than the ordinary concrete especially at a high temperature of concrete exposure. (Author)

  5. Elementary Thermal Operations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lostaglio, Matteo; Alhambra, Álvaro M.; Perry, Christopher

    2018-01-01

    To what extent do thermodynamic resource theories capture physically relevant constraints? Inspired by quantum computation, we define a set of elementary thermodynamic gates that only act on 2 energy levels of a system at a time. We show that this theory is well reproduced by a Jaynes-Cummings in......To what extent do thermodynamic resource theories capture physically relevant constraints? Inspired by quantum computation, we define a set of elementary thermodynamic gates that only act on 2 energy levels of a system at a time. We show that this theory is well reproduced by a Jaynes......-Cummings interaction in rotating wave approximation and draw a connection to standard descriptions of thermalisation. We then prove that elementary thermal operations present tighter constraints on the allowed transformations than thermal operations. Mathematically, this illustrates the failure at finite temperature...... to do so, including necessary and sufficient conditions for a given change of the population to be possible. As an example, we describe the resource theory of the Jaynes-Cummings model. Finally, we initiate an investigation into how our resource theories can be applied to Heat Bath Algorithmic Cooling...

  6. Manufacture and testing of the CTB&SBB thermal shield for the ITER magnet feeder system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Kun; Liu, Chen; Song, Yuntao; Feng, Hansheng; Ding, Kaizhong, E-mail: kzding@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, Tanbin; Ji, Hui

    2015-10-15

    The system of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) feeders is responsible for the power, helium cooling, and instrumentation of the magnets of the coil terminal box and S-bend box (CTB&SBB) thermal shield outside the cryostat. An 80-K rectangular Al thermal shield is hung inside the CTB&SBB to reduce the thermal radiation heat loads of 4.5-K helium. The American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) will supply all the 31 sets of feeders for ITER. A manufactured prototype of CTB&SBB thermal shield is first quality-tested before the commencement of the series production. First, a detailed configuration of the rectangular Al thermal shield is presented in this article. The paper also presents more information on the manufacturing process of the thermal shield, especially the welding process, the procedure for ensuring good weld quality, and the use of a specially designed tool to ensure <5-mm deformation on such a 7.3-m-long thermal shield during welding. In addition, the cold test and results, including the cooling process with 13-bar and 17.5-g/s 80-K He gas, and the temperature distribution on different panels of the thermal shield are presented. The whole process of manufacture and testing lays a good foundation for the series production of the thermal shield.

  7. The ITER thermal shields for the magnet system: Design evolution and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.; Krasikov, Yu.; Grigoriev, S.; Komarov, V.; Krylov, V.; Labusov, A.; Pyrjaev, V.; Chiocchio, S.; Smirnov, V.; Sorin, V.; Tanchuk, V.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal shield (TS) system provides the required reduction of thermal loads to the cold structures operating at 4.5 K. This paper presents the rationale for the TS design evolution, details of the recent modifications that affect the TS cooling panels, the central TS ports and support system, interface labyrinths and TS structural joints. The modern results of thermal-hydraulic, thermal, seismic, static and dynamic structural analyses, that involve sub-modeling and sub-structuring finite element analysis techniques, are also reported. The modifications result in considerable reduction of TS mass, surface area and heat loads to/from the TS, simplification of TS assembly procedure and in-cryostat maintenance

  8. Thermal-structural analysis for ITER in-wall shielding block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Junchuan; Song Yuntao; Wu Weiyue; Du Shuangsong; Wang, X.; Ioki, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► IWS blocks shall withstand various types of mechanical loads including EM loads, inertial loads and thermal loads. ► Due to the complicated geometry, the finite element method is the suitable tool to solve the problem. ► Contact element has been selected to simulate the friction between the different components. ► At baking phase, secondary stresses due to preloading and temperature difference predominate in the total stress. ► At plasma operation phase, secondary stresses due to preloading and thermal loads were deducted from the total stresses. - Abstract: In order to verify the design strength of the in-wall shielding (IWS) blocks of the ITER, thermal-structural analyses of one IWS block under vacuum vessel (VV) baking and plasma operation conditions have been respectively performed with finite element (FE) method. Among the complicated operation scenarios of the ITER, two critical types of combined loads required by the load specification of IWS were applied on the shielding block. The stress of the block is judged by American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) criterion. Results show that the structure of this block has enough safety margin, and it also supplies detailed information of the stress distribution in concerned region under certain loads.

  9. Use of fusion-welding techniques in fabrication of a superconducting-magnet thermal-shield system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Berkey, J.H.; Chang, Y.; Johnson, G.L.; Lathrop, G.H.; Podesta, D.L.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Success of the thermal shield system was demonstrated by the results of acceptance tests performed with the magnet and all its ancillary equipment. During these tests the thermal shield system was: (1) thermally cycled several times from 300 0 K to 77 0 K; (2) pressure cycled several times from 0 to 5 atmospheres; (3) operated for more than 500 hours at 77 0 K and in a vacuum environment of less than 10 - 5 torr; (4) operated in a magnetic field up to 6.0 Telsa; (5) exposed to a rapidly collapsing magnetic field of more than 250 gauss per second; (6) drained of all LN 2 in a few minutes, without any weld failures. The successful (and relatively problem free) operation of the magnet system validates the choice of the welding processes used, as well as their execution in both shop and field environments

  10. 6Li-doped silicate glass for thermal neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, C.A.; Blackburn, D.H.; Kauffman, D.A.; Cranmer, D.C.; Olmez, I.

    1994-01-01

    Glass formulations are described that contain high concentrations of 6 Li and are suitable for use as thermal neutron shielding. One formulation contained 31 mol% of 6 Li 2 O and 69 mol% of SiO 2 . Studies were performed on a second formulation that contained as much as 37 mol% of 6 Li 2 O and 59 mol% of SiO 2 , with 4 mol% Al 2 O 3 added to prevent crystallization at such high 6 Li 2 O concentrations. These lithium silicate glasses can be formed into a variety of shapes using conventional glass fabrication techniques. Examples include flat plates, disks, hollow cylinders, and other more complex geometries. Both in-beam and in-core experiments have been performed to study the use and durability of Li silicate glasses. In-core experiments show the glass can withstand the intense radiation fields near the core of a reactor. The neutron attenuation of the glasses used in these studies was 90%/mm. In-beam studies show that the glass is effective for reducing the gamma-ray and neutron fields near experiments. ((orig.))

  11. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: II-Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, M.; Ayers, T.; Collura, A.; Nasillo, G.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-01

    The formation flight configuration of the Simbol-X mission implies that the X-ray mirror module will be open to Space on both ends. In order to reduce the power required to maintain the thermal stability and, therefore, the high angular resolution of the shell optics, a thin foil thermal shield will cover the mirror module. Different options are presently being studied for the foil material of these shields. We report results of an experimental investigation conducted to verify that the scattering of X-rays, by interaction with the thin foil material of the thermal shield, will not significantly affect the performances of the telescope.

  12. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: II-Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbera, M.; Ayers, T.; Collura, A.; Nasillo, G.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-01-01

    The formation flight configuration of the Simbol-X mission implies that the X-ray mirror module will be open to Space on both ends. In order to reduce the power required to maintain the thermal stability and, therefore, the high angular resolution of the shell optics, a thin foil thermal shield will cover the mirror module. Different options are presently being studied for the foil material of these shields. We report results of an experimental investigation conducted to verify that the scattering of X-rays, by interaction with the thin foil material of the thermal shield, will not significantly affect the performances of the telescope.

  13. Thermal-hydraulic analysis and design improvement for coolant channel of ITER shield block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ling; Li Huaqi; Zheng Jiantao; Yi Jingwei; Kang Weishan; Chen Jiming

    2013-01-01

    As an important part for ITER, shield block is used to shield the neutron heat. The structure design of shield block, especially the inner coolant channel design will influence its cooling effect and safety significantly. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis for shield block has been performed by the computational fluid dynamics software, some optimization suggestions have been proposed and thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the improved model has been analyzed again. The analysis results for improved model show that pressure drop through flow path near the inlet and outlet region of the shield block has been reduced, and the total pressure drop in cooling path has been reduced too; the uniformity of the mass flowrate distribution and the velocity distribution have been improved in main cooling branches; the local highest temperature of solid domain reduced considerably, which could avoid thermal stress becoming too large because of coolant effect unevenly. (authors)

  14. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: I-Design and X-Ray Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collura, A.; Barbera, M.; Varisco, S.; Basso, S.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ayers, T.

    2009-05-01

    The Simbol-X mission is designed to fly in formation flight configuration. As a consequence, the telescope has both ends open to space, and thermal shielding at telescope entrance and exit is required to maintain temperature uniformity throughout the mirrors. Both mesh and meshless solutions are presently under study for the shields. We discuss the design and the X-ray transmission.

  15. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: I - Design and X-Ray Transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collura, A.; Varisco, S.; Barbera, M.; Basso, S.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ayers, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Simbol-X mission is designed to fly in formation flight configuration. As a consequence, the telescope has both ends open to space, and thermal shielding at telescope entrance and exit is required to maintain temperature uniformity throughout the mirrors. Both mesh and meshless solutions are presently under study for the shields. We discuss the design and the X-ray transmission.

  16. Experimental Studies on Shadow Shields for Thermal Protection of Cryogenic Tanks in Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knoll, Richard

    1968-01-01

    ... (high-emissivity coatings on annular rings of shields) on thermal performance. The experimental data, in general, agreed closely with an analytical model which assumed diffuse surfaces with nonuniform radiosity...

  17. Rectification of leak from upper aluminium thermal shield cooling water inlet line of Cirus reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Anil; Joshi, N.S.; Kharpate, A.V.; Marik, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    During 1994, a small water leak was observed from the upper aluminium thermal shield of Cirus reactor. Detailed investigations revealed that the leakage was from the weld joint of one of the 1 1/4 inch NB Sch. 80 coolant inlet pipes connected to the upper aluminium thermal shield. The location of the leak was identified by monitoring the stabilised water level in the vertical inlet pipe under stagnant condition. The exact location was identified by installing an inflatable seal arrangement inside the leaky pipe and inflating the seal at different elevations to isolate the leaky location and ensuring that the leak was completely stopped. This location was about 15 feet below the operating floor of the reactor. The pipe was visually inspected with the help of a fibre-scope to assess the condition of the inner surface. Eddy current testing was also carried out for volumetric examination. This revealed one more localised flaw on the outer surface little above the leaky joint. A hollow plug, with expandable rings, having C-shaped cross section at both the ends and a straight portion in the middle to cover the defective region, was developed and qualified in a mock-up station after extensive trials. In view of the site constraints, a flexible hollow link assembly was engineered, for installing the plug remotely. The inner surface of the pipe was cleaned using an emery brush and a deburring tool. The plug was then installed covering the leak area and the rings were expanded by remote tightening. The shield was hydro-tested satisfactorily. (author)

  18. Optimization of thermal design for nitrogen shield of JET cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.; Obert, W.

    1991-11-01

    The reference design of JET cryopump nitrogen shield consists of an outer section made of copper chevrons fastened to two cooling tubes and an inner stainless steel section and backing plate with two cooling tubes. These tubes are fed in a parallel flow arrangement. The inlet flow is divided into two parallel paths so that both tubes on either section are always at the same temperature. This arrangement was selected due to concern about conduction between warm and cold parts of the shield during cooldown transients. If the heat loads are unequal, such a parallel flow arrangement can result in flow starvation in the path with higher heat load. This will cause large temperature differences and, ultimately, structural failure. Hence, an analysis was undertaken to investigate the conduction effects in the shield for other flow arrangements. 4 refs., 8 figs

  19. Shielding measurements and augmentation for high power operations of FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jose, M.T.; Baskar, S.; Viswanathan, S.; Balasundar, S.; Subramanian, V.; Ravi, T.; Sundaram, V.M.; Raghunath, V.M.; Varadarajan, S.; Jena, A.K.

    1996-01-01

    Fast breeder test reactor (FBTR) at Kalpakkam is a 40 MWt loop type fast reactor with sodium coolant. Since criticality in 1985, radiation surveys were carried out at all accessible locations at different power levels to find out the hot spots and evaluate the shielding adequacy. This paper gives the details of findings of these measurements, consequent changes in shielding, and the present status of dose profile after the augmentation of shielding. (author). 1 ref., 1 fig., 1 tab

  20. Study of the behavior of thermal shield support system for the French CPO series plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellet, S.; Roux, P.; Bhandari, D.R.; Schwirian, R.E.; Yu, C.; Matarazzo, J.C.; Singleton, N.R.

    1996-01-01

    Degradation/failure of thermal shield support system in PWRs has been observed in the US as well as in foreign plants. In almost all the cases, remedial actions were put in place at very high economic costs to the utilities only after the failures had occurred. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive study to predict the long term behavior of a thermal shield support system due to flow-induced vibratory loads and thermal transients. Excellent agreement from the system finite model between the measured plant test data on the barrel/thermal shield beam and shell mode frequencies and the flexure strains confirms the basic structural behavior and physics of the flow induced vibrations. Loads and stresses on the support bolts and the flexures were determined to predict the fatigue life of the components

  1. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-01

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly

  2. Enhancement of thermal neutron shielding of cement mortar by using borosilicate glass powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-Kil; Lee, Jun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2017-05-01

    Concrete has been used as a traditional biological shielding material. High hydrogen content in concrete also effectively attenuates high-energy fast neutrons. However, concrete does not have strong protection against thermal neutrons because of the lack of boron compound. In this research, boron was added in the form of borosilicate glass powder to increase the neutron shielding property of cement mortar. Borosilicate glass powder was chosen in order to have beneficial pozzolanic activity and to avoid deleterious expansion caused by an alkali-silica reaction. According to the experimental results, borosilicate glass powder with an average particle size of 13µm showed pozzolanic activity. The replacement of borosilicate glass powder with cement caused a slight increase in the 28-day compressive strength. However, the incorporation of borosilicate glass powder resulted in higher thermal neutron shielding capability. Thus, borosilicate glass powder can be used as a good mineral additive for various radiation shielding purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Helium leak testing of superconducting magnets, thermal shields and cryogenic lines of SST -1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thankey, P.L.; Joshi, K.S.; Semwal, P.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Khan, Z.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak SST - 1 is under commissioning at Institute for Plasma Research. It comprises of a toroidal doughnut shaped plasma chamber, surrounded by liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets, housed in a cryostat chamber. The cryostat has two cooling circuits, (1) liquid nitrogen cooling circuit operating at 80 K to minimize the radiation heat load on the magnets, and (2) liquid helium cooling circuit to cool magnets and cold mass support structure to 4.5 K. In this paper we describe (a) the leak testing of copper - SS joints, brazing joints, interconnecting joints of the superconducting magnets, and (b) the leak testing of the liquid nitrogen cooling circuit, comprising of the main supply header, the thermal shields, interconnecting pipes, main return header and electrical isolators. All these tests were carried out using both vacuum and sniffer methods. (author)

  4. 75 FR 65525 - Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... DEPARTMENT OF LABOR Employment and Training Administration [TA-W-74,327] Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division of Wellpoint, Inc., Green Bay, WI; Notice... former workers of Anthem Blue Cross Blue Shield, Claim Management Services, Inc. Operations, a Division...

  5. Radiation shielding lead shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei, Shoichi.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns lead shields for radiation shielding. Shield boxes are disposed so as to surround a pipeline through which radioactive liquids, mists or like other objects are passed. Flanges are formed to each of the end edges of the shield boxes and the shield boxes are connected to each other by the flanges. Upon installation, empty shield boxes not charged with lead particles and iron plate shields are secured at first at the periphery of the pipeline. Then, lead particles are charged into the shield boxes. This attains a state as if lead plate corresponding to the depth of the box is disposed. Accordingly, operations for installation, dismantling and restoration can be conducted in an empty state with reduced weight to facilitate the operations. (I.S.)

  6. Design of vessel baking system and thermal radiation shields for SST-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, E.R.; Nagabhushana, S.; Pathak, H.A.; Panigrahi, S.; Nath, T.R.; Babu, A.V.S; Gangradey, R.; Patel, R.J.; Saxena, Y.C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    1998-07-01

    SST-1 is a Steady State Tokamak with a major radius of 1.1 m, minor radius of 0.2 m and toroidal field of 3.0 T. The toroidal and poloidal field coils of SST-1 are superconducting. One of the main objectives of SST-1 is to demonstrate steady state particle removal and active plasma density control which states the necessity of wall conditioning. The vacuum vessel will be baked up to 525 K by passing hot nitrogen gas through the U - channels welded on the inner surface of vacuum vessel. The required mass flow rate at 5 bar is 0.712 Kg/s to maintain 525 K wall temperature in steady state. Superconducting coils operating at 4.5 K will be protected against thermal radiation from hot surfaces using liquid nitrogen cooled panels operating at 87 K. Maximum 1200 litres/hour liquid nitrogen is required during vessel baking. The design of vacuum vessel baking system and thermal radiation shields and related flow analysis are presented here. (authors)

  7. Design of vessel baking system and thermal radiation shields for SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, E.R.; Nagabhushana, S.; Pathak, H.A.; Panigrahi, S.; Nath, T.R.; Babu, A.V.S; Gangradey, R.; Patel, R.J.; Saxena, Y.C.

    1998-01-01

    SST-1 is a Steady State Tokamak with a major radius of 1.1 m, minor radius of 0.2 m and toroidal field of 3.0 T. The toroidal and poloidal field coils of SST-1 are superconducting. One of the main objectives of SST-1 is to demonstrate steady state particle removal and active plasma density control which states the necessity of wall conditioning. The vacuum vessel will be baked up to 525 K by passing hot nitrogen gas through the U - channels welded on the inner surface of vacuum vessel. The required mass flow rate at 5 bar is 0.712 Kg/s to maintain 525 K wall temperature in steady state. Superconducting coils operating at 4.5 K will be protected against thermal radiation from hot surfaces using liquid nitrogen cooled panels operating at 87 K. Maximum 1200 litres/hour liquid nitrogen is required during vessel baking. The design of vacuum vessel baking system and thermal radiation shields and related flow analysis are presented here. (authors)

  8. Optimization of thermal neutron shield concrete mixture using artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadollahi, A. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box: 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazemi, E., E-mail: nazemi.ehsan@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box: 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajorloo, A.M. [Water and Environmental Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, P.O. Box: 167651719, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Colemanite was used in fabricating of thermal neutron shield concrete. • The Taguchi method was implemented to obtain the data set required for training the ANN. • Trained ANN predicted quality characteristics of thermal neutron shield. - Abstract: Colemanite is the most convenient boron mineral which has been widely used in construction of radiation shielding concrete in order to improve the capture of thermal neutrons. But utilization of Colemanite in radiation shielding concrete has a deleterious effect on both physical and mechanical properties. In the present work, Taguchi method and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to find an optimal mixture of Colemanite based concrete in order to improve the boron content of concrete and increase thermal neutron absorption without violating the standards for physical and mechanical properties. Using Taguchi method for experimental design, 27 concrete samples with different mixtures were fabricated and tested. Water/cement ratio, cement quantity, volume fraction of Colemanite aggregate and silica fume quantity were selected as control factors, and compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity and thermal neutron transmission ratio were considered as the quality responses. Obtained data from 27 experiments were used to train 3 ANNs. Four control factors were utilized as the inputs of 3 ANNs and 3 quality responses were used as the outputs, separately (each ANN for one quality response). After training the ANNs, 1024 different mixtures with different quality responses were predicted. At the final, optimum mixture was obtained among the predicted different mixtures. Results demonstrated that the optimal mixture of thermal neutron shielding concrete has a water–cement ratio of 0.38, cement content of 400 kg/m{sup 3}, a volume fraction Colemanite aggregate of 50% and silica fume–cement ratio of 0.15.

  9. Optimization of thermal neutron shield concrete mixture using artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadollahi, A.; Nazemi, E.; Zolfaghari, A.; Ajorloo, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Colemanite was used in fabricating of thermal neutron shield concrete. • The Taguchi method was implemented to obtain the data set required for training the ANN. • Trained ANN predicted quality characteristics of thermal neutron shield. - Abstract: Colemanite is the most convenient boron mineral which has been widely used in construction of radiation shielding concrete in order to improve the capture of thermal neutrons. But utilization of Colemanite in radiation shielding concrete has a deleterious effect on both physical and mechanical properties. In the present work, Taguchi method and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to find an optimal mixture of Colemanite based concrete in order to improve the boron content of concrete and increase thermal neutron absorption without violating the standards for physical and mechanical properties. Using Taguchi method for experimental design, 27 concrete samples with different mixtures were fabricated and tested. Water/cement ratio, cement quantity, volume fraction of Colemanite aggregate and silica fume quantity were selected as control factors, and compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity and thermal neutron transmission ratio were considered as the quality responses. Obtained data from 27 experiments were used to train 3 ANNs. Four control factors were utilized as the inputs of 3 ANNs and 3 quality responses were used as the outputs, separately (each ANN for one quality response). After training the ANNs, 1024 different mixtures with different quality responses were predicted. At the final, optimum mixture was obtained among the predicted different mixtures. Results demonstrated that the optimal mixture of thermal neutron shielding concrete has a water–cement ratio of 0.38, cement content of 400 kg/m 3 , a volume fraction Colemanite aggregate of 50% and silica fume–cement ratio of 0.15.

  10. Integrated thermal analysis of top-shield and reactor vault of Indian FBR-600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendrakumar, M.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    The design for next generation fast breeder reactors (FBR-600) has been commenced with enhanced safety and improved economy as the main targets. The Top Shield (TS) of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a box type structure consisting of Roof Slab (RS), Small Rotatable Plug (SRP), and Large Rotatable Plug (LRP). The large box type structure with many penetrations posed difficulties during manufacturing. Because of the required high load carrying capabilities, a dome shaped thick plate roof slab is conceived for FBR-600. Main Vessel (MV) which holds the primary sodium and associated components is welded to the RS through a triple joint. Reactor vault (RV) is a thick concrete structure which supports MV and Safety Vessel (SV). The temperature of RV concrete has to be less than 338 K (65°C) under normal operating heat loads (full and part load conditions) and less than 363 K (90°C) under Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal (SGDHR) conditions with one cooling loop in service. The temperature in the component penetrations of the RS should be greater than 120°C to avoid sodium aerosol deposition. Similarly, the temperature of the LRP and SRP has to be ∼120°C to protect the elastomeric seals provided to these structures. Further, the heat load to RV transferred by direct conduction by roof slab support has to be minimum. To meet these conflicting thermal requirements, detailed multi-physics CFD calculations have been performed to finalize, (i) the insulation requirements on the top of roof slab, (ii) number and position of reflective insulation plates below the bottom plate of roof slab/rotating plugs, (iii) air flow rate for various zones of the top shield and (iv) water flow rate and pitch of water cooling pipes for the reactor vault. (author)

  11. Thermal and flow considerations for the 80 K shield of the SSC magnet cryostats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovich, S.; Yuecel, A.; Demko, J.; Thirumaleshwar, M.

    1994-01-01

    The nominal temperatures in the SSC magnets range between 4.2 K in the superconducting coils and 300 K on the cryostat outer wall. To minimize the 4 K heat load, one thermal shield cooled by liquid and vapor nitrogen flows at 84 K, and another cooled by helium flow at 20 K are incorporated in the cryostat. Tubes attached to the shields serve as conduits for the cryogens. The liquid nitrogen tube in the cryostat is used for shield refrigeration and also for liquid distribution around the SSC rings. The second nitrogen line is used to return the vapor to the helium refrigerators for helium precooling. The nominal LN2 flow from a 4.3 km long cryogenic string (4 sections) to the surface is 64 g/s. The total liquid nitrogen consumption of approximately 5000 g/s will be supplied at one, two or more locations on the surface. The total heat load of the 80 K shield is estimated as 3.2 W/m: about 50% is composed of infrared radiation; the remaining 50% is by heat conduction through supports, vacuum barriers and other thermal connections between the shield and the 300 K outer wall. The required LN2 flow rate depends on the distribution and circulation schemes. The LN2 temperature will in turn vary depending on the flow rate and on the recooling method used. For example, with a massflow of 400 g/s of LN2 the temperature rises from 82 K to 86 K between two compact recoolers 1 km apart. This temperature is higher than desired. The temperature can be reduced by increasing the flow rate of the liquid or by using the continuous recooling scheme. This paper discusses some thermal problems caused by certain mechanical designs of the 80 K shield and the possible improvement by using continuous recooling. The authors present results of the 80 K shield temperature distribution analysis, the 20 K shield heat load augmentation resulting from the increased 80 K shield temperatures, the continuous nitrogen recooling scheme and some flow timing related analysis

  12. Atom interferometry in space: Thermal management and magnetic shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milke, Alexander; Kubelka-Lange, André; Gürlebeck, Norman, E-mail: norman.guerlebeck@zarm.uni-bremen.de; Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Schuldt, Thilo [DLR Institute for Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Braxmaier, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); DLR Institute for Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10{sup −4} % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup 5}. We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space.

  13. Thermal and mechanical analysis of the Faraday shield for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesey, R.A.

    1988-02-01

    The antenna for the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is protected from the plasma environment by a Faraday shield, an array of gas-cooled metallic tubes. The plasma side of the tubes is armored with graphite tiles, which can be either brazed or mechanically attached to the tube. The Faraday shield has been analyzed using finite element codes to model thermal and mechanical responses to typical CIT heating and disruption loads. Four representative materials (Inconel 718, tantalum-10 tungsten, copper alloy C17510, and molybdenum alloy TZM) and several combinations of tube and armor thicknesses were used in the thermal analysis, which revealed that maximum allowable temperatures were not exceeded for any of the four materials considered. The two-dimensional thermal stress analysis indicated Von Mises stresses greater than twice the yield stress for a tube constructed of Inconel 718 (the original design material) for the brazed-graphite design. Analysis of stresses caused by plasma disruption (/rvec J/ /times/ /rvec B/) loads eliminated the copper and molybdenum alloys as candidate tube materials. Of the four materials considered, tantalum-10 tungsten performed the best for a brazed graphite design, showing acceptable thermal stresses (69% of yield) and disruption stresses (42% of yield). A preliminary thermal analysis of the mechanically attached graphite scheme predicts minimal thermal stresses in the tube. The survivability of the graphite tubes in this scheme is yet to be analyzed. 8 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs

  14. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available

  15. Application of a calculational model for thermal neutrons through biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, A M [Nuclear engineering safety department, national center for nuclear safety and radiation, Nasr City Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    In this work a computational program, based on the Boltzmann transport integrodifferential equation, is applied. The scattering kernel is represented by the synthetic scattering model. The behaviour of thermal neutron in hydrogenous materials, which can be used as biological shields, are studied. These materials are water, polyethylene, Oak-Ridge concrete, ordinary concrete and manganese concrete. The data obtained are presented in tables. The results are analysed and compared with similar experimental values. Safety evaluation and environmental impact are discussed. 2 tabs.

  16. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  17. Including the Effect of Shielding in Prediction of Weather Window for Offshore Lifting Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Camilla Waldum

    2015-01-01

    The offshore industry is constantly seeking to operate in more extreme conditions. DeepOcean is a subsea service company, where offshore lifts is a part of every day operations. To remain competitive, it is important to reduce operational downtime, where time spent waiting on weather is one of the main contributors. The main goal of this thesis is to investigate how shielding effects influence the operational limit for offshore lifting operations at different heading angles. Common practice i...

  18. Shielding practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauermann, P.F.

    1985-08-01

    The basis of shielding practice against external irradiation is shown in a simple way. For most sources of radiation (point sources) occurring in shielding practice, the basic data are given, mainly in the form of tables, which are required to solve the shielding problems. The application of these data is explained and discussed using practical examples. Thickness of shielding panes of glove boxes for α and β radiation; shielding of sealed γ-radiography sources; shielding of a Co-60 radiation source, and of the manipulator panels for hot cells; damping factors for γ radiation and neutrons; shielding of fast and thermal neutrons, and of bremsstrahlung (X-ray tubes, Kr-85 pressure gas cylinders, 42 MeV betatrons, 20 MeV linacs); two-fold shielding (lead glass windows for hot cells, 14 MeV neutron generators); shielding against scattered radiation. (orig./HP) [de

  19. Self-shielding coefficient and thermal flux depression factor of voluminous sample in neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorddin Ibrahim; Rosnie Akang

    2009-01-01

    Full text: One of the major problems encountered during the irradiation of large inhomogeneous samples in performing activation analysis using neutron is the perturbation of the neutron field due to absorption and scattering of neutron within the sample as well as along the neutron guide in the case of prompt gamma activation analysis. The magnitude of this perturbation shown by self-shielding coefficient and flux depression depend on several factors including the average neutron energy, the size and shape of the sample, as well as the macroscopic absorption cross section of the sample. In this study, we use Monte Carlo N-Particle codes to simulate the variation of neutron self-shielding coefficient and thermal flux depression factor as a function of the macroscopic thermal absorption cross section. The simulation works was carried out using the high performance computing facility available at UTM while the experimental work was performed at the tangential beam port of Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI, Malaysia Nuclear Agency. The neutron flux measured along the beam port is found to be in good agreement with the simulated data. Our simulation results also reveal that total flux perturbation factor decreases as the value of absorption increases. This factor is close to unity for low absorbing sample and tends towards zero for strong absorber. In addition, sample with long mean chord length produces smaller flux perturbation than the shorter mean chord length. When comparing both the graphs of self-shielding factor and total disturbance, we can conclude that the total disturbance of the thermal neutron flux on the large samples is dominated by the self-shielding effect. (Author)

  20. Thermal power plant design and operation

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Dipak

    2015-01-01

    Thermal Power Plant: Design and Operation deals with various aspects of a thermal power plant, providing a new dimension to the subject, with focus on operating practices and troubleshooting, as well as technology and design. Its author has a 40-long association with thermal power plants in design as well as field engineering, sharing his experience with professional engineers under various training capacities, such as training programs for graduate engineers and operating personnel. Thermal Power Plant presents practical content on coal-, gas-, oil-, peat- and biomass-fueled thermal power

  1. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample

  2. Shielding plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makishima, Kenji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: In shielding plugs of an LMFBR type reactor, to restrain natural convection of heat in an annular space between a thermal shield layer and a shield shell, to prevent the lowering of heat-insulation performance, and to alleviate a thermal stress in a reactor container and the shield shell. Constitution: A ring-like leaf spring split in the direction of height is disposed in an annular space between a thermal shield layer and a shield shell. In consequence, the space is partitioned in the direction of height and, therefore, if axial temperature conditions and space width are the same and the space is low, the natural convection is hard to occur. Thus the rise of upper surface temperature of the shielding plugs can prevent the lowering of the heat insulation performance which will result in the increment of shielding plug cooling capacity, thereby improving reliability. In the meantime, since there is mounted an earthquake-resisting support, the thermal shield layer will move for a slight gap in case of an earthquake, being supported by the earthquake-resisting support, and the movement of the thermal shield layer is restricted, thereby maintaining integrity without increasing the stroke of the ring-like spring. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Optimization of the outer support in the ITER lower cryostat thermal shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, C.H., E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, W., E-mail: whchung@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, J., E-mail: jongmin.lim@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B.C., E-mail: bclee@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Design methodology for the ITER lower cryostat thermal shield support is described. • Design optimization is performed using the kriging meta-model. • Single plate support design is proposed as an alternative design. • Proposed design has 24% reduced weight compared with the initial design. - Abstract: ITER Lower Cryostat Thermal Shield (LCTS) is fixed to the cryostat floor by a thin flexible plate support. Double plate made of titanium alloy is adopted as a reference design. Double plate is effective to get structural reliability for the high inertia load and buckling load. Thin plate with titanium alloy has good flexibility to the thermal movement and reduces conduction heat load from cryostat floor to the thermal shield. Double plate support has enough structural margin. In addition, titanium alloy requires high cost for fabrication. Design optimization is required to save manufacturing expenses. In addition to the mass minimization, design modification from double plate to single plate is proposed, because welding of double plate is difficult due to narrow gap between two plates. In this paper, design process to find optimal design of LCTS support is described. The sensitivities of the design variables such as thickness, height, width and gap between two plates are investigated. Optimal design solution is obtained by Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) algorithm based on the meta-model developed by randomly selected experimental samples. Through the design optimization process, optimal designs of the LCTS support are obtained. The weight of the support plates can be reduced to 24% compared with the initial design.

  4. Optimization of the outer support in the ITER lower cryostat thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, C.H.; Chung, W.; Lim, J.; Lee, B.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Design methodology for the ITER lower cryostat thermal shield support is described. • Design optimization is performed using the kriging meta-model. • Single plate support design is proposed as an alternative design. • Proposed design has 24% reduced weight compared with the initial design. - Abstract: ITER Lower Cryostat Thermal Shield (LCTS) is fixed to the cryostat floor by a thin flexible plate support. Double plate made of titanium alloy is adopted as a reference design. Double plate is effective to get structural reliability for the high inertia load and buckling load. Thin plate with titanium alloy has good flexibility to the thermal movement and reduces conduction heat load from cryostat floor to the thermal shield. Double plate support has enough structural margin. In addition, titanium alloy requires high cost for fabrication. Design optimization is required to save manufacturing expenses. In addition to the mass minimization, design modification from double plate to single plate is proposed, because welding of double plate is difficult due to narrow gap between two plates. In this paper, design process to find optimal design of LCTS support is described. The sensitivities of the design variables such as thickness, height, width and gap between two plates are investigated. Optimal design solution is obtained by Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) algorithm based on the meta-model developed by randomly selected experimental samples. Through the design optimization process, optimal designs of the LCTS support are obtained. The weight of the support plates can be reduced to 24% compared with the initial design.

  5. Computational models for electromagnetic transients in ITER vacuum vessel, cryostat and thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.; Arslanova, D.; Belov, A.; Belyakov, V.; Gapionok, E.; Gornikel, I.; Gribov, Y.; Ioki, K.; Kukhtin, V.; Lamzin, E.; Sugihara, M.; Sychevsky, S.; Terasawa, A.; Utin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A set of detailed computational models are reviewed that covers integrally the system “vacuum vessel (VV), cryostat, and thermal shields (TS)” to study transient electromagnetics (EMs) in the ITER machine. The models have been developed in the course of activities requested and supervised by the ITER Organization. EM analysis is enabled for all ITER operational scenarios. The input data are derived from results of DINA code simulations. The external EM fields are modeled accurate to the input data description. The known magnetic shell approach can be effectively applied to simulate thin-walled structures of the ITER machine. Using an integral–differential formulation, a single unknown is determined within the shells in terms of the vector electric potential taken only at the nodes of a finite-element (FE) mesh of the conducting structures. As a result, the FE mesh encompasses only the system “VV + Cryostat + TS”. The 3D model requires much higher computational resources as compared to a shell model based on the equivalent approximation. The shell models have been developed for all principal conducting structures in the system “VV + Cryostat + TS” including regular ports and neutral beam ports. The structures are described in details in accordance with the latest design. The models have also been applied for simulations of EM transients in components of diagnostic systems and cryopumps and estimation of the 3D effects of the ITER structures on the plasma performance. The developed models have been elaborated and applied for the last 15 years to support the ITER design activities. The finalization of the ITER VV design enables this set of models to be considered ready to use in plasma-physics computations and the development of ITER simulators

  6. An investigation of safety aspects of operating the end-shields in a brittle condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seth, V.K.; Patwardhan, V.M.

    1975-01-01

    Published data on radiation embrittlement of 3.5% Ni steels (material for RAPP-1, RAPP-2 and MAPP-1 end shields - with charpy V notch value of 2.074 gm at -101 0 C) indicates that the nil ductility transition temperature rise would be of the order of 205 0 C to 260 0 C at the end of 30 year reactor life, against earlier figure of around 120 0 C. Surveillance programme on radiation embrittlement of the end-shields is being conducted to get an idea of the actual condition of the material at any required time. A study has been made to investigate safety aspects of operating the end shields in 'Brittle condition' of the material under the presently designed operating conditions. This study is based on the concept of crack arrest approach (employing fracture analysis diagram; FAD and linear elastic fracture mechanics (using possible correlation between Ksub(Ic) and CVN values). (author)

  7. Needle-Bonded Electromagnetic Shielding Thermally Insulating Nonwoven Composite Boards: Property Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Horng Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Complicated environmental problems inevitably arise when technology advances. One major environmental problem is the presence of electromagnetic radiation. Long-term exposure to electromagnetic radiation can damage people’s health in many ways. Therefore, this study proposes producing composite boards with electromagnetic shielding effectiveness and thermal insulation by utilizing the structures and properties of materials. Different combinations of flame-retardant polyester fiber (FR fiber, recycled far-infrared polyester fiber (FI fiber, and 4D low-melting-point fibers (LM fiber were made into flame-retardant and thermally insulating matrices. The matrices and carbon fiber (CF woven fabric in a sandwich-structure were needle-punched in order to be tightly compact, and then circularly heat dried in order to have a heat set and reinforced structure. The test results indicate that Polyester (PET/CF composite boards are mechanically strong and have thermal insulation and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness at a frequency between 0.6 MHz and 3 GHz.

  8. Risk of Peripheral Nerve Disease in Military Working Dogs Deployed in Operations Desert Shield/Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    two cohorts where not discussed except for deaths caused by hostile action, gastric dilation volvulus , heat stroke, and death due to other reasons......4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Risk of Peripheral Nerve Disease in Military Working Dogs Deployed in Operations Desert Shield/Storm 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  9. TFTR radiation contour and shielding efficiency measurements during D-D operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kugel, H.W.; Ascione, G.; Elwood, S.; Gilbert, J.; Hwang, D.; Lewis, M.; Levine, J.; Ku, L.P.; Rule, K.; Hajnal, F.

    1994-11-01

    Extensive neutron and gamma radiation contour, shielding efficiency, and spectral measurements were performed during high power TFTR D-D operations at the tokamak Test Cell inner walls, ceiling, roof, and outer walls, in nearby control rooms, work areas, and personnel pathways, outdoors along the site fence at 125 m, and out to the nearest property lines at 180 m. The results confirmed that the efficiency of the basic radiation shielding was sufficient to allow the TFTR D-T experimental plan, and provide empirical guidance for simulating the radiation fields of future fusion reactors

  10. Thermal operator representation of finite temperature graphs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, F.T.; Frenkel, J.; Das, Ashok; Espinosa, Olivier; Perez, Silvana

    2005-01-01

    Using the mixed space representation (t,p→) in the context of scalar field theories, we prove in a simple manner that the Feynman graphs at finite temperature are related to the corresponding zero temperature diagrams through a simple thermal operator, both in the imaginary time as well as in the real time formalisms. This result is generalized to the case when there is a nontrivial chemical potential present. Several interesting properties of the thermal operator are also discussed

  11. Thermal Shielding Effects of a Damaged Shock Absorber and an Intact Shock Absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Kim, K. Y.; Seo, C. S.; Seo, K. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In order to safely transport the radioactive waste arising from the hot test of an ACP(Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process) a shipping package is required. Therefore, KAERI is developing a shipping package to transport the radioactive waste arising from the ACPF during a hot test. The regulatory requirements for a Type B package are specified in the Korea Most Act 2009-37, IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1, and US 10 CFR Part. These regulatory guidelines classify the hot cell cask as a Type B package, and state that the Type B package for transporting radioactive materials should be able to withstand a test sequence consisting of a 9 m drop onto an unyielding surface, a 1 m drop onto a puncture bar, and a 30 minute fully engulfing fire. Greiner et al. investigated the thermal protection provided by shock absorbers by using the CAFE computer code. To evaluate the thermal shielding effect of the shock absorber, the thermal test was performed by using a 1/2 scale model with a shock absorber which was damaged by both a 9 m drop test and a 1 m puncture test. For the purpose of comparison, the thermal test was also carried out by using a 1/2 scale model with the intact shock absorber

  12. Study on box shield tunneling method in trial field operation; Box shield koho jissho seko ni kansuru kosatsu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tada, K.; Taniguchi, T. [Toda Corp., Tokyo, (Japan); Furukawa, K.; Nakagawa, K. [Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1997-03-20

    This paper describes a rectangular section shield tunneling method as a part of developments of non-circular section shield tunneling methods. The non-circular shield is drawing attention because of need of excavation in small land available in urban areas and between congested existing structures, as well as reduction in the excavated soil amount. A full-scale machine was fabricated to perform a natural ground excavation experiment. The cutter units comprising two each of drum cutters and ring cutters were arranged above and below, by which two tunnels of 40 m long with a cross section of 2.85 m {times} 2.85 m were excavated. The natural ground was supported safely by holding mud water pressures at cutting points constant, thus stability of the cutting points was ensured. Back-filling has made complete filling of tail void (clearance between a segment and the ground) possible, resulting in suppression in conditional change of the surrounding ground. Attitude control has been performed properly as a result of correct selection of shield jacks and use of deflection jacks. Broken-type over-cutters were used to have constructed tunnels with curve radius of 80 and 100 m with high accuracy. Thrust and propulsion speed of the shield do not differ from those of circular shields. Possibilities of this construction method were verified. 8 refs., 26 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Thermal, operational, and economic aspects of repository design alternatives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Closs, K.D.; Papp, R.; Bechthold, W.; Engelmann, H.J.; Hartje, B.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses how a broad spectrum of heat-generating nuclear waste types like reprocessing waste (HLW, ILW), spent LWR, and spent HTR fuel will be disposed of in a future German repository located in a salt dome. Different package and emplacement concepts for the various waste forms are feasible, ranging from pure borehole emplacement of canisters and drums to pure drift emplacement of heavily shielded casks as well as combinations of both concepts. Optimization of the whole back-end system (waste treatment, interim storage, and disposal) is performed taking into account thermal, operational, and economic aspects. From a radiological viewpoint, the drift emplacement concept is superior to all concepts in as much as the occupational dose is lowest and zero release from the casks is attainable during normal and anomalous repository operation. As far as economics are concerned, the cost of the heavily shielded casks necessary for drift emplacement contributes markedly to the overall cost of the whole back-end system. Drift emplacement can compete economically with the other concepts only if the casks are used both for interim storage and disposal

  14. Integrating Army Aviation into the Combined Arms Team: Operational Art in Desert Shield and Desert Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    King of Saudi Arabia. The conversation took place prior to an Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) meeting of Arab Gulf members...Blumberg and Christopher C. French, eds., The Persian Gulf War: Views from the Social and Behavioral Sciences (Lanham, MD: University Press of America...1994), 17. 72 Blumberg and French, The Persian Gulf War, 29. 20 building up forces in northeast Saudi Arabia during Operation Desert Shield, in

  15. Ring thermal shield piping modification at Pickering Nuclear Generating Station 'A' Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.; Cobanoglu, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Each of the four Pickering Nuclear Generating Station A (PNGSA) CANDU units was constructed with its reactor and dump tank surrounded by a concrete Calandria Vault (CV). The Ring Thermal Shield (RTS) system at PNGSA units is a water cooled structure with internal cooling channels with the purpose of attenuating excessive heat flux from the calandria shell to the end shield rings and adjoining concrete (Figure 1). In newer CANDU units the reactor calandria vessel is surrounded by a large water filled shield tank which eliminates the requirement for the RTS system. The RTS structures are situated in the space between the calandria and the vault walls. Each RTS is assembled from eight flat sided carbon steel segments, tilted towards the calandria and supported from the end shield rings. Cooling water to the RTS is supplied by carbon steel cooling pipes with a portion of the pipe run embedded in the vault walls. Flow through each RTS is divided into two independent circuits, having an inlet and an outlet cooling line. There are four locations of RTS inlet and outlet cooling lines. The inlet lines are located at the bottom and the outlet lines at the top of the RTS. The 'L' shaped section of RTS inlet and outlet cooling lines, from the RTS waterbox to the start of embedded portion at the concrete wall, had become defective due to corrosion induced by excessive Moisture levels in the calandria vaults. An on-line leak sealing capability was developed and placed in service in all four PNGSA units. However, a leak found during the 1994 Unit 1 outage was too large,to seal with the current capability, forcing Ontario Hydro (OH) to develop a method to replace the corroded pipes. The repair project was subject to some lofty performance targets. All tools had to be able to withstand dose rates of up to 3000 Rem/hour. These tools, along with procedures and personnel had to successfully repair the RTS system within 6 months otherwise a costly outage extension would result. This

  16. Development of silver coating process and facilities for ITER thermal shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, D.K. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, R.G. [COTEC Corp., Changwon 641-846 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, K., E-mail: kwnam@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, C.H.; Chung, W. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, D.C. [COTEC Corp., Changwon 641-846 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, K.; Baek, J.P. [SFA Engineering Corp., Asan 336-873 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes both the test results of the bath type silver coating and the design of the bath to construct the silver coating plant for ITER thermal shield. The tests of small specimens made of SS304L and SS304LN were carried out to investigate the effect of the nitrogen content in SS304LN on the silver coating quality. The effect of different degreasing agents was also investigated to improve silver coating process. Small mock-up was tested to find a proper dipping direction during the electroplating process. Finally, noble bath design was conceived and structurally validated. Overall layout of silver coating plant is also shown in this paper.

  17. Eddy current and mechanical support of the wendelstein 7-X thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S. Y.; Nagel, M.; Schauer, F.

    2004-01-01

    The machine which equipped huge magnet such as fusion reactor must be in need of special care on the emergency process. Rapid drop down magnetic field generate noticeable induced current, eddy current, and it causes strong electromagnetic forces on mechanical structure. The Wendelstein 7-X consists with 5 pentagonal shaped modules, plasma vessel, and each module can be divided into two symmetric half modules. Each half-module is going to be covered by 20 pieces of plasma vessel thermal shield (PVTS). The subject of this calculation is to find appropriate support positions for PVTS which can withstand self-weight of PVTS and electromagnetic force during the emergency case within our design criterion. We report the calculation procedure and results with half-module of PVTS

  18. Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE) 1995, NIR Propellant Analyzer, to MIL-STD-398, Military Standard Shields, Operational for Ammunition Operations, Criteria for Design of and Tests for Acceptance

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    2003-01-01

    ... (SJMAC-DEM) to test the Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE) 1995 NIR Propellant Analyzer, to MIL-STD-398, "Military Standard Shields, Operational for Ammunition Operations, Criteria for Design of and Tests for Acceptance...

  19. Measurement of the thermal neutron self shielding coefficient in the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor inner irradiation site using the dy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Khamis, I.

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of the thermal self shielding coefficient ( Gth ) in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) inner irradiation site using Dy foils is presented in this paper. The thermal self shielding coefficient is measured as a function of the foil thickness or numbers. The mathematical equation which calculates the average relative radioactivity (Bq/g) versus the foil number is found as well.

  20. F2-3 using the shield for thermal energy storage in PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, G.T.; Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1994-01-01

    The PULSAR design study is evaluating the pulsed, inductively driven tokamak power plant to assess whether economies can be attained which-are more favorable than those of the steady-state, non-inductively driven tokamak. Considerations of market acceptance and component fatigue lead to the requirement of thermal energy storage (TES) to maintain steady-state power during the cyclic interruptions of fusion power production (open-quotes dwell phaseclose quotes). A major focus of the Study has been to identify and design technically viable TES systems for helium-cooled and liquid lithium self-cooled plants which are economically attractive, safe and environmentally benign. Several basic constraints impact the selection of the TES system. The system must be capable of discharging 2.5 GW during a dwell phase of approximately two minutes (determined by systems code analysis), thus have a capacity of at least 300 GJ. Coolant must be discharged from the TES at the static, burn phase temperature to minimize thermal stress in the steam generator. Several TES options were evaluated: Storage of heat transport working fluid, phase change media and sensible heat storage. Sensible heat storage in the outer shield was selected for PULSAR

  1. Nuclear thermal rocket engine operation and control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunn, S.V.; Savoie, M.T.; Hundal, R.

    1993-06-01

    The operation of a typical Rover/Nerva-derived nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) engine is characterized and the control requirements of the NTR are defined. A rationale for the selection of a candidate diverse redundant NTR engine control system is presented and the projected component operating requirements are related to the state of the art of candidate components and subsystems. The projected operational capabilities of the candidate system are delineated for the startup, full-thrust, shutdown, and decay heat removal phases of the engine operation. 9 refs

  2. Evaluation of thermal overload in boiler operators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Camila Soares; Rodrigues, Valéria Antônia Justino; Campos, Julio César Costa; de Souza, Amaury Paulo; Minette, Luciano José; de Moraes, Angêlo Casali; Sensato, Guilherme Luciano

    2012-01-01

    The Brazilians educational institutions need a large energy demand for the operation of laundries, restaurants and accommodation of students. Much of that energy comes from steam generated in boilers with wood fuel. The laboral activity in boiler may present problems for the operator's health due to exposure to excessive heat, and its operation has a high degree of risk. This paper describes an analysis made the conditions of thermal environment in the operation of a B category boiler, located at a Higher Education Institution, located in the Zona da Mata Mineira The equipments used to collect data were Meter WBGT of the Heat Index; Meter of Wet Bulb Index and Globe Thermometer (WBGT); Politeste Instruments, an anemometer and an Infrared Thermometer. By the application of questionnaires, the second phase consisted of collecting data on environmental factors (temperature natural environment, globe temperature, relative humidity and air velocity). The study concluded that during the period evaluated, the activity had thermal overload.

  3. Development of paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of B2O3 for thermal neutron shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyen, Donruedee; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2017-01-01

    In this work, paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) were prepared to evaluate the viscosity, flexural, and thermal neutron shielding properties for uses as thermal neutron shielding materials. The results showed that the addition of 3 wt% or 9 wt% bitumen to paraffin increased the overall flexural properties with the content of 9 wt% bitumen having the highest values. The improvement in flexural properties made the composites less brittle, stiffer, and longer-lasting. Furthermore, different contents of B 2 O 3 (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 wt%) were added to paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites to investigate the effects of the B 2 O 3 contents. The results indicated that an increase in B 2 O 3 contents improved the shielding properties but slightly reduced the flexural properties. Specifically for 5-mm paraffin and 5-mm paraffin/bitumen samples with 35 wt% of B 2 O 3 , both samples could reduce neutron flux by more than 70%. The overall results suggested that the paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of B 2 O 3 showed improved properties for utilization as effective thermal neutron shielding materials. (author)

  4. The generalized heavy free gas thermalization operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pitcher, H.H.W.

    1963-05-01

    This paper gives an introduction to the generalized heavy free gas (Horowitz) thermalization operator, which is a device for simplifying thermalization calculations. Analytical, experimental,and numerical methods for determining the energy-dependent function f in the operator are discussed. The dependence of f on the nature of the moderator, its temperature, and the absorption of the system are investigated, using a program FOCS which derives f's from DSN (multigroup) thermal spectra; it is found that for most purposes the dependence on absorption is negligible except when Pu240 is present. The sensitivity of calculated spectra and reaction rate to changes in f is considered. f is given for graphite at 300 and 600 deg. K. (author)

  5. Thermal fatigue cracks in gas turbine heat shield plates; Thermoermuedungsrisse in Hitzeschildplatten von Gasturbinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidel, Andreas; Riesenbeck, Susanne [Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany). Gas Turbine Plant Berlin Labs.

    2012-07-01

    There are numerous possible designations for the damage mechanism described in this case study. As a consequence, the terminology is far from being consistent. In this context, the Anglo-Saxon language area has to be taken into consideration. On the one hand many failure analysis reports have to be written in English, on the other hand it is meanwhile expected to use English terms in reports written in German, the latter in an effort to standardize the internal nomenclature. Therefore, it is advisable for damage analysts to know technical terms in both languages, at least for the most important damage mechanisms occurring in their respective fields of activity. In the present case, individual ceramic coated metal heat shield plates have been replaced after several ten thousand operating hours and several hundred start-up and shut-down procedures, i.e. machine start-ups, due to cracks in the central locating hole.

  6. Cost estimates for Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm: a budgetary analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, J. Andrew.

    1991-01-01

    Operation Desert Shield/Desert Storm (DS/DS) presented unique challenges for estimating the cost of that conflict. This analysis reviews the cost estimates and methodologies developed for that purpose by DoD, CBO and GAO. It considers the budget climate and the role of foreign cash and in-kind contributions. Finally, it reviews the budgeting innovations used to provide and monitor DS/DS defense spending. At the outset of the crisis, costs were estimated to determine the defense funding requir...

  7. Operational Experience from Solar Thermal Energy Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, C. P.

    1984-01-01

    Over the past few years, Sandia National Laboratories were involved in the design, construction, and operation of a number of DOE-sponsored solar thermal energy systems. Among the systems currently in operation are several industrial process heat projects and the Modular Industrial Solar Retrofit qualification test systems, all of which use parabolic troughs, and the Shenandoah Total Energy Project, which uses parabolic dishes. Operational experience has provided insight to both desirable and undesirable features of the designs of these systems. Features of these systems which are also relevant to the design of parabolic concentrator thermal electric systems are discussed. Other design features discussed are system control functions which were found to be especially convenient or effective, such as local concentrator controls, rainwash controls, and system response to changing isolation. Drive systems are also discussed with particular emphasis of the need for reliability and the usefulness of a manual drive capability.

  8. Operator product expansion and its thermal average

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mallik, S [Saha Inst. of Nuclear Physics, Calcutta (India)

    1998-05-01

    QCD sum rules at finite temperature, like the ones at zero temperature, require the coefficients of local operators, which arise in the short distance expansion of the thermal average of two-point functions of currents. We extend the configuration space method, applied earlier at zero temperature, to the case at finite temperature. We find that, upto dimension four, two new operators arise, in addition to the two appearing already in the vacuum correlation functions. It is argued that the new operators would contribute substantially to the sum rules, when the temperature is not too low. (orig.) 7 refs.

  9. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genard, Gilles; Portal, Romain; Bouchat, Virginie; Vanderperre, Serge

    2017-09-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  10. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genard Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assumptions on the source terms and on the source geometry as well as the way the shielding is determined and the results of the sizing are presented.

  11. Shielding analysis in the design phase of the new Emergency Operation Facility for Tihange Nuclear Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Genard Gilles; Portal Romain; Bouchat Virginie; Vanderperre Serge

    2017-01-01

    In the framework of the design studies for a new Emergency Operation Facility (EOF) for Tihange NPP, radiation protection analyses are needed to comply with effective dose rate criteria. In this aim, the shielding performed by, at the one hand, external walls and roof of the building and, on the other hand, internal walls, has been sized by means of MicroShield calculations. This paper explains how the calculations for external walls, doors, roof, floor and internal walls are made. The assump...

  12. Computer simulation of thermal plant operations

    CERN Document Server

    O'Kelly, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This book describes thermal plant simulation, that is, dynamic simulation of plants which produce, exchange and otherwise utilize heat as their working medium. Directed at chemical, mechanical and control engineers involved with operations, control and optimization and operator training, the book gives the mathematical formulation and use of simulation models of the equipment and systems typically found in these industries. The author has adopted a fundamental approach to the subject. The initial chapters provide an overview of simulation concepts and describe a suitable computer environment.

  13. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 1 250 LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies. Following a market survey carried out among 95 firms in sixteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2650/LHC/LHC) was sent on 8 November 1999 to eight firms in six Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received four tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm EISENWERKE KAISERSLAUTERN (DE), the lowest bidder, for the supply of 1 250 LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies for a total amount of 6 150 808 euros (9 858 518 Swiss francs), subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, with an option for the supply of up to 150 additional thermal shield bottom tray assemblies, for a total amount of 696 979 euros (1 117 118 Swiss francs), subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, bringing the total amount to a maximum of 6 847 787 euros (10 975 636 Swiss francs), subject to...

  14. A remotely operated, automated system for the infusion of shielded therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macfarlane, D.J.; Bartlett, M.; Bellen, J.; Peters, J.; Domagala, M.; Allison, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: A number of radiopharmaceuticals may soon emerge into mainstream clinical oncology for palliative and therapeutic treatment for a variety of malignancies. These agents are characterized by high linear energy transfer particulate emissions. Dispensing and administration of these therapies on a regular basis pose a substantial radiation burden to staff, from direct g-emissions and from Bremsstrahlung (braking) radiations. In an effort to implement the ALARA principle, a multidisciplinary team was given the brief to design a system which permitted: (1) safe, sterile transfer of a nominated quantity of radiopharmaceutical into a shielded reservoir compatible with the infusion pump; (2) remote variation of volume and administration rate upon command; (3) purging of delivery system following administration of dose; (4) monitoring of and communication with patient during infusion; (5) use of TGA-approved delivery system. The final design centred around an Abbott 'Lifecare 5000' volumetric dual-channel intravenous infusion pump and featured: microprocessor control with mutiline LCD prompting display; remote operation of keypad by pneumatic actuator; CCTV monitoring of patient, pump and physiological data; delivery of therapy dose from a shielded vial; flushing of therapy vial by 'back-priming'; and full array of safety alarms (air in line, occlusion, empty vial, etc). Further developments include audio communication with patient and remote physiological monitoring

  15. Thermal Wigner Operator in Coherent Thermal State Representation and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN HongYi

    2002-01-01

    In the coherent thermal state representation we introduce thermal Wigner operator and find that it is"squeezed" under the thermal transformation. The thermal Wigner operator provides us with a new direct and neatapproach for deriving Wigner functions of thermal states.

  16. Thermal Wigner Operator in Coherent Thermal State Representation and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANHong-Yi

    2002-01-01

    In the coherent thermal state representation we introduce thermal Wigner operator and find that it is “squeezed” under the thermal transformation.The thermal Wigner operator provides us with a new direct and neat approach for deriving Wigner functions of thermal states.

  17. Power MOSFET Thermal Instability Operation Characterization Support

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shue, John L.; Leidecker, Henning

    2010-01-01

    Metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) are used extensively in flight hardware and ground support equipment. In the quest for faster switching times and lower "on resistance," the MOSFETs designed from 1998 to the present have achieved most of their intended goals. In the quest for lower on resistance and higher switching speeds, the designs now being produced allow the charge-carrier dominated region (once small and outside of the area of concern) to become important and inside the safe operating area (SOA). The charge-carrier dominated region allows more current to flow as the temperature increases. The higher temperatures produce more current resulting in the beginning of thermal runaway. Thermal runaway is a problem affecting a wide range of modern MOSFETs from more than one manufacturer. This report contains information on MOSFET failures, their causes and test results and information dissemination.

  18. Flow and pressure profiles for the primary heat transport system of Rajasthan Atomic Power Station for the operation with few isolated reactor channels near the end shield cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaikwad, A J; Chaki, S K; Sehgal, R L; Venkat Raj, V [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai (India)

    1994-06-01

    The RAPS (Rajasthan Atomic Power Station) unit-1 is now operating at reduced power due to the removal of fifteen fuel channels for repair of south end shield cracks. The power level is restricted to 50% of the full power capacity as a precautionary measure. The relative difference that operation at 50% power and higher power would make to the end shield structure is being currently analysed with a view to operate this reactor at higher power levels. As a prerequisite, a detailed thermal hydraulic analysis is essential to assess the effect of reactor operation with isolated channels on the primary heat transport (PHT) system pressure, flow, temperature. The adequacy of the existing trip set points for the plant operation under this mode is also required to be assessed. In the present study, analysis of the PHT system has been carried out to determine the flow and pressure profiles for the RAPS heat transport system for operation of the reactor with isolated channels. (author). 5 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Evaluation of nuclear data for radiation shielding by model calculations and international co-operation aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canetta, E.; Maino, G.; Menapace, E.

    2001-01-01

    The matter is reviewed, also following previous discussions at ICRS-9, concerning evaluation and related theoretical activities on nuclear data for radiation shielding within the framework of international co-operation initiatives, according to recognised needs and priorities. Both cross-section data.- for reactions induced by neutrons and photons - and nuclear structure data have been considered. In this context, main contributions and typical results are presented from theoretical and evaluation activities at the ENEA Applied Physics Division, especially concerning neutron induced reaction data up to 20 MeV and photonuclear reaction data such as photon absorption and (gamma,n) cross-sections. Relevant aspects of algebraic nuclear models and of evaporation and pre-equilibrium models are discussed. (authors)

  20. A survey of Alberta physicians' use of and attitudes toward face masks and face shields in the operating room setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Philip J; Spady, Donald; Forgie, Sarah E D

    2007-09-01

    There is little evidence that surgical mask use by physicians in the operating room (OR) reduces surgical site infections (SSIs), but masks do protect the wearer from potentially infectious splashes. Face shields offer even more protection because they cover the eyes, but they may be perceived as offering less protection to the patient than do masks. The objectives of this study were to ascertain if there were predictors to determine which OR physicians are continuing to use masks and what their reasons are for doing so, and which OR physicians would accept face shields and their reasons for doing so. We surveyed the province of Alberta's surgeons, general practice (GP) surgeons, anesthesiologists, and GP anesthetists to determine how many physicians in the OR wear surgical masks, their reasons for wearing surgical masks (ethical, legal, protection of the patient, protection of the wearer), and if they believe that face shields offer more protection to the patient or to the wearer. We also sought to examine which demographic factors affected their responses. The data were examined with chi(2) analysis to assess the relationships of age and practitioner type, and for various outcome variables. A significance level of P masks; masks are worn to prevent the spread of disease, not because it is tradition to do so; masks protect the wearer more than do face shields; and wearing face shields alone will subject the patient to higher rates of SSIs. Surgeons are more likely than are anesthesiologists to wear surgical masks in the OR and wear a surgical mask and a face shield if the patient has risk factors for a blood borne infection. According to our survey, age and profession were the most important variables that affected the potential use of surgical masks and face shields. Younger OR physicians likely would be amenable to using face shields in addition to masks in the OR to protect themselves from exposure to blood or bodily fluids.

  1. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS INVESTIGATION ON THE USE OF HEAT SHIELDS FOR THERMAL MANAGEMENT IN A CAR UNDERHOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Y. Lam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations inside a car underhood are largely controlled by the heat originating from the engine block and the exhaust manifold. Excessive temperatures in the underhood can lead to the faster deterioration of engine components and may affect the thermal comfort level inside the passenger cabin. This paper presents computational fluid dynamics investigations to assess the performance of a heat shield in lowering the peak temperature of the engine components and firewall in the underhood region of a typical passenger car. The simulation used the finite volume method with the standard k-ε turbulence model and an isothermal model for the heat transfer calculations. The results show that the heat shield managed to reduce the peak temperature of the engine components and firewall by insulating the intense heat from the engine block and exhaust and regulating the airflow inside the underhood region.

  2. Design experience: CRBRP radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.; Chan, T.C.; Gallo, F.G.; Hedgecock, L.R.; McGinnis, C.A.; Wrights, G.N.

    1978-11-01

    The Clinch River Breeder Reactor Plant (CRBRP) is being designed as a fast breeder demonstration project in the U.S. Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor (LMFBR) program. Radiation shielding design of the facility consists of a comprehensive design approach to assure compliance with design and government regulatory requirements. Studies conducted during the CRBRP design process involved the aspects of radiation shielding dealing with protection of components, systems, and personnel from radiation exposure. Achievement of feasible designs, while considering the mechanical, structural, nuclear, and thermal performance of the component or system, has required judicious trade-offs in radiation shielding performance. Specific design problems which have been addressed are in-vessel radial shielding to protect permanent core support structures, flux monitor system shielding to isolate flux monitoring systems for extraneous background sources, reactor vessel support shielding to allow personnel access to the closure head during full power operation, and primary heat transport system pipe chaseway shielding to limit intermediate heat transport system sodium system coolant activation. The shielding design solutions to these problems defined a need for prototypic or benchmark experiments to provide assurance of the predicted shielding performance of selected design solutions and the verification of design methodology. Design activities of CRBRP plant components an systems, which have the potential for radiation exposure of plant personnel during operation or maintenance, are controlled by a design review process related to radiation shielding. The program implements design objectives, design requirements, and cost/benefit guidelines to assure that radiation exposures will be ''as low as reasonably achievable''

  3. Material characterisation and preliminary mechanical design for the HL-LHC shielded beam screens operating at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garion, C; Dufay-Chanat, L; Koettig, T; Machiocha, W; Morrone, M

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC project (HL-LHC) aims at increasing the luminosity (rate of collisions) in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value (from 300 to 3000 fb -1 ). It relies on new superconducting magnets, installed close to the interaction points, equipped with new beam screen. This component has to ensure the vacuum performance together with shielding the cold mass from physics debris and screening the cold bore cryogenic system from beam induced heating. The beam screen operates in the range 40-60 K whereas the magnet cold bore temperature is 1.9 K. A tungsten-based material is used to absorb the energy of particles. In this paper, measurements of the mechanical and physical properties of such tungsten material are shown at room and cryogenic temperature. In addition, the design and the thermal mechanical behaviour of the beam screen assembly are presented also. They include the heat transfer from the tungsten absorbers to the cooling pipes and the supporting system that has to minimise the heat inleak into the cold mass. The behaviour during a magnet quench is also presented. (paper)

  4. Material characterisation and preliminary mechanical design for the HL-LHC shielded beam screens operating at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C; Koettig, T; Machiocha, W; Morrone, M

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC project (HL-LHC) aims at increasing the luminosity (rate of collisions) in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value (from 300 to 3000 fb-1). It relies on new superconducting magnets, installed close to the interaction points, equipped with new beam screen. This component has to ensure the vacuum performance together with shielding the cold mass from physics debris and screening the cold bore cryogenic system from beam induced heating. The beam screen operates in the range 40-60 K whereas the magnet cold bore temperature is 1.9 K. A tungsten-based material is used to absorb the energy of particles. In this paper, measurements of the mechanical and physical properties of such tungsten material are shown at room and cryogenic temperature. In addition, the design and the thermal mechanical behaviour of the beam screen assembly are presented also. They include the heat transfer from the tungsten absorbers to the cooling pipes and the sup...

  5. Material characterisation and preliminary mechanical design for the HL-LHC shielded beam screens operating at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garion, C.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Machiocha, W.; Morrone, M.

    2015-12-01

    The High Luminosity LHC project (HL-LHC) aims at increasing the luminosity (rate of collisions) in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value (from 300 to 3000 fb-1). It relies on new superconducting magnets, installed close to the interaction points, equipped with new beam screen. This component has to ensure the vacuum performance together with shielding the cold mass from physics debris and screening the cold bore cryogenic system from beam induced heating. The beam screen operates in the range 40-60 K whereas the magnet cold bore temperature is 1.9 K. A tungsten-based material is used to absorb the energy of particles. In this paper, measurements of the mechanical and physical properties of such tungsten material are shown at room and cryogenic temperature. In addition, the design and the thermal mechanical behaviour of the beam screen assembly are presented also. They include the heat transfer from the tungsten absorbers to the cooling pipes and the supporting system that has to minimise the heat inleak into the cold mass. The behaviour during a magnet quench is also presented.

  6. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M.N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required

  7. Graphite-ceramic rf Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, D.L.Q.; Hosea, J.C.

    1983-05-05

    The present invention is directed to a brazing procedure for joining a ceramic or glass material (e.g., Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or Macor) to graphite. In particular, the present invention is directed to a novel brazing procedure for the production of a brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield. The brazed ceramic graphite Faraday shield of the present invention may be used in Magnetic Fusion Devices (e.g., Princeton Large Torus Tokamak) or other high temperature resistant apparatus.

  8. Demonstration test on manufacturing 200 l drum inner shielding material for recycling of reactor operating metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemura, A.; Kimura, K.; Ueno, H.

    1993-01-01

    Low-level reactor wastes should be safely recycled considering those resource values, the reduction of waste disposal volume and environmental effects. The reasonable recycling system of reactor operating metal scrap has been studied and it was concluded that the 200 liter drum inner shielding material is a very promising product for recycling within the nuclear industry. The drum inner shielding material does not require high quality and so it is expected to be easily manufactured by melting and casting from roughly sorted scrap metals. This means that the economical scrap metal recycling system can be achieved by introducing it. Furthermore its use will ensure safety because of being contained in a drum. In order to realize this recycling system with the drum inner shielding material, the demonstration test program is being conducted. The construction of the test facility, which consists of a melting and refining furnace, a casting apparatus, a machining apparatus etc., was finishing in September, 1992

  9. Initial Operation of the Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J., Jr.; Pearson, J. Boise; Schoenfeld, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The Nuclear Thermal Rocket Element Environmental Simulator (NTREES) facility is designed to perform realistic non-nuclear testing of nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) fuel elements and fuel materials. Although the NTREES facility cannot mimic the neutron and gamma environment of an operating NTR, it can simulate the thermal hydraulic environment within an NTR fuel element to provide critical information on material performance and compatibility. The NTREES facility has recently been upgraded such that the power capabilities of the facility have been increased significantly. At its present 1.2 MW power level, more prototypical fuel element temperatures nay now be reached. The new 1.2 MW induction heater consists of three physical units consisting of a transformer, rectifier, and inverter. This multiunit arrangement facilitated increasing the flexibility of the induction heater by more easily allowing variable frequency operation. Frequency ranges between 20 and 60 kHz can accommodated in the new induction heater allowing more representative power distributions to be generated within the test elements. The water cooling system was also upgraded to so as to be capable of removing 100% of the heat generated during testing In this new higher power configuration, NTREES will be capable of testing fuel elements and fuel materials at near-prototypic power densities. As checkout testing progressed and as higher power levels were achieved, several design deficiencies were discovered and fixed. Most of these design deficiencies were related to stray RF energy causing various components to encounter unexpected heating. Copper shielding around these components largely eliminated these problems. Other problems encountered involved unexpected movement in the coil due to electromagnetic forces and electrical arcing between the coil and a dummy test article. The coil movement and arcing which were encountered during the checkout testing effectively destroyed the induction coil in use at

  10. Enhancement of thermal neutron self-shielding in materials surrounded by reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelia Chilian; Gregory Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Materials containing from 41 to 1124 mg chlorine and surrounded by polyethylene containers of various thicknesses, from 0.01 to 5.6 mm, were irradiated in a research reactor neutron spectrum and the 38 Cl activity produced was measured as a function of polyethylene reflector thickness. For the material containing the higher amount of chlorine, the 38 Cl specific activity decreased with increasing reflector thickness, indicating increased neutron self-shielding. It was found that the amount of neutron self-shielding increased by as much as 52% with increasing reflector thickness. This is explained by neutrons which have exited the material subsequently reflecting back into it and thus increasing the total mean path length in the material. All physical and empirical models currently used to predict neutron self-shielding have ignored this effect and need to be modified. A method is given for measuring the adjustable parameter of a self-shielding model for a particular sample size and combination of neutron reflectors. (author)

  11. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of microcellular polyimide/in situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Yu, Zhi; Wu, Peng; Zou, Huawei; Liu, Pengbo

    2018-03-01

    A simple and effective method was adopted to fabricate microcellular polyimide (PI)/reduced graphene oxide (GO)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposites. Firstly, microcellular poly (amic acid) (PAA)/GO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were prepared through solvent evaporation induced phase separation. In this process, PAA and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) co-dissolved in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) underwent phase separation with DMAc evaporating, and DBP microdomains were formed in continuous PAA phase. Subsequently, PAA was thermally imidized and simultaneously GO was in situ reduced. After DBP was removed, the microcellular PI/reduced GO (RGO)/MWCNTs nanocomposites were finally obtained. When the initial filler loading was 8 wt%, the electrical conductivity of microcellular PI/RGO, PI/MWCNTs and PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were 0.05, 0.02 and 1.87 S·m-1, respectively, and the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency (SE) of microcellular PI/RGO, PI/MWCNTs and PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were 13.7-15.1, 13.0-14.3 and 16.6-18.2 dB, respectively. The synergistic effect between RGO and MWCNTs enhanced both the electrical conductivity and EMI shielding performance of the microcellular PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites. The dominating EMI shielding mechanism for these materials was microwave absorption. While the initial loading of GO and MWCNT was 8 wt%, the microcellular PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposite (500 μm thickness) had extremely high specific EMI SE value of 755-823 dB·cm2·g-1. Its thermal stability was also obviously improved, the 5% weight loss temperature in nitrogen was 548 °C. In addition, it also possessed a high Young's modulus of 789 MPa.

  12. Fabrication of a full-size mock-up for inboard 10o section of ITER vacuum vessel thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, W.; Nam, K.; Noh, C.H.; Kang, D.K.; Kang, S.M.; Oh, Y.G.; Choi, S.W.; Kang, S.H.; Utin, Y.; Ioki, K.; Her, N.; Yu, J.

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale mock-up of VVTS inboard section was made in order to validate its manufacturing processes before manufacturing the vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) for ITER tokamak. VVTS inboard 10 o section consists of 20 mm shells on which cooling tubes are welded and flange joints that connect adjacent thermal shield sectors. The whole VVTS inboard is divided into two by bisectional flange joint located at the center. All the manufacturing processes except silver coating were tested and verified in the fabrication of mock-up. For the forming and the welding, pre-qualification tests were conducted to find proper process conditions. Shell thickness change was measured after bending, forming and buffing processes. Shell distortion was adjusted after the welding. Welding was validated by non-destructive examination. Bisectional flange joint was successfully assembled by inserting pins and tightening with bolt/nut. Bolt hole margin of 2 mm for sector flange was revealed to be sufficient by successful sector assembly of upper and lower parts of mock-up. Handling jig was found to be essential because the inboard section was flexible. Dimensional inspection of the fabricated mock-up was performed with a 3D laser scanner.

  13. Light and Strong Hierarchical Porous SiC Foam for Efficient Electromagnetic Interference Shielding and Thermal Insulation at Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Caiyun; Wang, Zhenfeng; Wu, Lina; Zhang, Xiaochen; Wang, Huan; Wang, Zhijiang

    2017-09-06

    A novel light but strong SiC foam with hierarchical porous architecture was fabricated by using dough as raw material via carbonization followed by carbothermal reduction with silicon source. A significant synergistic effect is achieved by embedding meso- and nanopores in a microsized porous skeleton, which endows the SiC foam with high-performance electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, thermal insulation, and mechanical properties. The microsized skeleton withstands high stress. The meso- and nanosized pores enhance multiple reflection of the incident electromagnetic waves and elongate the path of heat transfer. For the hierarchical porous SiC foam with 72.8% porosity, EMI shielding can be higher than 20 dB, and specific EMI effectiveness exceeds 24.8 dB·cm 3 ·g -1 at a frequency of 11 GHz at 25-600 °C, which is 3 times higher than that of dense SiC ceramic. The thermal conductivity reaches as low as 0.02 W·m -1 ·K -1 , which is comparable to that of aerogel. The compressive strength is as high as 9.8 MPa. Given the chemical and high-temperature stability of SiC, the fabricated SiC foam is a promising candidate for modern aircraft and automobile applications.

  14. Thermal behavior of neutron shielding material, NS-4-FR, under long term storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, N.; O-iwa, A.; Asano, R.; Horita, R.; Kusunoki, K.

    2004-01-01

    NS-4-FR, Epoxy-Resin, has been widely used as a neutron shielding material for casks. It is recognized that the resin will degrade during storage and loose weight under high temperature conditions. Most of the examinations for the resin degrading behavior were conducted with rather small bare resin specimens. However, the actual quantity of neutron shielding is quite large and is covered by the cask body. To confirm the degrading behavior of the resin under the long-term storage conditions, we performed the test on the specimen with the same cross-section as the actual design, Hitz B69. The resin test vessels were made out of stainless steel and equipped with flange

  15. Model-based analysis of nonstationary thermal mode in premises with an insolation passive heating system with a three-layer translucent shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avezova, N.R.; Avezov, R.R.; Rashidov, Y.K. et al.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the model-based study of nonstationary thermal mode in premises with an insolation passive heating system with a three-layer translucent shield are presented. The article is aimed at determining daily variations in the air temperature of the heated premise on typical heating season days and analyzing the optimization of the thermal capacity of the short-term (daily) thermal battery of the heating system on this basis. (author)

  16. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Yamagami, Makoto.

    1996-01-01

    A fixed shielding member made of a radiation shielding material is constituted in perpendicular to an opening formed on radiation shielding walls. The fixed shielding member has one side opened and has other side, the upper portion and the lower portion disposed in close contact with the radiation shielding walls. Movable shielding members made of a radiation shielding material are each disposed openably on both side of the fixed shielding member. The movable shielding member has a shaft as a fulcrum on one side thereof for connecting it to the radiation shielding walls. The other side has a handle attached for opening/closing the movable shielding member. Upon access of an operator, when each one of the movable shielding members is opened/closed on every time, leakage of linear or scattered radiation can be prevented. Even when both of the movable shielding members are opened simultaneously, the fixed shielding member and the movable shielding members form labyrinth to prevent leakage of linear radioactivity. (I.N.)

  17. Thermal performance of a depleted uranium shielded storage, transportation, and disposal package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for management and disposal of large quantities of depleted uranium (DU) in the DOE complex. Viable economic options for the use and eventual disposal of the material are needed. One possible option is the use of DU as shielding material for vitrified Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) storage, transportation, and disposal packages. Use of DU as a shielding material provides the potential benefit of disposing of significant quantities of DU during the DHLW storage and disposal process. Two DU package concepts have been developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The first concept is the Storage/Disposal plus Transportation (S/D+T) package. The S/D+T package consists of two major components: a storage/disposal (S/D) container and a transportation overpack. The second concept is the S/D/T package which is an integral storage, transportation, and disposal package. The package concept considered in this analysis is the S/D+T package with seven DHLW waste canisters. The S/D+T package provides shielding and containment for the DHLW waste canisters. The S/D container is intended to be used as an on-site storage and repository disposal container. In this analysis, the S/D container is constructed from a combination of stainless steel and DU. Other material combinations, such as mild steel and DU, are potential candidates. The transportation overpack is used to transport the S/D containers to a final geological repository and is not included in this analysis

  18. Experimental assessment on the thermal effects of the neutron shielding and heat-transfer fin of dual purpose casks on open pool fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Kyoung-Sik; Yu, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Ju-Chan; Seo, Ki-Seog; Choi, Woo-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An open pool fire test was performed to estimate not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin of the dual purpose cask. • The heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced, when the neutron shielding burns. • The surface temperatures are lower in the present of the heat transfer fins. • If inflammable material is used as the components of the cask, evaluating thermal integrity using the thermal test would be desirable. - Abstract: Dual purpose casks are used for storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. They must therefore satisfy the requirements prescribed in the Korea Nuclear Safety Security Commission Act 2014-50, the IAEA Safety Standard Series No. SSR-6, and US 10 CFR Part 71. These regulatory guidelines classify the dual purpose cask as a Type B package and state that a Type B package must be able to withstand a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. NS-4-FR is used as neutron shielding of the dual purpose cask. Heat transfer fins are embedded to enhance heat transfer from the cask body to the outer-shell because the thermal conductivity of NS-4-FR is not good. However, accurately simulating not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin in the thermal analysis is not easy. Therefore, an open pool fire test was conducted using a one-sixth slice of a real cask to estimate these effects at a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. The temperature at the central portion of the neutron shielding was lower when the neutron shielding in contact with the outer cask burned because the neutron shielding absorbed the surrounding latent heat as the neutron shielding burned. Therefore, the heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced. The surface temperature was lower when a heat transfer fin was installed because the high heat generated by the flame was transferred to the

  19. Experimental assessment on the thermal effects of the neutron shielding and heat-transfer fin of dual purpose casks on open pool fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kyoung-Sik, E-mail: nksbang@kaeri.re.kr; Yu, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Ju-Chan; Seo, Ki-Seog; Choi, Woo-Seok

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • An open pool fire test was performed to estimate not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin of the dual purpose cask. • The heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced, when the neutron shielding burns. • The surface temperatures are lower in the present of the heat transfer fins. • If inflammable material is used as the components of the cask, evaluating thermal integrity using the thermal test would be desirable. - Abstract: Dual purpose casks are used for storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. They must therefore satisfy the requirements prescribed in the Korea Nuclear Safety Security Commission Act 2014-50, the IAEA Safety Standard Series No. SSR-6, and US 10 CFR Part 71. These regulatory guidelines classify the dual purpose cask as a Type B package and state that a Type B package must be able to withstand a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. NS-4-FR is used as neutron shielding of the dual purpose cask. Heat transfer fins are embedded to enhance heat transfer from the cask body to the outer-shell because the thermal conductivity of NS-4-FR is not good. However, accurately simulating not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin in the thermal analysis is not easy. Therefore, an open pool fire test was conducted using a one-sixth slice of a real cask to estimate these effects at a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. The temperature at the central portion of the neutron shielding was lower when the neutron shielding in contact with the outer cask burned because the neutron shielding absorbed the surrounding latent heat as the neutron shielding burned. Therefore, the heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced. The surface temperature was lower when a heat transfer fin was installed because the high heat generated by the flame was transferred to the

  20. Electromagnetic interference shielding and thermal properties of non-covalently functionalized reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Chhetri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO was non-covalently functionalized using sulfanilic acid azocromotrop (SAC followed by hydrazine reduction to achieve SAC functionalized reduced GO (SAC-rGO. Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis and electrical conductivity measurements confirmed the successful functionlization and reduction of GO. The electrical conductivity of ~515 S•m−1 for SAC-rGO was recorded. The non-covalently functionalized reduced GO was subsequently dispersed in epoxy matrix at the loading level of 0.3 to 0.5 wt% to investigate its electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding properties. The morphological and structural characterization of the SAC-rGO/epoxy composites was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy analysis, which revealed the good dispersion of SAC-rGO in the epoxy. The SAC-rGO/epoxy composites showed the EMI shielding of −22.6 dB at the loading of 0.5 wt% SAC-rGO. Dynamical mechanical properties of the composites were studied to establish the reinforcing competency of the SAC-rGO. The storage modulus of the composites was found to increase within the studied temperature. Thermal stability of pure epoxy and its composites were compared by selecting the temperatures at 10 and 50% weight loss, respectively.

  1. Thermal performance of a depleted uranium shielded storage, transportation, and disposal package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for management and disposal of large quantities of depleted uranium (DU) in the DOE complex. Viable economic options for the use and eventual disposal of the material are needed. One possible option is the use of DU as shielding material for vitrified Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) storage, transportation, and disposal packages. Use of DU as a shielding material provides the potential benefit of disposing of significant quantities of DU during the DHLW storage and disposal process. Two DU package concepts have been developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The first concept is the Storage/Disposal plus Transportation (S/D+T) package. The S/D+T package consists of two major components: a storage/disposal (S/D) container and a transportation overpack. The second concept is the S/D/T package which is an integral storage, transportation, and disposal package. The package concept considered in this analysis is the S/D+T package with seven DHLW waste canisters

  2. Fabrication of full-size mock-up for 10° section of ITER vacuum vessel thermal shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong Kwon [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo, E-mail: kwnam@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kyoung-O; Noh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Wooho [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Kisuk; Kang, Youngkil [SFA Engineering Corp., Asan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 336-873 (Korea, Republic of); Hamlyn-Harris, Craig; Her, Namil; Robby, Hicks [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, a full-scale prototype fabrication for vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) of ITER tokamak is described and test results are reported. All the manufacturing processes except for silver coating were performed in the fabrication of 10° section of VVTS. Pre-qualification test was conducted to compare the vertical and the horizontal welding positions. After shell welding, shell distortion was measured and adjusted. Shell thickness change was also measured after buffing process. Specially, VVTS ports need large bending and complex welding of shell and flange. Bending method for the complex and long cooling tube layout especially for the VVTS ports was developed in detail. Dimensional inspection of the fabricated mock-up was performed with a 3D laser scanner and the scanning data was analyzed.

  3. Self-shielding factors for TLD-600 and TLD-100 in an isotropic flux of thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Y.S.; Dubi, A.; Ben Shahar, B.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters in mixed n-γ environments, and the dependence of LiF-TL on linear energy transfer are both topics of current interest. Monte Carlo calculations have therefore been carried out to determine the thermal neutron absorption probability (and consequently the self-shielding factor) for an isotropic flux of neutrons impinging on different sized cylindrical samples of LiF TLD-100 and TLD-600. The calculations were performed for cylinders of radius up to 10 cm and heights of 0.1 to 1.5 cm. The Monte Carlo results were found to be significantly different from the analytic calculations for infinitely long cylinders, but, as expected, converged to the same value for (r/h) << 1. (U.K.)

  4. Tower Shielding Reactor II design and operation report. Vol. 3. Assembling and testing of the control mechanism assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, D.R.; Holland, L.B.

    1979-09-01

    The mechanisms that are operated to control the reactivity of the Tower Shielding Reactor II(TSR-II) are mounted on a Control Mechanism Housing (CMH) that is centered inside the reactor core. The information required to procure, fabricate, inspect, and assemble a CMH is contained in the ORNL engineering drawings listed in the appropriate sections. The components are fabricated and inspected from these drawings in accordance with a Quality Assurance Plan and a Manufacturing Plan. The material in this report describes the acceptance and performance tests of CMH subassemblies used ty the Tower Shielding Facility (TSF) staff but it can also be used by personnel fabricating the components. This information which was developed and used before the advent of the formalized QA Program and Manufacturing Plans evolved during the fabrication and testing of the first five CMHs

  5. Calculation of self-shielding coefficients, flux depression and cadmium factor for thermal neutron flux measurement of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Andre Luis Ferreira; Ting, Daniel Kao Sun; Mendonca, Arlindo Gilson

    1996-01-01

    A calculation methodology of Flux Depression, Self-Shielding and Cadmium Factors is presented, using the ANISN code, for experiments conducted at the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor. The correction factors were determined considering thermal neutron flux and 0.125 e 0.250 mm diameter of 197 Au wires. (author)

  6. The TRIUMF thermal neutron facility as planned for operation by 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arrott, A.S.; Templeton, T.L.; Thorson, I.M.; Blaby, R.E.; Burgerjon, J.J.

    1977-08-01

    The concepts of the thermal neutron facility have been considerably modified since they were first put forth in 1971. The move has been toward simplification. This report describes the basic vacuum tank structure, its surrounding steel shielding and the concrete structure. The vacuum tank contains a target, moderator and reflector and has ports for the extraction of thermal neutron beams. It also has capabilities for producing mesons and for irradiation of targets in the primary proton beam. The system has been designed with flexibility for modification to meet possible future demands for irradiation facilities, radiography, or pulsed operation. The targets can be easily changed, and it is planned to do this to meet the heat transfer problems as they arise on going to higher beam currents. Feasibility studies for Pb-Bi and Pb targets have been carried out. The Pb target was chosen because of safety considerations and simpler design. (author)

  7. Evaluation using Monte Carlo simulations, of the effect of a shielding, called external shielding, for fotoneutrons generated in linear accelerators, using the computational model of Varian accelerator 2300 C/D operating in eight rotation angles of the GA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Hugo R.; Silva, Ademir X.; Rebello, Wilson F.; Silva, Maria G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to present the results obtained by Monte Carlo simulation of the effect of shielding against neutrons, called External Shielding, to be placed on the heads of linear accelerators used in radiotherapy. For this, it was used the radiation transport code Monte Carlo N-Particle - MCNPX, in which were developed computational model of the head of the linear accelerator Varian 2300 C/D. The equipment was simulated within a bunker, operating at energies of 10, 15 and 18 MV, considering the rotation of the gantry at eight different angles ( 0 deg, 45 deg, 90 deg, 135 deg, 180 deg, 225 deg, 270 deg and 315 deg), in all cases, the equipment was modeled without and with the shielding positioned attached to the head of the accelerator on its bottom. In each of these settings, it was calculated the Ambient Dose Equivalent due to neutron H * (10)n on points situated in the region of the patient (region of interest for evaluation of undesirable neutron doses on the patient) and in the maze of radiotherapy room (region of interest for shielding the access door to the bunker). It was observed for all energies of equipment operation as well as for all angles of inclination of the gantry, a significant reduction in the values of H * (10) n when the equipment operated with the external shielding, both in the region of the patient as in the region of the maze. (author)

  8. Shield evaluation and validation for design and operation of facility for treatment of legacy Intermediate Level Radioactive Liquid Waste (ILW)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deepa, A.; Jakhete, A.P.; Rathish, K.R.; Saroj, S.K.; Patel, H.S.; Gopalakrishnan, R.K.; Gangadharan, Anand; Singh, Neelima

    2014-01-01

    An ion exchange treatment facility has been commissioned at PRIX facility, for the treatment of legacy ILW generated at reprocessing plant, Trombay. The treatment system is based on the deployment of selective sorbents for removal of cesium and strontium from ILW. Activity concentration due to beta emitters likely to be processed is of the order of 111-1850 MBq/l. Dose rates in different areas of the facility were evaluated using shielding code and design input. Present work give details of the comparison of dose rates estimated and dose rates measured at various stages of the processing of ILW. At PRIX, the ILW treatment system comprises of shielded IX columns (two cesium and one strontium) housed in a MS cubicle the process lines inlet and outlet of IX treatment system and effluent storage tanks. The MS cubicle, prefilter and piping are housed in a process cell of 500 mm concrete shielding. Effluent storage tanks are outside processing building. Theoretical assessment of expected dose rates were carried out prior to installation of various systems in different areas of PRIX. Dose rate on IX column and MS cubicle for a maximum inventory of 3.7x10 7 MBq of 137 Cs and its contribution in operating gallery was estimated

  9. Shielding property for thermal equilibrium states in the quantum Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móller, N. S.; de Paula, A. L.; Drumond, R. C.

    2018-03-01

    We show that Gibbs states of nonhomogeneous transverse Ising chains satisfy a shielding property. Namely, whatever the fields on each spin and exchange couplings between neighboring spins are, if the field in one particular site is null, then the reduced states of the subchains to the right and to the left of this site are exactly the Gibbs states of each subchain alone. Therefore, even if there is a strong exchange coupling between the extremal sites of each subchain, the Gibbs states of the each subchain behave as if there is no interaction between them. In general, if a lattice can be divided into two disconnected regions separated by an interface of sites with zero applied field, then we can guarantee a similar result only if the surface contains a single site. Already for an interface with two sites we show an example where the property does not hold. When it holds, however, we show that if a perturbation of the Hamiltonian parameters is done in one side of the lattice, then the other side is completely unchanged, with regard to both its equilibrium state and dynamics.

  10. Burst shield for a pressurized nuclear-reactor core and method of operating same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beine, B.; Schilling, F.

    1976-01-01

    A pressurized nuclear-reactor core stands on a base up from which extends a cylindrical side wall formed of a plurality of hollow iron castings held together by circumferential and longitudinal prestressed elements. A cylindrical space between this shield and the core serves for inspection of the core and is normally filled with cast-iron segmental slabs so that if the core bursts pieces thrown out do not acquire any dangerous kinetic energy before engaging the burst shield. The top of the shield is removably secured to the side so that it can be moved out of the way periodically for removal of the filler slabs and inspection of the core. An anchor on the upper end of each longitudinal prestressing element bears against a sleeve pressing against the uppermost side element, and a nut engageable with this anchor is engageable down over the top to hold it in place, removal of this nut leaving the element prestressed in the side wall. 11 claims, 16 drawing figures

  11. Thermal impact assessment of multi power plant operations on estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eraslan, A.H.; Kim, K.H.; Harris, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    The assessment of the thermal impact of multi power plant operations on large estuaries requires careful consideration of the problems associated with: re-entrainment, re-circulation, thermal interaction, delay in the attainment of thermal equilibrium state, and uncertainty in specifying open boundaries and open boundary conditions of the regions, which are critically important in the analysis of the thermal conditions in receiving water bodies with tidal dominated, periodically reversing flow conditions. The results of an extensive study in the Hudson River at Indian Point, 42 miles upstream of the ocean end at the Battery, concluded that the tidal-transient, multi-dimensional discrete-element (UTA) thermal transport models (ESTONE, FLOTWO, TMPTWO computer codes) and the near-field far-field zone-matching methodology can be employed with a high degree of reliability in the assessment of the thermal impact of multi power plant operations on tidal dominated estuaries

  12. LOFT shield tank steady state temperatures with addition of gamma and neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kyllingstad, G.

    1977-01-01

    The effect of introducing a neutron and gamma shield into the annulus between the reactor vessel and the shield tank is analyzed. This addition has been proposed in order to intercept neutron streaming up the annulus during nuclear operations. Its installation will require removal of approximately 20- 1 / 2 inches of stainless steel foil insulation at the top of the annulus. The resulting conduction path is believed to result in increased water temperatures within the shield tank, possibly beyond the 150 0 F limit, and/or cooling of the reactor vessel nozzles such that adverse thermal stresses would be generated. A two dimensional thermal analysis using the finite element code COUPLE/MOD2 was done for the shield tank system illustrated in the figure (1). The reactor was assumed to be at full power, 55 MW (th), with a loop flow rate of 2.15 x 10 6 lbm/hr (268.4 kg/s) at 2250 psi (15.51 MPa). Calculations indicate a steady state shield tank water temperature of 140 0 F (60 0 C). This is below the 150 0 F (65.56 0 C) limit. Also, no significant changes in thermal gradients within the nozzle or reactor vessel wall are generated. A spacer between the gamma shield and the shield tank is recommended, however, in order to ensure free air circulation through the annulus

  13. Exposition of the operator's eye lens and efficacy of radiation shielding in fluoroscopically guided interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galster, M.; Adamus, R.; Guhl, C.; Uder, M.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Efficacy of radiation protection tools for the eye lens dose of the radiologist in fluoroscopic interventions. Materials and Methods: A patient phantom was exposed using a fluoroscopic system. Dose measurements were made at the eye location of the radiologist using an ionization chamber. The setting followed typical fluoroscopic interventions. The reduction of scattered radiation by the equipment-mounted shielding (undercouch drapes and overcouch top) was evaluated. The ceiling-suspended lead acrylic glass screen was tested in scattered radiation generated by a slab phantom. The protective properties of different lead glass goggles and lead acrylic visors were evaluated by thermoluminescence measurements on a head phantom in the primary beam. Results: The exposition of the lens of about 110 to 550 μSv during radiologic interventions is only slightly reduced by the undercouch drapes. Applying the top in addition to the drapes reduces the lens dose by a factor of 2 for PA projections. In 25 LAO the dose is reduced by a factor between 1.2 and 5. The highest doses were measured for AP angulations furthermore the efficacy of the equipment-mounted shielding is minimal. The ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced scatter by a factor of about 30. The lead glass goggles and visors reduced the lens dose up to a factor of 8 to 10. Depending on the specific design, the tested models are less effective especially for radiation from lateral with cranial angulation of the beam. Occasionally the visors even caused an increase of dose. Conclusion: The exposition of the eye lens can be kept below the new occupational limit recommended by the ICRP if the radiation shielding equipment is used consistently. (orig.)

  14. [Exposition of the operator's eye lens and efficacy of radiation shielding in fluoroscopically guided interventions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galster, M; Guhl, C; Uder, M; Adamus, R

    2013-05-01

    Efficacy of radiation protection tools for the eye lens dose of the radiologist in fluoroscopic interventions. A patient phantom was exposed using a fluoroscopic system. Dose measurements were made at the eye location of the radiologist using an ionization chamber. The setting followed typical fluoroscopic interventions. The reduction of scattered radiation by the equipment-mounted shielding (undercouch drapes and overcouch top) was evaluated. The ceiling-suspended lead acrylic glass screen was tested in scattered radiation generated by a slab phantom. The protective properties of different lead glass goggles and lead acrylic visors were evaluated by thermoluminescence measurements on a head phantom in the primary beam. The exposition of the lens of about 110 to 550 μSv during radiologic interventions is only slightly reduced by the undercouch drapes. Applying the top in addition to the drapes reduces the lens dose by a factor of 2 for PA projections. In 25°LAO the dose is reduced by a factor between 1.2 and 5. The highest doses were measured for AP angulations furthermore the efficacy of the equipment-mounted shielding is minimal. The ceiling-suspended lead screen reduced scatter by a factor of about 30. The lead glass goggles and visors reduced the lens dose up to a factor of 8 to 10. Depending on the specific design, the tested models are less effective especially for radiation from lateral with cranial angulation of the beam. Occasionally the visors even caused an increase of dose. The exposition of the eye lens can be kept below the new occupational limit recommended by the ICRP if the radiation shielding equipment is used consistently. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Thermal and shielding layout of the transport and storage container Asse TB1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessels, W.; Muth, M.; Gross, S.; Pfeifer, S.; Kolditz, H.

    1985-01-01

    A large spectrum has been devoted to the general questions of the thermal and radiological calculations, the nuclide content of the different types of waste and to the layout of an optimum transport container. This also concerns the considerations in case of fire, since upon inserting a transport container into a mine particular importance is attached to the possible liberation of toxic materials under these circumstances. It was possible to construct a transport container with a weight less than 10 t in such a way that it is suitable to transport and store the planned vitrified HLW according to DWK-specifications in a final repository borehole. (orig./HP) [de

  16. Integrated operation of hydro thermal system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanthakumar, J.

    1994-01-01

    Long-term power system expansion planning studies are carried out to meet the electricity requirement in the future. Prior to the expansion planning studies, it is essential to know the energy potential of the existing generating system, especially the hydro power plants. Detailed hydro thermal stimulation studies of the integrated system is therefore carried out to determine the best way to maximise the hydro energy of the existing and committed plants. The results of the integrated system simulated model are stored in numerous files and are available for retrieval. Most important output used for expansion analysis is the energy production of each hydro plant. The annual hydro energy potential of the total hydro system of Sri Lanka for the hydrological year from 1949 to 1988 is given. Hydro condition data with different probability levels are also indicated

  17. High temperature glass thermal control structure and coating. [for application to spacecraft reusable heat shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. A.; Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature stable and solar radiation stable thermal control coating is described which is useful either as such, applied directly to a member to be protected, or applied as a coating on a re-usable surface insulation (RSI). It has a base coat layer and an overlay glass layer. The base coat layer has a high emittance, and the overlay layer is formed from discrete, but sintered together glass particles to give the overlay layer a high scattering coefficient. The resulting two-layer space and thermal control coating has an absorptivity-to-emissivity ratio of less than or equal to 0.4 at room temperature, with an emittance of 0.8 at 1200 F. It is capable of exposure to either solar radiation or temperatures as high as 2000 F without significant degradation. When used as a coating on a silica substrate to give an RSI structure, the coatings of this invention show significantly less reduction in emittance after long term convective heating and less residual strain than prior art coatings for RSI structures.

  18. Conceptual design for the thermal shield bridges and multilayer insulation in the interconnect region for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baritchi, D.; Nicol, T.; Boroski, W.

    1991-01-01

    The interconnect region serves as the connection area between magnets. In order to minimize radiant heat transfer in the interconnect area, the authors used shield bridges which span the 80K and 20K shield gap between adjacent magnets. A sliding joint between bridge sections on adjacent magnets accommodates contraction during cool-down. An investigation was done to determine which attachment schemes (riveted or bolted versus welded) are better for heat transfer. Each shield bridge is covered with the same multilayer insulation scheme used throughout the body of the magnet. These shield bridges also contain pressure reliefs for each shield in the event of an internal piping failure. The reliefs are located in the upper half of the shield section in order to prevent liquid spills from impinging directly onto the vacuum vessel wall

  19. Theoretical analysis and experimental investigation on performance of the thermal shield of accelerator cryomodules by thermo-siphon cooling of liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, T. S.; Kar, S.; Kumar, M.; Choudhury, A.; Chacko, J.; Antony, J.; Babu, S.; Sahu, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Five beam line cryomodules with total 27 superconducting Radio Frequency (RF) cavities are installed and commissioned at IUAC to enhance the energy of heavy ion from 15 UD Pelletron. To reduce the heat load at 4.2 K, liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooled intermediate thermal shield is used for all these cryomodules. For three linac cryomodules, concept of forced flow LN2 cooling is used and for superbuncher and rebuncher, thermo-siphon cooling is incorporated. It is noticed that the shield temperature of superbuncher varies from 90 K to 110 K with respect to liquid nitrogen level. The temperature difference can't be explained by using the basic concept of thermo-siphon with the heat load on up flow line. A simple thermo-siphon experimental set up is developed to simulate the thermal shield temperature profile. Mass flow rate of liquid nitrogen is measured with different heat load on up flow line for different liquid levels. It is noticed that small amount of heat load on down flow line have a significant effect on mass flow rate. The present paper will be investigating the data generated from the thermosiphon experimental set up and a theoretical analysis will be presented here to validate the measured temperature profile of the cryomodule shield.

  20. A study of thermal, structural and shielding safety analysis for dry storage of spent nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, S. H. [Kyungpook Nationl Univ., Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-03-15

    As a replaced method for MRS, the dry storage has been intensively developed by the advanced countries of nuclear power technology. Currently, the domestic technology for the dry storage is also under development. In the present study, the developed technical standards for USNRC and its operation are summarized. Futhermore, the SAR for VECTRA's NUHOMES satisfied with DOE and NRC's requirements is inversely analyzed and combined with both USNRC's regulatory guide and LLNL's SARS. In the safety analysis of a dry storage, the principal design criteria which identifies the structural and mechanical safety criteria is investigated. Based on the design criteria, hypothetical accident analysis as well as off-normal operation analysis are investigated.

  1. Avoided operating costs in thermal generating systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chowdhury, N.; Billinton, R.; Gupta, R.

    1995-01-01

    A simple and straightforward technique was developed to assess avoided system operating costs associated with non-utility generation (NUG). The technique was based on optimum loading configurations of the committed units both before and after the inclusion of NUG energy. The salient features of the technique were presented in this paper. Assessment of avoided operating cost with deterministic and probabilistic criteria were explained. A time differentiated price system was adopted in the algorithms to reflect the different value placed on purchased price by a utility at different times of the day. The algorithms show the utility effects of dispatchable and non-dispatchable NUG energies. The IEEE Reliability Test System (RTS) was utilized for numerical analysis. Results were illustrated. It was found that sensitivity studies similar to those performed on the IEEE-RTS could be utilized to determine the amount of energy and the time period during which utilities and NUGs can maximize their economic benefits. 7 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  2. Wake Shield Target Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-01-01

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed

  3. Thermal Shielding of the Shock Absorber to a Seal of a Hot-cell Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Kim, K. Y.; Seo, C. S.; Seo, K. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    In order to safely transport the radioactive waste arising from the hot test of ACP(Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process) a shipping package is required. Therefore KAERI is developing a shipping package to transport the radioactive waste arising in the ACPF during a hot test. Regulatory requirements for a Type B package are specified in the Korea MOST Act 2008-69, IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1, and US 10 CFR Part. These regulatory guidelines classify the hot cell cask as a Type B package, and state that the Type B package for transporting radioactive materials should be able to withstand a test sequence consisting of a 9 m drop onto an unyielding surface, a 1 m drop onto a puncture bar, and a 30 minute fully engulfing fire. Greiner et al. performed a research on the thermal protection provided by shock absorbers by using CAFE computer code. This paper discusses the experimental approach used to simulate the response of the hot cell cask to fire in a furnace with chamber dimensions of 300 cm(W) x 400 cm(L) x 200 cm(H) by using a 1/2 scale model which was damaged by both a 9 m drop test and a 1 m puncture test

  4. Effects of golf course construction and operation on water chemistry of headwater streams on the Precambrian Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winter, Jennifer G.; Dillon, Peter J.

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effects of golf course construction and operation on the water chemistry of Shield streams, we compared the water chemistry in streams draining golf courses under construction (2) and in operation (5) to streams in forested reference locations and to upstream sites where available. Streams were more alkaline and higher in base cation and nitrate concentrations downstream of operational golf courses. Levels of these parameters and total phosphorus increased over time in several streams during golf course construction through to operation. There was evidence of inputs of mercury to streams on two of the operational courses. Nutrient (phosphorus and nitrogen) concentrations were significantly related to the area of unmanaged vegetation in a 30 x 30 m area on either side of the sampling sites, and to River Bank Quality Index scores, suggesting that maintaining vegetated buffers along the stream on golf courses will reduce in-stream nutrient concentrations. - Golf course construction and operation had a significant impact on alkalinity, nitrogen and base cation concentrations of streams

  5. Analysis of piping response to thermal and operational transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C.Y.

    1987-01-01

    The reactor piping system is an extremely complex three-dimensional structure. Maintaining its structural integrity is essential to the safe operation of the reactor and the steam-supply system. In the safety analysis, various transient loads can be imposed on the piping which may cause plastic deformation and possible damage to the system, including those generated from hydrodynamic wave propagations, thermal and operational transients, as well as the seismic events. At Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), a three-dimensional (3-D) piping code, SHAPS, aimed for short-duration transients due to wave propagation, has been developed. Since 1984, the development work has been shifted to the long-duration accidents originating from the thermal and operational transient. As a result, a new version of the code, SHAPS-2, is being established. This paper describes many features related to this later development. To analyze piping response generated from thermal and operational transients, a 3-D implicit finite element algorithm has been developed for calculating the hoop, flexural, axial, and torsional deformations induced by the thermomechanical loads. The analysis appropriately accounts for stresses arising from the temperature dependence of the elastic material properties, the thermal expansion of the materials, and the changes in the temperature-dependent yield surface. Thermal softening, failure, strain rate, creep, and stress ratching can also be considered

  6. Shielded cells transfer automation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear waste from shielded cells is removed, packaged, and transferred manually in many nuclear facilities. Radiation exposure is absorbed by operators during these operations and limited only through procedural controls. Technological advances in automation using robotics have allowed a production waste removal operation to be automated to reduce radiation exposure. The robotic system bags waste containers out of glove box and transfers them to a shielded container. Operators control the system outside the system work area via television cameras. 9 figures

  7. Effect of adjustable molecular chain structure and pure silica zeolite nanoparticles on thermal, mechanical, dielectric, UV-shielding and hydrophobic properties of fluorinated copolyimide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Liao, Guangfu; Zhang, Shulai; Pang, Long; Tong, Hao; Zhao, Wenzhe; Xu, Zushun

    2018-01-01

    A series of polyimide (PI) films, polyimide/pure silica zeolite nanoparticles (PSZN) blend films and polyimide/amine-functionalized pure silica zeolite nanoparticles (APSZN) composite films were successfully prepared by random copolycondensation. Thereinto, PSZN were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The polyimides were derived from 4,4‧-diaminodiphenyl ether (ODA), and three adjustable molar ratios (3:1, 1:1, 1:3) of 2,2-bis[4-(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy)phenyl] propane dianhydride (BPADA) and 4,4‧-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) diphthalic anhydride (6FDA). The effects of PSZN, APSZN and different chain structure on PI films were specifically evaluated in terms of morphology, thermal, mechanical, dielectric and UV-shielding properties, etc. Comparison was given among pure PI flims, PI/PSZN blend films and PI/APSZN composite flims. The results showed that the thermal and mechanical properties of PI films were drastically impaired after adding PSZN. On the contrary, the strength, toughness and thermal stability were improved after adding APSZN. Moreover, the dielectric constants of the PI/APSZN composite flims were lowered but UV-shielding properties were enhanced. Interestingly, we found that the greatest effects were obtained through introducing APSZN in PI derived by the 1:1 ratio of BPADA:6FDA. The corresponding PI/APSZN composite flim exhibited the most reinforced and toughened properties, the largest decrement of dielectric constant and the best UV-shielding efficiency, which made the composite flim be used as ultraviolet shielding material in outer space filled with high temperature and intensive ultraviolet light. Meanwhile, this work also provided a facile way to synthesize composite materials with adjustable performance.

  8. Numerical simulation of a reinforced concrete shield around a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahama, Mumuni Salifu

    1996-02-01

    Ghana currently operates a Research Reactor and other nuclear facilities including a Gamma Irradiation Facility, a Radiographic Non-Destructive Testing laboratory and would be operating in the nearest future a Radiotherapy Centre. Each of these has a concrete radiation shield as a major safety device. In carrying out its functions, a concrete radiation shield may be subjected to thermal and mechanical stresses. A facility for analysing these stresses is desirable. Two computer codes have been developed under this programme for radiation shielding computation and stress analysis of cylindrical reactor shields. (au)

  9. SP-100 GES/NAT radiation shielding systems design and development testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Disney, R.K.; Kulikowski, H.D.; McGinnis, C.A.; Reese, J.C.; Thomas, K.; Wiltshire, F.

    1991-01-01

    Advanced Energy Systems (AES) of Westinghouse Electric Corporation is under subcontract to the General Electric Company to supply nuclear radiation shielding components for the SP-100 Ground Engineering System (GES) Nuclear Assembly Test to be conducted at Westinghouse Hanford Company at Richland, Washington. The radiation shielding components are integral to the Nuclear Assembly Test (NAT) assembly and include prototypic and non-prototypic radiation shielding components which provide prototypic test conditions for the SP-100 reactor subsystem and reactor control subsystem components during the GES/NAT operations. W-AES is designing three radiation shield components for the NAT assembly; a prototypic Generic Flight System (GFS) shield, the Lower Internal Facility Shield (LIFS), and the Upper Internal Facility Shield (UIFS). This paper describes the design approach and development testing to support the design, fabrication, and assembly of these three shield components for use within the vacuum vessel of the GES/NAT. The GES/NAT shields must be designed to operate in a high vacuum which simulates space operations. The GFS shield and LIFS must provide prototypic radiation/thermal environments and mechanical interfaces for reactor system components. The NAT shields, in combination with the test facility shielding, must provide adequate radiation attenuation for overall test operations. Special design considerations account for the ground test facility effects on the prototypic GFS shield. Validation of the GFS shield design and performance will be based on detailed Monte Carlo analyses and developmental testing of design features. Full scale prototype testing of the shield subsystems is not planned

  10. Transient shielded liquid hydrogen containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varghese, A.P.; Herring, R.H.

    1990-01-01

    The storage of hydrogen in the liquid phase has been limited in duration due to the thermal performance constraints of conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers available. Conventional Liquid Hydrogen containers lose hydrogen because of their relatively high heat leak and variations in usage pattern of hydrogen due to shutdowns. Local regulations also discourage venting of hydrogen. Long term storage of Liquid Hydrogen without product loss was usually accomplished using Liquid Nitrogen sacrificial shields. This paper reports on a new low heat leak container developed and patented that will extend the storage time of liquid hydrogen by five hundred percent. The principle of operation of the Transient Shields which makes the extraordinary performance of this container feasible is described in this paper. Also covered are the impact of this new container on present applications of hydrogen and the new opportunities afforded to Liquid hydrogen in the world hydrogen market

  11. Research of the cold shield in cryogenic liquid storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, L. B.; Zheng, J. P.; Wu, X. L.; Cui, C.; Zhou, Y.; Wang, J. J.

    2017-12-01

    To realize zero boil-off storage of cryogenic liquids, a cryocooler that can achieve a temperature below the boiling point temperature of the cryogenic liquid is generally needed. Taking into account that the efficiency of the cryocooler will be higher at a higher operating temperature, a novel thermal insulation system using a sandwich container filled with cryogenic liquid with a higher boiling point as a cold radiation shield between the cryogenic tank and the vacuum shield in room temperature is proposed to reduce the electricity power consumption. A two-stage cryocooler or two separate cryocoolers are adopted to condense the evaporated gas from the cold shield and the cryogenic tank. The calculation result of a 55 liter liquid hydrogen tank with a liquid nitrogen shield shows that only 14.4 W of electrical power is needed to make all the evaporated gas condensation while 121.7 W will be needed without the liquid nitrogen shield.

  12. Microstability of TMX-U during initial thermal barrier operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casper, T.A.; Berzins, L.V.; Ellis, R.F.; James, R.A.; Lasnier, C.

    1984-03-01

    During the initial thermal barrier experiments on the Tandem Mirror Experiment-Upgrade (TMX-U), we successfully demonstrated the principle of improved axial tandem mirror confinement achieved by establishment of both the thermal barrier and the ion confining potential peak. During this operation, we created both hot (100-keV) mirror-confined electron and hot (8-keV) mirror-confined ion populations in the end cells. In certain parameter ranges, we observed these species to be weakly unstable to various microinstabilities, but we did not observe clear evidence for an absolute limit to confinement

  13. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Shian V.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  14. Flexible operation of thermal plants with integrated energy storage technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koytsoumpa, Efthymia Ioanna; Bergins, Christian; Kakaras, Emmanouil

    2017-08-01

    The energy system in the EU requires today as well as towards 2030 to 2050 significant amounts of thermal power plants in combination with the continuously increasing share of Renewables Energy Sources (RES) to assure the grid stability and to secure electricity supply as well as to provide heat. The operation of the conventional fleet should be harmonised with the fluctuating renewable energy sources and their intermittent electricity production. Flexible thermal plants should be able to reach their lowest minimum load capabilities while keeping the efficiency drop moderate as well as to increase their ramp up and down rates. A novel approach for integrating energy storage as an evolutionary measure to overcome many of the challenges, which arise from increasing RES and balancing with thermal power is presented. Energy storage technologies such as Power to Fuel, Liquid Air Energy Storage and Batteries are investigated in conjunction with flexible power plants.

  15. Thermal, Mechanical and UV-Shielding Properties of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate/Cerium Dioxide Hybrid Systems Obtained by Melt Compounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Reyes-Acosta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thick and homogeneous hybrid film systems based on poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and CeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using the melt compounding method to improve thermal stability, mechanical and UV-shielding properties, as well as to propose them for use in the multifunctional materials industry. The effect of the inorganic phase on these properties was assessed by using two different weight percentages of synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles (0.5 and 1.0 wt % with the sol–gel method and thermal treatment at different temperatures (120, 235, 400, 600 and 800 °C. Thereafter, the nanoceria powders were added to the polymer matrix by single screw extrusion. The absorption in the UV region was increased with the crystallite size of the CeO2 nanoparticles and the PMMA/CeO2 weight ratio. Due to the crystallinity of CeO2 nanoparticles, the thermal, mechanical and UV-shielding properties of the PMMA matrix were improved. The presence of CeO2 nanostructures exerts an influence on the mobility of PMMA chain segments, leading to a different glass transition temperature.

  16. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK (DST) THERMAL & SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL & OPERATING LOADS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY, T.C.

    2006-03-17

    This report summarizes the results of the Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TOLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis. This combined analysis provides a thorough, defensible, and documented analysis that will become a part of the overall analysis of record for the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs).

  17. Transient thermal analysis of semiconductor diode lasers under pulsed operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veerabathran, G. K.; Sprengel, S.; Karl, S.; Andrejew, A.; Schmeiduch, H.; Amann, M.-C.

    2017-02-01

    Self-heating in semiconductor lasers is often assumed negligible during pulsed operation, provided the pulses are `short'. However, there is no consensus on the upper limit of pulse width for a given device to avoid-self heating. In this paper, we present an experimental and theoretical analysis of the effect of pulse width on laser characteristics. First, a measurement method is introduced to study thermal transients of edge-emitting lasers during pulsed operation. This method can also be applied to lasers that do not operate in continuous-wave mode. Secondly, an analytical thermal model is presented which is used to fit the experimental data to extract important parameters for thermal analysis. Although commercial numerical tools are available for such transient analyses, this model is more suitable for parameter extraction due to its analytical nature. Thirdly, to validate this approach, it was used to study a GaSb-based inter-band laser and an InP-based quantum cascade laser (QCL). The maximum pulse-width for less than 5% error in the measured threshold currents was determined to be 200 and 25 ns for the GaSb-based laser and QCL, respectively.

  18. Design of ITER shielding blanket

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furuya, Kazuyuki; Sato, Satoshi; Hatano, Toshihisa; Tokami, Ikuhide; Kitamura, Kazunori; Miura, Hidenori; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroda, Toshimasa; Takatsu, Hideyuki

    1997-05-01

    A mechanical configuration of ITER integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module were developed focusing on the welded attachment of its support leg to the back plate. A 100 mm x 150 mm space between the legs of adjacent modules was incorporated for the working space of welding/cutting tools. A concept of coolant branch pipe connection to accommodate deformation due to the leg welding and differential displacement of the module and the manifold/back plate during operation was introduced. Two-dimensional FEM analyses showed that thermal stresses in Cu-alloy (first wall) and stainless steel (first wall coolant tube and shield block) satisfied the stress criteria following ASME code for ITER BPP operation. On the other hand, three-dimensional FEM analyses for overall in-vessel structures exhibited excessive primary stresses in the back plate and its support structure to the vacuum vessel under VDE disruption load and marginal stresses in the support leg of module No.4. Fabrication procedure of the integrated primary first wall/shield blanket module was developed based on single step solid HIP for the joining of Cu-alloy/Cu-alloy, Cu-alloy/stainless steel, and stainless steel/stainless steel. (author)

  19. Primary shield displacement and bowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor primary shield is constructed of high density concrete and surrounds the reactor core. The inlet, outlet and side primary shields were constructed in-place using 2.54 cm (1 in) thick steel plates as the forms. The plates remained as an integral part of the shields. The elongation of the pressure tubes due to thermal expansion and pressurization is not moving through the inlet nozzle hardware as designed but is accommodated by outward displacement and bowing of the inlet and outlet shields. Excessive distortion of the shields may result in gas seal failures, intolerable helium gas leaks, increased argon-41 emissions, and shield cooling tube failures. The shield surveillance and testing results are presented

  20. Automatic detection of animals in mowing operations using thermal cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steen, Kim Arild; Villa-Henriksen, Andrés; Therkildsen, Ole Roland; Green, Ole

    2012-01-01

    During the last decades, high-efficiency farming equipment has been developed in the agricultural sector. This has also included efficiency improvement of moving techniques, which include increased working speeds and widths. Therefore, the risk of wild animals being accidentally injured or killed during routine farming operations has increased dramatically over the years. In particular, the nests of ground nesting bird species like grey partridge (Perdix perdix) or pheasant (Phasianus colchicus) are vulnerable to farming operations in their breeding habitat, whereas in mammals, the natural instinct of e.g., leverets of brown hare (Lepus europaeus) and fawns of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus) to lay low and still in the vegetation to avoid predators increase their risk of being killed or injured in farming operations. Various methods and approaches have been used to reduce wildlife mortality resulting from farming operations. However, since wildlife-friendly farming often results in lower efficiency, attempts have been made to develop automatic systems capable of detecting wild animals in the crop. Here we assessed the suitability of thermal imaging in combination with digital image processing to automatically detect a chicken (Gallus domesticus) and a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) in a grassland habitat. Throughout the different test scenarios, our study animals were detected with a high precision, although the most dense grass cover reduced the detection rate. We conclude that thermal imaging and digital imaging processing may be an important tool for the improvement of wildlife-friendly farming practices in the future.

  1. Thermal evolution of the Schwinger model with matrix product operators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banuls, M.C.; Cirac, J.I.; Cichy, K.; Jansen, K.; Saito, H.

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate the suitability of tensor network techniques for describing the thermal evolution of lattice gauge theories. As a benchmark case, we have studied the temperature dependence of the chiral condensate in the Schwinger model, using matrix product operators to approximate the thermal equilibrium states for finite system sizes with non-zero lattice spacings. We show how these techniques allow for reliable extrapolations in bond dimension, step width, system size and lattice spacing, and for a systematic estimation and control of all error sources involved in the calculation. The reached values of the lattice spacing are small enough to capture the most challenging region of high temperatures and the final results are consistent with the analytical prediction by Sachs and Wipf over a broad temperature range.

  2. Impact of a Disposable Sterile Radiation Shield on Operator Radiation Exposure During Percutaneous Coronary Intervention of Chronic Total Occlusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shorrock, Deborah; Christopoulos, Georgios; Wosik, Jedrek; Kotsia, Anna; Rangan, Bavana; Abdullah, Shuaib; Cipher, Daisha; Banerjee, Subhash; Brilakis, Emmanouil S

    2015-07-01

    Daily radiation exposure over many years can adversely impact the health of medical professionals. Operator radiation exposure was recorded for 124 percutaneous coronary interventions (PCIs) performed at our institution between August 2011 and May 2013: 69 were chronic total occlusion (CTO)-PCIs and 55 were non-CTO PCIs. A disposable radiation protection sterile drape (Radpad; Worldwide Innovations & Technologies, Inc) was used in all CTO-PCI cases vs none of the non-CTO PCI cases. Operator radiation exposure was compared between CTO and non-CTO PCIs. Mean age was 64.6 ± 6.2 years and 99.2% of the patients were men. Compared with non-CTO PCI, patients undergoing CTO-PCI were more likely to have congestive heart failure, to be current smokers, and to have longer lesions, and less likely to have prior PCI and a saphenous vein graft target lesion. CTO-PCI cases had longer procedural time (median: 123 minutes [IQR, 85-192 minutes] vs 27 minutes [IQR, 20-44 minutes]; P<.001), fluoroscopy time (35 minutes [IQR, 19-54 minutes] vs 8 minutes [IQR, 5-16 minutes]; P<.001), number of stents placed (2.4 ± 1.5 vs 1.7 ± 0.9; P<.001), and patient air kerma radiation exposure (3.92 Gray [IQR, 2.48-5.86 Gray] vs 1.22 Gray [IQR, 0.74-1.90 Gray]; P<.001), as well as dose area product (267 Gray•cm² [IQR, 163-4.25 Gray•cm²] vs 84 Gray•cm² [IQR, 48-138 Gray•cm²]; P<.001). In spite of higher patient radiation exposure, operator radiation exposure was similar between the two groups (20 μSv [IQR, 9.5-31 μSv] vs 15 μSv [IQR, 7-23 μSv]; P=.07). Operator radiation exposure during CTO-PCI can be reduced to levels similar to less complicated cases with the use of a disposable sterile radiation protection shield.

  3. Shielding container for radioactive isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sumi, Tetsuo; Tosa, Masayoshi; Hatogai, Tatsuaki.

    1975-01-01

    Object: To effect opening and closing bidirectional radiation used particularly for a gamma densimeter or the like by one operation. Structure: This device comprises a rotatable shielding body for receiving radioactive isotope in the central portion thereof and having at least two radiation openings through which radiation is taken out of the isotope, and a shielding container having openings corresponding to the first mentioned radiation openings, respectively. The radioactive isotope is secured to a rotational shaft of the shielding body, and the shielding body is rotated to register the openings of the shielding container with the openings of the shielding body or to shield the openings, thereby effecting radiation and cut off of gamma ray in the bidirection by one operation. (Kamimura, M.)

  4. Radiation shield for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esenov, Amra; Pustovgar, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    One of the chief structures of a reactor pit is a 'dry' shield. Setting up a 'dry' shield includes the technologically complex process of thermal processing of serpentinite concrete. Modern advances in the area of materials technology permit avoiding this complex and demanding procedure, and this significantly decreases the duration, labor intensity, and cost of setting it up. (orig.)

  5. Shielding wall for thermonuclear device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, Takaho.

    1989-01-01

    This invention concerns shielding walls opposing to plasmas of a thermonuclear device and it is an object thereof to conduct reactor operation with no troubles even if a portion of shielding wall tiles should be damaged. That is, the shielding wall tiles are constituted as a dual layer structure in which the lower base tiles are connected by means of bolts to first walls. Further, the upper surface tiles are bolt-connected to the layer base tiles. In this structure, the plasma thermal loads are directly received by the surface layer tiles and heat is conducted by means of conduction and radiation to the underlying base tiles and the first walls. Even upon occurrence of destruction accidents to the surface layer tiles caused by incident heat or electromagnetic force upon elimination of plasmas, since the underlying base tiles remain as they are, the first walls constituted with stainless steels, etc. are not directly exposed to the plasmas. Accordingly, the integrity of the first walls having cooling channels can be maintained and sputtering intrusion of atoms of high atom number into the plasmas can be prevented. (I.S.)

  6. Operation of transition-edge sensors with excess thermal noise

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maasilta, I J; Kinnunen, K M; Nuottajaervi, A K; Leppaeniemi, J; Luukanen, A

    2006-01-01

    The superconducting transition-edge sensor (TES) is currently one of the most attractive choices for ultra-high resolution calorimetry in the keV x-ray band, and is being considered for future ESA and NASA missions. We have performed a study on the noise characteristics of Au/Ti bilayer TESs, at operating temperatures around ∼100 mK, with the SQUID readout at 1.5 K. Experimental results indicate that without modifications the back-action noise from the SQUID chip degrades the noise characteristics significantly. We present a simple and effective solution to the problem: by installing an extra shunt resistor which absorbs the excess radiation from the SQUID input, we have reduced the excess thermal (photon) noise power down by approximately a factor of five, allowing high resolution operation of the sensors

  7. Self-generated clouds of micron-sized particles as a promising way of a Solar Probe shielding from intense thermal radiation of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Reviznikov, Dmitry L.; Kryukov, Alexei P.; Levashov, Vladimir Yu

    2017-10-01

    An effect of shielding of an intense solar radiation towards a solar probe with the use of micron-sized SiC particles generated during ablation of a composite thermal protection material is estimated on a basis of numerical solution to a combined radiative and heat transfer problem. The radiative properties of particles are calculated using the Mie theory, and the spectral two-flux model is employed in radiative transfer calculations for non-uniform particle clouds. A computational model for generation and evolution of the cloud is based on a conjugated heat transfer problem taking into account heating and thermal destruction of the matrix of thermal protection material and sublimation of SiC particles in the generated cloud. The effect of light pressure, which is especially important for small particles, is also taken into account. The computational data for mass loss due to the particle cloud sublimation showed the low value about 1 kg/m2 per hour at the distance between the vehicle and the Sun surface of about four radii of the Sun. This indicates that embedding of silicon carbide or other particles into a thermal protection layer and the resulting generation of a particle cloud can be considered as a promising way to improve the possibilities of space missions due to a significant decrease in the vehicle working distance from the solar photosphere.

  8. Automatic Detection of Animals in Mowing Operations Using Thermal Cameras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Green

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available During the last decades, high-efficiency farming equipment has been developed in the agricultural sector. This has also included efficiency improvement of moving techniques, which include increased working speeds and widths. Therefore, the risk of wild animals being accidentally injured or killed during routine farming operations has increased dramatically over the years. In particular, the nests of ground nesting bird species like grey partridge (Perdix perdix or pheasant (Phasianus colchicus are vulnerable to farming operations in their breeding habitat, whereas in mammals, the natural instinct of e.g., leverets of brown hare (Lepus europaeus and fawns of roe deer (Capreolus capreolus to lay low and still in the vegetation to avoid predators increase their risk of being killed or injured in farming operations. Various methods and approaches have been used to reduce wildlife mortality resulting from farming operations. However, since wildlife-friendly farming often results in lower efficiency, attempts have been made to develop automatic systems capable of detecting wild animals in the crop. Here we assessed the suitability of thermal imaging in combination with digital image processing to automatically detect a chicken (Gallus domesticus and a rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus in a grassland habitat. Throughout the different test scenarios, our study animals were detected with a high precision, although the most dense grass cover reduced the detection rate. We conclude that thermal imaging and digital imaging processing may be an important tool for the improvement of wildlife-friendly farming practices in the future.

  9. Quantum heat engine operating between thermal and spin reservoirs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Jackson S. S. T.; Gould, Tim; Carvalho, André R. R.; Bedkihal, Salil; Vaccaro, Joan A.

    2018-05-01

    Landauer's erasure principle is a cornerstone of thermodynamics and information theory [R. Landauer, IBM J. Res. Dev. 5, 183 (1961), 10.1147/rd.53.0183]. According to this principle, erasing information incurs a minimum energy cost. Recently, Vaccaro and Barnett [J. A. Vaccaro and S. M. Barnett, Proc. R. Soc. A 467, 1770 (2011), 10.1098/rspa.2010.0577] explored information erasure in the context of multiple conserved quantities and showed that the erasure cost can be solely in terms of spin angular momentum. As Landauer's erasure principle plays a fundamental role in heat engines, their result considerably widens the possible configurations that heat engines can have. Motivated by this, we propose here an optical heat engine that operates under a single thermal reservoir and a spin angular momentum reservoir coupled to a three-level system with two energy degenerate ground states. The proposed heat engine operates without producing waste heat and goes beyond the traditional Carnot engine where the working fluid is subjected to two thermal baths at different temperatures.

  10. Shielding container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, K.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    A shielding container incorporates a dense shield, for example of depleted uranium, cast around a tubular member of curvilinear configuration for accommodating a radiation source capsule. A lining for the tubular member, in the form of a close-coiled flexible guide, provides easy replaceability to counter wear while the container is in service. Container life is extended, and maintenance costs are reduced. (author)

  11. Study on welding thermal cycle and residual stress of UNS S32304 duplex steel selected as external shield for a transport packaging of Mo-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Gomes, Maurilio P.; Milagre, Mariana X.; Machado, Caruline S.C.; Reis, Luis A.M.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Rossi, Jesualdo L.; Orlando, Marcos T.D.; Luz, Temístocles S.

    2017-01-01

    Thin plates of duplex stainless steel UNS S32304 were welded using the pulsed gas tungsten arc GTAW process (butt joint) without filler addition. The used shielding gas was pure argon and 98% argon plus 2% of nitrogen. The thermal cycles were acquired during welding, in regions near the melting pool. This alloy is candidate for the external clad of a cask for the transport of high activity radiopharmaceuticals substances. For the residual stress measurements in austenite phase an X-ray diffractometer was used in a Bragg-Brentano geometry with CuKα radiation (γ= 0.154 and for ferrite phase was used a pseudo-parallel geometry with CrKα radiation (γ= 0.2291 nm). The results of residual stress using sin 2 Ψ methodology shown that the influence of the high welding temperature leads to compressive stresses in for both phase of the duplex steels mainly in heat-affected zone. It was observed a high temperature peak and an increase of the mean residual stress after addition of nitrogen to the argon shielding gas. (author)

  12. Study on welding thermal cycle and residual stress of UNS S32304 duplex steel selected as external shield for a transport packaging of Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Gomes, Maurilio P.; Milagre, Mariana X.; Machado, Caruline S.C.; Reis, Luis A.M.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: egbetini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Orlando, Marcos T.D.; Luz, Temístocles S., E-mail: mtdorlando@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (DFIS/UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil). Departamento de Física

    2017-07-01

    Thin plates of duplex stainless steel UNS S32304 were welded using the pulsed gas tungsten arc GTAW process (butt joint) without filler addition. The used shielding gas was pure argon and 98% argon plus 2% of nitrogen. The thermal cycles were acquired during welding, in regions near the melting pool. This alloy is candidate for the external clad of a cask for the transport of high activity radiopharmaceuticals substances. For the residual stress measurements in austenite phase an X-ray diffractometer was used in a Bragg-Brentano geometry with CuKα radiation (γ= 0.154 and for ferrite phase was used a pseudo-parallel geometry with CrKα radiation (γ= 0.2291 nm). The results of residual stress using sin{sup 2} Ψ methodology shown that the influence of the high welding temperature leads to compressive stresses in for both phase of the duplex steels mainly in heat-affected zone. It was observed a high temperature peak and an increase of the mean residual stress after addition of nitrogen to the argon shielding gas. (author)

  13. Cross-section fluctuations and self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance region - International Evaluation Co-operation volume 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Froehner, F.H.; Larson, Duane C.; Tagesen, Siegfried; Petrizzi, Luigi; Hasegawa, Akira; Nakagawa, Tsuneo; Hogenbirk, Alfred; Weigmann, H.

    1995-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). NEA/NSC Subgroup 15 has had the task to assess self-shielding effects in the unresolved resonance range of structural materials, in particular their importance at various energies, and possible ways to deal with them in shielding and activation work. The principal results achieved are summarised briefly, in particular: - New data base consisting of high-resolution transmission data measured at Oak Ridge and Geel; - Improved theoretical understanding of cross-section fluctuations, including their prediction, that has been derived from the Hauser-Feshbach theory; - Benchmark results on the importance of self-shielding in iron at various energies; - Consequences for information storage in evaluated nuclear data files; - Practical utilisation of self-shielding information from evaluated files. Benchmark results as well as the Hauser-Feshbach theory show that self-shielding effects are important up to a 4-or 5-MeV neutron energy. Fluctuation factors extracted from high-resolution total cross-section data can be

  14. Thermal operations conditions in a national waste terminal storage facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-09-01

    Some of the major technical questions associated with the burial of radioactive high-level wastes in geologic formations are related to the thermal environments generated by the waste and the impact of this dissipated heat on the surrounding environment. The design of a high level waste storage facility must be such that the temperature variations that occur do not adversely affect operating personnel and equipment. The objective of this investigation was to assist OWI by determining the thermal environment that would be experienced by personnel and equipment in a waste storage facility in salt. Particular emphasis was placed on determining the maximum floor and air temperatures with and without ventilation in the first 30 years after waste emplacement. The assumed facility design differs somewhat from those previously analyzed and reported, but many of the previous parametric surveys are useful for comparison. In this investigation a number of 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional simulations of the heat flow in a repository have been performed on the HEATING5 and TRUMP heat transfer codes. The representative repository constructs used in the simulations are described, as well as the computational models and computer codes. Results of the simulations are presented and discussed. Comparisons are made between the recent results and those from previous analyses. Finally, a summary of study limitations, comparisons, and conclusions is given

  15. Pyrometer model based on sensor physical structure and thermal operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sebastian, Eduardo; Armiens, Carlos; Gomez-Elvira, Javier

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a new simplified thermal model for pyrometers, which takes into account both their internal and external physical structure and operation. The model is experimentally tested on the REMS GTS, an instrument for measuring ground temperature, which is part of the payload of the NASA MSL mission to Mars. The proposed model is based on an energy balance equation that represents the heat fluxes exchanged between sensor elements through radiation, conduction and convection. Despite being mathematically more complex than the more commonly used model, the proposed model makes it possible to design a methodology to compensate the effects of sensor spatial thermal gradients. The paper includes a practical methodology for identifying model constants, which is part of the GTS instrument calibration plan and uses a differential approach to avoid setup errors. Experimental results of the model identification methodology and a target temperature measurement performance after identification has been made are reported. Results demonstrate the good behaviour of the model, with errors below 0.15 deg. C in target temperature estimates.

  16. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  17. Electromagnetic shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, J.S.

    1987-01-01

    An electromagnetic shield is described comprising: closed, electrically-conductive rings, each having an open center; and binder means for arranging the rings in a predetermined, fixed relationship relative to each other, the so-arranged rings and binder means defining an outer surface; wherein electromagnetic energy received by the shield from a source adjacent its outer surface induces an electrical current to flow in a predetermined direction adjacent and parallel to the outer surface, through the rings; and wherein each ring is configured to cause source-induced alternating current flowing through the portion of the ring closest to the outer surface to electromagnetically induce an oppositely-directed current in the portion of the ring furthest from the surface, such oppositely-directed current bucking any source-induced current in the latter ring portion and thus reducing the magnitude of current flowing through it, whereby the electromagnetic shielding effected by the shield is enhanced

  18. Neutron shieldings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarutani, Kohei

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To decrease the stresses resulted by the core bendings to the base of an entrance nozzle. Constitution: Three types of round shielding rods of different diameter are arranged in a hexagonal tube. The hexagonal tube is provided with several spacer pads receiving the loads from the core constrain mechanism at its outer circumference, a handling head for a fuel exchanger at its top and an entrance nozzle for self-holding the neutron shieldings and flowing heat-removing coolants at its bottom. The diameters for R 1 , R 2 and R 3 for the round shielding rods are designed as: 0.1 R 1 2 1 and 0.2 R 1 2 1 . Since a plurality of shielding rods of small diameter are provided, soft structure are obtained and a plurality of coolant paths are formed. (Furukawa, Y.)

  19. Nuclear shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linares, R.C.; Nienart, L.F.; Toelcke, G.A.

    1976-01-01

    A process is described for preparing melt-processable nuclear shielding compositions from chloro-fluoro substituted ethylene polymers, particularly PCTFE and E-CTFE, containing 1 to 75 percent by weight of a gadolinium compound. 13 claims, no drawings

  20. REACTOR SHIELD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.E.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-17

    Radiation shield construction is described for a nuclear reactor. The shield is comprised of a plurality of steel plates arranged in parallel spaced relationship within a peripheral shell. Reactor coolant inlet tubes extend at right angles through the plates and baffles are arranged between the plates at right angles thereto and extend between the tubes to create a series of zigzag channels between the plates for the circulation of coolant fluid through the shield. The shield may be divided into two main sections; an inner section adjacent the reactor container and an outer section spaced therefrom. Coolant through the first section may be circulated at a faster rate than coolant circulated through the outer section since the area closest to the reactor container is at a higher temperature and is more radioactive. The two sections may have separate cooling systems to prevent the coolant in the outer section from mixing with the more contaminated coolant in the inner section.

  1. Method for dismantling shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukuzawa, Rokuro; Kondo, Nobuhiro; Kamiyama, Yoshinori; Kawasato, Ken; Hiraga, Tomoaki.

    1990-01-01

    The object of the present invention is to enable operators to dismantle shieldings contaminated by radioactivity easily and in a short period of time without danger of radiation exposure. A plurality of introduction pipes are embedded previously to the shielding walls of shielding members which contain a reactor core in a state where both ends of the introduction pipes are in communication with the outside. A wire saw is inserted into the introduction pipes to cut the shieldings upon dismantling. Then, shieldings can be dismantled easily in a short period of time with no radiation exposure to operator's. Further, according to the present invention, since the wire saw can be set easily and a large area can be cut at once, operation efficiency is improved. Further, since remote control is possible, cutting can be conducted in water and complicated places of the reactor. Biting upon starting the wire saw in the introduction pipe is reduced to facilitate startup for the rotation. (I.S.)

  2. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodaka, M.; Iida, T.; Taniuchi, H.; Yosimura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    1993-01-01

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  3. Development of the safety control framework for shield tunneling in close proximity to the operational subway tunnels: case studies in mainland China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinggao; Yuan, Dajun

    2016-01-01

    China's largest cities like Beijing and Shanghai have seen a sharp increase in subway network development as a result of the rapid urbanization in the last decade. The cities are still expanding their subway networks now, and many shield tunnels are being or will be constructed in close proximity to the existing operational subway tunnels. The execution plans for the new nearby shield tunnel construction calls for the development of a safety control framework-a set of control standards and best practices to help organizations manage the risks involved. Typical case studies and relevant key technical parameters are presented with a view to presenting the resulting safety control framework. The framework, created through collaboration among the relevant parties, addresses and manages the risks in a systematic way based on actual conditions of each tunnel crossing construction. The framework consists of six parts: (1) inspecting the operational subway tunnels; (2) deciding allowed movements of the existing tunnels and tracks; (3) simulating effects of the shield tunneling on the existing tunnels; (4) doing preparation work; (5) monitoring design and information management; and (6) measures and activation mechanism of the countermeasures. The six components are explained and demonstrated in detail. In the end, discussions made involve construction and post-construction settlement of the operational tunnel, application of the remedial grouting to rectify excessive settlements of the operational tunnel, and use of the innovative tool of the optical fiber measurement for tunnel movement monitoring. It is concluded that the construction movement of the tunnel can be controlled within 15 mm when the shield machine is <7 m in excavation diameter. The post-construction settlement of the tunnel buried in the very soft ground is much greater than its construction settlement, and last several years until reaching a final stable state. Two cases are outlined to demonstrate the

  4. Enhancement of thermal neutron attenuation of nano-B4C, -BN dispersed neutron shielding polymer nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jaewoo; Lee, Byung-Chul; Uhm, Young Rang; Miller, William H.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Preparation of B 4 C and BN nanopowders using a simple ball milling process. • Homogeneous dispersion and strong adhesion of nano-B 4 C and -BN with polymer matrix. • Enhancement of mechanical properties of the nanocomposites compared to their micro counterparts. • Enhancement of thermal neutron attenuation of the nanocomposites. - Abstract: Nano-sized boron carbide (B 4 C) and boron nitride (BN) powder were prepared using ball milling. Micro- and milled nano-powders were melt blended with high density polyethylene (HDPE) using a polymer mixer followed by hot pressing to fabricate sheet composites. The tensile and flexural strengths of HDPE nanocomposites were ∼20% higher than their micro counterparts, while those for latter decreased compared to neat HDPE. Thermal neutrons attenuation of the prepared HDPE nanocomposites was evaluated using a monochromatic ∼0.025 eV neutron beam. Thermal neutron attenuation of the HDPE nanocomposites was greatly enhanced compared to their micro counterparts at the same B-10 areal densities. Monte Carlo n-Particles (MCNP) simulations based on the lattice structure modeling also shows the similar filler size dependent thermal neutron absorption

  5. Enhancement of thermal neutron attenuation of nano-B{sub 4}C, -BN dispersed neutron shielding polymer nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jaewoo, E-mail: kimj@kaeri.re.kr [Nuclear Materials Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111-989 Daeduck-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); WCI Quantum Beam based Radiation Research Center, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111-989 Daeduck-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Missouri University Research Reactor, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); Lee, Byung-Chul [Nuclear Reactor Core Design Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111-989 Daeduck-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Uhm, Young Rang [Radioisotopes Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 111-989 Daeduck-daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon-si 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Miller, William H. [Missouri University Research Reactor, University of Missouri-Columbia, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Preparation of B{sub 4}C and BN nanopowders using a simple ball milling process. • Homogeneous dispersion and strong adhesion of nano-B{sub 4}C and -BN with polymer matrix. • Enhancement of mechanical properties of the nanocomposites compared to their micro counterparts. • Enhancement of thermal neutron attenuation of the nanocomposites. - Abstract: Nano-sized boron carbide (B{sub 4}C) and boron nitride (BN) powder were prepared using ball milling. Micro- and milled nano-powders were melt blended with high density polyethylene (HDPE) using a polymer mixer followed by hot pressing to fabricate sheet composites. The tensile and flexural strengths of HDPE nanocomposites were ∼20% higher than their micro counterparts, while those for latter decreased compared to neat HDPE. Thermal neutrons attenuation of the prepared HDPE nanocomposites was evaluated using a monochromatic ∼0.025 eV neutron beam. Thermal neutron attenuation of the HDPE nanocomposites was greatly enhanced compared to their micro counterparts at the same B-10 areal densities. Monte Carlo n-Particles (MCNP) simulations based on the lattice structure modeling also shows the similar filler size dependent thermal neutron absorption.

  6. Radiation shield for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weissenfluh, J.A.

    1978-01-01

    A shield for use with nuclear reactor systems to attenuate radiation resulting from reactor operation is described. The shield comprises a container preferably of a thin, flexible or elastic material, which may be in the form of a bag, a mattress, a toroidal segment or toroid or the like filled with radiation attenuating liuid. Means are provided in the container for filling and draining the container in place. Due to its flexibility, the shield readily conforms to irregularities in surfaces with which it may be in contact in a shielding position

  7. Multilayer radiation shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  8. Radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.

    1979-01-01

    Shields for equipment in which ionising radiation is associated with high electrical gradients, for example X-ray tubes and particle accelerators, incorporate a radiation-absorbing metal, as such or as a compound, and are electrically non-conducting and can be placed in the high electrical gradient region of the equipment. Substances disclosed include dispersions of lead, tungsten, uranium or oxides of these in acrylics polyesters, PVC, ABS, polyamides, PTFE, epoxy resins, glass or ceramics. The material used may constitute an evacuable enclosure of the equipment or may be an external shield thereof. (U.K.)

  9. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.; Calle, Carlos I.

    2016-01-01

    Dust mitigation technology has been highlighted by NASA and the International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has developed an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. Further development is underway to improve the operation and reliability of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment (MISSE). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the Moon.

  10. Gonadal shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, J A; Stiteler, R D; Glasgow, G P; Mill, W B

    1975-10-01

    A secondary gonadal shield for use in the pelvic irradiation of males was designed and built using material and apparatus available with the Cerrobend blocking system. The gonadal dose was reduced to approximately 1.5 to 2.5% of the given dose.

  11. Thermal modeling of nickel-hydrogen battery cells operating under transient orbital conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrage, Dean S.

    1991-01-01

    An analytical study of the thermal operating characteristics of nickel-hydrogen battery cells is presented. Combined finite-element and finite-difference techniques are employed to arrive at a computationally efficient composite thermal model representing a series-cell arrangement operating in conjunction with a radiately coupled baseplate and coldplate thermal bus. An aggressive, low-mass design approach indicates that thermal considerations can and should direct the design of the thermal bus arrangement. Special consideration is given to the potential for mixed conductive and convective processes across the hydrogen gap. Results of a compressible flow model are presented and indicate the transfer process is suitably represented by molecular conduction. A high-fidelity thermal model of the cell stack (and related components) indicates the presence of axial and radial temperature gradients. A detailed model of the thermal bus reveals the thermal interaction of individual cells and is imperative for assessing the intercell temperature gradients.

  12. Studies of thermal and radiation effects on water-rock systems related to envisaged isolation of high level radioactive wastes in crystalline formations of the Ukrainian shield (Ukraine)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litovchenko, A.; Kalinichenko, E.; Ivanitsky, V.; Bagmut, M.; Plastinina, M.; Zlobenko, B.

    2000-01-01

    In this work there are presented the general data on the study of thermal and radiation effects in minerals separated from rocks of the Ukrainian shield. These minerals (quartz, feldspar, amphiboles, apatite, biotite, kaolinite, etc.), exposed by doses 10 4 , 10 6 , 10 8 Gy by Co 60 source, were studied by a complex of physical methods. Special attention was given to the study of radiation defects formation (electron-hole paramagnetic centres, OH- groups destruction, changes in a charge state of ions) in a mineral structure. The mentioned radiation defects were used in the extrapolation method. The connection between structural peculiarities of minerals (containing uranium and thorium) and processes of their metamyctization are considered. It is demonstrated that the minerals, which have large channels or interlayer spaces in their structure, as a rule, are not metamyct. Using the spectroscopic methods of the extrapolation it is shown that the crystalline massifs, which do not have detectable amounts of hydroxyl containing minerals (biotite, amphibole, etc.) and ions Fe 2- , are perspective for long-lived radioactive wastes (RAW) dumping. As it follows from obtained results, the rocks, containing minerals with OH- groups and gas-liquid inclusions, should be considered as the 'mineral-water' system. (author)

  13. Significant reduction of radiation exposure to operator and staff during cardiac interventions by analysis of radiation leakage and improved lead shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuon, Eberhard; Schmitt, Moritz; Dahm, Johannes B

    2002-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to disclose and to reduce occupational radiation leakage in invasive cardiology. Prospectively, we analyzed various dose parameters for 330 coronary procedures. We used a Rando phantom to measure scatter entrance skin air kerma to the operator (S-ESAK-O) during fluoroscopy for all standard tube angulations, and to plot isodose lines for 0 degrees /0 degrees -posterior anterior angulation. The patient's measured dose area product due to diagnostic catheterization and elective percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty was 6.2 and 10.4 Gycm(2), which represents 11% and 13% of currently typical values, respectively. With use of 0.5- and 1.0-mm overcouch and undercouch shielding, it was possible to reduce the mean of 4,686 nSv/Gycm(2) to 677 and 277 nSv/Gycm(2), respectively. Closure of radiation leakage up to 897 microSv/hour at the operator's gonadal height (80 to 105 cm), not heretofore described, was achieved by an additional 1.0-mm, lead-equivalent undercouch-top and overcouch-flap adjacent to the table, down to a S-ESAK-O/dose area product level of 47.5 nSv/Gycm(2). With use of a 0.5-mm lead apron, collar, glasses, foot-switch shield and 1.0-mm lead cover around the patient's thighs, the operator received a mean S-ESAK-O of 8.5, while his forehead, eyes, thyroid, chest, gonads, and hands were exposed to 68.2, 1.2, 1.2, 1.2, 0.8, and 58.2 nSv/Gycm(2), respectively. In conclusion, radiation-attenuating intervention techniques and improved lead protection can effectively contribute to a new state of the art in invasive cardiology, with reduction of operator radiation exposure to 0.8% of typical S-ESAK-O levels in advanced catheterization laboratories.

  14. Radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue, D.D.

    1979-01-01

    Details are given of a cylindrical electric penetration assembly for carrying instrumentation leads, used in monitoring the performance of a nuclear reactor, through the containment wall of the reactor. Effective yet economical shielding protection against both fast neutron and high-energy gamma radiation is provided. Adequate spacing within the assembly allows excessive heat to be efficiently dissipated and means of monitoring all potential radiation and gas leakage paths are provided. (UK)

  15. Shielded container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    A shielded container for transportation of radioactive materials is disclosed in which leakage from the container is minimized due to constructional features including, inter alia, forming the container of a series of telescoping members having sliding fits between adjacent side walls and having at least two of the members including machine sealed lids and at least two of the elements including hand-tightenable caps

  16. Shielding research in France

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lafore, P

    1964-10-01

    Shielding research as an independent subject in France dates from 1956. The importance of these studies has been reflected in the contribution which they have made to power reactor design and in the resultant savings in expenditure for civil engineering and machinery for the removal of mobile shields. The Reactor Shielding Research Division numbers approximately 60 persons and uses several experimental facilities. These include: NAIADE I, installed near the ZOE reactor and operating with a natural uranium slab 2 cm thick (an effective diameter of 60 cm is the one most commonly used); the TRITON pool-type reactor, mainly used in shielding studies, includes an active-water loop, by means of which the secondary shields required for light-water reactors can be studied; core, NEREIDE, which is situated near a 2 m x 2 m aluminium window enables a large neutron source to be placed in a compartment without water in which large-scale mock-ups can be mounted for the study, in particular, of neutron diffusion in large cavities, and of reactor shielding of greater thickness than that in NAIADE I; SAMES 600 keV accelerator is used for monoenergetic neutron studies. Instrumentation studies are an important part of the work, mainly in the measurement of fast neutrons and their spectra by activation detectors. Of late, attention has been directed towards the use of (n, n') (rhodium) reactions and of heavy detectors for low-flux measurements. The simultaneous use of a large number of detectors poses automation problems. With our installation we can count 16 detectors simultaneously. Neutron spectrum studies are conducted with nuclear emulsions and a lithium-6 semiconductor spectrometer. As to the materials used, the research carried out in France involves chiefly graphite, iron and concrete at various temperatures up to 800 deg C. Different compounds, borated and non-borated and of densities up to between 1 and 9 are under consideration. Problems connected with applications are

  17. Dangers of bypassing thermal overload relays in nuclear power plant motor operated valve circuits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxter, F.D.

    1980-01-01

    Operation of motor operated valves is analyzed under various abnormal conditions such as frozen bearing, tight packing, mid-travel obstruction, torque switch failure, limit switch failure, and post-accident operation. Each condition has been reviewed to show that an adverse situation results if the thermal overload relays in the circuit are bypassed. In conclusion, there appears to be no technical basis for bypassing or oversizing the thermal overload relay provided it is selected correctly

  18. SNF shipping cask shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.; Pace, J.V. III.

    1996-01-01

    The Waste Management and Remedial Action Division has planned a modification sequence for storage facility 7827 in the Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA). The modification cycle is: (1) modify an empty caisson, (2) transfer the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) of an occupied caisson to a hot cell in building 3525 for inspection and possible repackaging, and (3) return the package to the modified caisson in the SWSA. Although the SNF to be moved is in the solid form, it has different levels of activity. Thus, the following 5 shipping casks will be available for the task: the Loop Transport Carrier, the In- Pile Loop LITR HB-2 Carrier, the 6.5-inch HRLEL Carrier, the HFIR Hot Scrap Carrier, and the 10-inch ORR Experiment Removal Shield Cask. This report describes the shielding tasks for the 5 casks: determination of shielding characteristics, any streaming avenues, estimation of thermal limits, and shielding calculational uncertainty for use in the transportation plan

  19. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text: Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions. (authors)

  20. Radiation shielding for neutron guides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ersez, T.; Braoudakis, G.; Osborn, J.C.

    2006-01-01

    Models of the neutron guide shielding for the out of bunker guides on the thermal and cold neutron beam lines of the OPAL Reactor (ANSTO) were constructed using the Monte Carlo code MCNP 4B. The neutrons that were not reflected inside the guides but were absorbed by the supermirror (SM) layers were noted to be a significant source of gammas. Gammas also arise from neutrons absorbed by the B, Si, Na and K contained in the glass. The proposed shielding design has produced compact shielding assemblies. These arrangements are consistent with safety requirements, floor load limits, and cost constraints. To verify the design a prototype was assembled consisting of 120 mm thick Pb(96%)Sb(4%) walls resting on a concrete block. There was good agreement between experimental measurements and calculated dose rates for bulk shield regions

  1. Mathematical modeling of thermal runaway in semiconductor laser operation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, W.R.

    2000-01-01

    A mathematical model describing the coupling of electrical, optical and thermal effects in semiconductor lasers is introduced. Through a systematic asymptotic expansion, the governing system of differential equations is reduced to a single second-order boundary value problem. This highly nonlinear

  2. Radiation shielding cloth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ijiri, Yasuo; Fujinuma, Tadashi; Tamura, Shoji.

    1989-01-01

    Radiation shielding cloth having radiation shielding layers comprising a composition of inorganic powder of high specific gravity and rubber are excellentin flexibility and comfortable to put on. However, since they are heavy in the weight, operators are tired upon putting them for a long time. In view of the above, the radiation ray shielding layers are prepared by calendering sheets obtained by preliminary molding of the composition to set the variation of the thickness within a range of +15% to -0% of prescribed thickness. Since the composition of inorganic powder at high specific gravity and rubber used for radiation ray shielding comprises a great amount of inorganic powder at high specific gravity blended therein, it is generally poor in fabricability. Therefor, it is difficult to attain fine control for the sheet thickness by merely molding a composition block at once. Then, the composition is at first preliminarily molded into a sheet-like shape which is somewhat thickener than the final thickness and then finished by calendering, by which the thickness can be reduced in average as compared with conventional products while keeping the prescribed thickness and reducing the weight reduce by so much. (N.H.)

  3. Penetration portion shielding structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, Katsumi; Narita, Hitoshi; Handa, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Jun; Tozuka, Fumio.

    1994-01-01

    Openings of a plurality of shieldings for penetration members are aligned to each other, and penetration members are inserted from the openings. Then, the openings of the plurality of shielding members are slightly displaced with each other to make the penetration portions into a helical configuration, so that leakage of radiation is reduced. Upon removal of the members, reverse operation is conducted. When a flowable shielding material is used, the penetration portions are constituted with two plates having previously formed openings and pipes for connecting the openings with each other and a vessel covering the entire of them. After passing the penetration members such as a cable, the relative position of the two plates is changed by twisting, to form a helical configuration which reduces radiation leakage. Since they are bent into the helical configuration, shielding performance is extremely improved compared with a case that radiation leakage is caused from an opening of a straight pipe. In addition, since they can be returned to straight pipes, attachment, detachment and maintenance can be conducted easily. (N.H.)

  4. Design and operation of gas-heated thermal pumping units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rostek, H A [Ruhrgas A.G., Essen (Germany, F.R.)

    1979-03-01

    The first gas heat pump systems have been operated since spring 1977. These are applied in living houses, school, swimming pools, and sport places and administration buildings. The heating performance of these systems is 150-3800 kW. Two of these systems, one in a swimming pool and one in a house for several families are operating, each of them for one heating period. The operational experiences with these gas heat pumps are reported on, basing on measurement results. The experience gathered from the operation of gas heat pumps systems is applied to the planning of other plants. The development of a standardized gas heat pump-series is emphasized.

  5. Proceedings of the 10. Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos Bastos, W. dos

    1995-01-01

    These proceedings presents all the Meeting papers emphasizing specific aspects on reactor physics method, criticality, fuel management, nuclear data, safety analysis, simulation and shielding, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, reactor operation and computational methods

  6. Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C)

  7. Landsat 8 Operational Land Imager (OLI)_Thermal Infared Sensor (TIRS) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Abstract:The Operational Land Imager (OLI) and Thermal Infrared Sensor (TIRS) are instruments onboard the Landsat 8 satellite, which was launched in February of...

  8. Effects of Operating Conditions on Gas Release Thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gas release rates and the flame length of the potential jet fires were initially estimated using Simplex Source Term Models which pay limited attention to operating conditions. Finally a more detailed follow-up study, accounting for a range of practical factors was conducted. A number of useful risk management metrics ...

  9. Shielded scanning electron microscope for radioactive samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crouse, R.S.; Parsley, W.B.

    1977-01-01

    A small commercial SEM had been successfully shielded for examining radioactive materials transferred directly from a remote handling facility. Relatively minor mechanical modifications were required to achieve excellent operation. Two inches of steel provide adequate shielding for most samples encountered. However, samples reading 75 rad/hr γ have been examined by adding extra shielding in the form of tungsten sample holders and external lead shadow shields. Some degradation of secondary electron imaging was seen but was adequately compensated for by changing operating conditions

  10. Exergy Analysis of Operating Lignite Fired Thermal Power Plant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Murugesan

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The energy assessment must be made through the energy quantity as well as the quality. But the usual energy analysisevaluates the energy generally on its quantity only. However, the exergy analysis assesses the energy on quantity as well asthe quality. The aim of the exergy analysis is to identify the magnitudes and the locations of real energy losses, in order toimprove the existing systems, processes or components. The present paper deals with an exergy analysis performed on anoperating 50MWe unit of lignite fired steam power plant at Thermal Power Station-I, Neyveli Lignite Corporation Limited,Neyveli, Tamil Nadu, India. The exergy losses occurred in the various subsystems of the plant and their components havebeen calculated using the mass, energy and exergy balance equations. The distribution of the exergy losses in several plantcomponents during the real time plant running conditions has been assessed to locate the process irreversibility. The Firstlaw efficiency (energy efficiency and the Second law efficiency (exergy efficiency of the plant have also been calculated.The comparison between the energy losses and the exergy losses of the individual components of the plant shows that themaximum energy losses of 39% occur in the condenser, whereas the maximum exergy losses of 42.73% occur in the combustor.The real losses of energy which has a scope for the improvement are given as maximum exergy losses that occurredin the combustor.

  11. Nuclear steam generator tubesheet shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, J.H.D.; Ruhe, A.

    1982-01-01

    The invention involves improvements to a nuclear steam generator of the type in which a plurality of U-shaped tubes are connected at opposite ends to a tubesheet and extend between inlet and outlet chambers, with the steam generator including an integral preheater zone adjacent to the downflow legs of the U-shaped tubes. The improvement is a thermal shield disposed adjacent to an upper face of the tubesheet within the preheater zone, the shield including ductile cladding material applied directly to the upper face of the tubesheet, with the downflow legs of the U-shaped tubes extending through the cladding into the tubesheet

  12. Thermal aging effects of VVER-1000 weld metal under operation temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chernobaeva, A.A.; Kuleshova, E.A.; Gurovich, B.A.; Erak, D.Y.; Zabusov, O.O.; Maltsev, D.A.; Zhurko, D.A.; Papina, V.B.; Skundin, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The VVER-1000 thermal aging surveillance specimen sets are located in the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) under real operation conditions. Thermal aging surveillance specimens data are the most reliable source of the information about changing of VVER-1000 RPV materials properties because of long-term (hundred thousand hours) exposure at operation temperature. A revision of database of VVER-1000 weld metal thermal aging surveillance specimens has been done. The reassessment of transition temperature (T t ) for all tested groups of specimens has been performed. The duration of thermal exposure and phosphorus contents have been defined more precisely. The analysis of thermal aging effects has been done. The yield strength data, study of carbides evolution show absence of hardening effects due to thermal aging under 310-320 C degrees. Measurements of phosphorus content in grain boundaries segregation in different states have been performed. The correlation between intergranular fracture mode in Charpy specimens and transition temperature shift under thermal aging at temperature 310-320 C degrees has been revealed. All these data allow developing the model of thermal aging. (authors)

  13. Core test reactor shield cooling system analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, E.M.; Elliott, R.D.

    1971-01-01

    System requirements for cooling the shield within the vacuum vessel for the core test reactor are analyzed. The total heat to be removed by the coolant system is less than 22,700 Btu/hr, with an additional 4600 Btu/hr to be removed by the 2-inch thick steel plate below the shield. The maximum temperature of the concrete in the shield can be kept below 200 0 F if the shield plug walls are kept below 160 0 F. The walls of the two ''donut'' shaped shield segments, which are cooled by the water from the shield and vessel cooling system, should operate below 95 0 F. The walls of the center plug, which are cooled with nitrogen, should operate below 100 0 F. (U.S.)

  14. Shielding modification design of the N.S. Mutsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, A.; Miyakoshi, J.; Kageyama, T.; Futamura, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Shielding modification design of the N.S. Mutsu was performed for reducing the radiation doses outside the primary and the secondary shields by providing shields for neutrons streaming through the air gap between the pressure vessel and the primary shield. This was accomplished by replacing parts of the shields and adding new shields in the upper and lower sections of both primary and secondary shields, and also replacing the thermal insulator in the gap. The shielding design calculations were made using one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates codes and also a point kernel code. Special attention was paid to the calculations of, (1) the neutrons streaming through the gap between the pressure vessel and the primary shield, (2) the radiations transmitted through the radial shield of the core in the primary shield, (3) the radiations transmitted through the upper and lower sections of the secondary shield, and (4) the dose rate equivalent in the accommodation area. Their calculational accuracies were estimated by analyzing various experiments. To support the modification, a variety of experiments and tests were carried out, which were material tests, cooling test of the primary shield, mechanical strength test of the double bottom, trial fabrication tests of new shields, performance degradation test of heavy concrete and duct streaming experiment in the secondary shield. (author)

  15. Shielding calculations for NET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verschuur, K.A.; Hogenbirk, A.

    1991-05-01

    In the European Fusion Technology Programme there is only a small activity on research and development for fusion neutronics. Never-the-less, looking further than blanket design now, as ECN is getting involved in design of radiation shields for the coils and biological shields, it becomes apparent that fusion neutronics as a whole still needs substantial development. Existing exact codes for calculation of complex geometries like MCNP and DORT/TORT are put over the limits of their numerical capabilities, whilst approximate codes for complex geometries like FURNACE and MERCURE4 are put over the limits of their modelling capabilities. The main objective of this study is just to find out how far we can get with existing codes in obtaining reliable values for the radiation levels inside and outside the cryostat/shield during operation and after shut-down. Starting with a 1D torus model for preliminary parametric studies, more dimensional approximation of the torus or parts of it including the main heterogeneities should follow. Regular contacts with the NET-Team are kept, to be aware of main changes in NET design that might affect our calculation models. Work on the contract started 1 July 1990. The technical description of the contract is given. (author). 14 refs.; 4 figs.; 1 tab

  16. About the Scythian Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    About the Scythian Shields

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shields played major role in the armament system of the Scythians. Made from organic materials, they are poorly traced on the materials of archaeological excavations. Besides, scaly surface of shields was often perceived in practice as the remnants of the scaly armor. E. V. Chernenko was able to discern the difference between shields’ scaly plates and armor scales. The top edge of the scales was bent inwards, and shield plates had a wire fixation. These observations let significantly increase the number of shields, found in the burial complexes of the Scythians. The comparison of archaeological materials and the images of Scythian warriors allow distinguishing the main forms of Scythian shields. All shields are divided into fencing shields and cover shields. The fencing shields include round wooden shields, reinforced with bronze sheet, and round moon-shaped shields with a notch at the top, with a metal scaly surface. They came to the Scythians under the Greek influence and are known in the monuments of the 4th century BC. Oval shields with scaly surface (back cover shields were used by the Scythian cavalry. They protected the rider in case of frontal attack, and moved back in case of maneuver or closein fighting. Scythian battle tactics were based on rapid approaching the enemy and throwing spears and further rapid withdrawal. Spears stuck in the shields of enemies, forcing them to drop the shields, uncover, and in this stage of the battle the archers attacked the disorganized ranks of the enemy. That was followed by the stage of close fight. Oval form of a wooden shield with leather covering was used by the Scythian infantry and spearmen. Rectangular shields, including wooden shields and the shields pleached from rods, represented a special category. The top of such shield was made of wood, and a pleached pad on leather basis was attached to it. This shield could be a reliable protection from arrows, but it could not protect against javelins

  17. Shielding synchrotron light sources: Advantages of circular shield walls tunnels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kramer, S.L. [Design and Accelerator Operations Consulting, 568 Wintergreen Ct Ridge, NY 11961 (United States); Ghosh, V.J.; Breitfeller, M. [NSLS-II, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2016-08-11

    Third generation high brightness light sources are designed to have low emittance and high current beams, which contribute to higher beam loss rates that will be compensated by Top-Off injection. Shielding for these higher loss rates will be critical to protect the projected higher occupancy factors for the users. Top-Off injection requires a full energy injector, which will demand greater consideration of the potential abnormal beam miss-steering and localized losses that could occur. The high energy electron injection beam produce significantly higher neutron component dose to the experimental floor than lower energy injection and ramped operations. High energy neutrons produced in the forward direction from thin target beam losses are a major component of the dose rate outside the shield walls of the tunnel. The convention has been to provide thicker 90° ratchet walls to reduce this dose to the beam line users. We present an alternate circular shield wall design, which naturally and cost effectively increases the path length for this forward radiation in the shield wall and thereby substantially decreasing the dose rate for these beam losses. This shield wall design will greatly reduce the dose rate to the users working near the front end optical components but will challenge the beam line designers to effectively utilize the longer length of beam line penetration in the shield wall. Additional advantages of the circular shield wall tunnel are that it's simpler to construct, allows greater access to the insertion devices and the upstream in tunnel beam line components, as well as reducing the volume of concrete and therefore the cost of the shield wall.

  18. Characterization of a thermoelectric cooler based thermal management system under different operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russel, M.K.; Ewing, D.; Ching, C.Y.

    2013-01-01

    The performance of a thermoelectric cooler (TEC) based thermal management system for an electronic packaging design that operates under a range of ambient conditions and system loads is examined using a standard model for the TEC and a thermal resistance network for the other components. Experiments were performed and it was found that the model predictions were in good agreement with the experimental results. An operating envelope is developed to characterize the TEC based thermal management system for peak and off peak operating conditions. Parametric studies were performed to analyze the effect of the number of TEC module(s) in the system, geometric factor of the thermo-elements and the cold to hot side thermal resistances on the system performance. The results showed that there is a tradeoff between the extent of off peak heat fluxes and ambient temperatures when the system can be operated at a low power penalty region and the maximum capacity of the system. - Highlights: ► A model was developed for thermal management systems using thermoelectric coolers. ► Model predictions were in good agreement with experimental results. ► An operating envelope was developed for peak and off peak conditions. ► The effect of the number of thermoelectric coolers on the system was determined.

  19. Thermal-Hydraulic Analysis Tasks for ANAV NPPs in Support of Plant Operation and Control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Batet

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Thermal-hydraulic analysis tasks aimed at supporting plant operation and control of nuclear power plants are an important issue for the Asociación Nuclear Ascó-Vandellòs (ANAV. ANAV is the consortium that runs the Ascó power plants (2 units and the Vandellòs-II power plant. The reactors are Westinghouse-design, 3-loop PWRs with an approximate electrical power of 1000 MW. The Technical University of Catalonia (UPC thermal-hydraulic analysis team has jointly worked together with ANAV engineers at different levels in the analysis and improvement of these reactors. This article is an illustration of the usefulness of computational analysis for operational support. The contents presented were operational between 1985 and 2001 and subsequently changed slightly following various organizational adjustments. The paper has two different parts. In the first part, it describes the specific aspects of thermal-hydraulic analysis tasks related to operation and control and, in the second part, it briefly presents the results of three examples of analyses that were performed. All the presented examples are related to actual situations in which the scenarios were studied by analysts using thermal-hydraulic codes and prepared nodalizations. The paper also includes a qualitative evaluation of the benefits obtained by ANAV through thermal-hydraulic analyses aimed at supporting operation and plant control.

  20. A Sensitivity Study on the Radiation Shield of KSPR Space Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cerba, S.; Lee, Hyun Chul; Lim, Hong Sik; Noh, Jae Man [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    The idea of a space reactor was realised some decades ago and since that time several research activities have been performed into this field. The US National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been developing a small fast reactor called as fission power system (FPS) for deep space mission, where highly enriched uranium (HEU) is used as fuel. On the other hand, other researchers have also surveyed a thermal reactor concept with low enriched uranium (LEU) for space applications. One of the main concerns in terms of a space reactor is the total size and the mass of the system including the reactor itself as well as the radiation shield. Since the reactor core is a source of neutrons and gamma photons of various energies, which may cause severe damage on the electronics of the space stations, the questions related to the development of a radiation shield should be address appropriately. The proposal of a radiation shield for a small space reactor is discussed in this paper. The requirements for the radiation shield have been addressed in terms of maximal absorbed doses and neutron flounces during 10 years of operation. In this study a radiation shield design for a small space reactor was investigated. All the presented calculations were performed using the multi-purpose stochastic MCNP code with temperature dependent continuous energy ENDF/B VII.0 neutron and photon cross section libraries. The aim of this study was to design a neutron and gamma shield that can meet the requirements of 250 Gy absorbed during 10 years of reactor operation. The comparison with a fast reactor design showed that high content of {sup 238}U strongly influences the shielding mass. This phenomenon is due to the higher photon production in case of the KSPR design and therefore the use of high {sup 235}U enrichments and the operation in fast neutron spectrum may be more desirable. In case if the KSPR space reactor the best shielding performance was achieved while utilizing a multi

  1. 30 CFR 56.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 56.14213... Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14213 Ventilation and shielding for welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous to...

  2. Investigation of Heat Pump Operation Strategies with Thermal Storage in Heating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wangsik Jung

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available A heat pump with thermal storage system is a system that operates a heat pump during nighttime using inexpensive electricity; during this time, the generated thermal energy is stored in a thermal storage tank. The stored thermal energy is used by the heat pump during daytime. Based on a model of a dual latent thermal storage tank and a heat pump, this study conducts control simulations using both conventional and advanced methods for heating in a building. Conventional methods include the thermal storage priority method and the heat pump priority method, while advanced approaches include the region control method and the dynamic programming method. The heating load required for an office building is identified using TRNSYS (Transient system simulation, used for simulations of various control methods. The thermal storage priority method shows a low coefficient of performance (COP, while the heat pump priority method leads to high electricity costs due to the low use of thermal storage. In contrast, electricity costs are lower for the region control method, which operates using the optimal part load ratio of the heat pump, and for dynamic programming, which operates the system by following the minimum cost path. According to simulation results for the winter season, the electricity costs using the dynamic programming method are 17% and 9% lower than those of the heat pump priority and thermal storage priority methods, respectively. The region control method shows results similar to the dynamic programming method with respect to electricity costs. In conclusion, advanced control methods are proven to have advantages over conventional methods in terms of power consumption and electricity costs.

  3. Technical and economic aspects of operation of thermal and hydro power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakken, Bjoern Harald

    1997-12-31

    This thesis studies system operation and operational costs of primary and secondary control in hydro and thermal power systems. The cost of providing primary control reserves in thermal power systems is estimated to 1-3% of total production cost. Hydro power units, on the other hand, provide a very cheap primary reserve compared to thermal units. The HVDC (High Voltage Direct Current) connection can be used for primary control in either direction but the thesis only considers substitution of reserves in the thermal system with reserves from the hydro system. Since the HVDC connection is easy to control, the transient characteristics are considerably improved, and one can substitute an amount of thermal spinning reserve corresponding to the available HVDC capacity with little disturbance in any system. A more realistic alternative, at present, is to sell secondary control reserves across the HVDC connections. Keeping spinning reserve for automatic secondary control in a thermal power system is estimated to cost 3-5% of total production cost. Secondary control reserves probably cannot compete with the value of the peak load export, but one should seriously consider using part of the HVDC capacity as secondary control reserve for the thermal system during off-peak hours with. The author discusses the concept of automatic secondary control both theoretically and by simulations and finds that there are no special technical difficulties in introducing automatic secondary control in the Nordel (an organization for Nordic power cooperation) system. 78 refs., 4 figs., 23 tabs.

  4. Technical and economic aspects of operation of thermal and hydro power systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bakken, Bjoern Harald

    1998-12-31

    This thesis studies system operation and operational costs of primary and secondary control in hydro and thermal power systems. The cost of providing primary control reserves in thermal power systems is estimated to 1-3% of total production cost. Hydro power units, on the other hand, provide a very cheap primary reserve compared to thermal units. The HVDC (High Voltage Direct Current) connection can be used for primary control in either direction but the thesis only considers substitution of reserves in the thermal system with reserves from the hydro system. Since the HVDC connection is easy to control, the transient characteristics are considerably improved, and one can substitute an amount of thermal spinning reserve corresponding to the available HVDC capacity with little disturbance in any system. A more realistic alternative, at present, is to sell secondary control reserves across the HVDC connections. Keeping spinning reserve for automatic secondary control in a thermal power system is estimated to cost 3-5% of total production cost. Secondary control reserves probably cannot compete with the value of the peak load export, but one should seriously consider using part of the HVDC capacity as secondary control reserve for the thermal system during off-peak hours with. The author discusses the concept of automatic secondary control both theoretically and by simulations and finds that there are no special technical difficulties in introducing automatic secondary control in the Nordel (an organization for Nordic power cooperation) system. 78 refs., 4 figs., 23 tabs.

  5. Technical and economic aspects of operation of thermal and hydro power systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, Bjoern Harald.

    1997-01-01

    This thesis studies system operation and operational costs of primary and secondary control in hydro and thermal power systems. The cost of providing primary control reserves in thermal power systems is estimated to 1-3% of total production cost. Hydro power units, on the other hand, provide a very cheap primary reserve compared to thermal units. The HVDC (High Voltage Direct Current) connection can be used for primary control in either direction but the thesis only considers substitution of reserves in the thermal system with reserves from the hydro system. Since the HVDC connection is easy to control, the transient characteristics are considerably improved, and one can substitute an amount of thermal spinning reserve corresponding to the available HVDC capacity with little disturbance in any system. A more realistic alternative, at present, is to sell secondary control reserves across the HVDC connections. Keeping spinning reserve for automatic secondary control in a thermal power system is estimated to cost 3-5% of total production cost. Secondary control reserves probably cannot compete with the value of the peak load export, but one should seriously consider using part of the HVDC capacity as secondary control reserve for the thermal system during off-peak hours with. The author discusses the concept of automatic secondary control both theoretically and by simulations and finds that there are no special technical difficulties in introducing automatic secondary control in the Nordel (an organization for Nordic power cooperation) system. 78 refs., 4 figs., 23 tabs

  6. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    More than 100 papers were presented. The meeting was divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling.

  7. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    More than 100 papers were presented. The meeting was divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling

  8. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-07-01

    More than 100 papers presented at the meeting were divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling.

  9. Proceedings of the fourth international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    More than 100 papers presented at the meeting were divided in 56 sessions and covered the following topics: Plant Operation, Retrofitting and Maintenance Experience; Steam Generator Operation and Maintenance; Artificial Intelligence and Expert Systems; Seismic Technologies for Plant Design and Operations; Aging Management and Life Extension; Two-Phase Flow Modeling and Applications; Severe Accidents and Degraded Core Thermal Hydraulics; Plant Simulators, Analyzers, and Workstations; Advanced Nuclear Fuel Challenges; Recent Nuclear Power Station Decommissioning Experiences in the USA; Application of Probabilistic risk assessment/Probabilistic safety assessment (PRA/PSA) in Design and Modification; Numerical Modeling in Thermal Hydraulics; General Thermal Hydraulics; Severe Accident Management; Licensing and Regulatory Requirements; Advanced Light Water Reactor Designs to Support Reduced Emergency Planning; Best Estimate loss-of-coolant (LOCA) Methodologies; Plant Instrumentation and Control; LWR Fuel Designs for Improved Thermal Hydraulic Performance; Performance Assessment of Radioactive Waste Disposal; Thermal Hydraulics in Passive Reactor Systems; Advances in Man-Machine Interface Design and the Related Human Factors Engineering; Advances in Measurements and Instrumentation; Computer Aided Technology for non-destructive evaluation (NDE) and Plant Maintenance Plant Uprating; Flow-Accelerated Corrosion in Nuclear Power Plants; Advances in Radiological Measurement and Analysis Risk Management and Assessment; Stability in Thermal Hydraulic Systems; Critical heat flux (CHF) and Post Dryout Heat Transfer; Plant Transient and Accident Modeling

  10. Shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Kawai, Masayoshi; Nakazawa, Masaharu.

    1978-09-01

    Shielding benchmark problems were prepared by the Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Comittee on Shielding Design of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan, and compiled by the Shielding Laboratory of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Twenty-one kinds of shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm and the accuracy of computer codes based on the discrete ordinates method and the Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in the codes. (author)

  11. Experimental results of thermally controlled superconducting switches for high frequency operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, G.B.J.; IerAvest, D.; Tenkate, H.H.J.; Krooshoop, H.J.G.; Van de Klundert, L.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this study is to develop thermally controlled switches which are to be used in superconducting rectifiers operating at a few hertz and 1 kA. Usually, the operating frequency of thermally controlled rectifiers is limited to about 0.1 Hz due to the thermal recovery times of the switches. The thermal switches have to satisfy two conditions which are specific for the application in a superconducting rectifier: a) they have to operate in the repetitive mode so beside short activation times, fast recovery times of the switches are equally important, b) the power required to effect and maintain the normal state of the switches should be low since it will determine the rectifier efficiency. To what extent these obviously conflicting demands can be satisfied depends on the material and geometry of the switch. This paper presents a theoretical model of the thermal behaviour of a switch. The calculations are compared with experimental results of several switches having recovery times between 40 and 200 ms. Also, the feasibility of such switches for application in superconducting rectifiers operating at a few hertz with an acceptable efficiency is demonstrated

  12. Operation management of thermal power plant. Karyoku plant no unten kanri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-06-15

    Nowadays, thermal power plants are getting bigger and bigger in capacity. At the same time, high reliability to the frequent start and stop due to the demand change as well as effective economy. This paper describes the total operation management system. It included the start and stop, normal operation, specified operation, water quality, operation management involving the environmental problems, protection of machinery and equipment in case of emergency, measures against the failure, and the measures against the disaster. The outline of the normal operation is as follows: from the cost economical point of view, the kind of fuel is changed according to the load; i.e., coal for basic operation, LNG for basic to medium operation, and oil for medium to peak operation. The change in demand cannot be followed by the hydroelectric power. The adjustment of the power depending on the load change can be achieved by the thermal power generation. The automatic frequency control, economical load distribution control are also done. In the nighttime, the minimum load operation is required. The voltage change operation below the rated value or the phase-advancing operation is also done depending on the load conditions. 21 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Radiation dose reduction by water shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeb, J.; Arshed, W.; Ahmad, S.S.

    2007-06-01

    This report is an operational manual of shielding software W-Shielder, developed at Health Physics Division (HPD), Pakistan Institute of Nuclear Science and Technology (PINSTECH), Pakistan Atomic Energy Commission. The software estimates shielding thickness for photons having their energy in the range 0.5 to 10 MeV. To compute the shield thickness, self absorption in the source has been neglected and the source has been assumed as a point source. Water is used as a shielding material in this software. The software is helpful in estimating the water thickness for safe handling, storage of gamma emitting radionuclide. (author)

  14. Evaluation of thermal performance of all-GaN power module in parallel operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chou, Po-Chien; Cheng, Stone; Chen, Szu-Hao

    2014-01-01

    This work presents an extensive thermal characterization of a single discrete GaN high-electron-mobility transistor (HEMT) device when operated in parallel at temperatures of 25 °C–175 °C. The maximum drain current (I D max ), on-resistance (R ON ), pinch-off voltage (V P ) and peak transconductance (g m ) at various chamber temperatures are measured and correlations among these parameters studied. Understanding the dependence of key transistor parameters on temperature is crucial to inhibiting the generation of hot spots and the equalization of currents in the parallel operation of HEMTs. A detailed analysis of the current imbalance between two parallel HEMT cells and its consequential effect on the junction temperature are also presented. The results from variations in the characteristics of the parallel-connected devices further verify that the thermal stability and switching behavior of these cells are balanced. Two parallel HEMT cells are operated at a safe working distance from thermal runaway to prevent destruction of the hottest cell. - Highlights: • This work reveals the sorting process of GaN devices for parallel operation. • The variations of I D max , R ON , V P , and g m with temperature are established. • The temperature-dependence parameters are crucial to prevent hot spots generation. • Safe working operation prevents thermal runaway and hottest cell destruction

  15. Stochastic optimization of energy hub operation with consideration of thermal energy market and demand response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vahid-Pakdel, M.J.; Nojavan, Sayyad; Mohammadi-ivatloo, B.; Zare, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Studying heating market impact on energy hub operation considering price uncertainty. • Investigating impact of implementation of heat demand response on hub operation. • Presenting stochastic method to consider wind generation and prices uncertainties. - Abstract: Multi carrier energy systems or energy hubs has provided more flexibility for energy management systems. On the other hand, due to mutual impact of different energy carriers in energy hubs, energy management studies become more challengeable. The initial patterns of energy demands from grids point of view can be modified by optimal scheduling of energy hubs. In this work, optimal operation of multi carrier energy system has been studied in the presence of wind farm, electrical and thermal storage systems, electrical and thermal demand response programs, electricity market and thermal energy market. Stochastic programming is implemented for modeling the system uncertainties such as demands, market prices and wind speed. It is shown that adding new source of heat energy for providing demand of consumers with market mechanism changes the optimal operation point of multi carrier energy system. Presented mixed integer linear formulation for the problem has been solved by executing CPLEX solver of GAMS optimization software. Simulation results shows that hub’s operation cost reduces up to 4.8% by enabling the option of using thermal energy market for meeting heat demand.

  16. A coupled nuclear reactor thermal energy storage system for enhanced load following operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alameri, Saeed A.; King, Jeffrey C.

    2013-01-01

    Nuclear power plants operate most economically at a constant power level, providing base load electric power. In an energy grid containing a high fraction of renewable power sources, nuclear reactors may be subject to significantly variable power demands. These variable power demands can negatively impact the effective capacity factor of the reactor and result in severe economic penalties. Coupling a nuclear reactor to a large thermal energy storage block will allow the reactor to better respond to variable power demands. In the system described in this paper, a Prismatic core Advanced High Temperature Reactor supplies constant power to a lithium chloride molten salt thermal energy storage block that provides thermal power as needed to a closed Brayton cycle energy conversion system. During normal operation, the thermal energy storage block stores thermal energy during the night for use in the times of peak demand during the day. In this case, the nuclear reactor stays at a constant thermal power level. After a loss of forced circulation, the reactor reaches a shut down state in less than half an hour and the average fuel, graphite and coolant temperatures remain well within the design limits over the duration of the transient, demonstrating the inherent safety of the coupled system. (author)

  17. 9 CFR 381.304 - Operations in the thermal processing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Canning and Canned... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Operations in the thermal processing area. 381.304 Section 381.304 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE...

  18. 9 CFR 318.304 - Operations in the thermal processing area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... area. 318.304 Section 318.304 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION... PREPARATION OF PRODUCTS Canning and Canned Products § 318.304 Operations in the thermal processing area. (a...

  19. Actinide data in the thermal energy range - International Evaluation Co-operation Volume 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tellier, Henri; Weigmann, H.; Sowerby, M.; Mattes, Margarete; Matsunobu, Hiroyuki; Tsuchihashi, Keichiro; Halsall, M.J.; Weston, L.; Deruytter, A.J.

    1994-01-01

    A Working Party on International Evaluation Co-operation was established under the sponsorship of the OECD/NEA Nuclear Science Committee (NSC) to promote the exchange of information on nuclear data evaluations, validation, and related topics. Its aim is also to provide a framework for co-operative activities between members of the major nuclear data evaluation projects. This includes the possible exchange of scientists in order to encourage co-operation. Requirements for experimental data resulting from this activity are compiled. The Working Party determines common criteria for evaluated nuclear data files with a view to assessing and improving the quality and completeness of evaluated data. The Parties to the project are: ENDF (United States), JEFF/EFF (NEA Data Bank Member countries), and JENDL (Japan). Co-operation with evaluation projects of non-OECD countries are organised through the Nuclear Data Section of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). This report was issued by a Subgroup investigating actinide data in the thermal energy range. Thermal nuclear constants for the primary actinides have been extensively studies, but the most recent evaluations are not in full agreement with thermal reactor calculations. The objective of the Subgroup was to identify the origin of these differences and to reassess the recent evaluations. A considerable effort was devoted to the η of U-235, where analysis of lattice temperature coefficient measurements has suggested an energy dependent shape below thermal energy

  20. SWIFT BAT Loop Heat Pipe Thermal System Characteristics and Ground/Flight Operation Procedure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2003-01-01

    The SWIFT Burst Alert Telescope (BAT) Detector Array has a total power dissipation of 208 W. To meet the stringent temperature gradient and thermal stability requirements in the normal operational mode, and heater power budget in both the normal operational and safehold modes, the Detector Array is thermally well coupled to eight constant conductance heat pipes (CCHPs) embedded in the Detector Array Plate (DAP), and two loop heat pipes (LHPs) transport heat fiom the CCHPs to a radiator. The CCHPs have ammonia as the working fluid and the LHPs have propylene as the working fluid. Precision heater controllers, which have adjustable set points in flight, are used to control the LHP compensation chamber and Detector Array XA1 ASIC temperatures. The radiator has the AZ-Tek AZW-LA-II low-alpha white paint as the thermal coating and is located on the anti-sun side of the spacecraft. This paper presents the characteristics, ground operation and flight operation procedures of the LHP thermal system.

  1. Operation of heat pumps for smart grid integrated buildings with thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Finck, C.J.; Li, R.; Zeiler, W.

    2017-01-01

    A small scale office building consisting of radiant heating, a heat pump, and a water thermal energy storage tank is implemented in an optimal control framework. The optimal control aims to minimize operational electricity costs of the heat pump based on real-time power spot market prices. Optimal

  2. Evaluation of Neutron shielding efficiency of Metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Sang Hwan; Chae, San; Kim, Yong Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Neutron shielding is achieved of interaction with material by moderation and absorption. Material that contains large amounts hydrogen atoms which are almost same neutron atomic weight is suited for fast neutron shielding material. Therefore, polymers containing high density hydrogen atom are being used for fast neutron shielding. On the other hand, composite materials containing high thermal neutron absorption cross section atom (Li, B, etc) are being used for thermal neutron shielding. However, these materials have low fast neutron absorption cross section. Therefore, these materials are not suited for fast neutron shielding. Hydrogen which has outstanding neutron energy reduction ability has very low thermal neutron absorption cross section, almost cannot be used for thermal neutron shielding. In this case, a large atomic number material (Pb, U, etc.) has been used. Thus, metal hydrides are considered as complement to concrete shielding material. Because metal hydrides contain high hydrogen density and elements with high atomic number. In this research neutron shielding performance and characteristic of nuclear about metal hydrides ((TiH{sub 2}, ZrH{sub 2}, HfH{sub 2}) is evaluated by experiment and MCNPX using {sup 252}Cf neutron source as purpose development shielding material to developed shielding material

  3. Comparative analysis on operation strategies of CCHP system with cool thermal storage for a data center

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Xu; Liu, Liuchen; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Tao; Wu, Zhu

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Load characteristics of the data center make a good match with CCHP systems. • TRNSYS models was used to simulate the discussed CCHP system in a data center. • Comprehensive system performance under two operation strategies were evaluated. • Cool thermal storage was introduced to reuse the energy surplus by FEL system. • The suitable principle of equipment selection for a FEL system were proposed. - Abstract: Combined Cooling, Heating, and Power (CCHP) systems with cool thermal storage can provide an appropriate energy supply for data centers. In this work, we evaluate the CCHP system performance under two different operation strategies, i.e., following thermal load (FTL) and following electric load (FEL). The evaluation is performed through a case study by using TRNSYS software. In the FEL system, the amount of cool thermal energy generated by the absorption chillers is larger than the cooling load and it can be therefore stored and reused at the off-peak times. Results indicate that systems under both operation strategies have advantages in the fields of energy saving and environmental protection. The largest percentage of reduction of primary energy consumption, CO_2 emissions, and operation cost for the FEL system, are 18.5%, 37.4% and 46.5%, respectively. Besides, the system performance is closely dependent on the equipment selection. The relation between the amount of energy recovered through cool thermal storage and the primary energy consumption has also been taken into account. Moreover, the introduction of cool thermal storage can adjust the heat to power ratio on the energy supply side close to that on the consumer side and consequently promote system flexibility and energy efficiency.

  4. Modeling of District Heating Networks for the Purpose of Operational Optimization with Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leśko, Michał; Bujalski, Wojciech

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this document is to present the topic of modeling district heating systems in order to enable optimization of their operation, with special focus on thermal energy storage in the pipelines. Two mathematical models for simulation of transient behavior of district heating networks have been described, and their results have been compared in a case study. The operational optimization in a DH system, especially if this system is supplied from a combined heat and power plant, is a difficult and complicated task. Finding a global financial optimum requires considering long periods of time and including thermal energy storage possibilities into consideration. One of the most interesting options for thermal energy storage is utilization of thermal inertia of the network itself. This approach requires no additional investment, while providing significant possibilities for heat load shifting. It is not feasible to use full topological models of the networks, comprising thousands of substations and network sections, for the purpose of operational optimization with thermal energy storage, because such models require long calculation times. In order to optimize planned thermal energy storage actions, it is necessary to model the transient behavior of the network in a very simple way - allowing for fast and reliable calculations. Two approaches to building such models have been presented. Both have been tested by comparing the results of simulation of the behavior of the same network. The characteristic features, advantages and disadvantages of both kinds of models have been identified. The results can prove useful for district heating system operators in the near future.

  5. Proceedings of the 10. Meeting on Reactor Physics and Thermal Hydraulics; Anais do 10. Encontro de Fisica de Reatores e Termo-Hidraulica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos Bastos, W. dos

    1995-12-31

    These proceedings presents all the Meeting papers emphasizing specific aspects on reactor physics method, criticality, fuel management, nuclear data, safety analysis, simulation and shielding, neutronics, thermal hydraulics, reactor operation and computational methods.

  6. ITER shielding blanket

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strebkov, Yu [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Avsjannikov, A [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Baryshev, M [NIAT, Moscow (Russian Federation); Blinov, Yu [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Shatalov, G [KIAE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vasiliev, N [KIAE, Moscow (Russian Federation); Vinnikov, A [ENTEK, Moscow (Russian Federation); Chernjagin, A [DYNAMICA, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    A reference non-breeding blanket is under development now for the ITER Basic Performance Phase for the purpose of high reliability during the first stage of ITER operation. More severe operation modes are expected in this stage with first wall (FW) local heat loads up to 100-300Wcm{sup -2}. Integration of a blanket design with protective and start limiters requires new solutions to achieve high reliability, and possible use of beryllium as a protective material leads to technologies. The rigid shielding blanket concept was developed in Russia to satisfy the above-mentioned requirements. The concept is based on a copper alloy FW, austenitic stainless steel blanket structure, water cooling. Beryllium protection is integrated in the FW design. Fabrication technology and assembly procedure are described in parallel with the equipment used. (orig.).

  7. Handout on shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilbron Filho, P.F.L.

    1991-01-01

    In order to avoid the difficulties of the radioprotection supervisors in the tasks related to shielding calculations, is presented in this paper the basic concepts of shielding theory. It also includes exercises and examples. (author)

  8. Operating cost guidelines for benchmarking DOE thermal treatment systems for low-level mixed waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salmon, R.; Loghry, S.L.; Hermes, W.H.

    1994-11-01

    This report presents guidelines for estimating operating costs for use in benchmarking US Department of Energy (DOE) low-level mixed waste thermal treatment systems. The guidelines are based on operating cost experience at the DOE Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) mixed waste incinerator at the K-25 Site at Oak Ridge. In presenting these guidelines, it should be made clear at the outset that it is not the intention of this report to present operating cost estimates for new technologies, but only guidelines for estimating such costs

  9. Problems of the power plant shield optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abagyan, A.A.; Dubinin, A.A.; Zhuravlev, V.I.; Kurachenko, Yu.A.; Petrov, Eh.E.

    1981-01-01

    General approaches to the solution of problems on the nuclear power plant radiation shield optimization are considered. The requirements to the shield parameters are formulated in a form of restrictions on a number of functionals, determined by the solution of γ quantum and neutron transport equations or dimensional and weight characteristics of shield components. Functional determined by weight-dimensional parameters (shield cost, mass and thickness) and functionals, determined by radiation fields (equivalent dose rate, produced by neutrons and γ quanta, activation functional, radiation functional, heat flux, integral heat flux in a particular part of the shield volume, total energy flux through a particular shield surface are considered. The following methods of numerical solution of simplified optimization problems are discussed: semiempirical methods using radiation transport physical leaks, numerical solution of approximate transport equations, numerical solution of transport equations for the simplest configurations making possible to decrease essentially a number of variables in the problem. The conclusion is drawn that the attained level of investigations on the problem of nuclear power plant shield optimization gives the possibility to pass on at present to the solution of problems with a more detailed account of the real shield operating conditions (shield temperature field account, its strength and other characteristics) [ru

  10. Hot Cell Window Shielding Analysis Using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pope, Chad L.; Scates, Wade W.; Taylor, J. Todd

    2009-01-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory Materials and Fuels Complex nuclear facilities are undergoing a documented safety analysis upgrade. In conjunction with the upgrade effort, shielding analysis of the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) hot cell windows has been conducted. This paper describes the shielding analysis methodology. Each 4-ft thick window uses nine glass slabs, an oil film between the slabs, numerous steel plates, and packed lead wool. Operations in the hot cell center on used nuclear fuel (UNF) processing. Prior to the shielding analysis, shield testing with a gamma ray source was conducted, and the windows were found to be very effective gamma shields. Despite these results, because the glass contained significant amounts of lead and little neutron absorbing material, some doubt lingered regarding the effectiveness of the windows in neutron shielding situations, such as during an accidental criticality. MCNP was selected as an analysis tool because it could model complicated geometry, and it could track gamma and neutron radiation. A bounding criticality source was developed based on the composition of the UNF. Additionally, a bounding gamma source was developed based on the fission product content of the UNF. Modeling the windows required field inspections and detailed examination of drawings and material specifications. Consistent with the shield testing results, MCNP results demonstrated that the shielding was very effective with respect to gamma radiation, and in addition, the analysis demonstrated that the shielding was also very effective during an accidental criticality.

  11. Design of emergency shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacturing of an emergency movable shield in the hot laboratories center is urgently needed for the safety of personnel in case of accidents or spilling of radioactive materials. In this report, a full design for an emergency shield is presented and the corresponding dose rates behind the shield for different activities (from 1 mCi to 5 Ci) was calculated by using micro shield computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab

  12. N Reactor thermal plume characterization during Pu-only mode of operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, R.M.; Thompson, F.L.; Whelan, G.

    1983-04-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratories (PNL) performed field and modeling studies -from March 1982 through June 1983 to characterize the thermal plume from the N Reactor heated water outfall while the N Reactor operated in the Pu-only mode. Part 1 of this report deals with the field studies conducted to characterize the N Reactor thermal plume while in the Pu-only mode of operation. It includes a description of the study area, a description of field tasks and procedures, and data collection results and discussion. Part 2 describes the computer simulation of the thermal plume under different flow conditions and the calibration of the model used. It includes a description of the computer model and the assumptions on which it is based, a presentation of the input data used in this application, and a discussion of modeling results. Because the field studies were restricted by the NPOES permit variance to the spring months when high Columbia River flows prevail the mathematical modeling of the N Reactor thermal plume while the reactor operates in the Pu-only mode is instrumental in characterizing the plume during low Columbia River flows.

  13. RF-driven tokamak reactor with sub-ignited, thermally stable operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harten, L.P.; Bers, A.; Fuchs, V.; Shoucri, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    A Radio-Frequency Driven Tokamak Reactor (RFDTR) can use RF-power, programmed by a delayed temperature measurement, to thermally stabilize a power equilibrium below ignition, and to drive a steady state current. We propose the parameters for such a device generating approx. = 1600 MW thermal power and operating with Q approx. = 40 (= power out/power in). A one temperature zero-dimensional model allows simple analytical formulation of the problem. The relevance of injected impurities for locating the equilibrium is discussed. We present the results of a one-dimensional (radial) code which includes the deposition of the supplementary power, and compare with our zero-dimensional model

  14. Electromagnetically shielded building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, T.; Nakamura, M.; Yabana, Y.; Ishikawa, T.; Nagata, K.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs

  15. Electromagnetically shielded building

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, T; Nakamura, M; Yabana, Y; Ishikawa, T; Nagata, K

    1992-04-21

    This invention relates to a building having an electromagnetic shield structure well-suited for application to an information network system utilizing electromagnetic waves, and more particularly to an electromagnetically shielded building for enhancing the electromagnetic shielding performance of an external wall. 6 figs.

  16. Protection of the skin against occupational and operational ultraviolet and thermal radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiskemann, A.

    1980-01-01

    When irradiation with short wave ultraviolet (UVB) exceed the threshold doses, the eye as well as the skin react with an acute inflammation. After chronic exposure to both radiations the skin is altered as a farmers skin. Thermal visible and infrared radiation may produce a local combustion or a livedo or a general hyperthermia. Many possibilities of an occupational exposition to natural or artificial optical radiation are listed. Until now no exposure limits have been recommended in the Federal Republic of Germany. The biologic effective radiant exposure can be calculated from the spectral distribution of the irradiance. The resulting value should be clearly lower than the threshold doses for the UV-keratoconjunctivitis and for the UV-erythema of the skin. Artificial light sources have to be closed exept the useful radiation beam. When this is impossible and in case of natural radiation, the skin must be shielded by clothing and/or by sunscreen preparations. Photosensitizers as tar products have to be kept away from the skin. (orig.) 891 MG/orig. 892 HIS [de

  17. Normalization of shielding structure quality and the method of its studying

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, Ya.A.; Lavdanskij, P.A.

    1987-01-01

    Method for evaluation of nuclear facility radiation shield quality is suggested. Indexes of shielding structure radiation efficiency and face efficiency are used as the shielding structure quality indexes. The first index is connected with radiation dose rate during personnel irradiation behind the shield, and the second one - with the stresses in shielding structure introduction of the indexes presented allows to evaluate objectively the quality of nuclear facility shielding structure quality design construction and operation and to economize labour and material resources

  18. Technical specifications for the bulk shielding reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-05-01

    This report provides information concerning the technical specifications for the Bulk Shielding Reactor. Areas covered include: safety limits and limiting safety settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and monitoring of airborne effluents. 10 refs

  19. Operation and maintenance of thermal power stations best practices and health monitoring

    CERN Document Server

    Chanda, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    This book illustrates operation and maintenance practices/guidelines for economic generation and managing health of a thermal power generator beyond its regulatory life. The book provides knowledge for professionals managing power station operations, through its unique approach to chemical analysis of water, steam, oil etc. to identify malfunctioning/defects in equipment/systems much before the physical manifestation of the problem. The book also contains a detailed procedure for conducting performance evaluation tests on different equipment, and for analyzing test results for predicting maintenance requirements, which has lent a new dimension to power systems operation and maintenance practices. A number of real life case studies also enrich the book. This book will prove particularly useful to power systems operations professionals in the developing economies, and also to researchers and students involved in studying power systems operations and control. .

  20. Operational features and air plasma characteristics of a thermal plasma torch with hollow electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hur, Min; Kim, Keun Su; Hong, Sang Hee

    2003-01-01

    The operational features and thermal plasma characteristics of a plasma torch with hollow electrodes are investigated based on their dependence on input current, gas flow rate and electrode diameter when air is used as a plasma gas. A plasma torch with a hollow cathode and anode has been designed and fabricated, and the arc voltages and thermal efficiencies are measured from its discharge. The newly modified similarity criteria are derived from the measured data related to torch performances. From the fact that these criteria successfully describe both the arc voltage and thermal efficiency behaviour of the torch, depending on its operating and geometrical parameters, it is proved that they can be usefully applied to the design and operation of high power torches. For the numerical modelling of the interior region of the torch, a cold flow analysis is employed along with a simplified balance equation of the Lorentz and gas dynamic drag forces in order to determine a cathode spot position on the cathode surface. The validity of this method is confirmed by comparison of the calculated and measured net powers. As a practically useful result of this analysis, carried out through this numerical and experimental work, it is suggested that low input current, high gas flow rate and relatively large electrode diameter are more favourable as appropriate operating conditions of the torch for the efficient treatment of hazardous organic wastes

  1. Dynamic thermal reaction analysis of wall structures in various cooling operation conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan, Biao; Long, Enshen; Meng, Xi

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Four different envelop structures are separately built in the same test building. • Cooling temperature and operation time were chosen as perturbations. • State Space Method is used to analyze the influence of wall sequence order. • The numerical models are validated by the comparisons of theory and test results. • The contrast of temperature change of different envelop structures was stark. - Abstract: This paper proposes a methodology of performance assessing of envelops under different cooling operation conditions, by focusing on indoor temperature change and dynamic thermal behavior performance of walls. To obtain a general relationship between the thermal environment change and the reaction of envelop, variously insulated walls made with the same insulation material are separately built in the same wall of a testing building with the four different structures, namely self-heat insulation (full insulation material), exterior insulation, internal insulation and intermediate insulation. The advantage of this setting is that the test targets are exposed to the same environmental variables, and the tests results are thus comparable. The target responses to two types of perturbations, cooling temperature and operation time were chosen as the important variations in the tests. Parameters of cooling set temperature of 22 °C and 18 °C, operation and restoring time 10 min and 15 min are set in the test models, and discussed with simulation results respectively. The results reveal that the exterior insulation and internal insulation are more sensitive to thermal environment change than self-heat insulation and intermediate insulation.

  2. Thermo-active building systems and sound absorbers: Thermal comfort under real operation conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Benjamin; Rage, Nils; Chigot, Pierre

    2018-01-01

    Radiant systems are established today and have a high ecological potential in buildings while ensuring thermal comfort. Free-hanging sound absorbers are commonly used for room acoustic control, but can reduce the heat exchange when suspended under an active slab. The aim of this study...... is to evaluate the impact on thermal comfort of horizontal and vertical free-hanging porous sound absorbers placed in rooms of a building cooled by Thermo-Active Building System (TABS), under real operation conditions. A design comparing five different ceiling coverage ratios and two room types has been...... implemented during three measurement periods. A clear correlation between increase of ceiling coverage ratio and reduction of thermal comfort could not be derived systematically for each measurement period and room type, contrarily to what was expected from literature. In the first two monitoring periods...

  3. Electromagnetic shielding formulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dahlberg, E.

    1979-02-01

    This addendum to an earlier collection of electromagnetic shielding formulae (TRITA-EPP-75-27) contains simple transfer matrices suitable for calculating the quasistatic shielding efficiency for multiple transverse-field and axial-field cylindrical and spherical shields, as well as for estimating leakage fields from long coaxial cables and the normal-incidence transmission of a plane wave through a multiple plane shield. The differences and similarities between these cases are illustrated by means of equivalent circuits and transmission line analogies. The addendum also includes a discussion of a possible heuristic improvement of some shielding formulae. (author)

  4. Shielding benchmark problems, (2)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Shun-ichi; Sasamoto, Nobuo; Oka, Yoshiaki; Shin, Kazuo; Tada, Keiko.

    1980-02-01

    Shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Assessment of Shielding Experiments in the Research Committee on Shielding Design in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Shielding Laboratory in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. Fourteen shielding benchmark problems are presented newly in addition to twenty-one problems proposed already, for evaluating the calculational algorithm and accuracy of computer codes based on discrete ordinates method and Monte Carlo method and for evaluating the nuclear data used in codes. The present benchmark problems are principally for investigating the backscattering and the streaming of neutrons and gamma rays in two- and three-dimensional configurations. (author)

  5. The Active Muon Shield

    CERN Document Server

    Bezshyiko, Iaroslava

    2016-01-01

    In the SHiP beam-dump of the order of 1011 muons will be produced per second. An active muon-shield is used to magnetically deflect these muons out of the acceptance of the spectrom- eter. This note describes how this shield is modelled and optimized. The SHiP spectrometer is being re-optimized using a conical decay-vessel, and utilizing the possibility to magnetize part of the beam-dump shielding iron. A shield adapted to these new conditions is presented which is significantly shorter and lighter than the shield used in the Technical Proposal (TP), while showing a similar performance.

  6. ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azizul Khakim

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK ANALISIS KESELAMATAN TERMOHIDROLIK BULK SHIELDING REAKTOR KARTINI. Bulk shielding merupakan fasilitas yang terintegrasi dengan reaktor Kartini yang berfungsi sebagai penyimpanan sementara bahan bakar bekas. Fasilitas ini merupakan fasilitas yang termasuk dalam struktur, sistem dan komponen (SSK yang penting bagi keselamatan. Salah satu fungsi keselamatan dari sistem penanganan dan penyimpanan bahan bakar adalah mencegah kecelakaan kekritisan yang tak terkendali dan membatasi naiknya temperatur bahan bakar. Analisis keselamatan paling kurang harus mencakup analisis keselamatan dari sisi neutronik dan termo hidrolik Bulk shielding. Analisis termo hidrolik ditujukan untuk memastikan perpindahan panas dan proses pendinginan bahan bakar bekas berjalan baik dan tidak terjadi akumulasi panas yang mengancam integritas bahan bakar. Code tervalidasi PARET/ANL digunakan untuk analisis pendinginan dengan mode konveksi alam. Hasil perhitungan menunjukkan bahwa mode pendinginan konvekasi alam cukup memadai dalam mendinginkan panas sisa tanpa mengakibatkan kenaikan temperatur bahan bakar yang signifikan. Kata kunci: Bulk shielding, bahan bakar bekas, konveksi alam, PARET.   ABSTRACT THERMAL HYDRAULIC SAFETY ANALYSIS OF BULK SHIELDING KARTINI REACTOR. Bulk shielding is an integrated facility to Kartini reactor which is used for temporary spent fuels storage. The facility is one of the structures, systems and components (SSCs important to safety. Among the safety functions of fuel handling and storage are to prevent any uncontrolable criticality accidents and to limit the fuel temperature increase. Safety analyses should, at least, cover neutronic and thermal hydraulic calculations of the bulk shielding. Thermal hydraulic analyses were intended to ensure that heat removal and the process of the spent fuels cooling takes place adequately and no heat accumulation that challenges the fuel integrity. Validated code, PARET/ANL was used for analysing the

  7. Elrotherm shielding systems. New pioneering material composites; Elrotherm-Abschirmsysteme. Neue Zukunftsweisende Materialkompositionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zika-Beyerlein, B [ElringKlinger (Germany). Geschaeftsbereich Abschirmtechnik

    2004-09-01

    Tightly packed engine compartments put special demands on thermal and acoustic shielding systems. With new material composites allowing for particularly thin-walled and light shielding parts, ElringKlinger is well equipped for the future. (orig.)

  8. Improving the shielding effectiveness of a board-level shield by bonding it with the waveguide-below-cutoff principle

    OpenAIRE

    Degraeve, Andy; Pissoort, Davy; Armstrong, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This paper discusses the shielding performance or shielding effectiveness of a board-level shield in function of its bonding method. Improved shielding performance at board-level in order to harden integrated circuits against unintentional and intentional electromagnetic interference, and this under harsh environmental conditions, is getting more and more important to achieve the desired levels of functional performance and operational reliability despite an ever more aggressive electromagnet...

  9. Thermal performance behavior of a domestic hot water solar storage tank during consumption operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dehghan, A.A.; Barzegar, A.

    2011-01-01

    Transient thermal performance behavior of a vertical storage tank of a domestic solar water heating system with a mantle heat exchanger has been investigated numerically in the discharge/consumption mode. It is assumed that the tank is initially stratified during its previous heat storing/charging operation. During the discharging period, the city cold water is fed at the bottom of the tank and hot water is extracted from its top outlet port for consumption. Meanwhile, the collector loop is assumed to be active. The conservation equations in the axis-symmetric cylindrical co-ordinate have been used and discretised by employing the finite volume method. The low Reynolds number (LRN) k - ω model is utilized for treating turbulence in the fluid. The influence of the tank Grashof number, the incoming cold fluid Reynolds number and the size of the inlet port of the heat storage tank on the transient thermal characteristics of the tank is investigated and discussed. It is found that for higher values of Grashof number, the pre-established thermal stratification is well preserved during the discharging operation mode. It is also noticed that in order to have a tank with a proper thermal performance and or have least mixing inside the tank during the consumption period, the tank inflow Reynolds number and or its inflow port diameter should be kept below certain values. In these cases, the storage tank is enabling to provide proper amount of hot water with a proper temperature for consumption purposes.

  10. Shielded Canister Transporter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eidem, G.G. Jr.; Fages, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Hanford Waste Vitrification Plant (HWVP) will produce canisters filled with high-level radioactive waste immobilized in borosilicate glass. This report discusses a Shielded Canister Transporter (SCT) which will provide the means for safe transportation and handling of the canisters from the Vitrification Building to the Canister Storage Building (CSB). The stainless steel canisters are 0.61 meters in diameter, 3.0 meters tall, and weigh approximately 2,135 kilograms, with a maximum exterior surface dose rate of 90,000 R/hr. The canisters are placed into storage tubes to a maximum of three tall (two for overpack canisters) with an impact limiter placed at the tube bottom and between each canister. A floor plug seals the top of the storage tube at the operating floor level of the CSB

  11. Repository Waste Package Transporter Shielding Weight Optimization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    C.E. Sanders; Shiaw-Der Su

    2005-01-01

    The Yucca Mountain repository requires the use of a waste package (WP) transporter to transport a WP from a process facility on the surface to the subsurface for underground emplacement. The transporter is a part of the waste emplacement transport systems, which includes a primary locomotive at the front end and a secondary locomotive at the rear end. The overall system with a WP on board weights over 350 metric tons (MT). With the shielding mass constituting approximately one-third of the total system weight, shielding optimization for minimal weight will benefit the overall transport system with reduced axle requirements and improved maneuverability. With a high contact dose rate on the WP external surface and minimal personnel shielding afforded by the WP, the transporter provides radiation shielding to workers during waste emplacement and retrieval operations. This paper presents the design approach and optimization method used in achieving a shielding configuration with minimal weight

  12. Operating experience feedback report -- Pressure locking and thermal binding of gate valves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, C.

    1993-03-01

    The potential for valve inoperability caused by pressure locking and thermal binding has been known for many years in the nuclear industry. Pressure locking or thermal binding is a common-mode failure mechanism that can prevent a gate valve from opening, and could render redundant trains of safety systems or multiple safety systems inoperable. In spite of numerous generic communications issued in the past by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and industry, pressure locking and thermal binding continues to occur to gate valves installed in safety-related systems of both boding water reactors (BWRs) and pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The generic communications to date have not led to effective industry action to fully identify, evaluate, and correct the problem. This report provides a review of operating events involving these failure mechanisms. As a result of this review this report: (1) identifies conditions when the failure mechanisms have occurred, (2) identifies the spectrum of safety systems that have been subjected to the failure mechanisms, and (3) identifies conditions that may introduce the failure mechanisms under both normal and accident conditions. On the basis of the evaluation of the operating events, the Office for Analysis and Evaluation of Operational Data (AEOD) of the NRC concludes that the binding problems with gate valves are an important safety issue that needs priority NRC and industry attention. This report also provides AEOD's recommendation for actions to effectively prevent the occurrence of valve binding failures

  13. A new method for evaluation and correction of thermal reactor power and present operational applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langenstein, M.; Streit, S.; Laipple, B.; Eitschberger, H.

    2005-01-01

    The determination of the thermal reactor power is traditionally be done by heat balance: 1) for a boiling water reactor (BWR) at the interface of reactor control volume and heat cycle. 2) for a pressurised-water reactor (PWR) at the interface of the steam generator control volume and turbine island on the secondary side. The uncertainty of these traditional methods is not easy to determine and can be in the range of several percent. Technical and legal regulations (e.g. 10CFR50) cover an estimated error of instrumentation up to 2% by increasing the design thermal reactor power for emergency analysis to 102 % of the licensed thermal reactor power. Basically the licensee has the duty to warrant at any time operation inside the analyzed region for thermal reactor power. This is normally done by keeping the indicated reactor power at the licensed 100% value. The better way is to use a method which allows a continuous warranty evaluation. The quantification of the level of fulfilment of this warranty is only achievable by a method which: 1) is independent of single measurements accuracies. 2) results in a certified quality of single process values and for the total heat cycle analysis. 3)leads to complete results including 2-sigma deviation especially for thermal reactor power. Here this method, which is called 'process data reconciliation based on VDI 2048 guideline', is presented [1, 2]. This method allows to determine the true process parameters with a statistical probability of 95%, by considering closed material, mass- and energy balances following the Gaussian correction principle. The amount of redundant process information and complexity of the process improves the final results. This represents the most probable state of the process with minimized uncertainty according to VDI 2048. Hence, calibration and control of the thermal reactor power are possible with low effort but high accuracy and independent of single measurement accuracies. Further more, VDI 2048

  14. New applications and developments in the neutron shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Fatma Aysun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shielding neutrons involve three steps that are slowing neutrons, absorption of neutrons, and impregnation of gamma rays. Neutrons slow down with thermal energy by hydrogen, water, paraffin, plastic. Hydrogenated materials are also very effective for the absorption of neutrons. Gamma rays are produced by neutron (radiation retention on the neutron shield, inelastic scattering, and degradation of activation products. If a source emits gamma rays at various energies, high-energy gamma rays sometimes specify shielding requirements. Multipurpose Materials for Neutron Shields; Concrete, especially with barium mixed in, can slow and absorb the neutrons, and shield the gamma rays. Plastic with boron is also a good multipurpose shielding material. In this study; new applications and developments in the area of neutron shielding will be discussed in terms of different materials.

  15. New applications and developments in the neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğur, Fatma Aysun

    2017-09-01

    Shielding neutrons involve three steps that are slowing neutrons, absorption of neutrons, and impregnation of gamma rays. Neutrons slow down with thermal energy by hydrogen, water, paraffin, plastic. Hydrogenated materials are also very effective for the absorption of neutrons. Gamma rays are produced by neutron (radiation) retention on the neutron shield, inelastic scattering, and degradation of activation products. If a source emits gamma rays at various energies, high-energy gamma rays sometimes specify shielding requirements. Multipurpose Materials for Neutron Shields; Concrete, especially with barium mixed in, can slow and absorb the neutrons, and shield the gamma rays. Plastic with boron is also a good multipurpose shielding material. In this study; new applications and developments in the area of neutron shielding will be discussed in terms of different materials.

  16. Final report of Shield System Trade Study. Volume II. WANL support activities for shielding trade study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-07-01

    Based on the trades made within this study BATH (mixture of B 4 C, aluminum and TiH 1 . 8 ) was selected as the internal shield material. Borated titanium hydride can also meet the criteria with a competitive weight but was rejected because of schedular constraints. A baseline internal shield design was accomplished. This design resulted in a single internal shield weighing about 3300 lb for both manned and unmanned missions. WANL checks on ANSC calculations are generally in agreement, but with some difference in the prediction of the effectiveness of the Boral liner. All of the alternate NSS concepts in the system weight reduction program were rejected. While some did save shield weight, they complicated the NSS design to an unacceptable degree. Studies were made of the feasibility of manual maintenance of NSS components outside of the pressure vessel. The requirements of the NSS components located forward of the internal shield were considered from a thermal and radiation damage standpoint. (auth)

  17. Using Large-Scale Cooperative Control to Manage Operational Uncertainties for Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaxa-Rozen, M.; Rostampour, V.; Kwakkel, J. H.; Bloemendal, M.

    2017-12-01

    Seasonal Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) technology can help reduce the demand of energy for heating and cooling in buildings, and has become a popular option for larger buildings in northern Europe. However, the larger-scale deployment of this technology has evidenced some issues of concern for policymakers; in particular, recent research shows that operational uncertainties contribute to inefficient outcomes under current planning methods for ATES. For instance, systems in the Netherlands typically use less than half of their permitted pumping volume on an annual basis. This overcapacity gives users more flexibility to operate their systems in response to the uncertainties which drive building energy demand; these include short-term operational factors such as weather and occupancy, and longer-term, deeply uncertain factors such as changes in climate and aquifer conditions over the lifespan of the buildings. However, as allocated subsurface volume remains unused, this situation limits the adoption of the technology in dense areas. Previous work using coupled agent-based/geohydrological simulation has shown that the cooperative operation of neighbouring ATES systems can support more efficient spatial planning, by dynamically managing thermal interactions in response to uncertain operating conditions. An idealized case study with centralized ATES control thus showed significant improvements in the energy savings which could obtained per unit of allocated subsurface volume, without degrading the recovery performance of systems. This work will extend this cooperative approach for a realistic case study of ATES planning in the city of Utrecht, in the Netherlands. This case was previously simulated under different scenarios for individual ATES operation. The poster will compare these results with a cooperative case under which neighbouring systems can coordinate their operation to manage interactions. Furthermore, a cooperative game-theoretical framework will be

  18. Development of neutron shielding material for cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najima, K.; Ohta, H.; Ishihara, N.; Matsuoka, T.; Kuri, S.; Ohsono, K.; Hode, S.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd (MHI) has established transport and storage cask design 'MSF series' which makes higher payload and reliability for long term storage. MSF series transport and storage cask uses new-developed neutron shielding material. This neutron shielding material has been developed for improving durability under high condition for long term. Since epoxy resin contains a lot of hydrogen and is comparatively resistant to heat, many casks employ epoxy base neutron shielding material. However, if the epoxy base neutron shielding material is used under high temperature condition for a long time, the material deteriorates and the moisture contained in it is released. The loss of moisture is in the range of several percents under more than 150 C. For this reason, our purpose was to develop a high durability epoxy base neutron shielding material which has the same self-fire-extinction property, high hydrogen content and so on as conventional. According to the long-time heating test, the weight loss of this new neutron shielding material after 5000 hours heating has been lower than 0.04% at 150 C and 0.35% at 170 C. A thermal test was also performed: a specimen of neutron shielding material covered with stainless steel was inserted in a furnace under condition of 800 C temperature for 30 minutes then was left to cool down in ambient conditions. The external view of the test piece shows that only a thin layer was carbonized

  19. Radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishima, Shigeru.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation shielding concretes comprise water, cement, fine aggregates consisting of serpentines and blown mist slags, coarse aggregates consisting of serpentines and kneading materials. Since serpentines containing a relatively great amount of water of crystallization in rocks as coarse aggregates and fine aggregates, the hydrogen content in the radiation shielding concretes is increased and the neutron shielding effect is improved. In addition, since serpentines are added as the fine aggregates and blown mists slags of a great specific gravity are used, the specific gravity of the shielding concretes is increased to improve the γ-ray shielding effect. Further, by the use of the kneading material having a water reducing effect and fluidizing effect, and by the bearing effect of the spherical blown mist slags used as the fine aggregates, concrete fluidity can be increased. Accordingly, workability of the radiation shielding concretes can be improved. (T.M.)

  20. Method of constructing shielding wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagao, Tetsuya.

    1990-01-01

    For instance, surfaces of lead particles each formed into a sphere of about 0.5 to 0.3 mm grain size are coated with a coating material of a synthetic resin comprising a polymeric material such as teflon. Subsequently, the floated lead particle are kneaded with concrete materials and then poured into a molding die by way of a hose. After coagulation, the molding die is removed to complete shielding walls in which lead particles are scattered substantially at an equal distance. In this way, since the lead particles are mixed into the shielding walls, shielding effects can be improved by so much as the lead particles are mixed, thereby enabling to reduce the thickness of the shielding walls. Further, since the lead particles are coated with the coating material, the lead particles are insulated from the concrete materials, thereby enabling to prevent the corrosion of the lead particles. Furthermore, since the lead particles and the concrete materials can be transported with ease, operation labors can be reduced. (T.M.)

  1. Research on transient thermal process of a friction brake during repetitive cycles of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavchev, Yanko; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Dimitrov, Yavor

    2017-12-01

    Simplified models are used in the classical engineering analyses of the friction brake heating temperature during repetitive cycles of operation to determine basically the maximum and minimum brake temperatures. The objective of the present work is to broaden and complement the possibilities for research through a model that is based on the classical scheme of the Newton's law of cooling and improves the studies by adding a disturbance function for a corresponding braking process. A general case of braking in non-periodic repetitive mode is considered, for which a piecewise function is defined to apply pulse thermal loads to the system. Cases with rectangular and triangular waveforms are presented. Periodic repetitive braking process is also studied using a periodic rectangular waveform until a steady thermal state is achieved. Different numerical methods such as the Euler's method, the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK4) and the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg 4-5 (RKF45) are used to solve the non-linear differential equation of the model. The constructed model allows during pre-engineering calculations to be determined effectively the time for reaching the steady thermal state of the brake, to be simulated actual braking modes in vehicles and material handling machines, and to be accounted for the thermal impact when performing fatigue calculations.

  2. Remote sampling and analysis of highly radioactive samples in shielded boxes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirpikov, D.A.; Miroshnichenko, I.V.; Pykhteev, O.Yu.

    2010-01-01

    The sampling procedure used for highly radioactive coolant water is associated with high risk of personnel irradiation and uncontrolled radioactive contamination. Remote sample manipulation with provision for proper radiation shielding is intended for safety enhancement of the sampling procedure. The sampling lines are located in an isolated compartment, a shielded box. Various equipment which enables remote or automatic sample manipulation is used for this purpose. The main issues of development of the shielded box equipment intended for a wider ranger of remote chemical analyses and manipulation techniques for highly radioactive water samples are considered in the paper. There were three principal directions of work: Transfer of chemical analysis performed in the laboratory inside the shielded box; Prevalence of computer-aided and remote techniques of highly radioactive sample manipulation inside the shielded box; and, Increase in control over sampling and determination of thermal-hydraulic parameters of the coolant water in the sampling lines. The developed equipment and solutions enable remote chemical analysis in the restricted volume of the shielded box by using ion-chromatographic, amperometrical, fluorimetric, flow injection, phototurbidimetric, conductometric and potentiometric methods. Extent of control performed in the shielded box is determined taking into account the requirements of the regulatory documents as well as feasibility and cost of the technical adaptation of various methods to the shielded box conditions. The work resulted in highly precise determination of more than 15 indexes of the coolant water quality performed in on-line mode in the shielded box. It averages to 80% of the total extent of control performed at the prototype reactor plants. The novel solutions for highly radioactive sample handling are implemented in the shielded box (for example, packaging, sample transportation to the laboratory, volume measurement). The shielded box is

  3. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L. Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, D.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1992-01-01

    Poor definition of the heating profiles that occur during normal operation of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas has complicated the mechanical design of ICRF system components. This paper reports that at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Faraday shield analysis is being used in defining rf heating profiles. In recent numerical analyses of proposed hardware for the Burning Plasma Experiment (BPX) and DIII-D, rf magnetic fields at Faraday shield surfaces were calculated, providing realistic predictions of the induced skin currents flowing on the shield elements and the resulting dissipated power profile. Detailed measurements on mock-ups of the Faraday shields for DIII-D and the Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor (TFTR) confirmed the predicted magnetic field distributions. A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the DIII-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed

  4. Infrared Thermal Signature Evaluation of a Pure and Saline Ice for Marine Operations in Cold Climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taimur Rashid

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Marine operations in cold climates are subjected to abundant ice accretion, which can lead to heavy ice loads over larger surface area. For safe and adequate operations on marine vessels over a larger area, remote ice detection and ice mitigation system can be useful. To study this remote ice detection option, lab experimentation was performed to detect the thermal gradient of ice with the infrared camera. Two different samples of ice blocks were prepared from tap water and saline water collected from the North Atlantic Ocean stream. The surfaces of ice samples were observed at room temperature. A complete thermal signature over the surface area was detected and recorded until the meltdown process was completed. Different temperature profiles for saline and pure ice samples were observed, which were kept under similar conditions. This article is focused to understand the experimentation methodology and thermal signatures of samples. However, challenges remains in terms of the validation of the detection signature and elimination of false detection.

  5. Sensitivity analysis for daily building operation from the energy and thermal comfort standpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignjatović Marko G.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Improving energy performance of buildings is one of the most important tasks for reaching sustainability. Assessing building energy consumption is performed more often with specialized simulation tools. Sensitivity analysis proved to be a valuable tool for creating more reliable and realistic building energy models and better buildings. This paper briefly describes the methodology for running global sensitivity analysis and tools that can be used, and presents the results of such an analysis conducted for winter period, daily, on input variables covering a real building's operation, control and occupant related parameters that affect both thermal comfort and heating energy consumption. Two sets of inputs were created. The only difference between these sets is an addition of clothing insulation and occupant heat gain as input variables. The reference building was simulated for three distinctive winter weeks. Two additional input variables have an effect especially on thermal comfort, but they do not disturb the relative order of other influential input variables. The common influential variables for both energy consumption and thermal comfort were identified and are: air handling unit sup-ply temperature and airflow rate and control system related parameters. This can help in future research into implementing the simulation-assisted optimized operation in real buildings. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. TR-33051: The concept of sustainable energy supply of settlements with energy efficient buildings

  6. Accelerator shielding benchmark problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, H.; Ban, S.; Nakamura, T.

    1993-01-01

    Accelerator shielding benchmark problems prepared by Working Group of Accelerator Shielding in the Research Committee on Radiation Behavior in the Atomic Energy Society of Japan were compiled by Radiation Safety Control Center of National Laboratory for High Energy Physics. Twenty-five accelerator shielding benchmark problems are presented for evaluating the calculational algorithm, the accuracy of computer codes and the nuclear data used in codes. (author)

  7. Geothermal waste heat utilization from in situ thermal bitumen recovery operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakevska, Nevenka; Schincariol, Robert A; Dehkordi, S Emad; Cheadle, Burns A

    2015-01-01

    In situ thermal methods for bitumen extraction introduce a tremendous amount of energy into the reservoirs raising ambient temperatures of 13 °C to as high as 200 °C at the steam chamber edge and 50 °C along the reservoir edge. In essence these operations have unintentionally acted as underground thermal energy storage systems which can be recovered after completion of bitumen extraction activities. Groundwater flow and heat transport models of the Cold Lake, Alberta, reservoir, coupled with a borehole heat exchanger (BHE) model, allowed for investigating the use of closed-loop geothermal systems for energy recovery. Three types of BHEs (single U-tube, double U-tube, coaxial) were tested and analyzed by comparing outlet temperatures and corresponding heat extraction rates. Initial one year continuous operation simulations show that the double U-tube configuration had the best performance producing an average temperature difference of 5.7 °C, and an average heat extraction of 41 W/m. Given the top of the reservoir is at a depth of 400 m, polyethylene piping provided for larger extraction gains over more thermally conductive steel piping. Thirty year operation simulations illustrate that allowing 6 month cyclic recovery periods only increases the loop temperature gain by a factor of 1.2 over continuous operation. Due to the wide spacing of existing boreholes and reservoir depth, only a small fraction of the energy is efficiently recovered. Drilling additional boreholes between existing wells would increase energy extraction. In areas with shallower bitumen deposits such as the Athabasca region, i.e. 65 to 115 m deep, BHE efficiencies should be larger. © 2014, National Ground Water Association.

  8. Mechanical design of the TIBER breeding shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathke, J.; Deutsch, L. (Grumman Corp., Bethpage, NY (USA). Space Systems Div.)

    1989-04-01

    TIBER features a segmented shield assembly that provides the nuclear shielding for the superconducting toroidal field coils. In addition to its primary function, the shield also provides tritium breeding through the use of water coolant that contains 16 wt% dissolved lithium nitrate. Because the TIBER reactor need not provide electrical power, the coolant is maintained at low pressure (0.2 MPa) and low temperature (75/sup 0/C). The shield is made in several segments to facilitate assembly and allow for replacement of high heat flux components (divertor blades). The segments are designated as inboard, outboard, upper, lower, and divertor modules. In total, there are 96 separate modules in the machine, consisting of six different types. The design features of the different modules vary primarily depending on the thickness of the shield in a given location. The very thick outboard shield has a breeding zone in the inboard portion of the module, with a shielding zone behind it. The breeding zone consists of a stainless steel casing filled with beryllium spheres. The shielding zone consists of the same casing filled with steel spheres. Both of these zones have lithiated water circulated throughout to provide cooling and breeding. In zones with minimal thickness, tungsten alloys are used to achieve the required shielding. These alloys are incoprorated in subassemblies utilizing stainless steel casings surrounding blocks of tungsten heavy metal alloy. These are infiltrated with lead on final assembly to form a thermally continuous panel. Several of these panels are then assembled into an outer stainless steel case to form an inboard module. These modules also use the lithiated coolant. The details of the design are presented and discussed. (orig.).

  9. Transient thermal analysis for radioactive liquid mixing operations in a large-scaled tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, S. Y.; Smith, F. G. III

    2014-01-01

    A transient heat balance model was developed to assess the impact of a Submersible Mixer Pump (SMP) on radioactive liquid temperature during the process of waste mixing and removal for the high-level radioactive materials stored in Savannah River Site (SRS) tanks. The model results will be mainly used to determine the SMP design impacts on the waste tank temperature during operations and to develop a specification for a new SMP design to replace existing longshaft mixer pumps used during waste removal. The present model was benchmarked against the test data obtained by the tank measurement to examine the quantitative thermal response of the tank and to establish the reference conditions of the operating variables under no SMP operation. The results showed that the model predictions agreed with the test data of the waste temperatures within about 10%

  10. Kraus operator solutions to a fermionic master equation describing a thermal bath and their matrix representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang-Guo, Meng; Ji-Suo, Wang; Hong-Yi, Fan; Cheng-Wei, Xia

    2016-04-01

    We solve the fermionic master equation for a thermal bath to obtain its explicit Kraus operator solutions via the fermionic state approach. The normalization condition of the Kraus operators is proved. The matrix representation for these solutions is obtained, which is incongruous with the result in the book completed by Nielsen and Chuang [Quantum Computation and Quantum Information, Cambridge University Press, 2000]. As especial cases, we also present the Kraus operator solutions to master equations for describing the amplitude-decay model and the diffusion process at finite temperature. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11347026), the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant Nos. ZR2013AM012 and ZR2012AM004), and the Research Fund for the Doctoral Program and Scientific Research Project of Liaocheng University, Shandong Province, China.

  11. Radiation shielding for TFTR DT diagnostics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, L.P.; Johnson, D.W.; Liew, S.L.

    1994-01-01

    The authors illustrate the designs of radiation shielding for the TFTR DT diagnostics using the ACX and TVTS systems as specific examples. The main emphasis here is on the radiation transport analyses carried out in support of the designs. Initial results from the DT operation indicate that the diagnostics have been functioning as anticipated and the shielding designs are satisfactory. The experience accumulated in the shielding design for the TFTR DT diagnostics should be useful and applicable to future devices, such as TPX and ITER, where many similar diagnostic systems are expected to be used

  12. MFTF-α + T shield design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.

    1985-01-01

    MFTF-α+T is a DT upgrade option of the Tandem Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B) to study better plasma performance, and test tritium breeding blankets in an actual fusion reactor environment. The central cell insert, designated DT axicell, has a 2-MW/m 2 neutron wall loading at the first wall for blanket testing. This upgrade is completely shielded to protect the reactor components, the workers, and the general public from the radiation environment during operation and after shutdown. The shield design for this upgrade is the subject of this paper including the design criteria and the tradeoff studies to reduce the shield cost

  13. Regolith Derived Heat Shield for Planetary Body Entry and Descent System with In Situ Fabrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Meuller, Robert P.; Sibille, Laurent; Hintze, Paul E.; Rasky, Daniel J.

    2012-01-01

    This NIAC project investigated an innovative approach to provide heat shield protection to spacecraft after launch and prior to each EDL thus potentially realizing significant launch mass savings. Heat shields fabricated in situ can provide a thermal-protection system for spacecraft that routinely enter a planetary atmosphere. By fabricating the heat shield with space resources from materials available on moons and asteroids, it is possible to avoid launching the heat-shield mass from Earth. Regolith has extremely good insulating properties and the silicates it contains can be used in the fabrication and molding of thermal-protection materials. Such in situ developed heat shields have been suggested before by Lewis. Prior research efforts have shown that regolith properties can be compatible with very-high temperature resistance. Our project team is highly experienced in regolith processing and thermal protection systems (TPS). Routine access to space and return from any planetary surface requires dealing with heat loads experienced by the spacecraft during reentry. Our team addresses some of the key issues with the EDL of human-scale missions through a highly innovative investigation of heat shields that can be fabricated in space by using local resources on asteroids and moons. Most space missions are one-way trips, dedicated to placing an asset in space for economical or scientific gain. However, for human missions, a very-reliable heat-shield system is necessary to protect the crew from the intense heat experienced at very high entry velocities of approximately 11 km/s at approximately Mach 33 (Apollo). For a human mission to Mars, the return problem is even more difficult, with predicted velocities of up to 14 km/s, at approximately Mach 42 at the Earth-atmosphere entry. In addition to human return, it is very likely that future space-travel architecture will include returning cargo to the Earth, either for scientific purposes or for commercial reasons

  14. First Wall, Blanket, Shield Engineering Technology Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nygren, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    The First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Technology Program sponsored by the Office of Fusion Energy of DOE has the overall objective of providing engineering data that will define performance parameters for nuclear systems in advanced fusion reactors. The program comprises testing and the development of computational tools in four areas: (1) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of first-wall component facsimiles with emphasis on surface heat loads; (2) thermomechanical and thermal-hydraulic performance of blanket and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on bulk heating; (3) electromagnetic effects in first wall, blanket, and shield component facsimiles with emphasis on transient field penetration and eddy-current effects; (4) assembly, maintenance and repair with emphasis on remote-handling techniques. This paper will focus on elements 2 and 4 above and, in keeping with the conference participation from both fusion and fission programs, will emphasize potential interfaces between fusion technology and experience in the fission industry

  15. Staff Technical Position on geological repository operations area underground facility design: Thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nataraja, M.S.

    1992-12-01

    The purpose of this Staff Technical Position (STP) is to provide the US Department of Energy (DOE) with a methodology acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission staff for demonstrating compliance with 10 CFR 60.133(i). The NRC staff's position is that DOE should develop and use a defensible methodology to demonstrate the acceptability of a geologic repository operations area (GROA) underground facility design. The staff anticipates that this methodology will include evaluation and development of appropriately coupled models, to account for the thermal, mechanical, hydrological, and chemical processes that are induced by repository-generated thermal loads. With respect to 10 CFR 60.133(i), the GROA underground facility design: (1) should satisfy design goals/criteria initially selected, by considering the performance objectives; and (2) must satisfy the performance objectives 10 CFR 60.111, 60.112, and 60.113. The methodology in this STP suggests an iterative approach suitable for the underground facility design

  16. Influence of thermal charge preparation on coke comminution under blast-furnace operating conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shkoller, M.B.; Dinel' t, V.M.; Korchuganova, G.S.; Petrov, V.B.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation is described for the study of structural breakdown of coke by thermochemical action of alkali and alkaline-earth metal vapors under blast furnace operating conditions. Bench-scale test facilities are described in which a pair of coke samples are exposed to the metal vapors then subjected to gasification. Structural strength tests were performed before and after each experiment. Coke samples were obtained in either moist or thermally prepared condition. The value of thermal charge preparation (heat treatment of the coal at 150/sup 0/C in a fluidized bed) was established, since it shifts the pore size distribution to the smaller size, thereby retarding adsorption of the metal vapors. 16 references, 4 figures, 2 tables.

  17. Hydrogen Fuel as Ecological Contribution to Operation of the Existing Coal-Fired Thermal Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cosic, D.

    2009-01-01

    The analysis is carried out of the application of a new hydrogen based alternative fuel as ecological contribution of the coal thermal power plants operation. Given the fact that coal thermal power plants are seen as the largest producers, not only of CO 2 , but of all others harmful gases, the idea is initiated to use the new alternative fuel as an additive to the coal which would result in much better performance of the coal power plants from an ecological point of view. It is possible to use such a fuel in relation of 10-30% of former coal use. The positive influence of such an application is much bigger than relative used quantity. This lecture has a goal to incite potential investors to create conditions for industrial testing of the new fuel. It will be very interesting to animate investors for large-scale production of the new fuel, too.(author).

  18. Thermal loads on tokamak plasma-facing components during normal operation and disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McGrath, R.T.

    1990-01-01

    Power loadings experienced by tokamak plasma-facing components during normal operation and during off-normal events are discussed. A model for power and particle flow in the tokamak boundary layer is presented and model predictions are compared to infrared measurements of component heating. The inclusion of the full three-dimensional geometry of the components and of the magnetic flux surface is very important in the modeling. Experimental measurements show that misalignment of component armour tile surfaces by only a millimeter can lead to significant localized heating. An application to the design of plasma-facing components for future machines is presented. Finally, thermal loads expected during tokamak disruptions are discussed. The primary problems are surface melting and vaporization due to localized intense heating during the disruption thermal quench and volumetric heating of the component armour and structure due to localised impact of runaway electrons. (author)

  19. Smart house-based optimal operation of thermal unit commitment for a smart grid considering transmission constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howlader, Harun Or Rashid; Matayoshi, Hidehito; Noorzad, Ahmad Samim; Muarapaz, Cirio Celestino; Senjyu, Tomonobu

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents a smart house-based power system for thermal unit commitment programme. The proposed power system consists of smart houses, renewable energy plants and conventional thermal units. The transmission constraints are considered for the proposed system. The generated power of the large capacity renewable energy plant leads to the violated transmission constraints in the thermal unit commitment programme, therefore, the transmission constraint should be considered. This paper focuses on the optimal operation of the thermal units incorporated with controllable loads such as Electrical Vehicle and Heat Pump water heater of the smart houses. The proposed method is compared with the power flow in thermal units operation without controllable loads and the optimal operation without the transmission constraints. Simulation results show the validation of the proposed method.

  20. Thermal power plant operating regimes in future British power systems with increasing variable renewable penetration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Edmunds, Ray; Davies, Lloyd; Deane, Paul; Pourkashanian, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This work investigates thermal power operating regimes in future power systems. • Gas plants have low utilisation in the scenarios considered. • Ramping intensity increases for gas plants and pumped storage. • Coal plants frequently operate at minimum stable levels and start-ups increase. • Grid emission intensity and total emission production remains substantial. - Abstract: This work investigates the operational requirements of thermal power plants in a number of potential future British power systems with increasing variable renewable penetration. The PLEXOS Integrated Energy Model has been used to develop the market models, with PLEXOS employing mixed integer programming to solve the unit commitment and economic dispatch problem, subject to a number of constraints. Initially, a model of the British power system was developed and validated. Subsequently, a 2020 test model was developed to analyse a number of future system structures with differing fuel and carbon prices and generation mixes. The study has found that in three of the four scenarios considered, the utilisation of gas power plants will be relatively low, but remains fundamental to the security of supply. Also, gas plants will be subject to more intense ramping. The findings have consequent implications for energy policy as expensive government interventions may be required to prevent early decommissioning of gas capacity, should the prevailing market conditions not guarantee revenue adequacy.

  1. Thermal-fluid analysis of the fill and drain operations of a cryrogenic fuel tank

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Craig A.; Hanna, Gregory J.; Gong, Leslie

    1993-01-01

    The Generic Research Cryogenic Tank was designed to establish techniques for testing and analyzing the behavior of reusable fuel tank structures subjected to cryogenic fuels and aerodynamic heating. The Generic Research Cryogenic Tank tests will consist of filling a pressure vessel to a prescribed fill level, waiting for steady-state conditions, then draining the liquid while heating the external surface to simulate the thermal environment associated with hypersonic flight. Initial tests of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank will use liquid nitrogen with future tests requiring liquid hydrogen. Two-dimensional finite-difference thermal-fluid models were developed for analyzing the behavior of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank during fill and drain operations. The development and results of the two-dimensional fill and drain models, using liquid nitrogen, are provided, along with results and discussion on extrapolating the model results to the operation of the full-size Generic Research Cryogenic Tank. These numerical models provided a means to predict the behavior of the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank during testing and to define the requirements for the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank support systems such as vent, drain, pressurization, and instrumentation systems. In addition, the fill model provided insight into the unexpected role of circumferential conduction in cooling the Generic Research Cryogenic Tank pressure vessel during fill operations.

  2. INTOR radiation shielding for personnel access

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Abdou, M.

    1981-01-01

    The INTOR reactor shield system consists of the blanket, bulk shield, penetration shield, component shield, and biological shield. The bulk shield consists of two parts: (a) the inboard shield; and (b) the outboard shield. The distinction between the different components of the shield system is essential to satisfy the different design constraints and achieve various objectives

  3. Effect of increased renewables generation on operation of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eser, Patrick; Singh, Antriksh; Chokani, Ndaona; Abhari, Reza S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Impacts of increased renewables in central European transmission system are assessed. • Individual transmission lines and power plants of transmission system are modelled. • Starts and ramps of thermal power plants significantly increase with increased renewables. • Impact of renewables on thermal power plants is highly dependent on location. - Abstract: High spatial and temporal resolution optimal power flow simulations of the 2013 and 2020 interconnected grid in Central Western and Eastern Europe regions are undertaken to assess the impact of an increased penetration of renewables on thermal power plants. In contrast to prior studies, the present work models each individual transmission line and power plant within the two regions. Furthermore, for conventional plants, electricity costs are determined with respect to fuel type, nameplate capacity, operating condition and geographic location; cycling costs are modeled as function of the recent operational history. For renewable power plants, costs and available power are determined using mesoscale weather simulations and hydrology models. Countrywide validation of the simulations shows that all renewable and most conventional power production is predicted with less than 10% error. It is shown that the increased penetration of renewables in 2020 will induce a 4–23% increase in the number of starts of conventional plants. The number of load ramps significantly increases by 63–181%, which underlines the necessity for equipment manufacturers and utilities to adapt to scenarios of high penetration of renewables. The increased cycling operation of coal plants is shown to depend strongly on the power plant’s location and is mainly observed in Germany and the Czech Republic. Austrian coal plants are cycled less because they supply more base load power to southern Germany, where several nuclear power plants will be phased out by 2020. Thus there is a need for more transmission capacity along

  4. Computer simulation of nonstationary thermal fields in design and operation of northern oil and gas fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaganova, N. A., E-mail: vna@imm.uran.ru [Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Filimonov, M. Yu., E-mail: fmy@imm.uran.ru [Ural Federal University, Ekaterinburg, Russia and Institute of Mathematics and Mechanics of Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-30

    A mathematical model, numerical algorithm and program code for simulation and long-term forecasting of changes in permafrost as a result of operation of a multiple well pad of northern oil and gas field are presented. In the model the most significant climatic and physical factors are taken into account such as solar radiation, determined by specific geographical location, heterogeneous structure of frozen soil, thermal stabilization of soil, possible insulation of the objects, seasonal fluctuations in air temperature, and freezing and thawing of the upper soil layer. Results of computing are presented.

  5. Shielded regenerative neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terhune, J.H.; Neissel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion chamber type neutron detector is disclosed which has a greatly extended lifespan. The detector includes a fission chamber containing a mixture of active and breeding material and a neutron shielding material. The breeding and shielding materials are selected to have similar or substantially matching neutron capture cross-sections so that their individual effects on increased detector life are mutually enhanced

  6. MEMS-Based Boiler Operation from Low Temperature Heat Transfer and Thermal Scavenging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leland Weiss

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Increasing world-wide energy use and growing population growth presents a critical need for enhanced energy efficiency and sustainability. One method to address this issue is via waste heat scavenging. In this approach, thermal energy that is normally expelled to the environment is transferred to a secondary device to produce useful power output. This paper investigates a novel MEMS-based boiler designed to operate as part of a small-scale energy scavenging system. For the first time, fabrication and operation of the boiler is presented. Boiler operation is based on capillary action that drives working fluid from surrounding reservoirs across a heated surface. Pressure is generated as working fluid transitions from liquid to vapor in an integrated steamdome. In a full system application, the steam can be made available to other MEMS-based devices to drive final power output. Capillary channels are formed from silicon substrates with 100 µm widths. Varying depths are studied that range from 57 to 170 µm. Operation of the boiler shows increasing flow-rates with increasing capillary channel depths. Maximum fluid mass transfer rates are 12.26 mg/s from 170 µm channels, an increase of 28% over 57 µm channel devices. Maximum pressures achieved during operation are 229 Pa.

  7. Radiation shielding plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Torakichi; Sugawara, Takeo.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose: To reduce the weight and stabilize the configuration of a radiation shielding plate which is used in close contact with an object to be irradiated with radiation rays. Constitution: The radiation shielding plate comprises a substrate made of lead glass and a metallic lead coating on the surface of the substrate by means of plating, vapor deposition or the like. Apertures for permeating radiation rays are formed to the radiation shielding plate. Since the shielding plate is based on a lead glass plate, a sufficient mechanical strength can be obtained with a thinner structure as compared with the conventional plate made of metallic lead. Accordingly, if the shielding plate is disposed on a soft object to be irradiated with radiation rays, the object and the plate itself less deform to obtain a radiation irradiation pattern with distinct edges. (Moriyama, K.)

  8. Shielding requirements for particle bed propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, S. J.

    1991-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems present unique challenges in reliability and safety. Due to the radiation incident upon all components of the propulsion system, shielding must be used to keep nuclear heating in the materials within limits; in addition, electronic control systems must be protected. This report analyzes the nuclear heating due to the radiation and the shielding required to meet the established criteria while also minimizing the shield mass. Heating rates were determined in a 2000 MWt Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) system for all materials in the interstage region, between the reactor vessel and the propellant tank, with special emphasis on meeting the silicon dose criteria. Using a Lithium Hydride/Tungsten shield, the optimum shield design was found to be: 50 cm LiH/2 cm W on the axial reflector in the reactor vessel and 50 cm LiH/2 cm W in a collar extension of the inside shield outside of the pressure vessel. Within these parameters, the radiation doses in all of the components in the interstage and lower tank regions would be within acceptable limits for mission requirements.

  9. Evaluation of operational safety at Babcock and Wilcox Plants: Volume 2, Thermal-hydraulic results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheatley, P.D.; Davis, C.B.; Callow, R.A.; Fletcher, C.D.; Dobbe, C.A.; Beelman, R.J.

    1987-11-01

    The Nuclear Regulatory Commission has initiated a research program to develop a methodology to assess the operational performance of Babcock and Wilcox plants and to apply this methodology on a trial basis. The methodology developed for analyzing Babcock and Wilcox plants integrated methods used in both thermal-hydraulics and human factors and compared results with information used in the assessment of risk. The integrated methodology involved an evaluation of a selected plant for each pressurized water reactor vendor during a limited number of transients. A plant was selected to represent each vendor, and three transients were identified for analysis. The plants were Oconee Unit 1 for Babcock and Wilcox, H.B. Robinson Unit 2 for Westinghouse, and Calvert Cliffs Unit 1 for Combustion Engineering. The three transients were a complete loss of all feedwater, a small-break loss-of-coolant accident, and a steam-generator overfill with auxiliary feedwater. Included in the integrated methodology was an assessment of the thermal-hydraulic behavior, including event timing, of the plants during the three transients. Thermal-hydraulic results are presented in this volume (Volume 2) of the report. 26 refs., 30 figs., 7 tabs

  10. Thermal response of a pin-type fusion reactor blanket during steady and transient reactor operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grotz, S.; Ghoniem, N.M.

    1986-02-01

    The thermal analysis of the blanket examines both the steady-state and transient reactor operations. The steady-state analysis covers full power and fractional power operation whereas the transient analysis examines the effects of power ramps and blanket preheat. The blanket configuration chosen for this study is a helium cooled solid breeder design. We first discuss the full power, steady-state temperature fields in the first wall, beryllium rods, and breeder rods. Next we examine the effects of fractional power on coolant flow and temperature field distributions. This includes power plateaus of 10%, 20%, 50%, 80%, and 100% of full power. Also examined are the restrictions on the rates of power ramping between plateaus. Finally we discuss the power and time requirements for pre-heating the primary from cold iron conditions up to startup temperature (250 0 C)

  11. Study of the thermal behavior of a latent heat cold storage unit operating under frosting conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simard, A.P.; Lacroix, M.

    2003-01-01

    A study is performed of the thermal behavior of a latent heat cold storage unit operating under frosting conditions. This unit is employed to maintain the temperature inside the refrigerated compartment of a truck below 265 K. The system consists of parallel plates filled with a phase change material (PCM) that absorbs heat from the flow of warm moist air. A mathematical model for the system is first presented and, next, validated with numerical and experimental data. It is then exploited to assess the effects of design parameters and operating conditions on the performance of the system. The recommended thickness and distance separating the PCM plates are found to be 50x10 -3 and 30x10 -3 m, respectively. The results indicate that the performance of the unit is enhanced by turbulent air flow in spite of the increased pressure loss and accentuated frost growth. The unit also performs well even when the surrounding relative humidity is 100%

  12. Evaluation of thermal power plant operational performance in Taiwan by data envelopment analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, C.H.; Lin, Sue J.; Lewis, Charles

    2010-01-01

    Electricity is essential in the economic development of a nation. Due to the rapid growth of economy and industrial development in Taiwan, the demand for use of electricity has increased rapidly. This study evaluates the power-generation efficiency of major thermal power plants in Taiwan during 2004-2006 using the data envelopment analysis (DEA) approach. A stability test was conducted to verify the stability of the DEA model. According to the results, all power plants studied achieved acceptable overall operational efficiencies during 2004-2006, and the combined cycle power plants were the most efficient among all plants. The most important variable in this DEA model is the 'heating value of total fuels'. Findings from this study can be beneficial in improving some of the existing power plants and for more efficient operational strategies and related policy-making for future power plants in Taiwan.

  13. Thermal-structural response of EBR-II major components under reactor operational transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, L.K.; Lee, M.J.

    1983-01-01

    Until recently, the LMFBR safety research has been focused primarily on severe but highly unlikely accident, such as hypothetical-core-disruptive accidents (HCDA's), and not enough attention has been given to accident prevention, which is less severe but more likely sequence. The objective of the EBR-II operational reliability testing (ORT) is to demonstrate that the reactor can be designed and operated to prevent accident. A series of mild duty cycles and overpower transients were designed for accident prevention tests. An assessment of the EBR-II major plant components has been performed to assure structural integrity of the reactor plant for the ORT program. In this paper, the thermal-structural response and structural evaluation of the reactor vessel, the reactor-vessel cover, the intermediate heat exchanger (IHX) and the superheater are presented

  14. Steam generator thermal hydraulic design & functional architecture features and related operational and reliability issues requiring consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klarner, R.G.

    2012-01-01

    Proper thermal hydraulic design and functional architecture are critical to successful steam generator operation and long term reliability. The evolution of steam generators has been a gradual learning process that has benefited from continuous industry operational experience (OPEX). Inadequate thermal hydraulic design can lead to numerous degradation mechanisms such as excessive deposition, corrosion, flow and level instabilities, fluid-elastic instabilities and tube wear. The functional architecture determines the health of the tube bundle and the other internals during manufacturing, handling and operation. It also determines thermal performance as well as establishing global thermal-hydraulic characteristics such as water level shrink and swell response. This paper discusses the range of operational and reliability issues and relates them to the thermal hydraulic attributes and functional architecture of steam generators (many SG reliability issues are further discussed in other presentations at this conference). In pursuing such issues, the paper focuses on the four major features of the equipment, identifying in each case the goals and requirements such features must meet. Typical approaches and the means by which such requirements are addressed in current equipment are discussed. The four features are: 1. Tubing Material and Tube Bundle Heat Transfer Performance; a. Two materials are in current use – Alloy 690 TT and Alloy 800. Both are good materials with excellent performance records which serve their owners very well (the reliability attributes of Alloy 800 and 690 are discussed in other papers at this conference). Caution is advised in the supply of any material: – material quality is only assured by what is specified to material suppliers in procurement specifications – i.e. - all the knowledge and research in the world assures nothing if its findings are not reflected in procurement requirements. b. Heat transfer performance in addition to being

  15. A dynamic model for air-based photovoltaic thermal systems working under real operating conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sohel, M. Imroz; Ma, Zhenjun; Cooper, Paul; Adams, Jamie; Scott, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A dynamic model suitable for air-based photovoltaic thermal (PVT) systems is presented. • The model is validated with PVT data from two unique buildings. • The simulated output variables match very well with the experimental data. • The performance of the PVT system under changing working condition is analysed. - Abstract: In this paper a dynamic model suitable for simulating real operating conditions of air-based photovoltaic thermal (PVT) systems is presented. The performance of the model is validated by using the operational data collected from the building integrated photovoltaic (PVT) systems installed in two unique buildings. The modelled air outlet temperature and electrical power match very well with the experimental data. In Solar Decathlon house PVT, the average (RMS) error in air outlet temperatures was 4.2%. The average (RMS) error in electrical power was also 4.2%. In the Sustainable Buildings Research Centre PVT, the average errors (RMS) of PV and air temperatures were 3.8% and 2.2%, respectively. The performance of the PVT system under changing working condition is also analysed in this paper. The analysis includes the effect of ambient air temperature, air inlet temperature, air flow rate and solar irradiation on thermal, electrical, first law and second law efficiencies. Both the thermal and the 1st law efficiencies almost linearly increased with the increase of the ambient temperature. However, the PVT electrical efficiency and the second law efficiency decreased with the increase of the ambient temperature. All efficiencies expect the second law efficiency decreased with increase of the PVT air inlet temperature. The second law efficiency first increased and then reduced. With increasing the air flow rate all the efficiencies increased. The electrical and second law efficiencies become less sensitive when the air flow rate exceeded 300 l/s. Both the thermal and the 1st law efficiencies decreased while the electrical

  16. Reactor vessel head permanent shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hankinson, M.F.; Leduc, R.J.; Richard, J.W.; Malandra, L.J.

    1989-01-01

    A nuclear reactor is described comprising: a nuclear reactor pressure vessel closure head; control rod drive mechanisms (CRDMs) disposed within the closure head so as to project vertically above the closure head; cooling air baffle means surrounding the control rod drive mechanisms for defining cooling air paths relative to the control rod drive mechanisms; means defined within the periphery of the closure head for accommodating fastening means for securing the closure head to its associated pressure vessel; lifting lugs fixedly secured to the closure head for facilitating lifting and lowering movements of the closure head relative to the pressure vessel; lift rods respectively operatively associated with the plurality of lifting lugs for transmitting load forces, developed during the lifting and lowering movements of the closure head, to the lifting lugs; upstanding radiation shield means interposed between the cooling air baffle means and the periphery of the enclosure head of shielding maintenance personnel operatively working upon the closure head fastening means from the effects of radiation which may emanate from the control rod drive mechanisms and the cooling air baffle means; and connecting systems respectively associated with each one of the lifting lugs and each one of the lifting rods for connecting each one of the lifting rods to a respective one of each one of the lifting lugs, and for simultaneously connecting a lower end portion of the upstanding radiation shield means to each one of the respective lifting lugs

  17. Severe transient tests on operation steam generators: Analysis of the fluid structure dynamic thermal interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billon, F.; David, J.; Procaccia, H.

    1983-01-01

    The operating efficiency of steam generators (S.G.s) and their structural integrity depend on the design configurations of the feedwater spray within the S.G., and on the operating procedure. To check the merit of some design modifications, and to verify the fluid-structure interaction with a view to preserve the S.G.s integrity during severe operating transients, a special instrumentation that admits the determination of the instantaneous thermal hydraulic characteristics of the flow in the secondary water and the S.G. tube sheet, has been installed by EDF on one steam generator of Tricastin unit 1 power plant. In parallel, FRAMATOME has developped a computer code, TEMPTRON, that allows the calculations of the thermal loads and the consequent stresses in the most sollicited zones of the steam generator during transient operation of the plant. This code divides the S.G. into three parts: - the first concerns the S.G.s region above the downcomer, zone where the mixing between hot water and cold feedwater occurs, - the second is the downcomer itself which is divided into n segments, - the third concerns the tube sheet zone which is also divided into n segments. The most severe transient test performed is the auxiliary cold feedwater injection into the steam generator during a hot standby of the plant: two levels of flow rate have been realised: 55 and 110 m 3 /h of 42 0 C feedwater. The tests have shown that if the cold feedwater injection occurs when the steam generator water level is below feedwater ring, the lowest fluid temperature reached at tube sheet inlet is about 230 0 C. (orig.)

  18. Gravity Scaling of a Power Reactor Water Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Boise

    2008-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being considered as an affordable option for potential use on initial lunar surface reactor power systems. Heat dissipation in the shield from nuclear sources must be rejected by an auxillary thermal hydraulic cooling system. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection between the core surface and an array of thermosyphon radiator elements. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design has been previously evaluated at lower power levels (Pearson, 2006). The current baseline assumes that 5.5 kW are dissipated in the water shield, the preponderance on the core surface, but with some volumetric heating in the naturally circulating water as well. This power is rejected by a radiator located above the shield with a surface temperature of 370 K. A similarity analysis on a water-based reactor shield is presented examining the effect of gravity on free convection between a radiation shield inner vessel and a radiation shield outer vessel boundaries. Two approaches established similarity: 1) direct scaling of Rayleigh number equates gravity-surface heat flux products, 2) temperature difference between the wall and thermal boundary layer held constant on Earth and the Moon. Nussult number for natural convection (laminar and turbulent) is assumed of form Nu = CRa n . These combined results estimate similarity conditions under Earth and Lunar gravities. The influence of reduced gravity on the performance of thermosyphon heat pipes is also examined

  19. New facility shield design criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howell, W.P.

    1981-07-01

    The purpose of the criteria presented here is to provide standard guidance for the design of nuclear radiation shields thoughout new facilities. These criteria are required to assure a consistent and integrated design that can be operated safely and economically within the DOE standards. The scope of this report is confined to the consideration of radiation shielding for contained sources. The whole body dose limit established by the DOE applies to all doses which are generally distributed throughout the trunk of the body. Therefore, where the whole body is the critical organ for an internally deposited radionuclide, the whole body dose limit applies to the sum of doses received must assure control of the concentration of radionuclides in the building atmosphere and thereby limit the dose from internal sources

  20. CAI and training system for the emergency operation procedure in the advanced thermal reactor, FUGEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozaki, T.; Imanaga, K.; Nakamura, S.; Maeda, K.; Sakurai, N.; Miyamoto, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the Advanced Thermal Reactor (ATR ) of the JNC, 'FUGEN', a symptom based Emergency Operating Procedure (EOF) was introduced in order to operate Fugen more safely and it became necessary for the plant operators to master the EOF. However it took a lot of time for the instructor to teach the EOP to operators and to train them. Thus, we have developed a Computer Aided Instruction (CAI) and Training System for the EOP, by which the operators can learn the EOP and can be trained. This system has two major functions, i.e., CAI and training. In the CAI function, there are three learning courses, namely, the EOP procedure, the simulation with guidance and Q and A, and the free simulation. In the training function, all of necessary control instruments (indicators, switches, annunciators and so forth) and physics models for the EOP training are simulated so that the trainees can be trained for all of the EOPs. In addition, 50 kinds of malfunction models are installed in order to perform appropriate accident scenarios for the EOP. The training of the EOP covers the range from AOO (Anticipated Operational Occurrence) to Over-DBAs (Design Based Accidents). This system is built in three personal computers that are connected by the computer network. One of the computers is expected to be used for the instructor and the other two are for the trainees. The EOP is composed of eight guidelines, such as 'Reactor Control' and 'Depression and Cooling', and the operation screens which are corresponded to the guidelines are respectively provided. According to the trial, we have estimated that the efficiency of the learning and the training would be improved about 30% for the trainee and about 75% for the instructor in the actual learning and training. (author)

  1. FY 1995 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G.; McDuffee, J.L.; McFee, M.T.; Ruggles, A.E.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1997-07-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. Special consideration was given to allow operation of the system in a stiff mode (constant flow) and in a soft mode (constant pressure drop) for proper implementation of true FE and DNB experiments. The facility is also designed to examine other T/H phenomena, including onset of incipient boiling (IB), single-phase heat transfer coefficients and friction factors, and two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics. Tests will also be conducted that are representative of decay heat levels at both high pressure and low pressure as well as other quasi-equilibrium conditions encountered during transient scenarios. A total of 22 FE tests and 2 CHF tests were performed during FY 1994 and FY 1995 with water flowing vertically upward. Comparison of these data as well as extensive data from other investigators led to a proposed modification to the Saha and Zuber correlation for onset of significant void (OSV), applied to FE prediction. The modification takes into account a demonstrated dependence of the OSV or FE thermal limits on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime.

  2. FY 1995 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G.; McDuffee, J.L.; McFee, M.T.; Ruggles, A.E.; Wendel, M.W.; Yoder, G.L.

    1997-07-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. Special consideration was given to allow operation of the system in a stiff mode (constant flow) and in a soft mode (constant pressure drop) for proper implementation of true FE and DNB experiments. The facility is also designed to examine other T/H phenomena, including onset of incipient boiling (IB), single-phase heat transfer coefficients and friction factors, and two-phase heat transfer and pressure drop characteristics. Tests will also be conducted that are representative of decay heat levels at both high pressure and low pressure as well as other quasi-equilibrium conditions encountered during transient scenarios. A total of 22 FE tests and 2 CHF tests were performed during FY 1994 and FY 1995 with water flowing vertically upward. Comparison of these data as well as extensive data from other investigators led to a proposed modification to the Saha and Zuber correlation for onset of significant void (OSV), applied to FE prediction. The modification takes into account a demonstrated dependence of the OSV or FE thermal limits on subcooling levels, especially in the low subcooling regime

  3. Bidirectional reconfiguration and thermal tuning of microcantilever metamaterial device operating from 77 K to 400 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitchappa, Prakash; Manjappa, Manukumara; Krishnamoorthy, Harish N. S.; Chang, Yuhua; Lee, Chengkuo; Singh, Ranjan

    2017-12-01

    We experimentally report the bidirectional reconfiguration of an out-of-plane deformable microcantilever based metamaterial for advanced and dynamic manipulation of terahertz waves. The microcantilever is made of a bimaterial stack with a large difference in the coefficient of thermal expansion of the constituent materials. This allows for the continuous deformation of microcantilevers in upward or downward direction in response to positive or negative temperature gradient, respectively. The fundamental resonance frequency of the fabricated microcantilever metamaterial is measured at 0.4 THz at room temperature of 293 K. With decreasing temperature, the resonance frequency continuously blue shifts by 30 GHz at 77 K. On the other hand, with increasing temperature, the resonance frequency gradually red shifts by 80 GHz and saturates at 0.32 THz for 400 K. Furthermore, as the temperature is increased above room temperature, which results in the downward actuation of the microcantilever, a significant resonance line-narrowing with an enhanced quality factor is observed due to tight field confinement in the metamaterial structure. The thermal control of the microcantilever possesses numerous inherent advantages such as enhanced tunable range (˜37.5% in this work compared to previously reported microcantilever metamaterials), continuous tunability, and repeatable operations. The microcantilever metamaterial also shows high robustness to operate at cryogenic conditions and hence opens up the possibility of using meta-devices in harsh environments such as space, polar, and deep sea applications.

  4. Radiation shielding activities at the OECD/Nuclear Energy Agency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sartori, Enrico; Vaz, Pedro

    2000-01-01

    The OECD Nuclear Energy Agency (NEA) has devoted considerable effort over the years to radiation shielding issues. The issues are addressed through international working groups. These activities are carried out in close co-ordination and co-operation with the Radiation Safety Information Computational Center (RSICC). The areas of work include: basic nuclear data activities in support of radiation shielding, computer codes, shipping cask shielding applications, reactor pressure vessel dosimetry, shielding experiments database. The method of work includes organising international code comparison exercises and benchmark studies. Training courses on radiation shielding computer codes are organised regularly including hands-on experience in modelling skills. The scope of the activity covers mainly reactor shields and spent fuel transportation packages, but also fusion neutronics and in particular shielding of accelerators and irradiation facilities. (author)

  5. 30 CFR 57.14213 - Ventilation and shielding for welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Ventilation and shielding for welding. 57.14213... welding. (a) Welding operations shall be shielded when performed at locations where arc flash could be hazardous to persons. (b) All welding operations shall be well-ventilated. ...

  6. Electromagnetic behaviour of the shield in turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Vecchio, P.; Veca, G.M.; Sacerdoti, G.

    1975-11-01

    The structure of turbogenerators with superconducting solenoids is analyzed and the investigation of electromagnetic behaviour of the rotating shield is presented. The cases considered are: (a) An hypothetical operation with a single phase with nominal current; (b) Steady-state operation in inverse sequence with 10% of the nominal current; (c) A step variation of the magnetic field intensity in the shield

  7. Proceedings of the 10th international topical meeting on nuclear thermal hydraulics, operation and safety (NUTHOS-10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2014-01-01

    The 10th International Topical Meeting on Nuclear Thermal Hydraulics, Operations and Safety (NUTHOS-10) in Okinawa, Japan is sponsored by Atomic Energy Society of Japan, in cooperation with the International Atomic Energy Agency, and co-sponsored by American Nuclear Society Thermal Hydraulics Division among others. Enhanced safety and reducing cost are going together, which can be achieved through continued research and development efforts. NUTHOS keeps you abreast of the most updated information in the advancement of science and technology in nuclear thermal hydraulics, operations and safety, and provides you insights into the future. (J.P.N.)

  8. Development and application of high performance liquid shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Toshimasa; Omata, Sadao; Otano, Naoteru; Hirao, Yoshihiro; Kanai, Yasuji

    1998-01-01

    Development of liquid shielding material with good performance for neutron and γ-ray was investigated. Lead, hydrogen and boron were selected as the elements of shielding materials which were made by the ultraviolet curing method. Good performance shielding materials with about 1 mm width to neutron and gamma ray were produced by mixing lead, boron compound and ultraviolet curing monomer with many hydrogens. The shielding performance was the same as a concrete with two times width. The activation was very small such as 1/10 6 -1/10 8 of the standard concrete. The weight and the external appearance did not charged from room temperature to 100degC. Polyfunctional monomer had good thermal resistance. This shielding material was applied to double bending cylindrical duct and annulus ring duct. The results proved the shielding materials developed had good performance. (S.Y.)

  9. Computer systems for thermal power plant operation and management; Karyoku hatsudensho no kodo joho system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adachi, M.; Miyabe, K.; Matsumoto, A. [Toshiba Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-07-01

    To improve on work efficiency by pooling information and prompting the transmission of information at thermal power stations, efforts have been under way for some years to realize a working environment in which everyone is provided with a computer exclusively for one`s own use. Toshiba Corporation believes that the coming information system has to be equipped with two features of on-demand and EUC (end user computing). Introduced in this report are some approaches to systems that will take care of plant operation information and facility information making use of Toshiba`s advanced information system GS7000XP series. Plant operation information is categorized into process data, operation history data, checking patrol data, and periodic inspection data and, for instance, a distributed-type management computer provided with data recording and application processing servers is used for handling operation history data. For the collection of facility information, efforts are being made to establish a computer network step by step for exchanging information with manufacturers and associated businesses. 3 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Potential of Nanocellulose Composite for Electromagnetic Shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabila Yah Nurul Fatihah

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, most people rely on the electronic devices for work, communicating with friends and family, school and personal enjoyment. As a result, more new equipment or devices operates in higher frequency were rapidly developed to accommodate the consumers need. However, the demand of using wireless technology and higher frequency in new devices also brings the need to shield the unwanted electromagnetic signals from those devices for both proper operation and human health concerns. This paper highlights the potential of nanocellulose for electromagnetic shielding using the organic environmental nanocellulose composite materials. In addition, the theory of electromagnetic shielding and recent development of green and organic material in electromagnetic shielding application has also been reviewed in this paper. The use of the natural fibers which is nanocelllose instead of traditional reinforcement materials provides several advantages including the natural fibers are renewable, abundant and low cost. Furthermore, added with other advantages such as lightweight and high electromagnetic shielding ability, nanocellulose has a great potential as an alternative material for electromagnetic shielding application.

  11. HPGe detector shielding adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, L.; Rulik, P.

    2008-01-01

    Low-level background shielding of HPGe detectors is used mainly for environmental samples with very low content of radionuclides. National Radiation Protection Institute (SURO) in Prague is equipped with 14 HPGe detectors with relative efficiency up to 150%. The detectors are placed in a room built from materials with low content of natural radionuclides and equipped with a double isolation of the floor against radon. Detectors themselves are placed in lead or steel shielding. Steel shielding with one of these detectors with relative efficiency of 100% was chosen to be rebuilt to achieve lower minimum detectable activity (MDA). Additional lead and copper shielding was built up inside the original steel shielding to reduce the volume of the inner space and filled with nitrogen by means of evaporating liquid nitrogen. The additional lead and copper shielding, consequent reduction of the inner volume and supply of evaporated nitrogen, caused a decrease of the background count and accordingly MDA values as well. The effect of nitrogen evaporation on the net areas of peaks belonging to radon daughters is significant. The enhanced shielding adjustment has the biggest influence in low energy range, what can be seen in collected data. MDA values in energy range from 30 keV to 400 keV decreased to 0.65-0.85 of original value, in energy range from 400 keV to 2 MeV they fell to 0.70-0.97 of original value. (authors)

  12. Shielding in experimental areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.; Tarnopolsky, G.; Thorndike, A.; White, S.

    1979-01-01

    The amount of shielding necessary to protect experimental detectors from various sources of background radiation is discussed. As illustrated an experiment has line of sight to sources extending approx. 90 m upstream from the intersection point. Packing a significant fraction of this space with shielding blocks would in general be unacceptable because primary access to the ring tunnel is from the experimental halls. (1) From basic machine design considerations and the inherent necessity to protect superconducting magnets it is expected that experimental areas in general will be cleaner than at any existing accelerator. (2) Even so, it will likely be necessary to have some shielding blocks available to protect experimental apparatus, and it may well be necessary to have a large amount of shielding available in the WAH. (3) Scraping will likely have some influence on all halls, and retractable apparatus may sometimes be necessary. (4) If access to any tunnel is needed to replace a magnet, one has 96 h (4 days) available to move shielding away to permit access without additional downtime. This (the amount of shielding one can shuffle about in 96 h) is a reasonable upper limit to shielding necessary in a hall

  13. Self shielding in cylindrical fissile sources in the APNea system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, D.

    1997-01-01

    In order for a source of fissile material to be useful as a calibration instrument, it is necessary to know not only how much fissile material is in the source but also what the effective fissile content is. Because uranium and plutonium absorb thermal neutrons so Efficiently, material in the center of a sample is shielded from the external thermal flux by the surface layers of the material. Differential dieaway measurements in the APNea System of five different sets of cylindrical fissile sources show the various self shielding effects that are routinely encountered. A method for calculating the self shielding effect is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental results

  14. Evaluation of the shielding integrity of end-shields in PHWR type NPPs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sah, B.M.L.; Ramamirtham, B.; Kutty, B.S.

    1996-01-01

    In the new plants (Narora Atomic Power Plants (NAPP) onwards) relatively higher radiation fields exist on the north and south fuelling machine (FM) vault walls of the E1 100m accessible area passages. These fields were first noticed at NAPS-1 and subsequently at NAPS-2 and KAPS-1. Such surveys done at RAPS have indicated that the fields on these walls would come out to be quite low (only 1-2 mR/h) from sources other than that arising from 41 Ar contamination. RAPS/MAPS experience pointed to adequacy of shielding of the FM vault walls and sufficient overall shielding thickness of the end-shields. Further, radiometry tests of end-shields carried out at Kaiga and RAPP 3 and 4 indicated fairly satisfactory and uniform filling of balls. Hence, incomplete filling of water column of the end-shields due to any venting problem was suspected to be one possible reason for the observed high fields in NAPS and Kakrapar Atomic Power Station (KAPS). Since the presence of high radiation fields, both neutron and gamma, is of long-term concern, a special study/measurement of radiation levels on reactor face during high power operation was undertaken. In order to compare the shielding integrity of the older (RAPS/MAPS solid plate type shielding) and newer (NAPS/KAPS steel ball-filled type) end shields, these experiments were done at MAPS-2 and NAPS-2. (author). 2 refs., 2 tabs

  15. Technical specifications: Tower Shielding Reactor II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-02-01

    The technical specifications define the key limitations that must be observed for safe operation of the Tower Shielding Reactor II (TSR-II) and an envelope of operation within which there is reasonable assurance that these limits cannot be exceeded. The specifications were written to satisfy the requirements of the Department of Energy (DOE) Manual Chapter 0540, September 1, 1972

  16. Underground docking of shields for the first time under the sea by MSD method. Shield for a gas pipe line to Shin Nagoya thermal power station of Chubu Electric Power Co. Ltd.,; Kaiteika hatsu no MSD koho ni yoru shirudo chichu setsugo. Chubu Denryoku Shin Nagoya Karyoku Hatsudensho gas dokan shirudo koji

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Y. [Shimizu Corp., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-04-25

    MSD (mechanical shield docking) method is a method for mechanical docking two shields which have been extended simultaneously from both ends of one section of tunnel boring to shorten work term. One of the two shields has a piercing ring on its tip and another has a receiving ring. In the final stage of boring, the two ring are docked directly by piercing-receiving. The MSD method has been applied for the first time under sea to a boring work of an under sea tunnel on a route of a gas pipe line from Chita LNG base, Aichi prefecture to the title power station. This paper reports the outline of the shield machine and horizontal boring for confirming shield position that is a key to an underground docking as well as docking work. In the horizontal boring, after the shield machine on receiving side had reached the docking point predestined, the shield machine on piercing side conducted primary boring at 20 m front of the docking point and then secondary boring at 3 m front, whereby the boring hole was pierced into the shield machine on the receiving side. The accomplishment of this work made certain the reliability of MSD method even under sea. 1 ref., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  17. Improvement of environmental aspects of thermal power plant operation by advanced control concepts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikulandrić Robert

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The necessity of the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, as formulated in the Kyoto Protocol, imposes the need for improving environmental aspects of existing thermal power plants operation. Improvements can be reached either by efficiency increment or by implementation of emission reduction measures. Investments in refurbishment of existing plant components or in plant upgrading by flue gas desulphurization, by primary and secondary measures of nitrogen oxides reduction, or by biomass co-firing, are usually accompanied by modernisation of thermal power plant instrumentation and control system including sensors, equipment diagnostics and advanced controls. Impact of advanced control solutions implementation depends on technical characteristics and status of existing instrumentation and control systems as well as on design characteristics and actual conditions of installed plant components. Evaluation of adequacy of implementation of advanced control concepts is especially important in Western Balkan region where thermal power plants portfolio is rather diversified in terms of size, type and commissioning year and where generally poor maintenance and lack of investments in power generation sector resulted in high greenhouse gases emissions and low efficiency of plants in operation. This paper is intended to present possibilities of implementation of advanced control concepts, and particularly those based on artificial intelligence, in selected thermal power plants in order to increase plant efficiency and to lower pollutants emissions and to comply with environmental quality standards prescribed in large combustion plant directive. [Acknowledgements. This paper has been created within WBalkICT - Supporting Common RTD actions in WBCs for developing Low Cost and Low Risk ICT based solutions for TPPs Energy Efficiency increasing, SEE-ERA.NET plus project in cooperation among partners from IPA SA - Romania, University of Zagreb - Croatia and Vinca

  18. HANFORD DOUBLE SHELL TANK THERMAL AND SEISMIC PROJECT SUMMARY OF COMBINED THERMAL AND OPERATING LOADS WITH SEISMIC ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MACKEY TC; DEIBLER JE; RINKER MW; JOHNSON KI; ABATT FG; KARRI NK; PILLI SP; STOOPS KL

    2009-01-15

    This report summarizes the results of the Double-Shell Tank Thermal and Operating Loads Analysis (TaLA) combined with the Seismic Analysis. This combined analysis provides a thorough, defensible, and documented analysis that will become a part of the overall analysis of record for the Hanford double-shell tanks (DSTs). The bases of the analytical work presented herein are two ANSYS{reg_sign} finite element models that were developed to represent a bounding-case tank. The TaLA model includes the effects of temperature on material properties, creep, concrete cracking, and various waste and annulus pressure-loading conditions. The seismic model considers the interaction of the tanks with the surrounding soil including a range of soil properties, and the effects of the waste contents during a seismic event. The structural evaluations completed with the representative tank models do not reveal any structural deficiencies with the integrity of the DSTs. The analyses represent 60 years of use, which extends well beyond the current date. In addition, the temperature loads imposed on the model are significantly more severe than any service to date or proposed for the future. Bounding material properties were also selected to provide the most severe combinations. While the focus of the analyses was a bounding-case tank, it was necessary during various evaluations to conduct tank-specific analyses. The primary tank buckling evaluation was carried out on a tank-specific basis because of the sensitivity to waste height, specific gravity, tank wall thickness, and primary tank vapor space vacuum limit. For this analysis, the occurrence of maximum tank vacuum was classified as a service level C, emergency load condition. The only area of potential concern in the analysis was with the buckling evaluation of the AP tank, which showed the current limit on demand of l2-inch water gauge vacuum to exceed the allowable of 10.4 inches. This determination was based on analysis at the

  19. Shielding member for thermonuclear device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Onozuka, Masanori

    1997-06-30

    In a thermonuclear device for shielding fast neutrons by shielding members disposed in a shielding vessel (vacuum vessel and structures such as a blanket disposed in the vacuum vessel), the shielding member comprises a large number of shielding wires formed fine and short so as to have elasticity. The shielding wires are sealed in a shielding vessel together with water, and when the width of the shielding vessel is changed, the shielding wires follow after the change of the width while elastically deforming in the shielding vessel, so that great stress and deformation are not formed thereby enabling to improve reliability. In addition, the length, the diameter and the shape of each of the shielding wires can be selected in accordance with the shielding space of the shielding vessel. Even if the shape of the shielding vessel is complicated, the shielding wires can be inserted easily. Accordingly, the filling rate of the shielding members can be changed easily. It can be produced more easily compared with a conventional spherical pebbles. It can be produced more easily than existent spherical shielding pebbles thereby enabling to reduce the production cost. (N.H.)

  20. The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) conceptual design shielding analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johnson, J.O.; Odano, N.; Lillie, R.A.

    1998-03-01

    The shielding design is important for the construction of an intense high-energy accelerator facility like the proposed Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) due to its impact on conventional facility design, maintenance operations, and since the cost for the radiation shielding shares a considerable part of the total facility costs. A calculational strategy utilizing coupled high energy Monte Carlo calculations and multi-dimensional discrete ordinates calculations, along with semi-empirical calculations, was implemented to perform the conceptual design shielding assessment of the proposed SNS. Biological shields have been designed and assessed for the proton beam transport system and associated beam dumps, the target station, and the target service cell and general remote maintenance cell. Shielding requirements have been assessed with respect to weight, space, and dose-rate constraints for operating, shutdown, and accident conditions. A discussion of the proposed facility design, conceptual design shielding requirements calculational strategy, source terms, preliminary results and conclusions, and recommendations for additional analyses are presented

  1. Thermal-Hydraulic Experiment To Test The Stable Operation Of A PIUS Type Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irianto, Djoko; Kanji, T.; Kukita, Y.

    1996-01-01

    An advanced type of reaktor concept as the Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS) reactor was based on intrinsically passive safety considerations. The stable operation of a PIUS type reactor is based on the automation of circulation pump speed. An automatic circulation pump speed control system by using a measurement of the temperature distribution in the lower density lock is proposed the PIUS-type reactor. In principle this control system maintains the fluid temperature at the axial center of the lower density lock at average of the fluid temperatures below and above the lower density lock. This control system will prevent the poison water from penetrating into the core during normal operation. The effectiveness of this control system was successfully confirmed by a series of experiments using atmospheric pressure thermal-hydraulic test loop which simulated the PIUS principle. The experiments such as: start-up and power ramping tests for normal operation simulation and loss of feedwater test for an accident condition simulation, carried out in JAERI

  2. THERMAL HYDRAULIC ISSUES OF CONTAINMENT FILTERED VENTING SYSTEM FOR A LONG OPERATING TIME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOUNG SU NA

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the thermal hydraulic issues in the Containment Filtered Venting System (CFVS for a long operating time using the MELCOR computer code. The modeling of the CFVS, including the models for pool scrubbing and the filter, was added to the input file for the OPR-1000, and a Station Blackout (SBO was chosen as an accident scenario. Although depressurization in the containment building as a primary objective of the CFVS was successful, the decontamination feature by scrubbing and filtering in the CFVS for a long operating time could fail by the continuous evaporation of the scrubbing solution. After the operation of the CFVS, the atmosphere temperature in the CFVS became slightly above the water saturation temperature owing to the release of an amount of steam with high temperature from the containment building to the scrubbing solution. Reduced pipe diameters at the inlet and outlet of the CFVS vessel mitigated the evaporation of scrubbing water by controlling the amount of high-temperature steam and the water saturation temperature.

  3. Control of waste well casing vent gas from a thermal enhanced oil recovery operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peavy, M.A.; Braun, J.E.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of a waste gas treatment system designed to control emissions from thermally enhanced oil recovery wells. This case study discusses the need, design, installation and operations of the system. Oryx Energy Company (Oryx) operates approximately 940 wells in the Midway-Sunset (MWSS) field under casing vapor recovery systems. The emissions collected from well casing vent gas cotaining hydrocarbons and hydrogen sulfide that are collected and processed through casing vapor recovery skids. These skids are composed of condensers, compressors, and pumps that separate fluids from the waste gas stream. The non-condensible gas is then disposed of in incinerators that reduce the hydrocarbon and sulfur emissions into the atmosphere. Approximately 91,000 lbs/day of hydrocarbon and 10,116 lbs/day of sulfur dioxide are removed from the atmosphere from wells contained within these systems operated by Oryx. These hydrocarbons yield approximately 550 barrels of oil per day (BOPD). The system helps manage the pressure differential from the reservoir into each wellbore and contributes to improved ambient air quality in Kern County, California

  4. Estimating ISABELLE shielding requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevens, A.J.; Thorndike, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    Estimates were made of the shielding thicknesses required at various points around the ISABELLE ring. Both hadron and muon requirements are considered. Radiation levels at the outside of the shield and at the BNL site boundary are kept at or below 1000 mrem per year and 5 mrem/year respectively. Muon requirements are based on the Wang formula for pion spectra, and the hadron requirements on the hadron cascade program CYLKAZ of Ranft. A muon shield thickness of 77 meters of sand is indicated outside the ring in one area, and hadron shields equivalent to from 2.7 to 5.6 meters in thickness of sand above the ring. The suggested safety allowance would increase these values to 86 meters and 4.0 to 7.2 meters respectively. There are many uncertainties in such estimates, but these last figures are considered to be rather conservative

  5. Scintillation counter, segmented shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olson, R.E.; Thumim, A.D.

    1975-01-01

    A scintillation counter, particularly for counting gamma ray photons, includes a massive lead radiation shield surrounding a sample-receiving zone. The shield is disassembleable into a plurality of segments to allow facile installation and removal of a photomultiplier tube assembly, the segments being so constructed as to prevent straight-line access of external radiation through the shield into radiation-responsive areas. Provisions are made for accurately aligning the photomultiplier tube with respect to one or more sample-transmitting bores extending through the shield to the sample receiving zone. A sample elevator, used in transporting samples into the zone, is designed to provide a maximum gamma-receiving aspect to maximize the gamma detecting efficiency. (U.S.)

  6. Thermal and Evolved Gas Behavior of Calcite Under Mars Phoenix TEGA Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D.W.; Niles, P.B.; Morris, R.V.; Boynton, W.V.; Golden, D.C.; Lauer, H.V.; Sutter, B.

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Phoenix Scout Mission with its diverse instrument suite successfully examined several soils on the Northern plains of Mars. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) was employed to detect organic and inorganic materials by coupling a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) with a magnetic-sector mass spectrometer (MS). Martian soil was heated up to 1000 C in the DSC ovens and evolved gases from mineral decomposition products were examined with the MS. TEGA s DSC has the capability to detect endothermic and exothermic reactions during heating that are characteristic of minerals present in the Martian soil. Initial TEGA results indicated the presence of endothermic peaks with onset temperatures that ranged from 675 C to 750 C with corresponding CO2 release. This result suggests the presence of calcite (CaCO3. CaO + CO2). Organic combustion to CO2 is not likely since this mostly occurs at temperatures below 550 C. Fe-carbonate and Mg-carbonate are not likely because their decomposition temperatures are less than 600 C. TEGA enthalpy determinations suggest that calcite, may occur in the Martian soil in concentrations of approx.1 to 5 wt. %. The detection of calcite could be questioned based on previous results that suggest Mars soils are mostly acidic. However, the Phoenix landing site soil pH was measured at pH 8.3 0.5, which is typical of terrestrial soils where pH is controlled by calcite solubility. The range of onset temperatures and calcite concentration as calculated by TEGA is poorly con-strained in part because of limited thermal data of cal-cite at reduced pressures. TEGA operates at calcite literature thermal data was obtained at 1000 mbar or higher pressures.

  7. FY 1993 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G. [and others

    1994-07-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 MG/m{sup 2}-s. In a parallel fuel plate configuration as in the ANSR, the flow is subject to a potential excursive static-flow instability that can very rapidly lead to flow starvation and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) in the ``hot channel``. The current correlations and experimental data bases for flow excursion (FE) and critical heat flux (CHF) seldom evaluate the specific combination of ANSR operating parameters. The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. A series of FE tests with water flowing vertically upward was completed over a nominal heat flux range of 6 to 17 MW/m{sup 2}, a mass flux range of 8 to 28 Mg/m{sup 2}-s, an exit pressure range of 1.4 to 2.1 MPa, and an inlet temperature range of 40 to 50 C. FE experiments were also conducted using as ``soft`` a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomena (actual secondary burnout). True DNB experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. To the author`s knowledge, no other FE data have been reported in the literature to date that dover such a combination of conditions of high mass flux, high heat flux, and moderately high pressure.

  8. FY 1993 progress report on the ANS thermal-hydraulic test loop operation and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Farquharson, G.

    1994-07-01

    The Thermal-Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) is an experimental facility constructed to support the development of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Highly subcooled heavy-water coolant flows vertically upward at a very high mass flux of almost 27 MG/m 2 -s. In a parallel fuel plate configuration as in the ANSR, the flow is subject to a potential excursive static-flow instability that can very rapidly lead to flow starvation and departure from nucleate boiling (DNB) in the ''hot channel''. The current correlations and experimental data bases for flow excursion (FE) and critical heat flux (CHF) seldom evaluate the specific combination of ANSR operating parameters. The THTL facility was designed and built to provide known thermal-hydraulic (T/H) conditions for a simulated full-length coolant subchannel of the ANS reactor core, thus facilitating experimental determination of FE and CHF thermal limits under expected ANSR T/H conditions. A series of FE tests with water flowing vertically upward was completed over a nominal heat flux range of 6 to 17 MW/m 2 , a mass flux range of 8 to 28 Mg/m 2 -s, an exit pressure range of 1.4 to 2.1 MPa, and an inlet temperature range of 40 to 50 C. FE experiments were also conducted using as ''soft'' a system as possible to secure a true FE phenomena (actual secondary burnout). True DNB experiments under similar conditions were also conducted. To the author's knowledge, no other FE data have been reported in the literature to date that dover such a combination of conditions of high mass flux, high heat flux, and moderately high pressure

  9. Optimum thermal sizing and operating conditions for once through steam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Kunwoo; Ju, Kyongin; Im, Inyoung; Kim, Eunkee [KEPCO Engineering and Construction Company., Inc., Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    The steam generator is designed to be optimized so as to remove heat and to produce steam vapor. Because of its importance, theoretical and experimental researches have been performed on forced convection boiling heat transfer. The purpose of this study is to predict the thermal behavior and to perform optimum thermal sizing of once through steam generator. To estimate the tube thermal sizing and operating conditions of the steam generator, the analytical modeling is employed on the basis of the empirical correlation equations and theory. The optimized algorithm model, Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA)-II, uses for this analysis. This research is focused on the design of in-vessel steam generator. An one dimensional analysis code is developed to evaluate previous researches and to optimize steam generator design parameters. The results of one-dimensional analysis need to be verified with experimental data. Goals of multi-objective optimization are to minimize tube length, pressure drop and tube number. Feedwater flow rate up to 115.425kg/s is selected so as to have margin of feedwater temperature 20 ..deg. C. For the design of 200MWth once through steam generator, it is evaluated that the tube length shall be over 12.0m for the number of tubes, 2500ea, and the length of the tube shall be over 8.0m for the number of tubes, 4500ea. The parallel coordinates chart can be provided to determine the optimal combination of number of tube, pressure drop, tube diameter and length.

  10. Shields for nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aspden, G.J.

    1984-01-01

    The patent concerns shields for nuclear reactors. The roof shield comprises a normally fixed radial outer portion, a radial inner portion rotatable about a vertical axis, and a connection between the inner and outer portions. In the event of hypothecal core disruption conditions, a cantilever system on the inner wall allows the upward movement of the inner wall, in order to prevent loss of containment. (UK)

  11. Radiation shielding curtain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, N.T.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation shield is described in the form of a stranded curtain made up of bead-chains whose material and geometry are selected to produce a cross-sectional density that is the equivalent of 0.25 mm or more of lead and which curtain may be mounted on various radiological devices to shield against scattered radiation while offering a minimum of obstruction to the radiologist

  12. Effects of bubbling operations on a thermally stratified reservoir: implications for water quality amelioration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, R L; Bonansea, M; Cosavella, A; Monarde, F; Ferreyra, M; Bresciano, J

    2012-01-01

    Artificial thermal mixing of the water column is a common method of addressing water quality problems with the most popular method of destratification being the bubble curtain. The air or oxygen distribution along submerged multiport diffusers is based on similar basic principles as those of outfall disposal systems. Moreover, the disposal of sequestered greenhouse gases into the ocean, as recently proposed by several researchers to mitigate the global warming problem, requires analogous design criteria. In this paper, the influence of a bubble-plume is evaluated using full-scale temperature and water quality data collected in San Roque Reservoir, Argentina. A composite system consisting of seven separated diffusers connected to four 500 kPa compressors was installed at this reservoir by the end of 2008. The original purpose of this air bubble system was to reduce the stratification, so that the water body may completely mix under natural phenomena and remain well oxygenated throughout the year. By using a combination of the field measurements and modelling, this work demonstrates that thermal mixing by means of compressed air may improve water quality; however, if improperly sized or operated, such mixing can also cause deterioration. Any disruption in aeration during the destratification process, for example, may result in a reduction of oxygen levels due to the higher hypolimnetic temperatures. Further, the use of artificial destratification appears to have insignificant influence on reducing evaporation rates in relatively shallow impoundments such as San Roque reservoir.

  13. Ventilation and filtration techniques for handling aerosols produced by thermal cutting operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bishop, A.

    1989-01-01

    This report describes the work done to characterize aerosols from thermal cutting operations and to develop suitable ventilation and filtration techniques. The work has been carried out under a research contract between the Windscale Laboratory and the Commission of the European Communities. The contract started in October 1984 and was completed in June 1988. The total cost of the work was UKL 132 000 of which 50% was funded by the Commission. This report has been compiled from the several progress reports submitted during the work period and details the main findings from the work programme. By working with colleagues from Commissariat a l'energie atomique, Saclay, France, additional useful data were collected. The bimodal size distribution of aerosols from oxypropane cutting was confirmed. Trials on various prefilters showed that the electrostatic precipitator (ESP) and the cartridge filter had excellent collection properties. From these trials the ESP was selected as the prefilter for the windscale advanced gas-cooled reactor (WAGR) decommissioning project. This work is presented in Appendix 1 to this report. Details are given of the proposals to modify the ESP to enable the safe removal of radioactive dust and contamined collector plates. Tests are described on aerosols generated by laser cutting and also trials on the ESP and high gradient magnetic separation prefilters. Finally, the measurement of filter burdens, aerosol concentrations and dust deposition rates from thermal cutting in a full-size ventilation rig are reported

  14. Methods and procedures for shielding analyses for the SNS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popova, I.; Ferguson, F.; Gallmeier, F.X.; Iverson, E.; Lu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    In order to provide radiologically safe Spallation Neutron Source operation, shielding analyses are performed according to Oak Ridge National Laboratory internal regulations and to comply with the Code of Federal Regulations. An overview of on-going shielding work for the accelerator facility and neutrons beam lines, methods used for the analyses, and associated procedures and regulations are presented. Methods used to perform shielding analyses are described as well. (author)

  15. Small scale thermal-hydraulic experiment for stable operation of a pius-type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tasaka, K.; Tamaki, M.; Imai, S.; Irianto, I.D.; Tsuji, Y.; Kukita, Y.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal-hydraulic experiments using a small-scale atmospheric pressure test loop have been performed for the Process Inherent Ultimate Safety (PIUS)-type reactor to develop the new pump speed feedback control system. Three feedback control systems based on the measurement of flow rate, differential pressure, and fluid temperature distribution in the lower density lock have been proposed and confirmed by a series of experiments. Each of the feedback control systems had been verified in the simulation experiment such as a start-up simulation test. The automatic pump speed control based on the fluid temperature at the lower density lock was quite effective to maintain the stratified interface between primary water and borated pool water for stable operation of the reactor. (author)

  16. Crosswinds Effect on the Thermal Performance of Wet Cooling Towers Under Variable Operating Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, You Liang; Shi, Yong Feng; Hao, Jian Gang; Chang, Hao; Sun, Feng Zhong

    2018-01-01

    In order to quantitatively analyze the influence of the variable operating parameters on the cooling performance of natural draft wet cooling towers (NDWCTs), a hot model test system was set up with adjustable ambient temperature and humidity, circulating water flowrate and temperature. In order to apply the hot model test results to the real tower, the crosswind Froude number is defined. The results show that the crosswind has a negative effect on the thermal performance of the cooling tower, and there is a critical crosswind velocity corresponding to the lowest cooling efficiency. According to the crosswind Froude number similarity, when the ambient temperature decreases, or the circulating water flowrate and temperature increase, the cooling tower draft force will increase, and the critical crosswind velocity will increase correspondingly.

  17. Thermal and mechanical properties of aluminized fabrics for use in ferrous metal handling operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wren, J E; Scott, W D; Bates, C E

    1977-11-01

    Protective garments are normally worn in molten handling operations to provide some protection against molten metal splashes. These garments are also intended to provide protection against radiant heat, and they should be as heat resistant and comfortable as possible. Asbestos-based fabrics have been employed for many years, but recently some concern has been expressed over possible asbestos exposure. This program was undertaken to explore the ability of several types of fabrics to resist heat transfer during molten metal impact. A molten metal splash test, along with standard methods for determining tensile strength, flame resistance, and abrasion-flexing resistance were used to evaluate several classes of protective fabrics. The results indicate that there are materials available that offer equal or better mechanical properties and thermal protection compared to aluminized asbestos.

  18. Thermal characterization of phacoemulsification probes operated in axial and torsional modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharias, Jaime

    2015-01-01

    To analyze temperature increases and identify potential sources of heat generated when sleeved and sleeveless phacoemulsification probes were operated in axial and torsional modes using the Infiniti Vision System with the Ozil torsional handpiece. Phacodynamics Laboratory, Pasteur Ophthalmic Clinic, Santiago, Chile. Experimental study. Two computer-controlled thermal transfer systems were developed to evaluate the contribution of internal metal stress and tip-to-sleeve friction on heat generation during phacoemulsification using axial and torsional ultrasound modalities. Both systems incorporated infrared thermal imaging and used a black-body film to accurately capture temperature measurements. Axial mode was consistently associated with greater temperature increases than torsional mode whether tips were operated with or without sleeves. In tests involving bare tips, axial mode and torsional mode peaked at 51.7°C and 34.2°C, respectively. In an example using sleeved tips in which a 30.0 g load was applied for 1 second, temperatures for axial mode reached 45°C and for torsional mode, 38°C. Friction between the sleeved probe and the incisional wall contributed more significantly to the temperature increase than internal metal stress regardless of the mode used. In all experiments, the temperature increase observed with axial mode was greater than that observed with torsional mode, even when conditions such as power or amplitude and flow rate were varied. Tip-to-sleeve friction was a more dominant source of phaco probe heating than internal metal stress. The temperature increase due to internal metal stress was greater with axial mode than with torsional mode. Dr. Zacharias received research funding from Alcon Laboratories, Inc., to conduct this study. He has no financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2015 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Characterization of cold sensitivity and thermal preference using an operant orofacial assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caudle Robert M

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A hallmark of many orofacial pain disorders is cold sensitivity, but relative to heat-related pain, mechanisms of cold perception and the development of cold allodynia are not clearly understood. Molecular mediators of cold sensation such as TRPM8 have been recently identified and characterized using in vitro studies. In this study we characterized operant behavior with respect to individually presented cold stimuli (24, 10, 2, and -4°C and in a thermal preference task where rats chose between -4 and 48°C stimulation. We also evaluated the effects of menthol, a TRPM8 agonist, on operant responses to cold stimulation (24, 10, and -4°C. Male and female rats were trained to drink sweetened milk while pressing their shaved faces against a thermode. This presents a conflict paradigm between milk reward and thermal stimulation. Results We demonstrated that the cold stimulus response function was modest compared to heat. There was a significant effect of temperature on facial (stimulus contacts, the ratio of licking contacts to stimulus contacts, and the stimulus duration/contact ratio. Males and females differed only in their facial contacts at 10°C. In the preference task, males preferred 48°C to -4°C, despite the fact that 48°C and -4°C were equally painful as based on their reward/stimulus and duration/contact ratios. We were able to induce hypersensitivity to cold using menthol at 10°C, but not at 24 or -4°C. Conclusion Our results indicate a strong role for an affective component in processing of cold stimuli, more so than for heat, which is in concordance with human psychophysical findings. The induction of allodynia with menthol provides a model for cold allodynia. This study provides the basis for future studies involving orofacial pain and analgesics, and is translatable to the human experience.

  20. Magnetic shield effect simulation of superconducting film shield covering directly coupled HTS dc-SQUID magnetometer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terauchi, N.; Noguchi, S.; Igarashi, H.

    2011-01-01

    A superconducting film shield over a SQUID ring improves the robustness of the SQUID with respect to magnetic noise. Supercurrent in the SQUID magnetometer and the superconducting film shield were simulated. The superconducting film shield reduces the influence of the external magnetic field on the SQUID ring. An HTS SQUID is a high sensitive magnetic sensor. In recent years, the HTS SQUID is widely used in various applications. In some applications, high robustness with respect to magnetic noise is required to realize stable operation at outside of a magnetic shielding room. The target of this paper is a directly coupled HTS dc-SQUID magnetometer. To enhance the robustness of the SQUID magnetometer, use of a superconducting thin film shield has been proposed. The magnetic field directly penetrating the SQUID ring causes the change of the critical current of Josephson junction, and then the SQUID magnetometer transitions into inoperative state. In order to confirm the magnetic shield effect of the superconducting film shield, electromagnetic field simulation with 3D edge finite element method was performed. To simulate the high temperature superconductor, E-J characteristics and c-axis anisotropy are considered. To evaluate the effect of the superconducting film shield, an external magnetic field which is supposed to be a magnetic noise is applied. From the simulation results, the time transition of the magnetic flux penetrating the SQUID ring is investigated and the effect of the superconducting film shield is confirmed. The amplitude of the magnetic flux penetrating the SQUID ring can be reduced to about one-sixth since the superconducting film shield prevents the magnetic noise from directly penetrating the SQUID ring.

  1. Integrating SAR with Optical and Thermal Remote Sensing for Operational Near Real-Time Volcano Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. J.; Webley, P.; Dehn, J.; Arko, S. A.; McAlpin, D. B.

    2013-12-01

    Volcanic eruptions are among the most significant hazards to human society, capable of triggering natural disasters on regional to global scales. In the last decade, remote sensing techniques have become established in operational forecasting, monitoring, and managing of volcanic hazards. Monitoring organizations, like the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), are nowadays heavily relying on remote sensing data from a variety of optical and thermal sensors to provide time-critical hazard information. Despite the high utilization of these remote sensing data to detect and monitor volcanic eruptions, the presence of clouds and a dependence on solar illumination often limit their impact on decision making processes. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) systems are widely believed to be superior to optical sensors in operational monitoring situations, due to the weather and illumination independence of their observations and the sensitivity of SAR to surface changes and deformation. Despite these benefits, the contributions of SAR to operational volcano monitoring have been limited in the past due to (1) high SAR data costs, (2) traditionally long data processing times, and (3) the low temporal sampling frequencies inherent to most SAR systems. In this study, we present improved data access, data processing, and data integration techniques that mitigate some of the above mentioned limitations and allow, for the first time, a meaningful integration of SAR into operational volcano monitoring systems. We will introduce a new database interface that was developed in cooperation with the Alaska Satellite Facility (ASF) and allows for rapid and seamless data access to all of ASF's SAR data holdings. We will also present processing techniques that improve the temporal frequency with which hazard-related products can be produced. These techniques take advantage of modern signal processing technology as well as new radiometric normalization schemes, both enabling the combination of

  2. Using Paraffin PCM to Make Optical Communication Type of Payloads Thermally Self-Sufficient for Operation in Orion Crew Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Michael K.

    2016-01-01

    An innovative concept of using paraffin phase change material with a melting point of 28 C to make Optical Communication type of payload thermally self-sufficient for operation in the Orion Crew Module is presented. It stores the waste heat of the payload and permits it to operate for about one hour by maintaining its temperature within the maximum operating limit. It overcomes the problem of relying on the availability of cold plate heat sink in the Orion Crew Module.

  3. Experimental studies on thermal hydraulic responses for transient operations of the SMART-P

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.Y.; Park, H.S.; Cho, S.; Park, C.K.; Lee, S.J.; Song, C.H.; Chung, M.K.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Thermal hydraulic responses for transient operations of the SMART-P are experimentally investigated by using a integral effect test facility. This test facility (VISTA) has been constructed to simulate the SMART-P, which is a pilot plant of the SMART. The SMART-P is an advanced modular integral type pressurized water reactor (65 MWt) whose major RCS components, such as main coolant pumps, helical-coiled tube bundle steam generators and pressurizers, are contained in a reactor vessel. This integral design approach eliminates the large coolant loop piping, thus eliminates the occurrence of a large break LOCA. Passive Residual Heat Removal System (PRHRS) is installed to prevent overheating and over-pressurization of the primary system during accidental conditions. The PRHRS of the SMART-P removes the core decay heat by natural circulation of the two-phase fluid. The VISTA facility is a full height and 1/96 volume scaled test facility with respect to the SMART-P and will be used to understand the thermal-hydraulic responses following transients and finally to verify the system design of the SMART-P. The experimental data from the VISTA facility will be essential to system designers to resolve open issues relevant to the design of the SMART-P. The full functional control logics are implanted into the VISTA facility to cope with abnormal transients. The core of the facility can be selectively controlled by either a T-control or a T+N control method. The T-control method is a control method to adjust the core power according to the core exit coolant temperature and is designed to be used for high primary coolant flow conditions. On the other hand, the T+N control method is for low primary coolant flow conditions and it uses core exit temperature as well as core power itself as control inputs. The thermal hydraulic responses are carefully investigated according to different core control methods. Several experiments have been performed to

  4. Operating modes of high-Tc composite superconductors and thermal runaway conditions under current charging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovskii, V R; Watanabe, K

    2006-01-01

    The operating thermal and electric modes of a high-T c superconducting composite in partially and fully penetrated states induced by the charging current are investigated. They were studied under conditions in which the current charging rate, the volume fraction of the superconductor in a composite or the temperature of the cooling bath were changed. The transient behaviour of the voltage-current dependence, which is characteristic during stable and unstable increases in electric field inside the composite under a continuous current charging, is discussed. Simulations were done using zero- and one-dimensional steady and unsteady thermoelectric models with a power equation describing the virgin voltage-current characteristic of a superconductor. It is found that some thermoelectric trends underlie the shape of the voltage-current characteristic of the high-T c superconducting composite. These have to be considered during experiments in which the critical or quench currents are defined. First, in the initial stage of the fully penetrated regime (in the low voltage range), the electric field distribution does not have a uniform character. These states depend on the volume fraction of the superconductor and the current charging rate: the higher these quantities, the higher the heterogeneity of the electric field. Second, during the stable over-critical regime (in the high voltage range) occurring in complete penetration modes, the evolution of the electric field may depend on the relevant temperature increase of a composite according to the corresponding increase in its temperature-dependent heat capacity. Consequently, the shape of the voltage-current characteristic of a composite high-T c superconductor during continuous current charging, both before and after thermal runaway, has only a positive slope. Moreover, it is proved that the growth of the fully penetrated part of the voltage-current characteristic becomes less intensive when the current charging rate or the

  5. Effect of mode of operation on hydrogen production from glycerol at thermal neutral conditions: Thermodynamic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pairojpiriyakul, Thirasak; Soottitantawat, Apinan; Arpornwichanop, Amornchai; Assabumrungrat, Suttichai [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Chulalongkorn University (Thailand); Kiatkittipong, Worapon [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering and Industrial Technology, Silpakorn University (Thailand); Wiyaratn, Wisitsree [Department of Production Technology Education, Faculty of Industrial Education and Technology, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi (Thailand); Laosiripojana, Navadol [The Joint Graduate School of Energy and Environment, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi (Thailand); Croiset, Eric [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Waterloo (Canada)

    2010-10-15

    Thermodynamic analysis of hydrogen production from glycerol under thermal neutral conditions is studied in this work. Heat requirement from the process can be achieved from the exothermic reaction of glycerol with oxygen in air fed to the system. Two modes of operation for air feeding are considered including (i) Single-feed mode in which air is fed in combination with water and glycerol to the reformer, and (ii) Split-feed mode in which air and part of glycerol is fed to a combustor in order to generate heat. The thermal neutral conditions are considered for two levels including Reformer and System levels. It was found that the H{sub 2} yield from both modes is not significantly different at the Reformer level. In contrast, the difference becomes more pronounced at the System level. Single-feed and Split-feed modes offer high H{sub 2} yield in low (600-900 K) and high (900-1200 K) temperature ranges, respectively. The maximum H{sub 2} yields are 5.67 (water to glycerol ratio, WGR = 12, oxygen to glycerol ratio, OGR = 0.37, T = 900 K, Split-feed mode), and 3.28 (WGR = 3, OGR = 1.40, T = 900 K, Single-feed mode), for the Reformer and System levels, respectively. The difference between H{sub 2} yields in both levels mainly arises from the huge heat demand for preheating feeds in the System level, and therefore, a higher amount of air is needed to achieve the thermal neutral condition. Split-feed mode is a favorable choice in term of H{sub 2} purity because the gas product is not diluted with N{sub 2} from the air. The use of pure O{sub 2} and afterburner products (ABP) stream were also considered at the System level. The maximum H{sub 2} yield becomes 3.75 (WGR = 5.21, OGR = 1.28, T = 900 K, Split-feed mode) at thermal neutral condition when utilizing heat from the ABP stream. Finally comparisons between the different modes and levels are addressed in terms of yield of by-products, and carbon formation. (author)

  6. Design considerations for Mars transfer vehicles using nuclear thermal propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emrich, William J.

    1995-01-01

    The design of a Mars Transfer Vehicle (MTV) utilizing nuclear propulsion will require that careful consideration be given to the nuclear radiation environment in which it will operate. The extremely high neutron and gamma fluxes characteristic of nuclear thermal propulsion systems will cause significant heating of the fluid systems in close proximity to the reactor, especially in the lower propellant tanks. Crew radiation doses are also a concern particularly late in a mission when there is less shielding from the propellant tanks. In this study, various vehicle configuration and shielding strategies were examined and the resulting time dependent radiation fields evaluated. A common cluster of three particle bed reactor (PBR) engines were used in all configurations examined. In general, it appears that long, relatively narrow vehicles perform the best from a radiation standpoint, however, good shield optimization will be critical in maintaining a low radiation environment while minimizing the shield weight penalty.

  7. X-ray shielding behaviour of kaolin derived mullite-barites ceramic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripin, A.; Mohamed, F.; Choo, T. F.; Yusof, M. R.; Hashim, S.; Ghoshal, S. K.

    2018-03-01

    Mullite-barite ceramic (MBC) is an emergent material for effective shielding of redundant ionizing radiation exposure. The composition dependent mechanical, thermal, and microstructure properties of MBC that makes MBC a high performing novel radiation shielding candidate remained unexplored. This paper examines the possibility of exploiting Malaysian kaolin (AKIM-35) and barite (BaSO4) derived ceramic (MBC) system for X-ray shielding operation. Using conventional pressing and sintering method six ceramic samples are prepared by mixing AKIM-35 with barite at varying contents (0, 10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 wt%). Synthesized pressed mixtures are calcined at 400 °C for 30 min and then sintered to 1300 °C for 120 min at a heating rate of 10 °C/min. Sintered samples are characterized via X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), lead equivalent (LE), uniformity and dose reduction analyses. XRD pattern of prepared ceramics revealed the presence of monoclinic barium alumino-silicate (BAS) and orthorhombic mullite as major shielding phases together with other minor phase of barite and hexagonal quartz (SiO2) structures. Furthermore, FESEM images of ceramics (between 0 and 30 wt%) displayed the existence of compacted monoclinic plate of BAS and acicular mullite morphology (ceramics at 40 and 50 wt%). Radiation tests displayed the capacity of ceramics (at 0 and 10 wt%) to shield the X-ray radiation emanated at tube potential range of 50-120 kV. The highest radiation attenuation is ascertained at 70 kV where the dose is reduced remarkably between 99.11% and 97.42%. Ceramics at 0 and 10 wt% demonstrated the highest lead (Pb) equivalent thickness (LE) of 0.44 mm and 0.34 mm, respectively. It is established that such MBC may contribute towards the development of shielding material against ionizing radiation in diagnostic radiology (X-ray) dose range.

  8. Boron evaporation in thermally-driven seawater desalination: Effect of temperature and operating conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Alpatova, Alla; Alsaadi, Ahmad Salem; Ghaffour, NorEddine

    2018-01-01

    The volatilization of boron in thermal desalination processes, namely multi-stage flash (MSF) and air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD) was investigated for the first time. This phenomenon was observed at feed temperatures above 55 °C in both studied processes. In simulated MSF process with two feeds, model boric acid and Red Sea water, boron concentration in distillate increased with feed temperature increase from 55 °C to 104 °C because of the increase in boric acid vapor pressure. Salinity and pH were the main factors controlling boron evaporation. The achieved boron concentrations in simulated MSF process were consistent with those measured in distillate samples collected from commercial MSF plants. The AGMD process also revealed a strong influence of operating temperature on boron removal. However, unlike MSF process, the boron concentration in AGMD permeate decreased with the feed temperature increase from 55 °C to 80 °C due probably to increase in vapor production and corresponding permeate dilution. When AGMD was operated in concentrating mode at a constant feed temperature of 80 °C, permeate boron concentration increased with process time due to concentration polarization and membrane fouling. A 10% flux decline observed after 21 h was attributed to CaCO scaling on the membrane surface.

  9. Boron evaporation in thermally-driven seawater desalination: Effect of temperature and operating conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpatova, A; Alsaadi, A; Ghaffour, N

    2018-06-05

    The volatilization of boron in thermal desalination processes, namely multi-stage flash (MSF) and air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD) was investigated for the first time. This phenomenon was observed at feed temperatures above 55 °C in both studied processes. In simulated MSF process with two feeds, model boric acid and Red Sea water, boron concentration in distillate increased with feed temperature increase from 55 °C to 104 °C because of the increase in boric acid vapor pressure. Salinity and pH were the main factors controlling boron evaporation. The achieved boron concentrations in simulated MSF process were consistent with those measured in distillate samples collected from commercial MSF plants. The AGMD process also revealed a strong influence of operating temperature on boron removal. However, unlike MSF process, the boron concentration in AGMD permeate decreased with the feed temperature increase from 55 °C to 80 °C due probably to increase in vapor production and corresponding permeate dilution. When AGMD was operated in concentrating mode at a constant feed temperature of 80 °C, permeate boron concentration increased with process time due to concentration polarization and membrane fouling. A 10% flux decline observed after 21 h was attributed to CaCO 3 scaling on the membrane surface. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Boron evaporation in thermally-driven seawater desalination: Effect of temperature and operating conditions

    KAUST Repository

    Alpatova, Alla

    2018-03-26

    The volatilization of boron in thermal desalination processes, namely multi-stage flash (MSF) and air-gap membrane distillation (AGMD) was investigated for the first time. This phenomenon was observed at feed temperatures above 55 °C in both studied processes. In simulated MSF process with two feeds, model boric acid and Red Sea water, boron concentration in distillate increased with feed temperature increase from 55 °C to 104 °C because of the increase in boric acid vapor pressure. Salinity and pH were the main factors controlling boron evaporation. The achieved boron concentrations in simulated MSF process were consistent with those measured in distillate samples collected from commercial MSF plants. The AGMD process also revealed a strong influence of operating temperature on boron removal. However, unlike MSF process, the boron concentration in AGMD permeate decreased with the feed temperature increase from 55 °C to 80 °C due probably to increase in vapor production and corresponding permeate dilution. When AGMD was operated in concentrating mode at a constant feed temperature of 80 °C, permeate boron concentration increased with process time due to concentration polarization and membrane fouling. A 10% flux decline observed after 21 h was attributed to CaCO scaling on the membrane surface.

  11. Thermal analysis of EAST neutral beam injectors for long-pulse beam operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chundong, HU; Yongjian, XU; Yuanlai, XIE; Yahong, XIE; Lizhen, LIANG; Caichao, JIANG; Sheng, LIU; Jianglong, WEI; Peng, SHENG; Zhimin, LIU; Ling, TAO; the NBI Team

    2018-04-01

    Two sets of neutral beam injectors (NBI-1 and NBI-2) have been mounted on the EAST tokamak since 2014. NBI-1 and NBI-2 are co-direction and counter-direction, respectively. As with in-depth physics and engineering study of EAST, the ability of long pulse beam injection should be required in the NBI system. For NBIs, the most important and difficult thing that should be overcome is heat removal capacity of heat loaded components for long-pulse beam extraction. In this article, the thermal state of the components of EAST NBI is investigated using water flow calorimetry and thermocouple temperatures. Results show that (1) operation parameters have an obvious influence on the heat deposited on the inner components of the beamline, (2) a suitable operation parameter can decrease the heat loading effectively and obtain longer beam pulse length, and (3) under the cooling water pressure of 0.25 MPa, the predicted maximum beam pulse length will be up to 260 s with 50 keV beam energy by a duty factor of 0.5. The results present that, in this regard, the EAST NBI-1 system has the ability of long-pulse beam injection.

  12. A dynamic switching strategy for air-conditioning systems operated in light-thermal-load conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin, Jin-Long; Yeh, T.-J.; Hwang, Wei-Yang

    2009-01-01

    Recently, modern air-conditioners have begun to incorporate variable-speed compressors and variable-opening expansion valves, together with feedback control to improve the performance and energy efficiency. However, for the compressor there usually exists a low-speed limit below which its speed can not be continuously modulated unless it is completely turned off. When the air-conditioning system is operated in light-thermal-load conditions, the low-speed limit causes the compressor to run in an on-off manner which can significantly degrade the performance and efficiency. In this paper, a dynamic switching strategy is proposed for such scenarios. The strategy is basically an integration of a cascading control structure, an intuitive switching strategy, and a dynamic compensator. While the control structure provides the nominal performance, the intuitive switching strategy and the dynamic compensator together can account for the compressor's low-speed limitation. Theoretical analysis reveals that when the output matrix of the dynamic compensator is chosen properly, the proposed strategy can effectively reduce the output error caused by the on-off operation of the compressor. Experiments also demonstrate that the proposed strategy can simultaneously provide better regulation for the indoor temperature and improve the energy efficiency at steady state.

  13. INTOR first wall/blanket/shield activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gohar, Y.; Billone, M.C.; Cha, Y.S.; Finn, P.A.; Hassanein, A.M.; Liu, Y.Y.; Majumdar, S.; Picologlou, B.F.; Smith, D.L.

    1986-01-01

    The main emphasis of the INTOR first wall/blanket/shield (FWBS) during this period has been upon the tritium breeding issues. The objective is to develop a FWBS concept which produces the tritium requirement for INTOR operation and uses a small fraction of the first wall surface area. The FWBS is constrained by the dimensions of the reference design and the protection criteria required for different reactor components. The blanket extrapolation to commercial power reactor conditions and the proper temperature for power extraction have been sacrificed to achieve the highest possible local tritium breeding ratio (TBR). In addition, several other factors that have been considered in the blanket survey study include safety, reliability, lifetime fluence, number of burn cycles, simplicity, cost, and development issues. The implications of different tritium supply scenarios were discussed from the cost and availability for INTOR conditions. A wide variety of blanket options was explored in a preliminary way to determine feasibility and to see if they can satisfy the INTOR conditions. This survey and related issues are summarized in this report. Also discussed are material design requirements, thermal hydraulic considerations, structure analyses, tritium permeation through the first wall into the coolant, and tritium inventory

  14. Shielding design for positron emission tomography facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdallah, I.I.

    2007-01-01

    With the recent advent of readily available tracer isotopes, there has been marked increase in the number of hospital-based and free-standing positron emission tomography (PET) clinics. PET facilities employ relatively large activities of high-energy photon emitting isotopes, which can be dangerous to the health of humans and animals. This coupled with the current dose limits for radiation worker and members of the public can result in shielding requirements. This research contributes to the calculation of the appropriate shielding to keep the level of radiation within an acceptable recommended limit. Two different methods were used including measurements made at selected points of an operating PET facility and computer simulations by using Monte Carlo Transport Code. The measurements mainly concerned the radiation exposure at different points around facility using the survey meter detectors and Thermoluminescent Dosimeters (TLD). Then the set of manual calculation procedures were used to estimate the shielding requirements for a newly built PEF facility. The results from the measurement and the computer simulation were compared to the results obtained from the set manual calculation procedure. In general, the estimated weekly dose at the points of interest is lower than the regulatory limits for the little company of Mary Hospital. Furthermore, the density and the HVL for normal strength concrete and clay bricks are almost similar. In conclusion, PET facilities present somewhat different design requirements and are more likely to require additional radiation shielding. Therefore, existing shields at the little Company of Mary Hospital are in general found to be adequate and satisfactory and additional shielding was found necessary at the new PET facility in the department of Nuclear Medicine of the Dr. George Mukhari Hospital. By use of appropriate design, by implying specific shielding requirements and by maintaining good operating practices, radiation doses to

  15. Continuous electrodeionization through electrostatic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dermentzis, Konstantinos

    2008-01-01

    We report a new continuous electrodeionization cell with electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments or electrochemical Faraday cages formed by porous electronically and ionically conductive media, instead of permselective ion exchange membranes. Due to local elimination of the applied electric field within the compartments, they electrostatically retain the incoming ions and act as 'electrostatic ion pumps' or 'ion traps' and therefore concentrate compartments. The porous media are chemically and thermally stable. Electrodeionization or electrodialysis cells containing such concentrate compartments in place of ion exchange membranes can be used to regenerate ion exchange resins and produce deionized water, to purify industrial effluents and desalinate brackish or seawater. The cells can work by polarity reversal without any negative impact to the deionization process. Because the electronically and ionically active media constituting the electrostatically shielded concentrate compartments are not permselective and coions are not repelled but can be swept by the migrating counterions, the cells are not affected by the known membrane associated limitations, such as concentration polarization or scaling and show an increased current efficiency

  16. Graphene shield enhanced photocathodes and methods for making the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Nathan Andrew

    2014-09-02

    Disclosed are graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, such as high QE photocathodes. In certain embodiments, a monolayer graphene shield membrane ruggedizes a high quantum efficiency photoemission electron source by protecting a photosensitive film of the photocathode, extending operational lifetime and simplifying its integration in practical electron sources. In certain embodiments of the disclosed graphene shield enhanced photocathodes, the graphene serves as a transparent shield that does not inhibit photon or electron transmission but isolates the photosensitive film of the photocathode from reactive gas species, preventing contamination and yielding longer lifetime.

  17. Electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of 3D printed polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viskadourakis, Z.; Vasilopoulos, K. C.; Economou, E. N.; Soukoulis, C. M.; Kenanakis, G.

    2017-12-01

    We report on preliminary results regarding the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of various 3D printed polymeric composite structures. All studied samples were fabricated using 3D printing technology, following the fused deposition modeling approach, using commercially available filaments as starting materials. The electromagnetic shielding performance of the fabricated 3D samples was investigated in the so called C-band of the electromagnetic spectrum (3.5-7.0 GHz), which is typically used for long-distance radio telecommunications. We provide evidence that 3D printing technology can be effectively utilized to prepare operational shields, making them promising candidates for electromagnetic shielding applications for electronic devices.

  18. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankie, Charles G.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the project was to design and manufacture a device to demonstrate a new technology developed by NASA's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory. The technology itself is a system which uses magnetic principles to remove regolith dust from its surface. This project was to create an enclosure that will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the invention to The Office of the Chief Technologist. ONE of the most important challenges of space exploration is actually caused by something very small and seemingly insignificant. Dust in space, most notably on the moon and Mars, has caused many unforeseen issues. Dirt and dust on Earth, while a nuisance, can be easily cleaned and kept at bay. However, there is considerably less weathering and erosion in space. As a result, the microscopic particles are extremely rough and abrasive. They are also electrostatically charged, so they cling to everything they make contact with. This was first noted to be a major problem during the Apollo missions. Dust would stick to the spacesuits, and could not be wiped off as predicted. Dust was brought back into the spacecraft, and was even inhaled by astronauts. This is a major health hazard. Atmospheric storms and other events can also cause dust to coat surfaces of spacecraft. This can cause abrasive damage to the craft. The coating can also reduce the effectiveness of thermal insulation and solar panels.' A group of engineers at Kennedy Space Center's Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory have developed a new technology, called the Electrodynamic Dust Shield, to help alleviate these problems. It is based off of the electric curtain concept developed at NASA in 1967. "The EDS is an active dust mitigation technology that uses traveling electric fields to transport electrostatically charged dust particles along surfaces. To generate the traveling electric fields, the EDS consists of a multilayer dielectric coating with an embedded thin electrode grid

  19. Concrete radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplan, M.F.

    1989-01-01

    The increased use of nuclear energy has given rise to a growth in the amount of artificially produced radiation and radioactive materials. The design and construction of shielding to protect people, equipment and structures from the effects of radiation has never been more important. Experience has shown that concrete is an effective, versatile and economical material for the construction of radiation shielding. This book provides information on the principles governing the interaction of radiation with matter and on relevant nuclear physics to give the engineer an understanding of the design and construction of concrete shielding. It covers the physical, mechanical and nuclear properties of concrete; the effects of elevated temperatures and possible damage to concrete due to radiation; basic procedures for the design of concrete radiation shields and finally the special problems associated with their construction and cost. Although written primarily for engineers concerned with the design and construction of concrete shielding, the book also reviews the widely scattered data and information available on this subject and should therefore be of interest to students and those wishing to research further in this field. (author)

  20. Mechanical shielded hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgy, H.R.; Abdel-Rassoul, A.A.

    1983-01-01

    A plan to erect a mechanical shielded hot cell in the process hall of the Radiochemical Laboratory at Inchas is described. The hot cell is designed for safe handling of spent fuel bundles, from the Inchas reactor, and for dismantling and cutting the fuel rods in preparation for subsequent treatment. The biological shielding allows for the safe handling of a total radioactivity level up to 10,000 MeV-Ci. The hot cell consists of an α-tight stainless-steel box, connected to a γ-shielded SAS, through an air-lock containing a movable carriage. The α-box is tightly connected with six dry-storage cavities for adequate storage of the spent fuel bundles. Both the α-box, with the dry-storage cavities, and the SAS are surrounded by 200-mm thick biological lead shielding. The α-box is equipped with two master-slave manipulators, a lead-glass window, a monorail crane and Padirac and Minirag systems. The SAS is equipped with a lead-glass window, tong manipulator, a shielded pit and a mechanism for the entry of the spent fuel bundle. The hot cell is served by adequate ventilation and monitoring systems. (author)

  1. Investigation of high temperature phase stability, thermal properties and evaluation of metallurgical compatibility with 304L stainless steel, of indigenously developed ferroboron alternate shielding material for fast reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Arun Kumar [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Raju, S., E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Jeya Ganesh, B. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vijayalakshmi, M.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > High temperature phase stability and metallurgical compatibility of indigenous Ferro boron alloy (17 wt.%) with 304L SS have been evaluated using calorimetry, metallography and X-ray diffraction. > Fe-B is stable upto 1227 deg. C without any phase transformation. > In combination with SS 304L, it develops an eutectic reaction at 1198 deg. C. > High temperature metallurgical interaction between Ferroboron and 304L SS clad has been simulated for temperatures 550-800 deg. C for reaction times up to 5000 h, using diffusion couple. > Clad penetration depth with time follows a paraobolic rate law. - Abstract: Towards the cause of serving economic power production through fast reactors, it is necessary to bring in functionally more efficient and innovative design options, which also includes exploration of cheaper material alternatives, wherever possible. In this regard, the feasibility of using a commercial grade ferroboron alloy as potential alternate shielding material in the outer subassemblies of future Indian fast reactors has been recently investigated from shielding physics point of view. The present study explores in detail the high temperature thermal stability and the metallurgical compatibility of Fe-15.4B-0.3C-0.89Si-0.17Al-0.006S-0.004P-0.003O (wt.%) alloy with SS 304L material. In addition, the high temperature specific heat and lattice thermal expansion characteristics of this alloy have also been investigated as a part of the present comprehensive characterisation program. The Fe-15 wt.%B alloy is constituted of principally of two boride phases, namely tetragonal Fe{sub 2}B and orthorhombic FeB phases, which in addition to boron also contains some amount of C and Si dissolved in solid solution form. This Fe-B alloy undergoes a series of phase transformation as a function of increasing temperature; the major ones among them are the dissolution of Fe{sub 2}B-lower boride in the matrix through a eutectic type reaction, which results in the

  2. Design report for shielded glove box

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ku, J. H.; Lee, J. C.; Seo, K. S.; Bang, K. S.; Lee, D. W.; Kim, J. H.; Min, D. K.; Park, S. W.

    1999-05-01

    For the examination of spent fuels and high radioactive specimens using a specially equipped scanning electron microscope, a shielded glove box was designed and constructed at PIE facility of KAERI. This glove box consisted of shielding walls, containment box, lead glasses, manipulators, gloves, ventilation systems, doors, hot-cell specimen cask adapter, etc. It was emphasized that both the easy operation and radiation safety are important factors in the shielded glove box were installed also considered as a important factor to build the basic concept of the assembling. Two sliding doors and one hinge-type door were installed for the easy installation, operation and maintenance of scanning electron microscope. Containment box which confines the radioactive material into the box consisted of reinforced transparent glasses, aluminum frames and stainless steel plate liner. Therefore everything beyond the containment box can be seen through the lead glass which installed at the front shielding wall. All shielding walls and doors were introduced separately into the room and assembled by bolting. (author). 3 refs., 5 tabs., 18 figs

  3. Thermal Performance of a Scramjet Combustor Operating at Mach 5.6 Flight Conditions

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Stouffer, Scott

    1997-01-01

    .... The objective of the thermal loads testing was to map the thermal and mechanical loads, including heat transfer, dynamic and static pressures, and skin friction in a scramjet combustor during direct...

  4. Analysis of shield for the nuclear ship MUTSU

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuse, Takayoshi; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Yamaji, Akio

    1975-01-01

    On the nuclear ship MUTSU, a higher-than-expected level of radiation was found, with output raised to 1.4 per cent. To investigate the radiation leakage, the analysis of the shielding problem utilized a four-step sequence of PALLAS-2DCY cylindrical r-z calculations with fixed sources distributions in the core. The neutron dose contours show the importance of streaming in the gap between the reactor vessel and the primary shield. Dominant consideration of thermal insulation exclude shielding from this area resulting in an imbalance in the shielding effectiveness. The neutron dose rate at the upper part of the reactor vessel is increased by neutrons incident on the head from cavity scattering. The calculation indicates that the neutron dose rate at the top of the primary shield is 5 rem/hr at 100 per cent output. (auth.)

  5. Shield support frame. Schildausbaugestell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plaga, K.

    1981-09-17

    A powered shield support frame for coal sheds is described comprising of two bottom sliding shoes, a large area gob shield and a larg area roof assembly, all joined movable together. The sliding shoes and the gob shield are joined by a lemniscate guide. Two hydraulic props are arranged at the face-side at one third of the length of the sliding shoes and at the goaf-side at one third of the length of the roof assembly. A nearly horizontal lying pushing prop unit joins the bottom wall sliding shoes to the goaf-side lemniscate guide. This assembly can be applied to seams with a thickness down to 45 cm. (OGR).

  6. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Isobe, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the shielding capacity of the radiation shielding material having an abundant flexibility. Constitution: A mat consisting of a lead or lead alloy fibrous material is covered with a cloth, and the two are made integral by sewing in a kilted fashion by using a yarn. Thereafter, the system is covered with a gas-tight film or sheet. The shielding material obtained in this way has, in addition to the above merits, advantages in that (1) it is free from restoration due to elasticity so that it can readily seal contaminants, (2) it can be used in a state consisting of a number of overlapped layers, (3) it fits the shoulder well and is readily portable and (4) it permits attachment of fasteners or the like. (Ikeda, J.)

  7. Hybrid Magnetic Shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, Kevin; Crawford, Christopher; Mullins, Andrew; Porter, Greg; Blanton, Hunter; Johnstone, Connor; Kistler, Ben; Olivera, Daniela

    2017-09-01

    The search for the electric dipole moment of the neutron requires the ambient magnetic field to be on the pT scale which is accomplished with large magnetic shielding rooms. These rooms are fitted with large mu-metal sheets to allow for passive cancellation of background magnetic fields. Active shielding technology cannot uniformly cancel background magnetic fields. These issues can be remedied by combining the methods into a hybrid system. The design used is composed of panels that have an active layer of cancellation between two sheets of mu-metal. The panels form a cube and draw in magnetic fields perpendicular to the surface which can then be reduced using active shielding. This work is supported by the Department of Energy under Contract DE-SC0008107.

  8. Reactor head shielding apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schukei, G.E.; Roebelen, G.J.

    1992-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor head shielding apparatus for mounting on spaced reactor head lifting members radially inwardly of the head bolts. It comprises a frame of sections for mounting on the lifting members and extending around the top central area of the head, mounting means for so mounting the frame sections, including downwardly projecting members on the frame sections and complementary upwardly open recessed members for fastening to the lifting members for receiving the downwardly projecting members when the frame sections are lowered thereto with lead shielding supported thereby on means for hanging lead shielding on the frame to minimize radiation exposure or personnel working with the head bolts or in the vicinity thereof

  9. Double-layer neutron shield design as neutron shielding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    The shield design in particle accelerators and other high energy facilities are mainly connected to the high-energy neutrons. The deep penetration of neutrons through massive shield has become a very serious problem. For shielding to be efficient, most of these neutrons should be confined to the shielding volume. If the interior space will become limited, the sufficient thickness of multilayer shield must be used. Concrete and iron are widely used as a multilayer shield material. Two layers shield material was selected to guarantee radiation safety outside of the shield against neutrons generated in the interaction of the different proton energies. One of them was one meter of concrete, the other was iron-contained material (FeB, Fe2B and stainless-steel) to be determined shield thicknesses. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used for shield design geometry and required neutron dose distributions. The resulting two layered shields are shown better performance than single used concrete, thus the shield design could leave more space in the interior shielded areas.

  10. Radiation shielding bricks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crowe, G.J.W.

    1983-01-01

    A radiation shielding brick for use in building dry walls to form radiation proof enclosures and other structures is described. It is square in shape and comprises a sandwich of an inner layer of lead or similar shielding material between outer layers of plastics material, for structural stability. The ability to mechanically interlock adjacent bricks is provided by shaping the edges as cooperating external and internal V-sections. Relatively leak-free joints are ensured by enlarging the width of the inner layer in the edge region. (author)

  11. Hybrid Active-Passive Radiation Shielding System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation shielding system is proposed that integrates active magnetic fields with passive shielding materials. The objective is to increase the shielding...

  12. Photon spectrum behind biological shielding of the LVR-15 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klupak, V.; Viererbl, L.; Lahodova, Z.; Marek, M.; Vins, M. [Research Centre Rez Ltd., Husinec-Rez 130 (Czech Republic)

    2011-07-01

    The LVR-15 reactor is a light water research reactor situated at the Research Centre Rez, near Prague. It operates as a multipurpose facility with a maximum thermal power of 10 MW. The reactor core usually contains from 28 to 32 fuel assemblies with a total mass of {sup 235}U of about 5 kg. Emitted radiation from the fuel caused by fission is shielded by moderating water, a steel reactor vessel, and heavy concrete. This paper deals with measurement and analysis of the gamma spectrum near the outer surface of the concrete wall, behind biological shielding, mainly in the 3- to 10-MeV energy range. A portable HPGe detector with a portable multichannel analyzer was used to measure gamma spectra. The origin of energy lines in gamma detector spectra was identified. (authors)

  13. Shielding considerations for advanced space nuclear reactor systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelo, J.P. Jr.; Buden, D.

    1982-01-01

    To meet the anticipated future space power needs, the Los Alamos National Laboratory is developing components for a compact, 100 kW/sub e/-class heat pipe nuclear reactor. The reactor uses uranium dioxide (UO 2 ) as its fuel, and is designed to operate around 1500 k. Heat pipes are used to remove thermal energy from the core without the use of pumps or compressors. The reactor heat pipes transfer mal energy to thermoelectric conversion elements that are advanced versions of the converters used on the enormously successful Voyager missions to the outer planets. Advanced versions of this heat pipe reactor could also be used to provide megawatt-level power plants. The paper reviews the status of this advanced heat pipe reactor and explores the radiation environments and shielding requirements for representative manned and unmanned applications

  14. Characteristics of ion spectrum in a low energy nitrogen operated plasma focus: application to the metallic substrates thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelly, H.; Lepone, A.; Marquez, A.

    1998-01-01

    Full text: This work presents the nitrogen ion spectrum characteristics in a Plasma Focus device, determined using a Thomson spectrometer and a Faraday cup, operated in the secondary electron collective mode. It is also discussed the thermal treatment and the re coating induce by ions incident on a metallic surface (AISI 304 steel) placed in front of the coaxial gun, when the device is operated with a Ti implant at the end of the central electrode

  15. Design and Operation of an IR-CAGE For Thermal Vacuum Testing of a Communication Satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuersching, C.

    2004-08-01

    A specific infrared radiation device was designed and manufactured for infrared simulation on a communication satellite. For the thermal vacuum test of this satellite, radiation fields with different sizes, shapes and radiation intensities were required to deliver additional heating power onto the space- craft panels. Five of the six sides of the cube- shaped satellite had to be equipped with flat IR- frames so that a cage surrounding the S/C had to be designed. The following features of the IR-cage were re- quired: A lightweight, but still rigid construction of the frame with space-proofed materials; using of standard components for cost reasons; radiation intensities of 400 to 1100 W/m2; a computer-based system for individual control of the heating circuits; a user friendly and safe handling of the operation panel and the recording of all operational parame- ter. The mechanical construction was realised by using aluminium profiles. The standard components al- lowed completing the mechanical set-up within a short time. After some investigation concerning the heating devices it was decided to use heating strips for the radiation fields of low intensity and com- mercial IR-quartz radiators for fields with higher intensity. A special suspension for the heating strips was designed to keep them under defined tension. The power supplies for the heating circuits were computer-controlled. The software allowed the individual power setting of each heater. Addition- ally an automatic mode for controlling the heaters by a reference thermocouple was foreseen. Beside design features of the cage, this paper will also describe the heater concept and the control system, and it will have a look at QA relevant mat- ters.

  16. Optimum pressure for total-reflux operated thermal diffusion column for isotope separation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamamoto, Ichiro; Makino, Hitoshi; Kanagawa, Akira

    1990-01-01

    A formula for prediction of the optimum operating pressure P opt of the thermal diffusion columns at total reflux is derived based on the approximate formulae for the column constants which can be evaluated analytically. The formula is expressed explicitly in terms of (1) physical properties of gases to be separated, (2) ratio of radii between hot wire and cold wall of the column, and (3) the ratio of the temperature difference to the cold wall temperature. The result is compared with experimental data; (1) binary monatomic gas systems, (2) multicomponent monatomic gas systems, (3) isotopically substituted polyatomic systems, (4) systems of low atomic or molecular weight, and (5) mixtures of unlike gases; mainly obtained by Rutherford and coworkers. Although the formula is based on the rather rough approximation for the column constants, the optimum pressures predicted by the present formula are in successfully good agreement with the experimental data even for the systems of low atomic or molecular weight and that of mixtures of unlike gases. (author)

  17. The thermal comfort, the indoor environment control, and the energy consumption in three types of operating rooms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Melhado, M.D.A.; Beyer, P.O.; Hensen, J.L.M.; Siqueira, L.F.G.

    2005-01-01

    This research investigated the influence of three layouts of operating rooms on the indoor environment control, on thermal comfort and on energy consumption. It was used the EnergyPlus software. The parameters of the environment were described in accordance with standards. The three layouts had

  18. Radiation shielding issues on the FMIT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burke, R.J.; Davis, A.A.; Huang, S.; Morford, R.J.

    1981-05-01

    The Fusion Materials Irradiation Test Facility (FMIT) is being built to study neutron radiation effects in candidate fusion reactor materials. The FMIT will yield high fluence data in a fusion-like neutron radiation environment produced by the interaction of a 0.1A, 35 MeV deuteron beam with a flowing lithium target. The design of the facility as a whole is driven by a high availability requirement. The variety of radiation environments in the facility requires the use of diverse and extensive shielding. Shielding design throughout the FMIT must accommodate the need for maintenance and operations access while providing adequate personnel and equipment protection

  19. Operational and environmental performance in China's thermal power industry: Taking an effectiveness measure as complement to an efficiency measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ke; Zhang, Jieming; Wei, Yi-Ming

    2017-05-01

    The trend toward a more fiercely competitive and strictly environmentally regulated electricity market in several countries, including China has led to efforts by both industry and government to develop advanced performance evaluation models that adapt to new evaluation requirements. Traditional operational and environmental efficiency measures do not fully consider the influence of market competition and environmental regulations and, thus, are not sufficient for the thermal power industry to evaluate its operational performance with respect to specific marketing goals (operational effectiveness) and its environmental performance with respect to specific emissions reduction targets (environmental effectiveness). As a complement to an operational efficiency measure, an operational effectiveness measure not only reflects the capacity of an electricity production system to increase its electricity generation through the improvement of operational efficiency, but it also reflects the system's capability to adjust its electricity generation activities to match electricity demand. In addition, as a complement to an environmental efficiency measure, an environmental effectiveness measure not only reflects the capacity of an electricity production system to decrease its pollutant emissions through the improvement of environmental efficiency, but it also reflects the system's capability to adjust its emissions abatement activities to fulfill environmental regulations. Furthermore, an environmental effectiveness measure helps the government regulator to verify the rationality of its emissions reduction targets assigned to the thermal power industry. Several newly developed effectiveness measurements based on data envelopment analysis (DEA) were utilized in this study to evaluate the operational and environmental performance of the thermal power industry in China during 2006-2013. Both efficiency and effectiveness were evaluated from the three perspectives of operational

  20. Is lead shielding of patients necessary during fluoroscopic procedures? A study based on kyphoplasty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Joshua R.; Marsh, Rebecca M.; Silosky, Michael S. [University of Colorado School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Aurora, CO (United States)

    2018-01-15

    To determine the benefits, risks, and limitations associated with wrapping a patient with lead shielding during fluoroscopy-guided kyphoplasty procedures as a way to reduce operator radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to mimic a patient undergoing a kyphoplasty procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiation measurements of the air kerma rate (AKR) were made at several locations and under various experimental conditions. First, AKR was measured at various angles along the horizontal plane of the phantom and at varying distances from the phantom, both with and without a lead apron wrapped around the lower portion of the phantom (referred to here as phantom shielding). Second, the effect of an operator's apron was simulated by suspending a lead apron between the phantom and the measurement device. AKR was measured for the four shielding conditions - phantom shielding only, operator apron only, both phantom shielding and operator apron, and no shielding. Third, AKR measurements were made at various heights and with varying C-arm angle. At all locations, the phantom shielding provided no substantial protection beyond that provided by an operator's own lead apron. Phantom shielding did not reduce AKR at a height comparable to that of an operator's head. Previous reports of using patient shielding to reduce operator exposure fail to consider the role of an operator's own lead apron in radiation protection. For an operator wearing appropriate personal lead apparel, patient shielding provides no substantial reduction in operator dose. (orig.)

  1. Is lead shielding of patients necessary during fluoroscopic procedures? A study based on kyphoplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Joshua R.; Marsh, Rebecca M.; Silosky, Michael S.

    2018-01-01

    To determine the benefits, risks, and limitations associated with wrapping a patient with lead shielding during fluoroscopy-guided kyphoplasty procedures as a way to reduce operator radiation exposure. An anthropomorphic phantom was used to mimic a patient undergoing a kyphoplasty procedure under fluoroscopic guidance. Radiation measurements of the air kerma rate (AKR) were made at several locations and under various experimental conditions. First, AKR was measured at various angles along the horizontal plane of the phantom and at varying distances from the phantom, both with and without a lead apron wrapped around the lower portion of the phantom (referred to here as phantom shielding). Second, the effect of an operator's apron was simulated by suspending a lead apron between the phantom and the measurement device. AKR was measured for the four shielding conditions - phantom shielding only, operator apron only, both phantom shielding and operator apron, and no shielding. Third, AKR measurements were made at various heights and with varying C-arm angle. At all locations, the phantom shielding provided no substantial protection beyond that provided by an operator's own lead apron. Phantom shielding did not reduce AKR at a height comparable to that of an operator's head. Previous reports of using patient shielding to reduce operator exposure fail to consider the role of an operator's own lead apron in radiation protection. For an operator wearing appropriate personal lead apparel, patient shielding provides no substantial reduction in operator dose. (orig.)

  2. Neutron guide shielding for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS

    OpenAIRE

    Mantulnikovs, K.; Bertelsen, M.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Lefmann, K.; Klinkby, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the study of fast-neutron background for the BIFROST spectrometerat ESS. We investigate the effect of background radiation induced by the interaction of fast neutrons from the source with the material of the neutron guide and devise a reasonable fast, thermal/cold neutron shielding solution for the current guide geometry using McStas and MCNPX. We investigate the effectiveness of the steel shielding around the guide by running simulations with three different steel thicknesses. T...

  3. Development of epoxy resin-type neutron shielding materials (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy

    1997-12-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear /radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various materials properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 31 refs., 22 tabs., 17 figs.

  4. Alternative methodology for irradiation reactor experimental shielding calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vellozo, Sergio de Oliveira; Vital, Helio de Carvalho

    1996-01-01

    Due to a change in the project of the Experimental Irradiation Reactor, its shielding design had to be recalculated according to an alternative simplified analytical approach, since the standard transport calculations were temporarily unavailable. In the calculation of the new width for the shielding made up of steel and high-density concrete layers, the following radiation components were considered: fast neutrons and primary gammas (produced by fission and beta decay), from the core; and secondary gammas, produced by thermal neutron capture in the shielding. (author)

  5. Development of silicone rubber-type neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Jae Bum; Cho, Soo Hang; Kim, Ik Soo; Oh, Seung Chul; Hong, Soon Seok; Noh, Sung Ki; Jeong, Duk Yeon.

    1997-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 16 tabs., 17 figs., 25 refs

  6. Electrostatic shielding of transformers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Leon, Francisco

    2017-11-28

    Toroidal transformers are currently used only in low-voltage applications. There is no published experience for toroidal transformer design at distribution-level voltages. Toroidal transformers are provided with electrostatic shielding to make possible high voltage applications and withstand the impulse test.

  7. Dosimetry and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farinelli, U.

    1977-01-01

    Today, reactor dosimetry and shielding have wide areas of overlap as concerns both problems and methods. Increased interchange of results and know-how would benefit both. The areas of common interest include calculational methods, sensitivity studies, theoretical and experimental benchmarks, cross sections and other nuclear data, multigroup libraries and procedures for their adjustment, experimental techniques and damage functions. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art and the latest development in each of these areas as far as shielding is concerned, and suggests a number of interactions that could be profitable for reactor dosimetry. Among them, re-evaluation of the potentialities of calculational methods (in view of the recent developments) in predicting radiation environments of interest; the application of sensitivity analysis to dosimetry problems; a common effort in the field of theoretical benchmarks; the use of the shielding one-material propagation experiments as reference spectra for detector cross sections; common standardization of the detector nuclear data used in both fields; the setting up of a common (or compatible) multigroup structure and library applicable to shielding, dosimetry and core physics; the exchange of information and experience in the fields of cross section errors, correlations and adjustment; and the intercomparison of experimental techniques

  8. Radiation shielding glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kido, Kazuhiro; Ueda, Hajime.

    1997-01-01

    It was found that a glass composition comprising, as essential ingredients, SiO 2 , PbO, Gd 2 O 3 and alkali metal oxides can provide a shielding performance against electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons. The present invention provides radiation shielding glass containing at least from 16 to 46wt% of SiO 2 , from 47 to 75wt% of PbO, from 1 to 10wt% of Gd 2 O 3 , from 0 to 3wt% of Li 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of Na 2 O, from 0 to 7wt% of K 2 O provided that Li 2 O + Na 2 O + K 2 O is from 1 to 10wt%, B 2 O 3 is from 0 to 10wt%, CeO 2 is from 0 to 3wt%, As 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt% and Sb 2 O 3 is from 0 to 1wt%. Since the glass can shield electromagnetic waves, charged particles and neutrons simultaneously, radiation shielding windows can be designed and manufactured at a reduced thickness and by less constitutional numbers in a circumstance where they are present altogether. (T.M.)

  9. Verification of radiation exposure using lead shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashida, Keiichi; Yamamoto, Kenyu; Azuma, Masami

    2016-01-01

    A long time use of radiation during IVR (intervention radiology) treatment leads up to an increased exposure on IVR operator. In order to prepare good environment for the operator to work without worry about exposure, the authors examined exposure reduction with the shields attached to the angiography instrument, i. e. lead curtain and lead glass. In this study, the lumber spine phantom was radiated using the instrument and the radiation leaked outside with and without shields was measured by the ionization chamber type survey meter. The meter was placed at the position which was considered to be that for IVR operator, and changed vertically 20-100 cm above X-ray focus by 10 cm interval. The radiation at the position of 80 cm above X-ray focus was maximum without shield and was hardly reduced with lead curtain. However, it was reduced with lead curtain plus lead glass. Similar reduction effects were observed at the position of 90-100 cm above X-ray focus. On the other hand, the radiation at the position of 70 cm above X-ray focus was not reduced with either shield, because that position corresponded to the gap between lead curtain and lead glass. The radiation at the position of 20-60 cm above X-ray focus was reduced with lead curtain, even if without lead glass. These results show that lead curtain and lead glass attached to the instrument can reduce the radiation exposure on IVR operator. Using these shields is considered to be one of good means for IVR operator to work safely. (author)

  10. Neutral and plasma shielding model for pellet ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Houlberg, W.A.; Milora, S.L.; Attenberger, S.E.

    1987-10-01

    The neutral gas shielding model for ablation of frozen hydrogenic pellets is extended to include the effects of an initial Maxwelliam distribution of incident electron energies; a cold plasma shield outside the neutral shield and extended along the magnetic field; energetic neutral beam ions and alpha particles; and self-limiting electron ablation in the collisionless plasma limit. Including the full electron distribution increases ablation, but adding the cold ionized shield reduces ablation; the net effect is a modest reduction in pellet penetration compared with the monoenergetic electron neutral shielding model with no plasma shield. Unlike electrons, fast ions can enter the neutral shield directly without passing through the cold ionized shield because their gyro-orbits are typically larger than the diameter of the cold plasma tube. Fast alpha particles should not enhance the ablation rate unless their population exceeds that expected from local classical thermalization. Fast beam ions, however, may enhance ablation in the plasma periphery if their population is high enough. Self-limiting ablation in the collisionless limit leads to a temporary distortion of the original plasma electron Maxwellian distribution function through preferential depopulation of the higher-energy electrons. 23 refs., 9 figs

  11. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1990-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. The shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station and advanced manned lunar base. (author)

  12. Space nuclear reactor shields for manned and unmanned applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mckissock, B.I.; Bloomfield, H.S.

    1989-01-01

    Missions which use nuclear reactor power systems require radiation shielding of payload and/or crew areas to predetermined dose rates. Since shielding can become a significant fraction of the total mass of the system, it is of interest to show the effect of various parameters on shield thickness and mass for manned and unmanned applications. Algorithms were developed to give the thicknesses needed if reactor thermal power, separation distances, and dose rates are given as input. The thickness algorithms were combined with models for four different shield geometries to allow tradeoff studies of shield volume and mass for a variety of manned and unmanned missions. Shield design tradeoffs presented in this study include the effects of: higher allowable dose rates; radiation hardened electronics; shorter crew exposure times; shield geometry; distance of the payload and/or crew from the reactor; and changes in the size of the shielded area. Specific NASA missions that were considered in this study include unmanned outer planetary exploration, manned advanced/evolutionary space station, and advanced manned lunar base

  13. Heating profiles on ICRF antenna Faraday shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Hahs, C.L.; Riemer, B.W.; Ryan, P.M.; Williamson, D.E.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual design for an uncooled Faraday shield for the BPX ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) antenna, which should withstand the proposed long-pulse operation, has been completed. A high-heat-flux, uncooled Faraday shield has also been designed for the fast-wave current drive (FWCD) antenna on D3-D. For both components, the improved understanding of the heating profiles made it possible to design for heat fluxes that would otherwise have been too close to mechanically established limits. The analytical effort is described in detail, with emphasis on the design work for the BPX ICRH antenna conceptual design and for the replacement Faraday shield for the D3-D FWCD antenna. Results of analyses are shown, and configuration issues involved in component modeling are discussed. 3 refs., 6 figs., 2 tabs

  14. MEANS FOR SHIELDING AND COOLING REACTORS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigner, E.P.; Ohlinger, L.A.; Young, G.J.; Weinberg, A.M.

    1959-02-10

    Reactors of the water-cooled type and a means for shielding such a rcactor to protect operating personnel from harmful radiation are discussed. In this reactor coolant tubes which contain the fissionable material extend vertically through a mass of moderator. Liquid coolant enters through the bottom of the coolant tubes and passes upwardly over the fissionable material. A shield tank is disposed over the top of the reactor and communicates through its bottom with the upper end of the coolant tubes. A hydrocarbon shielding fluid floats on the coolant within the shield tank. With this arrangements the upper face of the reactor can be opened to the atmosphere through the two superimposed liquid layers. A principal feature of the invention is that in the event radioactive fission products enter thc coolant stream. imposed layer of hydrocarbon reduces the intense radioactivity introduced into the layer over the reactors and permits removal of the offending fuel material by personnel shielded by the uncontaminated hydrocarbon layer.

  15. Thermal status of saturation divers during operational dives in the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mekjavic, I.B.; Golden, F.St.C.; Eglin, C.M.; Tipton, M.J.

    1999-08-01

    This report summarises the findings of a study investigating the body temperature responses of divers at different depths, seasons, and locations in order to evaluated the effectiveness of current equipment and diving procedures and especially that of the thermal protection to maintain the safety of the diver. Details of the thermal monitoring system and the field study examining diving suit microclimate temperature, skin temperature, core temperature, thermal comfort, and fluid balance are outlined, and recommendations are given.

  16. Evaluation of Shielding Performance for Newly Developed Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Beren Richard

    This work details an investigation into the contributing factors behind the success of newly developed composite neutron shield materials. Monte Carlo simulation methods were utilized to assess the neutron shielding capabilities and secondary radiation production characteristics of aluminum boron carbide, tungsten boron carbide, bismuth borosilicate glass, and Metathene within various neutron energy spectra. Shielding performance and secondary radiation data suggested that tungsten boron carbide was the most effective composite material. An analysis of the macroscopic cross-section contributions from constituent materials and interaction mechanisms was then performed in an attempt to determine the reasons for tungsten boron carbide's success over the other investigated materials. This analysis determined that there was a positive correlation between a non-elastic interaction contribution towards a material's total cross-section and shielding performance within the thermal and epi-thermal energy regimes. This finding was assumed to be a result of the boron-10 absorption reaction. The analysis also determined that within the faster energy regions, materials featuring higher non-elastic interaction contributions were comparable to those exhibiting primarily elastic scattering via low Z elements. This allowed for the conclusion that composite shield success within higher energy neutron spectra does not necessitate the use elastic scattering via low Z elements. These findings suggest that the inclusion of materials featuring high thermal absorption properties is more critical to composite neutron shield performance than the presence of constituent materials more inclined to maximize elastic scattering energy loss.

  17. Gonad shielding in diagnostic radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The use of gonad shielding is an important radiation protection technique, intended to reduce unnecessary x-ray exposure of the gonads of patients from diagnostic x-ray procedures. The types of gonad shields in use are discussed as are the types of diagnostic examinations that should include gonad shielding. It was found that when properly used, most shields provided substantial gonad dose reductions

  18. Ford motor company NDE facility shielding design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metzger, R. L.; Van Riper, K. A.; Jones, M. H.

    2005-01-01

    Ford Motor Company proposed the construction of a large non-destructive evaluation laboratory for radiography of automotive power train components. The authors were commissioned to design the shielding and to survey the completed facility for compliance with radiation doses for occupationally and non-occupationally exposed personnel. The two X-ray sources are Varian Linatron 3000 accelerators operating at 9-11 MV. One performs computed tomography of automotive transmissions, while the other does real-time radiography of operating engines and transmissions. The shield thickness for the primary barrier and all secondary barriers were determined by point-kernel techniques. Point-kernel techniques did not work well for skyshine calculations and locations where multiple sources (e.g. tube head leakage and various scatter fields) impacted doses. Shielding for these areas was determined using transport calculations. A number of MCNP [Briesmeister, J. F. MCNPCA general Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4B. Los Alamos National Laboratory Manual (1997)] calculations focused on skyshine estimates and the office areas. Measurements on the operational facility confirmed the shielding calculations. (authors)

  19. Ford Motor Company NDE facility shielding design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Robert L; Van Riper, Kenneth A; Jones, Martin H

    2005-01-01

    Ford Motor Company proposed the construction of a large non-destructive evaluation laboratory for radiography of automotive power train components. The authors were commissioned to design the shielding and to survey the completed facility for compliance with radiation doses for occupationally and non-occupationally exposed personnel. The two X-ray sources are Varian Linatron 3000 accelerators operating at 9-11 MV. One performs computed tomography of automotive transmissions, while the other does real-time radiography of operating engines and transmissions. The shield thickness for the primary barrier and all secondary barriers were determined by point-kernel techniques. Point-kernel techniques did not work well for skyshine calculations and locations where multiple sources (e.g. tube head leakage and various scatter fields) impacted doses. Shielding for these areas was determined using transport calculations. A number of MCNP [Briesmeister, J. F. MCNPCA general Monte Carlo N-particle transport code version 4B. Los Alamos National Laboratory Manual (1997)] calculations focused on skyshine estimates and the office areas. Measurements on the operational facility confirmed the shielding calculations.

  20. Thermal performance of various multilayer insulation systems below 80K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boroski, W.N.; Nicol, T.H.; Schoo, C.J.

    1992-04-01

    The SSC collider dipole cryostat consists of a vacuum shell operating at room temperature, two thermal shields operating near 80K and 20K respectively, and the superconducting magnet assembly operating near 4K. The cryostat design incorporates multilayer insulation (MLI) blankets to limit radiant heat transfer into the 80K and 20K thermal shields. Also, an MLI blanket is used to impede heat transfer through residual gas conduction into the 4K superconducting magnet assembly. A measurement facility at Fermilab has been used to experimentally optimize the thermal insulation system for the dipole cryostat. Previous thermal measurements have been used to define the 80K MLI system configuration and verify system performance. With the 80K MLI system defined, the current effort has focused on experimentally defining the optimum insulation scheme for the 20K thermal shield. The SSC design specification requires that radiant heat transfer be limited to 0.093 W/m 2 at an insulating vacuum of 10 -6 torr

  1. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2000-06-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  2. Shielding experiments for accelerator facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakashima, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Susumu; Sakamoto, Yukio

    2000-01-01

    A series of shielding experiments was carried out by using AVF cyclotron accelerator of TIARA at JAERI in order to validate shielding design methods for accelerator facilities in intermediate energy region. In this paper neutron transmission experiment through thick shields and radiation streaming experiment through a labyrinth are reported. (author)

  3. A Preliminary Shielding Study on the Integrated Operation Verification System in the Head-End Hot-Cell of the Pyro-processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinhwam; Kim, Yewon; Park, Se-Hwan; Ahn, Seong-Kyu; Cho, Gyuseong [KAIST, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Nuclear power accounts for more than 30 percent of power production in Korea. Its significance has annually been increased. Disposal spent fuel containing uranium, transuranic elements, and fission products is unavoidable byproduct of nuclear power production. it is recognized that finding appropriate sites for interim storage of disposal spent fuel is not easy because isolated sites should be required. Pyro-processing technology, Pyro-processing should be operated under high radiation environment in hot-cell structures. Because of this reason, all workers should be unauthorized to access inside the hot-cell areas under any circumstances except for acceptable dose verification and a normal operation should be remotely manipulated. For the reliable normal operation of pyroprocessing, it is noted that an evaluation of the space dose distribution in the hot-cell environments is necessary in advance in order to determine which technologies or instruments can be utilized on or near the process as the Integrated Operation Verification System (IOVS) is measured. Not like the electroreduction and electro-refining hot-cells, the head-end hot-cell equips Camera Radiation Detector (CRD) in which plutonium is securely measured and monitored for the safeguard of the pyro-processing. Results have been obtained using F2 surface tally in order to observe the magnitude of the gamma-ray and neutron flux which pass through the surface of the process cell. Furthermore, T-mesh tally has also been used to obtain the space dose distribution in the headend hot-cell. The hot-cell was divided into 7,668 cells in which each dimension was 1 x 1 x 1m for the T-mesh tally. To determine the position of the CRD and the surveillance camera, divergent approaches were required. Because the purpose of the CRD which contains a gamma-ray detector and a neutron detector is to identify the material composition as the process proceeds, the position in which detectable flux is exposed is required, whereas

  4. An experimental study on a superconducting generator with dual machine shield system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishigohka, T.; Ninomiya, A.; Okada, T.; Nitta, T.; Shintani, T.; Mukai, E.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have studied the optimal machine shield system through experiments on a 20kVa superconducting generator. The first experiment is carried out on a fully iron-less aluminum-shield machine which has only an aluminum eddy current machine shield in the stator. The second experiment is carried out on a generator with a dual-shield system which has both an aluminum eddy current shield and an iron magnetic shield. From the first one, the authors have got an experimental result that the aluminum-shield machine exhibits so large eddy current loss in the shield that it would be difficult to operate the machine continuously. On the other hand, the second experiment shows that the dual-shield machine exhibits much smaller loss in the shielding system, and that it has higher output power than the aluminum-shield machine. From these experiments, it becomes clear that insertion of a very thin iron shield between the armature winding and the eddy current shield can improve the machine performance eminently without large weight increase even if the iron shield were saturated

  5. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.

    1994-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially of planned decommissioning operations. Thus lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for contaminated lead is removing the superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a scaled-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  6. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radionuclides and is therefore a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Lab. decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 100 metric tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium under pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 280 kPa (40 psig) rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a pump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process

  7. Decontaminating lead bricks and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lussiez, G.W.

    1993-01-01

    Lead used for shielding is often surface contaminated with radioisotopes and is therefore a RCRA D008 mixed waste. The technology-based standard for treatment is macroencapsulation. However, decontaminating and recycling the clean lead is a more attractive solution. Los Alamos National Laboratory decontaminates material and equipment contaminated with radioisotopes. Decontaminating lead poses special problems because of the RCRA hazard classification and the size of the inventory, now about 50 tons and likely to grow substantially because of planned decommissioning operations. This lead, in the form of bricks and other shield shapes, is surface contaminated with fission products. One of the best methods for decontaminating lead is removing the thin superficial layer of contamination with an abrasive medium trader pressure. For lead, a mixture of alumina with water and air at about 40 psig rapidly and effectively decontaminates the lead. The abrasive medium is sprayed onto the lead in a sealed-off area. The slurry of abrasive and particles of lead falls through a floor grating and is collected in a sump. A pump sends the slurry mixture back to the spray gun, creating a continuous process. The process generates small volumes of contaminated lead slurry that can be solidified and, because it passes the TCLP, is not a mixed waste. The decontaminated lead can be released for recycling

  8. TPX remote maintenance and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rennich, M.J.; Nelson, B.E.

    1994-01-01

    The Tokamak Physics Experiment machine design incorporates comprehensive planning for efficient and safe component maintenance. Three programmatic decisions have been made to insure the successful implementation of this objective. First, the tokamak incorporates radiation shielding to reduce activation of components and limit the dose rate to personnel working on the outside of the machine. This allows most of the ex-vessel equipment to be maintained through conventional ''hands-on'' procedures. Second, to the maximum extent possible, low activation materials will be used inside the shielding volume. This resulted in the selection of Titanium (Ti-6Al-4V) for the vacuum vessel and PFC structures. The third decision stipulated that the primary in-vessel components will be replaced or repaired via remote maintenance tools specifically provided for the task. The component designers have been given the responsibility of incorporating maintenance design and for proving the maintainability of the design concepts in full-scale mockup tests prior to the initiation of final fabrication. Remote maintenance of the TPX machine is facilitated by general purpose tools provided by a special purpose design team. Major tools will include an in-vessel transporter, a vessel transfer system and a large component transfer container. In addition, tools such as manipulators and remotely operable impact wrenches will be made available to the component designers by this group. Maintenance systems will also provide the necessary controls for this equipment

  9. The shielding calculation for the CN guide shielding assembly in HANARO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, H. S.; Lee, B. C.; Lee, K. H.; Kim, H.

    2006-01-01

    The cold neutron research facility in HANARO is under construction. The area including neutron guides and rotary shutter in the reactor hall should be shielded by the guide shielding assembly which is constructed of heavy concrete blocks and structure. The guide shielding assembly is divided into 2 parts, A and B. Part A is about 6.4 meters apart from the reactor biological shield and it is constructed of heavy concrete blocks whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 . And part B is a fixed heavy concrete structure whose density is above 3.5g/cm 3 . The rotary shutter is also made with heavy concrete whose density is above 4.0g/cm 3 and includes 5 neutron guides inside. It can block the neutron beam by rotating when CNS is not operating. The dose criterion outside the guide shielding assembly is established as 12.5 μSv/hr which is also applied to reactor shielding in HANARO

  10. Method of operating a thermal engine powered by a chemical reaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, J.; Escher, C.

    1988-06-07

    The invention involves a novel method of increasing the efficiency of a thermal engine. Heat is generated by a non-linear chemical reaction of reactants, said heat being transferred to a thermal engine such as Rankine cycle power plant. The novel method includes externally perturbing one or more of the thermodynamic variables of said non-linear chemical reaction. 7 figs.

  11. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2015-01-01

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm

  12. Operation of a novel two-pipe active beam system in an office building: a thermal comfort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Maccarini, Alessandro; Hultmark, Göran; Bergsøe, Niels Christian

    2018-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation regarding a thermal comfort study carried out in an office building located in Jönköping, Sweden. The particularity is that, in authors’ knowledge, this is the first building equipped with a novel active beam system that operates a water loop with temperatures...... for a continuous period of 24 hours. The daily monitoring of the thermal environment showed that the room air temperature was between approximately 21 °C and 23 °C all year round. No significant vertical air temperature difference was noticed, and the draught rate was below 10% for most of the cases....

  13. Radiation protection and shielding design - Strengthening the link

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hobson, J.; Cooper, A.

    2005-01-01

    The improvement in quality and flexibility of shielding methods and data has been progressive and beneficial in opening up new opportunities for optimising radiation protection in design. The paper describes how these opportunities can best be seized by taking a holistic view of radiation protection, with shielding design being an important component part. This view is best achieved by enhancing the role of 'shielding assessors' so that they truly become 'radiation protection designers'. The increase in speed and efficiency of shielding calculations has been enormous over the past decades. This has raised the issue of how the assessor's time now can be best utilised; pursuing ever greater precision and accuracy in shielding/dose assessments, or improving the contribution that shielding assessment makes to radiological protection and cost-effective design. It is argued in this paper that the latter option is of great importance and will give considerable benefits. Shielding design needs to form part of a larger radiation protection perspective based on a deep understanding/appreciation of the opportunities and constraints of operators and designers, enabling minimal design iterations, cost optimisation of alternative designs (with a 'lifetime' perspective) and improved realisation of design intent in operations. The future of shielding design development is argued to be not in improving the 'tool-kit', but in enhanced understanding of the 'product' and the 'process' for achieving it. The holistic processes being developed in BNFL to realise these benefits are described in the paper and will be illustrated by case studies. (authors)

  14. Comparative evaluation of structural integrity for ITER blanket shield block based on SDC-IC and ASME code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shim, Hee-Jin [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ha, Min-Su, E-mail: msha12@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sa-Woong; Jung, Hun-Chea [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148 Gwahak-Ro, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Duck-Hoi [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon sur Verdon - CS 90046, 13067 Sant Paul Lez Durance (France)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • The procedure of structural integrity and fatigue assessment was described. • Case studies were performed according to both SDC-IC and ASME Sec. • III codes The conservatism of the ASME code was demonstrated. • The study only covers the specifically comparable case about fatigue usage factor. - Abstract: The ITER blanket Shield Block is a bulk structure to absorb radiation and to provide thermal shielding to vacuum vessel and external vessel components, therefore the most significant load for Shield Block is the thermal load. In the previous study, the thermo-mechanical analysis has been performed under the inductive operation as representative loading condition. And the fatigue evaluations were conducted to assure structural integrity for Shield Block according to Structural Design Criteria for In-vessel Components (SDC-IC) which provided by ITER Organization (IO) based on the code of RCC-MR. Generally, ASME code (especially, B&PV Sec. III) is widely applied for design of nuclear components, and is usually well known as more conservative than other specific codes. For the view point of the fatigue assessment, ASME code is very conservative compared with SDC-IC in terms of the reflected K{sub e} factor, design fatigue curve and other factors. Therefore, an accurate fatigue assessment comparison is needed to measure of conservatism. The purpose of this study is to provide the fatigue usage comparison resulting from the specified operating conditions shall be evaluated for Shield Block based on both SDC-IC and ASME code, and to discuss the conservatism of the results.

  15. Comparative evaluation of structural integrity for ITER blanket shield block based on SDC-IC and ASME code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Hee-Jin; Ha, Min-Su; Kim, Sa-Woong; Jung, Hun-Chea; Kim, Duck-Hoi

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The procedure of structural integrity and fatigue assessment was described. • Case studies were performed according to both SDC-IC and ASME Sec. • III codes The conservatism of the ASME code was demonstrated. • The study only covers the specifically comparable case about fatigue usage factor. - Abstract: The ITER blanket Shield Block is a bulk structure to absorb radiation and to provide thermal shielding to vacuum vessel and external vessel components, therefore the most significant load for Shield Block is the thermal load. In the previous study, the thermo-mechanical analysis has been performed under the inductive operation as representative loading condition. And the fatigue evaluations were conducted to assure structural integrity for Shield Block according to Structural Design Criteria for In-vessel Components (SDC-IC) which provided by ITER Organization (IO) based on the code of RCC-MR. Generally, ASME code (especially, B&PV Sec. III) is widely applied for design of nuclear components, and is usually well known as more conservative than other specific codes. For the view point of the fatigue assessment, ASME code is very conservative compared with SDC-IC in terms of the reflected K_e factor, design fatigue curve and other factors. Therefore, an accurate fatigue assessment comparison is needed to measure of conservatism. The purpose of this study is to provide the fatigue usage comparison resulting from the specified operating conditions shall be evaluated for Shield Block based on both SDC-IC and ASME code, and to discuss the conservatism of the results.

  16. Induced radioactivity in Bevatron concrete radiation shielding blocks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, G.C.; Donahue, R.J.

    1994-07-01

    The Bevatron accelerated protons up to 6.2 GeV and heavy ions up to 2.1 GeV/amu. It operated from 1954 to 1993. Radioactivity was induced in some concrete radiation shielding blocks by prompt radiation. Prompt radiation is primarily neutrons and protons that were generated by the Bevatron's primary beam interactions with targets and other materials. The goal was to identify the gamma-ray emitting nuclides (t 1/2 > 0.5 yr) that could be present in the concrete blocks and estimate the depth at which the maximum radioactivity presently occurs. It is shown that the majority of radioactivity was produced via thermal neutron capture by trace elements present in concrete. The depth of maximum thermal neutron flux, in theory, corresponds with the depth of maximum induced activity. To estimate the depth at which maximum activity occurs in the concrete blocks, the LAHET Code System was used to calculate the depth of maximum thermal neutron flux. The primary beam interactions that generate the neutrons are also modeled by the LAHET Code System

  17. External dosimetry sources and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calisto, Washington

    1994-01-01

    A definition of external dosimetry r external sources dosimetry,physical and mathematical treatment of the interaction of gamma radiation with a minimal area in that direction. Concept of attenuation coefficient, cumulated effect by polyenergetic sources, exposition rate, units, cumulated dose,shielding, foton shielding, depth calculation, materials used for shielding.Beta shielding, consideration of range and maximum β energy , low stopping radiation by use of low Z shielding. Tables for β energy of β emitters, I (tau) factor, energy-range curves for β emitters in aqueous media, gamma attenuation factors for U, W and Pb. Y factor for bone tissue,muscle and air, build-up factors

  18. Radiation shielding calculation using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Masukawa, Fumihiro

    2001-01-01

    To verify the Monte Carlo code MCNP4A as a tool to generate the reference data in the shielding designs and the safety evaluations, various shielding benchmark experiments were analyzed using this code. These experiments were categorized in three types of the shielding subjects; bulk shielding, streaming, and skyshine. For the variance reduction technique, which is indispensable to get meaningful results with the Monte Carlo shielding calculation, we mainly used the weight window, the energy dependent Russian roulette and spitting. As a whole, our analyses performed enough small statistical errors and showed good agreements with these experiments. (author)

  19. Operational Constraints on Hydropeaking and its Effects on the Hydrologic and Thermal Regime of a River in Central Chile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares, M. A.; Guzman, C.; Rossel, V.; De La Fuente, A.

    2013-12-01

    Hydropower accounts for about 44% of installed capacity in Chile's Central Interconnected System, which serves most of the Chilean population. Hydropower reservoir projects can affect ecosystems by changing the hydrologic regime and water quality. Given its volumen regulation capacity, low operation costs and fast response to demand fluctuations, reservoir hydropower plants commonly operate on a load-following or hydropeaking scheme. This short-term operational pattern produces alterations in the hydrologic regime downstream the reservoir. In the case of thermally stratified reservoirs, peaking operations can affect the thermal structure of the reservoir, as well as the thermal regime downstream. In this study, we assessed the subdaily hydrologic and thermal alteration donwstream of Rapel reservoir in Central Chile for alternative operational scenarios, including a base case and several scenarios involving minimum instream flow (Qmin) and maximum hourly ramping rates (ΔQmax). Scenarios were simulated for the stratification season of summer 2009-2012 in a grid-wide short-term economic dispatch model which prescribes hourly power production by every power plant on a weekly horizon. Power time series are then translated into time series of turbined flows at each hydropower plants. Indicators of subdaily hydrologic alteration (SDHA) were computed for every scenario. Additionally, turbined flows were used as input data for a three-dimensional hydrodynamic model (CWR-ELCOM) of the reservoir which simulated the vertical temperature profile in the reservoir and the outflow temperature. For the time series of outflow temperatures we computed several indicators of subdaily thermal alteration (SDTA). Operational constraints reduce the values of both SDHA and SDTA indicators with respect to the base case. When constraints are applied separately, the indicators of SDHA decrease as each type of constraint (Qmin or ΔQmax) becomes more stringent. However, ramping rate

  20. Thermal cracking of recycled hydrocarbon gas-mixtures for re-pyrolysis: Operational analysis of some industrial furnaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gal, T. [MOL PETCHEM Division, Tisza Chemical Works Co. Ltd. (TVK), P.O. Box 20, H-3581 Tiszaujvaros (Hungary); Lakatos, B.G. [Department of Process Engineering, University of Pannonia, P.O. Box 158, H-8200 Veszprem (Hungary)

    2008-02-15

    Thermal decomposition process of recycled hydrocarbon gas-mixtures in industrial furnaces is analyzed by computer simulation. The detailed kinetic and mathematical model developed was validated by using the process control laboratory cracked gas analysis of an industrially operated furnace. The effects of feed compositions and operational conditions are examined to select the favorable operating parameters and to achieve the possibly highest online operation period of the furnace. The effect of deposited coke on the lifetime of radiant coils is examined by a heat-transfer model. The simulation study confirmed that temporal variations of the feedstock composition could be harmonized well with the operating parameters of furnaces with the purpose of achieving maximum effectiveness. (author)

  1. Shielding benchmark test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawai, Masayoshi

    1984-01-01

    Iron data in JENDL-2 have been tested by analyzing shielding benchmark experiments for neutron transmission through iron block performed at KFK using CF-252 neutron source and at ORNL using collimated neutron beam from reactor. The analyses are made by a shielding analysis code system RADHEAT-V4 developed at JAERI. The calculated results are compared with the measured data. As for the KFK experiments, the C/E values are about 1.1. For the ORNL experiments, the calculated values agree with the measured data within an accuracy of 33% for the off-center geometry. The d-t neutron transmission measurements through carbon sphere made at LLNL are also analyzed preliminarily by using the revised JENDL data for fusion neutronics calculation. (author)

  2. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigenori; Iimori, Hiroshi; Kobori, Junzo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a neutron shielding material which incorporates preferable shielding capacity, heat resistance, fire resistance and workability by employing a mixture of thermosetting resin, polyethylene and aluminium hydroxide in special range ratio and curing it. Constitution: A mixture containing 20 to 60% by weight of thermosetting resin having preferable heat resistance, 10 to 40% by weight of polyethylene powder having high hydrogen atom density and 1000 to 60000 of molecular weight, and 15 to 55% by weight of Al(OH) 3 for imparting fire resistance and self-fire extinguishing property thereto is cured. At this time approx. 0.5 to 5% of curing catalyst of the thermosetting resin is contained in 100 parts by weight of the mixture. (Sekiya, K.)

  3. Radiation shielding wall structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishimura, Yoshitaka; Oka, Shinji; Kan, Toshihiko; Misato, Takeshi.

    1990-01-01

    A space between a pair of vertical steel plates laterally disposed in parallel at an optional distance has a structure of a plurality of vertically extending tranks partitioned laterally by vertically placed steel plates. Then, cements are grouted to the tranks. Strip-like steel plates each having a thickness greater than the gap between the each of the vertically placed steel plates and the cement are bonded each at the surface for each of the vertically placed steel plates opposing to the cements. A protrusion of a strip width having radiation shielding performance substantially identical with that by the thickness of the cement is disposed in the strip-like steel plates. With such a constitution, a safety radiation shielding wall structure with no worry of radiation intrusion to gaps, if formed, between the steel plates and the grouted cements due to shrinkage of the cements. (I.N.)

  4. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakubo, Takamasa; Yamada, Fumiyuki; Nakazato, Kenjiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a material, which is used for printing a samples name and date on an X-ray photographic film at the same time an X-ray radiography. Constitution: A radiation shielding material of a large mass absorption coefficient such as lead oxide, barium oxide, barium sulfate, etc. is added to a solution of a radiation permeable substance capable of imparting cold plastic fluidity (such as microcrystalline wax, paraffin, low molecular polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, etc.). The resultant system is agitated and then cooled, and thereafter it is press fitted to or bonded to a base in the form of a film of a predetermined thickness. This radiation shielding layer is scraped off by using a writing tool to enter information to be printed in a photographic film, and then it is laid over the film and exposed to X-radiation to thereby print the information on the film. (Seki, T.)

  5. Light shielding apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Richard Dean; Thom, Robert Anthony

    2017-10-10

    A light shielding apparatus for blocking light from reaching an electronic device, the light shielding apparatus including left and right support assemblies, a cross member, and an opaque shroud. The support assemblies each include primary support structure, a mounting element for removably connecting the apparatus to the electronic device, and a support member depending from the primary support structure for retaining the apparatus in an upright orientation. The cross member couples the left and right support assemblies together and spaces them apart according to the size and shape of the electronic device. The shroud may be removably and adjustably connectable to the left and right support assemblies and configured to take a cylindrical dome shape so as to form a central space covered from above. The opaque shroud prevents light from entering the central space and contacting sensitive elements of the electronic device.

  6. Shielding calculations using FLUKA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Chiri; Tesch, K.; Dinter, H.

    1988-06-01

    The dose equivalent on the surface of concrete shielding has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code FLUKA86 for incident proton energies from 10 to 800 GeV. The results have been compared with some simple equations. The value of the angular dependent parameter in Moyer's equation has been calculated from the locations where the values of the maximum dose equivalent occur. (author)

  7. Shielding Benchmark Computational Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunter, H.T.; Slater, C.O.; Holland, L.B.; Tracz, G.; Marshall, W.J.; Parsons, J.L.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past several decades, nuclear science has relied on experimental research to verify and validate information about shielding nuclear radiation for a variety of applications. These benchmarks are compared with results from computer code models and are useful for the development of more accurate cross-section libraries, computer code development of radiation transport modeling, and building accurate tests for miniature shielding mockups of new nuclear facilities. When documenting measurements, one must describe many parts of the experimental results to allow a complete computational analysis. Both old and new benchmark experiments, by any definition, must provide a sound basis for modeling more complex geometries required for quality assurance and cost savings in nuclear project development. Benchmarks may involve one or many materials and thicknesses, types of sources, and measurement techniques. In this paper the benchmark experiments of varying complexity are chosen to study the transport properties of some popular materials and thicknesses. These were analyzed using three-dimensional (3-D) models and continuous energy libraries of MCNP4B2, a Monte Carlo code developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, New Mexico. A shielding benchmark library provided the experimental data and allowed a wide range of choices for source, geometry, and measurement data. The experimental data had often been used in previous analyses by reputable groups such as the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG) and the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development/Nuclear Energy Agency Nuclear Science Committee (OECD/NEANSC)

  8. Muon shielding for PEP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jenkins, T.M.; Thomas, R.H.

    1974-01-01

    The first stage of construction of PEP will consist of electron and positron storage rings. At a later date a 200 GeV proton storage ring may be added. It is judicious therefore, to ensure that the first and second phases of construction are compatible with each other. One of several factors determining the elevation at which the storage rings will be constructed is the necessity to provide adequate radiation shielding. The overhead shielding of PEP is determined by the reproduction of neutrons in the hadron cascade generated by primary protons lost from the storage ring. The minimum overburden planned for PEP is 5.5 meters of earth (1100 gm cm/sup /minus/2/). To obtain a rough estimate of the magnitude of the muon radiation problem this note presents some preliminary calculations. Their purpose is intended merely to show that the presently proposed design for PEP will present no major shielding problems should the protons storage ring be installed. More detailed calculations will be made using muon yield computer codes developed at CERN and NAL and muon transport codes developed at SLAC, when details of the proton storage ring become settled. 9 refs., 4 figs

  9. Self-Shielding Of Transmission Lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christodoulou, Christos [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    The use of shielding to contend with noise or harmful EMI/EMR energy is not a new concept. An inevitable trade that must be made for shielding is physical space and weight. Space was often not as much of a painful design trade in older larger systems as they are in today’s smaller systems. Today we are packing in an exponentially growing number of functionality within the same or smaller volumes. As systems become smaller and space within systems become more restricted, the implementation of shielding becomes more problematic. Often, space that was used to design a more mechanically robust component must be used for shielding. As the system gets smaller and space is at more of a premium, the trades starts to result in defects, designs with inadequate margin in other performance areas, and designs that are sensitive to manufacturing variability. With these challenges in mind, it would be ideal to maximize attenuation of harmful fields as they inevitably couple onto transmission lines without the use of traditional shielding. Dr. Tom Van Doren proposed a design concept for transmission lines to a class of engineers while visiting New Mexico. This design concept works by maximizing Electric field (E) and Magnetic Field (H) field containment between operating transmission lines to achieve what he called “Self-Shielding”. By making the geometric centroid of the outgoing current coincident with the return current, maximum field containment is achieved. The reciprocal should be true as well, resulting in greater attenuation of incident fields. Figure’s 1(a)-1(b) are examples of designs where the current centroids are coincident. Coax cables are good examples of transmission lines with co-located centroids but they demonstrate excellent field attenuation for other reasons and can’t be used to test this design concept. Figure 1(b) is a flex circuit design that demonstrate the implementation of self-shielding vs a standard conductor layout.

  10. Effects of regional groundwater flow on the performance of an aquifer thermal energy storage system under continuous operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun Sang

    2014-01-01

    Numerical investigations and a thermohydraulic evaluation are presented for two-well models of an aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) system operating under a continuous flow regime. A three-dimensional numerical model for groundwater flow and heat transport is used to analyze the thermal energy storage in the aquifer. This study emphasizes the influence of regional groundwater flow on the heat transfer and storage of the system under various operation scenarios. For different parameters of the system, performances were compared in terms of the temperature of recovered water and the temperature field in the aquifer. The calculated temperature at the producing well varies within a certain range throughout the year, reflecting the seasonal (quarterly) temperature variation of the injected water. The pressure gradient across the system, which determines the direction and velocity of regional groundwater flow, has a substantial influence on the convective heat transport and performance of aquifer thermal storage. Injection/production rate and geometrical size of the aquifer used in the model also impact the predicted temperature distribution at each stage and the recovery water temperature. The hydrogeological-thermal simulation is shown to play an integral part in the prediction of performance of processes as complicated as those in ATES systems.

  11. Onboard radiation shielding estimates for interplanetary manned missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Totemeier, A.; Jevremovic, T.; Hounshel, D.

    2004-01-01

    The main focus of space related shielding design is to protect operating systems, personnel and key structural components from outer space and onboard radiation. This paper summarizes the feasibility of a lightweight neutron radiation shield design for a nuclear powered, manned space vehicle. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 is used to determine radiation transport characteristics of the different materials and find the optimized shield configuration. A phantom torso encased in air is used to determine a dose rate for a crew member on the ship. Calculation results indicate that onboard shield against neutron radiation coming from nuclear engine can be achieved with very little addition of weight to the space vehicle. The selection of materials and neutron transport analysis as presented in this paper are useful starting data to design shield against neutrons generated when high-energy particles from outer space interact with matter on the space vehicle. (authors)

  12. Effect of low air velocities on thermal homeostasis and comfort during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beumer, Ronald J.

    1989-01-01

    The effectiveness of different low air velocities in maintaining thermal comfort and homeostasis during exercise at space station operational temperature and humidity was investigated. Five male subjects exercised on a treadmill for successive ten minute periods at 60, 71, and 83 percent of maximum oxygen consumption at each of four air velocities, 30, 50, 80, and 120 ft/min, at 22 C and 62 percent relative humidity. No consistent trends or statistically significant differences between air velocities were found in body weight loss, sweat accumulation, or changes in rectal, skin, and body temperatures. Occurrence of the smallest body weight loss at 120 ft/min, the largest sweat accumulation at 30 ft/min, and the smallest rise in rectal temperature and the greatest drop in skin temperature at 120 ft/min all suggested more efficient evaporative cooling at the highest velocity. Heat storage at all velocities was evidenced by increased rectal and body temperatures; skin temperatures declined or increased only slightly. Body and rectal temperature increases corresponded with increased perception of warmth and slight thermal discomfort as exercise progressed. At all air velocities, mean thermal perception never exceeded warm and mean discomfort, greatest at 30 ft/min, was categorized at worst as uncomfortable; sensation of thermal neutrality and comfort returned rapidly after cessation of exercise. Suggestions for further elucidation of the effects of low air velocities on thermal comfort and homeostasis include larger numbers of subjects, more extensive skin temperature measurements and more rigorous analysis of the data from this study.

  13. In-beam background suppression shield

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santoro, V.; Cai, Xiao Xiao; DiJulio, D. D.

    2015-01-01

    The long (3 ms) proton pulse of the European Spallation Source (ESS) gives rise to unique and potentially high backgrounds for the instrument suite. In such a source an instrument's capabilities will be limited by its Signal to Noise (S/N) ratio. The instruments with a direct view of the moderator......, which do not use a bender to help mitigate the fast neutron background, are the most challenging. For these beam lines we propose the innovative shielding of placing blocks of material directly into the guide system, which allow a minimum attenuation of the cold and thermal fluxes relative...... to the background suppression. This shielding configuration has been worked into a beam line model using Geant4. We study particularly the advantages of single crystal sapphire and silicon blocks....

  14. Neutronics and shielding issues of ADS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abderrahim, H. A.; Aoust, T.; Haeck, W.; Malambu, E.; Van den Eynde, G.; Gonzalez, E.; Vicente, C.; Martinez-Val, J. M.; Romanets, Y.; Vaz, P.

    2007-01-01

    implementation and deployment have in common the fact that they raise cutting edge scientific and technological problems, associated to the operation of the high-intensity proton accelerator, the high-power (in the multi-MegaWatt range) delivered to the target and the material damage in the target and surrounding structures. The thermal power in the core, the thermal-hydraulic aspects associated to the heat removal in steady state and also in transient mode, the subcriticality level of the system and the efficiency of the transmutation process, is particularly sensitive to the core design (geometry, number of subassemblies, fuel composition, among many other aspects). Neutronic and shielding issues and the computation and mapping of neutron fluxes and doses are important throughout all stages of design of these systems. In this paper, i) the main characteristics and parameters of the ADS systems previously alluded to will be reviewed ii) the neutronics and shielding calculations of relevance for the design of the ADS systems, for radiation damage and for radiation protection purposes will be extensively described

  15. Distributed generation incorporated with the thermal generation for optimum operation of a smart grid considering forecast error

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howlader, Harun Or Rashid; Matayoshi, Hidehito; Senjyu, Tomonobu

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Optimal operation of the thermal generation for the smart grid system. • Different distributed generations are considered as the power generation sources. • Forecast error of the renewable energy systems is considered. • Controllable loads of the smart houses are considered to achieve the optimal operation. • Economical benefits can be achieved for the smart grid system. - Abstract: This paper concentrates on the optimal operation of the conventional thermal generators with distributed generations for a smart grid considering forecast error. The distributed generations are considered as wind generators, photovoltaic generators, battery energy storage systems in the supply side and a large number of smart houses in the demand side. A smart house consists of the electric vehicle, heat pump, photovoltaic generator and solar collector. The electric vehicle and heat pump are considered as the controllable loads which can compensate the power for the forecast error of renewable energy sources. As a result, power generation cost of the smart grid can reduce through coordinated with distributed generations and thermal units scheduling process. The electric vehicles of the smart house are considered as the spinning reserve in the scheduling process which lead to lessen the additional operation of thermal units. Finally, obtained results of the proposed system have been compared with the conventional method. The conventional method does not consider the electric vehicle in the smart houses. The acquired results demonstrate that total power generation cost of the smart grid has been reduced by the proposed method considering forecast error. Effectiveness of the proposed method has been verified by the extensive simulation results using MATLAB® software

  16. Cooling Performance of TBM-shield Designed for Manufacturability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dong Jun; Yoon, Jae Sung; Ahn, Mu Young

    2016-01-01

    Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) is composed of four sub-modules and a common back manifold (BM). The associated shield is a water-cooled 316L(N)-IG block with internal cooling channels. The purpose of the TBM-shield is to make the condition with the allowable neutron flux and dose rate level. The radially continuous layers of water and structure were configured. The main purpose of the shield is to reduce the neutron flux by absorbing the neutron in the structure. The water could act as the moderator and cool down the structure which is heated due to the reaction with the neutrons. The moderated neutrons are easily absorbed by the structure. It could meet the criteria for the minimum neutron flux by increasing the thickness of structure. The formation of inside cooling channel in the TBM-shield should be considered while maintaining the allowable temperature range. In this work, a manufacturing process including the formation of inside cooling channel was presented. Current design and thermal analysis results for the TBM-shield were presented. The geometry of the shield blocks was considerably changed. The coolant channel was exposed to the outer surface of the TBM-shield. The overall manufacturing process is simplified compared with the previous process of CD model

  17. Cooling Performance of TBM-shield Designed for Manufacturability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Dae; Lee, Dong Won; Kim, Dong Jun; Yoon, Jae Sung [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu Young [NFRI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-05-15

    Helium cooled ceramic reflector (HCCR) test blanket module (TBM) is composed of four sub-modules and a common back manifold (BM). The associated shield is a water-cooled 316L(N)-IG block with internal cooling channels. The purpose of the TBM-shield is to make the condition with the allowable neutron flux and dose rate level. The radially continuous layers of water and structure were configured. The main purpose of the shield is to reduce the neutron flux by absorbing the neutron in the structure. The water could act as the moderator and cool down the structure which is heated due to the reaction with the neutrons. The moderated neutrons are easily absorbed by the structure. It could meet the criteria for the minimum neutron flux by increasing the thickness of structure. The formation of inside cooling channel in the TBM-shield should be considered while maintaining the allowable temperature range. In this work, a manufacturing process including the formation of inside cooling channel was presented. Current design and thermal analysis results for the TBM-shield were presented. The geometry of the shield blocks was considerably changed. The coolant channel was exposed to the outer surface of the TBM-shield. The overall manufacturing process is simplified compared with the previous process of CD model.

  18. Open Rotor Noise Shielding by Blended-Wing-Body Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yueping; Czech, Michael J.; Thomas, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of open rotor noise shielding by Blended Wing Body (BWB) aircraft by using model scale test data acquired in the Boeing Low Speed Aeroacoustic Facility (LSAF) with a legacy F7/A7 rotor model and a simplified BWB platform. The objective of the analysis is the understanding of the shielding features of the BWB and the method of application of the shielding data for noise studies of BWB aircraft with open rotor propulsion. By studying the directivity patterns of individual tones, it is shown that though the tonal energy distribution and the spectral content of the wind tunnel test model, and thus its total noise, may differ from those of more advanced rotor designs, the individual tones follow directivity patterns that characterize far field radiations of modern open rotors, ensuring the validity of the use of this shielding data. Thus, open rotor tonal noise shielding should be categorized into front rotor tones, aft rotor tones and interaction tones, not only because of the different directivities of the three groups of tones, but also due to the differences in their source locations and coherence features, which make the respective shielding characteristics of the three groups of tones distinctly different from each other. To reveal the parametric trends of the BWB shielding effects, results are presented with variations in frequency, far field emission angle, rotor operational condition, engine installation geometry, and local airframe features. These results prepare the way for the development of parametric models for the shielding effects in prediction tools.

  19. Discussions for the shielding materials of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Many synchrotron radiation facilities are now under operation such as E.S.R.F., APS, and S.P.ring-8. New facilities with intermediated stored electron energy are also under construction and designing such as D.I.A.M.O.N.D., S.O.L.E.I.L., and S.S.R.F.. At these third generation synchrotron radiation facilities, the beamline shielding as well as the bulk shield is very important for designing radiation safety because of intense and high energy synchrotron radiation beam. Some reasons employ lead shield wall for the synchrotron radiation beamlines. One is narrow space for the construction of many beamlines at the experimental hall, and the other is the necessary of many movable mechanisms at the beamlines, for examples. Some cases are required to shield high energy neutrons due to stored electron beam loss and photoneutrons due to gas Bremsstrahlung. Ordinary concrete and heavy concrete are coming up to shield material of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches. However, few discussions have been performed so far for the shielding materials of the hutches. In this presentation, therefore, we will discuss the characteristics of the shielding conditions including build up effect for the beamline hutches by using the ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, and lead for shielding materials with 3 GeV and 8 GeV class synchrotron radiation source. (author)

  20. A contribution to shielding effectiveness analysis of shielded tents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vranić Zoran M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available An analysis of shielding effectiveness (SE of the shielded tents made of the metallised fabrics is given. First, two electromagnetic characteristic fundamental for coupling through electrically thin shield, the skin depth break frequency and the surface resistance or transfer impedance, is defined and analyzed. Then, the transfer function and the SE are analyzed regarding to the frequency range of interest to the Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC Community.

  1. Light-refractory radiation shielding materials using diatomites and zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    It has been recently shown that diatomites and zeolites have some useful characteristics for radiation shielding materials. In this study, the availability of these materials for unexpected accidents in the nuclear sites is examined. The diatomites and zeolites, compared to existing shielding materials, have superior characteristics; low density and light weight, low in radiation-induced problem, high-heat resistance, remain unaltered by the addition of an acid except hydrofluoric acid, porous and large specific surface area, and also excellent water-absorbing property. These porous materials could also expand the shielding energy range applied and be used for fast- and thermal-neutrons, and γ ray. In addition, these materials are easy to store for long periods of time against emergency because of their natural rocks. From the examinations, it is cleared that diatomites and zeolites have excellent properties as radiation shielding materials for emergency use. (author)

  2. Neutron guide shielding for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantulnikovs, K.; Bertelsen, M.; Cooper-Jensen, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the study of fast-neutron background for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS. We investigate the effect of background radiation induced by the interaction of fast neutrons from the source with the material of the neutron guide and devise a reasonable fast, thermal/cold neutron shielding...... solution for the current guide geometry using McStas and MCNPX. We investigate the effectiveness of the steel shielding around the guide by running simulations with three different steel thicknesses. The same approach is used to study the efficiencies of the steel wall a flat cylinder pierced by the guide...... in the middle and the polyethylene layer. The final model presented here has a 3 cm thick steel shielding around the guide, 30 cm of polyethylene around the shielding, two 5 mm thick B4C layers and a steel wall at position Z = 38 m, being 1 m thick and 10 m in radius. The final model finally proves...

  3. RSMASS: A simple model for estimating reactor and shield masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Aragon, J.; Gallup, D.

    1987-01-01

    A simple mathematical model (RSMASS) has been developed to provide rapid estimates of reactor and shield masses for space-based reactor power systems. Approximations are used rather than correlations or detailed calculations to estimate the reactor fuel mass and the masses of the moderator, structure, reflector, pressure vessel, miscellaneous components, and the reactor shield. The fuel mass is determined either by neutronics limits, thermal/hydraulic limits, or fuel damage limits, whichever yields the largest mass. RSMASS requires the reactor power and energy, 24 reactor parameters, and 20 shield parameters to be specified. This parametric approach should be applicable to a very broad range of reactor types. Reactor and shield masses calculated by RSMASS were found to be in good agreement with the masses obtained from detailed calculations

  4. Design and characterization of a novel neutron shield for BNCT in an experimental model of oral cancer in the hamster cheek pouch at RA-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pozzi, E.C.C.; Curotto, P.; Monti Hughes, A.; Nigg, D.W.; Schwint, A.E.; Trivillin, V.A.; Thorp, S.I.

    2013-01-01

    Our research group at the Radiation Pathology Division of the Department of Radiobiology (National Atomic Energy Commission) has previously demonstrated the therapeutic efficacy of different BNCT protocols to treat oral cancer in an experimental hamster cheek pouch model. In particular, to perform studies in this experimental model at the thermal facility constructed at RA-3, we designed and constructed a shielding device for thermal neutrons, to be able to expose the cheek pouch while minimizing the dose to the rest of the body. This device allowed for the irradiation of one animal at a time. Given the usage rate of the device, the aim of the present study was to design and construct an optimized version of the existing shielding device that would allow for the simultaneous irradiation of 2 animals at the thermal facility of RA-3. Taking into account the characteristics of the neutron source and preliminary biological assays, we designed the shielding device for the body of the animal, i.e. a rectangular shaped box with double acrylic walls. The space between the walls contains a continuous filling of 6Li 2 CO 3 (95% enriched in 6Li), approximately 6 mm thick. Two small windows interrupt the shield at one end of the box through which the right pouch of each hamster is everted out onto an external acrylic shelf for exposure to the neutron flux. The characterization of the shielding device showed that the neutron flux was equivalent at both irradiation positions confirming that we were able to design and construct a new shielding device that allows for the irradiation of 2 animals at the same time at the thermal facility of RA-3. This new version of the shielding device will reduce the number of interventions of the reactor operators, reducing occupational exposure to radiation and will make the procedure more efficient for researchers. In addition, we addressed the generation of tritium as a product of the capture reaction in lithium. It was considered as a

  5. Thermal balance of a four stroke SI engine operating on hydrogen as a supplementary fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yueksel, F.; Ceviz, M.A.

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the effects of adding constant quantity hydrogen to gasoline-air mixture on SI engine thermal balance and performance. A four stroke, four-cylinder SI engine was used for conducting this study. Thermal balance tests were conducted for engine thermal efficiency, heat loss through the exhaust gases, heat loss to the cooling water and unaccounted losses (i.e. heat lost by lubricating oil, radiation), while performance tests were in respect to the brake power, specific fuel consumption and air ratio. Hydrogen supplementations were used with three different and fixed mass flow rates; 0.129, 0.168 and 0.208 kg h -1 at near three-fourth throttle opening position and variable engine speed ranging from 1000 to 4500 rpm. The results showed that supplementation of hydrogen to gasoline decreases the heat loss to cooling water and unaccounted losses, and the heat loss through the exhaust gas is nearly the same with pure gasoline experiments. Additionally, specific fuel consumption decreases, while the engine thermal efficiency and the air ratio increase. Engine performance parameters such as thermal efficiency and specific fuel consumption improved the level of the ratio of hydrogen mass flow rate to that of gasoline up to 5%

  6. First wall thermal hydraulic models for fusion blankets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fillo, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    Subject to normal and off-normal reactor conditions, thermal hydraulic models of first walls, e.g., a thermal mass barrier, a tubular shield, and a radiating liner are reviewed. Under normal operation the plasma behaves as expected in a predicted way for transient and steady-state conditions. The most severe thermal loading on the first wall occurs when the plasma becomes unstable and dumps its energy on the wall in a very short period of time (milliseconds). Depending on the plasma dump time and area over which the energy is deposited may result in melting of the first wall surface, and if the temperature is high enough, vaporization

  7. Lifetime improvement of sheathed thermocouples for use in high-temperature and thermal transient operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCulloch, R.W.; Clift, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    Premature failure of small-diameter, magnesium-oxide-insulated sheathed thermocouples occurred when they were placed within nuclear fuel rod simulators (FRSs) to measure high temperatures and to follow severe thermal transients encountered during simulation of nuclear reactor accidents in Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) thermal-hydraulic test facilities. Investigation of thermally cycled thermocouples yielded three criteria for improvement of thermocouple lifetime: (1) reduction of oxygen impurities prior to and during their fabrication, (2) refinement of thermoelement grain size during their fabrication, and (3) elimination of prestrain prior to use above their recrystallization temperature. The first and third criteria were satisfied by improved techniques of thermocouple assembly and by a recovery anneal prior to thermocouple use

  8. Transient thermal-mechanical coupling behavior analysis of mechanical seals during start-up operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, B. C.; Meng, X. K.; Shen, M. X.; Peng, X. D.

    2016-05-01

    A transient thermal-mechanical coupling model for a contacting mechanical seal during start-up has been developed. It takes into consideration the coupling relationship among thermal-mechanical deformation, film thickness, temperature and heat generation. The finite element method and multi-iteration technology are applied to solve the temperature distribution and thermal-mechanical deformation as well as their evolution behavior. Results show that the seal gap transforms from negative coning to positive coning and the contact area of the mechanical seal gradually decreases during start-up. The location of the maximum temperature and maximum contact pressure move from the outer diameter to inside diameter. The heat generation and the friction torque increase sharply at first and then decrease. Meanwhile, the contact force decreases and the fluid film force and leakage rate increase.

  9. Exergy analysis of the FIGUEIRA thermal power plant operation - state of Parana, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanescu, George; Lima, Joao E. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: stanescu@demec.ufpr.br; joeduli@demec.ufpr.br; Andrade, Carlos de [FIGUEIRA Thermal Power Plant, Figueira, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: ccarlosaandrade@zipmail.com.br

    2000-07-01

    Exergy analysis is a powerful tool to evaluate, design and improve the thermal systems. The method of exergy analysis or availability analysis is well suited for furthering the goal of increasing the efficiency of existing power generation systems, and the capability of more effective energy resource use. Exergy analysis of the FIGUEIRA thermal power plant is presented. Exergy losses occurring in various components are considered and the exergy balance is shown in tabular form. Results clearly reveal that the steam generator is the principal site of thermodynamic losses, while the condenser is relatively unimportant. (author)

  10. Radiation shielding quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Dallsun

    For the radiation shielding quality assurance, the validity and reliability of the neutron transport code MCNP, which is now one of the most widely used radiation shielding analysis codes, were checked with lot of benchmark experiments. And also as a practical example, follows were performed in this thesis. One integral neutron transport experiment to measure the effect of neutron streaming in iron and void was performed with Dog-Legged Void Assembly in Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory in 1991. Neutron flux was measured six different places with the methane detectors and a BF-3 detector. The main purpose of the measurements was to provide benchmark against which various neutron transport calculation tools could be compared. Those data were used in verification of Monte Carlo Neutron & Photon Transport Code, MCNP, with the modeling for that. Experimental results and calculation results were compared in both ways, as the total integrated value of neutron fluxes along neutron energy range from 10 KeV to 2 MeV and as the neutron spectrum along with neutron energy range. Both results are well matched with the statistical error +/-20%. MCNP results were also compared with those of TORT, a three dimensional discrete ordinates code which was developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. MCNP results are superior to the TORT results at all detector places except one. This means that MCNP is proved as a very powerful tool for the analysis of neutron transport through iron & air and further it could be used as a powerful tool for the radiation shielding analysis. For one application of the analysis of variance (ANOVA) to neutron and gamma transport problems, uncertainties for the calculated values of critical K were evaluated as in the ANOVA on statistical data.

  11. COMBINED CYCLE GAS TURBINE FOR THERMAL POWER STATIONS: EXPERIENCE IN DESIGNING AND OPERATION, PROSPECTS IN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Karnitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has reviewed main world tendencies in power consumption and power system structure. Main schemes of combined cycle gas turbines have been considered in the paper. The paper contains an operational analysis of CCGT blocks that are operating within the Belarusian energy system. The analysis results have been given in tables showing main operational indices of power blocks

  12. Future distributed generation: An operational multi-objective optimization model for integrated small scale urban electrical, thermal and gas grids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Cascio, Ermanno; Borelli, Davide; Devia, Francesco; Schenone, Corrado

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Multi-objective optimization model for retrofitted and integrated natural gas pressure regulation stations. • Comparison of different incentive mechanisms for recovered energy based on the characteristics of preheating process. • Control strategies comparison: performances achieved with optimal control vs. ones obtained by thermal load tracking. - Abstract: A multi-objective optimization model for urban integrated electrical, thermal and gas grids is presented. The main system consists of a retrofitted natural gas pressure regulation station where a turbo-expander allows to recover energy from the process. Here, the natural gas must be preheated in order to avoid methane hydrates. The preheating phase could be based on fossil fuels, renewable or on a thermal mix. Depending on the system configuration, the proposed optimization model enables a proper differentiation based on how the natural gas preheating process is expected to be accomplished. This differentiation is addressed by weighting the electricity produced by the turbo-expander and linking it to proper remuneration tariffs. The effectiveness of the model has been tested on an existing plant located in the city of Genoa. Here, the thermal energy is provided by means of two redundant gas-fired boilers and a cogeneration unit. Furthermore, the whole system is thermally integrated with a district heating network. Numerical simulation results, obtained with the commercial proprietary software Honeywell UniSim Design Suite, have been compared with the optimal solutions achieved. The effectiveness of the model, in terms of economic and environmental performances, is finally quantified. For specific conditions, the model allows achieving an operational costs reduction of about 17% with the respect to thermal-load-tracking control logic.

  13. A shield against distraction

    OpenAIRE

    Halin, N.; Marsh, J.E.; Hellman, A.; Hellstrom, I.; Sörqvist, Patrik

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we apply the basic idea of a trade-off between the level of concentration and distractibility to test whether a manipulation of task difficulty can shield against distraction. Participants read, either in quiet or with a speech noise background, texts that were displayed either in an easy-to-read or a hard-to-read font. Background speech impaired prose recall, but only when the text was displayed in the easy-to-read font. Most importantly, recall was better in the background sp...

  14. Shielding device for control rod in nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakamaki, Kazuo; Tomatsu, Tsutomu.

    1995-01-01

    The device of the present invention shields radiation emitted from control rods to greatly reduce an operator's radiation exposure even if reactor water level is lowered and the upper portion of the control rod is exposed upon inspection of a BWR type reactor. Namely, a shield assembly has a structure comprising a set of four columnar shields in a two-row and two-column arrangement, which can be inserted into a control rod guide tube. Upon conducting inspection, the control rod is lowered into the control rod guide tube, and in this state, the columnar shields of the shield assembly are inserted to the control rod in the control rod guide tube. With such procedures, the upper portion of the control rod protruded from the control rod guide tube is covered with the shield assembly. As a result, radiation leaked from the control rod is shielded. Accordingly, irradiation in the reactor due to leaked radiation can be prevented thereby enabling to reduce an operator's radiation exposure. (I.S.)

  15. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadori Amir; Semones Edward; Ewert Michael; Broyan James; Walker Steven

    2017-01-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles ...

  16. Selective shielding device for scintiphotography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, J.W.; Kay, T.D.

    1976-01-01

    A selective shielding device to be used in combination with a scintillation camera is described. The shielding device is a substantially oval-shaped configuration removably secured to the scintillation camera. As a result of this combination scanning of preselected areas of a patient can be rapidly and accurately performed without the requirement of mounting any type of shielding paraphernalia on the patient. 1 claim, 2 drawing figures

  17. Tax Shield, Insolvenz und Zinsschranke

    OpenAIRE

    Arnold, Sven; Lahmann, Alexander; Schwetzler, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Dieser Beitrag analysiert den Wertbeitrag fremdfinanzierungsbedingter Steuervorteile (Tax Shield) unter realistischen Bedingungen (keine Negativsteuer; mögliche Insolvenz) für unterschiedliche Finanzierungspolitiken. Zusätzlich wird der Effekt der sogenannten Zinsschranke auf den Wert des Tax Shield ermittelt. Die Bewertung des Tax Shield mit und ohne Zinsschranke findet im einperiodigen Fall auf der Basis von Optionspreismodellen und im mehrperiodigen Fall auf der Basis von Monte Carlo Simul...

  18. 77 FR 11598 - Thermal Overload Protection for Electric Motors on Motor-Operated Valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-27

    ... application of thermal overload protection devices that are integral with the motor starter for electric... Research, U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, Washington, DC 20555-0001, telephone: 301-251-7455; email... Development Branch, Division of Engineering, Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research. [FR Doc. 2012-4552 Filed 2...

  19. Thermal stress analysis and operational characteristics of a bellows-seal globe valve

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kwang Su; Kim, Youn Jae

    2005-01-01

    Because of design and manufacturing costs, it is important to predict an expected life of bellows with component stresses of bellows as its design factors and material characteristics. In this study, numerical analyses are carried out to elucidate the thermal and flow characteristics with 0.1 m (4 inch) bellows-seal globe valve for high temperature (max. 600 .deg. C) and for high pressure (max. 104 kgf/cm 2 , 10.2 MPa) conditions. Using commercial codes, FLUENT, which uses FVM and SIMPLE algorithm, and ANSYS, which uses FEM, the pressure and temperature fields are calculated and the results are graphically depicted. In addition, when bellows have an axial displacement, thermal stress affecting bellows life is studied. The pressure and temperature values obtained from the flow analyses are adopted as the boundary conditions for thermal stress analyses. As the result of this study, we get the reasonable coefficients for valve and thermal stress for bellows, compared with existing coefficients and calculated values

  20. Shielding design for PWR in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, G.; Charransol; Le Dieu de Ville, A.; Nimal, J.C.; Vergnaud, T.

    1983-05-01

    Shielding calculation scheme used in France for PWR is presented here for 900 MWe and 1300 MWe plants built by EDF the French utility giving electricity. Neutron dose rate at areas accessible by personnel during the reactor operation is calculated and compared with the measurements which were carried out in 900 MWe units up to now. Measurements on the first French 1300 MWe reactor are foreseen at the end of 1983