WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal shield materials

  1. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800 degree C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280 degree F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found

  2. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1990-03-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing, These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environmental prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase showed that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  3. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.N.

    1990-01-01

    The GA-4 and GA-9 spent fuel shipping casks employ a solid neutron shielding material. During a hypothetical thermal accident, any combustion of the neutron shield must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. A two-phase thermal testing program was carried out to assist in selecting satisfactory shielding materials. In the first phase, small-scale screening tests were performed on nine candidate materials using ASTM procedures. From these initial results, three of the nine candidates were chosen for inclusion in the second phase of testing. These materials were Bisco Products NS-4-FR, Reactor Experiments 201-1, and Reactor Experiments 207. In the second phase, each selected material was fabricated into a test article which simulated a full-scale section of neutron shield from the cask. The test article was heated in an environment prescribed by NRC regulations. Results of this second testing phase show that all three materials are thermally acceptable

  4. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-A19897, R.H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280degF. Table 1 lists the neutron shield materials tested. The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found. The Bisco modified NS-4 and Reactor Experiments HMPP are both acceptable materials from a thermal accident standpoint for use in the shipping cask. Tests of the Kobe PP-R01 and Envirotech HDPE were stopped for safety reasons, due to inability to deal with the heavy smoke, before completion of the 30-minute heating phase. However these materials may prove satisfactory if they could undergo the complete heating. (J.P.N.)

  5. Analysis of the Thermal Shielding Properties of Camouflage Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bennett, John G; Polsen, Erik S

    2007-01-01

    .... The outer surface of each panel was thermostatically controlled to the same temperature. The camouflage material covered one of the panels, while the other, uncovered, panel acted as the baseline...

  6. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nodaka, M.; Iida, T.; Taniuchi, H.; Yosimura, K.; Nagahama, H.

    1993-01-01

    From among the neutron shielding materials of the 'kobesh' series developed by Kobe Steel, Ltd. for transport and storage packagings, silicon rubber base type material has been tested for several items with a view to practical application and official authorization, and in order to determine its adaptability to actual vessels. Silicon rubber base type 'kobesh SR-T01' is a material in which, from among the silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials, the hydrogen content is highest and the boron content is most optimized. Its neutron shielding capability has been already described in the previous report (Taniuchi, 1986). The following tests were carried out to determine suitability for practical application; 1) Long-term thermal stability test 2) Pouring test on an actual-scale model 3) Fire test The experimental results showed that the silicone rubber based neutron shielding material has good neutron shielding capability and high long-term fire resistance, and that it can be applied to the advanced transport packaging. (author)

  7. Radiation Shielding Materials and Containers Incorporating Same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirsky, Steven M.; Krill, Stephen J.; and Murray, Alexander P.

    2005-11-01

    An improved radiation shielding material and storage systems for radioactive materials incorporating the same. The PYRolytic Uranium Compound (''PYRUC'') shielding material is preferably formed by heat and/or pressure treatment of a precursor material comprising microspheres of a uranium compound, such as uranium dioxide or uranium carbide, and a suitable binder. The PYRUC shielding material provides improved radiation shielding, thermal characteristic, cost and ease of use in comparison with other shielding materials. The shielding material can be used to form containment systems, container vessels, shielding structures, and containment storage areas, all of which can be used to house radioactive waste. The preferred shielding system is in the form of a container for storage, transportation, and disposal of radioactive waste. In addition, improved methods for preparing uranium dioxide and uranium carbide microspheres for use in the radiation shielding materials are also provided.

  8. Enhancement of thermal neutron self-shielding in materials surrounded by reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornelia Chilian; Gregory Kennedy

    2012-01-01

    Materials containing from 41 to 1124 mg chlorine and surrounded by polyethylene containers of various thicknesses, from 0.01 to 5.6 mm, were irradiated in a research reactor neutron spectrum and the 38 Cl activity produced was measured as a function of polyethylene reflector thickness. For the material containing the higher amount of chlorine, the 38 Cl specific activity decreased with increasing reflector thickness, indicating increased neutron self-shielding. It was found that the amount of neutron self-shielding increased by as much as 52% with increasing reflector thickness. This is explained by neutrons which have exited the material subsequently reflecting back into it and thus increasing the total mean path length in the material. All physical and empirical models currently used to predict neutron self-shielding have ignored this effect and need to be modified. A method is given for measuring the adjustable parameter of a self-shielding model for a particular sample size and combination of neutron reflectors. (author)

  9. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, Akio; Isobe, Eiji.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To increase the shielding capacity of the radiation shielding material having an abundant flexibility. Constitution: A mat consisting of a lead or lead alloy fibrous material is covered with a cloth, and the two are made integral by sewing in a kilted fashion by using a yarn. Thereafter, the system is covered with a gas-tight film or sheet. The shielding material obtained in this way has, in addition to the above merits, advantages in that (1) it is free from restoration due to elasticity so that it can readily seal contaminants, (2) it can be used in a state consisting of a number of overlapped layers, (3) it fits the shoulder well and is readily portable and (4) it permits attachment of fasteners or the like. (Ikeda, J.)

  10. Thermal behavior of neutron shielding material, NS-4-FR, under long term storage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamada, N.; O-iwa, A.; Asano, R.; Horita, R.; Kusunoki, K.

    2004-01-01

    NS-4-FR, Epoxy-Resin, has been widely used as a neutron shielding material for casks. It is recognized that the resin will degrade during storage and loose weight under high temperature conditions. Most of the examinations for the resin degrading behavior were conducted with rather small bare resin specimens. However, the actual quantity of neutron shielding is quite large and is covered by the cask body. To confirm the degrading behavior of the resin under the long-term storage conditions, we performed the test on the specimen with the same cross-section as the actual design, Hitz B69. The resin test vessels were made out of stainless steel and equipped with flange

  11. Radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawakubo, Takamasa; Yamada, Fumiyuki; Nakazato, Kenjiro.

    1976-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a material, which is used for printing a samples name and date on an X-ray photographic film at the same time an X-ray radiography. Constitution: A radiation shielding material of a large mass absorption coefficient such as lead oxide, barium oxide, barium sulfate, etc. is added to a solution of a radiation permeable substance capable of imparting cold plastic fluidity (such as microcrystalline wax, paraffin, low molecular polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, etc.). The resultant system is agitated and then cooled, and thereafter it is press fitted to or bonded to a base in the form of a film of a predetermined thickness. This radiation shielding layer is scraped off by using a writing tool to enter information to be printed in a photographic film, and then it is laid over the film and exposed to X-radiation to thereby print the information on the film. (Seki, T.)

  12. Neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Shigenori; Iimori, Hiroshi; Kobori, Junzo.

    1980-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a neutron shielding material which incorporates preferable shielding capacity, heat resistance, fire resistance and workability by employing a mixture of thermosetting resin, polyethylene and aluminium hydroxide in special range ratio and curing it. Constitution: A mixture containing 20 to 60% by weight of thermosetting resin having preferable heat resistance, 10 to 40% by weight of polyethylene powder having high hydrogen atom density and 1000 to 60000 of molecular weight, and 15 to 55% by weight of Al(OH) 3 for imparting fire resistance and self-fire extinguishing property thereto is cured. At this time approx. 0.5 to 5% of curing catalyst of the thermosetting resin is contained in 100 parts by weight of the mixture. (Sekiya, K.)

  13. Thermophysical Properties of Heat Resistant Shielding Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porter, W.D.

    2004-01-01

    This project was aimed at determining thermal conductivity, specific heat and thermal expansion of a heat resistant shielding material for neutron absorption applications. These data are critical in predicting the structural integrity of the shielding under thermal cycling and mechanical load. The measurements of thermal conductivity and specific heat were conducted in air at five different temperatures (-31 F, 73.4 F, 140 F, 212 F and 302 F). The transient plane source (TPS) method was used in the tests. Thermal expansion tests were conducted using push rod dilatometry over the continuous range from -40 F (-40 C) to 302 F (150 C)

  14. Neutronic reactor thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lowe, P.E.

    1976-01-01

    A shield for a nuclear reactor includes at least two layers of alternating wide and narrow rectangular blocks so arranged that the spaces between blocks in adjacent layers are out of registry, each block having an opening therein equally spaced from the sides of the blocks and nearer the top of the block than the bottom, the distance from the top of the block to the opening in one layer being different from this distance in adjacent layers, openings in blocks in adjacent layers being in registry. 1 claim, 7 drawing figures

  15. Development of neutron shielding material for cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najima, K.; Ohta, H.; Ishihara, N.; Matsuoka, T.; Kuri, S.; Ohsono, K.; Hode, S.

    2001-01-01

    Since 1980's Mitsubishi Heavy Industries, Ltd (MHI) has established transport and storage cask design 'MSF series' which makes higher payload and reliability for long term storage. MSF series transport and storage cask uses new-developed neutron shielding material. This neutron shielding material has been developed for improving durability under high condition for long term. Since epoxy resin contains a lot of hydrogen and is comparatively resistant to heat, many casks employ epoxy base neutron shielding material. However, if the epoxy base neutron shielding material is used under high temperature condition for a long time, the material deteriorates and the moisture contained in it is released. The loss of moisture is in the range of several percents under more than 150 C. For this reason, our purpose was to develop a high durability epoxy base neutron shielding material which has the same self-fire-extinction property, high hydrogen content and so on as conventional. According to the long-time heating test, the weight loss of this new neutron shielding material after 5000 hours heating has been lower than 0.04% at 150 C and 0.35% at 170 C. A thermal test was also performed: a specimen of neutron shielding material covered with stainless steel was inserted in a furnace under condition of 800 C temperature for 30 minutes then was left to cool down in ambient conditions. The external view of the test piece shows that only a thin layer was carbonized

  16. Thermal shielding device in LMFBR type reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Hiroshi.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To improve the soundness and earthquake proofness of mounting structures to a reactor vessel in a thermal shielding device comprising a plurality of tightly closed casings evacuated or shield with heat insulation gases, by reducing the wall thickness and weight of the casing. Constitution: the thermal shielding body comprises tightly closed casings and compressing core materials for preventing the deformation of the casings. The tightly closed casing is in the shape of a hollow vessel, completely sealed in gastight manner, and evacuated or sealed with heat insulation gases at a low pressure of about less than 0.5 kg/cm 2 G, such that the inner pressure is lower than the outer pressure. Compressing core materials made of porous metals or porous ceramics are contained to the inside of the casing. In this way, the wall thickness of the tightly closed casing can be reduced significantly as compared with the conventional case, whereby the mounting work on the site to the reactor container on the field can remarkably be improved and high reliability can be maintained at the mounting portion. (Kamimura, M.)

  17. Thermal neutron shield and method of manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brindza, Paul Daniel; Metzger, Bert Clayton

    2013-05-28

    A thermal neutron shield comprising concrete with a high percentage of the element Boron. The concrete is least 54% Boron by weight which maximizes the effectiveness of the shielding against thermal neutrons. The accompanying method discloses the manufacture of Boron loaded concrete which includes enriching the concrete mixture with varying grit sizes of Boron Carbide.

  18. Using the shield for thermal energy storage in pulsar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, G.T.; Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.P.C.; Bathke, C.G.; Blanchard, J.P.; Brimer, C.; Cheng, E.T.; El-Guebaly, L.A.; Hasan, M.Z.; Najmabadi, F.; Sharafat, S.; Sviatoslavski, I.N.; Waganer, L.

    1995-01-01

    The PULSAR pulsed tokamak power plant design utilizes the outboard shield for thermal energy storage to maintain full 1000MW(e) output during the dwell period of 200s. Thermal energy resulting from direct nuclear heating is accumulated in the shield during the 7200s fusion power production phase. The maximum shield temperature may be much higher than that for the blanket because radiation damage is significantly reduced. During the dwell period, thermal power discharged from the shield and coolant temperature are simultaneously regulated by controlling the coolant mass flow rate at the shield inlet. This is facilitated by throttled coolant bypass. Design concepts using helium and lithium coolant have been developed. Two-dimensional time-dependent thermal hydraulic calculations were performed to confirm performance capabilities required of the design concepts. The results indicate that the system design and performance can accommodate uncertainties in material limits or the length of the dwell period. (orig.)

  19. Thermal design of top shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghupathy, S.; Velusamy, K.; Parthasarathy, U.; Ghosh, D.; Selvaraj, P.; Chellapandi, P.; Chetal, S.C.

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a 500 MWe, sodium cooled, pool type fast reactor. The top shield forms the top cover for the main vessel (MV) and includes roof slab (RS), large rotatable plug (LRP), small rotatable plug (SRP) and control Plug (CP). RS, LRP and SRP are box type structures consisting of top and bottom plates stiffened by radial stiffeners and vertical penetration shells. TS is exposed to argon cover gas provided above sodium pool on the bottom side and reactor containment building air at the top. Heat transfer takes place through the argon cover gas to the bottom plate of TS. Annular gaps are formed between the components supported on TS and the component penetrations through which cellular convection takes place. A single thermal shield provided below TS reduces the heat flux to the bottom plate to 1.15 kW/m 2 . The MV (SS 316 LN) is welded to RS (carbon steel A48 P2) through a dissimilar metal weld. A step in RS and an anti convection barrier (ACB) outside RS are provided to limit the temperature at the MV-RS junction. The MV is surrounded by safety vessel (SV) and reactor vault made of concrete. Thermal insulation is provided outside SV to limit the heat transfer to the reactor vault. The design requirements of TS are to maintain the operating temperature at 383-393 K, limit the temperature difference (ΔT) across the height of TS to 20 / 100 K under normal operation/loss of cooling, provide minimum annular gap size at the component penetrations, provide a nearly linear temperature gradient in the CP portion within the height of TS, maintain the temperature of top plate of CP > 383 K, limit the ΔT across the top plate of CP to 2 K, limit the temperature near the inflatable / backup seal to 393 K, limit the temperature at the MV-RS junction and the heat flux to the reactor vault. The total heat transferred to TS is estimated to be 210 kW. A dedicated closed loop cooling system with a total flow rate of 10

  20. Radiation-shielding transparent material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusumeki, Asao.

    1983-01-01

    Purpose : To obtain radiation-shielding transparent material having a high resistivity to the radioactive rays or light irradiation which is greater at least by two digits as compared with lead glass. Constitution : The shielding material is composed of a saturated aqueous solution zinc iodide. Zinc iodide (specific gravity of 4.2) is dissolved by 430 g into 100 cc of water at a temperature of 20 0 C and forms a heavy liquid with a specific gravity of 2.80. The radiation length of the heavy liquid is 3.8 cm which is 1.5 times as large as lead glass. The light transmission is greater than 95% in average. Furthermore, by adding hypophosphorous acid as a reducing agent to the aqueous solution of the lead iodide, the material is stabilized against the irradiation of light or radioactive rays and causes no discoloration for a long time. (Moriyama, K.)

  1. Development and application of high performance liquid shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miura, Toshimasa; Omata, Sadao; Otano, Naoteru; Hirao, Yoshihiro; Kanai, Yasuji

    1998-01-01

    Development of liquid shielding material with good performance for neutron and γ-ray was investigated. Lead, hydrogen and boron were selected as the elements of shielding materials which were made by the ultraviolet curing method. Good performance shielding materials with about 1 mm width to neutron and gamma ray were produced by mixing lead, boron compound and ultraviolet curing monomer with many hydrogens. The shielding performance was the same as a concrete with two times width. The activation was very small such as 1/10 6 -1/10 8 of the standard concrete. The weight and the external appearance did not charged from room temperature to 100degC. Polyfunctional monomer had good thermal resistance. This shielding material was applied to double bending cylindrical duct and annulus ring duct. The results proved the shielding materials developed had good performance. (S.Y.)

  2. Thermal design of top shield for PFBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gajapathy, R.; Jalaludeen, S.; Selvaraj, A.; Bhoje, S.B.

    1988-01-01

    India's Liquid Metal Cooled Fast Breeder Reactor programme started with the construction of loop type 13MW(e) Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) which attained criticality in October 1985. With the experience of FBTR, the design work on pool type 500 MW(e) Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) which will be a forerunner for future commercial fast breeder reactors, has been started. The Top Shield forms the cover for the main vessel which contains the primary circuit. Argon cover gas separates the Top Shield from the free level of hot sodium pool (803K). The Top Shield which is of box type construction consists of control plug, two rotatable plugs and roof slab, assembled together, which provide biological shielding, thermal shielding and leak tight containment at the top of the main vessel. Heat is transferred from the sodium pool to the Top Shield through argon cover gas and through components supported by it and dipped in the sodium pool. The Top Shield should be maintained at the desired operating temperature by incorporating a cooling system inside it. Insulation may be provided below the bottom plate to reduce the heat load to the cooling system, if required. The thermal design of Top Shield consists of estimation of heat transfer to the Top Shield, selection of operating temperature, assessment of insulation requirement, design of cooling system and evaluation of transient temperature changes

  3. Using glass as a shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousef, S.

    2002-04-01

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  4. Using glass as a shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yousef, S.

    2003-01-01

    Different theoretical and technological concepts and problems in using glass as a shielding material was discussed, some primarily designs for different types of radiation shielding windows were illustrated. (author)

  5. Highly heat removing radiation shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Norio; Hozumi, Masahiro.

    1990-01-01

    Organic materials, inorganic materials or metals having excellent radiation shielding performance are impregnated into expanded metal materials, such as Al, Cu or Mg, having high heat conductivity. Further, the porosity of the expanded metals and combination of the expanded metals and the materials to be impregnated are changed depending on the purpose. Further, a plurality of shielding materials are impregnated into the expanded metal of the same kind, to constitute shielding materials. In such shielding materials, impregnated materials provide shielding performance against radiation rays such as neutrons and gamma rays, the expanded metals provide heat removing performance respectively and they act as shielding materials having heat removing performance as a whole. Accordingly, problems of non-informity and discontinuity in the prior art can be dissolved be provide materials having flexibility in view of fabrication work. (T.M.)

  6. Transparent fast neutron shielding material and shielding method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nashimoto, Tetsuji; Katase, Haruhisa.

    1993-01-01

    Polyisobutylene having a viscosity average molecular weight of 20,000 to 80,000 and a hydrogen atom density of greater than 7.0 x 10 22 /cm 3 is used as a fast neutron shielding material. The shielding material is excellent in the shielding performance against fast neutrons, and there is no worry of leakage even when holes should be formed to a vessel. Further, it is excellent in fabricability, relatively safe even upon occurrence of fire and, in addition, it is transparent to enable to observe contents easily. (T.M.)

  7. Development of epoxy resin-type neutron shielding materials (I)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy

    1997-12-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear /radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various materials properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 31 refs., 22 tabs., 17 figs.

  8. Development of silicone rubber-type neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Do, Jae Bum; Cho, Soo Hang; Kim, Ik Soo; Oh, Seung Chul; Hong, Soon Seok; Noh, Sung Ki; Jeong, Duk Yeon.

    1997-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed silicone rubber based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. (author). 16 tabs., 17 figs., 25 refs

  9. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Chrul, Anna; Damianoglou, Dimitrios; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Strychalski, Michał; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles; Wright, Loren

    2014-01-01

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  10. Upgrade of the LHC magnet interconnections thermal shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musso, Andrea; Barlow, Graeme; Bastard, Alain; Charrondiere, Maryline; Deferne, Guy; Dib, Gaëlle; Duret, Max; Guinchard, Michael; Prin, Hervé; Craen, Arnaud Vande; Villiger, Gilles [CERN European Organization for Nuclear Research, Meyrin 1211, Geneva 23, CH (Switzerland); Chrul, Anna [The Henryk Niewodniczanski Institute of Nuclear Physics, Polish Academy of Sciences, ul.Radzikowskiego 152, 31-324 Krakow (Poland); Damianoglou, Dimitrios [NTUA National Technical University of Athens, Heeron Polytechniou 9, 15780 Zografou (Greece); Strychalski, Michał [Wroclaw University of Technology, Faculty of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Wyb. Wyspianskiego 27, Wroclaw, 50-370 (Poland); Wright, Loren [Lancaster University, Bailrigg, Lancaster, LA1 4YW (United Kingdom)

    2014-01-29

    The about 1700 interconnections (ICs) between the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) superconducting magnets include thermal shielding at 50-75 K, providing continuity to the thermal shielding of the magnet cryostats to reduce the overall radiation heat loads to the 1.9 K helium bath of the magnets. The IC shield, made of aluminum, is conduction-cooled via a welded bridge to the thermal shield of the adjacent magnets which is actively cooled. TIG welding of these bridges made in the LHC tunnel at installation of the magnets induced a considerable risk of fire hazard due to the proximity of the multi-layer insulation of the magnet shields. A fire incident occurred in one of the machine sectors during machine installation, but fortunately with limited consequences thanks to prompt intervention of the operators. LHC is now undergoing a 2 years technical stop during which all magnet's ICs will have to be opened to consolidate the magnet electrical connections. The IC thermal shields will therefore have to be removed and re-installed after the work is completed. In order to eliminate the risk of fire hazard when re-welding, it has been decided to review the design of the IC shields, by replacing the welded bridges with a mechanical clamping which also preserves its thermal function. An additional advantage of this new solution is the ease in dismantling for maintenance, and eliminating weld-grinding operations at removal needing radioprotection measures because of material activation after long-term operation of the LHC. This paper describes the new design of the IC shields and in particular the theoretical and experimental validation of its thermal performance. Furthermore a status report of the on-going upgrade work in the LHC is given.

  11. Combination thermal and radiation shield for well logging apparatus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, B.F.

    1984-01-01

    A device for providing both thermal protection and radiation shielding for components such as radiation detectors within a well logging instrument comprises a thermally insulative flask containing a weldment filled with a mass of eutectic material which undergoes a change of state e.g. melting at a temperature which will provide an acceptable thermal environment for such components for extended time periods. The eutectic material which is preferably a bismuth (58%)/tin (42%) alloy has a specific gravity (> 8.5) facilitating its use as a radiation shield and is distributed around the radiation detectors so as to selectively impede the impinging of the detectors by radiation. The device is incorporated in a skid of a well logging instrument for measuring γ backscatter. A γ source is located either above or within the protective shielding. (author)

  12. Evaluation of Shielding Performance for Newly Developed Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Beren Richard

    This work details an investigation into the contributing factors behind the success of newly developed composite neutron shield materials. Monte Carlo simulation methods were utilized to assess the neutron shielding capabilities and secondary radiation production characteristics of aluminum boron carbide, tungsten boron carbide, bismuth borosilicate glass, and Metathene within various neutron energy spectra. Shielding performance and secondary radiation data suggested that tungsten boron carbide was the most effective composite material. An analysis of the macroscopic cross-section contributions from constituent materials and interaction mechanisms was then performed in an attempt to determine the reasons for tungsten boron carbide's success over the other investigated materials. This analysis determined that there was a positive correlation between a non-elastic interaction contribution towards a material's total cross-section and shielding performance within the thermal and epi-thermal energy regimes. This finding was assumed to be a result of the boron-10 absorption reaction. The analysis also determined that within the faster energy regions, materials featuring higher non-elastic interaction contributions were comparable to those exhibiting primarily elastic scattering via low Z elements. This allowed for the conclusion that composite shield success within higher energy neutron spectra does not necessitate the use elastic scattering via low Z elements. These findings suggest that the inclusion of materials featuring high thermal absorption properties is more critical to composite neutron shield performance than the presence of constituent materials more inclined to maximize elastic scattering energy loss.

  13. Light-refractory radiation shielding materials using diatomites and zeolites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    It has been recently shown that diatomites and zeolites have some useful characteristics for radiation shielding materials. In this study, the availability of these materials for unexpected accidents in the nuclear sites is examined. The diatomites and zeolites, compared to existing shielding materials, have superior characteristics; low density and light weight, low in radiation-induced problem, high-heat resistance, remain unaltered by the addition of an acid except hydrofluoric acid, porous and large specific surface area, and also excellent water-absorbing property. These porous materials could also expand the shielding energy range applied and be used for fast- and thermal-neutrons, and γ ray. In addition, these materials are easy to store for long periods of time against emergency because of their natural rocks. From the examinations, it is cleared that diatomites and zeolites have excellent properties as radiation shielding materials for emergency use. (author)

  14. Elrotherm shielding systems. New pioneering material composites; Elrotherm-Abschirmsysteme. Neue Zukunftsweisende Materialkompositionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zika-Beyerlein, B [ElringKlinger (Germany). Geschaeftsbereich Abschirmtechnik

    2004-09-01

    Tightly packed engine compartments put special demands on thermal and acoustic shielding systems. With new material composites allowing for particularly thin-walled and light shielding parts, ElringKlinger is well equipped for the future. (orig.)

  15. Dismantling system of concrete thermal shielding walls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machida, Nobuhiro; Saiki, Yoshikuni; Ono, Yorimasa; Tokioka, Masatake; Ogino, Nobuyuki.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To enable safety and efficient dismantling of concrete thermal shielding walls in nuclear reactors. Method: Concrete thermal shielding walls are cut and dismantled into dismantled blocks by a plasma cutting tool while sealing the top opening of bioshielding structures. The dismantled blocks are gripped and conveyed. The cutting tool is remote-handled while monitoring on a television receiver. Slugs and dusts produced by cutting are removed to recover. Since the dismantling work is carried out while sealing the working circumstance and by the remote control of the cutting tool, the operators' safety can be secured. Further, since the thermal sealing walls are cut and dismantled into blocks, dismantling work can be done efficiently. (Moriyama, K.)

  16. Investigation of Turkish marbles as shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atasoy, H.; Tarcan, G.; Doekmen, S.

    1992-01-01

    The natural Turkish marbles, especially Usak Green (UG), Aegean Purple (AP), and Marmara White (MW) were tested as shielding materials using standard gamma sources such as Co-60, Cs-137 and Eu-152. The experiment showed that UG, AP and MW are very effective shields against gamma-rays. The result for this experiment is that the gamma-ray attenuation coefficients of UG, AP and MW are almost equal for the energy range from 0.1 MeV to 1.4 MeV. Also, the elemental compositions of the natural UG, AP and MW marbles have been determined by fast and thermal neutron activation analysis and fourteen elements including Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca, V, Ti, Mn, Fe, La, Ba and Sc have been found using the gamma spectroscopic method. The range of element contents of all Turkish marbles are remarkably different, but most of the elements are common such as Ca, Fe, Na, Cl, Mg, Si. (orig.)

  17. Uranium-lead shielding for nuclear material transportation systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lusk, E.C.; Miller, N.E.; Basham, S.J. Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The basis for the selection of shielding materials for spent fuel shipping containers is described with comments concerning the favorable and unfavorable aspects of steel, lead, and depleted uranium. A concept for a new type of material made of depleted uranium and lead is described which capitalizes on the best cask shielding characteristics of both materials. This cask shielding is made by filling the shielding cavity with pieces of depleted uranium and then backfilling the interstitial voids with lead. The lead would be bonded to the uranium and also to the cask shells if desired. Shielding density approaching 80 percent of that of solid uranium could be achieved, while a density of 65 percent is readily obtainable. This material should overcome the problems of the effect of lead melting in the fire accident, high thermal gradients at uranium-stainless steel interfaces and at a major reduction in cost over that of a solid uranium shielded cask. A development program is described to obtain information on the properties of the composite material to aid in design analysis and licensing and to define the fabrication techniques

  18. Space Shielding Materials for Prometheus Application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    R. Lewis

    2006-01-20

    At the time of Prometheus program restructuring, shield material and design screening efforts had progressed to the point where a down-selection from approximately eighty-eight materials to a set of five ''primary'' materials was in process. The primary materials were beryllium (Be), boron carbide (B{sub 4}C), tungsten (W), lithium hydride (LiH), and water (H{sub 2}O). The primary materials were judged to be sufficient to design a Prometheus shield--excluding structural and insulating materials, that had not been studied in detail. The foremost preconceptual shield concepts included: (1) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W/LiH shield; (2) a Be/B{sub 4}C/W shield; (3) and a Be/B{sub 4}C/H{sub 2}O shield. Since the shield design and materials studies were still preliminary, alternative materials (e.g., {sup nal}B or {sup 10}B metal) were still being screened, but at a low level of effort. Two competing low mass neutron shielding materials are included in the primary materials due to significant materials uncertainties in both. For LiH, irradiation-induced swelling was the key issue, whereas for H{sub 2}O, containment corrosion without active chemistry control was key, Although detailed design studies are required to accurately estimate the mass of shields based on either hydrogenous material, both are expected to be similar in mass, and lower mass than virtually any alternative. Unlike Be, W, and B{sub 4}C, which are not expected to have restrictive temperature limits, shield temperature limits and design accommodations are likely to be needed for either LiH or H{sub 2}O. The NRPCT focused efforts on understanding swelting of LiH, and observed, from approximately fifty prior irradiation tests, that either casting ar thorough out-gassing should reduce swelling. A potential contributor to LiH swelling appears to be LiOH contamination due to exposure to humid air, that can be eliminated by careful processing. To better understand LiH irradiation performance and

  19. Structural Design and Thermal Analysis for Thermal Shields of the MICE Coupling Magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, Michael A.; Pan, Heng; Liu, X.K.; Wang, Li; Wu, Hong; Chen, A.B.; Guo, X.L.

    2009-01-01

    A superconducting coupling magnet made from copper matrix NbTi conductors operating at 4 K will be used in the Muon Ionization Cooling Experiment (MICE) to produce up to 2.6 T on the magnet centerline to keep the muon beam within the thin RF cavity indows. The coupling magnet is to be cooled by two cryocoolers with a total cooling capacity of 3 W at 4.2 K. In order to keep a certain operating temperature margin, the most important is to reduce the heat leakage imposed on cold surfaces of coil cold mass assembly. An ntermediate temperature shield system placed between the coupling coil and warm vacuum chamber is adopted. The shield system consists of upper neck shield, main shields, flexible connections and eight supports, which is to be cooled by the first stage cold heads of two ryocoolers with cooling capacity of 55 W at 60 K each. The maximum temperature difference on the shields should be less than 20 K, so the thermal analyses for the shields with different thicknesses, materials, flexible connections for shields' cooling and structure design for heir supports were carried out. 1100 Al is finally adopted and the maximum temperature difference is around 15 K with 4 mm shield thickness. The paper is to present detailed analyses on the shield system design.

  20. Method for limiting movement of a thermal shield for a nuclear reactor, and thermal shield displacement limiter therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Boyd, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method of limiting the movement of a thermal shield of a nuclear reactor. It comprises: machining at least four (4) pockets in upper portions of a thermal shield circumferentially about a core barrel of a nuclear reactor to receive key-wave inserts; tapping bolt holes in the pockets of the thermal shield to receive bolts; positioning key-wave inserts into the pockets of the thermal shield to be bolted in place with the bolt holes; machining dowel holes at least partially through the positioned key-way inserts and the thermal shield to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the key-way insert and thermal shield to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; sliding limiter keys into the key-way inserts and bolting the limiter keys to the core barrel to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative and the core barrel while allowing radial and axial movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; machining dowel holes through the limiter key and at least partially through the core barrel to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the limiter key and core barrel to restrain tangential movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel of the nuclear reactor

  1. Cosmic Ray Interactions in Shielding Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Ankney, Austin S.; Orrell, John L.; Berguson, Timothy J.; Troy, Meredith D.

    2011-01-01

    This document provides a detailed study of materials used to shield against the hadronic particles from cosmic ray showers at Earth's surface. This work was motivated by the need for a shield that minimizes activation of the enriched germanium during transport for the MAJORANA collaboration. The materials suitable for cosmic-ray shield design are materials such as lead and iron that will stop the primary protons, and materials like polyethylene, borated polyethylene, concrete and water that will stop the induced neutrons. The interaction of the different cosmic-ray components at ground level (protons, neutrons, muons) with their wide energy range (from kilo-electron volts to giga-electron volts) is a complex calculation. Monte Carlo calculations have proven to be a suitable tool for the simulation of nucleon transport, including hadron interactions and radioactive isotope production. The industry standard Monte Carlo simulation tool, Geant4, was used for this study. The result of this study is the assertion that activation at Earth's surface is a result of the neutronic and protonic components of the cosmic-ray shower. The best material to shield against these cosmic-ray components is iron, which has the best combination of primary shielding and minimal secondary neutron production.

  2. Evaluation of radiation-shielding properties of the composite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavlenko, V.I.; Chekashina, N.I.; Yastrebinskij, R.N.; Sokolenko, I.V.; Noskov, A.V.

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the evaluation of radiation-shielding properties of composite materials with respect to gamma-radiation. As a binder for the synthesis of radiation-shielding composites we used lead boronsilicate glass matrix. As filler we used nanotubular chrysotile filled with lead tungstate PbWO4. It is shown that all the developed composites have good physical-mechanical characteristics, such as compressive strength, thermal stability and can be used as structural materials. On the basis of theoretical calculation we described the graphs of the gamma-quanta linear attenuation coefficient depending on the emitted energy for all investigated composites. We founded high radiation-shielding properties of all the composites on the basis of theoretical and experimental data compared to materials conventionally used in the nuclear industry - iron, concrete, etc

  3. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: II-Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbera, M.; Ayers, T.; Collura, A.; Nasillo, G.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-05-01

    The formation flight configuration of the Simbol-X mission implies that the X-ray mirror module will be open to Space on both ends. In order to reduce the power required to maintain the thermal stability and, therefore, the high angular resolution of the shell optics, a thin foil thermal shield will cover the mirror module. Different options are presently being studied for the foil material of these shields. We report results of an experimental investigation conducted to verify that the scattering of X-rays, by interaction with the thin foil material of the thermal shield, will not significantly affect the performances of the telescope.

  4. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: II-Small Angle X-Ray Scattering Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbera, M.; Ayers, T.; Collura, A.; Nasillo, G.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.

    2009-01-01

    The formation flight configuration of the Simbol-X mission implies that the X-ray mirror module will be open to Space on both ends. In order to reduce the power required to maintain the thermal stability and, therefore, the high angular resolution of the shell optics, a thin foil thermal shield will cover the mirror module. Different options are presently being studied for the foil material of these shields. We report results of an experimental investigation conducted to verify that the scattering of X-rays, by interaction with the thin foil material of the thermal shield, will not significantly affect the performances of the telescope.

  5. Resonance shielding in thermal reactor lattices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rothenstein, W.; Taviv, E.; Aminpour, M.

    1982-01-01

    The theoretical foundations of a new methodology for the accurate treatment of resonance absorption in thermal reactor lattice analysis are presented. This methodology is based on the solution of the point-energy transport equation in its integral or integro-differential form for a heterogeneous lattice using detailed resonance cross-section profiles. The methodology is applied to LWR benchmark analysis, with emphasis on temperature dependence of resonance absorption during fuel depletion, spatial and mutual self-shielding, integral parameter analysis and treatment of cluster geometry. The capabilities of the OZMA code, which implements the new methodology are discussed. These capabilities provide a means against which simpler and more rapid resonance absorption algorithms can be checked. (author)

  6. Thes - Website for Thermal Shields Upgrade Management

    CERN Document Server

    Micula, Adina

    2013-01-01

    There are a total of 1695 thermal shields (TS) in the interconnections between the superconducting magnets. During LHC Long Shutdown 1 (LS1) all of these TS are being upgraded with a new fixation design. This procedure involves the transport of all the TS from LHC to a workshop on the surface where they are being modified and the subsequent transport of the upgraded TS back to the tunnel where they are laid on the cryostats and await the closure of the interconnection. These operations have to be carefully coordinated in order to ensure that there are always enough modified TS to satisfy the demand in the tunnel and respect the time constraint imposed by the schedule of LS1. As part of my summer project, I developed a database driven website whose aim is to enable the TS upgrade monitoring.

  7. Production of neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roszler, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    A neutron-absorbing material consisting of a layer of boron carbide sandwiched between layers of aluminum is produced by constructing a rectangular box from aluminum plate leaving one end open. The box is filled with a uniform mixture of finely-divided boron carbide and anodized aluminum powders and the open end is sealed by welding an aluminum plate in place. The box is then heated to 800-850 deg F and rolled to reduce its thickness to the desired amount. The hot rolling bonds or sinters the particles of metal powder or boron carbide. (LL)

  8. Removal, transportation and disposal of the Millstone 2 neutron thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snedeker, D.F.; Thomas, L.S.; Schmoker, D.S.; Cade, M.S.

    1985-01-01

    Some PWR reactors equipped with neutron thermal shields (NTS) have experienced severe neutron shield degradation to the extent that removal and disposal of these shields has become necessary. Due to the relative size and activation levels of the thermal shield, disposal techniques, remote material handling and transportation equipment must be carefully evaluated to minimize plant down time and maintain disposal costs at a minimum. This paper describes the techniques, equipment and methodology employed in the removal, transportation and disposal of the NTS at the Millstone 2 Nuclear Generating Station, a PWR facility owned and operated by Northeast Utilities of Hartford, CT. Specific areas addressed include: (1) remote underwater equipment and tooling for use in segmenting and loading the thermal shield in a disposal liner; (2) adaptation of the General Electric IF-300 Irradiated Fuel Cask for transportation of the NTS for disposal; (3) equipment and techniques used for cask handling and liner burial at the Low Level Radioactive Waste (LLRW) disposal facility

  9. Development of neutron shielding concrete containing iron content materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    Concrete is one of the most important construction materials which widely used as a neutron shielding. Neutron shield is obtained of interaction with matter depends on neutron energy and the density of the shielding material. Shielding properties of concrete could be improved by changing its composition and density. High density materials such as iron or high atomic number elements are added to concrete to increase the radiation resistance property. In this study, shielding properties of concrete were investigated by adding iron, FeB, Fe2B, stainless - steel at different ratios into concrete. Neutron dose distributions and shield design was obtained by using FLUKA Monte Carlo code. The determined shield thicknesses vary depending on the densities of the mixture formed by the additional material and ratio. It is seen that a combination of iron rich materials is enhanced the neutron shielding of capabilities of concrete. Also, the thicknesses of shield are reduced.

  10. Test of thermal shields for early warning station detectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Jesper

    1997-01-01

    The properties of thermal shields around NaI crystal scintillators for early warning stations have been checked in order to assure that external temperature variations cannot influence the stability of the measurements....

  11. Thermal shield support degradation in pressurized water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweeney, F.J.; Fry, D.N.

    1986-01-01

    Damage to the thermal shield support structures of three pressurized water reactors (PWRs) due to flow-induced vibrations was recently discovered during refueling. In two of the reactors, severe damage occurred to the thermal shield, and in one reactor the core support barrel (CSB) was damaged, necessitating extended outages for repairs. In all three reactors, several of the thermal shield supports were either loose, damaged, or missing. The three plants had been in operation for approximately 10 years before the damage was apparent by visual inspection. Because each of the three US PWR manufacturers have experienced thermal shield support degradation, the Nuclear Regulatory Commission requested that Oak Ridge National Laboratory analyze ex-core neutron detector noise data to determine the feasibility of detecting incipient thermal shield support degradation. Results of the noise data analysis indicate that thermal shield support degradation probably began early in the life of both severely damaged plants. The degradation was characterized by shifts in the resonant frequencies of core internal structures and the appearance of new resonances in the ex-core neutron detector noise. Both the data analyses and the finite element calculations indicate that these changes in resonant frequencies are less than 3 Hz. 11 refs., 16 figs

  12. Neutron shielding material based on colemanite and epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okuno, K.

    2005-01-01

    In recent years, there has been a need for compact shielding design such as self-shielding of a PET cyclotron or up-gradation of radiation machinery in existing facilities. In these cases, high performance shielding materials are needed. Concrete or polyethylene have been used for a neutron shield. However, for compact shielding, they fall short in terms of performance or durability. Therefore, a new type of neutron shielding material based on epoxy resin and colemanite has been developed. Slab attenuation experiments up to 40 cm for the new shielding material were carried out using a 252 Cf neutron source. Measurement was carried out using a REM-counter, and compared with calculation. The results show that the shielding performance is better than concrete and polyethylene mixed with 10 wt% boron oxide. From the result, we confirmed that the performance of the new material is suitable for practical use. (authors)

  13. Flexible shielding material sheet for radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokan, Susumu; Fukuoka, Masasuke.

    1976-01-01

    Object: To provide a soft sheet of shielding material for radioactive rays without involving no problem such as environmental contamination, without generating intense second radioactive rays such as conventional cadmium. Structure: 100 weight parts of boron compound (boron carbide, boric acid anhydride) and 5 to 60 weight parts of low molecular-weight polyethylene resin, of which average molecular weight is less than 8000, are agitated in a mixer and during agitation are increased in temperature to a level above a softening temperature of the polyethylene resin to obtain a mixture in which the boron compound is coated with the low molecular-weight polyethylene. Next, 3 to 200 weight parts of the resultant mixture and 100 weight parts of olefin group resin (ethylene-vinyl acetate copolymer, styrene-butadiene random copolymer) are evenly mixed within an agitator such as a tumbler to form a sheet having the desired thickness and dimension. The thus obtained shielding material generates no capture gamma radiation. (Kamimura, M.)

  14. A study on the characteristics of modified and novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Hong, Sun Seok; Oh, Seung Chul; Do, Jae Bum [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    1998-10-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. In this study, we developed modified and novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, prolonged time heat resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimently. (author). 31 refs., 27 figs., 16 tabs.

  15. Optimal beta-ray shielding thicknesses for different therapeutic radionuclides and shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Yong In; Kim, Ja Mee; Kim, Jung Hoon

    2017-01-01

    To better understand the distribution of deposited energy of beta and gamma rays according to changes in shielding materials and thicknesses when radionuclides are used for therapeutic nuclear medicine, a simulation was conducted. The results showed that due to the physical characteristics of each therapeutic radionuclide, the thicknesses of shielding materials at which beta-ray shielding takes place varied. Additional analysis of the shielding of gamma ray was conducted for radionuclides that emit both beta and gamma rays simultaneously with results showing shielding effects proportional to the atomic number and density of the shielding materials. Also, analysis of bremsstrahlung emission after beta-ray interactions in the simulation revealed that the occurrence of bremsstrahlung was relatively lower than theoretically calculated and varied depending on different radionuclides. (authors)

  16. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reid, Robert S.; Pearson, J. Bosie; Stewart, Eric T.

    2007-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  17. EXPERIMENTAL EVALUATION OF THE THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF A WATER SHIELD FOR A SURFACE POWER REACTOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REID, ROBERT S. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; PEARSON, J. BOSIE [Los Alamos National Laboratory; STEWART, ERIC T. [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2007-01-16

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield.

  18. Experimental Evaluation of the Thermal Performance of a Water Shield for a Surface Power Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, J. Boise; Stewart, Eric T.; Reid, Robert S.

    2007-01-01

    Water based reactor shielding is being investigated for use on initial lunar surface power systems. A water shield may lower overall cost (as compared to development cost for other materials) and simplify operations in the setup and handling. The thermal hydraulic performance of the shield is of significant interest. The mechanism for transferring heat through the shield is natural convection. Natural convection in a 100 kWt lunar surface reactor shield design is evaluated with 2 kW power input to the water in the Water Shield Testbed (WST) at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The experimental data from the WST is used to validate a CFD model. Performance of the water shield on the lunar surface is then predicted with a CFD model anchored to test data. The experiment had a maximum water temperature of 75 deg. C. The CFD model with 1/6-g predicts a maximum water temperature of 88 deg. C with the same heat load and external boundary conditions. This difference in maximum temperature does not greatly affect the structural design of the shield, and demonstrates that it may be possible to use water for a lunar reactor shield

  19. Development of neutron shielding material using metathesis-polymer matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakurai, Yoshinori E-mail: ysakurai@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp; Sasaki, Akira; Kobayashi, Tooru

    2004-04-21

    A neutron shielding material using a metathesis-polymer matrix, which is a thermosetting resin, was developed. This shielding material has characteristics that can be controlled for different mixing ratios of neutron absorbers and for formation in the laboratory. Additionally, the elastic modulus can be changed at the hardening process, from a flexible elastoma to a mechanically tough solid. Experiments were performed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor in order to determine the important characteristics of this metathesis-polymer shielding material, such as neutron shielding performance, secondary gamma-ray generation and activation. The metathesis-polymer shielding material was shown to be practical and as effective as the other available shielding materials, which mainly consist of thermoplastic resin.

  20. Enhancement of thermal neutron shielding of cement mortar by using borosilicate glass powder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Bo-Kil; Lee, Jun-Cheol; Kim, Ji-Hyun; Chung, Chul-Woo

    2017-05-01

    Concrete has been used as a traditional biological shielding material. High hydrogen content in concrete also effectively attenuates high-energy fast neutrons. However, concrete does not have strong protection against thermal neutrons because of the lack of boron compound. In this research, boron was added in the form of borosilicate glass powder to increase the neutron shielding property of cement mortar. Borosilicate glass powder was chosen in order to have beneficial pozzolanic activity and to avoid deleterious expansion caused by an alkali-silica reaction. According to the experimental results, borosilicate glass powder with an average particle size of 13µm showed pozzolanic activity. The replacement of borosilicate glass powder with cement caused a slight increase in the 28-day compressive strength. However, the incorporation of borosilicate glass powder resulted in higher thermal neutron shielding capability. Thus, borosilicate glass powder can be used as a good mineral additive for various radiation shielding purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of Neutron Shielding Material for Cask and Accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kang, Hee Young; Seo, Ki Seog; Lee, Byung Chul; Park, Chang Jae; Kim, Ho Dong

    2008-01-01

    The neutron shielding materials are used as a neutron shield for spent fuel shipping cask, beam accelerators and neutron generators. At early stage, the neutron attenuations of materials were evaluated with the cross sections. After that, benchmark or mock-up experiments on the multi-layer problem to confirm the shielding characteristics or to evaluate analysis accuracy were reported. Recently, the need to transport spent nuclear fuels is increasing due to the current limited storage capacity. The on-site storage capacity at some of nuclear power plants is expected to be full in near future. With a growing inventory of spent fuels at power plants, these spent fuels need to be transported to other storage facilities. Shipping casks have been developed to safely transport spent fuels that emit high neutrons and gamma-ray radiation. The external radiation level of the shipping cask from the spent fuel must be limited to meet the standards specified by the IAEA radioactive material package regulation, so it is important to develop a proper neutron shielding material for a shipping cask. Neutron shielding experiments and analyses on the shielding effects of materials have been conducted, and some experiments have been performed to examine the shielding effects of selected materials. The shielding experiments consist of evaluating not only the shielding effects of a material alone but also the effects of the material thickness. The experimental results were compared with those obtained by using the MCNP-5c code

  2. Development of highly effective neutron shields and neutron absorbing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsuda, K.; Matsuda, F.; Taniuchi, H.; Yuhara, T.; Iida, T.

    1993-01-01

    A wide range of materials, including polymers and hydrogen-occluded alloys that might be usable as the neutron shielding material were examined. And a wide range of materials, including aluminum alloys that might be usable as the neutron-absorbing material were examined. After screening, the candidate material was determined on the basis of evaluation regarding its adaptabilities as a high-performance neutron-shielding and neutron-absorbing material. This candidate material was manufactured for trial, after which material properties tests, neutron-shielding tests and neutron-absorbing tests were carried out on it. The specifications of this material were thus determined. This research has resulted in materials of good performance; a neutron-shielding material based on ethylene propylene rubber and titanium hydride, and a neutron-absorbing material based on aluminum and titanium hydride. (author)

  3. Elastomeric neutron shielding material and process of production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, G.; Knorr, W.

    1987-01-01

    Elastomeric neutron shielding material made of plastic with high hydrogen content, characterized in that the shielding material is a polymeric reaction product of a reaction between (a) polyol on the base of polybutadiene which compares with polyethylene with regard to hydrogen content, and (b) aliphatic diisocyanate, and in that the hydrogen content is higher than 8 weight per cent. (orig.) [de

  4. Piping structural design for the ITER thermal shield manifold

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Chang Hyun, E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Wooho, E-mail: whchung@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo; Kang, Kyoung-O. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Jing Do; Cha, Jong Kook [Korea Marine Equipment Research Institute, Busan 606-806 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kyoung-Kyu [Mecha T& S, Jinju-si 660-843 (Korea, Republic of); Hamlyn-Harris, Craig; Hicks, Robby; Her, Namil; Jun, Chang-Hoon [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • We finalized piping design of ITER thermal shield manifold for procurement. • Support span is determined by stress and deflection limitation. • SQP, which is design optimization method, is used for the pipe design. • Benchmark analysis is performed to verify the analysis software. • Pipe design is verified by structural analyses. - Abstract: The thermal shield (TS) provides the thermal barrier in the ITER tokamak to minimize heat load transferred by thermal radiation from the hot components to the superconducting magnets operating at 4.2 K. The TS is actively cooled by 80 K pressurized helium gas which flows from the cold valve box to the cooling tubes on the TS panels via manifold piping. This paper describes the manifold piping design and analysis for the ITER thermal shield. First, maximum allowable span for the manifold support is calculated based on the simple beam theory. In order to accommodate the thermal contraction in the manifold feeder, a contraction loop is designed and applied. Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) method is used to determine the optimized dimensions of the contraction loop to ensure adequate flexibility of manifold pipe. Global structural behavior of the manifold is investigated when the thermal movement of the redundant (un-cooled) pipe is large.

  5. Development of highly effective neutron shielding material made of phenol-novolac type epoxy resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Soo Haeng; Jeong, Myeong Soo; Hong, Sun Seok; Lee, Won Kyoung; Kim, Ik Soo; Shin, Young Joon; Do, Jae Bum; Ro, Seung Gy; Oh, Seok Jin

    1998-06-01

    Because the exposure to radiation in the nuclear facilities can be fatal to human, it is important to reduce the radiation dose level to a tolerable level. The purpose of this study is to develop highly effective neutron shielding materials for the shipping and storage cask of radioactive materials or in the nuclear/radiation facilities. On this study, we developed epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their various material properties, including neutron shielding ability, fire resistance, combustion characteristics, radiation resistance, thermal and mechanical properties were evaluated experimentally. Especially we developed phenol-novolac type epoxy resin based neutron shielding materials and their characteristics were also evaluated. (author). 22 refs., 11 tabs., 21 figs

  6. Experiment on thermal insulation and sodium deposition of shield plug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashiguchi, K.; Honda, M.; Shiratori, H.; Ozaki, O.; Suzuki, M.

    1986-01-01

    A series of experiments on temperature distribution and thermal insulation characteristics was conducted using a reduced scale model of LMFBR shield plug. Observation and measurement of sodium deposition were also conducted on the model after the experiment. The effect of annulus natural convection was clarified for temperature and the thermal insulation characteristics from evaluating the result. Temperature distribution analysis was conducted successfully by combining the general purpose structural analysis program NASTRAN and vertical annulus natural convection analysis program VANAC. Moreover, significant effect was substantiated for the annulus convection barrier to increase the thermal insulation performance, narrow horizontal gap structure to prevent sodium deposition and thermal insulation plates. (author)

  7. Negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evans, J.S.O.

    1997-01-01

    The recent discovery of negative thermal expansion over an unprecedented temperature range in ZrW 2 O 8 (which contracts continuously on warming from below 2 K to above 1000 K) has stimulated considerable interest in this unusual phenomenon. Negative and low thermal expansion materials have a number of important potential uses in ceramic, optical and electronic applications. We have now found negative thermal expansion in a large new family of materials with the general formula A 2 (MO 4 ) 3 . Chemical substitution dramatically influences the thermal expansion properties of these materials allowing the production of ceramics with negative, positive or zero coefficients of thermal expansion, with the potential to control other important materials properties such as refractive index and dielectric constant. The mechanism of negative thermal expansion and the phase transitions exhibited by this important new class of low-expansion materials will be discussed. (orig.)

  8. Neutron shielding material and a process for producing the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadokoro, S.; Segawa, H.

    1982-01-01

    A neutron shielding material comprises a polymerization product of a monomer mixture of an alkyl methacrylate or styrene and a boric acid containing a polyol constituent. Such a material may be formed into transparent sheets with high mechanical strength

  9. Research on shielding neutron efficiency of some boron-bearing fabric and transparent resin materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Changmao; Liu Jinhua; Su Jingling; Wang Zheng

    1995-01-01

    The shielding neutron efficiency of boron-bearing materials developed recently is introduced. The thermal neutron shield ratios for two kinds of non-woven cloth with thickness of 58 mg/cm 2 and 153 mg/cm 2 are 51% and 79% respectively. Their mass attenuation coefficient for 0.186, 24.4 and 144 keV neutron are 1.56, 1.29 and 0.9 cm 2 /g respectively. The thermal neutron shield ratio is 85% for the natural boron-bearing transparent resin plate with the thickness of 0.59 g/cm 2 , and 97% for enriched boron or gadolinium bearing resin plate. The shield ratios of all three materials for 24.4 keV neutrons are 38%. The transparence of natural light for enriched boron-bearing resin plates shows no considerable change after they were exposed to thermal neutrons up to 6 Sv. After they were exposed up to 20 Sv, the transparence decreases to 50% but thermal neutron shield ratio does not change. The gadolinium-bearing plate has a very strong thermal neutron-capture gamma radiation and its dose-equivalent is greater than that of incident thermal neutrons

  10. Thermal Degradation of Lead Monoxide Filled Polymer Composite Radiation Shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harish, V.; Nagaiah, N.

    2011-01-01

    Lead monoxide filled Isophthalate resin particulate polymer composites were prepared with different filler concentrations and investigated for physical, thermal, mechanical and gamma radiation shielding characteristics. This paper discusses about the thermo gravimetric analysis of the composites done to understand their thermal properties especially the effect of filler concentration on the thermal stability and degradation rate of composites. Pristine polymer exhibits single stage degradation whereas filled composites exhibit two stage degradation processes. Further, the IDT values as well as degradation rates decrease with the increased filler content in the composite.

  11. Advanced thermal management materials

    CERN Document Server

    Jiang, Guosheng; Kuang, Ken

    2012-01-01

    ""Advanced Thermal Management Materials"" provides a comprehensive and hands-on treatise on the importance of thermal packaging in high performance systems. These systems, ranging from active electronically-scanned radar arrays to web servers, require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires materials capable of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility with the packaging and dye. Its coverage includes all aspects of thermal management materials, both traditional and non-traditional, with an emphasis on metal based materials. An in-depth discussion of properties and m

  12. Discussions for the shielding materials of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asano, Y.

    2006-01-01

    Many synchrotron radiation facilities are now under operation such as E.S.R.F., APS, and S.P.ring-8. New facilities with intermediated stored electron energy are also under construction and designing such as D.I.A.M.O.N.D., S.O.L.E.I.L., and S.S.R.F.. At these third generation synchrotron radiation facilities, the beamline shielding as well as the bulk shield is very important for designing radiation safety because of intense and high energy synchrotron radiation beam. Some reasons employ lead shield wall for the synchrotron radiation beamlines. One is narrow space for the construction of many beamlines at the experimental hall, and the other is the necessary of many movable mechanisms at the beamlines, for examples. Some cases are required to shield high energy neutrons due to stored electron beam loss and photoneutrons due to gas Bremsstrahlung. Ordinary concrete and heavy concrete are coming up to shield material of synchrotron radiation beamline hutches. However, few discussions have been performed so far for the shielding materials of the hutches. In this presentation, therefore, we will discuss the characteristics of the shielding conditions including build up effect for the beamline hutches by using the ordinary concrete, heavy concrete, and lead for shielding materials with 3 GeV and 8 GeV class synchrotron radiation source. (author)

  13. Optimal selection for shielding materials by fuzzy linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Y.; Miura, N.; Sugasawa, S.

    1996-01-01

    An application of fuzzy linear programming methods to optimization of a radiation shield is presented. The main purpose of the present study is the choice of materials and the search of the ratio of mixture-component as the first stage of the methodology on optimum shielding design according to individual requirements of nuclear reactor, reprocessing facility, shipping cask installing spent fuel, ect. The characteristic values for the shield optimization may be considered their cost, spatial space, weight and some shielding qualities such as activation rate and total dose rate for neutron and gamma ray (includes secondary gamma ray). This new approach can reduce huge combination calculations for conventional two-valued logic approaches to representative single shielding calculation by group-wised optimization parameters determined in advance. Using the fuzzy linear programming method, possibilities for reducing radiation effects attainable in optimal compositions hydrated, lead- and boron-contained materials are investigated

  14. Application of a calculational model for thermal neutrons through biological shields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hathout, A M [Nuclear engineering safety department, national center for nuclear safety and radiation, Nasr City Cairo, (Egypt)

    1995-10-01

    In this work a computational program, based on the Boltzmann transport integrodifferential equation, is applied. The scattering kernel is represented by the synthetic scattering model. The behaviour of thermal neutron in hydrogenous materials, which can be used as biological shields, are studied. These materials are water, polyethylene, Oak-Ridge concrete, ordinary concrete and manganese concrete. The data obtained are presented in tables. The results are analysed and compared with similar experimental values. Safety evaluation and environmental impact are discussed. 2 tabs.

  15. Thermal Analysis of a SHIELD Electromigration Test Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benson, David A.; Bowman, Duane J.; Mitchell, Robert T.

    1999-05-01

    The steady state and transient thermal behavior of an electromigration test structure was analyzed. The test structure was a Sandia SHIELD (Self-stressing HIgh fregquency rELiability Device) electromigration test device manufactured by an outside vendor. This device has a high frequency oscillator circuit, a buffer circuit to isolate and drive the metal line to the tested (DUT), the DUT to be electromigrated itself, a metal resistance thermometry monitor, and a heater elment to temperature accelerate the electromigration effect.

  16. Tungsten-based composite materials for fusion reactor shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenspan, E.; Karni, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Composite tungsten-based materials were recently proposed for the heavy constituent of compact fusion reactor shields. These composite materials will enable the incorporation of tungsten - the most efficient nonfissionable inelastic scattering (as well as good neutron absorbing and very good photon attenuating) material - in the shield in a relatively cheap way and without introducing voids (so as to enable minimizing the shield thickness). It is proposed that these goals be achieved by bonding tungsten powder, which is significantly cheaper than high-density tungsten, with a material having the following properties: good shielding ability and relatively low cost and ease of fabrication. The purpose of this work is to study the effectiveness of the composite materials as a function of their composition, and to estimate the economic benefit that might be gained by the use of these materials. Two materials are being considered for the binder: copper, second to tungsten in its shielding ability, and iron (or stainless steel), the common fusion reactor shield heavy constituent

  17. Thermal and mechanical analysis of the Faraday shield for the Compact Ignition Tokamak

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vesey, R.A.

    1988-02-01

    The antenna for the ion cyclotron resonance heating (ICRH) system of the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) is protected from the plasma environment by a Faraday shield, an array of gas-cooled metallic tubes. The plasma side of the tubes is armored with graphite tiles, which can be either brazed or mechanically attached to the tube. The Faraday shield has been analyzed using finite element codes to model thermal and mechanical responses to typical CIT heating and disruption loads. Four representative materials (Inconel 718, tantalum-10 tungsten, copper alloy C17510, and molybdenum alloy TZM) and several combinations of tube and armor thicknesses were used in the thermal analysis, which revealed that maximum allowable temperatures were not exceeded for any of the four materials considered. The two-dimensional thermal stress analysis indicated Von Mises stresses greater than twice the yield stress for a tube constructed of Inconel 718 (the original design material) for the brazed-graphite design. Analysis of stresses caused by plasma disruption (/rvec J/ /times/ /rvec B/) loads eliminated the copper and molybdenum alloys as candidate tube materials. Of the four materials considered, tantalum-10 tungsten performed the best for a brazed graphite design, showing acceptable thermal stresses (69% of yield) and disruption stresses (42% of yield). A preliminary thermal analysis of the mechanically attached graphite scheme predicts minimal thermal stresses in the tube. The survivability of the graphite tubes in this scheme is yet to be analyzed. 8 refs., 19 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for large sample instrumental neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzika, F.; Stamatelatos, I.E.

    2004-01-01

    Thermal neutron self-shielding within large samples was studied using the Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP. The code enabled a three-dimensional modeling of the actual source and geometry configuration including reactor core, graphite pile and sample. Neutron flux self-shielding correction factors derived for a set of materials of interest for large sample neutron activation analysis are presented and evaluated. Simulations were experimentally verified by measurements performed using activation foils. The results of this study can be applied in order to determine neutron self-shielding factors of unknown samples from the thermal neutron fluxes measured at the surface of the sample

  19. Heavy metal oxide glasses as gamma rays shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaur, Preet; Singh, Devinder; Singh, Tejbir

    2016-01-01

    The gamma rays shielding parameters for heavy metal oxide glasses and concrete samples are comparable. However, the transparent nature of glasses provides additional feature to visualize inside the shielding material. Hence, different researchers had contributed in computing/measuring different shielding parameters for different configurations of heavy metal oxide glass systems. In the present work, a detailed study on different heavy metal (_5_6Ba, _6_4Gd, _8_2Pb, _8_3Bi) oxide glasses has been presented on the basis of different gamma rays shielding parameters as reported by different researchers in the recent years. It has been observed that among the selected heavy metal oxide glass systems, Bismuth based glasses provide better gamma rays shielding. Hence, Bismuth based glasses can be better substitute to concrete walls at nuclear reactor sites and nuclear labs.

  20. Heavy metal oxide glasses as gamma rays shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaur, Preet; Singh, Devinder; Singh, Tejbir, E-mail: dr.tejbir@gmail.com

    2016-10-15

    The gamma rays shielding parameters for heavy metal oxide glasses and concrete samples are comparable. However, the transparent nature of glasses provides additional feature to visualize inside the shielding material. Hence, different researchers had contributed in computing/measuring different shielding parameters for different configurations of heavy metal oxide glass systems. In the present work, a detailed study on different heavy metal ({sub 56}Ba, {sub 64}Gd, {sub 82}Pb, {sub 83}Bi) oxide glasses has been presented on the basis of different gamma rays shielding parameters as reported by different researchers in the recent years. It has been observed that among the selected heavy metal oxide glass systems, Bismuth based glasses provide better gamma rays shielding. Hence, Bismuth based glasses can be better substitute to concrete walls at nuclear reactor sites and nuclear labs.

  1. Thermal fatigue. Materials modelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siegele, D.; Fingerhuth, J.; Mrovec, M.

    2012-01-01

    In the framework of the ongoing joint research project 'Thermal Fatigue - Basics of the system-, outflow- and material-characteristics of piping under thermal fatigue' funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (BMBF) fundamental numerical and experimental investigations on the material behavior under transient thermal-mechanical stress conditions (high cycle fatigue V HCF and low cycle fatigue - LCF) are carried out. The primary objective of the research is the further development of simulation methods applied in safety evaluations of nuclear power plant components. In this context the modeling of crack initiation and growth inside the material structure induced by varying thermal loads are of particular interest. Therefore, three scientific working groups organized in three sub-projects of the joint research project are dealing with numerical modeling and simulation at different levels ranging from atomistic to micromechanics and continuum mechanics, and in addition corresponding experimental data for the validation of the numerical results and identification of the parameters of the associated material models are provided. The present contribution is focused on the development and experimental validation of material models and methods to characterize the damage evolution and the life cycle assessment as a result of thermal cyclic loading. The individual purposes of the subprojects are as following: - Material characterization, Influence of temperature and surface roughness on fatigue endurances, biaxial thermo-mechanical behavior, experiments on structural behavior of cruciform specimens and scatter band analysis (IfW Darmstadt) - Life cycle assessment with micromechanical material models (MPA Stuttgart) - Life cycle assessment with atomistic and damage-mechanical material models associated with material tests under thermal fatigue (Fraunhofer IWM, Freiburg) - Simulation of fatigue crack growth, opening and closure of a short crack under

  2. Shielding experiments in different materials with 252Cf neutron spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sathian, Deepa; Marathe, P.K.; Pal, Rupali; Jayalakshmi, V.; Chourasiya, G.; Mayya, Y.S.

    2008-01-01

    Adequate shielding for neutron sources can be determined using analytical method or by actually measuring the attenuation for the target configuration. This paper describes the measurement of Half Value Thickness (HVT), Tenth Value Thickness (TVT), Σ values for four different shielding materials, using a standard 252 Cf neutron source and comparing with the values calculated using an empirical relationship. BF 3 based REM-counter is used for measurement of neutron dose equivalent, against different thickness of the shielding material. The experimental HVT and S values are in good agreement with the calculated values. From this study, it is concluded that, among the four materials studied, high density polyethylene (HDPE) is best suitable for the shielding of a 252 Cf neutron source. (author)

  3. High Thermal Conductivity Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Shinde, Subhash L

    2006-01-01

    Thermal management has become a ‘hot’ field in recent years due to a need to obtain high performance levels in many devices used in such diverse areas as space science, mainframe and desktop computers, optoelectronics and even Formula One racing cars! Thermal solutions require not just taking care of very high thermal flux, but also ‘hot spots’, where the flux densities can exceed 200 W/cm2. High thermal conductivity materials play an important role in addressing thermal management issues. This volume provides readers a basic understanding of the thermal conduction mechanisms in these materials and discusses how the thermal conductivity may be related to their crystal structures as well as microstructures developed as a result of their processing history. The techniques for accurate measurement of these properties on large as well as small scales have been reviewed. Detailed information on the thermal conductivity of diverse materials including aluminum nitride (AlN), silicon carbide (SiC), diamond, a...

  4. Comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for HDPE, BPE and concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhang, Prosenjit; Verma, Rishi; Shyam, Anurag

    2015-01-01

    In the compact accelerator based DD neutron generator, the deuterium ions generated by the ion source are accelerated after the extraction and bombarded to a deuterated titanium target. The emitted neutrons have typical energy of ∼2.45MeV. Utilization of these compact accelerator based neutron generators of yield up to 10 9 neutron/second (DD) is under active consideration in many research laboratories for conducting active neutron interrogation experiments. Requirement of an adequately shielded laboratory is mandatory for the effective and safe utilization of these generators for intended applications. In this reference, we report the comprehensive analysis of shielding effectiveness for High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Borated Polyethylene (BPE) and Concrete as candidate materials for neutron shielding. In shielding calculations, neutron induced scattering and absorption gamma dose has also been considered along with neutron dose. Contemporarily any material with higher hydrogenous concentration is best suited for neutron shielding. Choice of shielding material is also dominated by practical issues like economic viability and availability of space. Our computational analysis results reveal that utilization of BPE sheets results in minimum wall thickness requirement for attaining similar range of attenuation in neutron and gamma dose. The added advantage of using borated polyethylene is that it reduces the effect of both neutron and gamma dose by absorbing neutron and producing lithium and alpha particle. It has also been realized that for deciding upon optimum thickness determination of any shielding material, three important factors to be necessarily considered are: use factor, occupancy factor and work load factor. (author)

  5. Tests of a thermal acoustic shield with a supersonic jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickup, N.; Mangiarotty, R. A.; Okeefe, J. V.

    1981-10-01

    Fuel economy is a key element in the design of a future supersonic transport (SST). Variable cycle engines are being developed to provide the most economic combination of characteristics for a range of cruise speeds extending from subsonic speeds for overland flights to the supersonic cruise speeds. For one of these engines, the VCE-702, some form of noise suppression is needed for takeoff/sideline thrusts. The considered investigation is primarily concerned with scale model static tests of one particular concept for achieving that reduction, the thermal acoustic shield (TAS), which could also benefit other candidate SST engines. Other noise suppression devices being considered for SST application are the coannular nozzle, an internally ventilated nozzle, and mechanical suppressors. A test description is provided, taking into account the model configurations, the instrumentation, the test jet conditions, and aspects of screech noise control. Attention is given to shield thickness effects, a spectrum analysis, suppression and performance loss, and installed performance.

  6. Development and qualification of materials and processes for radiation shielding of Galileo spacecraft electronic components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hribar, F.; Bauer, J.L.; O'Donnell, T.P.

    1990-01-01

    Several materials and processing methods were evaluated for use on the JPL Galileo spacecraft in the area of radiation shielding for electronics. Development and qualification activities involving an aluminum structural laminate are described. These activities included requirements assessment, design tradeoffs, materials selection, adhesive bonding development, mechanical properties measurements, thermal stability assessment, and nondestructive evaluation. This paper presents evaluation of three adhesives for bonding tantalum to aluminum. The concept of combining a thin sheet of tantalum with two outer aluminum face sheets using adhesive bonding was developed successfully. This radiation shield laminate also provides a structural shear plate for mounting electronic assemblies

  7. New gadolinium based glasses for gamma-rays shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaewjang, S.; Maghanemi, U.; Kothan, S.; Kim, H.J.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Kaewkhao, J.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Gd 2 O 3 based glasses have been fabricated and investigated radiation shielding properties between 223 and 662 keV. • Density of the glass increases with increasing of Gd 2 O 3. • All the glasses of Gd 2 O 3 compositions studied had been shown lower HVL than X-rays shielding window. • Prepared glasses to be utilized as radiation shielding material with Pb-free advantage. • This work is the first to reports on radiation shielding properties of Gd 2 O 3 based glass matrices. - Abstract: In this work, Gd 2 O 3 based glasses in compositions (80−x)B 2 O 3 -10SiO 2 -10CaO-xGd 2 O 3 (where x = 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 mol%) have been fabricated and investigated for their radiation shielding, physical and optical properties. The density of the glass was found to increase with the increasing of Gd 2 O 3 concentration. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ m ), effective atomic number (Z eff ) and effective electron densities (N e ) of the glasses were found to increase with the increasing of Gd 2 O 3 concentration and also with the decreasing of photon energy from 223 to 662 keV. The glasses of all Gd 2 O 3 compositions studied have been shown with lower HVL values in comparison to an X-rays shielding window, ordinary concrete and commercial window; indicating their potential as radiation shielding materials with Pb-free advantage. Optical spectra of the glasses in the present study had been shown with light transparency; an advantage when used as radiation shielding materials

  8. New gadolinium based glasses for gamma-rays shielding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaewjang, S.; Maghanemi, U.; Kothan, S. [Department of Radiologic Technology, Faculty of Associated Medical Sciences, Chang Mai University, Chang Mai 50200 (Thailand); Kim, H.J. [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Limkitjaroenporn, P. [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand); Kaewkhao, J., E-mail: mink110@hotmail.com [Center of Excellence in Glass Technology and Materials Science (CEGM), Nakhon Pathom Rajabhat University, Nakhon Pathom 73000 (Thailand)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glasses have been fabricated and investigated radiation shielding properties between 223 and 662 keV. • Density of the glass increases with increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3.} • All the glasses of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions studied had been shown lower HVL than X-rays shielding window. • Prepared glasses to be utilized as radiation shielding material with Pb-free advantage. • This work is the first to reports on radiation shielding properties of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glass matrices. - Abstract: In this work, Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} based glasses in compositions (80−x)B{sub 2}O{sub 3}-10SiO{sub 2}-10CaO-xGd{sub 2}O{sub 3} (where x = 15, 20, 25, 30 and 35 mol%) have been fabricated and investigated for their radiation shielding, physical and optical properties. The density of the glass was found to increase with the increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration. The experimental values of mass attenuation coefficients (μ{sub m}), effective atomic number (Z{sub eff}) and effective electron densities (N{sub e}) of the glasses were found to increase with the increasing of Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} concentration and also with the decreasing of photon energy from 223 to 662 keV. The glasses of all Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} compositions studied have been shown with lower HVL values in comparison to an X-rays shielding window, ordinary concrete and commercial window; indicating their potential as radiation shielding materials with Pb-free advantage. Optical spectra of the glasses in the present study had been shown with light transparency; an advantage when used as radiation shielding materials.

  9. Design, fabrication, and properties of a continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide gamma ray/neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Peng; Tang, Xiaobin; Chai, Hao; Chen, Da; Qiu, Yunlong

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Sm_2O_3 is used for neutron absorber instead of B_4C, and Sm_2O_3 has a good photon-shielding effect. • Carbon-fiber cloth and polyimide were used to enhance shielding materials’ mechanical behavior and thermal behavior. • Both Monte Carlo method and shielding test were used to evaluate shielding performance of the novel shielding material. - Abstract: The design and fabrication of shielding materials with good heat-resistance and mechanical properties is a major problem in the radiation shielding field. In this paper, based on gamma ray and neutron shielding theory, a continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide gamma ray/neutron shielding material was fabricated by hot-pressing method. The material's application behavior was subsequently evaluated using neutron shielding, photon shielding, mechanical tensile, and thermogravimetric analysis–differential scanning calorimetry tests. The results show that the tensile strength of the novel shielding material exceeds 200 MPa, which makes it of similar strength to aluminum alloy. The material does not undergo crosslinking and decomposition reactions at 300 °C and it can be used in such environments for long periods of time. The continuous carbon-fiber reinforced Sm_2O_3/polyimide material has a good shielding performance with respect to gamma rays and neutrons. The material thus has good prospects for use in fusion reactor system and nuclear waste disposal applications.

  10. Under Water Thermal Cutting of the Moderator Vessel and Thermal Shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loeb, A.; Sokcic-Kostic, M.; Eisenmann, B.; Prechtl, E.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents the segmentation of the in 8 meter depth of water and for cutting through super alloyed moderator vessel and of the thermal shield of the MZFR stainless steel up to 130 mm wall thickness. Depending on the research reactor by means of under water plasma and contact arc metal cutting. The moderator vessel and the thermal shield are the most essential parts of the MZFR reactor vessel internals. These components have been segmented in 2005 by means of remotely controlled under water cutting utilizing a special manipulator system, a plasma torch and CAMC (Contact Arc Metal Cutting) as cutting tools. The engineered equipment used is a highly advanced design developed in a two years R and D program. It was qualified to cut through steel walls of more than 100 mm thickness in 8 meters water depth. Both the moderator vessel and the thermal shield had to be cut into such size that the segments could afterwards be packed into shielded waste containers each with a volume of roughly 1 m 3 . Segmentation of the moderator vessel and of the thermal shield was performed within 15 months. (author)

  11. Thermal stress evaluation of the Viking RTG heat shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stadter, J.T.; Weiss, R.O.

    1976-03-01

    Thermal stress analyses of the Viking RTG heat shield are presented. The primary purpose of the analyses was to determine the effects of the end cap and the finite length of the heat shield on the peak tensile stress in the barrel wall. The SAAS III computer code was used to calculate the thermal stresses; axisymmetric and plane section analyses were performed for a variety of temperature distributions. The study consisted of three parts. In the first phase, the influence of the end cap on the barrel wall stresses was examined by parametrically varying the modulus of elasticity of the contact zone between the end cap and the barrel. The second phase was concerned with stresses occurring as a result of an orbital decay reentry trajectory, and the effects of the magnitude and shape of the axial temperature gradient. The final part of the study was concerned with the circumferentially nonuniform temperature distribution which develops during a side-on stable reentry. The last part includes a comparison of stresses generated for a hexagonal cross section with those generated for a circular cross section

  12. Development of special radiation shielding concretes using natural local materials and evaluation of their shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Takeyeddin, M.; Al-Nassri, M.; Yousef, S.

    2008-01-01

    Concrete is one of the most important materials used for radiation shielding in facilities containing radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the composite of the concrete. Aggregates is the largest constituent (about 70-80% of the total weight of normal concrete). The aim of this work is to develop special concrete with good shielding properties for gamma and neutrons, using natural local materials. For this reason two types of typical concrete widely used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) and four other types of concrete, using aggregates from different regions, have been prepared. The shielding properties of these six types were studied for gamma ray (from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources)and for neutrons (from am-Be source). A reduction of about 10% in the HVL was obtained for the concrete from Damascus in comparison with that from Aleppo, for both neutrons and gammas. One of the other four types of concrete (from Rajo site, mostly Hematite), was found to further reduce the HVL by about 10% for both neutrons and gamma rays.(author)

  13. Investigation of high temperature phase stability, thermal properties and evaluation of metallurgical compatibility with 304L stainless steel, of indigenously developed ferroboron alternate shielding material for fast reactor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rai, Arun Kumar [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Raju, S., E-mail: sraju@igcar.gov.in [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Jeya Ganesh, B. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Panneerselvam, G. [Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Vijayalakshmi, M.; Jayakumar, T. [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Raj, Baldev [Metallurgy and Materials Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India); Chemistry Group, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam, 603102 (India)

    2011-08-15

    Highlights: > High temperature phase stability and metallurgical compatibility of indigenous Ferro boron alloy (17 wt.%) with 304L SS have been evaluated using calorimetry, metallography and X-ray diffraction. > Fe-B is stable upto 1227 deg. C without any phase transformation. > In combination with SS 304L, it develops an eutectic reaction at 1198 deg. C. > High temperature metallurgical interaction between Ferroboron and 304L SS clad has been simulated for temperatures 550-800 deg. C for reaction times up to 5000 h, using diffusion couple. > Clad penetration depth with time follows a paraobolic rate law. - Abstract: Towards the cause of serving economic power production through fast reactors, it is necessary to bring in functionally more efficient and innovative design options, which also includes exploration of cheaper material alternatives, wherever possible. In this regard, the feasibility of using a commercial grade ferroboron alloy as potential alternate shielding material in the outer subassemblies of future Indian fast reactors has been recently investigated from shielding physics point of view. The present study explores in detail the high temperature thermal stability and the metallurgical compatibility of Fe-15.4B-0.3C-0.89Si-0.17Al-0.006S-0.004P-0.003O (wt.%) alloy with SS 304L material. In addition, the high temperature specific heat and lattice thermal expansion characteristics of this alloy have also been investigated as a part of the present comprehensive characterisation program. The Fe-15 wt.%B alloy is constituted of principally of two boride phases, namely tetragonal Fe{sub 2}B and orthorhombic FeB phases, which in addition to boron also contains some amount of C and Si dissolved in solid solution form. This Fe-B alloy undergoes a series of phase transformation as a function of increasing temperature; the major ones among them are the dissolution of Fe{sub 2}B-lower boride in the matrix through a eutectic type reaction, which results in the

  14. Novel shielding materials for space and air travel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vana, N.; Hajek, M.; Berger, T.; Fugger, M.; Hofmann, P.

    2006-01-01

    The reduction of dose onboard spacecraft and aircraft by appropriate shielding measures plays an essential role in the future development of space exploration and air travel. The design of novel shielding strategies and materials may involve hydrogenous composites, as it is well known that liquid hydrogen is most effective in attenuating charged particle radiation. As precursor for a later flight experiment, the shielding properties of newly developed hydrogen-rich polymers and rare earth-doped high-density rubber were tested in various ground-based neutron and heavy ion fields and compared with aluminium and polyethylene as reference materials. Absorbed dose, average linear energy transfer and gamma-equivalent neutron absorbed dose were determined by means of LiF:Mg,Ti thermoluminescence dosemeters and CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors. First results for samples of equal aerial density indicate that selected hydrogen-rich plastics and rare-earth-doped rubber may be more effective in attenuating cosmic rays by up to 10% compared with conventional aluminium shielding. The appropriate adaptation of shielding thicknesses may thus allow reducing the biologically relevant dose. Owing to the lower density of the plastic composites, mass savings shall result in a significant reduction of launch costs. The experiment was flown as part of the European Space Agency's Biopan-5 mission in May 2005. (authors)

  15. Thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuation properties of ilmenite-serpentine heat resistant concrete shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kany, A.M.I.; El-Gohary, M.I.; Kamal, S.M.

    1994-01-01

    Experimental measurements were carried out to study the attenuation properties of low-energy neutrons transmitted through unheated and preheated barriers of heavy-weight, highly hydrated and heat-resistant concrete shields. The concrete shields under investigation have been prepared from naturally occurring ilmenite and serpentine Egyptian ores. A collimated beam obtained from an Am-Be source was used as a source of neutrons, while the measurements of total thermal, epithermal, and thermalized neutron fluxes were performed using a BF-3 detector, multichannel analyzer and Cd filter. Results show that the ilmenite-serpentine concrete proved to be a better thermal, epithermal and thermalized neutron attenuator than the ordinary concrete especially at a high temperature of concrete exposure. (Author)

  16. The distribution property of shielding materials used in radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, Paulo R.

    1996-01-01

    A parametric model for the distribution of the radiation scattered by shielding materials is proposed. The advantages regarding to chemical composition or to linear attenuation coefficient of the media as a function of energy are presented. Comparative results between the model and experimental data are reported

  17. Using natural local materials for developing special radiation shielding concretes, and deduction of its shielding characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharita, M. H.; Takeyeddin, M.; Al-Nassar, M.; Yousef, S.

    2006-06-01

    Concrete is considered as the most important material to be used for radiation shielding in facilities contain radioactive sources and radiation generating machines. The concrete shielding properties may vary depending on the construction of the concrete, which is highly relative to the composing aggregates i.e. aggregates consist about 70 - 80% of the total weight of normal concrete. In this project tow types of concrete used in Syria (in Damascus and Aleppo) had been studied and their shielding properties were defined for gamma ray from Cs-137 and Co-60 sources, and for neutrons from Am-Be source. About 10% reduction in HVL was found in the comparison between the tow concrete types for both neutrons and gammas. Some other types of concrete were studied using aggregates from different regions in Syria, to improve the shielding properties of concrete, and another 10% of reduction was achieved in comparison with Damascene concrete (20% in comparison with the concrete from Aleppo) for both neutrons and gamma rays. (author)

  18. Multiscale modeling of acoustic shielding materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, K.; Dommelen, van J.A.W.; Geers, M.G.D.

    2012-01-01

    It is very important to protect high-tech systems from acoustic excitation when operating in a noisy environment. Some passive absorbing materials such as acoustic foams can improve the performance which depends on the interaction of the acoustic wave and the microstructure of the foam.

  19. Shield materials recommended for space power nuclear reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaszubinski, L. J.

    1973-01-01

    Lithium hydride is recommended for neutron attenuation and depleted uranium is recommended for gamma ray attenuation. For minimum shield weights these materials must be arranged in alternate layers to attenuate the secondary gamma rays efficiently. In the regions of the shield near the reactor, where excessive fissioning occurs in the uranium, a tungsten alloy is used instead. Alloys of uranium such as either the U-0.5Ti or U-8Mo are available to accommodate structural requirements. The zone-cooled casting process is recommended for lithium hydride fabrication. Internal honeycomb reinforcement to control cracks in the lithium hydride is recommended.

  20. Manufacture and testing of the CTB&SBB thermal shield for the ITER magnet feeder system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Kun; Liu, Chen; Song, Yuntao; Feng, Hansheng; Ding, Kaizhong, E-mail: kzding@ipp.ac.cn; Wang, Tanbin; Ji, Hui

    2015-10-15

    The system of International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) feeders is responsible for the power, helium cooling, and instrumentation of the magnets of the coil terminal box and S-bend box (CTB&SBB) thermal shield outside the cryostat. An 80-K rectangular Al thermal shield is hung inside the CTB&SBB to reduce the thermal radiation heat loads of 4.5-K helium. The American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP) will supply all the 31 sets of feeders for ITER. A manufactured prototype of CTB&SBB thermal shield is first quality-tested before the commencement of the series production. First, a detailed configuration of the rectangular Al thermal shield is presented in this article. The paper also presents more information on the manufacturing process of the thermal shield, especially the welding process, the procedure for ensuring good weld quality, and the use of a specially designed tool to ensure <5-mm deformation on such a 7.3-m-long thermal shield during welding. In addition, the cold test and results, including the cooling process with 13-bar and 17.5-g/s 80-K He gas, and the temperature distribution on different panels of the thermal shield are presented. The whole process of manufacture and testing lays a good foundation for the series production of the thermal shield.

  1. Evaluation of neutron shielding made of cement type material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seshimo, Takuya; Nagai, Takayuki; Onose, Atsushi; Takuma, Yasuhisa; Tanuma, Hiroyuki; Otagawa, Masaaki

    1998-01-01

    We prepared boron-containing cement and evaluated the characteristics of this new cement. This is the material of neutron shielding which is lighter than existing one. The quality we aimed is: H ≥ 0.025 g/cm 3 , B ≥ 0.065 g/cm 3 , density ≤ 1.70 g/cm 3 . We made test pieces changing water powder ratio (W/P), adding amount of air entraining agent, adding amount of water reducing agent, and time of vibration, and then, evaluated the characteristics. The measured parameters are the air content, mortar flow and homogeneity for cement mortar, homogeneity and compressive strength for hardened one. From the results of these tests, we confirmed the possibility of making neutron shielding that can satisfy the aimed quality using this boron-containing cement. After all, we established the method of making the neutron shielding, and this method was used in the construction of RETF. (author)

  2. Benchmark analysis and evaluations of materials for shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benton, E.R.; Gersey, B.B.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Kitamura, H.; Shavers, M.R.

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this project is to provide a benchmark set of heavy ion beam measurements behind ''standard'' targets made using radiation detectors routinely used for astronaut dosimetry and to test the radiation shielding properties of candidate multifunctional spacecraft materials. These measurements are used in testing and validating space radiation transport codes currently being developed by NASA and in selecting promising materials for further development. The radiation dosimetry instruments being used include CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD), Tissue-Equivalent Proportional Counter (TEPC), the Liulin Mobile Dosimetry Unit (MDU) and thermoluminescent detector (TLD). Each set of measurements include LET/y spectra, and dose and dose equivalent as functions of shield thickness. Measurements are being conducted at the NIRS HIMAC, using heavy-ion beams of energy commonly encountered in the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) environment and that have been identified as being of particular concern to the radiation protection of space crews. Measurements are being made behind a set of standard'' targets including Al, Cu, polyethylene (HDPE) and graphite that vary in thickness from 0.5 to > 30 g/cm 2 . In addition, we are measuring the shielding properties of novel shielding materials being developed by and for NASA, including carbon and polymer composites. (author)

  3. {sup 3}He detector analysis of some special shielding materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avdic, S; Pesic, M [Boris Kidric, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, Beograd (Yugoslavia); Marinkovic, P [ETF Belgrade Univ. (Yugoslavia)

    1990-07-01

    The shielding properties of commercial materials of reactor Experiments, Inc. (R/X) were analyzed at the facility which includes bare heavy water experimental reactor RB with external neutron converter ENC, The fast neutron spectrum measurements in energy range from 1 MeV to 10 MeV was performed using ORTEC semiconductor neutron detector with He{sup 3} in diode coincidence arrangement. The neutron spectra have been evaluated from measured pulse-height distribution using numerical code HE3 for computation of detector efficiency in a collimated neutron beam. The neutron dose rates behind ENC with and without sample R/X material were determined using cubic spline interpolation routine for calculating the corresponding flux-dose rate conversion factors. Satisfactory shielding properties of the examined material in a fast neutron field in measurements and calculations are demonstrated. (author)

  4. Experimental simulation and numerical modeling of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhtin, V.P.; Konkashbaev, I.; Landman, I.; Safronov, V.M.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1995-01-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and are experimentally analyzed at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. ((orig.))

  5. Gamma ray absorption of cylindrical fissile material with dual shields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Chenyan; Cheng Yiying; Huang Yongyi; Lu Fuquan; Yang Fujia

    2005-01-01

    This work analyzed the gamma ray attenuation effect from the self-absorption and shield attenuation perspectively. An exact mathematical equation was given for the geometric factor of the cylindrical fissile material with dual shields. In addition, several approximation approaches suitable for real situation were discussed, especially in the radial and axial directions of the cylinders, since the G-factors have simple forms. Then the space distribution patterns of the G-factor were analyzed based on numerical result and effective ways to solved the geometric information of the cylindrical fissile material, the radii and the heights, were deduced. This method was checked and verified by numerical calculation. Because of the efficiency of the method, it is ideal for application in real situations, such as nuclear safeguards, which demands speed of detection and accuracy of geometric analysis. (authors)

  6. Depleted uranium hexafluoride: The source material for advanced shielding systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quapp, W.J.; Lessing, P.A. [Idaho National Engineering Lab., Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Cooley, C.R. [Department of Technology, Germantown, MD (United States)

    1997-02-01

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has a management challenge and financial liability problem in the form of 50,000 cylinders containing 555,000 metric tons of depleted uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) that are stored at the gaseous diffusion plants. DOE is evaluating several options for the disposition of this UF{sub 6}, including continued storage, disposal, and recycle into a product. Based on studies conducted to date, the most feasible recycle option for the depleted uranium is shielding in low-level waste, spent nuclear fuel, or vitrified high-level waste containers. Estimates for the cost of disposal, using existing technologies, range between $3.8 and $11.3 billion depending on factors such as the disposal site and the applicability of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). Advanced technologies can reduce these costs, but UF{sub 6} disposal still represents large future costs. This paper describes an application for depleted uranium in which depleted uranium hexafluoride is converted into an oxide and then into a heavy aggregate. The heavy uranium aggregate is combined with conventional concrete materials to form an ultra high density concrete, DUCRETE, weighing more than 400 lb/ft{sup 3}. DUCRETE can be used as shielding in spent nuclear fuel/high-level waste casks at a cost comparable to the lower of the disposal cost estimates. Consequently, the case can be made that DUCRETE shielded casks are an alternative to disposal. In this case, a beneficial long term solution is attained for much less than the combined cost of independently providing shielded casks and disposing of the depleted uranium. Furthermore, if disposal is avoided, the political problems associated with selection of a disposal location are also avoided. Other studies have also shown cost benefits for low level waste shielded disposal containers.

  7. Identification of Shielding Material Configurations Using NMIS Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grogan, Brandon R.; Mihalczo, John T.; McConchie, Seth M.; Mullens, James Allen

    2011-01-01

    The Nuclear Materials Identification System (NMIS) uses fast neutron tomographic imaging to nonintrusively examine the interior structure of shielded objects. The pixel values in such images represent the attenuation coefficients of the time- and directionally-tagged fast neutrons from a deuterium-tritium (D T) neutron generator. The reconstruction techniques use either a filtered back projection or a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm. As a first test of the capabilities of these reconstruction techniques to correctly identify individual parts inside of an object, fast neutron imaging was used to identify the regions of shielding surrounding a depleted uranium casting from a library of possible parts. The shielding consisted of multiple regions of common materials such as steel, lead, aluminum, and polyethylene. First, the full object was imaged, and then each of the individual parts was imaged. Several additional parts that were not present in the original object were also imaged to form a library. The individual parts were compared to the full object, and the correct ones were identified using three different methods. These methods included a visual match, an iterative fit of each part, and a mathematical test comparing the sum of squared errors. The successful results demonstrate an initial application of matching. This suggests that it should be possible to implement more sophisticated matching techniques using automated pixel-by-pixel comparison methods in the future.

  8. Discussion on the Standardization of Shielding Materials — Sensitivity Analysis of Material Compositions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogata Tomohiro

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overview of standardization activities for shielding materials is described. We propose a basic approach for standardizing material composition used in radiation shielding design for nuclear and accelerator facilities. We have collected concrete composition data from actual concrete samples to organize a representative composition and its variance data. Then the sensitivity analysis of the composition variance has been performed through a simple 1-D dose calculation. Recent findings from the analysis are summarized.

  9. 6Li-doped silicate glass for thermal neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stone, C.A.; Blackburn, D.H.; Kauffman, D.A.; Cranmer, D.C.; Olmez, I.

    1994-01-01

    Glass formulations are described that contain high concentrations of 6 Li and are suitable for use as thermal neutron shielding. One formulation contained 31 mol% of 6 Li 2 O and 69 mol% of SiO 2 . Studies were performed on a second formulation that contained as much as 37 mol% of 6 Li 2 O and 59 mol% of SiO 2 , with 4 mol% Al 2 O 3 added to prevent crystallization at such high 6 Li 2 O concentrations. These lithium silicate glasses can be formed into a variety of shapes using conventional glass fabrication techniques. Examples include flat plates, disks, hollow cylinders, and other more complex geometries. Both in-beam and in-core experiments have been performed to study the use and durability of Li silicate glasses. In-core experiments show the glass can withstand the intense radiation fields near the core of a reactor. The neutron attenuation of the glasses used in these studies was 90%/mm. In-beam studies show that the glass is effective for reducing the gamma-ray and neutron fields near experiments. ((orig.))

  10. Thermal-hydraulic analysis and design improvement for coolant channel of ITER shield block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Ling; Li Huaqi; Zheng Jiantao; Yi Jingwei; Kang Weishan; Chen Jiming

    2013-01-01

    As an important part for ITER, shield block is used to shield the neutron heat. The structure design of shield block, especially the inner coolant channel design will influence its cooling effect and safety significantly. In this study, the thermal-hydraulic analysis for shield block has been performed by the computational fluid dynamics software, some optimization suggestions have been proposed and thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the improved model has been analyzed again. The analysis results for improved model show that pressure drop through flow path near the inlet and outlet region of the shield block has been reduced, and the total pressure drop in cooling path has been reduced too; the uniformity of the mass flowrate distribution and the velocity distribution have been improved in main cooling branches; the local highest temperature of solid domain reduced considerably, which could avoid thermal stress becoming too large because of coolant effect unevenly. (authors)

  11. Needle-Bonded Electromagnetic Shielding Thermally Insulating Nonwoven Composite Boards: Property Evaluations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jia-Horng Lin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Complicated environmental problems inevitably arise when technology advances. One major environmental problem is the presence of electromagnetic radiation. Long-term exposure to electromagnetic radiation can damage people’s health in many ways. Therefore, this study proposes producing composite boards with electromagnetic shielding effectiveness and thermal insulation by utilizing the structures and properties of materials. Different combinations of flame-retardant polyester fiber (FR fiber, recycled far-infrared polyester fiber (FI fiber, and 4D low-melting-point fibers (LM fiber were made into flame-retardant and thermally insulating matrices. The matrices and carbon fiber (CF woven fabric in a sandwich-structure were needle-punched in order to be tightly compact, and then circularly heat dried in order to have a heat set and reinforced structure. The test results indicate that Polyester (PET/CF composite boards are mechanically strong and have thermal insulation and electromagnetic shielding effectiveness at a frequency between 0.6 MHz and 3 GHz.

  12. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study. Phase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibeault, Sheila A.; Fay, Catharine C.; Lowther, Sharon E.; Earle, Kevin D.; Sauti, Godfrey; Kang, Jin Ho; Park, Cheol; McMullen, Amelia M.

    2012-01-01

    than possible with hydrogen storage; however, a systematic experimental hydrogenation study has not been reported. A combination of the two approaches may be explored to provide yet higher hydrogen content. The hydrogen containing BNNT produced in our study will be characterized for hydrogen content and thermal stability in simulated space service environments. These new materials systems will be tested for their radiation shielding effectiveness against high energy protons and high energy heavy ions at the HIMAC facility in Japan, or a comparable facility. These high energy particles simulate exposure to SEP and GCR environments. They will also be tested in the LaRC Neutron Exposure Laboratory for their neutron shielding effectiveness, an attribute that determines their capability to shield against the secondary neutrons found inside structures and on lunar and planetary surfaces. The potential significance is to produce a radiation protection enabling technology for future exploration missions. Crew on deep space human exploration missions greater than approximately 90 days cannot remain below current crew Permissible Exposure Limits without shielding and/or biological countermeasures. The intent of this research is to bring the Agency closer to extending space missions beyond the 90-day limit, with 1 year as a long-term goal. We are advocating a systems solution with a structural materials component. Our intent is to develop the best materials system for that materials component. In this Phase I study, we have shown, computationally, that hydrogen containing BNNT is effective for shielding against GCR, SEP, and neutrons over a wide range of energies. This is why we are focusing on hydrogen containing BNNT as an innovative advanced concept. In our future work, we plan to demonstrate, experimentally, that hydrogen, boron, and nitrogen based materials can provide mechanically strong, thermally stable, structural materials with effective radiation shielding against GCR

  13. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: I-Design and X-Ray Transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collura, A.; Barbera, M.; Varisco, S.; Basso, S.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ayers, T.

    2009-05-01

    The Simbol-X mission is designed to fly in formation flight configuration. As a consequence, the telescope has both ends open to space, and thermal shielding at telescope entrance and exit is required to maintain temperature uniformity throughout the mirrors. Both mesh and meshless solutions are presently under study for the shields. We discuss the design and the X-ray transmission.

  14. Simbol-X Mirror Module Thermal Shields: I - Design and X-Ray Transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collura, A.; Varisco, S.; Barbera, M.; Basso, S.; Pareschi, G.; Tagliaferri, G.; Ayers, T.

    2009-01-01

    The Simbol-X mission is designed to fly in formation flight configuration. As a consequence, the telescope has both ends open to space, and thermal shielding at telescope entrance and exit is required to maintain temperature uniformity throughout the mirrors. Both mesh and meshless solutions are presently under study for the shields. We discuss the design and the X-ray transmission.

  15. Gamma radiation shielding materials improved with burning resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Michio; Nakamura, Ken-ichi; Yukawa, Katsunori.

    1985-01-01

    Purpose: To obtain gamma irradiation shielding materials excellent in workability and resistant to burning by using a two component type room temperature vulcanizing silicon rubber composition as the base material. Method: Silicon rubber comprising a diorganopolysiloxane polymer, an alkyl silicate as a crosslinker and a suitable sulfurdizing catalyst, for example, a carboxylate is mixed with iron powder and silicon oxide powder as reinforcing and flame retardant material and applied with molding. The iron powder and the silica rocks powder have grain size of 50 - 150 μm and 1 - 70 μm and charged by the amount of from 55 to 60 % by weight and from 20 to 25 % by weight respectively. The fluidizing property is impaired if the particle size of the silica rocks powder is less than 1 μm and, while on the other hand, no desired specific gravity of a predetermined value can be obtained for the molding product if the filled amount of the iron powder is less than 55 %. The oxygen index of the molding product is 45 to improve the burning resistance. The materials are excellent in the air-tightness, gamma radiation shielding performance, elasticity and workability required for the cable penetrations in a nuclear power plant and they generate noxious gases neither. (Kawakami, Y.)

  16. Radiation Shielding Materials Containing Hydrogen, Boron, and Nitrogen: Systematic Computational and Experimental Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objectives of the proposed research are to develop a space radiation shielding material system that has high efficacy for shielding radiation and also has high...

  17. Bismuth silicate glass containing heavy metal oxide as a promising radiation shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elalaily, Nagia A.; Abou-Hussien, Eman M.; Saad, Ebtisam A.

    2016-12-01

    Optical and FTIR spectroscopic measurements and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) properties have been utilized to investigate and characterize the given compositions of binary bismuth silicate glasses. In this work, it is aimed to study the possibility of using the prepared bismuth silicate glasses as a good shielding material for γ-rays in which adding bismuth oxide to silicate glasses causes distinguish increase in its density by an order of magnitude ranging from one to two more than mono divalent oxides. The good thermal stability and high density of the bismuth-based silicate glass encourage many studies to be undertaken to understand its radiation shielding efficiency. For this purpose a glass containing 20% bismuth oxide and 80% SiO2 was prepared using the melting-annealing technique. In addition the effects of adding some alkali heavy metal oxides to this glass, such as PbO, BaO or SrO, were also studied. EPR measurements show that the prepared glasses have good stability when exposed to γ-irradiation. The changes in the FTIR spectra due to the presence of metal oxides were referred to the different housing positions and physical properties of the respective divalent Sr2+, Ba2+ and Pb2+ ions. Calculations of optical band gap energies were presented for some selected glasses from the UV data to support the probability of using these glasses as a gamma radiation shielding material. The results showed stability of both optical and magnetic spectra of the studied glasses toward gamma irradiation, which validates their irradiation shielding behavior and suitability as the radiation shielding candidate materials.

  18. Experimental Studies on Shadow Shields for Thermal Protection of Cryogenic Tanks in Space

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knoll, Richard

    1968-01-01

    ... (high-emissivity coatings on annular rings of shields) on thermal performance. The experimental data, in general, agreed closely with an analytical model which assumed diffuse surfaces with nonuniform radiosity...

  19. Development of paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of B2O3 for thermal neutron shielding applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toyen, Donruedee; Saenboonruang, Kiadtisak

    2017-01-01

    In this work, paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of boron oxide (B 2 O 3 ) were prepared to evaluate the viscosity, flexural, and thermal neutron shielding properties for uses as thermal neutron shielding materials. The results showed that the addition of 3 wt% or 9 wt% bitumen to paraffin increased the overall flexural properties with the content of 9 wt% bitumen having the highest values. The improvement in flexural properties made the composites less brittle, stiffer, and longer-lasting. Furthermore, different contents of B 2 O 3 (0, 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 wt%) were added to paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites to investigate the effects of the B 2 O 3 contents. The results indicated that an increase in B 2 O 3 contents improved the shielding properties but slightly reduced the flexural properties. Specifically for 5-mm paraffin and 5-mm paraffin/bitumen samples with 35 wt% of B 2 O 3 , both samples could reduce neutron flux by more than 70%. The overall results suggested that the paraffin and paraffin/bitumen composites with additions of B 2 O 3 showed improved properties for utilization as effective thermal neutron shielding materials. (author)

  20. Calculation of thermal neutron self-shielding correction factors for aqueous bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis using the MCNP code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasrabadi, M.N.; Jalali, M.; Mohammadi, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this work thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing materials is studied using bulk sample prompt gamma neutron activation analysis (BSPGNAA) with the MCNP code. The code was used to perform three dimensional simulations of a neutron source, neutron detector and sample of various material compositions. The MCNP model was validated against experimental measurements of the neutron flux performed using a BF 3 detector. Simulations were performed to predict thermal neutron self-shielding in aqueous bulk samples containing neutron absorbing solutes. In practice, the MCNP calculations are combined with experimental measurements of the relative thermal neutron flux over the sample's surface, with respect to a reference water sample, to derive the thermal neutron self-shielding within the sample. The proposed methodology can be used for the determination of the elemental concentration of unknown aqueous samples by BSPGNAA where knowledge of the average thermal neutron flux within the sample volume is required

  1. Method of measurement on materials shielding effectiveness test in time domain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Shunkun; Han Jun; Chen Xiangyue

    2009-01-01

    Windows method is a measurement of slot coupling effect in nature when it is used to measure material's shielding effectiveness. The error of measurement will become serious when it is used to measure material's shielding effectiveness in low frequency band. It is difficult to measure material's shielding effectiveness of electromagnetic pulse with Windows method. Device under test method (DUT method) was presented in this paper to overcome the limitations of Windows method in material's shielding effectiveness test. The method can be used to measure any material's shielding Effectiveness effectively through the design and the test of the DUT.The method was used to measure shielding effectiveness of special cement .Compared with theoretical analysis,the measurement result prove the DUT method to be very efficient in material's shielding effectiveness test. (authors)

  2. Shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Wilcox, A.D.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1983-03-01

    The shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility is based upon one-, two- and three-dimensional transport calculations with experimental measurements utilized to refine the nuclear data including the neutron cross sections from 20 to 50 MeV and the gamma ray and neutron source terms. The high energy neutrons and deuterons produce activation products from the numerous reactions that are kinematically allowed. The analyses for both beam-on and beam-off (from the activation products) conditions have required extensive nuclear data libraries and the utilization of Monte Carlo, discrete ordinates, point kernel and auxiliary computer codes

  3. γ-ray shielding behaviors of some nuclear engineering materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh

    2017-01-01

    The essential requirement of a material to be used for engineering purposes at nuclear establishments is its ability to attenuate the most penetrating ionizing radiations, gamma (γ)-rays. Mostly, high-Z materials such as heavy concrete, lead, mercury, and their mixtures or alloys have been used in the construction of nuclear establishments and thus termed as nuclear engineering materials (NEM). The NEM are classified into two categories, namely opaque and transparent, depending on their behavior towards the visible spectrum of EM waves. The majority of NEM are opaque. By contrast, various types of glass, which are transparent to visible light, are necessary at certain places in the nuclear establishments. In the present study, γ-ray shielding behaviors (GSB) of six glass samples (transparent NEM) were evaluated and compared with some opaque NEM in a wide range of energy (15 keV–15 MeV) and optical thickness (OT). The study was performed by computing various γ-ray shielding parameters (GSP) such as the mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number, and buildup factor. A self-designed and validated computer-program, the buildup factor-tool, was used for various computations. It has been established that some glass samples show good GSB, thus can safely be used in the construction of nuclear establishments in conjunction with the opaque NEM as well

  4. γ-ray shielding behaviors of some nuclear engineering materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh [Dept. of Physics, D.A.V. College, Punjab (India)

    2017-06-15

    The essential requirement of a material to be used for engineering purposes at nuclear establishments is its ability to attenuate the most penetrating ionizing radiations, gamma (γ)-rays. Mostly, high-Z materials such as heavy concrete, lead, mercury, and their mixtures or alloys have been used in the construction of nuclear establishments and thus termed as nuclear engineering materials (NEM). The NEM are classified into two categories, namely opaque and transparent, depending on their behavior towards the visible spectrum of EM waves. The majority of NEM are opaque. By contrast, various types of glass, which are transparent to visible light, are necessary at certain places in the nuclear establishments. In the present study, γ-ray shielding behaviors (GSB) of six glass samples (transparent NEM) were evaluated and compared with some opaque NEM in a wide range of energy (15 keV–15 MeV) and optical thickness (OT). The study was performed by computing various γ-ray shielding parameters (GSP) such as the mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number, and buildup factor. A self-designed and validated computer-program, the buildup factor-tool, was used for various computations. It has been established that some glass samples show good GSB, thus can safely be used in the construction of nuclear establishments in conjunction with the opaque NEM as well.

  5. γ-Ray Shielding Behaviors of Some Nuclear Engineering Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulwinder Singh Mann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The essential requirement of a material to be used for engineering purposes at nuclear establishments is its ability to attenuate the most penetrating ionizing radiations, gamma (γ-rays. Mostly, high-Z materials such as heavy concrete, lead, mercury, and their mixtures or alloys have been used in the construction of nuclear establishments and thus termed as nuclear engineering materials (NEM. The NEM are classified into two categories, namely opaque and transparent, depending on their behavior towards the visible spectrum of EM waves. The majority of NEM are opaque. By contrast, various types of glass, which are transparent to visible light, are necessary at certain places in the nuclear establishments. In the present study, γ-ray shielding behaviors (GSB of six glass samples (transparent NEM were evaluated and compared with some opaque NEM in a wide range of energy (15 keV–15 MeV and optical thickness (OT. The study was performed by computing various γ-ray shielding parameters (GSP such as the mass attenuation coefficient, equivalent atomic number, and buildup factor. A self-designed and validated computer-program, the buildup factor-tool, was used for various computations. It has been established that some glass samples show good GSB, thus can safely be used in the construction of nuclear establishments in conjunction with the opaque NEM as well.

  6. Requirements for timber and cadmium used in shielding for fissile material transport packaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-02-01

    This Code of Practice has been prepared as a guide for designers who require packaging for fissile materials. It should be noted that this document covers design requirements only and it is not a manufacturing specification which can be quoted on a manufacturing contract without qualification. Compliance with the regulations regarding the safe transport of fissile materials may be achieved by the provision of an effective shield embodying:- (a) a moderating material -usually one rich in hydrogen, such as wood - in order to thermalise incoming neutrons, and (b) a material - such as cadmium - with a large absorption cross-section for thermal neutrons, located between the moderator and the fissile material, in order to capture the incoming neutrons. This Code describes the requirements in two sections, one for each of these materials. (author)

  7. Radiation shielding material and method of fabricating the same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagai, Haruo; Uehara, Hiroshi; Imamura, Katsuji.

    1979-01-01

    Purpose: To provide a radiation shielding material containing lead acrylates, which material is provided with an excellent optical transparency and mechanical strength. Constitution: The material comprises a polymer consisting of a substate monomer selected from the group of (hydroxy) alkyl metacrylate, hydroxyalkyl acrylate and styrene and lead (meta) acrylate, and an/organic acid lead represented by a general formula, (RCOO)sub(a) Pb where a: an integer equivalent to the valency of lead, and R: an unsaturated hydrocarbon group. Furthermore, both substances are caused to be copresent so that the ratio x (weight percentage) of metacrylic acid lead or acrylic acid lead to the entire monomer and the blending ratio y (weight part) of organic acid lead to 100% by weight of the entire monomer satisfy specific conditions. (Aizawa, K.)

  8. Effect of particle size of mineral fillers on polymer-matrix composite shielding materials against ionizing electromagnetic radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belgin, E.E.; Aycik, G.A.

    2017-01-01

    Filler particle size is an important particle that effects radiation attenuation performance of a composite shielding material but the effects of it have not been exploited so far. In this study, two mineral (hematite-ilmenite) with different particle sizes were used as fillers in a polymer-matrix composite and effects of particle size on shielding performance was investigated within a widerange of radiation energy (0-2000 keV). The thermal and structural properties of the composites were also examined. The results showed that as the filler particle size decreased the shielding performance increased. The highest shielding performance reached was 23% with particle sizes being between <7 and <74 µm. (author)

  9. Thermal transfer in multilayer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouayad, H.; Mokhtari, A.; Martin, C.; Fauchais, P. [Laboratoire de Materiaux Ceramiques et Traitements de Surface, 87 - Limoges (France)

    1993-12-31

    It is easier to measure the thermal diffusivity (a) of material rather than its thermal conductivity (k), a simple relationship (k=a cp) allowing to calculate k provided and cp are measured. However this relationship applies only if the considered material is homogenous. For composite materials, especially for multilayers ones, we have developed an analytical model and a numerical one. The first one allows to determine the thermal diffusivity and conductivity of a two-layer material. The second one allows to determine the thermal diffusivity of one of the layers provided the values of (a) are known for the two other layers (for a two or three-layer material). The use of the two models to calculate the apparent diffusivity of a two layer material results in values in fairly good agreement. (Authors). 4 refs., 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Optimization of thermal design for nitrogen shield of JET cryopump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baxi, C.B.; Obert, W.

    1991-11-01

    The reference design of JET cryopump nitrogen shield consists of an outer section made of copper chevrons fastened to two cooling tubes and an inner stainless steel section and backing plate with two cooling tubes. These tubes are fed in a parallel flow arrangement. The inlet flow is divided into two parallel paths so that both tubes on either section are always at the same temperature. This arrangement was selected due to concern about conduction between warm and cold parts of the shield during cooldown transients. If the heat loads are unequal, such a parallel flow arrangement can result in flow starvation in the path with higher heat load. This will cause large temperature differences and, ultimately, structural failure. Hence, an analysis was undertaken to investigate the conduction effects in the shield for other flow arrangements. 4 refs., 8 figs

  11. Advanced materials for thermal protection system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heng, Sangvavann; Sherman, Andrew J.

    1996-03-01

    Reticulated open-cell ceramic foams (both vitreous carbon and silicon carbide) and ceramic composites (SiC-based, both monolithic and fiber-reinforced) were evaluated as candidate materials for use in a heat shield sandwich panel design as an advanced thermal protection system (TPS) for unmanned single-use hypersonic reentry vehicles. These materials were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition/infiltration (CVD/CVI) and evaluated extensively for their mechanical, thermal, and erosion/ablation performance. In the TPS, the ceramic foams were used as a structural core providing thermal insulation and mechanical load distribution, while the ceramic composites were used as facesheets providing resistance to aerodynamic, shear, and erosive forces. Tensile, compressive, and shear strength, elastic and shear modulus, fracture toughness, Poisson's ratio, and thermal conductivity were measured for the ceramic foams, while arcjet testing was conducted on the ceramic composites at heat flux levels up to 5.90 MW/m2 (520 Btu/ft2ṡsec). Two prototype test articles were fabricated and subjected to arcjet testing at heat flux levels of 1.70-3.40 MW/m2 (150-300 Btu/ft2ṡsec) under simulated reentry trajectories.

  12. Thermal Shielding Effects of a Damaged Shock Absorber and an Intact Shock Absorber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Kim, K. Y.; Seo, C. S.; Seo, K. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-15

    In order to safely transport the radioactive waste arising from the hot test of an ACP(Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process) a shipping package is required. Therefore, KAERI is developing a shipping package to transport the radioactive waste arising from the ACPF during a hot test. The regulatory requirements for a Type B package are specified in the Korea Most Act 2009-37, IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1, and US 10 CFR Part. These regulatory guidelines classify the hot cell cask as a Type B package, and state that the Type B package for transporting radioactive materials should be able to withstand a test sequence consisting of a 9 m drop onto an unyielding surface, a 1 m drop onto a puncture bar, and a 30 minute fully engulfing fire. Greiner et al. investigated the thermal protection provided by shock absorbers by using the CAFE computer code. To evaluate the thermal shielding effect of the shock absorber, the thermal test was performed by using a 1/2 scale model with a shock absorber which was damaged by both a 9 m drop test and a 1 m puncture test. For the purpose of comparison, the thermal test was also carried out by using a 1/2 scale model with the intact shock absorber

  13. Study of the behavior of thermal shield support system for the French CPO series plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bellet, S.; Roux, P.; Bhandari, D.R.; Schwirian, R.E.; Yu, C.; Matarazzo, J.C.; Singleton, N.R.

    1996-01-01

    Degradation/failure of thermal shield support system in PWRs has been observed in the US as well as in foreign plants. In almost all the cases, remedial actions were put in place at very high economic costs to the utilities only after the failures had occurred. This paper presents the results of a comprehensive study to predict the long term behavior of a thermal shield support system due to flow-induced vibratory loads and thermal transients. Excellent agreement from the system finite model between the measured plant test data on the barrel/thermal shield beam and shell mode frequencies and the flexure strains confirms the basic structural behavior and physics of the flow induced vibrations. Loads and stresses on the support bolts and the flexures were determined to predict the fatigue life of the components

  14. TORE-SUPRA: design of thermal radiation shield at 80 K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymar, R.; Cordier, J.J.; Deschamps, P.; Gauthier, A.; Perin, J.P.

    1982-09-01

    The TORE-SUPRA superconducting toroidal magnet operating at liquid helium temperature, must be protected against thermal radiation from the vessels. For this purpose, stainless steel heat shields, cooled at 80 K, are positioned between coil casings at 4.5 K and the vessels, and constitute a double stiff toroid which completely surrounds the magnet. Mockups have been manufactured to study their design and operating problems. Calculations have also been made to analyse the mechanical behaviour of these shields

  15. A novel comprehensive utilization of vanadium slag: As gamma ray shielding material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Mengge [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Xue, Xiangxin, E-mail: xuexx@mail.neu.edu.cn [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Yang, He; Liu, Dong [School of Metallurgy, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110004 (China); Liaoning Key Laboratory of Metallurgical Resources Recycling Science, Shenyang 110004 (China); Wang, Chao [Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Li, Zhefu [Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China)

    2016-11-15

    Highlights: • A novel comprehensive utilization method for vanadium slag is proposed. • Shielding properties of vanadium slag are better than ordinary concrete. • HVL of vanadium slag is between Lead and concrete to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray. • HVL of composite is higher than concrete when adding amount of vanadium slag is 900. • Composite can be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in concrete shields. - Abstract: New exploration of vanadium slag as gamma ray shielding material was proposed, the shielding properties of vanadium slag was higher than concrete when the energy of photons was in 0.0001 MeV–100000 MeV. Vanadium slag/epoxy resin composites were prepared, shielding and material properties of materials were tested by {sup 60}Co gamma ray, simultaneous DSC-TGA, electronic universal testing machine and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. The results showed that the shielding properties of composite would be better with the increase of vanadium slag addition amount. The HVL (half value layer thickness) of vanadium slag was between Lead and concrete while composite was higher than concrete when the addition amount of vanadium slag was 900 used as material to shield {sup 60}Co gamma ray, also the resistance temperature of composite was about 215 °C and the bending strength was over 10 MPa. The composites could be used as injecting mortar for cracks developed in biological concrete shields, coating for the floor of the nuclear facilities, and shielding materials by itself.

  16. Experimental studies of dynamic impact response with scale models of lead shielded radioactive material shipping containers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robinson, R.A.; Hadden, J.A.; Basham, S.J.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary experimental studies of dynamic impact response of scale models of lead-shielded radioactive material shipping containers are presented. The objective of these studies is to provide DOE/ECT with a data base to allow the prediction of a rational margin of confidence in overviewing and assessing the adequacy of the safety and environmental control provided by these shipping containers. Replica scale modeling techniques were employed to predict full scale response with 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 scale models of shipping containers that are used in the shipment of spent nuclear fuel and high level wastes. Free fall impact experiments are described for scale models of plain cylindrical stainless steel shells, stainless steel shells filled with lead, and replica scale models of radioactive material shipping containers. Dynamic induced strain and acceleration measurements were obtained at several critical locations on the models. The models were dropped from various heights, attitudes to the impact surface, with and without impact limiters and at uniform temperatures between -40 and 175 0 C. In addition, thermal expansion and thermal gradient induced strains were measured at -40 and 175 0 C. The frequency content of the strain signals and the effect of different drop pad compositions and stiffness were examined. Appropriate scale modeling laws were developed and scaling techniques were substantiated for predicting full scale response by comparison of dynamic strain data for 1/8, 1/4, and 1/2 scale models with stainless steel shells and lead shielding

  17. Microwavable thermal energy storage material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salyer, I.O.

    1998-09-08

    A microwavable thermal energy storage material is provided which includes a mixture of a phase change material and silica, and a carbon black additive in the form of a conformable dry powder of phase change material/silica/carbon black, or solid pellets, films, fibers, moldings or strands of phase change material/high density polyethylene/ethylene vinyl acetate/silica/carbon black which allows the phase change material to be rapidly heated in a microwave oven. The carbon black additive, which is preferably an electrically conductive carbon black, may be added in low concentrations of from 0.5 to 15% by weight, and may be used to tailor the heating times of the phase change material as desired. The microwavable thermal energy storage material can be used in food serving applications such as tableware items or pizza warmers, and in medical wraps and garments. 3 figs.

  18. Development of high-performance shielding material by heat curing method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miura, Toshimasa; Hirao, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Takayuki; Okuno, Koichi; Sato, Osamu [National Maritime Research Institute, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A high-performance shielding material is developed by a heat curing method. It is mainly made of a thermosetting resin, lead powder, and a boron compound. To make the resin, a single functional monomer stearyl methacrylate (SMA) is used. To get good dispersion of lead and the boron compound in the resin, the viscosity of the SMA is increased by adding a small amount of a peroxide into the liquid monomer and heating up to the temperature of 100 .deg. C. Next, a peroxide, lead powder, a boron compound, a three functional monomer, and a curing accelerator are mixed into the viscous SMA. The mixture is cured in an atmosphere of nitrogen after removing bubbles using a vacuum pump. Measured properties of the cured material are as follows. The curing rate of SMA is 97 %. The density is kept 2.35 g/cm{sub 3} in the range from room temperature to 150 .deg. C. The weight-change measured by a thermogravimetry is 0.16 % in the range from room temperature to 200 .deg. C. Details of fragments in the gas released from the material is analyzed by a gas chromatography and a mass spectrometry. The hydrogen content of the material is 6.04x10 {sub 22} /cm{sub 3} . The shielding effect is calculated for a fission source by an Sn code ANISN. The shielding effect of the curing material is excellent. For example, concrete shield of a certain thickness can be replaced by the material having a thickness less than a half of concrete. Several samples of the material are irradiated at an irradiation equipment of the research reactor JRR-4 installed at Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. At the 14{sub th} day after irradiating with the thermal neutron fluence of 6.6x10{sub 15} /cm{sub 2} , the radioactivity is less than one tenth of 75 Bq/g above which materials are regulated as the radioactive substance in Japan.

  19. Thermal conductivity of granular materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buyevich, Yu A

    1974-01-01

    Stationary heat transfer in a granular material consisting of a continuous medium containing spherical granules of other substances is considered under the assumption that the spatial distribution of granules is random. The effective thermal conductivity characterizing macroscopic heat transfer in such a material is expressed as a certain function of the conductivities and volume fractions of the medium and dispersed substances. For reasons of mathematical analogy, all the results obtained for the thermal conductivity are valid while computing the effective diffusivity of some admixture in granular materials as well as for evaluation of the effective electric conductivity or the mean dielectric and magnetic permeabilities of granular conductors and dielectrics. (23 refs.)

  20. Preliminary study for development of low dose radiation shielding material using liquid silicon and metallic compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Seo Goo; Lee, Sung Soo [Dept. of Medical Science, Graduate School of Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Su Chul [Div. of Medical Radiation Equipment, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Sung Jin [SoonChunHyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Sung Wook [Graduate school of SeJong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-09-15

    This study measured and compared the protective clothing using Pb used for shielding in a diagnostic X-ray energy range, and the shielding rates of X-ray fusion shielding materials using Si and TiO{sub 2}. For the experiment, a pad type shielding with a thickness of 1 mm was prepared by mixing Si-TiO{sub 2}, and the X-ray shielding rate was compared with 0.5 mmPb plate of The shielding rate of shielding of 0.5 mmPb plate 95.92%, 85.26 % based on the case of no shielding under each 60kVp, 100kVp tube voltage condition. When the shielding of Si-TiO{sub 2} pad was applied, the shielding rate equal to or greater than 0.5 mmPb plate was obtained at a thickness of 11 mm or more, and the shielding rate of 100% or more was confirmed at a thickness of 13 nn in 60kVp condition. When the shielding of Si-TiO{sub 2} pad was applied, the shielding rate equal to or greater than 0.5 mmPb plate was obtained at a thickness of 17 mm or more, and a shielding rate of 0.5 mmPb plate was observed at a thickness of 23 mm in 100kVp condition. Through the results of this study, We could confirm the possibility of manufacturing radiation protective materials that does not contain lead hazard using various metallic compound and liquid Si. This study shows that possibility of liquid Si and other metallic compound can harmonize easily. Beside, It is flexible and strong to physical stress than Pb obtained radiation protective clothes. But additional studies are needed to increase the shielding rate and reduce the weight.

  1. Materials development for ITER shielding and test blanket in China

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, J.M., E-mail: Chenjm@swip.ac.cn [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wu, J.H.; Liu, X.; Wang, P.H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China); Wang, Z.H.; Li, Z.N. [Ningxia Orient Non-ferrous Metals Group Co. Ltd., P.O. Box 105, Shizuishan (China); Wang, X.S.; Zhang, P.C. [China Academy of Engineering Physics, P.O. Box 919-71, Mianyang 621900 (China); Zhang, N.M.; Fu, H.Y.; Liu, D.H. [Southwestern Institute of Physics, P.O. Box 432, Chengdu 610041 (China)

    2011-10-01

    China is a member of the ITER program and is developing her own materials for its shielding and test blanket modules. The materials include vacuum-hot-pressing (VHP) Be, CuCrZr alloy, 316L(N) and China low activation ferritic/martensitic (CLF-1) steels. Joining technologies including Be/Cu hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and electron beam (EB) weldability of 316L(N) were investigated. Chinese VHP-Be showed good properties, with BeO content and ductility that satisfy the ITER requirements. Be/Cu mock-ups were fabricated for Be qualification tests at simulated ITER vertical displacement event (VDE) and heat flux cycling conditions. Fine microstructure and good mechanical strength of the CuCrZr alloy were achieved by a pre-forging treatment, while the weldability of 316L(N) by EB was demonstrated for welding depths varying from 5 to 80 mm. Fine microstructure, high strength, and good ductility were achieved in CLF-1 steel by an optimized normalizing, tempering and aging procedure.

  2. Chemical and thermal analysis for characterisation of building materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, S.C.; Sudersanan, M.; Ravindran, P.V.; Kalekar, B.B.; Mathur, P.K.

    2000-01-01

    Cement and other construction materials are extensively used for the construction of shielding materials for nuclear and high energy radiations. The design and optimum utilisation of such materials need an accurate analysis of their chemical composition. The moisture content and presence of bound water and other volatile materials are also important. The use of thermal analysis supplements the data obtained by chemical analysis and enables a distinction of moisture and chemically bound water. It also enables an identification of the process leading to the loss on ignition. The work carried out on the analysis of sand, cement and other aggregate materials used for the preparation of concrete is described in the paper. (author)

  3. New shielding material development for compact accelerator-driven neutron source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The Compact Accelerator-driven Neutron Source (CANS, especially the transportable neutron source is longing for high effectiveness shielding material. For this reason, new shielding material is researched in this investigation. The component of shielding material is designed and many samples are manufactured. Then the attenuation detection experiments were carried out. In the detections, the dead time of the detector appeases when the proton beam is too strong. To grasp the linear range and nonlinear range of the detector, two currents of proton are employed in Pb attenuation detections. The transmission ratio of new shielding material, polyethylene (PE, PE + Pb, BPE + Pb is detected under suitable current of proton. Since the results of experimental neutrons and γ-rays appear as together, the MCNP and PHITS simulations are applied to assisting the analysis. The new shielding material could reduce of the weight and volume compared with BPE + Pb and PE + Pb.

  4. Omni-directional selective shielding material based on amorphous glass coated microwires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ababei, G; Chiriac, H; David, V; Dafinescu, V; Nica, I

    2012-01-01

    The shielding effectiveness of the omni-directional selective shielding material based on CoFe-glass coated amorphous wires in 0.8 GHz-3 GHz microwave frequency range is investigated. The measurements were done in a controlled medium using a TEM cell and in the free space using horn antennas, respectively. Experimental results indicate that the composite shielding material can be developed with desired shielding effectiveness and selective absorption of the microwave frequency range by controlling the number of the layers and the length of microwires.

  5. Characterization of serpentine. A potential nuclear shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, A.; Rajeswari, B.; Kadam, R.M.; Kshirsagar, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The use of serpentine as a potential nuclear shielding material necessitates a chemical quality control of the samples before its use in reactors. With this in view, characterization of these mineral samples was carried out using inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) and Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) methods. The analytical results obtained by both ICP-AES and NAA techniques were found to be comparable. Na, Cr, Co, Zn, and Cu were found to be present in all samples of Indian origin while Ga, Ag, Ni, and Cd were found to below the limits of detection. A comparison on the detection limits of elements of interest was also carried out by both the analytical techniques and found to be in good agreement. An infrared spectroscopic investigation was also carried out on all the mineral samples. Bands at 3,689 and 3,648 cm -1 were attributed to inner and outer hydroxyl stretching of Mg-OH, respectively. The weak and broad band centered around 3,416 cm -1 was assigned due to the stretching vibrations of the adsorbed water molecules while three bands at 1076, 1022 and 968 cm -1 were prescribed to the vibrations of the SiO 4 tetrahedra. (author)

  6. Research of glass fibre used in the electromagnetic wave shielding and absorption composite material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M.; Jia, F.; Bao, H. Q.; Cui, K.; Zhang, F.

    2016-07-01

    Electromagnetic shielding and absorption composite material plays an important role in the defence and economic field. Comparing with other filler, Glass fibre and its processed product—metal-coated glass fibre can greatly reduce the material's weight and costs, while it still remains the high strength and the electromagnetic shielding effectiveness. In this paper, the electromagnetic absorption mechanism and the reflection mechanism have been investigated as a whole, and the shielding effectiveness of the double-layer glass fibre composite material is mainly focused. The relationship between the shielding effectiveness and the filled glass fibre as well as its metal-coated product's parameters has also been studied. From the subsequent coaxial flange and anechoic chamber analysis, it can be confirmed that the peak electromagnetic shielding effectiveness of this double-layer material can reach -78dB while the bandwidth is from 2GHz to 18GHz.

  7. Optimization of thermal neutron shield concrete mixture using artificial neural network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadollahi, A. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box: 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nazemi, E., E-mail: nazemi.ehsan@yahoo.com [Young Researchers and Elite Club, Kermanshah Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Zolfaghari, A. [Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, G.C., P.O. Box: 1983963113, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ajorloo, A.M. [Water and Environmental Engineering Department, Shahid Beheshti University, P.O. Box: 167651719, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-15

    Highlights: • Colemanite was used in fabricating of thermal neutron shield concrete. • The Taguchi method was implemented to obtain the data set required for training the ANN. • Trained ANN predicted quality characteristics of thermal neutron shield. - Abstract: Colemanite is the most convenient boron mineral which has been widely used in construction of radiation shielding concrete in order to improve the capture of thermal neutrons. But utilization of Colemanite in radiation shielding concrete has a deleterious effect on both physical and mechanical properties. In the present work, Taguchi method and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to find an optimal mixture of Colemanite based concrete in order to improve the boron content of concrete and increase thermal neutron absorption without violating the standards for physical and mechanical properties. Using Taguchi method for experimental design, 27 concrete samples with different mixtures were fabricated and tested. Water/cement ratio, cement quantity, volume fraction of Colemanite aggregate and silica fume quantity were selected as control factors, and compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity and thermal neutron transmission ratio were considered as the quality responses. Obtained data from 27 experiments were used to train 3 ANNs. Four control factors were utilized as the inputs of 3 ANNs and 3 quality responses were used as the outputs, separately (each ANN for one quality response). After training the ANNs, 1024 different mixtures with different quality responses were predicted. At the final, optimum mixture was obtained among the predicted different mixtures. Results demonstrated that the optimal mixture of thermal neutron shielding concrete has a water–cement ratio of 0.38, cement content of 400 kg/m{sup 3}, a volume fraction Colemanite aggregate of 50% and silica fume–cement ratio of 0.15.

  8. Optimization of thermal neutron shield concrete mixture using artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadollahi, A.; Nazemi, E.; Zolfaghari, A.; Ajorloo, A.M.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Colemanite was used in fabricating of thermal neutron shield concrete. • The Taguchi method was implemented to obtain the data set required for training the ANN. • Trained ANN predicted quality characteristics of thermal neutron shield. - Abstract: Colemanite is the most convenient boron mineral which has been widely used in construction of radiation shielding concrete in order to improve the capture of thermal neutrons. But utilization of Colemanite in radiation shielding concrete has a deleterious effect on both physical and mechanical properties. In the present work, Taguchi method and artificial neural network (ANN) were employed to find an optimal mixture of Colemanite based concrete in order to improve the boron content of concrete and increase thermal neutron absorption without violating the standards for physical and mechanical properties. Using Taguchi method for experimental design, 27 concrete samples with different mixtures were fabricated and tested. Water/cement ratio, cement quantity, volume fraction of Colemanite aggregate and silica fume quantity were selected as control factors, and compressive strength, ultrasonic pulse velocity and thermal neutron transmission ratio were considered as the quality responses. Obtained data from 27 experiments were used to train 3 ANNs. Four control factors were utilized as the inputs of 3 ANNs and 3 quality responses were used as the outputs, separately (each ANN for one quality response). After training the ANNs, 1024 different mixtures with different quality responses were predicted. At the final, optimum mixture was obtained among the predicted different mixtures. Results demonstrated that the optimal mixture of thermal neutron shielding concrete has a water–cement ratio of 0.38, cement content of 400 kg/m 3 , a volume fraction Colemanite aggregate of 50% and silica fume–cement ratio of 0.15.

  9. Irradiation behavior of graphite shielding materials for FBR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Tadashi; Kaito, Takeji; Onose, Shoji; Shibahara, Itaru

    1994-01-01

    Thirteen kinds of isotropic graphites with different density and maximum grain size were irradiated in the experimental fast reactor 'JOYO' to fluences from 2.11 to 2.86x10 26 n/m 2 (E>0.1 MeV) at temperatures from 549 to 597degC. Postirradiation examination was carried out on dimensional change, elastic modulus, and the thermal conductivity. The result of measurement of dimensional change indicated that the graphites irradiated at lower fluences showed shrinkage upon neutron irradiation followed by increase with increasing neutron fluences, irrespective of differences in material parameters. The Young's modulus and Poisson's ratio increased to two to three times of unirradiated values. A large scatter found in Poisson's ratio of unirradiated materials became very small and a linear dependency on density was obtained after irradiation. The thermal conductivity decreased to one-fifth to one-tenth of unirradiated values, but the change in specific heat was negligibly small. The results of postirradiation examination indicated that the changes in physical properties of high density, isotropic graphites were mainly dominated by the irradiation condition rather than their material parameters. Namely, the effects of irradiation induced defects on physical properties of heavily neutron-irradiated graphites are much larger than that of defects associated with as-fabricated specimens. (author)

  10. Thermal and flow considerations for the 80 K shield of the SSC magnet cryostats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abramovich, S.; Yuecel, A.; Demko, J.; Thirumaleshwar, M.

    1994-01-01

    The nominal temperatures in the SSC magnets range between 4.2 K in the superconducting coils and 300 K on the cryostat outer wall. To minimize the 4 K heat load, one thermal shield cooled by liquid and vapor nitrogen flows at 84 K, and another cooled by helium flow at 20 K are incorporated in the cryostat. Tubes attached to the shields serve as conduits for the cryogens. The liquid nitrogen tube in the cryostat is used for shield refrigeration and also for liquid distribution around the SSC rings. The second nitrogen line is used to return the vapor to the helium refrigerators for helium precooling. The nominal LN2 flow from a 4.3 km long cryogenic string (4 sections) to the surface is 64 g/s. The total liquid nitrogen consumption of approximately 5000 g/s will be supplied at one, two or more locations on the surface. The total heat load of the 80 K shield is estimated as 3.2 W/m: about 50% is composed of infrared radiation; the remaining 50% is by heat conduction through supports, vacuum barriers and other thermal connections between the shield and the 300 K outer wall. The required LN2 flow rate depends on the distribution and circulation schemes. The LN2 temperature will in turn vary depending on the flow rate and on the recooling method used. For example, with a massflow of 400 g/s of LN2 the temperature rises from 82 K to 86 K between two compact recoolers 1 km apart. This temperature is higher than desired. The temperature can be reduced by increasing the flow rate of the liquid or by using the continuous recooling scheme. This paper discusses some thermal problems caused by certain mechanical designs of the 80 K shield and the possible improvement by using continuous recooling. The authors present results of the 80 K shield temperature distribution analysis, the 20 K shield heat load augmentation resulting from the increased 80 K shield temperatures, the continuous nitrogen recooling scheme and some flow timing related analysis

  11. Materials tests and analyses of Faraday shield tubes for ICRF [ion cyclotron resonant frequency] antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, J.F.; Baity, F.W.; Hoffman, D.J.; Walls, J.C.; Taylor, D.J.

    1988-01-01

    The ion cyclotron resonant frequency (ICRF) antennas for heating fusion plasmas require careful analysis of the materials selected for the design and the successful fabrication of high integrity braze bonds. Graphite tiles are brazed to Inconel 625 Faraday shield tubes to protect the antenna from the plasma. The bond between the graphite and Inconel tube is difficult to achieve due to the different coefficients of thermal expansion. A 2-D stress analysis showed the graphite could be bonded to Inconel with a Ag-Cu-Ti braze alloy without cracking the graphite. Brazing procedures and nondestructive examination methods have been developed for these joints. This paper presents the results of our joining development and proof testing. 2 refs., 3 figs

  12. Barium-borate-flyash glasses: As radiation shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Sukhpal; Kumar, Ashok; Singh, Devinder; Thind, Kulwant Singh; Mudahar, Gurmel S.

    2008-01-01

    The attenuation coefficients of barium-borate-flyash glasses have been measured for γ-ray photon energies of 356, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV using narrow beam transmission geometry. The photon beam was highly collimated and overall scatter acceptance angle was less than 3 o . Our results have an uncertainty of less than 3%. These coefficients were then used to obtain the values of mean free path (mfp), effective atomic number and electron density. Good agreements have been observed between experimental and theoretical values of these parameters. From the studies of the obtained results it is reported here that from the shielding point of view the barium-borate-flyash glasses are better shields to γ-radiations in comparison to the standard radiation shielding concretes and also to the ordinary barium-borate glasses

  13. Evaluation of rubber composites as shielding materials against ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atia, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    Styrene-butadiene rubber/lead oxide composites were prepared as γ-radiation shields.The composites were prepared with different concentration of red lead oxide (Pb 3 O 4 ) .The assessment of the linear attenuation coefficient of the SBR/lead oxide composites for γ -rays from 137 Cs 137 γ-radiation point source was studied . The factors affecting the mechanical properties and shielding capacity of the composites were also studied. These factors include the lead oxide concentration, the type of monomers added and the irradiation dose. The styrene-butadiene rubber/lead oxide composites can attain up to about 43% of the shielding capacity of pure lead. The incorporation of high concentrations of lead oxide and the effect of accumulative irradiation doses up to 3000 kGy on the physico-mechanical properties of the composites were studied . These led to hardening of the SBR rubber/lead oxide composites.

  14. Comparative study of tungsten and lead as gamma ray shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Jian; Zou Shuliang

    2011-01-01

    This article firstly compares the tungsten and lead's physical properties, price and environmental performance, then calculates the thickness of tungsten and lead with the gamma ray 10% transmission when the photon energy are 0.1 MeV, 0.2 MeV, 0.5, 1 MeV and 1.25 MeV, and makes a comparison chart. Finally, it establishes a commonly used shielding model, through which to validate whether the thickness of theoretical calculation can achieve an effective shielding effect by MCNP program. The results showers that tungsten as a new type of shielding material has a lot of advantages, which shielding ability is far higher than the lead. Thus it provides the reference to choose the suitable shielding materials in special occasions. (authors)

  15. Nano lead oxide and epdm composite for development of polymer based radiation shielding material: Gamma irradiation and attenuation tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, T.; Güngör, A.; Akbay, I. K.; Uzun, H.; Babucçuoglu, Y.

    2018-03-01

    It is important to have a shielding material that is not easily breaking in order to have a robust product that guarantee the radiation protection of the patients and radiation workers especially during the medical exposure. In this study, nano sized lead oxide (PbO) particles were used, for the first time, to obtain an elastomeric composite material in which lead oxide nanoparticles, after the surface modification with silane binding agent, was used as functional material for radiation shielding. In addition, the composite material including 1%, 5%, 10%, 15% and 20% weight percent nano sized lead oxide was irradiated with doses of 81, 100 and 120 kGy up to an irradiation period of 248 days in a gamma ray source with an initial dose rate of 21.1 Gy/h. Mechanical, thermal properties of the irradiated materials were investigated using DSC, DMA, TGA and tensile testing and modifications in thermal and mechanical properties of the nano lead oxide containing composite material via gamma irradiation were reported. Moreover, effect of bismuth-III oxide addition on radiation attenuation of the composite material was investigated. Nano lead oxide and bismuth-III oxide particles were mixed with different weight ratios. Attenuation tests have been conducted to determine lead equivalent values for the developed composite material. Lead equivalent thickness values from 0.07 to 0.65 (2-6 mm sample thickness) were obtained.

  16. Experimental validation of thermal design of top shield for a pool type SFR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aithal, Sriramachandra; Babu, V. Rajan; Balasubramaniyan, V.; Velusamy, K.; Chellapandi, P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Overall thermal design of top shield in a SFR is experimentally verified. • Air jet cooling is effective in ensuring the temperatures limits for top shield. • Convection patterns in narrow annulus are in line with published CFD results. • Wire mesh insulation ensures gradual thermal gradient at top portion of main vessel. • Under loss of cooling scenario, sufficient time is available for corrective action. - Abstract: An Integrated Top Shield Test Facility towards validation of thermal design of top shield for a pool type SFR has been conceived, constructed & commissioned. Detailed experiments were performed in this experimental facility having full-scale features. Steady state temperature distribution within the facility is measured for various heater plate temperatures in addition to simulating different operating states of the reactor. Following are the important observations (i) jet cooling system is effective in regulating the roof slab bottom plate temperature and thermal gradient across roof slab simulating normal operation of reactor, (ii) wire mesh insulation provided in roof slab-main vessel annulus is effective in obtaining gradual thermal gradient along main vessel top portion and inhibiting the setting up of cellular convection within annulus and (iii) cellular convection with four distinct convective cells sets in the annular gap between roof slab and small rotatable plug measuring ∼ϕ4 m in diameter & gap width varying from 16 mm to 30 mm. Repeatability of results is also ensured during all the above tests. The results presented in this paper is expected to provide reference data for validation of thermal hydraulic models in addition to serving as design validation of jet cooling system for pool type SFR.

  17. Gamma ray and neutron shielding properties of some concrete materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilmaz, E.; Baltas, H.; Kiris, E.; Ustabas, I.; Cevik, U.; El-Khayatt, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → This study sheds light on the shielding properties of gamma-rays and neutrons for some concrete samples. → The experimental mass attenuation coefficients values were compared with theoretical values obtained using WinXCom. → Moreover, neutron shielding has been treated in terms of macroscopic removal cross-section (Σ R , cm -1 ) concept. → The NXcom program was employed to calculate the attenuation coefficients values of neutrons. → These values showed a change with energy and composition of the concrete samples. - Abstract: Shielding of gamma-rays and neutrons by 12 concrete samples with and without mineral additives has been studied. The total mass attenuation and linear attenuation coefficients, half-value thicknesses, effective atomic numbers, effective electron densities and atomic cross-sections at photons energies of 59.5 and 661 keV have been measured and calculated. The measured and calculated values were compared and a reasonable agreement has been observed. Also the recorded values showed a change with energy and composition of the concrete samples. In addition, neutron shielding has been treated in terms of macroscopic removal cross-section (Σ R , cm -1 ) concept. The WinXCom and NXcom programs were employed to calculate the attenuation coefficients of gamma-rays and neutrons, respectively.

  18. Atom interferometry in space: Thermal management and magnetic shielding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milke, Alexander; Kubelka-Lange, André; Gürlebeck, Norman, E-mail: norman.guerlebeck@zarm.uni-bremen.de; Rievers, Benny; Herrmann, Sven [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Schuldt, Thilo [DLR Institute for Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany); Braxmaier, Claus [Center of Applied Space Technology and Microgravity (ZARM), University Bremen, Am Fallturm, 28359 Bremen (Germany); DLR Institute for Space Systems, Robert-Hooke-Str. 7, 28359 Bremen (Germany)

    2014-08-15

    Atom interferometry is an exciting tool to probe fundamental physics. It is considered especially apt to test the universality of free fall by using two different sorts of atoms. The increasing sensitivity required for this kind of experiment sets severe requirements on its environments, instrument control, and systematic effects. This can partially be mitigated by going to space as was proposed, for example, in the Spacetime Explorer and Quantum Equivalence Principle Space Test (STE-QUEST) mission. However, the requirements on the instrument are still very challenging. For example, the specifications of the STE-QUEST mission imply that the Feshbach coils of the atom interferometer are allowed to change their radius only by about 260 nm or 2.6 × 10{sup −4} % due to thermal expansion although they consume an average power of 22 W. Also Earth's magnetic field has to be suppressed by a factor of 10{sup 5}. We show in this article that with the right design such thermal and magnetic requirements can indeed be met and that these are not an impediment for the exciting physics possible with atom interferometers in space.

  19. Space Station Validation of Advanced Radiation-Shielding Polymeric Materials, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In Subtopic X11.01, NASA has identified the need to develop advanced radiation-shielding materials and systems to protect humans from the hazards of space radiation...

  20. Application of Advanced Radiation Shielding Materials to Inflatable Structures, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This innovation is a weight-optimized, inflatable structure that incorporates radiation shielding materials into its construction, for use as a habitation module or...

  1. Conservative method for determination of material thickness used in shielding of veterinary facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lava, Deise D.; Borges, Diogo da S.; Affonso, Renato R.W.; Moreira, Maria de L.; Guimaraes, Antonio C.F.

    2014-01-01

    For determination of an effective method for shielding of veterinary rooms, was provided shielding methods generally used in rooms which works with X-ray production and radiotherapy. Every calculation procedure is based in traditional variables used to transmission calculation. The thickness of the materials used for primary and secondary shieldings are obtained to respect the limits set by the Brazilian National Nuclear Energy Commission (CNEN). This work presents the development of a computer code in order to serve as a practical tool for determining rapid and effective materials and their thicknesses to shield veterinary facilities. The code determines transmission values of the shieldings and compares them with data from transmission 'maps' provided by NCRP-148 report. These 'maps' were added to the algorithm through interpolation techniques of curves of materials used for shielding. Each interpolation generates about 1,000,000 points that are used to generate a new curve. The new curve is subjected to regression techniques, which makes possible to obtain nine degree polynomial, and exponential equations. These equations whose variables consist of transmission of values, enable trace all the points of this curve with high precision. The data obtained from the algorithm were satisfactory with official data presented by the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) and can contribute as a practical tool for verification of shielding of veterinary facilities that require using Radiotherapy techniques and X-ray production

  2. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available

  3. Test program element II blanket and shield thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing, experimental facility survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ware, A.G.; Longhurst, G.R.

    1981-12-01

    This report presents results of a survey conducted by EG and G Idaho to determine facilities available to conduct thermal-hydraulic and thermomechanical testing for the Department of Energy Office of Fusion Energy First Wall/Blanket/Shield Engineering Test Program. In response to EG and G queries, twelve organizations (in addition to EG and G and General Atomic) expressed interest in providing experimental facilities. A variety of methods of supplying heat is available.

  4. Local Thermal Insulating Materials For Thermal Energy Storage ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Thermal insulation is one of the most important components of a thermal energy storage system. In this paper the thermal properties of selected potential local materials which can be used for high temperature insulation are presented. Thermal properties of seven different samples were measured. Samples consisted of: ...

  5. Experimental assessment on the thermal effects of the neutron shielding and heat-transfer fin of dual purpose casks on open pool fire

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bang, Kyoung-Sik; Yu, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Ju-Chan; Seo, Ki-Seog; Choi, Woo-Seok

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • An open pool fire test was performed to estimate not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin of the dual purpose cask. • The heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced, when the neutron shielding burns. • The surface temperatures are lower in the present of the heat transfer fins. • If inflammable material is used as the components of the cask, evaluating thermal integrity using the thermal test would be desirable. - Abstract: Dual purpose casks are used for storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. They must therefore satisfy the requirements prescribed in the Korea Nuclear Safety Security Commission Act 2014-50, the IAEA Safety Standard Series No. SSR-6, and US 10 CFR Part 71. These regulatory guidelines classify the dual purpose cask as a Type B package and state that a Type B package must be able to withstand a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. NS-4-FR is used as neutron shielding of the dual purpose cask. Heat transfer fins are embedded to enhance heat transfer from the cask body to the outer-shell because the thermal conductivity of NS-4-FR is not good. However, accurately simulating not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin in the thermal analysis is not easy. Therefore, an open pool fire test was conducted using a one-sixth slice of a real cask to estimate these effects at a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. The temperature at the central portion of the neutron shielding was lower when the neutron shielding in contact with the outer cask burned because the neutron shielding absorbed the surrounding latent heat as the neutron shielding burned. Therefore, the heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced. The surface temperature was lower when a heat transfer fin was installed because the high heat generated by the flame was transferred to the

  6. Experimental assessment on the thermal effects of the neutron shielding and heat-transfer fin of dual purpose casks on open pool fire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, Kyoung-Sik, E-mail: nksbang@kaeri.re.kr; Yu, Seung-Hwan; Lee, Ju-Chan; Seo, Ki-Seog; Choi, Woo-Seok

    2016-08-01

    Highlights: • An open pool fire test was performed to estimate not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin of the dual purpose cask. • The heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced, when the neutron shielding burns. • The surface temperatures are lower in the present of the heat transfer fins. • If inflammable material is used as the components of the cask, evaluating thermal integrity using the thermal test would be desirable. - Abstract: Dual purpose casks are used for storage and transport of spent nuclear fuel assemblies. They must therefore satisfy the requirements prescribed in the Korea Nuclear Safety Security Commission Act 2014-50, the IAEA Safety Standard Series No. SSR-6, and US 10 CFR Part 71. These regulatory guidelines classify the dual purpose cask as a Type B package and state that a Type B package must be able to withstand a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. NS-4-FR is used as neutron shielding of the dual purpose cask. Heat transfer fins are embedded to enhance heat transfer from the cask body to the outer-shell because the thermal conductivity of NS-4-FR is not good. However, accurately simulating not only the combustion effect of the neutron shielding but also the effect of the heat transfer fin in the thermal analysis is not easy. Therefore, an open pool fire test was conducted using a one-sixth slice of a real cask to estimate these effects at a temperature of 800 °C for a period of 30 min. The temperature at the central portion of the neutron shielding was lower when the neutron shielding in contact with the outer cask burned because the neutron shielding absorbed the surrounding latent heat as the neutron shielding burned. Therefore, the heat transfer to the inside of the dual purpose cask was reduced. The surface temperature was lower when a heat transfer fin was installed because the high heat generated by the flame was transferred to the

  7. Radiation production and absorption in human spacecraft shielding systems under high charge and energy Galactic Cosmic Rays: Material medium, shielding depth, and byproduct aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barthel, Joseph; Sarigul-Klijn, Nesrin

    2018-03-01

    Deep space missions such as the planned 2025 mission to asteroids require spacecraft shields to protect electronics and humans from adverse effects caused by the space radiation environment, primarily Galactic Cosmic Rays. This paper first reviews the theory on how these rays of charged particles interact with matter, and then presents a simulation for a 500 day Mars flyby mission using a deterministic based computer code. High density polyethylene and aluminum shielding materials at a solar minimum are considered. Plots of effective dose with varying shield depth, charged particle flux, and dose in silicon and human tissue behind shielding are presented.

  8. Graphite-ceramic rf Faraday-thermal shield and plasma limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, D.L.Q.; Hosea, J.C.

    1983-05-05

    The present invention is directed to a brazing procedure for joining a ceramic or glass material (e.g., Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ or Macor) to graphite. In particular, the present invention is directed to a novel brazing procedure for the production of a brazed ceramic graphite product useful as a Faraday shield. The brazed ceramic graphite Faraday shield of the present invention may be used in Magnetic Fusion Devices (e.g., Princeton Large Torus Tokamak) or other high temperature resistant apparatus.

  9. SPADA: a project to study the effectiveness of shielding materials in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pugliese, M.; Casolino, M.; Cerciello, V.

    2008-01-01

    The SPADA (SPAce Dosimetry for Astronauts) project is a part of an extensive teamwork that aims to optimize shielding solutions against space radiation. Shielding is indeed all irreplaceable tool to reduce, exposure of crews of future Moon and Mars missions. We concentrated our studies on two flexible materials, Kevlar (R) and Nextel (R), because of their ability to protect space infrastructure from micro meteoroids measured radiation hardness of these shielding materials and compared to polyethylene, generally acknowledged as the most effective space radiation shield with practical applications in spacecraft. Both flight test (on the International Space Station and on the Russian FOTON M3 rocket), with passive dosimeters and accelerator-based experiments have been performed. Accelerator tests using high-energy Fe ions have demonstrated that Kevlar is almost as effective as polyethylene in shielding heavy ions, while Nextel is a poor shield against, high-charge and -energy particles. Preliminary results from spaceflight, however, show that for the radiation environment ill low-Earth orbit. dominated by trapped protons, thin shields of Kevlar and Nextel provide limited reduction.

  10. Numerical modeling and experimental simulation of vapor shield formation and divertor material erosion for ITER typical plasma disruptions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuerz, H.; Arkhipov, N.I.; Bakhin, V.P.; Goel, B.; Hoebel, W.; Konkashbaev, I.; Landman, I.; Piazza, G.; Safronov, V.M.; Sherbakov, A.R.; Toporkov, D.A.; Zhitlukhin, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    The high divertor heat load during a tokamak plasma disruption results in sudden evaporation of a thin layer of divertor plate material, which acts as vapor shield and protects the target from further excessive evaporation. Formation and effectiveness of the vapor shield are theoretically modeled and experimentally investigated at the 2MK-200 facility under conditions simulating the thermal quench phase of ITER tokamak plasma disruptions. In the optical wavelength range C II, C III, C IV emission lines for graphite, Cu I, Cu II lines for copper and continuum radiation for tungsten samples are observed in the target plasma. The plasma expands along the magnetic field lines with velocities of (4±1)x10 6 cm/s for graphite and 10 5 cm/s for copper. Modeling was done with a radiation hydrodynamics code in one-dimensional planar geometry. The multifrequency radiation transport is treated in flux limited diffusion and in forward reverse transport approximation. In these first modeling studies the overall shielding efficiency for carbon and tungsten defined as ratio of the incident energy and the vaporization energy for power densities of 10 MW/cm 2 exceeds a factor of 30. The vapor shield is established within 2 μs, the power fraction to the target after 10 μs is below 3% and reaches in the stationary state after about 20 μs a value of around 1.5%. ((orig.))

  11. Effectiveness of construction materials and some minerals used as radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khunarak, P.; Bunnak, S.

    1988-01-01

    There are many kinds of ores in Thailand, some large amount of them are cheap and easy to obtain possess shielding properties for gamma radiation. These ores are baryte, illmenite, galena, scheelite, wolframite pyrite, cerrusite. Besides, building structure materials are also introduced for shielding properties study by using Co-60, Cs-137 and Ra-226 as gamma radiation sources in the experiments. The results turn out that those high density ores will possess a better shielding property than the low density ores. Radiation measurement equipment is G.M. tube connected to rate meter

  12. Shielding practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sauermann, P.F.

    1985-08-01

    The basis of shielding practice against external irradiation is shown in a simple way. For most sources of radiation (point sources) occurring in shielding practice, the basic data are given, mainly in the form of tables, which are required to solve the shielding problems. The application of these data is explained and discussed using practical examples. Thickness of shielding panes of glove boxes for α and β radiation; shielding of sealed γ-radiography sources; shielding of a Co-60 radiation source, and of the manipulator panels for hot cells; damping factors for γ radiation and neutrons; shielding of fast and thermal neutrons, and of bremsstrahlung (X-ray tubes, Kr-85 pressure gas cylinders, 42 MeV betatrons, 20 MeV linacs); two-fold shielding (lead glass windows for hot cells, 14 MeV neutron generators); shielding against scattered radiation. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Time-domain simulation and waveform reconstruction for shielding effectiveness of materials against electromagnetic pulse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu, Xiao-feng; Chen, Xiang; Wei, Ming

    2013-01-01

    Shielding effectiveness (SE) of materials of current testing standards is often carried out by using continuous-wave measurement and amplitude-frequency characteristics curve is used to characterize the results. However, with in-depth study of high-power electromagnetic pulse (EMP) interference, it was discovered that only by frequency-domain SE of materials cannot be completely characterized by shielding performance of time-domain pulsed-field. And there is no uniform testing methods and standards of SE of materials against EMP. In this paper, the method of minimum phase transfer function is used to reconstruct shielded time-domain waveform based on the analysis of the waveform reconstruction method. Pulse of plane waves through an infinite planar material is simulated by using CST simulation software. The reconstructed waveform and simulation waveform is compared. The results show that the waveform reconstruction method based on the minimum phase can be well estimated EMP waveform through the infinite planar materials.

  14. Self-shielding coefficient and thermal flux depression factor of voluminous sample in neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noorddin Ibrahim; Rosnie Akang

    2009-01-01

    Full text: One of the major problems encountered during the irradiation of large inhomogeneous samples in performing activation analysis using neutron is the perturbation of the neutron field due to absorption and scattering of neutron within the sample as well as along the neutron guide in the case of prompt gamma activation analysis. The magnitude of this perturbation shown by self-shielding coefficient and flux depression depend on several factors including the average neutron energy, the size and shape of the sample, as well as the macroscopic absorption cross section of the sample. In this study, we use Monte Carlo N-Particle codes to simulate the variation of neutron self-shielding coefficient and thermal flux depression factor as a function of the macroscopic thermal absorption cross section. The simulation works was carried out using the high performance computing facility available at UTM while the experimental work was performed at the tangential beam port of Reactor TRIGA PUSPATI, Malaysia Nuclear Agency. The neutron flux measured along the beam port is found to be in good agreement with the simulated data. Our simulation results also reveal that total flux perturbation factor decreases as the value of absorption increases. This factor is close to unity for low absorbing sample and tends towards zero for strong absorber. In addition, sample with long mean chord length produces smaller flux perturbation than the shorter mean chord length. When comparing both the graphs of self-shielding factor and total disturbance, we can conclude that the total disturbance of the thermal neutron flux on the large samples is dominated by the self-shielding effect. (Author)

  15. The ITER thermal shields for the magnet system: Design evolution and analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bykov, V.; Krasikov, Yu.; Grigoriev, S.; Komarov, V.; Krylov, V.; Labusov, A.; Pyrjaev, V.; Chiocchio, S.; Smirnov, V.; Sorin, V.; Tanchuk, V.

    2005-01-01

    The thermal shield (TS) system provides the required reduction of thermal loads to the cold structures operating at 4.5 K. This paper presents the rationale for the TS design evolution, details of the recent modifications that affect the TS cooling panels, the central TS ports and support system, interface labyrinths and TS structural joints. The modern results of thermal-hydraulic, thermal, seismic, static and dynamic structural analyses, that involve sub-modeling and sub-structuring finite element analysis techniques, are also reported. The modifications result in considerable reduction of TS mass, surface area and heat loads to/from the TS, simplification of TS assembly procedure and in-cryostat maintenance

  16. Investigation of ionizing radiation shielding effectiveness of decorative building materials used in Bangladeshi dwellings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yesmin, Sabina; Sonker Barua, Bijoy; Uddin Khandaker, Mayeen; Tareque Chowdhury, Mohammed; Kamal, Masud; Rashid, M.A.; Miah, M.M.H.; Bradley, D.A.

    2017-01-01

    Following the rapid growing per capita income, a major portion of Bangladeshi dwellers is upgrading their non-brick houses by rod-cement-concrete materials and simultaneously curious to decorate the houses using luxurious marble stones. Present study was undertaken to investigate the gamma-ray attenuation co-efficient of decorative marble materials leading to their suitability as shielding of ionizing radiation. A number of commercial grades decorative marble stones were collected from home and abroad following their large-scale uses. A well-shielded HPGe γ-ray spectrometer combined with associated electronics was used to evaluate the mass attenuation coefficients of the studied materials for high energy photons. Some allied parameters such as half-value layer and radiation protection efficacy of the investigated marbles were calculated. The results showed that among the studied samples, the marble ‘Carrara’ imported from Italy is suitable to be used as radiation shielding material. - Highlights: • Studies of decorative building materials for shielding of ionizing radiation. • High energy photon beam were used to obtain various interaction properties. • Marble stone ‘Carrara’ from Italy shows suitability to be used as shielding material.

  17. Radiation shield for PWR reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esenov, Amra; Pustovgar, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    One of the chief structures of a reactor pit is a 'dry' shield. Setting up a 'dry' shield includes the technologically complex process of thermal processing of serpentinite concrete. Modern advances in the area of materials technology permit avoiding this complex and demanding procedure, and this significantly decreases the duration, labor intensity, and cost of setting it up. (orig.)

  18. High thermal conductivity materials for thermal management applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broido, David A.; Reinecke, Thomas L.; Lindsay, Lucas R.

    2018-05-29

    High thermal conductivity materials and methods of their use for thermal management applications are provided. In some embodiments, a device comprises a heat generating unit (304) and a thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) in thermal communication with the heat generating unit (304) for conducting heat generated by the heat generating unit (304) away from the heat generating unit (304), the thermally conductive unit (306, 308, 310) comprising a thermally conductive compound, alloy or composite thereof. The thermally conductive compound may include Boron Arsenide, Boron Antimonide, Germanium Carbide and Beryllium Selenide.

  19. A Reliability Comparison of Classical and Stochastic Thickness Margin Approaches to Address Material Property Uncertainties for the Orion Heat Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepka, Steve; Vander Kam, Jeremy; McGuire, Kathy

    2018-01-01

    The Orion Thermal Protection System (TPS) margin process uses a root-sum-square approach with branches addressing trajectory, aerothermodynamics, and material response uncertainties in ablator thickness design. The material response branch applies a bond line temperature reduction between the Avcoat ablator and EA9394 adhesive by 60 C (108 F) from its peak allowed value of 260 C (500 F). This process is known as the Bond Line Temperature Material Margin (BTMM) and is intended to cover material property and performance uncertainties. The value of 60 C (108 F) is a constant, applied at any spacecraft body location and for any trajectory. By varying only material properties in a random (monte carlo) manner, the perl-based script mcCHAR is used to investigate the confidence interval provided by the BTMM. In particular, this study will look at various locations on the Orion heat shield forebody for a guided and an abort (ballistic) trajectory.

  20. Light and Strong Hierarchical Porous SiC Foam for Efficient Electromagnetic Interference Shielding and Thermal Insulation at Elevated Temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Caiyun; Wang, Zhenfeng; Wu, Lina; Zhang, Xiaochen; Wang, Huan; Wang, Zhijiang

    2017-09-06

    A novel light but strong SiC foam with hierarchical porous architecture was fabricated by using dough as raw material via carbonization followed by carbothermal reduction with silicon source. A significant synergistic effect is achieved by embedding meso- and nanopores in a microsized porous skeleton, which endows the SiC foam with high-performance electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding, thermal insulation, and mechanical properties. The microsized skeleton withstands high stress. The meso- and nanosized pores enhance multiple reflection of the incident electromagnetic waves and elongate the path of heat transfer. For the hierarchical porous SiC foam with 72.8% porosity, EMI shielding can be higher than 20 dB, and specific EMI effectiveness exceeds 24.8 dB·cm 3 ·g -1 at a frequency of 11 GHz at 25-600 °C, which is 3 times higher than that of dense SiC ceramic. The thermal conductivity reaches as low as 0.02 W·m -1 ·K -1 , which is comparable to that of aerogel. The compressive strength is as high as 9.8 MPa. Given the chemical and high-temperature stability of SiC, the fabricated SiC foam is a promising candidate for modern aircraft and automobile applications.

  1. Handleable shapes of thermal insulation material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J. T.

    1989-01-17

    Handleable and machineable shapes of thermal insulation material are made by compacting finely divided thermal insulation material into the cells of a reinforcing honeycomb insulation material into the cells of a reinforcing honeycomb structure. The finely divided thermal insulation material may be, for example, silica aerogel, pyrogenic silica, carbon black, silica gel, volatilised silica, calcium silicate, vermiculate or perlite, or finely divided metal oxides such as alumina or titania. The finely divided thermal insulation material may include an infra-red opacifier and/or reinforcing fibres. The reinforcing honeycomb structure may be made from, for example, metals such as aluminium foil, inorganic materials such as ceramics, organic materials such as plastics materials, woven fabrics or paper. A rigidiser may be employed. The shapes of thermal insulation material are substantially rigid and may be machines, for example by mechanical or laser cutting devices, or may be formed, for example by rolling, into curved or other shaped materials. 12 figs.

  2. Shielding plugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makishima, Kenji.

    1986-01-01

    Purpose: In shielding plugs of an LMFBR type reactor, to restrain natural convection of heat in an annular space between a thermal shield layer and a shield shell, to prevent the lowering of heat-insulation performance, and to alleviate a thermal stress in a reactor container and the shield shell. Constitution: A ring-like leaf spring split in the direction of height is disposed in an annular space between a thermal shield layer and a shield shell. In consequence, the space is partitioned in the direction of height and, therefore, if axial temperature conditions and space width are the same and the space is low, the natural convection is hard to occur. Thus the rise of upper surface temperature of the shielding plugs can prevent the lowering of the heat insulation performance which will result in the increment of shielding plug cooling capacity, thereby improving reliability. In the meantime, since there is mounted an earthquake-resisting support, the thermal shield layer will move for a slight gap in case of an earthquake, being supported by the earthquake-resisting support, and the movement of the thermal shield layer is restricted, thereby maintaining integrity without increasing the stroke of the ring-like spring. (Kawakami, Y.)

  3. Investigation of ionizing radiation shielding effectiveness of decorative building materials used in Bangladeshi dwellings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesmin, Sabina; Sonker Barua, Bijoy; Uddin Khandaker, Mayeen; Tareque Chowdhury, Mohammed; Kamal, Masud; Rashid, M. A.; Miah, M. M. H.; Bradley, D. A.

    2017-11-01

    Following the rapid growing per capita income, a major portion of Bangladeshi dwellers is upgrading their non-brick houses by rod-cement-concrete materials and simultaneously curious to decorate the houses using luxurious marble stones. Present study was undertaken to investigate the gamma-ray attenuation co-efficient of decorative marble materials leading to their suitability as shielding of ionizing radiation. A number of commercial grades decorative marble stones were collected from home and abroad following their large-scale uses. A well-shielded HPGe γ-ray spectrometer combined with associated electronics was used to evaluate the mass attenuation coefficients of the studied materials for high energy photons. Some allied parameters such as half-value layer and radiation protection efficacy of the investigated marbles were calculated. The results showed that among the studied samples, the marble 'Carrara' imported from Italy is suitable to be used as radiation shielding material.

  4. Decision-making methodology of optimal shielding materials by using fuzzy linear programming

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanai, Y.; Miura, T.; Hirao, Y.

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of our studies are to select materials and determine the ratio of constituent materials as the first stage of optimum shielding design to suit the individual requirements of nuclear reactors, reprocessing facilities, casks for shipping spent fuel, etc. The parameters of the shield optimization are cost, space, weight and some shielding properties such as activation rates or individual irradiation and cooling time, and total dose rate for neutrons (including secondary gamma ray) and for primary gamma ray. Using conventional two-valued logic (i.e. crisp) approaches, huge combination calculations are needed to identify suitable materials for optimum shielding design. Also, re-computation is required for minor changes, as the approach does not react sensitively to the computation result. Present approach using a fuzzy linear programming method is much of the decision-making toward the satisfying solution might take place in fuzzy environment. And it can quickly and easily provide a guiding principle of optimal selection of shielding materials under the above-mentioned conditions. The possibility or reducing radiation effects by optimizing the ratio of constituent materials is investigated. (author)

  5. Electromagnetic interference shielding effectiveness of microcellular polyimide/in situ thermally reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotubes nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hongli; Yu, Zhi; Wu, Peng; Zou, Huawei; Liu, Pengbo

    2018-03-01

    A simple and effective method was adopted to fabricate microcellular polyimide (PI)/reduced graphene oxide (GO)/multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) nanocomposites. Firstly, microcellular poly (amic acid) (PAA)/GO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were prepared through solvent evaporation induced phase separation. In this process, PAA and dibutyl phthalate (DBP) co-dissolved in N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMAc) underwent phase separation with DMAc evaporating, and DBP microdomains were formed in continuous PAA phase. Subsequently, PAA was thermally imidized and simultaneously GO was in situ reduced. After DBP was removed, the microcellular PI/reduced GO (RGO)/MWCNTs nanocomposites were finally obtained. When the initial filler loading was 8 wt%, the electrical conductivity of microcellular PI/RGO, PI/MWCNTs and PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were 0.05, 0.02 and 1.87 S·m-1, respectively, and the electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding efficiency (SE) of microcellular PI/RGO, PI/MWCNTs and PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites were 13.7-15.1, 13.0-14.3 and 16.6-18.2 dB, respectively. The synergistic effect between RGO and MWCNTs enhanced both the electrical conductivity and EMI shielding performance of the microcellular PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposites. The dominating EMI shielding mechanism for these materials was microwave absorption. While the initial loading of GO and MWCNT was 8 wt%, the microcellular PI/RGO/MWCNTs nanocomposite (500 μm thickness) had extremely high specific EMI SE value of 755-823 dB·cm2·g-1. Its thermal stability was also obviously improved, the 5% weight loss temperature in nitrogen was 548 °C. In addition, it also possessed a high Young's modulus of 789 MPa.

  6. Optimization of the outer support in the ITER lower cryostat thermal shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, C.H., E-mail: chnoh@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Chung, W., E-mail: whchung@nfri.re.kr [National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon, 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, J., E-mail: jongmin.lim@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, B.C., E-mail: bclee@kaist.ac.kr [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-338 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Highlights: • Design methodology for the ITER lower cryostat thermal shield support is described. • Design optimization is performed using the kriging meta-model. • Single plate support design is proposed as an alternative design. • Proposed design has 24% reduced weight compared with the initial design. - Abstract: ITER Lower Cryostat Thermal Shield (LCTS) is fixed to the cryostat floor by a thin flexible plate support. Double plate made of titanium alloy is adopted as a reference design. Double plate is effective to get structural reliability for the high inertia load and buckling load. Thin plate with titanium alloy has good flexibility to the thermal movement and reduces conduction heat load from cryostat floor to the thermal shield. Double plate support has enough structural margin. In addition, titanium alloy requires high cost for fabrication. Design optimization is required to save manufacturing expenses. In addition to the mass minimization, design modification from double plate to single plate is proposed, because welding of double plate is difficult due to narrow gap between two plates. In this paper, design process to find optimal design of LCTS support is described. The sensitivities of the design variables such as thickness, height, width and gap between two plates are investigated. Optimal design solution is obtained by Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) algorithm based on the meta-model developed by randomly selected experimental samples. Through the design optimization process, optimal designs of the LCTS support are obtained. The weight of the support plates can be reduced to 24% compared with the initial design.

  7. Optimization of the outer support in the ITER lower cryostat thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, C.H.; Chung, W.; Lim, J.; Lee, B.C.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Design methodology for the ITER lower cryostat thermal shield support is described. • Design optimization is performed using the kriging meta-model. • Single plate support design is proposed as an alternative design. • Proposed design has 24% reduced weight compared with the initial design. - Abstract: ITER Lower Cryostat Thermal Shield (LCTS) is fixed to the cryostat floor by a thin flexible plate support. Double plate made of titanium alloy is adopted as a reference design. Double plate is effective to get structural reliability for the high inertia load and buckling load. Thin plate with titanium alloy has good flexibility to the thermal movement and reduces conduction heat load from cryostat floor to the thermal shield. Double plate support has enough structural margin. In addition, titanium alloy requires high cost for fabrication. Design optimization is required to save manufacturing expenses. In addition to the mass minimization, design modification from double plate to single plate is proposed, because welding of double plate is difficult due to narrow gap between two plates. In this paper, design process to find optimal design of LCTS support is described. The sensitivities of the design variables such as thickness, height, width and gap between two plates are investigated. Optimal design solution is obtained by Sequential Quadratic Programming (SQP) algorithm based on the meta-model developed by randomly selected experimental samples. Through the design optimization process, optimal designs of the LCTS support are obtained. The weight of the support plates can be reduced to 24% compared with the initial design.

  8. Measurements of nuclear properties of shielding materials and nuclear fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorovic, J.

    1961-12-01

    The objective of this study was determine total cross sections in resonant, thermal and sub thermal neutron energy range, i.e. from few tens of electron volts to 10 -4 . First part of this report contains theoretical results which enable obtaining parameters of nuclides resonant level from experimental data. in some cases it is possible to calculate total scattering cross section, coherent and incoherent cross section. Second part covers the description of transmission method for measuring the total cross section

  9. Hydramite II screening tests of potential bremsstrahlung converter debris shield materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Hedemann, M.A.; Stark, M.A.

    1986-03-01

    Results of a brief test series aimed at screening a number of potential bremsstrahlung converter debris shield materials are reported. These tests were run on Sandia National Laboratories' Hydramite II accelerator using a diode configuration which produces a pinched electron beam. The materials tested include: (1) laminated Kevlar 49/polyester and E-glass/polyester composites, (2) a low density laminated Kevlar 49 composite, and (3) two types of through-the-thickness reinforced Kevlar 49 composites. As expected, tests using laminated Kevlar 49/polyester shields showed that shield permanent set (i.e., permanent deflection) increased with increasing tantalum conversion foil thickness and decreased with increasing shield thickness. The through-the-thickness reinforced composites developed localized, but severe, back surface damage. The laminated composites displayed little back surface damage, although extensive internal matrix cracking and ply delaminations were generated. Roughly the same degree of permanent set was produced in shields made from the low density Kevlar 49 composite and the Kevlar 49/polyester. The E-glass reinforced shields exhibited relatively low levels of permanent set

  10. Determination of boron in Jabroc wood used as a shielding material in nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Manisha, V.; Venkatesh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Jabroc are non-impregnated, densified wood laminates developed commercially for a wide range of industrial applications. Jabroc can be used with other neutron shielding materials such as Lead to form complex shielding structures. Its relative light weight and cleanliness in handling are additional features that make it a suitable candidate for the standard design of neutron shielding equipment. Jabroc can also be impregnated with Boron up to a maximum of 4% to be used in areas where Gamma radiation produced on Neutron capture reaches unacceptable dose rates. Boron impregnated Jabroc wood finds application in TAPS 3 and 4 as a shielding material for the Ion Chambers and the Horizontal Flux Units (HFU). The shielding property of this material is optimized by incorporating requisite amount of boron in wood. Boron content in this material has to be determined accurately prior to its use in the nuclear reactors. In this work a method was standardized to determine boron in Jabroc wood samples to check for conformance to specifications. The wood sample flakes were wetted with saturated barium hydroxide solution and dries under IR. The sample was ashed in a muffle furnace at 600℃ for 2 h

  11. Radiation distribution through serpentine concrete using local materials and its application as a reactor biological shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kansouh, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► New serpentine concrete was made and examined as a reactor biological shield. ► Ilmenite–limonite concrete is a better reactor biological shield. ► New serpentine concrete is a better reactor fast neutrons shield than ordinary and hematite–serpentine concretes. ► Serpentine concrete has lower properties as a reactor total gamma rays shields. - Abstract: In the present work attempt has been made to estimate the shielding parameters of the new serpentine concrete (density = 2.4 g/cm 3 ) using local materials on the shielding parameters for two types of heat resistant concretes, namely hematite–serpentine (density = 2.5 g/cm 3 ) and ilmenite–limonite (density = 2.9 g/cm 3 ). Shielding parameters for ordinary concrete (density = 2.3 g/cm 3 ) were also discussed. These parameters were determined experimentally for serpentine concrete and compared with previously published values for other concretes, which had also been obtained using local materials. The leakage spectra of reactor fast neutrons and total gamma photon beams from cylindrical samples of these concrete shields were also investigated using a collimated beam from ET-RR-1 reactor. A neutron–gamma spectrometer was used in order to obtain pulse height spectra of reactor fast neutrons and the total gamma rays leakage through the investigated concrete samples. These spectra were utilized to obtain the energy spectra required in these investigations. Removal cross section Σ R (E n ) and linear attenuation coefficient μ(E g ) for reactor fast neutrons and total gamma rays and their relative coefficients were evaluated and presented. Measured results were compared with those previously measured for other concretes. The results show that ilmenite–limonite concrete is a better reactor biological shield than the other three concretes. Serpentine concrete under investigation is a better reactor fast neutrons shield than ordinary and hematite–serpentine concretes. Serpentine concrete

  12. Thermal-structural analysis for ITER in-wall shielding block

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hao Junchuan; Song Yuntao; Wu Weiyue; Du Shuangsong; Wang, X.; Ioki, K.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► IWS blocks shall withstand various types of mechanical loads including EM loads, inertial loads and thermal loads. ► Due to the complicated geometry, the finite element method is the suitable tool to solve the problem. ► Contact element has been selected to simulate the friction between the different components. ► At baking phase, secondary stresses due to preloading and temperature difference predominate in the total stress. ► At plasma operation phase, secondary stresses due to preloading and thermal loads were deducted from the total stresses. - Abstract: In order to verify the design strength of the in-wall shielding (IWS) blocks of the ITER, thermal-structural analyses of one IWS block under vacuum vessel (VV) baking and plasma operation conditions have been respectively performed with finite element (FE) method. Among the complicated operation scenarios of the ITER, two critical types of combined loads required by the load specification of IWS were applied on the shielding block. The stress of the block is judged by American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) criterion. Results show that the structure of this block has enough safety margin, and it also supplies detailed information of the stress distribution in concerned region under certain loads.

  13. Determination of material and its thickness for Cs-137 gamma source shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tukiman

    2008-01-01

    Its has been determined the shielding material and its thickness necessarily conducted due to every material will have different half-thickness characteristics, and by the selection a suitable material and its thickness will be obtained. Half-thickness of any material is the ability of the material at a certain thickness to absorb any radiation intensity so that the intensity becomes half of its source. Sample materials to be used are concrete, wood, and lead with their thickness varied. From experiment data and theoretical computation can be concluded that lead is the suitable material for shielding with the value of HVT for gamma radiation 0,732 cm. For wood and concrete will give half-thickness of 11,0 cm and 3,164 cm respectively. (author)

  14. Effectiveness of shield materials in the design of the PFBR irradiated fuel subassembly shipping cask

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radhakrishnan, G.

    2003-01-01

    Fuel subassemblies are irradiated inside the reactor core till they achieve the required burn up and after that they are cooled to permissible decay power level in in-vessel and ex-vessel storage places. Subsequently they are transported to reprocessing plants by means of shipping casks. Shield for the shipping cask has to be designed such a way that it has to comply with the ICRP recommended dose levels of less than 2 mSv/h on contact at the outer surface of the cask and less than 100 mSv/h at 1 m distance from the outer surface of the cask. In this paper, shield design of a typical PFBR irradiated fuel subassembly, which can transport three subassemblies at a time, is narrated. Considering the neutron and fission product and induced gamma rays emitted by typical PFBR irradiated core central subassembly subjected to a maximum burn up, as the source term shield design optimizations have been done. One-dimensional discrete ordinates transport theory computer code ANISN and point kernel computer code QAD-CGGP have been used in complement to carry out the shield design optimizations. Cast-iron, carbon steel, stainless steel 304 and lead and permali have been considered for shield materials. Shield requirements on top, bottom and along the axial height of the shipping cask have also been estimated. (author)

  15. Radiation attenuation by lead and nonlead materials used in radiation shielding garments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCaffrey, J. P.; Shen, H.; Downton, B.; Mainegra-Hing, E.

    2007-01-01

    The attenuating properties of several types of lead (Pb)-based and non-Pb radiation shielding materials were studied and a correlation was made of radiation attenuation, materials properties, calculated spectra and ambient dose equivalent. Utilizing the well-characterized x-ray and gamma ray beams at the National Research Council of Canada, air kerma measurements were used to compare a variety of commercial and pre-commercial radiation shielding materials over mean energy ranges from 39 to 205 keV. The EGSnrc Monte Carlo user code cavity.cpp was extended to provide computed spectra for a variety of elements that have been used as a replacement for Pb in radiation shielding garments. Computed air kerma values were compared with experimental values and with the SRS-30 catalogue of diagnostic spectra available through the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine Report 78. In addition to garment materials, measurements also included pure Pb sheets, allowing direct comparisons to the common industry standards of 0.25 and 0.5 mm 'lead equivalent'. The parameter 'lead equivalent' is misleading, since photon attenuation properties for all materials (including Pb) vary significantly over the energy spectrum, with the largest variations occurring in the diagnostic imaging range. Furthermore, air kerma measurements are typically made to determine attenuation properties without reference to the measures of biological damage such as ambient dose equivalent, which also vary significantly with air kerma over the diagnostic imaging energy range. A single material or combination cannot provide optimum shielding for all energy ranges. However, appropriate choice of materials for a particular energy range can offer significantly improved shielding per unit mass over traditional Pb-based materials

  16. Dosimetric characteristics of Thermo-Shield material for orthovoltage photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bahmaid, Mohammad; Kim, Siyong; Liu, Chihray R.; Palta, Jatinder R.

    2003-01-01

    Conventionally, lead has been used for field shaping in orthovoltage radiation therapy. Recently, a compensator material named Thermo-Shield was presented for field shaping in electron beams. Thermo-Shield is composed of nontoxic, high atomic weight metal particles dispersed in a thermoplastic matrix. It is manually moldable and conforms to human anatomy or any shape at temperatures of 108-132 degree sign F. It is reusable and can be continuously reshaped to better fit the treatment field. Dosimetric characteristics of thermoplastic material were studied for Philips RT250 orthovoltage photon beams ranging from 75 to 250 kVp. It was found that Thermo-Shield should be four to five times thicker than lead to achieve the same transmission (less than 5%). However, it did not cause significant degradation in penumbra. Clinical procedures for use are discussed

  17. Electromagnetic shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzeng, Wen-Shian V.

    1991-01-01

    Electromagnetic interference (EMI) shielding materials are well known in the art in forms such as gaskets, caulking compounds, adhesives, coatings and the like for a variety of EMI shielding purposes. In the past, where high shielding performance is necessary, EMI shielding has tended to use silver particles or silver coated copper particles dispersed in a resin binder. More recently, aluminum core silver coated particles have been used to reduce costs while maintaining good electrical and physical properties. (author). 8 figs

  18. Potential Use of In Situ Material Composites such as Regolith/Polyethylene for Shielding Space Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Corey A.; Gersey, Buddy; Bacon, Eugene; Johnson, Quincy; Zhang, Ye; Norman, Jullian; Foley, Ijette; Wilkins, Rick; Zhou, Jianren; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    NASA has an extensive program for studying materials and methods for the shielding of astronauts to reduce the effects of space radiation when on the surfaces of the Moon and Mars, especially in the use of in situ materials native to the destination reducing the expense of materials transport. The most studied material from the Moon is Lunar regolith and has been shown to be as efficient as aluminum for shielding purposes (1). The addition of hydrogenous materials such as polyethylene should increase shielding effectiveness and provide mechanical properties necessary of structural materials (2). The neutron radiation shielding effectiveness of polyethylene/regolith stimulant (JSC-1A) composites were studied using confluent human fibroblast cell cultures exposed to a beam of high-energy spallation neutrons at the 30deg-left beam line (ICE house) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center. At this angle, the radiation spectrum mimics the energy spectrum of secondary neutrons generated in the upper atmosphere and encountered when aboard spacecraft and high-altitude aircraft. Cell samples were exposed in series either directly to the neutron beam, within a habitat created using regolith composite blocks, or behind 25 g/sq cm of loose regolith bulk material. In another experiment, cells were also exposed in series directly to the neutron beam in T-25 flasks completely filled with either media or water up to a depth of 20 cm to test shielding effectiveness versus depth and investigate the possible influence of secondary particle generation. All samples were sent directly back to JSC for sub-culturing and micronucleus analysis. This presentation is of work performed in collaboration with the NASA sponsored Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M.

  19. Overview of thermal conductivity models of anisotropic thermal insulation materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skurikhin, A. V.; Kostanovsky, A. V.

    2017-11-01

    Currently, the most of existing materials and substances under elaboration are anisotropic. It makes certain difficulties in the study of heat transfer process. Thermal conductivity of the materials can be characterized by tensor of the second order. Also, the parallelism between the temperature gradient vector and the density of heat flow vector is violated in anisotropic thermal insulation materials (TIM). One of the most famous TIM is a family of integrated thermal insulation refractory material («ITIRM»). The main component ensuring its properties is the «inflated» vermiculite. Natural mineral vermiculite is ground into powder state, fired by gas burner for dehydration, and its precipitate is then compressed. The key feature of thus treated batch of vermiculite is a package structure. The properties of the material lead to a slow heating of manufactured products due to low absorption and high radiation reflection. The maximum of reflection function is referred to infrared spectral region. A review of current models of heat propagation in anisotropic thermal insulation materials is carried out, as well as analysis of their thermal and optical properties. A theoretical model, which allows to determine the heat conductivity «ITIRM», can be useful in the study of thermal characteristics such as specific heat capacity, temperature conductivity, and others. Materials as «ITIRM» can be used in the metallurgy industry, thermal energy and nuclear power-engineering.

  20. Rectification of leak from upper aluminium thermal shield cooling water inlet line of Cirus reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Anil; Joshi, N.S.; Kharpate, A.V.; Marik, S.K.

    2006-01-01

    During 1994, a small water leak was observed from the upper aluminium thermal shield of Cirus reactor. Detailed investigations revealed that the leakage was from the weld joint of one of the 1 1/4 inch NB Sch. 80 coolant inlet pipes connected to the upper aluminium thermal shield. The location of the leak was identified by monitoring the stabilised water level in the vertical inlet pipe under stagnant condition. The exact location was identified by installing an inflatable seal arrangement inside the leaky pipe and inflating the seal at different elevations to isolate the leaky location and ensuring that the leak was completely stopped. This location was about 15 feet below the operating floor of the reactor. The pipe was visually inspected with the help of a fibre-scope to assess the condition of the inner surface. Eddy current testing was also carried out for volumetric examination. This revealed one more localised flaw on the outer surface little above the leaky joint. A hollow plug, with expandable rings, having C-shaped cross section at both the ends and a straight portion in the middle to cover the defective region, was developed and qualified in a mock-up station after extensive trials. In view of the site constraints, a flexible hollow link assembly was engineered, for installing the plug remotely. The inner surface of the pipe was cleaned using an emery brush and a deburring tool. The plug was then installed covering the leak area and the rings were expanded by remote tightening. The shield was hydro-tested satisfactorily. (author)

  1. Neutron data error estimate of criticality calculations for lattice in shielding containers with metal fissionable materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasil'ev, A.P.; Krepkij, A.S.; Lukin, A.V.; Mikhal'kova, A.G.; Orlov, A.I.; Perezhogin, V.D.; Samojlova, L.Yu.; Sokolov, Yu.A.; Terekhin, V.A.; Chernukhin, Yu.I.

    1991-01-01

    Critical mass experiments were performed using assemblies which simulated one-dimensional lattice consisting of shielding containers with metal fissile materials. Calculations of the criticality of the above assemblies were carried out using the KLAN program with the BAS neutron constants. Errors in the calculations of the criticality for one-, two-, and three-dimensional lattices are estimated. 3 refs.; 1 tab

  2. ORNL shielded facilities capable of remote handling of highly radioactive beta--gamma emitting materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitson, W.R.

    1977-09-01

    A survey of ORNL facilities having adequate shielding and containment for the remote handling of experimental quantities of highly radioactive beta-gamma emitting materials is summarized. Portions of the detailed descriptions of these facilities previously published in ORNL/TM-1268 are still valid and are repeated

  3. Neutron activation of building materials used in the reactor shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, A.T.; Perez, G.; D'Alessandro, K.

    1993-01-01

    Cuban concretes and their main components (mineral aggregates and cement) were investigated through long-lived activation products induced by neutrons from a reactor. The multielemental content in the materials studied was obtained by neutron activation analysis in an IBR-2 reactor and gamma activation analysis in an MT-25 microtron from Join Institute of Nuclear Research of Dubna. After irradiation of building materials for 30 years by a neutron flow of unitary density, induced radioactivity was calculated according to experimental data. The comparative evaluation of different concretes aggregates and two types of cement related to the activation properties is discussed

  4. Phase change material thermal capacitor clothing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  5. Neutron shielding material and process for its manufacture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tadokoro, S.I; Segawa, H.

    1980-01-01

    The artificial resin sheets are optically transparent and mechanically strong. They are the polymerisation product of methyl methacrylate and a boric acid ester, for example. The boron content of the material is between 1% and 6% by weight (many examples). (RW) [de

  6. Self-closing shielded container for use with radioactive materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J.E.

    A container for storage of radioactive material comprises a container body and a closure member. The closure member is coupled to the container body to enable the closure body to move automatically from a first position (e.g., closed) to a second position (open).

  7. Thermal performance of a depleted uranium shielded storage, transportation, and disposal package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for management and disposal of large quantities of depleted uranium (DU) in the DOE complex. Viable economic options for the use and eventual disposal of the material are needed. One possible option is the use of DU as shielding material for vitrified Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) storage, transportation, and disposal packages. Use of DU as a shielding material provides the potential benefit of disposing of significant quantities of DU during the DHLW storage and disposal process. Two DU package concepts have been developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The first concept is the Storage/Disposal plus Transportation (S/D+T) package. The S/D+T package consists of two major components: a storage/disposal (S/D) container and a transportation overpack. The second concept is the S/D/T package which is an integral storage, transportation, and disposal package. The package concept considered in this analysis is the S/D+T package with seven DHLW waste canisters. The S/D+T package provides shielding and containment for the DHLW waste canisters. The S/D container is intended to be used as an on-site storage and repository disposal container. In this analysis, the S/D container is constructed from a combination of stainless steel and DU. Other material combinations, such as mild steel and DU, are potential candidates. The transportation overpack is used to transport the S/D containers to a final geological repository and is not included in this analysis

  8. Bulk-shield design for the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carter, L.L.; Mann, F.M.; Morford, R.J.; Johnson, D.L.; Huang, S.T.

    1982-07-01

    The accelerator-based Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) facility will provide a high-fluence, fusion-like radiation environment for the testing of materials. While the neutron spectrum produced in the forward direction by the 35 MeV deuterons incident upon a flowing lithium target is characterized by a broad peak around 14 MeV, a high energy tail extends up to about 50 MeV. Some shield design considerations are reviewed

  9. X-Ray Micro-Tomography Applied to Nasa's Materials Research: Heat Shields, Parachutes and Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Francesco; Borner, Arnaud; Ferguson, Joseph C.; Mansour, Nagi N.; Stern, Eric C.; Barnard, Harold S.; Macdowell, Alastair A.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray micro-tomography is used to support the research on materials carried out at NASA Ames Research Center. The technique is applied to a variety of applications, including the ability to characterize heat shield materials for planetary entry, to study the Earth- impacting asteroids, and to improve broadcloths of spacecraft parachutes. From micro-tomography images, relevant morphological and transport properties are determined and validated against experimental data.

  10. Practical high-density shielding materials for medical linear accelerator rooms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barish, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    High-energy linear accelerators are replacing lower energy units in radiation therapy centers. Radiation protection requirements necessitate expensive reconstruction of existing treatment rooms to accommodate these new machines. We describe two shielding materials: one made by embedding small pieces of scrap steel in cement, and the other made with cast iron in cement. Both materials produce high-density barriers at low cost using standard construction methods

  11. Modeling of ferrite-based materials for shielding enclosures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koledintseva, Marina; Drewniak, James; Zhang Yaojiang; Lenn, James; Thoms, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    An analytical model for a magneto-dielectric composite material is presented based on the Maxwell Garnett rule for a dielectric mixture, and on Bruggeman's effective medium theory for permeability of a ferrite powder embedded in a dielectric. In order to simultaneously treat frequency-dispersive permittivity and permeability of a composite in a full-wave FDTD code, a new algorithm based on discretized auxiliary differential equations has been implemented. In this paper, numerical examples of modeling structures containing different magneto-dielectric mixtures are presented

  12. Flow distribution analysis on the cooling tube network of ITER thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Kwanwoo; Chung, Wooho; Noh, Chang Hyun; Kang, Dong Kwon; Kang, Kyoung-O; Ahn, Hee Jae; Lee, Hyeon Gon

    2014-01-01

    Thermal shield (TS) is to be installed between the vacuum vessel or the cryostat and the magnets in ITER tokamak to reduce the thermal radiation load to the magnets operating at 4.2K. The TS is cooled by pressurized helium gas at the inlet temperature of 80K. The cooling tube is welded on the TS panel surface and the composed flow network of the TS cooling tubes is complex. The flow rate in each panel should be matched to the thermal design value for effective radiation shielding. This paper presents one dimensional analysis on the flow distribution of cooling tube network for the ITER TS. The hydraulic cooling tube network is modeled by an electrical analogy. Only the cooling tube on the TS surface and its connecting pipe from the manifold are considered in the analysis model. Considering the frictional factor and the local loss in the cooling tube, the hydraulic resistance is expressed as a linear function with respect to mass flow rate. Sub-circuits in the TS are analyzed separately because each circuit is controlled by its own control valve independently. It is found that flow rates in some panels are insufficient compared with the design values. In order to improve the flow distribution, two kinds of design modifications are proposed. The first one is to connect the tubes of the adjacent panels. This will increase the resistance of the tube on the panel where the flow rate is excessive. The other design suggestion is that an orifice is installed at the exit of tube routing where the flow rate is to be reduced. The analysis for the design suggestions shows that the flow mal-distribution is improved significantly

  13. Thermal performance of a depleted uranium shielded storage, transportation, and disposal package

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wix, S.D.; Yoshimura, H.R.

    1994-01-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) is responsible for management and disposal of large quantities of depleted uranium (DU) in the DOE complex. Viable economic options for the use and eventual disposal of the material are needed. One possible option is the use of DU as shielding material for vitrified Defense High-Level Waste (DHLW) storage, transportation, and disposal packages. Use of DU as a shielding material provides the potential benefit of disposing of significant quantities of DU during the DHLW storage and disposal process. Two DU package concepts have been developed by Sandia National Laboratories. The first concept is the Storage/Disposal plus Transportation (S/D+T) package. The S/D+T package consists of two major components: a storage/disposal (S/D) container and a transportation overpack. The second concept is the S/D/T package which is an integral storage, transportation, and disposal package. The package concept considered in this analysis is the S/D+T package with seven DHLW waste canisters

  14. Evaluation of Neutron shielding efficiency of Metal hydrides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeon, Sang Hwan; Chae, San; Kim, Yong Soo [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    Neutron shielding is achieved of interaction with material by moderation and absorption. Material that contains large amounts hydrogen atoms which are almost same neutron atomic weight is suited for fast neutron shielding material. Therefore, polymers containing high density hydrogen atom are being used for fast neutron shielding. On the other hand, composite materials containing high thermal neutron absorption cross section atom (Li, B, etc) are being used for thermal neutron shielding. However, these materials have low fast neutron absorption cross section. Therefore, these materials are not suited for fast neutron shielding. Hydrogen which has outstanding neutron energy reduction ability has very low thermal neutron absorption cross section, almost cannot be used for thermal neutron shielding. In this case, a large atomic number material (Pb, U, etc.) has been used. Thus, metal hydrides are considered as complement to concrete shielding material. Because metal hydrides contain high hydrogen density and elements with high atomic number. In this research neutron shielding performance and characteristic of nuclear about metal hydrides ((TiH{sub 2}, ZrH{sub 2}, HfH{sub 2}) is evaluated by experiment and MCNPX using {sup 252}Cf neutron source as purpose development shielding material to developed shielding material

  15. Role of Outgassing of ITER Vacuum Vessel In-Wall Shielding Materials in Leak Detection of ITER Vacuum Vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, A.; Pathak, H. A.; Mehta, B. K.; Phull, G. S.; Laad, R.; Shaikh, M. S.; George, S.; Joshi, K.; Khan, Z.

    2017-04-01

    ITER Vacuum Vessel is a torus-shaped, double wall structure. The space between the double walls of the VV is filled with In-Wall Shielding Blocks (IWS) and Water. The main purpose of IWS is to provide neutron shielding during ITER plasma operation and to reduce ripple of Toroidal Magnetic Field (TF). Although In-Wall Shield Blocks (IWS) will be submerged in water in between the walls of the ITER Vacuum Vessel (VV), Outgassing Rate (OGR) of IWS materials plays a significant role in leak detection of Vacuum Vessel of ITER. Thermal Outgassing Rate of a material critically depends on the Surface Roughness of material. During leak detection process using RGA equipped Leak detector and tracer gas Helium, there will be a spill over of mass 3 and mass 2 to mass 4 which creates a background reading. Helium background will have contribution of Hydrogen too. So it is necessary to ensure the low OGR of Hydrogen. To achieve an effective leak test it is required to obtain a background below 1 × 10-8 mbar 1 s-1 and hence the maximum Outgassing rate of IWS Materials should comply with the maximum Outgassing rate required for hydrogen i.e. 1 x 10-10 mbar 1 s-1 cm-2 at room temperature. As IWS Materials are special materials developed for ITER project, it is necessary to ensure the compliance of Outgassing rate with the requirement. There is a possibility of diffusing the gasses in material at the time of production. So, to validate the production process of materials as well as manufacturing of final product from this material, three coupons of each IWS material have been manufactured with the same technique which is being used in manufacturing of IWS blocks. Manufacturing records of these coupons have been approved by ITER-IO (International Organization). Outgassing rates of these coupons have been measured at room temperature and found in acceptable limit to obtain the required Helium Background. On the basis of these measurements, test reports have been generated and got

  16. Controlling Thermal Conduction by Graded Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qin; Huang, Ji-Ping

    2018-04-01

    Manipulating thermal conductivities are fundamentally important for controlling the conduction of heat at will. Thermal cloaks and concentrators, which have been extensively studied recently, are actually graded materials designed according to coordinate transformation approaches, and their effective thermal conductivity is equal to that of the host medium outside the cloak or concentrator. Here we attempt to investigate a more general problem: what is the effective thermal conductivity of graded materials? In particular, we perform a first-principles approach to the analytic exact results of effective thermal conductivities of materials possessing either power-law or linear gradation profiles. On the other hand, by solving Laplace’s equation, we derive a differential equation for calculating the effective thermal conductivity of a material whose thermal conductivity varies along the radius with arbitrary gradation profiles. The two methods agree with each other for both external and internal heat sources, as confirmed by simulation and experiment. This work provides different methods for designing new thermal metamaterials (including thermal cloaks and concentrators), in order to control or manipulate the transfer of heat. Support by the National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant No. 11725521, by the Science and Technology Commission of Shanghai Municipality under Grant No. 16ZR1445100

  17. Radioisotope Identification Of Shielded And Masked SNM RDD Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salaymeh, S.; Jeffcoat, R.

    2010-01-01

    Sonar and speech techniques have been investigated to improve functionality and enable handheld and other man-portable, mobile, and portal systems to positively detect and identify illicit nuclear materials, with minimal data and with minimal false positives and false negatives. RadSonar isotope detection and identification is an algorithm development project funded by NA-22 and employing the resources of Savannah River National Laboratory and three University Laboratories (JHU-APL, UT-ARL, and UW-APL). Algorithms have been developed that improve the probability of detection and decrease the number of false positives and negatives. Two algorithms have been developed and tested. The first algorithm uses support vector machine (SVM) classifiers to determine the most prevalent nuclide(s) in a spectrum. It then uses a constrained weighted least squares fit to estimate and remove the contribution of these nuclide(s) to the spectrum, iterating classification and fitting until there is nothing of significance left. If any Special Nuclear Materials (SNMs) were detected in this process, a second tier of more stringent classifiers are used to make the final SNM alert decision. The second algorithm is looking at identifying existing feature sets that would be relevant in the radioisotope identification context. The underlying philosophy here is to identify parallels between the physics and/or the structures present in the data for the two applications (speech analysis and gamma spectroscopy). The expectation is that similar approaches may work in both cases. The mel-frequency cepstral representation of spectra is widely used in speech, particularly for two reasons: approximation of the response of the human ear, and simplicity of channel effect separation (in this context, a 'channel' is a method of signal transport that affects the signal, examples being vocal tract shape, room echoes, and microphone response). Measured and simulated gamma-ray spectra from a hand

  18. Efficiency of cement - based low - weight shielding materials for Cs-137 gamma rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satty, H. E. M.

    2014-10-01

    Due to the development of nuclear technology and use of technologies in various field of industry, medicine and research against ionizing radiation is one of the most important topics in this field. The purpose of this work is to reduce the dose rate from radioactive sources. The exposure to gamma radiation is leading to several health effects as the result of absorption by the human body. The frequently used shielding material for gamma rays is lead. In spite of its effectiveness and high mass attenuation coefficient, lower weight gamma shielding materials are required. In this effectiveness of three materials: carbon and mixture (50% carbon + 50% cement) was studied and compared to that of lead. The results were obtained in terms of the variations of the transmitted intensity. This is done using a gamma spectroscopy system.(Author)

  19. Effect of adjustable molecular chain structure and pure silica zeolite nanoparticles on thermal, mechanical, dielectric, UV-shielding and hydrophobic properties of fluorinated copolyimide composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qing; Liao, Guangfu; Zhang, Shulai; Pang, Long; Tong, Hao; Zhao, Wenzhe; Xu, Zushun

    2018-01-01

    A series of polyimide (PI) films, polyimide/pure silica zeolite nanoparticles (PSZN) blend films and polyimide/amine-functionalized pure silica zeolite nanoparticles (APSZN) composite films were successfully prepared by random copolycondensation. Thereinto, PSZN were synthesized by hydrothermal method. The polyimides were derived from 4,4‧-diaminodiphenyl ether (ODA), and three adjustable molar ratios (3:1, 1:1, 1:3) of 2,2-bis[4-(3,4-dicarboxyphenoxy)phenyl] propane dianhydride (BPADA) and 4,4‧-(hexafluoroisopropylidene) diphthalic anhydride (6FDA). The effects of PSZN, APSZN and different chain structure on PI films were specifically evaluated in terms of morphology, thermal, mechanical, dielectric and UV-shielding properties, etc. Comparison was given among pure PI flims, PI/PSZN blend films and PI/APSZN composite flims. The results showed that the thermal and mechanical properties of PI films were drastically impaired after adding PSZN. On the contrary, the strength, toughness and thermal stability were improved after adding APSZN. Moreover, the dielectric constants of the PI/APSZN composite flims were lowered but UV-shielding properties were enhanced. Interestingly, we found that the greatest effects were obtained through introducing APSZN in PI derived by the 1:1 ratio of BPADA:6FDA. The corresponding PI/APSZN composite flim exhibited the most reinforced and toughened properties, the largest decrement of dielectric constant and the best UV-shielding efficiency, which made the composite flim be used as ultraviolet shielding material in outer space filled with high temperature and intensive ultraviolet light. Meanwhile, this work also provided a facile way to synthesize composite materials with adjustable performance.

  20. Ring thermal shield piping modification at Pickering Nuclear Generating Station 'A' Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.; Cobanoglu, M.M.

    1995-01-01

    Each of the four Pickering Nuclear Generating Station A (PNGSA) CANDU units was constructed with its reactor and dump tank surrounded by a concrete Calandria Vault (CV). The Ring Thermal Shield (RTS) system at PNGSA units is a water cooled structure with internal cooling channels with the purpose of attenuating excessive heat flux from the calandria shell to the end shield rings and adjoining concrete (Figure 1). In newer CANDU units the reactor calandria vessel is surrounded by a large water filled shield tank which eliminates the requirement for the RTS system. The RTS structures are situated in the space between the calandria and the vault walls. Each RTS is assembled from eight flat sided carbon steel segments, tilted towards the calandria and supported from the end shield rings. Cooling water to the RTS is supplied by carbon steel cooling pipes with a portion of the pipe run embedded in the vault walls. Flow through each RTS is divided into two independent circuits, having an inlet and an outlet cooling line. There are four locations of RTS inlet and outlet cooling lines. The inlet lines are located at the bottom and the outlet lines at the top of the RTS. The 'L' shaped section of RTS inlet and outlet cooling lines, from the RTS waterbox to the start of embedded portion at the concrete wall, had become defective due to corrosion induced by excessive Moisture levels in the calandria vaults. An on-line leak sealing capability was developed and placed in service in all four PNGSA units. However, a leak found during the 1994 Unit 1 outage was too large,to seal with the current capability, forcing Ontario Hydro (OH) to develop a method to replace the corroded pipes. The repair project was subject to some lofty performance targets. All tools had to be able to withstand dose rates of up to 3000 Rem/hour. These tools, along with procedures and personnel had to successfully repair the RTS system within 6 months otherwise a costly outage extension would result. This

  1. Helium leak testing of superconducting magnets, thermal shields and cryogenic lines of SST -1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thankey, P.L.; Joshi, K.S.; Semwal, P.; Pathan, F.S.; Raval, D.C.; Khan, Z.; Patel, R.J.; Pathak, H.A.

    2005-01-01

    Tokamak SST - 1 is under commissioning at Institute for Plasma Research. It comprises of a toroidal doughnut shaped plasma chamber, surrounded by liquid helium cooled superconducting magnets, housed in a cryostat chamber. The cryostat has two cooling circuits, (1) liquid nitrogen cooling circuit operating at 80 K to minimize the radiation heat load on the magnets, and (2) liquid helium cooling circuit to cool magnets and cold mass support structure to 4.5 K. In this paper we describe (a) the leak testing of copper - SS joints, brazing joints, interconnecting joints of the superconducting magnets, and (b) the leak testing of the liquid nitrogen cooling circuit, comprising of the main supply header, the thermal shields, interconnecting pipes, main return header and electrical isolators. All these tests were carried out using both vacuum and sniffer methods. (author)

  2. Development of silver coating process and facilities for ITER thermal shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, D.K. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, R.G. [COTEC Corp., Changwon 641-846 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, K., E-mail: kwnam@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Noh, C.H.; Chung, W. [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, D.C. [COTEC Corp., Changwon 641-846 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, K.; Baek, J.P. [SFA Engineering Corp., Asan 336-873 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    This paper describes both the test results of the bath type silver coating and the design of the bath to construct the silver coating plant for ITER thermal shield. The tests of small specimens made of SS304L and SS304LN were carried out to investigate the effect of the nitrogen content in SS304LN on the silver coating quality. The effect of different degreasing agents was also investigated to improve silver coating process. Small mock-up was tested to find a proper dipping direction during the electroplating process. Finally, noble bath design was conceived and structurally validated. Overall layout of silver coating plant is also shown in this paper.

  3. Eddy current and mechanical support of the wendelstein 7-X thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, S. Y.; Nagel, M.; Schauer, F.

    2004-01-01

    The machine which equipped huge magnet such as fusion reactor must be in need of special care on the emergency process. Rapid drop down magnetic field generate noticeable induced current, eddy current, and it causes strong electromagnetic forces on mechanical structure. The Wendelstein 7-X consists with 5 pentagonal shaped modules, plasma vessel, and each module can be divided into two symmetric half modules. Each half-module is going to be covered by 20 pieces of plasma vessel thermal shield (PVTS). The subject of this calculation is to find appropriate support positions for PVTS which can withstand self-weight of PVTS and electromagnetic force during the emergency case within our design criterion. We report the calculation procedure and results with half-module of PVTS

  4. Nonreciprocal Thermal Material by Spatiotemporal Modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrent, Daniel; Poncelet, Olivier; Batsale, Jean-Chirstophe

    2018-03-01

    The thermal properties of a material with a spatiotemporal modulation, in the form of a traveling wave, in both the thermal conductivity and the specific heat capacity are studied. It is found that these materials behave as materials with an internal convectionlike term that provides them with nonreciprocal properties, in the sense that the heat flux has different properties when it propagates in the same direction or in the opposite one to the modulation of the parameters. An effective medium description is presented which accurately describes the modulated material, and numerical simulations support this description and verify the nonreciprocal properties of the material. It is found that these materials are promising candidates for the design of thermal diodes and other advanced devices for the control of the heat flow at all scales.

  5. Modeling Thermal Ignition of Energetic Materials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gerri, Norman J; Berning, Ellen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents an attempt to computationally simulate the mechanics and thermal regimes created when a threat perforates an armor envelope and comes in contact with stowed energetic material...

  6. Measurement of the thermal neutron self shielding coefficient in the Syrian miniature neutron source reactor inner irradiation site using the dy soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khattab, K.; Khamis, I.

    2007-01-01

    Measurement of the thermal self shielding coefficient ( Gth ) in the Syrian Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) inner irradiation site using Dy foils is presented in this paper. The thermal self shielding coefficient is measured as a function of the foil thickness or numbers. The mathematical equation which calculates the average relative radioactivity (Bq/g) versus the foil number is found as well.

  7. Time-domain modeling for shielding effectiveness of materials against electromagnetic pulse based on system identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiang; Chen, Yong Guang; Wei, Ming; Hu, Xiao Feng

    2013-01-01

    Shielding effectiveness (SE) of materials against electromagnetic pulse (EMP) cannot be well estimated by traditional test method of SE of materials which only consider the amplitude-frequency characteristic of materials, but ignore the phase-frequency ones. In order to solve this problem, the model of SE of materials against EMP was established based on system identification (SI) method with time-domain linear cosine frequency sweep signal. The feasibility of the method in this paper was examined depending on infinite planar material and the simulation research of coaxial test method and windowed semi-anechoic box of materials. The results show that the amplitude-frequency and phase-frequency information of each frequency can be fully extracted with this method. SE of materials against strong EMP can be evaluated with time-domain low field strength (voltage) of cosine frequency sweep signal. And SE of materials against a variety EMP will be predicted by the model.

  8. Electromagnetic interference shielding with Portland cement paste containing carbon materials and processed fly ash

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zornoza, E.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study described in this article explored the effect of adding different types of carbon materials (graphite powder and three types of carbon fibre, fly ash (with 5.6%, 15.9% and 24.3% Fe2O3, and a mix of both on electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding in Portland cement pastes. The parameters studied included the type and aspect ratio of the carbonic material, composite material thickness, the frequency of the incident electromagnetic radiation and the percentage of the magnetic fraction in the fly ash. The findings showed that the polyacrylonitrile-based carbon fibres, which had the highest aspect ratio, provided more effective shielding than any of the other carbon materials studied. Shielding was more effective in thicker specimens and at higher radiation frequencies. Raising the magnetic fraction of the fly ash, in turn, also enhanced paste shielding performance. Finally, adding both carbon fibre and fly ash to the paste resulted in the most effective EMI shielding as a result of the synergies generated.

    En el presente trabajo se investiga la influencia de la adición de diferentes tipos de materiales carbonosos (polvo de grafito y 3 tipos de fibra de carbono, de una ceniza volante con diferentes contenidos de fase magnética (5,6%, 15,9% y 24,3% de Fe2O3 y de una mezcla de ambos, sobre la capacidad de apantallar interferencias electromagnéticas de pastas de cemento Pórtland. Entre los parámetros estudiados se encuentra: el tipo de material carbonoso, la relación de aspecto del material carbonoso, el espesor del material compuesto, la frecuencia de la radiación electromagnética incidente y el porcentaje de fracción magnética en la ceniza volante. Los resultados obtenidos indican que entre los materiales carbonosos estudiados son las fibras de carbono basadas en poliacrilonitrilo con una mayor relación de aspecto las que dan mejores resultados de apantallamiento. Al aumentar

  9. Comparison of MCNP4C and experimental results on neutron and gamma ray shielding effects for materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Kyoon Ho; Lee, Eun Ki [KEPRI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    MCNP code is a general-purpose Monte Carlo radiation transport code that can numerically simulate neutron, photon, and electron transport. Increasing the speed of computing machine is making numerical transport simulation more attractive and has led to the widespread use of such code. This code can be used for general radiation shielding and criticality accident alarm system related dose calculations, so that the version 4C2 of this code was used to evaluate the shielding effect against neutron and gamma ray experiments. The Ueki experiments were used for neutron shielding effects for materials, and the Kansas State University (KSU) photon skyshine experiments of 1977 were tested for gamma ray shielding effects.

  10. Polymeric materials for solar thermal applications

    CERN Document Server

    Köhl, Michael; Papillon, Philippe; Wallner, Gernot M; Saile, Sandrin

    2012-01-01

    Bridging the gap between basic science and technological applications, this is the first book devoted to polymers for solar thermal applications.Clearly divided into three major parts, the contributions are written by experts on solar thermal applications and polymer scientists alike. The first part explains the fundamentals of solar thermal energy especially for representatives of the plastics industry and researchers. Part two then goes on to provide introductory information on polymeric materials and processing for solar thermal experts. The third part combines both of these fields, dis

  11. Evaluation of serpentine ore as a nuclear shielding material using gas chromatographic techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Unnikrishnan, E.K.; Kumar, Sangita D.

    2007-01-01

    Serpentine ore mixed with cement has been recognized as a candidate shielding material for use in nuclear reactors because of its many desirable properties. Therefore the assessment of serpentine ore for release of volatile gases during exposure to elevated temperatures, irradiation and changes in chemical composition, is essential. The present paper deals with the studies on the serpentine ores using gas chromatography and combustion gas chromatographic techniques. (author)

  12. Mechanical performance optimization of neutron shielding material based on short carbon fiber reinforced B4C/epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Peng; Tang Xiaobin; Chen Feida; Chen Da

    2013-01-01

    To satisfy engineering requirements for mechanics performance of neutron shielding material, short carbon fiber was used to reinforce the traditional containing B 4 C neutron shielding material and effects of fiber content, length and surface treatment to mechanics performance of material was discussed. Based on Americium-Beryllium neutron source, material's neutron shielding performance was tested. The result of experiment prove that tensile strength of material which the quality ratio of resin and fiber is 5:1 is comparatively excellent for 10wt% B 4 C of carbon fiber reinforced epoxy resin. The tensile properties of material change little with the fiber length ranged from 3-10 mm The treatment of fiber surface with silane coupling agent KH-550 can increase the tensile properties of materials by 20% compared with the untreated of that. A result of shielding experiment that the novel neutron shielding material can satisfy the neutron shielding requirements can be obtained by comparing with B 4 C/polypropylene materials. The material has good mechanical properties and wide application prospect. (authors)

  13. Thermal protection for hypervelocity flight in earth's atmosphere by use of radiation backscattering ablating materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howe, John T.; Yang, Lily

    1991-01-01

    A heat-shield-material response code predicting the transient performance of a material subject to the combined convective and radiative heating associated with the hypervelocity flight is developed. The code is dynamically interactive to the heating from a transient flow field, including the effects of material ablation on flow field behavior. It accomodates finite time variable material thickness, internal material phase change, wavelength-dependent radiative properties, and temperature-dependent thermal, physical, and radiative properties. The equations of radiative transfer are solved with the material and are coupled to the transfer energy equation containing the radiative flux divergence in addition to the usual energy terms.

  14. Design of vessel baking system and thermal radiation shields for SST-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, E.R.; Nagabhushana, S.; Pathak, H.A.; Panigrahi, S.; Nath, T.R.; Babu, A.V.S; Gangradey, R.; Patel, R.J.; Saxena, Y.C. [Institute for Plasma Research, Gandhinagar (India)

    1998-07-01

    SST-1 is a Steady State Tokamak with a major radius of 1.1 m, minor radius of 0.2 m and toroidal field of 3.0 T. The toroidal and poloidal field coils of SST-1 are superconducting. One of the main objectives of SST-1 is to demonstrate steady state particle removal and active plasma density control which states the necessity of wall conditioning. The vacuum vessel will be baked up to 525 K by passing hot nitrogen gas through the U - channels welded on the inner surface of vacuum vessel. The required mass flow rate at 5 bar is 0.712 Kg/s to maintain 525 K wall temperature in steady state. Superconducting coils operating at 4.5 K will be protected against thermal radiation from hot surfaces using liquid nitrogen cooled panels operating at 87 K. Maximum 1200 litres/hour liquid nitrogen is required during vessel baking. The design of vacuum vessel baking system and thermal radiation shields and related flow analysis are presented here. (authors)

  15. Design of vessel baking system and thermal radiation shields for SST-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, E.R.; Nagabhushana, S.; Pathak, H.A.; Panigrahi, S.; Nath, T.R.; Babu, A.V.S; Gangradey, R.; Patel, R.J.; Saxena, Y.C.

    1998-01-01

    SST-1 is a Steady State Tokamak with a major radius of 1.1 m, minor radius of 0.2 m and toroidal field of 3.0 T. The toroidal and poloidal field coils of SST-1 are superconducting. One of the main objectives of SST-1 is to demonstrate steady state particle removal and active plasma density control which states the necessity of wall conditioning. The vacuum vessel will be baked up to 525 K by passing hot nitrogen gas through the U - channels welded on the inner surface of vacuum vessel. The required mass flow rate at 5 bar is 0.712 Kg/s to maintain 525 K wall temperature in steady state. Superconducting coils operating at 4.5 K will be protected against thermal radiation from hot surfaces using liquid nitrogen cooled panels operating at 87 K. Maximum 1200 litres/hour liquid nitrogen is required during vessel baking. The design of vacuum vessel baking system and thermal radiation shields and related flow analysis are presented here. (authors)

  16. F2-3 using the shield for thermal energy storage in PULSAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sager, G.T.; Sze, D.K.; Wong, C.P.C.

    1994-01-01

    The PULSAR design study is evaluating the pulsed, inductively driven tokamak power plant to assess whether economies can be attained which-are more favorable than those of the steady-state, non-inductively driven tokamak. Considerations of market acceptance and component fatigue lead to the requirement of thermal energy storage (TES) to maintain steady-state power during the cyclic interruptions of fusion power production (open-quotes dwell phaseclose quotes). A major focus of the Study has been to identify and design technically viable TES systems for helium-cooled and liquid lithium self-cooled plants which are economically attractive, safe and environmentally benign. Several basic constraints impact the selection of the TES system. The system must be capable of discharging 2.5 GW during a dwell phase of approximately two minutes (determined by systems code analysis), thus have a capacity of at least 300 GJ. Coolant must be discharged from the TES at the static, burn phase temperature to minimize thermal stress in the steam generator. Several TES options were evaluated: Storage of heat transport working fluid, phase change media and sensible heat storage. Sensible heat storage in the outer shield was selected for PULSAR

  17. Structure and thermal stability of nanocrystalline materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In addition, study of the thermal stability of nanocrystalline materials against significant grain growth is both scientific and technological interest. A sharp increase in grain size (to micron levels) during consolidation of nanocrystalline powders to obtain fully dense materials may consequently result in the loss of some unique ...

  18. Integrated thermal analysis of top-shield and reactor vault of Indian FBR-600

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajendrakumar, M.; Velusamy, K.; Selvaraj, P.

    2015-01-01

    The design for next generation fast breeder reactors (FBR-600) has been commenced with enhanced safety and improved economy as the main targets. The Top Shield (TS) of Prototype Fast Breeder Reactor (PFBR) is a box type structure consisting of Roof Slab (RS), Small Rotatable Plug (SRP), and Large Rotatable Plug (LRP). The large box type structure with many penetrations posed difficulties during manufacturing. Because of the required high load carrying capabilities, a dome shaped thick plate roof slab is conceived for FBR-600. Main Vessel (MV) which holds the primary sodium and associated components is welded to the RS through a triple joint. Reactor vault (RV) is a thick concrete structure which supports MV and Safety Vessel (SV). The temperature of RV concrete has to be less than 338 K (65°C) under normal operating heat loads (full and part load conditions) and less than 363 K (90°C) under Safety Grade Decay Heat Removal (SGDHR) conditions with one cooling loop in service. The temperature in the component penetrations of the RS should be greater than 120°C to avoid sodium aerosol deposition. Similarly, the temperature of the LRP and SRP has to be ∼120°C to protect the elastomeric seals provided to these structures. Further, the heat load to RV transferred by direct conduction by roof slab support has to be minimum. To meet these conflicting thermal requirements, detailed multi-physics CFD calculations have been performed to finalize, (i) the insulation requirements on the top of roof slab, (ii) number and position of reflective insulation plates below the bottom plate of roof slab/rotating plugs, (iii) air flow rate for various zones of the top shield and (iv) water flow rate and pitch of water cooling pipes for the reactor vault. (author)

  19. Preparation and properties of the fast-curing γ-ray-shielding materials based on polyurethane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ni, Minxuan; Tang, Xiao Bin; Chai, Hao; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Tuo; Chen, Da [Dept. of Nuclear Science and Engineering, Nanjing University of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Nanjing (China)

    2016-12-15

    In this study, fast-curing shielding materials were prepared with a two-component polyurethane matrix and a filler material of PbO through a one-step, laboratory-scale method. With an increase in the filler content, viscosity increased. However, the two components showed a small difference. Curing time decreased as the filler content increased. The minimum tack-free time of 27 s was obtained at a filler content of 70 wt%. Tensile strength and compressive strength initially increased and then decreased as the filler content increased. Even when the filler content reached 60 wt%, mechanical properties were still greater than those of the matrix. Cohesional strength decreased as the filler content increased. However, cohesional strength was still greater than 100 kPa at a filler content of 60 wt%. The γ-ray-shielding properties increased with the increase in the filler content, and composite thickness could be increased to improve the shielding performance when the energy of γ-rays was high. When the filler content was 60 wt%, the composite showed excellent comprehensive properties.

  20. Shielding behavior of multi-transformation phase change materials (MTPCM) against nuclear radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Ravindra; Goplani, Deepak; Kumar, Rohitash; Das, Mrinal Kumar; Kumar, Pramod; Jodha, Ajay Singh; Misra, Manoj; Khatri, P.K.

    2008-01-01

    In nuclear hardened structures and AFV's, special shielding materials are being used to provide protection from radiations generated in nuclear blast. However, in blast an intense heat pulse is also generated along with radiation. Currently used shield does not take care of this heat pulse. Defence Laboratory, Jodhpur has developed multi transformation phase change materials (MTPCM) based cool panels for passive moderation of temperature in severe desert heat. The MTPCM contains light nuclei of hydrogen, carbon and oxygen, and thus can absorb good amount of neutrons. MTPCM can also absorb intense heat pulse along with heat generated by secondary fires during blast as its latent heat (160-170 J/g) without significant rise in temperature (melting point 36-38 deg. C). Thus MTPCM can provide protection against both radiation as well as heat pulse generated in a nuclear blast along with its designed regular function of passively moderating temperature below 40 deg C during severe desert summer. A study has been undertaken to explore multiple applications of MTPCM panel. Protection factor provided by standard MTPCM panels against neutron and gamma radiations (both initial and fall out) were measured and results compared with PF provided by special lining pad currently being used in AFV's and field structures for nuclear protection. It is observed that MTPCM provides good PF (2.17) against neutron which is better than currently used shield pads (PFP%1.8). Present paper discusses results of this study. (author)

  1. Beam loss reduction by magnetic shielding using beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, J.; Ogiwara, N.; Hotchi, H.; Hayashi, N.; Kinsho, M.

    2014-11-01

    One of the main sources of beam loss in high power accelerators is unwanted stray magnetic fields from magnets near the beam line, which can distort the beam orbit. The most effective way to shield such magnetic fields is to perfectly surround the beam region without any gaps with a soft magnetic high permeability material. This leads to the manufacture of vacuum chambers (beam pipes and bellows) with soft magnetic materials. A Ni-Fe alloy (permalloy) was selected for the material of the pipe parts and outer bellows parts, while a ferritic stainless steel was selected for the flanges. An austenitic stainless steel, which is non-magnetic material, was used for the inner bellows for vacuum tightness. To achieve good magnetic shielding and vacuum performances, a heat treatment under high vacuum was applied during the manufacturing process of the vacuum chambers. Using this heat treatment, the ratio of the integrated magnetic flux density along the beam orbit between the inside and outside of the beam pipe and bellows became small enough to suppress beam orbit distortion. The outgassing rate of the materials with this heat treatment was reduced by one order magnitude compared to that without heat treatment. By installing the beam pipes and bellows of soft magnetic materials as part of the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex 3 GeV rapid cycling synchrotron beam line, the closed orbit distortion (COD) was reduced by more than 80%. In addition, a 95.5% beam survival ratio was achieved by this COD improvement.

  2. Use of fusion-welding techniques in fabrication of a superconducting-magnet thermal-shield system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Berkey, J.H.; Chang, Y.; Johnson, G.L.; Lathrop, G.H.; Podesta, D.L.; Van Sant, J.H.

    1983-01-01

    Success of the thermal shield system was demonstrated by the results of acceptance tests performed with the magnet and all its ancillary equipment. During these tests the thermal shield system was: (1) thermally cycled several times from 300 0 K to 77 0 K; (2) pressure cycled several times from 0 to 5 atmospheres; (3) operated for more than 500 hours at 77 0 K and in a vacuum environment of less than 10 - 5 torr; (4) operated in a magnetic field up to 6.0 Telsa; (5) exposed to a rapidly collapsing magnetic field of more than 250 gauss per second; (6) drained of all LN 2 in a few minutes, without any weld failures. The successful (and relatively problem free) operation of the magnet system validates the choice of the welding processes used, as well as their execution in both shop and field environments

  3. Sprayable Phase Change Coating Thermal Protection Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Rod W.; Hayes, Paul W.; Kaul, Raj

    2005-01-01

    NASA has expressed a need for reusable, environmentally friendly, phase change coating that is capable of withstanding the heat loads that have historically required an ablative thermal insulation. The Space Shuttle Program currently relies on ablative materials for thermal protection. The problem with an ablative insulation is that, by design, the material ablates away, in fulfilling its function of cooling the underlying substrate, thus preventing the insulation from being reused from flight to flight. The present generation of environmentally friendly, sprayable, ablative thermal insulation (MCC-l); currently use on the Space Shuttle SRBs, is very close to being a reusable insulation system. In actual flight conditions, as confirmed by the post-flight inspections of the SRBs, very little of the material ablates. Multi-flight thermal insulation use has not been qualified for the Space Shuttle. The gap that would have to be overcome in order to implement a reusable Phase Change Coating (PCC) is not unmanageable. PCC could be applied robotically with a spray process utilizing phase change material as filler to yield material of even higher strength and reliability as compared to MCC-1. The PCC filled coatings have also demonstrated potential as cryogenic thermal coatings. In experimental thermal tests, a thin application of PCC has provided the same thermal protection as a much thicker and heavier application of a traditional ablative thermal insulation. In addition, tests have shown that the structural integrity of the coating has been maintained and phase change performance after several aero-thermal cycles was not affected. Experimental tests have also shown that, unlike traditional ablative thermal insulations, PCC would not require an environmental seal coat, which has historically been required to prevent moisture absorption by the thermal insulation, prevent environmental degradation, and to improve the optical and aerodynamic properties. In order to reduce

  4. Phase Change Materials for Thermal Energy Storage

    OpenAIRE

    Stiebra, L; Cabulis, U; Knite, M

    2014-01-01

    Phase change materials (PCMs) for thermal energy storage (TES) have become an important subject of research in recent years. Using PCMs for thermal energy storage provides a solution to increase the efficiency of the storage and use of energy in many domestic and industrial sectors. Phase change TES systems offer a number of advantages over other systems (e.g. chemical storage systems): particularly small temperature distance between the storage and retrieval cycles, small unit sizes and lo...

  5. Simulation of photon attenuation coefficients for high effective shielding material Lead-Boron Polyethyene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L.; Jia, M. C.; Gong, J. J.; Xia, W. M.

    2017-12-01

    The mass attenuation coefficient of various Lead-Boron Polyethylene samples which can be used as the photon shielding materials in marine reactor, have been simulated using the MCNP-5 code, and compared with the theoretical values at the photon energy range 0.001MeV—20MeV. A good agreement has been observed. The variations of mass attenuation coefficient, linear attenuation coefficient and mean free path with photon energy between 0.001MeV to 100MeV have been plotted. The result shows that all the coefficients strongly depends on the photon energy, material atomic composition and density. The dose transmission factors for source Cesium-137 and Cobalt-60 have been worked out and their variations with the thickness of various sample materials have also been plotted. The variations show that with the increase of materials thickness the dose transmission factors decrease continuously. The results of this paper can provide some reference for the use of the high effective shielding material Lead-Boron Polyethyene.

  6. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    OpenAIRE

    Hoff, Gabriela; Costa, Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and com...

  7. A comparative study of two digestion methods employed for the determination boron in ferroboron used as an advanced shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Granthali S.; Manisha, V.; Venkatesh, K.

    2015-01-01

    Shielding of nuclear reactor core is an important requirement of fast reactors. An important objective of future Fast Breeder Reactors (FBRs) is to reduce the volume of shields. A large number of materials have been considered for use to reduce the neutron flux to acceptable levels. A shield material which brings down the energy of neutrons by elastic and inelastic scattering along with absorption will be more effective. Ferro boron is identified as one of the advanced shielding materials considered for use in future FBRs, planned to be constructed in India. Ferroboron is an economical and indigenously available material which qualifies as a promising shield material through literature survey and scoping calculations. Experiments have been conducted in KAMINI reactor to understand the effectiveness of prospective shield material Ferro-boron as an in-core shield material for future FBRs. The Ferro boron used in these experiments contained 11.8% and 15% of boron. Precise determination of boron content in these ferro boron samples is very important to determine its effectiveness as a shield material. In this work a comparative study was carried out to determine the boron content in ferro boron samples. In the first method the sample was treated with incremental amounts of nitric acid under reflux (to prevent rigorous reaction and volatalisation of boron). The solution was gradually heated and the solution was filtered through a Whatman Filter paper no. 41. The undissolved ferro boron residue collected in the filter paper after filtration, is transferred to a platinum crucible; mixed with sodium carbonate and is ashed. The crucible is placed over a burner for 1 h to fuse the contents. The fused mass is leached in dilute hydrochloric acid, added to the nitric acid filtrate and made up to pre-determined volume

  8. Passive thermal management using phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganatra, Yash Yogesh

    The trend of enhanced functionality and reducing thickness of mobile devices has. led to a rapid increase in power density and a potential thermal bottleneck since. thermal limits of components remain unchanged. Active cooling mechanisms are not. feasible due to size, weight and cost constraints. This work explores the feasibility. of a passive cooling system based on Phase Change Materials (PCMs) for thermal. management of mobile devices. PCMs stabilize temperatures due to the latent heat. of phase change thus increasing the operating time of the device before threshold. temperatures are exceeded. The primary contribution of this work is the identification. of key parameters which influence the design of a PCM based thermal management. system from both the experiments and the numerical models. This work first identifies strategies for integrating PCMs in an electronic device. A. detailed review of past research, including experimental techniques and computational. models, yields key material properties and metrics to evaluate the performance of. PCMs. Subsequently, a miniaturized version of a conventional thermal conductivity. measurement technique is developed to characterize thermal resistance of PCMs. Further, latent heat and transition temperatures are also characterized for a wide. range of PCMs. In-situ measurements with PCMs placed on the processor indicate that some. PCMs can extend the operating time of the device by as much as a factor of 2.48. relative to baseline tests (with no PCMs). This increase in operating time is investigated. by computational thermal models that explore various integration locations, both at the package and device level.

  9. Thermal conductivity of highly porous mullite material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barea, Rafael; Osendi, Maria Isabel; Ferreira, Jose M.F.; Miranzo, Pilar

    2005-01-01

    The thermal diffusivity of highly porous mullite materials (35-60 vol.% porosity) has been measured up to 1000 deg C by the laser flash method. These materials were fabricated by a direct consolidation method based on the swelling properties of starch granules in concentrated aqueous suspensions and showed mainly spherical shaped pores of about 30 μm in diameter. From the point of view of heat conduction, they behave as a bi-phase material of voids dispersed in the continuous mullite matrix. The temperature dependence of thermal conductivity for the different porosities was modeled by a simple equation that considers the contribution to heat conduction of the mullite matrix and the gas inside the pores, as well as the radiation. The thermal conductivity of the matrix was taken from the measurements done in a dense mullite while the conductivity in the voids was assumed to be that of the testing atmosphere

  10. Long term testing of materials for tube shielding, stage 2; Laangtidsprovning av tubskyddsmaterial, etapp 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Norling, Rikard; Hjoernhede, Anders; Mattsson, Mattias

    2012-02-15

    Circulating Fluidized Bed (CFB) boilers are commonly used for combustion of biomass and are used to some extent for Waste-to-Energy (WtE) plants as well. The superheaters of the latter are for obvious reasons more prone to suffer from high temperature corrosion caused by the corrosive species in the fuel, mainly chlorides. Frequently the final (hottest) superheater is positioned in the loop seal, where the circulating bed material is returned to the furnace after being separated from the flue gas by a cyclone. The environment in the loop seal is relatively free of chlorides, since these primarily follow the flue gas into the convection pass. Hence, higher steam temperature can be allowed without excessive damage to the final superheater. On the other hand the superheaters, which are located in the convection pass, are more exposed to the corrosive species of the flue gas. Further, they are eroded by particles entrained in the gas flow. Particles and condensing gaseous species are to a large extent deposited on the superheaters, which limits the heat transfer and promotes corrosion. The deposits are regularly removed e.g. by soot blowers. The pressurized steam from soot blowers causes additional erosion damage to that caused by entrained particles. It shall be noted that the actual damage is caused by a combined mechanism of erosion and corrosion denoted erosion-corrosion, which usually results in dramatically accelerated wear. To avoid excessive erosion damage on the superheater tubes the first tube row of each bundle is protected by tube shielding. In its simplest form the shields are made from a steel sheet that has been bent into a semi-circular half-cylinder shell. These shields are attached onto the wind-side of the tubes by hangers. A typical material for tube shielding is the austenitic high temperature resistant stainless steel 253MA. Life of tube shielding depends on numerous factors such as boiler design, superheater location, fuel and operating

  11. Development of a new neutron shielding material, TN trademark Resin Vyal for transport/storage casks for radioactive materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abadie, P. [COGEMA Logistics (AREVA Group), Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines (France)

    2004-07-01

    TN trademark Resin Vyal, a patent pending composite, is a new neutron shielding material developed by COGEMA LOGISTICS for transport/storage casks of radioactive materials (spent fuel, reprocessed fuel,..). This material is composed of a thermosetting resin (vinylester resin in solution of styrene) and two mineral fillers (alumine hydrate and zinc borate). Its shielding ability for neutron radiation is related to a high hydrogen content (for slowing down neutrons) and a high boron content (for absorbing neutrons). Source of hydrogen is organic matrix (resin) and alumine hydrate; source of boron is zinc borate. Atomic concentrations are equal to 5.10{sup 22} at/cm{sup 3} for hydrogen and 9.10{sup 20} at/cm{sup 3} for boron. Due to the flame retardant character of components, the final material has a good fire resistance (it is auto-extinguishable). Its density is equal to 1,8. The manufacturing process of these material is easy: it consists in mixing the fillers and pouring in-situ (in cask); so, the curing of this composite, which leads to a three-dimensional structure, takes place at ambient temperature. Temperature resistance of this material was evaluated by performing exposition tests of samples at different temperatures (150 C to 170 C). According to tests results, its maximal temperature of use was confirmed equal to 160 C.

  12. Development of a new neutron shielding material, TN trademark Resin Vyal for transport/storage casks for radioactive materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abadie, P.

    2004-01-01

    TN trademark Resin Vyal, a patent pending composite, is a new neutron shielding material developed by COGEMA LOGISTICS for transport/storage casks of radioactive materials (spent fuel, reprocessed fuel,..). This material is composed of a thermosetting resin (vinylester resin in solution of styrene) and two mineral fillers (alumine hydrate and zinc borate). Its shielding ability for neutron radiation is related to a high hydrogen content (for slowing down neutrons) and a high boron content (for absorbing neutrons). Source of hydrogen is organic matrix (resin) and alumine hydrate; source of boron is zinc borate. Atomic concentrations are equal to 5.10 22 at/cm 3 for hydrogen and 9.10 20 at/cm 3 for boron. Due to the flame retardant character of components, the final material has a good fire resistance (it is auto-extinguishable). Its density is equal to 1,8. The manufacturing process of these material is easy: it consists in mixing the fillers and pouring in-situ (in cask); so, the curing of this composite, which leads to a three-dimensional structure, takes place at ambient temperature. Temperature resistance of this material was evaluated by performing exposition tests of samples at different temperatures (150 C to 170 C). According to tests results, its maximal temperature of use was confirmed equal to 160 C

  13. Enhancement in the microstructure and neutron shielding efficiency of sandwich type of 6061Al–B4C composite material via hot isostatic pressing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jin-Ju; Hong, Sung-Mo; Lee, Min-Ku; Rhee, Chang-Kyu; Rhee, Won-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • 6061Al–B 4 C neutron shielding composites are fabricated by sintering and HIP. • HIP process improves the wettability of B 4 C particles into 6061Al matrix. • Neutron attenuation performance can be enhanced by application of HIP process. - Abstract: Sandwich type of 6061Al–B 4 C composite plates, which are used as a thermal neutron absorber for spent nuclear fuel pool storage rack, were fabricated using two different consolidation ways as sintering and hot isostatic pressing (HIP) processes and their thermal neutron shielding efficiency was investigated as a function of B 4 C concentration ranging from 0 to 40 wt.%. For this purpose, two respective inner core compaction parts of sintered and HIPped neutron absorbing composite materials were first produced and then cladded them between two outer plates by HIP process. The application of HIP process provided not only a lead of excellent interfacial adhesion due to the improved wettability but also an enhancement of thermal neutron shielding efficiency owing to the more uniform dispersion of B 4 C particles

  14. JSD1000: multi-group cross section sets for shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamano, Naoki

    1984-03-01

    A multi-group cross section library for shielding safety analysis has been produced by using ENDF/B-IV. The library consists of ultra-fine group cross sections, fine-group cross sections, secondary gamma-ray production cross sections and effective macroscopic cross sections for typical shielding materials. Temperature dependent data at 300, 560 and 900 K have been also provided. Angular distributions of the group to group transfer cross section are defined by a new method of ''Direct Angular Representation'' (DAR) instead of the method of finite Legendre expansion. The library designated JSD1000 are stored in a direct access data base named DATA-POOL and data manipulations are available by using the DATA-POOL access package. The 3824 neutron group data of the ultra-fine group cross sections and the 100 neutron, 20 photon group cross sections are applicable to shielding safety analyses of nuclear facilities. This report provides detailed specifications and the access method for the JSD1000 library. (author)

  15. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in diagnostic x-ray facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karoui, Mohamed Karim

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: A simulation of buildup factors for ordinary concrete, steel, lead, plate glass, lead glass, and gypsum wallboard in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 10 keV to 150 keV at 5 keV intervals is presented. Methods: Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials. Results: An example concretizing the use of the obtained buildup factors data in computing the broad beam transmission for tube potentials at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The half value layer, the tenth value layer, and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these tube potentials. Conclusions: The obtained values compared with those calculated from the published data show the ability of these data to predict shielding transmission curves. Therefore, the buildup factors data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of photon buildup factors for shielding materials in diagnostic x-ray facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kharrati, Hedi; Agrebi, Amel; Karoui, Mohamed Karim

    2012-10-01

    A simulation of buildup factors for ordinary concrete, steel, lead, plate glass, lead glass, and gypsum wallboard in broad beam geometry for photons energies from 10 keV to 150 keV at 5 keV intervals is presented. Monte Carlo N-particle radiation transport computer code has been used to determine the buildup factors for the studied shielding materials. An example concretizing the use of the obtained buildup factors data in computing the broad beam transmission for tube potentials at 70, 100, 120, and 140 kVp is given. The half value layer, the tenth value layer, and the equilibrium tenth value layer are calculated from the broad beam transmission for these tube potentials. The obtained values compared with those calculated from the published data show the ability of these data to predict shielding transmission curves. Therefore, the buildup factors data can be combined with primary, scatter, and leakage x-ray spectra to provide a computationally based solution to broad beam transmission for barriers in shielding x-ray facilities.

  17. Nuclear reactions and self-shielding effects of gamma-ray database for nuclear materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Noda, Tetsuji [National Research Institute for Metals, Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2001-03-01

    A database for transmutation and radioactivity of nuclear materials is required for selection and design of materials used in various nuclear reactors. The database based on the FENDL/A-2.0 on the Internet and the additional data collected from several references has been developed in NRIM site of 'Data-Free-Way' on the Internet. Recently, the function predicted self-shielding effect of materials for {gamma}-ray was added to this database. The user interface for this database has been constructed for retrieval of necessary data and for graphical presentation of the relation between the energy spectrum of neutron and neutron capture cross section. It is demonstrated that the possibility of chemical compositional change and radioactivity in a material caused by nuclear reactions can be easily retrieved using a browser such as Netscape or Explorer. (author)

  18. Nuclear reactions and self-shielding effects of gamma-ray database for nuclear materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Mitsutane; Noda, Tetsuji

    2001-01-01

    A database for transmutation and radioactivity of nuclear materials is required for selection and design of materials used in various nuclear reactors. The database based on the FENDL/A-2.0 on the Internet and the additional data collected from several references has been developed in NRIM site of 'Data-Free-Way' on the Internet. Recently, the function predicted self-shielding effect of materials for γ-ray was added to this database. The user interface for this database has been constructed for retrieval of necessary data and for graphical presentation of the relation between the energy spectrum of neutron and neutron capture cross section. It is demonstrated that the possibility of chemical compositional change and radioactivity in a material caused by nuclear reactions can be easily retrieved using a browser such as Netscape or Explorer. (author)

  19. Geant4 calculations for space radiation shielding material Al2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capali, Veli; Acar Yesil, Tolga; Kaya, Gokhan; Kaplan, Abdullah; Yavuz, Mustafa; Tilki, Tahir

    2015-07-01

    Aluminium Oxide, Al2O3 is the most widely used material in the engineering applications. It is significant aluminium metal, because of its hardness and as a refractory material owing to its high melting point. This material has several engineering applications in diverse fields such as, ballistic armour systems, wear components, electrical and electronic substrates, automotive parts, components for electric industry and aero-engine. As well, it is used as a dosimeter for radiation protection and therapy applications for its optically stimulated luminescence properties. In this study, stopping powers and penetrating distances have been calculated for the alpha, proton, electron and gamma particles in space radiation shielding material Al2O3 for incident energies 1 keV - 1 GeV using GEANT4 calculation code.

  20. Geant4 calculations for space radiation shielding material Al2O3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Capali Veli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aluminium Oxide, Al2O3 is the most widely used material in the engineering applications. It is significant aluminium metal, because of its hardness and as a refractory material owing to its high melting point. This material has several engineering applications in diverse fields such as, ballistic armour systems, wear components, electrical and electronic substrates, automotive parts, components for electric industry and aero-engine. As well, it is used as a dosimeter for radiation protection and therapy applications for its optically stimulated luminescence properties. In this study, stopping powers and penetrating distances have been calculated for the alpha, proton, electron and gamma particles in space radiation shielding material Al2O3 for incident energies 1 keV – 1 GeV using GEANT4 calculation code.

  1. General and crevice corrosion study of the in-wall shielding materials for ITER vacuum vessel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, K. S.; Pathak, H. A.; Dayal, R. K.; Bafna, V. K.; Kimihiro, Ioki; Barabash, V.

    2012-11-01

    Vacuum vessel In-Wall Shield (IWS) will be inserted between the inner and outer shells of the ITER vacuum vessel. The behaviour of IWS in the vacuum vessel especially concerning the susceptibility to crevice of shielding block assemblies could cause rapid and extensive corrosion attacks. Even galvanic corrosion may be due to different metals in same electrolyte. IWS blocks are not accessible until life of the machine after closing of vacuum vessel. Hence, it is necessary to study the susceptibility of IWS materials to general corrosion and crevice corrosion under operations of ITER vacuum vessel. Corrosion properties of IWS materials were studied by using (i) Immersion technique and (ii) Electro-chemical Polarization techniques. All the sample materials were subjected to a series of examinations before and after immersion test, like Loss/Gain weight measurement, SEM analysis, and Optical stereo microscopy, measurement of surface profile and hardness of materials. After immersion test, SS 304B4 and SS 304B7 showed slight weight gain which indicate oxide layer formation on the surface of coupons. The SS 430 material showed negligible weight loss which indicates mild general corrosion effect. On visual observation with SEM and Metallography, all material showed pitting corrosion attack. All sample materials were subjected to series of measurements like Open Circuit potential, Cyclic polarization, Pitting potential, protection potential, Critical anodic current and SEM examination. All materials show pitting loop in OC2 operating condition. However, its absence in OC1 operating condition clearly indicates the activity of chloride ion to penetrate oxide layer on the sample surface, at higher temperature. The critical pitting temperature of all samples remains between 100° and 200°C.

  2. Reliability of thermal interface materials: A review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due, Jens; Robinson, Anthony J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are used extensively to improve thermal conduction across two mating parts. They are particularly crucial in electronics thermal management since excessive junction-to-ambient thermal resistances can cause elevated temperatures which can negatively influence device performance and reliability. Of particular interest to electronic package designers is the thermal resistance of the TIM layer at the end of its design life. Estimations of this allow the package to be designed to perform adequately over its entire useful life. To this end, TIM reliability studies have been performed using accelerated stress tests. This paper reviews the body of work which has been performed on TIM reliability. It focuses on the various test methodologies with commentary on the results which have been obtained for the different TIM materials. Based on the information available in the open literature, a test procedure is proposed for TIM selection based on beginning and end of life performance. - Highlights: ► This paper reviews the body of work which has been performed on TIM reliability. ► Test methodologies for reliability testing are outlined. ► Reliability results for the different TIM materials are discussed. ► A test procedure is proposed for TIM selection BOLife and EOLife performance.

  3. Thermal, Mechanical and UV-Shielding Properties of Poly(Methyl Methacrylate/Cerium Dioxide Hybrid Systems Obtained by Melt Compounding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María A. Reyes-Acosta

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Thick and homogeneous hybrid film systems based on poly(methyl methacrylate (PMMA and CeO2 nanoparticles were synthesized using the melt compounding method to improve thermal stability, mechanical and UV-shielding properties, as well as to propose them for use in the multifunctional materials industry. The effect of the inorganic phase on these properties was assessed by using two different weight percentages of synthesized CeO2 nanoparticles (0.5 and 1.0 wt % with the sol–gel method and thermal treatment at different temperatures (120, 235, 400, 600 and 800 °C. Thereafter, the nanoceria powders were added to the polymer matrix by single screw extrusion. The absorption in the UV region was increased with the crystallite size of the CeO2 nanoparticles and the PMMA/CeO2 weight ratio. Due to the crystallinity of CeO2 nanoparticles, the thermal, mechanical and UV-shielding properties of the PMMA matrix were improved. The presence of CeO2 nanostructures exerts an influence on the mobility of PMMA chain segments, leading to a different glass transition temperature.

  4. Anisotropic thermal expansion in flexible materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romao, Carl P.

    2017-10-01

    A definition of the Grüneisen parameters for anisotropic materials is derived based on the response of phonon frequencies to uniaxial stress perturbations. This Grüneisen model relates the thermal expansion in a given direction (αi i) to one element of the elastic compliance tensor, which corresponds to the Young's modulus in that direction (Yi i). The model is tested through ab initio prediction of thermal expansion in zinc, graphite, and calcite using density functional perturbation theory, indicating that it could lead to increased accuracy for structurally complex systems. The direct dependence of αi i on Yi i suggests that materials which are flexible along their principal axes but rigid in other directions will generally display both positive and negative thermal expansion.

  5. Thermal Expansion Properties of Aerospace Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, E. F.

    1969-01-01

    Thermal expansion properties of materials used in aerospace systems are compiled into a single handbook. The data, derived from experimental measurements supplemented by information from literature sources, are presented in charts and tables arranged in two sections, covering cryogenic and elevated temperatures.

  6. On stress/strain shielding and the material stiffness paradigm for dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korabi, Raoof; Shemtov-Yona, Keren; Rittel, Daniel

    2017-10-01

    Stress shielding considerations suggest that the dental implant material's compliance should be matched to that of the host bone. However, this belief has not been confirmed from a general perspective, either clinically or numerically. To characterize the influence of the implant stiffness on its functionality using the failure envelope concept that examines all possible combinations of mechanical load and application angle for selected stress, strain and displacement-based bone failure criteria. Those criteria represent bone yielding, remodeling, and implant primary stability, respectively MATERIALS AND METHODS: We performed numerical simulations to generate failure envelopes for all possible loading configurations of dental implants, with stiffness ranging from very low (polymer) to extremely high, through that of bone, titanium, and ceramics. Irrespective of the failure criterion, stiffer implants allow for improved implant functionality. The latter reduces with increasing compliance, while the trabecular bone experiences higher strains, albeit of an overall small level. Micromotions remain quite small irrespective of the implant's stiffness. The current paradigm favoring reduced implant material's stiffness out of concern for stress or strain shielding, or even excessive micromotions, is not supported by the present calculations, that point exactly to the opposite. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Proposal for the award of a contract for the supply of LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies

    CERN Document Server

    2000-01-01

    This document concerns the award of a contract for the supply of 1 250 LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies. Following a market survey carried out among 95 firms in sixteen Member States, a call for tenders (IT-2650/LHC/LHC) was sent on 8 November 1999 to eight firms in six Member States. By the closing date, CERN had received four tenders. The Finance Committee is invited to agree to the negotiation of a contract with the firm EISENWERKE KAISERSLAUTERN (DE), the lowest bidder, for the supply of 1 250 LHC dipole thermal shield bottom tray assemblies for a total amount of 6 150 808 euros (9 858 518 Swiss francs), subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, with an option for the supply of up to 150 additional thermal shield bottom tray assemblies, for a total amount of 696 979 euros (1 117 118 Swiss francs), subject to revision for contractual deliveries after 31 December 2001, bringing the total amount to a maximum of 6 847 787 euros (10 975 636 Swiss francs), subject to...

  8. Multilayer radiation shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbahn, John Arthur; Laskaris, Evangelos Trifon

    2009-06-16

    A power generation system including: a generator including a rotor including a superconductive rotor coil coupled to a rotatable shaft; a first prime mover drivingly coupled to the rotatable shaft; and a thermal radiation shield, partially surrounding the rotor coil, including at least a first sheet and a second sheet spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft. A thermal radiation shield for a generator including a rotor including a super-conductive rotor coil including: a first sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material; and at least one additional sheet having at least one surface formed from a low emissivity material spaced apart from the first sheet by centripetal force produced by the rotatable shaft, wherein each successive sheet is an incrementally greater circumferential arc length and wherein the centripetal force shapes the sheets into a substantially catenary shape.

  9. Attenuation characteristics of materials used in radiation protection as radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida Junior, Airton T.; Araujo, F.G.S.; Nogueira, M.S.; Santos, M.A.P.

    2013-01-01

    Crystal glass has been widely used as shielding material in gamma radiation sources as well as x-ray generating equipment to replace the plumbiferous glass, in order to minimize exposure to individuals. In this work, ten plates of crystal glass, with dimensions of 20cm x 20cm and range of thicknesses from 0.5 to 2.0 cm, and barite concrete were irradiated with potential constants of 60kV, 80kV, 110kV, 150kV and gamma radiation of 60 Co. The curves of attenuation and of transmission were obtained for crystal glass, barite plaster and barite concrete (mGy/mA.min) at 1 meter as a function of thickness.Crystal glass has been widely used as shielding material in gamma radiation sources as well as x-ray generating equipment to replace the plumbiferous glass, in order to minimize exposure to individuals. In this work, ten plates of crystal glass, with dimensions of 20cm x 20cm and range of thicknesses from 0.5 to 2.0 cm, and barite concrete were irradiated with potential constants of 60kV, 80kV, 110kV, 150kV and gamma radiation of 60 Co. The curves of attenuation and of transmission were obtained for crystal glass, barite plaster and barite concrete (mGy/mA.min) at 1 meter as a function of thickness. (author)

  10. An Evaluation on Radiation Shielding and Activation Properties of ISOL-bunker Structural Materials for Radiation Safety in RAON Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Song Hyun; Woo, Myeong Hyeon; Lee, Jae Yong; Kim, Jong Woo; Shin, Chang Ho [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Shin Woo [Institute for Basic Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    RAON heavy ion accelerator has been designed by the Institute for Basic Science (IBS). ISOL is one of RAON facilities to generate and separate rare isotopes. For generating rare isotopes, high intensity proton beam, which has 70 MeV energy, is induced into UCx target. From this reaction, lots of neutrons are concomitantly generated. To meet our design goal, it was required that the structural material of ISOL-bunker should be carefully selected. In this study, to select the structural material which has lower activation property with higher performance for radiation shielding, following aspects were evaluated: (i) residual dose, (ii) radioactive wastes, and (iii) shielding performance in ISOL-bunker. In this study, to effectively design the radiation shielding of the RAON ISOL-bunker, two methods were proposed. No.1 strategy is a method to replace the normal concrete to specific concretes. No.2 strategy is to design dual-layer radiation shields that a specific shielding material is located inner side of the normal concrete. Using the strategies, performance evaluations were evaluated for three aspects, which are residual dose, radioactive waste, and prompt radiation. The results show that the residual radiation can be effectively reduced using B{sub 4}C, borated polyethylene and polyethylene with No.2 strategy. Also, the colemanite concrete and B{sub 4}C shielding give a good ability to reduce the radioactive wastes.

  11. Study on photon sensitivity of silicon diodes related to materials used for shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseev, T.

    1999-01-01

    Large area silicon diodes used in electronic neutron dosemeters have a significant over-response to X- and gamma-rays, highly non-linear at photon energies below 200 keV. This over-response to photons is proportional to the diode's active area and strongly affects the neutron sensitivity of such dosemeters. Since silicon diodes are sensitive to light and electromagnetic fields, most diode detector assemblies are provided with a shielding, sometimes also used as radiation filter. In this paper, the influence of materials covering the diode's active area is investigated using the MCNP-4A code by estimating the photon induced pulses in a typical silicon wafer (300 μm thickness and 1 cm diameter) when provided with a front case cover. There have been simulated small-size diode front covers made of several materials with low neutron interaction cross-sections like aluminium, TEFLON, iron and lead. The estimated number of induced pulses in the silicon wafer is calculated for each type of shielding at normal photon incidence for several photon energies from 9.8 keV up to 1.15 MeV and compared with that in a bare silicon wafer. The simulated pulse height spectra show the origin of the photon-induced pulses in silicon for each material used as protective cover: the photoelectric effect for low Z front case materials at low-energy incident photons (up to about 65 keV) and the Compton and build-up effects for high Z case materials at higher photon energies. A simple means to lower and flatten the photon response of silicon diodes over an extended X- and gamma rays energy range is proposed by designing a composed photon filter. (author)

  12. Study on Photon Sensitivity of Silicon Diodes Related to Materials Used for Shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moiseev, T.

    2000-01-01

    Large area Silicon diodes used in electronic neutron dosemeters have a significant over-response to X and gamma rays, highly non-linear at photon energies below 200 keV. This over-response to photons is proportional to the diodes active area and strongly affects the neutron sensitivity of such dosemeters. Since Silicon diodes are sensitive to light and electromagnetic fields, most diode detector assemblies are provided with a shielding, sometimes also used as radiation filter. In this paper, the influence of materials covering the diode's active area is investigated using the MCNP-4A code by estimating the photon induced pulses in a typical silicon wafer (300 μm thickness and 1 cm diameter) when provided with a front case cover. There have been simulated small-size diode front covers made of several materials with low neutron interaction cross-sections like aluminium, TEFLON, iron and lead. The estimated number of induced pulses in the silicon wafer is calculated for each type of shielding at normal photon incidence for several photon energies from 9.8 keV up to 1.15 MeV and compared with that in a bare silicon wafer. The simulated pulse height spectra show the origin of the photon induced pulses in silicon for each material used as protective cover: the photoelectric effect for low Z front case materials at low energy incident photons (up to about 65 keV) and the Compton and build-up effects for high Z case materials at higher photon energies. A simple means to lower and flatten the photon response of silicon diodes over an extended X and gamma rays energy range is proposed by designing a composed photon filter. (author)

  13. Computational models for electromagnetic transients in ITER vacuum vessel, cryostat and thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alekseev, A.; Arslanova, D.; Belov, A.; Belyakov, V.; Gapionok, E.; Gornikel, I.; Gribov, Y.; Ioki, K.; Kukhtin, V.; Lamzin, E.; Sugihara, M.; Sychevsky, S.; Terasawa, A.; Utin, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A set of detailed computational models are reviewed that covers integrally the system “vacuum vessel (VV), cryostat, and thermal shields (TS)” to study transient electromagnetics (EMs) in the ITER machine. The models have been developed in the course of activities requested and supervised by the ITER Organization. EM analysis is enabled for all ITER operational scenarios. The input data are derived from results of DINA code simulations. The external EM fields are modeled accurate to the input data description. The known magnetic shell approach can be effectively applied to simulate thin-walled structures of the ITER machine. Using an integral–differential formulation, a single unknown is determined within the shells in terms of the vector electric potential taken only at the nodes of a finite-element (FE) mesh of the conducting structures. As a result, the FE mesh encompasses only the system “VV + Cryostat + TS”. The 3D model requires much higher computational resources as compared to a shell model based on the equivalent approximation. The shell models have been developed for all principal conducting structures in the system “VV + Cryostat + TS” including regular ports and neutral beam ports. The structures are described in details in accordance with the latest design. The models have also been applied for simulations of EM transients in components of diagnostic systems and cryopumps and estimation of the 3D effects of the ITER structures on the plasma performance. The developed models have been elaborated and applied for the last 15 years to support the ITER design activities. The finalization of the ITER VV design enables this set of models to be considered ready to use in plasma-physics computations and the development of ITER simulators

  14. Gamma-ray mass attenuation coefficient and half value layer factor of some oxide glass shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waly, El-Sayed A.; Fusco, Michael A.; Bourham, Mohamed A.

    2016-01-01

    The variation in dosimetric parameters such as mass attenuation coefficient, half value layer factor, exposure buildup factor, and the photon mean free path for different oxide glasses for the incident gamma energy range 0.015–15 MeV has been studied using MicroShield code. It has been inferred that the addition of PbO and Bi 2 O 3 improves the gamma ray shielding properties. Thus, the effect of chemical composition on these parameters is investigated in the form of six different glass compositions, which are compared with specialty concrete for nuclear radiation shielding. The composition termed ‘Glass 6’ in this paper has the highest mass attenuation and the smallest half value layer and may have potential applications in radiation shielding. An example dry storage cask utilizing an additional layer of Glass 6 as an intermediate shielding layer, simulated in MicroShield, is capable of reducing the exposure rate at the cask surface by over 20 orders of magnitude compared to the case without a glass layer. Based on this study, Glass 6 shows promise as a gamma-ray shielding material, particularly for dry cask storage.

  15. New applications and developments in the neutron shielding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uğur Fatma Aysun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Shielding neutrons involve three steps that are slowing neutrons, absorption of neutrons, and impregnation of gamma rays. Neutrons slow down with thermal energy by hydrogen, water, paraffin, plastic. Hydrogenated materials are also very effective for the absorption of neutrons. Gamma rays are produced by neutron (radiation retention on the neutron shield, inelastic scattering, and degradation of activation products. If a source emits gamma rays at various energies, high-energy gamma rays sometimes specify shielding requirements. Multipurpose Materials for Neutron Shields; Concrete, especially with barium mixed in, can slow and absorb the neutrons, and shield the gamma rays. Plastic with boron is also a good multipurpose shielding material. In this study; new applications and developments in the area of neutron shielding will be discussed in terms of different materials.

  16. New applications and developments in the neutron shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uğur, Fatma Aysun

    2017-09-01

    Shielding neutrons involve three steps that are slowing neutrons, absorption of neutrons, and impregnation of gamma rays. Neutrons slow down with thermal energy by hydrogen, water, paraffin, plastic. Hydrogenated materials are also very effective for the absorption of neutrons. Gamma rays are produced by neutron (radiation) retention on the neutron shield, inelastic scattering, and degradation of activation products. If a source emits gamma rays at various energies, high-energy gamma rays sometimes specify shielding requirements. Multipurpose Materials for Neutron Shields; Concrete, especially with barium mixed in, can slow and absorb the neutrons, and shield the gamma rays. Plastic with boron is also a good multipurpose shielding material. In this study; new applications and developments in the area of neutron shielding will be discussed in terms of different materials.

  17. Development of a double plasma gun device for investigation of effects of vapor shielding on erosion of PFC materials under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, I.; Iwamoto, D.; Kitagawa, Y.; Kikuchi, Y.; Fukumoto, N.; Nagata, M.

    2012-10-01

    It is considered that thermal transient events such as type I edge localized modes (ELMs) could limit the lifetime of plasma-facing components (PFCs) in ITER. We have investigated surface damage of tungsten (W) materials under transient heat and particle loads by using a magnetized coaxial plasma gun (MCPG) device at University of Hyogo. The capacitor bank energy for the plasma discharge is 144 kJ (2.88 mF, 10 kVmax). Surface melting of a W material was clearly observed at the energy density of ˜2 MJ/m2. It is known that surface melting and evaporation during a transient heat load could generate a vapor cloud layer in front of the target material [1]. Then, the subsequent erosion could be reduced by the vapor shielding effect. In this study, we introduce a new experiment using two MCPG devices (MCPG-1, 2) to understand vapor shielding effects of a W surface under ELM-like pulsed plasma bombardment. The capacitor bank energy of MCPG-2 is almost same as that of MCPG-1. The second plasmoid is applied with a variable delay time after the plasmoid produced by MCPG-1. Then, a vapor cloud layer could shield the second plasma load. To verify the vapor shielding effects, surface damage of a W material is investigated by changing the delay time. In the conference, the preliminary experimental results will be shown.[4pt] [1] A. Hassanein et al., J. Nucl. Mater. 390-391, pp. 777-780 (2009).

  18. Shielding modification design of the N.S. Mutsu

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaji, A.; Miyakoshi, J.; Kageyama, T.; Futamura, Y.

    1983-01-01

    Shielding modification design of the N.S. Mutsu was performed for reducing the radiation doses outside the primary and the secondary shields by providing shields for neutrons streaming through the air gap between the pressure vessel and the primary shield. This was accomplished by replacing parts of the shields and adding new shields in the upper and lower sections of both primary and secondary shields, and also replacing the thermal insulator in the gap. The shielding design calculations were made using one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates codes and also a point kernel code. Special attention was paid to the calculations of, (1) the neutrons streaming through the gap between the pressure vessel and the primary shield, (2) the radiations transmitted through the radial shield of the core in the primary shield, (3) the radiations transmitted through the upper and lower sections of the secondary shield, and (4) the dose rate equivalent in the accommodation area. Their calculational accuracies were estimated by analyzing various experiments. To support the modification, a variety of experiments and tests were carried out, which were material tests, cooling test of the primary shield, mechanical strength test of the double bottom, trial fabrication tests of new shields, performance degradation test of heavy concrete and duct streaming experiment in the secondary shield. (author)

  19. Multi-objective optimization of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor computational model for biological shielding design using innovative materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tunes, M.A., E-mail: matheus.tunes@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil); Oliveira, C.R.E. de, E-mail: cassiano@unm.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, The University of New Mexico, Farris Engineering Center, 221, Albuquerque, NM 87131-1070 (United States); Schön, C.G., E-mail: schoen@usp.br [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Escola Politécnica da Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463 – CEP 05508 – 030 São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Use of two n-γ transport codes leads to optimized model of compact nuclear reactor. • It was possible to safely reduce both weight and volume of the biological shielding. • Best configuration obtained by using new composites for both γ and n attenuation. - Abstract: The aim of the present work is to develop a computational model of a compact pressurized water nuclear reactor (PWR) to investigate the use of innovative materials to enhance the biological shielding effectiveness. Two radiation transport codes were used: the first one – MCNP – for the PWR design and the GEM/EVENT to simulate (in a 1D slab) the behavior of several materials and shielding thickness on gamma and neutron radiation. Additionally MATLAB Optimization Toolbox was used to provide new geometric configurations of the slab aiming at reducing the volume and weight of the walls by means of a cost/objective function. It is demonstrated in the reactor model that the dose rate outside biological shielding has been reduced by one order of magnitude for the optimized model compared with the initial configuration. Volume and weight of the shielding walls were also reduced. The results indicated that one-dimensional deterministic code to reach an optimized geometry and test materials, combined with a three-dimensional model of a compact nuclear reactor in a stochastic code, is a fast and efficient procedure to test shielding performance and optimization before the experimental assessment. A major outcome of this research is that composite materials (ECOMASS 2150TU96) may replace (with advantages) traditional shielding materials without jeopardizing the nuclear power plant safety assurance.

  20. Measurement of Charged Particle Interactions in Spacecraft and Planetary Habitat Shielding Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Cary J.; Heilbronn, Lawrence H.; Miller, Jack; Wilson, John W.; Singleterry, Robert C., Jr.

    2003-01-01

    Accurate models of health risks to astronauts on long-duration missions outside the geomagnetosphere will require a full understanding of the radiation environment inside a spacecraft or planetary habitat. This in turn requires detailed knowledge of the flux of incident particles and their propagation through matter, including the nuclear interactions of heavy ions that are a part of the Galactic Cosmic Radiation (GCR). The most important ions are likely to be iron, silicon, oxygen, and carbon. Transport of heavy ions through complex shielding materials including self-shielding of tissue modifies the radiation field at points of interest (e.g., at the blood-forming organs). The incident flux is changed by two types of interactions: (1) ionization energy loss, which results in reduced particle velocity and higher LET (Linear Energy Transfer); and (2) nuclear interactions that fragment the incident nuclei into less massive ions. Ionization energy loss is well understood, nuclear interactions less so. Thus studies of nuclear fragmentation at GCR-like energies are needed to fill the large gaps that currently exist in the database. These can be done at only a few accelerator facilities where appropriate beams are available. Here we report results from experiments performed at the Brookhaven National Laboratory s Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) and the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator in Chiba, Japan (HIMAC). Recent efforts have focused on extracting charge-changing and fragment production cross sections from silicon beams at 400, 600, and 1200 MeV/nucleon. Some energy dependence is observed in the fragment production cross sections, and as in other data sets the production of fragments with even charge numbers is enhanced relative to those with odd charge numbers. These data are compared to the NASA-LaRC model NUCFRG2. The charge-changing cross section data are compared to recent calculations using an improved model due to Tripathi, which accurately predicts the

  1. Material characterisation and preliminary mechanical design for the HL-LHC shielded beam screens operating at cryogenic temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garion, C; Dufay-Chanat, L; Koettig, T; Machiocha, W; Morrone, M

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC project (HL-LHC) aims at increasing the luminosity (rate of collisions) in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value (from 300 to 3000 fb -1 ). It relies on new superconducting magnets, installed close to the interaction points, equipped with new beam screen. This component has to ensure the vacuum performance together with shielding the cold mass from physics debris and screening the cold bore cryogenic system from beam induced heating. The beam screen operates in the range 40-60 K whereas the magnet cold bore temperature is 1.9 K. A tungsten-based material is used to absorb the energy of particles. In this paper, measurements of the mechanical and physical properties of such tungsten material are shown at room and cryogenic temperature. In addition, the design and the thermal mechanical behaviour of the beam screen assembly are presented also. They include the heat transfer from the tungsten absorbers to the cooling pipes and the supporting system that has to minimise the heat inleak into the cold mass. The behaviour during a magnet quench is also presented. (paper)

  2. Material characterisation and preliminary mechanical design for the HL-LHC shielded beam screens operating at cryogenic temperatures

    CERN Document Server

    Garion, C; Koettig, T; Machiocha, W; Morrone, M

    2015-01-01

    The High Luminosity LHC project (HL-LHC) aims at increasing the luminosity (rate of collisions) in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value (from 300 to 3000 fb-1). It relies on new superconducting magnets, installed close to the interaction points, equipped with new beam screen. This component has to ensure the vacuum performance together with shielding the cold mass from physics debris and screening the cold bore cryogenic system from beam induced heating. The beam screen operates in the range 40-60 K whereas the magnet cold bore temperature is 1.9 K. A tungsten-based material is used to absorb the energy of particles. In this paper, measurements of the mechanical and physical properties of such tungsten material are shown at room and cryogenic temperature. In addition, the design and the thermal mechanical behaviour of the beam screen assembly are presented also. They include the heat transfer from the tungsten absorbers to the cooling pipes and the sup...

  3. Material characterisation and preliminary mechanical design for the HL-LHC shielded beam screens operating at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garion, C.; Dufay-Chanat, L.; Koettig, T.; Machiocha, W.; Morrone, M.

    2015-12-01

    The High Luminosity LHC project (HL-LHC) aims at increasing the luminosity (rate of collisions) in the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) experiments by a factor of 10 beyond the original design value (from 300 to 3000 fb-1). It relies on new superconducting magnets, installed close to the interaction points, equipped with new beam screen. This component has to ensure the vacuum performance together with shielding the cold mass from physics debris and screening the cold bore cryogenic system from beam induced heating. The beam screen operates in the range 40-60 K whereas the magnet cold bore temperature is 1.9 K. A tungsten-based material is used to absorb the energy of particles. In this paper, measurements of the mechanical and physical properties of such tungsten material are shown at room and cryogenic temperature. In addition, the design and the thermal mechanical behaviour of the beam screen assembly are presented also. They include the heat transfer from the tungsten absorbers to the cooling pipes and the supporting system that has to minimise the heat inleak into the cold mass. The behaviour during a magnet quench is also presented.

  4. Thermal conductivity of fusion solid breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Y.Y.; Tam, S.W.

    1986-06-01

    Several simple and useful formulae for estimating the thermal conductivity of lithium-containing ceramic tritium breeder materials for fusion reactor blankets are given. These formulae account for the effects of irradiation, as well as solid breeder configuration, i.e., monolith or a packed bed. In the latter case, a coated-sphere concept is found more attractive in incorporating beryllia (a neutron multiplier) into the blanket than a random mixture of solid breeder and beryllia spheres

  5. Local behaviour of negative thermal expansion materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fornasini, P.; Dalba, G.; Grisenti, R.; Purans, J.; Vaccari, M.; Rocca, F.; Sanson, A.

    2006-01-01

    EXAFS can represent a powerful probe of the local behaviour of negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials, thanks to the possibility of measuring the expansion of selected inter-atomic bonds and the perpendicular relative atomic displacements. The effectiveness of EXAFS for NTE studies is illustrated by a comparison of results recently obtained on germanium, CuCl and the cuprites Cu 2 O and Ag 2 O

  6. Thermally Conductive Structural 2D Composite Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-14

    Dimensional Pitch Polyimide Composite Micrographs ........ 27 Figure 23. 4-Ply Silver Polyimide Laminate ...through-thickness thermal conductivity of up to 20 W/m.K. This novel structural prepreg material will be developed through engineering of an optimal fiber...with an EPON 862/Epikure W epoxy resin system to form unidirectional prepreg tapes. Each prepreg was then cut to 6 inch by 6 inch plies and

  7. Self-generated clouds of micron-sized particles as a promising way of a Solar Probe shielding from intense thermal radiation of the Sun

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dombrovsky, Leonid A.; Reviznikov, Dmitry L.; Kryukov, Alexei P.; Levashov, Vladimir Yu

    2017-10-01

    An effect of shielding of an intense solar radiation towards a solar probe with the use of micron-sized SiC particles generated during ablation of a composite thermal protection material is estimated on a basis of numerical solution to a combined radiative and heat transfer problem. The radiative properties of particles are calculated using the Mie theory, and the spectral two-flux model is employed in radiative transfer calculations for non-uniform particle clouds. A computational model for generation and evolution of the cloud is based on a conjugated heat transfer problem taking into account heating and thermal destruction of the matrix of thermal protection material and sublimation of SiC particles in the generated cloud. The effect of light pressure, which is especially important for small particles, is also taken into account. The computational data for mass loss due to the particle cloud sublimation showed the low value about 1 kg/m2 per hour at the distance between the vehicle and the Sun surface of about four radii of the Sun. This indicates that embedding of silicon carbide or other particles into a thermal protection layer and the resulting generation of a particle cloud can be considered as a promising way to improve the possibilities of space missions due to a significant decrease in the vehicle working distance from the solar photosphere.

  8. Thermal Energy Storage with Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavinia Gabriela SOCACIU

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Thermal energy storage (TES systems provide several alternatives for efficient energy use and conservation. Phase change materials (PCMs for TES are materials supplying thermal regulation at particular phase change temperatures by absorbing and emitting the heat of the medium. TES in general and PCMs in particular, have been a main topic in research for the last 30 years, but although the information is quantitatively enormous, it is also spread widely in the literature, and difficult to find. PCMs absorb energy during the heating process as phase change takes place and release energy to the environment in the phase change range during a reverse cooling process. PCMs possesses the ability of latent thermal energy change their state with a certain temperature. PCMs for TES are generally solid-liquid phase change materials and therefore they need encapsulation. TES systems using PCMs as a storage medium offers advantages such as high TES capacity, small unit size and isothermal behaviour during charging and discharging when compared to the sensible TES.

  9. Evaluation of radiation shielding performance in sea transport of radioactive material by using simple calculation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odano, N.; Ohnishi, S.; Sawamura, H.; Tanaka, Y.; Nishimura, K.

    2004-01-01

    A modified code system based on the point kernel method was developed to use in evaluation of shielding performance for maritime transport of radioactive material. For evaluation of shielding performance accurately in the case of accident, it is required to preciously model the structure of transport casks and shipping vessel, and source term. To achieve accurate modelling of the geometry and source term condition, we aimed to develop the code system by using equivalent information regarding structure and source term used in the Monte Carlo calculation code, MCNP. Therefore, adding an option to use point kernel method to the existing Monte Carlo code, MCNP4C, the code system was developed. To verify the developed code system, dose rate distribution in an exclusive shipping vessel to transport the low level radioactive wastes were calculated by the developed code and the calculated results were compared with measurements and Monte Carlo calculations. It was confirmed that the developed simple calculation method can obtain calculation results very quickly with enough accuracy comparing with the Monte Carlo calculation code MCNP4C

  10. Thermal and shielding layout of the transport and storage container Asse TB1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessels, W.; Muth, M.; Gross, S.; Pfeifer, S.; Kolditz, H.

    1985-01-01

    A large spectrum has been devoted to the general questions of the thermal and radiological calculations, the nuclide content of the different types of waste and to the layout of an optimum transport container. This also concerns the considerations in case of fire, since upon inserting a transport container into a mine particular importance is attached to the possible liberation of toxic materials under these circumstances. It was possible to construct a transport container with a weight less than 10 t in such a way that it is suitable to transport and store the planned vitrified HLW according to DWK-specifications in a final repository borehole. (orig./HP) [de

  11. COMPUTATIONAL FLUID DYNAMICS INVESTIGATION ON THE USE OF HEAT SHIELDS FOR THERMAL MANAGEMENT IN A CAR UNDERHOOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.Y. Lam

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Temperature variations inside a car underhood are largely controlled by the heat originating from the engine block and the exhaust manifold. Excessive temperatures in the underhood can lead to the faster deterioration of engine components and may affect the thermal comfort level inside the passenger cabin. This paper presents computational fluid dynamics investigations to assess the performance of a heat shield in lowering the peak temperature of the engine components and firewall in the underhood region of a typical passenger car. The simulation used the finite volume method with the standard k-ε turbulence model and an isothermal model for the heat transfer calculations. The results show that the heat shield managed to reduce the peak temperature of the engine components and firewall by insulating the intense heat from the engine block and exhaust and regulating the airflow inside the underhood region.

  12. Demonstration test on manufacturing 200 l drum inner shielding material for recycling of reactor operating metal scrap

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Umemura, A.; Kimura, K.; Ueno, H.

    1993-01-01

    Low-level reactor wastes should be safely recycled considering those resource values, the reduction of waste disposal volume and environmental effects. The reasonable recycling system of reactor operating metal scrap has been studied and it was concluded that the 200 liter drum inner shielding material is a very promising product for recycling within the nuclear industry. The drum inner shielding material does not require high quality and so it is expected to be easily manufactured by melting and casting from roughly sorted scrap metals. This means that the economical scrap metal recycling system can be achieved by introducing it. Furthermore its use will ensure safety because of being contained in a drum. In order to realize this recycling system with the drum inner shielding material, the demonstration test program is being conducted. The construction of the test facility, which consists of a melting and refining furnace, a casting apparatus, a machining apparatus etc., was finishing in September, 1992

  13. Hybrid Active-Passive Radiation Shielding System

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A radiation shielding system is proposed that integrates active magnetic fields with passive shielding materials. The objective is to increase the shielding...

  14. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Koshi Takenaka

    2012-01-01

    Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over −30 ppm K−1. Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining pra...

  15. Cardboard Based Packaging Materials as Renewable Thermal Insulation of Buildings: Thermal and Life Cycle Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Čekon, Miroslav; Struhala, Karel; Slávik, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Cardboard based packaging components represent a material with a significant potential of renewable exploitation in buildings. This study presents the results of thermal and environmental analysis of existing packaging materials compared with standard conventional thermal insulations. Experimental measurements were performed to identify the thermal performance of studied cardboard packaging materials. Real-size samples were experimentally tested in laboratory measurements. The thermal resi...

  16. Radiative thermal rectification using superconducting materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nefzaoui, Elyes, E-mail: elyes.nefzaoui@univ-poitiers.fr; Joulain, Karl, E-mail: karl.joulain@univ-poitiers.fr; Drevillon, Jérémie; Ezzahri, Younès [Institut Pprime, Université de Poitiers-CNRS-ENSMA, 2, Rue Pierre Brousse, Bâtiment B25, TSA 41105, 86073 Poitiers Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-03-10

    Thermal rectification can be defined as an asymmetry in the heat flux when the temperature difference between two interacting thermal reservoirs is reversed. In this Letter, we present a far-field radiative thermal rectifier based on high-temperature superconducting materials with a rectification ratio up to 80%. This value is among the highest reported in literature. Two configurations are examined: a superconductor (Tl{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8}) exchanging heat with (1) a black body and (2) another superconductor, YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} in this case. The first configuration shows a higher maximal rectification ratio. Besides, we show that the two-superconductor rectifier exhibits different rectification regimes depending on the choice of the reference temperature, i.e., the temperature of the thermostat. Presented results might be useful for energy conversion devices, efficient cryogenic radiative insulators engineering, and thermal logical circuits’ development.

  17. Effective thermal conductivity in thermoelectric materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baranowski, LL; Snyder, GJ; Toberer, ES

    2013-05-28

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) are solid state heat engines that generate electricity from a temperature gradient. Optimizing these devices for maximum power production can be difficult due to the many heat transport mechanisms occurring simultaneously within the TEG. In this paper, we develop a model for heat transport in thermoelectric materials in which an "effective thermal conductivity" (kappa(eff)) encompasses both the one dimensional steady-state Fourier conduction and the heat generation/consumption due to secondary thermoelectric effects. This model is especially powerful in that the value of kappa(eff) does not depend upon the operating conditions of the TEG but rather on the transport properties of the TE materials themselves. We analyze a variety of thermoelectric materials and generator designs using this concept and demonstrate that kappa(eff) predicts the heat fluxes within these devices to 5% of the exact value. (C) 2013 AIP Publishing LLC.

  18. Self shielding in cylindrical fissile sources in the APNea system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hensley, D.

    1997-01-01

    In order for a source of fissile material to be useful as a calibration instrument, it is necessary to know not only how much fissile material is in the source but also what the effective fissile content is. Because uranium and plutonium absorb thermal neutrons so Efficiently, material in the center of a sample is shielded from the external thermal flux by the surface layers of the material. Differential dieaway measurements in the APNea System of five different sets of cylindrical fissile sources show the various self shielding effects that are routinely encountered. A method for calculating the self shielding effect is presented and its predictions are compared with the experimental results

  19. Development of radiation shielding materials and NBC pads for infantry combat vehicle and tank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pal, R.S.; Gautam, O.P.; Katiyar, Mohit; Tripathi, D.N.; Singh, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    Tanks have special lining materials inside, providing a certain degree of radiation protection for operation in nuclear scenario's. At present these special lining materials in the form of sheets are imported and are fitted into armoured vehicles. Three types of polymer compositions; PE(M)SE, PEC-ISE and PEC-IISE were formulated based on polymer matrix, specific fillers and anti-ageing additives. Prototype NBC pads based on polymer composition PEC-ISE was finalized for moulding of NBC pads for use in ICVs and composition PE(M)SE was finalized for T-90 tanks. The physico-mechanical properties for NBC pads have been evaluated. Radiography of test samples was conducted to ensure homogeneity of specific fillers in the polymer matrix. Radiation shielding factors against nuclear radiation sources ( 60 Co, I37 Cs and 252 Cf) were evaluated at DL Jodhpur and found to be better than imported Russian Pads designed for ICVs and T-90 Tanks. Drawings for twelve types of NBC pads for ICVs and one hundred eighteen types of pads for T-90 tank were generated with the help of design tool, Auto Desk Inventor-II and metallic moulds for moulding of NBC pads were fabricated. Prototype NBC pads were moulded through compression moulding process. Radiation protection factors of prototype NBC pads, after fitment in ICVs, were also evaluated against neutron and gamma (primary and secondary) radiation sources. Prototype NBC pads for ICVs have shown 20% improvement in overall protection level and NBC pads for T-90 tanks have been developed as per design requirements. Manufacturing facility for NBC shielding pads have been established in association with industries. (author)

  20. Material shielding of power frequency magnetic fields: Research and testing results from the EPRI Power Delivery Center-Lenox. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, C.B.

    1998-06-01

    Extensive investigations of a variety of material shielding methods have been performed at the EPRI Power Delivery Center--Lenox, Massachusetts. This work is part of a larger shielding investigation being done for EPRI by Electric Research and Management, Inc. (ERM) as part of the Magnetic Field Management Target in the EPRI Environment Group. Part of this work, involving cylinders of material, is to be included in a shielding handbook being prepared by ERM. Material shielding tests, not included in the handbook, as well as additional material shielding research, including testing, analyses, and computer simulations performed at the EPRI Power Delivery Center--Lenox are documented here. One of the major complications of using materials to shield magnetic fields is the mathematical complexity of the phenomenon involved. The result is that analytical solutions exist only for a very small number of simple geometries such as spheres, infinitely long cylinders, and infinite sheets. In practice, the materials typically come in the form of sheets. At present, there are no analytical methods for directly determining the shielding effectiveness of finite sheets of material, however, EPRI is sponsoring work in this area. There are some methods based on conformal mapping which can provide a solution for simple two-dimensional sheets. While such methods are useful in gaining insight into the mechanisms of shielding, they are not realistic enough to provide accurate shielding estimates. Empirical techniques are still required to determine the shielding effectiveness of material sheets. The material shielding tests and computer simulations are described in the report. The results of these tests and simulations have been used to develop a number of material shielding design rules for use in practical applications

  1. Self-shielding and burn-out effects in the irradiation of strongly-neutron-absorbing material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekine, T.; Baba, H.

    1978-01-01

    Self-shielding and burn-out effects are discussed in the evaluation of radioisotopes formed by neutron irradiation of a strongly-neutron-absorbing material. A method of the evaluation of such effects is developed both for thermal and epithermal neutrons. Gadolinium oxide uniformly mixed with graphite powder was irradiated by reactor-neutrons together with pieces of a Co-Al alloy wire (the content of Co being 0.475%) as the neutron flux monitor. The configuration of the samples and flux monitors in each of two irradiations is illustrated. The yields of activities produced in the irradiated samples were determined by the γ-spectrometry with a Ge(Li) detector of a relative detection efficiency of 8%. Activities at the end of irradiation were estimated by corrections due to pile-up, self-absorption, detection efficiency, branching ratio, and decay of the activity. Results of the calculation are discussed in comparison with the observed yields of 153 Gd, 160 Tb, and 161 Tb for the case of neutron irradiation of disc-shaped targets of gadolinium oxide. (T.G.)

  2. About the Scythian Shields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    About the Scythian Shields

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Shields played major role in the armament system of the Scythians. Made from organic materials, they are poorly traced on the materials of archaeological excavations. Besides, scaly surface of shields was often perceived in practice as the remnants of the scaly armor. E. V. Chernenko was able to discern the difference between shields’ scaly plates and armor scales. The top edge of the scales was bent inwards, and shield plates had a wire fixation. These observations let significantly increase the number of shields, found in the burial complexes of the Scythians. The comparison of archaeological materials and the images of Scythian warriors allow distinguishing the main forms of Scythian shields. All shields are divided into fencing shields and cover shields. The fencing shields include round wooden shields, reinforced with bronze sheet, and round moon-shaped shields with a notch at the top, with a metal scaly surface. They came to the Scythians under the Greek influence and are known in the monuments of the 4th century BC. Oval shields with scaly surface (back cover shields were used by the Scythian cavalry. They protected the rider in case of frontal attack, and moved back in case of maneuver or closein fighting. Scythian battle tactics were based on rapid approaching the enemy and throwing spears and further rapid withdrawal. Spears stuck in the shields of enemies, forcing them to drop the shields, uncover, and in this stage of the battle the archers attacked the disorganized ranks of the enemy. That was followed by the stage of close fight. Oval form of a wooden shield with leather covering was used by the Scythian infantry and spearmen. Rectangular shields, including wooden shields and the shields pleached from rods, represented a special category. The top of such shield was made of wood, and a pleached pad on leather basis was attached to it. This shield could be a reliable protection from arrows, but it could not protect against javelins

  3. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D. K.; Burrows, R. W.; Shinton, Y. D.

    1985-01-01

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations are discussed. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  4. Composite materials for thermal energy storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D.K.; Burrows, R.W.; Shinton, Y.D.

    1985-01-04

    A composite material for thermal energy storage based upon polyhydric alcohols, such as pentaerythritol, trimethylol ethane (also known as pentaglycerine), neopentyl glycol and related compounds including trimethylol propane, monoaminopentaerythritol, diamino-pentaerythritol and tris(hydroxymethyl)acetic acid, separately or in combinations, which provide reversible heat storage through crystalline phase transformations. These PCM's do not become liquid during use and are in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, porous rock, and mixtures thereof. Particulate additions such as aluminum or graphite powders, as well as metal and carbon fibers can also be incorporated therein. Particulate and/or fibrous additions can be introduced into molten phase change materials which can then be cast into various shapes. After the phase change materials have solidified, the additions will remain dispersed throughout the matrix of the cast solid. The polyol is in contact with at least one material selected from the group consisting of metals, carbon, siliceous, plastic, cellulosic, natural fiber, artificial fiber, concrete, gypsum, and mixtures thereof.

  5. Assessment of radiation shielding materials for protection of space crews using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeWitt, J.M.; Benton, E.R.; Uchihori, Y.; Yasuda, N.; Benton, E.V.; Frank, A.L.

    2009-01-01

    A significant obstacle to long duration human space exploration such as the establishment of a permanent base on the surface of the Moon or a human mission to Mars is the risk posed by prolonged exposure to space radiation. In order to keep mission costs at acceptable levels while simultaneously minimizing the risk from radiation to space crew health and safety, a judicious use of optimized shielding materials will be required. We have undertaken a comprehensive study using CR-39 plastic nuclear track detector (PNTD) to characterize the radiation shielding properties of a range of materials-both common baseline materials such as Al and polyethylene, and novel multifunctional materials such as carbon composites-at heavy ion accelerators. The study consists of analyzing CR-39 PNTD exposed in front of and behind shielding targets of varying composition and at a number of depths (target thicknesses) relevant to the development and testing of materials for space radiation shielding. Most targets consist of 10 cm x 10 cm slabs of solid materials ranging in thickness from 1 to >30 g/cm 2 . Exposures have been made to beams of C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, and Fe at energies ranging from 290 MeV/amu to 1 GeV/amu at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences HIMAC and the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Analysis of the exposed detectors yields LET spectrum, dose, and dose equivalent as functions of target depth and composition, and incident heavy ion charge, energy, and fluence. Efforts are currently underway to properly weigh and combine these results into a single quantitative estimate of a material's ability to shield space crews from the interplanetary galactic cosmic ray flux.

  6. A New Algorithm for Radioisotope Identification of Shielded and Masked SNM/RDD Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeffcoat, R.

    2012-01-01

    Detection and identification of shielded and masked nuclear materials is crucial to national security, but vast borders and high volumes of traffic impose stringent requirements for practical detection systems. Such tools must be be mobile, and hence low power, provide a low false alarm rate, and be sufficiently robust to be operable by non-technical personnel. Currently fielded systems have not achieved all of these requirements simultaneously. Transport modeling such as that done in GADRAS is able to predict observed spectra to a high degree of fidelity; our research is focusing on a radionuclide identification algorithm that inverts this modeling within the constraints imposed by a handheld device. Key components of this work include incorporation of uncertainty as a function of both the background radiation estimate and the hypothesized sources, dimensionality reduction, and nonnegative matrix factorization. We have partially evaluated performance of our algorithm on a third-party data collection made with two different sodium iodide detection devices. Initial results indicate, with caveats, that our algorithm performs as good as or better than the on-board identification algorithms. The system developed was based on a probabilistic approach with an improved approach to variance modeling relative to past work. This system was chosen based on technical innovation and system performance over algorithms developed at two competing research institutions. One key outcome of this probabilistic approach was the development of an intuitive measure of confidence which was indeed useful enough that a classification algorithm was developed based around alarming on high confidence targets. This paper will present and discuss results of this novel approach to accurately identifying shielded or masked radioisotopes with radiation detection systems.

  7. Ultra-low thermal expansion realized in giant negative thermal expansion materials through self-compensation

    OpenAIRE

    Fei-Ran Shen; Hao Kuang; Feng-Xia Hu; Hui Wu; Qing-Zhen Huang; Fei-Xiang Liang; Kai-Ming Qiao; Jia Li; Jing Wang; Yao Liu; Lei Zhang; Min He; Ying Zhang; Wen-Liang Zuo; Ji-Rong Sun

    2017-01-01

    Materials with zero thermal expansion (ZTE) or precisely tailored thermal expansion are in urgent demand of modern industries. However, the overwhelming majority of materials show positive thermal expansion. To develop ZTE or negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials as compensators has become an important challenge. Here, we present the evidence for the realization of ultra-low thermal expansion in Mn–Co–Ge–In particles. The bulk with the Ni2In-type hexagonal structure undergoes giant NTE o...

  8. Radiation shielding lead shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dei, Shoichi.

    1991-01-01

    The present invention concerns lead shields for radiation shielding. Shield boxes are disposed so as to surround a pipeline through which radioactive liquids, mists or like other objects are passed. Flanges are formed to each of the end edges of the shield boxes and the shield boxes are connected to each other by the flanges. Upon installation, empty shield boxes not charged with lead particles and iron plate shields are secured at first at the periphery of the pipeline. Then, lead particles are charged into the shield boxes. This attains a state as if lead plate corresponding to the depth of the box is disposed. Accordingly, operations for installation, dismantling and restoration can be conducted in an empty state with reduced weight to facilitate the operations. (I.S.)

  9. Thermal cycling fatigue of organic thermal interface materials using a thermal-displacement measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steill, Jason Scott

    The long term reliability of polymer-based thermal interface materials (TIM) is essential for modern electronic packages which require robust thermal management. The challenge for today's materials scientists and engineers is to maximize the heat flow from integrated circuits through a TIM and out the heat sink. Thermal cycling of the electronic package and non-uniformity in the heat flux with respect to the plan area can lead to void formation and delamination which re-introduces inefficient heat transfer. Measurement and understanding at the nano-scale is essential for TIM development. Finding and documenting the evolution of the defects is dependent upon a full understanding of the thermal probes response to changing environmental conditions and the effects of probe usage. The response of the thermal-displacement measurement technique was dominated by changes to the environment. Accurate measurement of the thermal performance was hindered by the inability to create a model system and control the operating conditions. This research highlights the need for continued study into the probe's thermal and mechanical response using tightly controlled test conditions.

  10. Fabrication of a full-size mock-up for inboard 10o section of ITER vacuum vessel thermal shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, W.; Nam, K.; Noh, C.H.; Kang, D.K.; Kang, S.M.; Oh, Y.G.; Choi, S.W.; Kang, S.H.; Utin, Y.; Ioki, K.; Her, N.; Yu, J.

    2011-01-01

    A full-scale mock-up of VVTS inboard section was made in order to validate its manufacturing processes before manufacturing the vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) for ITER tokamak. VVTS inboard 10 o section consists of 20 mm shells on which cooling tubes are welded and flange joints that connect adjacent thermal shield sectors. The whole VVTS inboard is divided into two by bisectional flange joint located at the center. All the manufacturing processes except silver coating were tested and verified in the fabrication of mock-up. For the forming and the welding, pre-qualification tests were conducted to find proper process conditions. Shell thickness change was measured after bending, forming and buffing processes. Shell distortion was adjusted after the welding. Welding was validated by non-destructive examination. Bisectional flange joint was successfully assembled by inserting pins and tightening with bolt/nut. Bolt hole margin of 2 mm for sector flange was revealed to be sufficient by successful sector assembly of upper and lower parts of mock-up. Handling jig was found to be essential because the inboard section was flexible. Dimensional inspection of the fabricated mock-up was performed with a 3D laser scanner.

  11. Radiation shielding material characterization by non-destructive neutron radiography technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hafizal Yazid; Azali Muhammad; Abdul Aziz Mohamed; Rafhayudi Jamro; Hishamuddin Husain

    2007-01-01

    Shielding property of boronated rubber was characterized easily by the use of neutron radiography technique. For 10 phr of boron carbide in the natural rubber composite, the ability to completely shield against neutron was found to have 8mm thickness and above for the neutron flux of 1.04 x 10 5 n/cm 2 s (author)

  12. Radiation shielding device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Takahiro; Yamagami, Makoto.

    1996-01-01

    A fixed shielding member made of a radiation shielding material is constituted in perpendicular to an opening formed on radiation shielding walls. The fixed shielding member has one side opened and has other side, the upper portion and the lower portion disposed in close contact with the radiation shielding walls. Movable shielding members made of a radiation shielding material are each disposed openably on both side of the fixed shielding member. The movable shielding member has a shaft as a fulcrum on one side thereof for connecting it to the radiation shielding walls. The other side has a handle attached for opening/closing the movable shielding member. Upon access of an operator, when each one of the movable shielding members is opened/closed on every time, leakage of linear or scattered radiation can be prevented. Even when both of the movable shielding members are opened simultaneously, the fixed shielding member and the movable shielding members form labyrinth to prevent leakage of linear radioactivity. (I.N.)

  13. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenaka, Koshi

    2012-02-01

    Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over -30 ppm K -1 . Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining practical aspects, this review briefly summarizes materials and mechanisms of NTE as well as composites containing NTE materials, based mainly on activities of the last decade.

  14. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koshi Takenaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over −30 ppm K−1. Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining practical aspects, this review briefly summarizes materials and mechanisms of NTE as well as composites containing NTE materials, based mainly on activities of the last decade.

  15. Negative thermal expansion materials: technological key for control of thermal expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takenaka, Koshi

    2012-01-01

    Most materials expand upon heating. However, although rare, some materials contract upon heating. Such negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials have enormous industrial merit because they can control the thermal expansion of materials. Recent progress in materials research enables us to obtain materials exhibiting negative coefficients of linear thermal expansion over −30 ppm K −1 . Such giant NTE is opening a new phase of control of thermal expansion in composites. Specifically examining practical aspects, this review briefly summarizes materials and mechanisms of NTE as well as composites containing NTE materials, based mainly on activities of the last decade. (topical review)

  16. Magnetic Materials Characterization and Modeling for the Enhanced Design of Magnetic Shielding of Cryomodules in Particle Accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, Sanjay [Virginia Commonwealth Univ., Richmond, VA (United States)

    2016-05-31

    Particle accelerators produce beams of high-energy particles, which are used for both fundamental and applied scientific research and are critical to the development of accelerator driven sub-critical reactor systems. An effective magnetic shield is very important to achieve higher quality factor (Qo) of the cryomodule of a particle accelerator. The allowed value of field inside the cavity due to all external fields (particularly the Earth’s magnetic field) is ~15 mG or less. The goal of this PhD dissertation is to comprehensively study the magnetic properties of commonly used magnetic shielding materials at both cryogenic and room temperatures. This knowledge can be used for the enhanced design of magnetic shields of cryomodes (CM) in particle accelerators. To this end, we first studied the temperature dependent magnetization behavior (M-H curves) of Amumetal and A4K under different annealing and deformation conditions. This characterized the effect of stress or deformation induced during the manufacturing processes and subsequent restoration of high permeability with appropriate heat treatment. Next, an energy based stochastic model for temperature dependent anhysteretic magnetization behavior of ferromagnetic materials was proposed and benchmarked against experimental data. We show that this model is able to simulate and explain the magnetic behavior of as rolled, deformed and annealed amumetal and A4K over a large range of temperatures. The experimental results for permeability are then used in a finite element model (FEM) in COMSOL to evaluate the shielding effectiveness of multiple shield designs at room temperature as well as cryogenic temperature. This work could serve as a guideline for future design, development and fabrication of magnetic shields of CMs.

  17. Reactive thermal waves in energetic materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Larry G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Reactive thermal waves (RTWs) arise in several energetic material applications, including self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (SHS), high explosive cookoff, and the detonation of heterogeneous explosives. In this paper I exmaine ideal RTWs, by which I mean that (1) material motion is neglected, (2) the state dependence of reaction is Arrhenius in the temperature, and (3) the reaction rate is modulated by an arbitrary mass-fraction-based reaction progress function. Numerical simulations demonstrate that one's natural intuition, which is based mainly upon experience with inert materials and which leads one to expect diffusion processes to become relatively slow after a short time period, is invalid for high energy, state-sensitive reactive systems. Instead, theory predicts that RTWs can propagate at very high speeds. This result agrees with estimates for detonating heterogeneous explosives, which indicate that RTWs must spread from hot-spot nucleation sites at rates comparable to the detonation speed in order to produce experimentally-observed reaction zone thicknesses. Using dimensionless scaling and further invoking the high activation energy approximation, I obtain an analytic formula for the steady plane RTW speed from numerical calculations. I then compute the RTW speed for real explosives, and discuss aspects of their behavior.

  18. Model-based analysis of nonstationary thermal mode in premises with an insolation passive heating system with a three-layer translucent shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avezova, N.R.; Avezov, R.R.; Rashidov, Y.K. et al.

    2014-01-01

    The results of the model-based study of nonstationary thermal mode in premises with an insolation passive heating system with a three-layer translucent shield are presented. The article is aimed at determining daily variations in the air temperature of the heated premise on typical heating season days and analyzing the optimization of the thermal capacity of the short-term (daily) thermal battery of the heating system on this basis. (author)

  19. X-ray Micro-Tomography of Ablative Heat Shield Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panerai, Francesco; Ferguson, Joseph; Borner, Arnaud; Mansour, Nagi N.; Barnard, Harold S.; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Parkinson, Dilworth Y.

    2016-01-01

    X-ray micro-tomography is a non-destructive characterization technique that allows imaging of materials structures with voxel sizes in the micrometer range. This level of resolution makes the technique very attractive for imaging porous ablators used in hypersonic entry systems. Besides providing a high fidelity description of the material architecture, micro-tomography enables computations of bulk material properties and simulations of micro-scale phenomena. This presentation provides an overview of a collaborative effort between NASA Ames Research Center and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, aimed at developing micro-tomography experiments and simulations for porous ablative materials. Measurements are carried using x-rays from the Advanced Light Source at Berkeley Lab on different classes of ablative materials used in NASA entry systems. Challenges, strengths and limitations of the technique for imaging materials such as lightweight carbon-phenolic systems and woven textiles are discussed. Computational tools developed to perform numerical simulations based on micro-tomography are described. These enable computations of material properties such as permeability, thermal and radiative conductivity, tortuosity and other parameters that are used in ablator response models. Finally, we present the design of environmental cells that enable imaging materials under simulated operational conditions, such as high temperature, mechanical loads and oxidizing atmospheres.Keywords: Micro-tomography, Porous media, Ablation

  20. Material and electromagnetic properties of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron heating antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Baity, F.W.; Becraft, W.R.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Tsai, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Faraday shields for ion cyclotron antennas must transmit magnetic waves and absorb little RF power. To investigate these properties, we have constructed 27 Faraday shields in many configurations, including chevrons, tubes, straps, concentric rings, various layered shields, conventionally leafed straps, and replicas of the Faraday shields for ASDEX, the Joint European Torus (JET), TEXTOR, and Alcator-C. We have measured the magnetic flux and observed loading at various operating resistances by using dielectric sheets or magnetic-coupled loads. Each Faraday shield effects a net change in the characteristic inductance of the antenna, resulting in a reduction of wave coupling. However, the load experienced by the antenna is not always reduced because the Faraday shield itself acts as a load. We differentiate between these effects experimentally. The net result of the study is that the Faraday shields now in use cost up to a factor of 50% of coupling. This, of course, reduces the power handling capability by 50% as well. However, configurations exist that are easily cooled and result in a reduction of less than 5% in loading

  1. Material and electromagnetic properties of Faraday shields for ion cyclotron heating antennas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, D.J.; Becraft, W.R.; Baity, F.W.; Caughman, J.B.O.; Tsai, C.C.

    1985-01-01

    The Faraday shields for ion cyclotron antennas must transmit magnetic waves and adsorb little rf power. To investigate these properties, we have constructed 27 Faraday shields in many configurations, including chevrons, tubes, straps, concentric rings, various layered shields, conventionally leafed straps, and replicas of the Faraday shields for ASDEX, the Joint European Torus (JET), TEXTOR, and Alcator-C. We have measured the magnetic flux and observed loading at various operating resistances by using dielectric sheets or magnetic-coupled loads. Each Faraday shield effects a net change in the characteristic inductance of the antenna, resulting in a reduction of wave coupling. However, the load experienced by the antenna is not always reduced because the Faraday shield itself acts as a load. We differentiate between these effects experimentally. The net result of the study is that the Faraday shields now in use cost up to a factor of 50% of coupling. This, of course, reduces the power handling capability by 50% as well. However, configurations exist that are easily cooled and result in a reduction of less than 5% in loading

  2. Nuclear steam generator tubesheet shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickerson, J.H.D.; Ruhe, A.

    1982-01-01

    The invention involves improvements to a nuclear steam generator of the type in which a plurality of U-shaped tubes are connected at opposite ends to a tubesheet and extend between inlet and outlet chambers, with the steam generator including an integral preheater zone adjacent to the downflow legs of the U-shaped tubes. The improvement is a thermal shield disposed adjacent to an upper face of the tubesheet within the preheater zone, the shield including ductile cladding material applied directly to the upper face of the tubesheet, with the downflow legs of the U-shaped tubes extending through the cladding into the tubesheet

  3. Thermal Shielding of the Shock Absorber to a Seal of a Hot-cell Cask

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bang, K. S.; Lee, J. C.; Kim, K. Y.; Seo, C. S.; Seo, K. S. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    In order to safely transport the radioactive waste arising from the hot test of ACP(Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process) a shipping package is required. Therefore KAERI is developing a shipping package to transport the radioactive waste arising in the ACPF during a hot test. Regulatory requirements for a Type B package are specified in the Korea MOST Act 2008-69, IAEA Safety Standard Series No. TS-R-1, and US 10 CFR Part. These regulatory guidelines classify the hot cell cask as a Type B package, and state that the Type B package for transporting radioactive materials should be able to withstand a test sequence consisting of a 9 m drop onto an unyielding surface, a 1 m drop onto a puncture bar, and a 30 minute fully engulfing fire. Greiner et al. performed a research on the thermal protection provided by shock absorbers by using CAFE computer code. This paper discusses the experimental approach used to simulate the response of the hot cell cask to fire in a furnace with chamber dimensions of 300 cm(W) x 400 cm(L) x 200 cm(H) by using a 1/2 scale model which was damaged by both a 9 m drop test and a 1 m puncture test

  4. Investigation of 1-cm dose equivalent for photons behind shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirayama, Hideo; Tanaka, Shun-ichi

    1991-03-01

    The ambient dose equivalent at 1-cm depth, assumed equivalent to the 1-cm dose equivalent in practical dose estimations behind shielding slabs of water, concrete, iron or lead for normally incident photons having various energies was calculated by using conversion factors for a slab phantom. It was compared with the 1-cm depth dose calculated with the Monte Carlo code EGS4. It was concluded from this comparison that the ambient dose equivalent calculated by using the conversion factors for the ICRU sphere could be used for the evaluation of the 1-cm dose equivalent for the sphere phantom within 20% errors. Average and practical conversion factors are defined as the conversion factors from exposure to ambient dose equivalent in a finite slab or an infinite one, respectively. They were calculated with EGS4 and the discrete ordinates code PALLAS. The exposure calculated with simple estimation procedures such as point kernel methods can be easily converted to ambient dose equivalent by using these conversion factors. The maximum value between 1 and 30 mfp can be adopted as the conversion factor which depends only on material and incident photon energy. This gives the ambient dose equivalent on the safe side. 13 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs

  5. Quantification of Fissile Materials by Photon Activation Method in a Highly Shielded Enclosure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dighe, P.M.; Pithawa, C.K.; Goswami, A.; Dixit, K.P.; Mittal, K.C.; Sunil, C.; Sarkar, P.K.; Mukhopadhyay, P.K.; Patil, R.K.; Srivastava, G.P.; Ganesan, S.; Venugopal, V.

    2010-01-01

    For active and non-destructive quantitative identification of heavily shielded fissile materials, photo fission is one of the most often used techniques. High energy photon beams can be conveniently generated with the help of electron LINACs. 10MeV energy electron LINACs are extensively used for various industrial applications such as food irradiation, X-ray radiography, etc. The radiological safety consideration favours the use of electron beam of upto 10 MeV energy. The photonuclear data available on 10 MeV end point energy is very scarce. The present paper gives the results of our initial experiments carried out using natural uranium samples at 10 MeV LINAC facility. Water cooled tantalum target converter was used to produce intense Bremsstrahlung to induce photofission in the samples. Neutron detection system consists of six numbers of high sensitivity Helium-3 proportional counters and gamma detection system consists of two numbers of 76 mm diameter BGO scintillators. Delayed neutron and delayed gamma radiations were measured and analyzed. The mass to count rate relationship has been established for both delayed neutron and gamma radiations. Delayed gamma decay constants of natural uranium have been derived for the 10 MeV end point energy. (author)

  6. Availability of special local rock materials for using in radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rammah, S.; Al-Hent, R.; Aissa, M.; Yousef, S.

    2003-11-01

    Concrete is an excellent and versatile material for using in radiation shielding of nuclear power plants, hot cells and medical facilities that deal with ionizing radiations, Because it is easy controlled with composition and density by using aggregates with high specific gravity such as Barite, Hematite, Magnetite, or minerals with high hydrogen content such as Serpentine. This research offered the essential information about local resources rocks and minerals can be used in this inclination, as aggregates for heavy/high hydrion concrete. The present work indicates that iron ores, which located in RAJO-EFREEN is better than other locations like ANTI-LEBANON or AL-KADMOUS. While the heavy beach sands in AL-BASSIT are the best compared with other locations on the Syrian seaside, because it has acceptable percentage of heavy mineral. Barite concretions were found in KALAMON, HOMS and other sites, which its percentages approach 50%, but however in small quantities. Finally, high hydrion concrete can be used by Serpentinite were found with high Serpentine percentage in BAYER and BASSIT blocks. (author)

  7. Barium and calcium borate glasses as shielding materials for x rays and gamma rays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, H.; Singh, K.; Sharma, G.

    2003-01-01

    Values of the gamma-ray, mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number have been determined experimentally for xBaO.(1-x) B2O3 (x=0.24, 0.30, 0.34,0.40 and 0.44) and xCaO. (I-x)B2O3 (x=0.30 and 0.40) glasses at photon energies 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV It is pointed out tha...... that these glasses are potential radiation shielding materials. The specific volume of the glasses has been derived from density measurements and studied as a function of composition.......Values of the gamma-ray, mass attenuation coefficient and the effective atomic number have been determined experimentally for xBaO.(1-x) B2O3 (x=0.24, 0.30, 0.34,0.40 and 0.44) and xCaO. (I-x)B2O3 (x=0.30 and 0.40) glasses at photon energies 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV It is pointed out...

  8. Ground-based simulations of cosmic ray heavy ion interactions in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J.; Zeitlin, C.; Heilbronn, L.; Borak, T.; Carter, T.; Frankel, K. A.; Fukumura, A.; Murakami, T.; Rademacher, S. E.; Schimmerling, W.; hide

    1998-01-01

    This paper surveys some recent accelerator-based measurements of the nuclear fragmentation of high energy nuclei in shielding and tissue-equivalent materials. These data are needed to make accurate predictions of the radiation field produced at depth in spacecraft and planetary habitat shielding materials and in the human body by heavy charged particles in the galactic cosmic radiation. Projectile-target combinations include 1 GeV/nucleon 56Fe incident on aluminum and graphite and 600 MeV/nucleon 56Fe and 290 MeV/nucleon 12C on polyethylene. We present examples of the dependence of fragmentation on material type and thickness, of a comparison between data and a fragmentation model, and of multiple fragments produced along the beam axis.

  9. Composite Materials for Thermal Energy Storage: Enhancing Performance through Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhiwei; Ye, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-01-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are investigated. The ceramic supporting material is essential for preventing salt leakage and hence provides a solution to the chemical incompatibility issue. The use of graphite gives a significant enhancement on the thermal conductivity of the composite. Analyses suggest that the experimentally observed microstructural development of the composite is associated with the wettability of the salt on the ceramic substrate and that on the thermal conduction enhancer. PMID:24591286

  10. Composite materials for thermal energy storage: enhancing performance through microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Zhiwei; Ye, Feng; Ding, Yulong

    2014-05-01

    Chemical incompatibility and low thermal conductivity issues of molten-salt-based thermal energy storage materials can be addressed by using microstructured composites. Using a eutectic mixture of lithium and sodium carbonates as molten salt, magnesium oxide as supporting material, and graphite as thermal conductivity enhancer, the microstructural development, chemical compatibility, thermal stability, thermal conductivity, and thermal energy storage performance of composite materials are investigated. The ceramic supporting material is essential for preventing salt leakage and hence provides a solution to the chemical incompatibility issue. The use of graphite gives a significant enhancement on the thermal conductivity of the composite. Analyses suggest that the experimentally observed microstructural development of the composite is associated with the wettability of the salt on the ceramic substrate and that on the thermal conduction enhancer. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Gonadal shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, J A; Stiteler, R D; Glasgow, G P; Mill, W B

    1975-10-01

    A secondary gonadal shield for use in the pelvic irradiation of males was designed and built using material and apparatus available with the Cerrobend blocking system. The gonadal dose was reduced to approximately 1.5 to 2.5% of the given dose.

  12. Radiation shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, D.

    1979-01-01

    Shields for equipment in which ionising radiation is associated with high electrical gradients, for example X-ray tubes and particle accelerators, incorporate a radiation-absorbing metal, as such or as a compound, and are electrically non-conducting and can be placed in the high electrical gradient region of the equipment. Substances disclosed include dispersions of lead, tungsten, uranium or oxides of these in acrylics polyesters, PVC, ABS, polyamides, PTFE, epoxy resins, glass or ceramics. The material used may constitute an evacuable enclosure of the equipment or may be an external shield thereof. (U.K.)

  13. Electromagnetic interference shielding and thermal properties of non-covalently functionalized reduced graphene oxide/epoxy composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Chhetri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Graphene oxide (GO was non-covalently functionalized using sulfanilic acid azocromotrop (SAC followed by hydrazine reduction to achieve SAC functionalized reduced GO (SAC-rGO. Fourier transform infrared spectra analysis and electrical conductivity measurements confirmed the successful functionlization and reduction of GO. The electrical conductivity of ~515 S•m−1 for SAC-rGO was recorded. The non-covalently functionalized reduced GO was subsequently dispersed in epoxy matrix at the loading level of 0.3 to 0.5 wt% to investigate its electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding properties. The morphological and structural characterization of the SAC-rGO/epoxy composites was carried out using X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy analysis, which revealed the good dispersion of SAC-rGO in the epoxy. The SAC-rGO/epoxy composites showed the EMI shielding of −22.6 dB at the loading of 0.5 wt% SAC-rGO. Dynamical mechanical properties of the composites were studied to establish the reinforcing competency of the SAC-rGO. The storage modulus of the composites was found to increase within the studied temperature. Thermal stability of pure epoxy and its composites were compared by selecting the temperatures at 10 and 50% weight loss, respectively.

  14. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoff, Gabriela [Pontificia Univ. Catolica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUCRS), Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil). Grupo de Experimentacao e Simulacao Computacional em Fisica Medica; Costa, Paulo Roberto, E-mail: pcosta@if.usp.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (IF/USP), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica Nuclear. Lab. de Dosimetria das Radiacoes e Fisica Medica

    2013-03-15

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and compared to The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) data for lead. Their influence on the transmission curves as well the study of the influence of the shielding material composition and beam geometry on the outgoing spectra were performed. Characteristics of transmitted spectra, such as shape, average energy and Half-Value Layer (HVL), were also evaluated. The Geant4 toolkit benchmark for the energy resulting from the positron annihilation phenomena and its application in transmission curves description shown good agreement between data published by American Association on Physicists in Medicine task group 108 and experimental data published by Brazil. The transmission properties for different material compositions were also studied and have shown low dependency with the considered thicknesses. The broad and narrow beams configuration presented significant differences on the result. The fitting parameter for determining the transmission curves equations, according to Archer model is presented for different material. As conclusion were defined that beam geometry has significant influence and the composition has low influence on transmission curves for shielding design for the range of energy applied to PET. (author)

  15. A comparative study for different shielding material composition and beam geometry applied to PET facilities: simulated transmission curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoff, Gabriela; Costa, Paulo Roberto

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to simulate transmission data for different beam geometry and material composition in order to evaluate the effect of these parameters on transmission curves. The simulations are focused on outgoing spectra for shielding barriers used in PET facilities. The behavior of the transmission was evaluated as a function of the shielding material composition and thickness using Geant4 Monte Carlo code, version 9.2 p 03.The application was benchmarked for barited mortar and compared to The American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) data for lead. Their influence on the transmission curves as well the study of the influence of the shielding material composition and beam geometry on the outgoing spectra were performed. Characteristics of transmitted spectra, such as shape, average energy and Half-Value Layer (HVL), were also evaluated. The Geant4 toolkit benchmark for the energy resulting from the positron annihilation phenomena and its application in transmission curves description shown good agreement between data published by American Association on Physicists in Medicine task group 108 and experimental data published by Brazil. The transmission properties for different material compositions were also studied and have shown low dependency with the considered thicknesses. The broad and narrow beams configuration presented significant differences on the result. The fitting parameter for determining the transmission curves equations, according to Archer model is presented for different material. As conclusion were defined that beam geometry has significant influence and the composition has low influence on transmission curves for shielding design for the range of energy applied to PET. (author)

  16. Basic Thermal Parameters of Selected Foods and Food Raw Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Monika Božiková; Ľubomír Híreš; Michal Valach; Martin Malínek; Jan Mareček

    2017-01-01

    In general, processing and manipulation with foods and food raw materials have significant influence on their physical properties. The article is focused on thermophysical parameters measurement of selected foods and food raw materials. There were examined thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of selected materials. For detection of thermal parameters was used instrument Isomet 2104, which principle of measurement is based on transient methods. In text are presented summary results of ...

  17. Complex evaluation of properties for some thermal insulating materials of NPP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurchenko, V.G.; Nazarova, G.A.; Yakunichev, V.N.; Potulov, V.V.; Kazakova, K.A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of the main operational factors (temperature, ionizing radiation, increased humidity) on some most widely applied fibrous materials are investigated. The samples were irradiated by 60 Co gamma photons at the PKhM-gamma-20 device in air at temperature of 40±1 deg C in order to analyze the radiation resistance of thermal insulating materials. The analysis and generalization of the results of laboratory tests give an opportunity to make the following conclusions. The thermal insulation articles and constructions made of superfine basalt fiber may be used in the zones of rigorous regime. The superfine glass fibers (GF) are recommended to be used for equipment and pipeline shielding in the zones of rigorous control only as a part of multilayer insulation as the second or next layers and only in places where leaks are impossible

  18. Fabrication of full-size mock-up for 10° section of ITER vacuum vessel thermal shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Dong Kwon [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Kwanwoo, E-mail: kwnam@nfri.re.kr [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Kyoung-O; Noh, Chang Hyun; Chung, Wooho [ITER Korea, National Fusion Research Institute, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Lim, Kisuk; Kang, Youngkil [SFA Engineering Corp., Asan-si, Chungcheongnam-do 336-873 (Korea, Republic of); Hamlyn-Harris, Craig; Her, Namil; Robby, Hicks [ITER Organization, Route de Vinon-sur-Verdon, CS 90 046, 13067 St. Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France)

    2015-10-15

    In this paper, a full-scale prototype fabrication for vacuum vessel thermal shield (VVTS) of ITER tokamak is described and test results are reported. All the manufacturing processes except for silver coating were performed in the fabrication of 10° section of VVTS. Pre-qualification test was conducted to compare the vertical and the horizontal welding positions. After shell welding, shell distortion was measured and adjusted. Shell thickness change was also measured after buffing process. Specially, VVTS ports need large bending and complex welding of shell and flange. Bending method for the complex and long cooling tube layout especially for the VVTS ports was developed in detail. Dimensional inspection of the fabricated mock-up was performed with a 3D laser scanner and the scanning data was analyzed.

  19. Self-shielding factors for TLD-600 and TLD-100 in an isotropic flux of thermal neutrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horowitz, Y.S.; Dubi, A.; Ben Shahar, B.

    1976-01-01

    The applications of lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosemeters in mixed n-γ environments, and the dependence of LiF-TL on linear energy transfer are both topics of current interest. Monte Carlo calculations have therefore been carried out to determine the thermal neutron absorption probability (and consequently the self-shielding factor) for an isotropic flux of neutrons impinging on different sized cylindrical samples of LiF TLD-100 and TLD-600. The calculations were performed for cylinders of radius up to 10 cm and heights of 0.1 to 1.5 cm. The Monte Carlo results were found to be significantly different from the analytic calculations for infinitely long cylinders, but, as expected, converged to the same value for (r/h) << 1. (U.K.)

  20. Development of BaO-ZnO-B2O3 glasses as a radiation shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanthima, N.; Kaewkhao, J.; Limkitjaroenporn, P.; Tuscharoen, S.; Kothan, S.; Tungjai, M.; Kaewjaeng, S.; Sarachai, S.; Limsuwan, P.

    2017-08-01

    The effects of the BaO on the optical, physical and radiation shielding properties of the xBaO: 20ZnO: (80-x)B2O3, where x=5, 10, 15, 20 and 25 mol%, were investigated. The glasses were developed by the conventional melt-quenching technique at 1400 °C with high purity chemicals of H3BO3, ZnO, and BaSO4. The optical transparency of the glasses indicated that the glasses samples were high, as observed by visual inspections. The mass attenuation coefficients (μm), the effective atomic numbers (Zeff), and the effective electron densities (Ne) were increased with the increase of BaO concentrations, and the decrease of gamma-ray energy. The developed glass samples were investigated and compared with the shielding concretes and glasses in terms of half value layer (HVL). The overall results demonstrated that the developed glasses had good shielding properties, and highly practical potentials in the environmental friendly radiation shielding materials without an additional of Pb.

  1. Measuring the spectral emissivity of thermal protection materials during atmospheric reentry simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Elizabeth

    1996-01-01

    Hypersonic spacecraft reentering the earth's atmosphere encounter extreme heat due to atmospheric friction. Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials shield the craft from this searing heat, which can reach temperatures of 2900 F. Various thermophysical and optical properties of TPS materials are tested at the Johnson Space Center Atmospheric Reentry Materials and Structures Evaluation Facility, which has the capability to simulate critical environmental conditions associated with entry into the earth's atmosphere. Emissivity is an optical property that determines how well a material will reradiate incident heat back into the atmosphere upon reentry, thus protecting the spacecraft from the intense frictional heat. This report describes a method of measuring TPS emissivities using the SR5000 Scanning Spectroradiometer, and includes system characteristics, sample data, and operational procedures developed for arc-jet applications.

  2. Design of emergency shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soliman, S.E.

    1993-01-01

    Manufacturing of an emergency movable shield in the hot laboratories center is urgently needed for the safety of personnel in case of accidents or spilling of radioactive materials. In this report, a full design for an emergency shield is presented and the corresponding dose rates behind the shield for different activities (from 1 mCi to 5 Ci) was calculated by using micro shield computer code. 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. Thermal fatigue cracks in gas turbine heat shield plates; Thermoermuedungsrisse in Hitzeschildplatten von Gasturbinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neidel, Andreas; Riesenbeck, Susanne [Siemens AG, Berlin (Germany). Gas Turbine Plant Berlin Labs.

    2012-07-01

    There are numerous possible designations for the damage mechanism described in this case study. As a consequence, the terminology is far from being consistent. In this context, the Anglo-Saxon language area has to be taken into consideration. On the one hand many failure analysis reports have to be written in English, on the other hand it is meanwhile expected to use English terms in reports written in German, the latter in an effort to standardize the internal nomenclature. Therefore, it is advisable for damage analysts to know technical terms in both languages, at least for the most important damage mechanisms occurring in their respective fields of activity. In the present case, individual ceramic coated metal heat shield plates have been replaced after several ten thousand operating hours and several hundred start-up and shut-down procedures, i.e. machine start-ups, due to cracks in the central locating hole.

  4. Calculation of self-shielding coefficients, flux depression and cadmium factor for thermal neutron flux measurement of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marques, Andre Luis Ferreira; Ting, Daniel Kao Sun; Mendonca, Arlindo Gilson

    1996-01-01

    A calculation methodology of Flux Depression, Self-Shielding and Cadmium Factors is presented, using the ANISN code, for experiments conducted at the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor. The correction factors were determined considering thermal neutron flux and 0.125 e 0.250 mm diameter of 197 Au wires. (author)

  5. Method for optimizing side shielding in positron-emission tomographs and for comparing detector materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derenzo, S.E.

    1980-01-01

    This report presents analytical formulas for the image-forming and background event rates seen by circular positron-emission tomographs with parallel side shielding. These formulas include deadtime losses, detector efficiency, coincidence resolving time, amount of activity, patient port diameter, shielding gap, and shielding depth. A figure of merit, defined in terms of these quantities, describes the signal-to-noise ratio in the reconstructed image of a 20-cm cylinder of water with uniformly dispersed activity. Results are presented for the scintillators NaI(TI), bismuth germanate (BGO), CsF, and plastic; and for Ge(Li) and wire chambers with converters. In these examples, BGO provided the best signal-to-noise for activity levels below 1000 μCi per cm, and CsF had the advantage for higher activity levels

  6. Flexible composite material with phase change thermal storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The composite material can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The composite may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the PCM composite also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, ,gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  7. Improvement and evaluation of thermal, electrical, sealing and mechanical contacts, and their interface materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xiangcheng

    Material contacts, including thermal, electrical, seating (fluid sealing and electromagnetic sealing) and mechanical (pressure) contacts, together with their interface materials, were, evaluated, and in some cases, improved beyond the state of the art. The evaluation involved the use of thermal, electrical and mechanical methods. For thermal contacts, this work evaluated and improved the heat transfer efficiency between two contacting components by developing various thermal interface pastes. Sodium silicate based thermal pastes (with boron nitride particles as the thermally conductive filler) as well as polyethylene glycol (PEG) based thermal pastes were developed and evaluated. The optimum volume fractions of BN in sodium silicate based pastes and PEG based pastes were 16% and 18% respectively. The contribution of Li+ ions to the thermal contact conductance in the PEG-based paste was confirmed. For electrical contacts, the relationship between the mechanical reliability and electrical reliability of solder/copper and silver-epoxy/copper joints was addressed. Mechanical pull-out testing was conducted on solder/copper and silver-epoxy/copper joints, while the contact electrical resistivity was measured. Cleansing of the copper surface was more effective for the reliability of silver-epoxy/copper joint than that of solder/copper joint. For sealing contacts, this work evaluated flexible graphite as an electromagnetic shielding gasket material. Flexible graphite was found to be at least comparable to conductive filled silicone (the state of the art) in terms of the shielding effectiveness. The conformability of flexible graphite with its mating metal surface under repeated compression was characterized by monitoring the contact electrical resistance, as the conformability is important to both electromagnetic scaling and fluid waling using flexible graphite. For mechanical contacts, this work focused on the correlation of the interface structure (such as elastic

  8. Basic Thermal Parameters of Selected Foods and Food Raw Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika Božiková

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In general, processing and manipulation with foods and food raw materials have significant influence on their physical properties. The article is focused on thermophysical parameters measurement of selected foods and food raw materials. There were examined thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity of selected materials. For detection of thermal parameters was used instrument Isomet 2104, which principle of measurement is based on transient methods. In text are presented summary results of thermal parameters measurement for various foods and food raw materials as: granular materials – corn flour and wheat flour; fruits, vegetables and fruit products – grated apple, dried apple and apple juice; liquid materials – milk, beer etc. Measurements were performed in two temperature ranges according to the character of examined material. From graphical relations of thermophysical parameter is evident, that thermal conductivity and diffusivity increases with temperature and moisture content linearly, only for granular materials were obtained non‑linear dependencies. Results shows, that foods and food raw materials have different thermal properties, which are influenced by their type, structure, chemical and physical properties. From presented results is evident, that basic thermal parameters are important for material quality detection in food industry.

  9. Thermally emissive sensing materials for chemical spectroscopy analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poole, Zsolt; Ohodnicki, Paul R.

    2018-05-08

    A sensor using thermally emissive materials for chemical spectroscopy analysis includes an emissive material, wherein the emissive material includes the thermally emissive materials which emit electromagnetic radiation, wherein the electromagnetic radiation is modified due to chemical composition in an environment; and a detector adapted to detect the electromagnetic radiation, wherein the electromagnetic radiation is indicative of the chemical interaction changes and hence chemical composition and/or chemical composition changes of the environment. The emissive material can be utilized with an optical fiber sensor, with the optical fiber sensor operating without the emissive material probed with a light source external to the material.

  10. Shielding property for thermal equilibrium states in the quantum Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móller, N. S.; de Paula, A. L.; Drumond, R. C.

    2018-03-01

    We show that Gibbs states of nonhomogeneous transverse Ising chains satisfy a shielding property. Namely, whatever the fields on each spin and exchange couplings between neighboring spins are, if the field in one particular site is null, then the reduced states of the subchains to the right and to the left of this site are exactly the Gibbs states of each subchain alone. Therefore, even if there is a strong exchange coupling between the extremal sites of each subchain, the Gibbs states of the each subchain behave as if there is no interaction between them. In general, if a lattice can be divided into two disconnected regions separated by an interface of sites with zero applied field, then we can guarantee a similar result only if the surface contains a single site. Already for an interface with two sites we show an example where the property does not hold. When it holds, however, we show that if a perturbation of the Hamiltonian parameters is done in one side of the lattice, then the other side is completely unchanged, with regard to both its equilibrium state and dynamics.

  11. Thermal conductivity analysis and applications of nanocellulose materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uetani, Kojiro; Hatori, Kimihito

    2017-01-01

    Abstract In this review, we summarize the recent progress in thermal conductivity analysis of nanocellulose materials called cellulose nanopapers, and compare them with polymeric materials, including neat polymers, composites, and traditional paper. It is important to individually measure the in-plane and through-plane heat-conducting properties of two-dimensional planar materials, so steady-state and non-equilibrium methods, in particular the laser spot periodic heating radiation thermometry method, are reviewed. The structural dependency of cellulose nanopaper on thermal conduction is described in terms of the crystallite size effect, fibre orientation, and interfacial thermal resistance between fibres and small pores. The novel applications of cellulose as thermally conductive transparent materials and thermal-guiding materials are also discussed. PMID:29152020

  12. Experiments on thermal conductivity in buffer materials for geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, T.; Yano, T.; Wakamatsu, H.; Matsushima, E.

    1989-01-01

    Engineered barriers for geologic disposal for HLW are planned to consist of canister, overpack and buffer elements. One of important physical characteristics of buffer materials is determining temperature profiles within the near field in a repository. Buffer materials require high thermal conductivity to disperse radiogenic heat away to the host rock. As the buffer materials, compacted blocks of the mixture of sodium bentonite and sand have been the most promising candidate in some countries, e.g. Sweden, Switzerland and Japan. The authors have been carrying out a series of thermal dispersion experiments to evaluate thermal conductivity of bentonite/quartz sand blocks. In this study, the following two factors considered to affect thermal properties of the near field were examined: effective thermal conductivities of buffer materials, and heat transfer characteristics of the gap between overpack and buffer materials

  13. Phase change thermal control materials, method and apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Theresa M. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An apparatus and method for metabolic cooling and insulation of a user in a cold environment. In its preferred embodiment the apparatus is a highly flexible composite material having a flexible matrix containing a phase change thermal storage material. The apparatus can be made to heat or cool the body or to act as a thermal buffer to protect the wearer from changing environmental conditions. The apparatus may also include an external thermal insulation layer and/or an internal thermal control layer to regulate the rate of heat exchange between the composite and the skin of the wearer. Other embodiments of the apparatus also provide 1) a path for evaporation or direct absorption of perspiration from the skin of the wearer for improved comfort and thermal control, 2) heat conductive pathways within the material for thermal equalization, 3) surface treatments for improved absorption or rejection of heat by the material, and 4) means for quickly regenerating the thermal storage capacity for reuse of the material. Applications of the composite materials are also described which take advantage of the composite's thermal characteristics. The examples described include a diver's wet suit, ski boot liners, thermal socks, gloves and a face mask for cold weather activities, and a metabolic heating or cooling blanket useful for treating hypothermia or fever patients in a medical setting and therapeutic heating or cooling orthopedic joint supports.

  14. Shielded regenerative neutron detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terhune, J.H.; Neissel, J.P.

    1978-01-01

    An ion chamber type neutron detector is disclosed which has a greatly extended lifespan. The detector includes a fission chamber containing a mixture of active and breeding material and a neutron shielding material. The breeding and shielding materials are selected to have similar or substantially matching neutron capture cross-sections so that their individual effects on increased detector life are mutually enhanced

  15. Final report of Shield System Trade Study. Volume II. WANL support activities for shielding trade study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1970-07-01

    Based on the trades made within this study BATH (mixture of B 4 C, aluminum and TiH 1 . 8 ) was selected as the internal shield material. Borated titanium hydride can also meet the criteria with a competitive weight but was rejected because of schedular constraints. A baseline internal shield design was accomplished. This design resulted in a single internal shield weighing about 3300 lb for both manned and unmanned missions. WANL checks on ANSC calculations are generally in agreement, but with some difference in the prediction of the effectiveness of the Boral liner. All of the alternate NSS concepts in the system weight reduction program were rejected. While some did save shield weight, they complicated the NSS design to an unacceptable degree. Studies were made of the feasibility of manual maintenance of NSS components outside of the pressure vessel. The requirements of the NSS components located forward of the internal shield were considered from a thermal and radiation damage standpoint. (auth)

  16. Thermal energy storage using phase change materials fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Fleischer, Amy S

    2015-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive introduction to the use of solid‐liquid phase change materials to store significant amounts of energy in the latent heat of fusion. The proper selection of materials for different applications is covered in detail, as is the use of high conductivity additives to enhance thermal diffusivity. Dr. Fleischer explores how applications of PCMS have expanded over the past 10 years to include the development of high efficiency building materials to reduce heating and cooling needs, smart material design for clothing, portable electronic systems thermal management, solar thermal power plant design and many others. Additional future research directions and challenges are also discussed.

  17. Thermal Characterization of Nanostructures and Advanced Engineered Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyal, Vivek Kumar

    Continuous downscaling of Si complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) technology and progress in high-power electronics demand more efficient heat removal techniques to handle the increasing power density and rising temperature of hot spots. For this reason, it is important to investigate thermal properties of materials at nanometer scale and identify materials with the extremely large or extremely low thermal conductivity for applications as heat spreaders or heat insulators in the next generation of integrated circuits. The thin films used in microelectronic and photonic devices need to have high thermal conductivity in order to transfer the dissipated power to heat sinks more effectively. On the other hand, thermoelectric devices call for materials or structures with low thermal conductivity because the performance of thermoelectric devices is determined by the figure of merit Z=S2sigma/K, where S is the Seebeck coefficient, K and sigma are the thermal and electrical conductivity, respectively. Nanostructured superlattices can have drastically reduced thermal conductivity as compared to their bulk counterparts making them promising candidates for high-efficiency thermoelectric materials. Other applications calling for thin films with low thermal conductivity value are high-temperature coatings for engines. Thus, materials with both high thermal conductivity and low thermal conductivity are technologically important. The increasing temperature of the hot spots in state-of-the-art chips stimulates the search for innovative methods for heat removal. One promising approach is to incorporate materials, which have high thermal conductivity into the chip design. Two suitable candidates for such applications are diamond and graphene. Another approach is to integrate the high-efficiency thermoelectric elements for on-spot cooling. In addition, there is strong motivation for improved thermal interface materials (TIMs) for heat transfer from the heat-generating chip

  18. Cryogenic Thermal Conductivity Measurements on Candidate Materials for Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, JIm; Canavan, Ed; Jahromi, Amir

    2017-01-01

    Spacecraft and instruments on space missions are built using a wide variety of carefully-chosen materials. In addition to having mechanical properties appropriate for surviving the launch environment, these materials generally must have thermal conductivity values which meet specific requirements in their operating temperature ranges. Space missions commonly propose to include materials for which the thermal conductivity is not well known at cryogenic temperatures. We developed a test facility in 2004 at NASAs Goddard Space Flight Center to measure material thermal conductivity at temperatures between 4 and 300 Kelvin, and we have characterized many candidate materials since then. The measurement technique is not extremely complex, but proper care to details of the setup, data acquisition and data reduction is necessary for high precision and accuracy. We describe the thermal conductivity measurement process and present results for several materials.

  19. Material recognition based on thermal cues: Mechanisms and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Hsin-Ni

    2018-01-01

    Some materials feel colder to the touch than others, and we can use this difference in perceived coldness for material recognition. This review focuses on the mechanisms underlying material recognition based on thermal cues. It provides an overview of the physical, perceptual, and cognitive processes involved in material recognition. It also describes engineering domains in which material recognition based on thermal cues have been applied. This includes haptic interfaces that seek to reproduce the sensations associated with contact in virtual environments and tactile sensors aim for automatic material recognition. The review concludes by considering the contributions of this line of research in both science and engineering.

  20. Shielded container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fries, B.A.

    1978-01-01

    A shielded container for transportation of radioactive materials is disclosed in which leakage from the container is minimized due to constructional features including, inter alia, forming the container of a series of telescoping members having sliding fits between adjacent side walls and having at least two of the members including machine sealed lids and at least two of the elements including hand-tightenable caps

  1. Preparation and characteristics of a flexible neutron and γ-ray shielding and radiation-resistant material reinforced by benzophenone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pin Gong

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available With a highly functional methyl vinyl silicone rubber (VMQ matrix and filler materials of B4C, PbO, and benzophenone (BP and through powder surface modification, silicone rubber mixing, and vulcanized molding, a flexible radiation shielding and resistant composite was prepared in the study. The dispersion property of the powder in the matrix filler was improved by powder surface modification. BP was added into the matrix to enhance the radiation resistance performance of the composites. After irradiation, the tensile strength, elongation, and tear strength of the composites decreased, while the Shore hardness of the composites and the crosslinking density of the VMQ matrix increased. Moreover, the composites with BP showed better mechanical properties and smaller crosslinking density than those without BP after irradiation. The initial degradation temperatures of the composites containing BP before and after irradiation were 323.6°C and 335.3°C, respectively. The transmission of neutrons for a 2-mm thick sample was only 0.12 for an Am–Be neutron source. The transmission of γ-rays with energies of 0.662, 1.173, and 1.332 MeV for 2-cm thick samples were 0.7, 0.782, and 0.795, respectively. Keywords: Flexible Composite, Neutron Shielding, Radiation Resistance, γ-ray Shielding

  2. Study of thermal sensitivity and thermal explosion violence of energetic materials in the LLNL ODTX system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, P C; Hust, G; Zhang, M X; Lorenz, T K; Reynolds, J G; Fried, L; Springer, H K; Maienschein, J L

    2014-01-01

    Incidents caused by fire and combat operations can heat energetic materials that may lead to thermal explosion and result in structural damage and casualty. Some explosives may thermally explode at fairly low temperatures (< 100 °C) and the violence from thermal explosion may cause significant damage. Thus it is important to understand the response of energetic materials to thermal insults. The One Dimensional Time to Explosion (ODTX) system at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory has been used for decades to measure times to explosion, threshold thermal explosion temperature, and determine kinetic parameters of energetic materials. Samples of different configurations (pressed part, powder, paste, and liquid) can be tested in the system. The ODTX testing can also provide useful data for assessing the thermal explosion violence of energetic materials. Recent ODTX experimental data are reported in the paper.

  3. Investigations of some building materials for γ-rays shielding effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Kulwinder Singh; Kaur, Baljit; Sidhu, Gurdeep Singh; Kumar, Ajay

    2013-06-01

    For construction of residential and non-residential buildings bricks are used as building blocks. Bricks are made from mixtures of sand, clay, cement, fly ash, gypsum, red mud and lime. Shielding effectiveness of five soil samples and two fly ash samples have been investigated using some energy absorption parameters (Mass attenuation coefficients, mass energy absorption coefficients, KERMA (kinetic energy released per unit mass), HVL, equivalent atomic number and electron densities) firstly at 14 different energies from 81-1332 keV then extended to wide energy range 0.015-15 MeV. The soil sample with maximum shielding effectiveness has been used for making eight fly ash bricks [(Lime)0.15 (Gypsum)0.05 (Fly Ash)x (Soil)0.8-x, where values of x are from 0.4-0.7]. High Purity Germanium (HPGe) detector has been used for gamma-ray spectroscopy. The elemental compositions of samples were analysed using an energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence (EDXRF) spectrometer. The agreements of theoretical and experimental values of mass attenuation coefficient have been found to be quite satisfactory. It has been verified that common brick possess the maximum shielding effectiveness for wide energy range 0.015-15 MeV. The results have been shown graphically with some useful conclusions for making radiation safe buildings.

  4. Radiation transmission data for radionuclides and materials relevant to brachytherapy facility shielding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papagiannis, P; Baltas, D; Granero, D; Pérez-Calatayud, J; Gimeno, J; Ballester, F; Venselaar, J L M

    2008-11-01

    To address the limited availability of radiation shielding data for brachytherapy as well as some disparity in existing data, Monte Carlo simulation was used to generate radiation transmission data for 60Co, 137CS, 198Au, 192Ir 169Yb, 170Tm, 131Cs, 125I, and 103pd photons through concrete, stainless steel, lead, as well as lead glass and baryte concrete. Results accounting for the oblique incidence of radiation to the barrier, spectral variation with barrier thickness, and broad beam conditions in a realistic geometry are compared to corresponding data in the literature in terms of the half value layer (HVL) and tenth value layer (TVL) indices. It is also shown that radiation shielding calculations using HVL or TVL values could overestimate or underestimate the barrier thickness required to achieve a certain reduction in radiation transmission. This questions the use of HVL or TVL indices instead of the actual transmission data. Therefore, a three-parameter model is fitted to results of this work to facilitate accurate and simple radiation shielding calculations.

  5. High temperature glass thermal control structure and coating. [for application to spacecraft reusable heat shielding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, D. A.; Goldstein, H. E.; Leiser, D. B. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A high temperature stable and solar radiation stable thermal control coating is described which is useful either as such, applied directly to a member to be protected, or applied as a coating on a re-usable surface insulation (RSI). It has a base coat layer and an overlay glass layer. The base coat layer has a high emittance, and the overlay layer is formed from discrete, but sintered together glass particles to give the overlay layer a high scattering coefficient. The resulting two-layer space and thermal control coating has an absorptivity-to-emissivity ratio of less than or equal to 0.4 at room temperature, with an emittance of 0.8 at 1200 F. It is capable of exposure to either solar radiation or temperatures as high as 2000 F without significant degradation. When used as a coating on a silica substrate to give an RSI structure, the coatings of this invention show significantly less reduction in emittance after long term convective heating and less residual strain than prior art coatings for RSI structures.

  6. Process for fabricating composite material having high thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colella, Nicholas J.; Davidson, Howard L.; Kerns, John A.; Makowiecki, Daniel M.

    2001-01-01

    A process for fabricating a composite material such as that having high thermal conductivity and having specific application as a heat sink or heat spreader for high density integrated circuits. The composite material produced by this process has a thermal conductivity between that of diamond and copper, and basically consists of coated diamond particles dispersed in a high conductivity metal, such as copper. The composite material can be fabricated in small or relatively large sizes using inexpensive materials. The process basically consists, for example, of sputter coating diamond powder with several elements, including a carbide forming element and a brazeable material, compacting them into a porous body, and infiltrating the porous body with a suitable braze material, such as copper-silver alloy, thereby producing a dense diamond-copper composite material with a thermal conductivity comparable to synthetic diamond films at a fraction of the cost.

  7. Conceptual design for the thermal shield bridges and multilayer insulation in the interconnect region for the SSC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baritchi, D.; Nicol, T.; Boroski, W.

    1991-01-01

    The interconnect region serves as the connection area between magnets. In order to minimize radiant heat transfer in the interconnect area, the authors used shield bridges which span the 80K and 20K shield gap between adjacent magnets. A sliding joint between bridge sections on adjacent magnets accommodates contraction during cool-down. An investigation was done to determine which attachment schemes (riveted or bolted versus welded) are better for heat transfer. Each shield bridge is covered with the same multilayer insulation scheme used throughout the body of the magnet. These shield bridges also contain pressure reliefs for each shield in the event of an internal piping failure. The reliefs are located in the upper half of the shield section in order to prevent liquid spills from impinging directly onto the vacuum vessel wall

  8. 3D carbon fiber mats/nano-Fe3O4 hybrid material with high electromagnetic shielding performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Yingqing; Long, Zhihang; Wan, Xinyi; Zhang, Jiemin; He, Shuangjiang; He, Yi

    2018-06-01

    To obtain high-performance electromagnetic shielding materials, structure and morphology are two key factors. We here developed an efficient and facial method to prepare high-performance 3D carbon nanofiber mats (CFM)/Fe3O4 hybrid electromagnetic shielding materials. For this purpose, the CFM were chemically modified by mussel-inspired poly-dopamine coating, which were further used as templates for decoration of Fe3O4 nanoparticles via solvothermal route. It was found that the Fe3O4 nano-spheres with diameters of 200-250 nm were uniformly coated on the surface of 3D carbon nanofibers. More importantly, the morphology and structure of resulting 3D carbon nanofiber mats/Fe3O4 hybrids could be easily controlled by altering the experiment parameters, which were examined by FT-IR, XPS, TGA, XRD, SEM, and TEM. The measured magnetic properties showed that saturation magnetism and coercivity increased from 13.4 to 39.7 emu/g and 85.3 to 104.6 Oe, respectively. The lowest reflectivity of resulting hybrid was calculated to be -47 dB at 10.0 GHz (2.5 mm). In addition, the reflectivity of 3D carbon nanofiber mats/Fe3O4 hybrid was less than -25 dB in the range of 7-13 GHz. Moreover, the resulting 3D carbon nanofiber mats/Fe3O4 hybrid exhibited an EMI shielding performance of -62.6 dB in the frequency range of 8.2-12.4 GHz. Therefore, 3D carbon fiber mats/Fe3O4 hybrids can be ideal EMI materials with strong absorption, low density, and wide absorption range.

  9. Theoretical analysis and experimental investigation on performance of the thermal shield of accelerator cryomodules by thermo-siphon cooling of liquid nitrogen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, T. S.; Kar, S.; Kumar, M.; Choudhury, A.; Chacko, J.; Antony, J.; Babu, S.; Sahu, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Five beam line cryomodules with total 27 superconducting Radio Frequency (RF) cavities are installed and commissioned at IUAC to enhance the energy of heavy ion from 15 UD Pelletron. To reduce the heat load at 4.2 K, liquid nitrogen (LN2) cooled intermediate thermal shield is used for all these cryomodules. For three linac cryomodules, concept of forced flow LN2 cooling is used and for superbuncher and rebuncher, thermo-siphon cooling is incorporated. It is noticed that the shield temperature of superbuncher varies from 90 K to 110 K with respect to liquid nitrogen level. The temperature difference can't be explained by using the basic concept of thermo-siphon with the heat load on up flow line. A simple thermo-siphon experimental set up is developed to simulate the thermal shield temperature profile. Mass flow rate of liquid nitrogen is measured with different heat load on up flow line for different liquid levels. It is noticed that small amount of heat load on down flow line have a significant effect on mass flow rate. The present paper will be investigating the data generated from the thermosiphon experimental set up and a theoretical analysis will be presented here to validate the measured temperature profile of the cryomodule shield.

  10. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Kotov

    2012-01-01

    On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  11. Advanced Thermal Interface Material Systems for Space Applications, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The ultimate aim of proposed efforts are to develop innovative material and process (M increase thermal cycles before degradation and efforts to ensure ease of...

  12. High Kinetic Energy Penetrator Shielding and High Wear Resistance Materials Fabricated with Boron Nitride Nanotubes (BNNTS) and BNNT Polymer Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jin Ho (Inventor); Sauti, Godfrey (Inventor); Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin C. (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Bryant, Robert George (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs), boron nitride nanoparticles (BNNPs), carbon nanotubes (CNTs), graphites, or combinations, are incorporated into matrices of polymer, ceramic or metals. Fibers, yarns, and woven or nonwoven mats of BNNTs are used as toughening layers in penetration resistant materials to maximize energy absorption and/or high hardness layers to rebound or deform penetrators. They can be also used as reinforcing inclusions combining with other polymer matrices to create composite layers like typical reinforcing fibers such as Kevlar.RTM., Spectra.RTM., ceramics and metals. Enhanced wear resistance and usage time are achieved by adding boron nitride nanomaterials, increasing hardness and toughness. Such materials can be used in high temperature environments since the oxidation temperature of BNNTs exceeds 800.degree. C. in air. Boron nitride based composites are useful as strong structural materials for anti-micrometeorite layers for spacecraft and space suits, ultra strong tethers, protective gear, vehicles, helmets, shields and safety suits/helmets for industry.

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, G.

    2004-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the performance of Alloy 22

  14. Stress Corrosion Cracking of the Drip Shield, the Waste Package Outer Barrier, and the Stainless Steel Structural Material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. Gordon

    2004-10-13

    Stress corrosion cracking is one of the most common corrosion-related causes for premature breach of metal structural components. Stress corrosion cracking is the initiation and propagation of cracks in structural components due to three factors that must be present simultaneously: metallurgical susceptibility, critical environment, and static (or sustained) tensile stresses. This report was prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Regulatory Integration Modeling and Analysis of the Waste Form and Waste Package'' (BSC 2004 [DIRS 171583]). The purpose of this report is to provide an evaluation of the potential for stress corrosion cracking of the engineered barrier system components (i.e., the drip shield, waste package outer barrier, and waste package stainless steel inner structural cylinder) under exposure conditions consistent with the repository during the regulatory period of 10,000 years after permanent closure. For the drip shield and waste package outer barrier, the critical environment is conservatively taken as any aqueous environment contacting the metal surfaces. Appendix B of this report describes the development of the SCC-relevant seismic crack density model (SCDM). The consequence of a stress corrosion cracking breach of the drip shield, the waste package outer barrier, or the stainless steel inner structural cylinder material is the initiation and propagation of tight, sometimes branching, cracks that might be induced by the combination of an aggressive environment and various tensile stresses that can develop in the drip shields or the waste packages. The Stainless Steel Type 316 inner structural cylinder of the waste package is excluded from the stress corrosion cracking evaluation because the Total System Performance Assessment for License Application (TSPA-LA) does not take credit for the inner cylinder. This document provides a detailed description of the process-level models that can be applied to assess the

  15. Wake Shield Target Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valmianski, Emanuil I.; Petzoldt, Ronald W.; Alexander, Neil B.

    2003-01-01

    The heat flux from both gas convection and chamber radiation on a direct drive target must be limited to avoid target damage from excessive D-T temperature increase. One of the possibilities of protecting the target is a wake shield flying in front of the target. A shield will also reduce drag force on the target, thereby facilitating target tracking and position prediction. A Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code was used to calculate convection heat loads as boundary conditions input into ANSYS thermal calculations. These were used for studying the quality of target protection depending on various shapes of shields, target-shield distance, and protective properties of the shield moving relative to the target. The results show that the shield can reduce the convective heat flux by a factor of 2 to 5 depending on pressure, temperature, and velocity. The protective effect of a shield moving relative to the target is greater than the protective properties of a fixed shield. However, the protective effect of a shield moving under the drag force is not sufficient for bringing the heat load on the target down to the necessary limit. Some other ways of diminishing heat flux using a protective shield are discussed

  16. Illusion thermal device based on material with constant anisotropic thermal conductivity for location camouflage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Quanwen; Zhao, Xiaopeng; Meng, Tong; Liu, Cunliang

    2016-09-01

    Thermal metamaterials and devices based on transformation thermodynamics often require materials with anisotropic and inhomogeneous thermal conductivities. In this study, still based on the concept of transformation thermodynamics, we designed a planar illusion thermal device, which can delocalize a heat source in the device such that the temperature profile outside the device appears to be produced by a virtual source at another position. This device can be constructed by only one kind of material with constant anisotropic thermal conductivity. The condition which should be satisfied by the device is provided, and the required anisotropic thermal conductivity is then deduced theoretically. This study may be useful for the designs of metamaterials or devices since materials with constant anisotropic parameters have great facility in fabrication. A prototype device has been fabricated based on a composite composed by two naturally occurring materials. The experimental results validate the effectiveness of the device.

  17. Advanced materials for thermal management of electronic packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Tong, Xingcun Colin

    2011-01-01

    The need for advanced thermal management materials in electronic packaging has been widely recognized as thermal challenges become barriers to the electronic industry's ability to provide continued improvements in device and system performance. With increased performance requirements for smaller, more capable, and more efficient electronic power devices, systems ranging from active electronically scanned radar arrays to web servers all require components that can dissipate heat efficiently. This requires that the materials have high capability of dissipating heat and maintaining compatibility

  18. Graphene-based filament material for thermal ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hewitt, J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Shick, C. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Siegfried, M. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-19

    The use of graphene oxide materials for thermal ionization mass spectrometry analysis of plutonium and uranium has been investigated. Filament made from graphene oxide slurries have been 3-D printed. A method for attaching these filaments to commercial thermal ionization post assemblies has been devised. Resistive heating of the graphene based filaments under high vacuum showed stable operation in excess of 4 hours. Plutonium ion production has been observed in an initial set of filaments spiked with the Pu 128 Certified Reference Material.

  19. Using thermal power plants waste for building materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduik, R. S.; Smoliakov, A. K.; Timokhin, R. A.; Batarshin, V. O.; Yevdokimova, Yu G.

    2017-10-01

    The recycled use of thermal power plants (TPPs) wastes in the building materials production is formulated. The possibility of using of TPPs fly ash as part of the cement composite binder for concrete is assessed. The results of X-ray diffraction and differential thermal analysis as well as and materials photomicrographs are presented. It was revealed that the fly ash of TPPs of Russian Primorsky Krai is suitable for use as a filler in cement binding based on its chemical composition.

  20. Comparison of MCNP5 and experimental results on neutron shielding effects for materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, D. A. (Daniel A.); Mosteller, R. D. (Russell D.); Sweezy, J. E. (Jeremy E.)

    2004-01-01

    The MCNP Radiation-Shielding Validation Suite was created to assess the impact on dose rates and attenuation factors of future improvements in the MCNP Monte Carlo code or its nuclear data libraries. However, it does not currently contain any deep-penetration cases. For this reason, a set of deep-penetration benchmarks has been investigated for possible inclusion in the Suite. Overall, the MCNP5 results match the measured values quite well. Furthermore, with the exception of Resin-F, there is no systematic trend in the ratio of calculated to measured results.

  1. Research on preparation and performance of graphite cement-based materials used for fast neutron shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Jun; Kang Qing; Shen Zhiqiang; Wang Zhenggang; Wang Zhiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Measurements have been carried out to investigate the 14.8 MeV neutron attenuation properties for 3 kinds of cement-graphite composites. In comparison with the void group, the 14.8 MeV neutron attenuation properties of cement-graphite composites raised not clearly in 8 mm thickness, and drop not remarkably in 40 mm thickness; with the increase of graphite content and the thickness, the 14.8 MeV neutron attenuation properties were enhanced clearly. The data may be useful to the radiation shielding design of neutron. (authors)

  2. ZnO-PbO-B2O3 glasses as gamma-ray shielding materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Harvinder; Singh, Kulwant; Gerward, Leif; Singh, Kanwarjit; Sahota, Hari Singh; Nathuram, Rohila

    2003-01-01

    Values of the gamma-ray mass-attenuation coefficient, the photon mean free path (MFP), the effective atomic number and the effective electron density have been determined experimentally for xZnO · 2xPbO · (1-3x)B 2 O 3 (x=0.1-0.26) glasses at photon energies 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV and compared with theoretical data. The specific volume of the glasses has been derived from density measurements and studied as a function of composition. It is pointed out that these glasses have potential applications in radiation shielding

  3. Method and apparatus for implementing material thermal property measurement by flash thermal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jiangang

    2017-11-14

    A method and apparatus are provided for implementing measurement of material thermal properties including measurement of thermal effusivity of a coating and/or film or a bulk material of uniform property. The test apparatus includes an infrared camera, a data acquisition and processing computer coupled to the infrared camera for acquiring and processing thermal image data, a flash lamp providing an input of heat onto the surface of a two-layer sample with an enhanced optical filter covering the flash lamp attenuating an entire infrared wavelength range with a series of thermal images is taken of the surface of the two-layer sample.

  4. Instrument for Measuring Thermal Conductivity of Materials at Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesmire, James; Sass, Jared; Johnson, Wesley

    2010-01-01

    With the advance of polymer and other non-metallic material sciences, whole new series of polymeric materials and composites are being created. These materials are being optimized for many different applications including cryogenic and low-temperature industrial processes. Engineers need these data to perform detailed system designs and enable new design possibilities for improved control, reliability, and efficiency in specific applications. One main area of interest is cryogenic structural elements and fluid handling components and other parts, films, and coatings for low-temperature application. An important thermal property of these new materials is the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value).

  5. Summary of Blast Shield and Material Testing for Development of Solid Debris Collection at the National Ignition Facility (NIF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shaughnessy, D.A.; Gostic, J.M.; Moody, K.J.; Grant, P.M.; Lewis, L.A.; Hutcheon, I.D.

    2011-01-01

    The ability to collect solid debris from the target chamber following a NIF shot has application for both capsule diagnostics, particularly for fuel-ablator mix, and measuring cross sections relevant to the Stockpile Stewardship program and nuclear astrophysics. Simulations have shown that doping the capsule with up to 10 15 atoms of an impurity not otherwise found in the capsule does not affect its performance. The dopant is an element that will undergo nuclear activations during the NIF implosion, forming radioactive species that can be collected and measured after extraction from the target chamber. For diagnostics, deuteron or alpha induced reactions can be used to probe the fuel-ablator mix. For measuring neutron cross sections, the dopant should be something that is sensitive to the 14 MeV neutrons produced through the fusion of deuterium and tritium. Developing the collector is a challenge due to the extreme environment of the NIF chamber. The collector surface is exposed to a large photon flux from x-rays and unconverted laser light before it is exposed to a debris wind that is formed from vaporized material from the target chamber center. The photons will ablate the collector surface to some extent, possibly impeding the debris from reaching the collector and sticking. In addition, the collector itself must be mechanically strong enough to withstand the large amount of energy it will be exposed to, and it should be something that will be easy to count and chemically process. In order to select the best material for the collector, a variety of different metals have been tested in the NIF chamber. They were exposed to high-energy laser shots in order to evaluate their postshot surface characterization, morphology, degree of melt, and their ability to retain debris from the chamber center. The first set of samples consisted of 1 mm thick pieces of aluminum that had been fielded in the chamber as blast shields protecting the neutron activation diagnostic. Ten

  6. Lightweight reduced graphene oxide-Fe3O4 nanoparticle composite in the quest for an excellent electromagnetic interference shielding material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Ajit; Kamal Haldar, Krishna; Gupta, Vinay; Singh, Kedar

    2018-06-01

    This work reports a detailed study of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-Fe3O4 nanoparticle composite as an excellent electromagnetic (EM) interference shielding material in GHz range. A rGO-Fe3O4 nanoparticle composite was synthesized using a facile, one step, and modified solvothermal method with the reaction of FeCl3, ethylenediamine and graphite oxide powder in the presence of ethylene glycol. Various structural, microstructural and optical characterization tools were used to determine its synthesis and various properties. Dielectric, magnetic and EM shielding parameters were also evaluated to estimate its performance as a shielding material for EM waves. X-ray diffraction patterns have provided information about the structural and crystallographic properties of the as-synthesized material. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs revealed the information regarding the exfoliation of graphite into rGO. Well-dispersed Fe3O4 nanoparticles over the surface of the graphene can easily be seen by employing transmission electron microscopy. For comparison, rGO nanosheets and Fe3O4 nanoparticles have also been synthesized and characterized in a similar fashion. A plot of the dielectric and magnetic characterizations provides some useful information related to various losses and the relaxation process. Shielding effectiveness due to reflection (SER), shielding effectiveness due to absorption (SEA), and total shielding effectiveness (SET) were also plotted against frequency over a broad range (8–12 GHz). A significant change in all parameters (SEA value from 5 dB to 35 dB for Fe3O4 nanoparticles to rGO-Fe3O4 nanoparticle composite) was found. An actual shielding effectiveness (SET) up to 55 dB was found in the rGO-Fe3O4 nanoparticle composite. These graphs give glimpses of how significantly this material shows shielding effectiveness over a broad range of frequency.

  7. Lightweight reduced graphene oxide-Fe3O4 nanoparticle composite in the quest for an excellent electromagnetic interference shielding material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashwani Kumar; Kumar, Ajit; Haldar, Krishna Kamal; Gupta, Vinay; Singh, Kedar

    2018-06-15

    This work reports a detailed study of reduced graphene oxide (rGO)-Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle composite as an excellent electromagnetic (EM) interference shielding material in GHz range. A rGO-Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle composite was synthesized using a facile, one step, and modified solvothermal method with the reaction of FeCl 3 , ethylenediamine and graphite oxide powder in the presence of ethylene glycol. Various structural, microstructural and optical characterization tools were used to determine its synthesis and various properties. Dielectric, magnetic and EM shielding parameters were also evaluated to estimate its performance as a shielding material for EM waves. X-ray diffraction patterns have provided information about the structural and crystallographic properties of the as-synthesized material. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs revealed the information regarding the exfoliation of graphite into rGO. Well-dispersed Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles over the surface of the graphene can easily be seen by employing transmission electron microscopy. For comparison, rGO nanosheets and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles have also been synthesized and characterized in a similar fashion. A plot of the dielectric and magnetic characterizations provides some useful information related to various losses and the relaxation process. Shielding effectiveness due to reflection (SE R ), shielding effectiveness due to absorption (SE A ), and total shielding effectiveness (SE T ) were also plotted against frequency over a broad range (8-12 GHz). A significant change in all parameters (SE A value from 5 dB to 35 dB for Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles to rGO-Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle composite) was found. An actual shielding effectiveness (SE T ) up to 55 dB was found in the rGO-Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticle composite. These graphs give glimpses of how significantly this material shows shielding effectiveness over a broad range of frequency.

  8. Switchable Shape Memory Alloys (SMA) Thermal Materials

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Materials and systems are being designed and developed to meet complex operational requirements while being kept lightweight, efficient, and robust. Multifunctional...

  9. Voltage tunability of thermal conductivity in ferroelectric materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ihlefeld, Jon; Hopkins, Patrick Edward

    2016-02-09

    A method to control thermal energy transport uses mobile coherent interfaces in nanoscale ferroelectric films to scatter phonons. The thermal conductivity can be actively tuned, simply by applying an electrical potential across the ferroelectric material and thereby altering the density of these coherent boundaries to directly impact thermal transport at room temperature and above. The invention eliminates the necessity of using moving components or poor efficiency methods to control heat transfer, enabling a means of thermal energy control at the micro- and nano-scales.

  10. Gamma ray shielding study of barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses as transparent shielding materials using MCNP-4C code, XCOM program, and available experimental data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Reza; Yousefinia, Hassan [Nuclear Fuel Cycle Research School (NFCRS), Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Moghaddam, Alireza Khorrami [Radiology Department, Paramedical Faculty, Mazandaran University of Medical Sciences, Sari (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    In this work, linear and mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electron density, mean free paths, and half value layer and 10th value layer values of barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses were obtained for 662 keV, 1,173 keV, and 1,332 keV gamma ray energies using MCNP-4C code and XCOM program. Then obtained data were compared with available experimental data. The MCNP-4C code and XCOM program results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Barium-bismuth-borosilicate glasses have good gamma ray shielding properties from the shielding point of view.

  11. Gamma Ray Shielding Study of Barium–Bismuth–Borosilicate Glasses as Transparent Shielding Materials using MCNP-4C Code, XCOM Program, and Available Experimental Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Bagheri

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this work, linear and mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electron density, mean free paths, and half value layer and 10th value layer values of barium–bismuth–borosilicate glasses were obtained for 662 keV, 1,173 keV, and 1,332 keV gamma ray energies using MCNP-4C code and XCOM program. Then obtained data were compared with available experimental data. The MCNP-4C code and XCOM program results were in good agreement with the experimental data. Barium–bismuth–borosilicate glasses have good gamma ray shielding properties from the shielding point of view.

  12. Radiation shielding concrete

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kunishima, Shigeru.

    1990-01-01

    The radiation shielding concretes comprise water, cement, fine aggregates consisting of serpentines and blown mist slags, coarse aggregates consisting of serpentines and kneading materials. Since serpentines containing a relatively great amount of water of crystallization in rocks as coarse aggregates and fine aggregates, the hydrogen content in the radiation shielding concretes is increased and the neutron shielding effect is improved. In addition, since serpentines are added as the fine aggregates and blown mists slags of a great specific gravity are used, the specific gravity of the shielding concretes is increased to improve the γ-ray shielding effect. Further, by the use of the kneading material having a water reducing effect and fluidizing effect, and by the bearing effect of the spherical blown mist slags used as the fine aggregates, concrete fluidity can be increased. Accordingly, workability of the radiation shielding concretes can be improved. (T.M.)

  13. Effect of physical, chemical and electro-kinetic properties of pumice samples on radiation shielding properties of pumice material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tapan, Mücip; Yalçın, Zeynel; İçelli, Orhan; Kara, Hüsnü; Orak, Salim; Özvan, Ali; Depci, Tolga

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Radiation shielding properties of pumice materials are studied. • The relationship between physical, chemical and electro-kinetic properties pumice samples is identified. • The photon atomic parameters are important for the absorber peculiarity of the pumices. - Abstract: Pumice has been used in cement, concrete, brick, and ceramic industries as an additive and aggregate material. In this study, some gamma-ray photon absorption parameters such as the total mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic number and electronic density have been investigated for six different pumice samples. Numerous values of energy related parameters from low energy (1 keV) to high energy (100 MeV) were calculated using WinXCom programme. The relationship between radiation shielding properties of the pumice samples and their physical, chemical and electro-kinetic properties was evaluated using simple regression analysis. Simple regression analysis indicated a strong correlation between photon energy absorption parameters and density and SiO 2 , Fe 2 O 3 , CaO, MgO, TiO 2 content of pumice samples in this study. It is found that photon energy absorption parameters are not related to electro-kinetic properties of pumice samples

  14. Phase Change Material Thermal Power Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jack A. (Inventor); Chao, Yi (Inventor); Valdez, Thomas I. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An energy producing device, for example a submersible vehicle for descending or ascending to different depths within water or ocean, is disclosed. The vehicle comprises a temperature-responsive material to which a hydraulic fluid is associated. A pressurized storage compartment stores the fluid as soon as the temperature-responsive material changes density. The storage compartment is connected with a hydraulic motor, and a valve allows fluid passage from the storage compartment to the hydraulic motor. An energy storage component, e.g. a battery, is connected with the hydraulic motor and is charged by the hydraulic motor when the hydraulic fluid passes through the hydraulic motor. Upon passage in the hydraulic motor, the fluid is stored in a further storage compartment and is then sent back to the area of the temperature-responsive material.

  15. Seal assembly for materials with different coefficients of thermal expansion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minford, Eric [Laurys Station, PA

    2009-09-01

    Seal assembly comprising (a) two or more seal elements, each element having having a coefficient of thermal expansion; and (b) a clamping element having a first segment, a second segment, and a connecting segment between and attached to the first and second segments, wherein the two or more seal elements are disposed between the first and second segments of the clamping element. The connecting segment has a central portion extending between the first segment of the clamping element and the second segment of the clamping element, and the connecting segment is made of a material having a coefficient of thermal expansion. The coefficient of thermal expansion of the material of the connecting segment is intermediate the largest and smallest of the coefficients of thermal expansion of the materials of the two or more seal elements.

  16. Gas-thermal coating of powdered materials. Communication 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermakov, S.S.

    1986-01-01

    This paper investigates the microstructure, microhardness, chemical composition of the transition zone, and also the strength characteristics of gas-thermal coatings including their adhesive power to the substrate (iron brand NC 100.24) and the residual stresses in the coatings. The microstructure of the transition zone was investigated; it was established that on the side of the substrate its density is greater than the mean density of both types of coating. It is shown that the porosity of the substrate has a competing effect on the thermal interaction of materials. Discovered regularities lead to the conclusion that the process of gas-thermal coating of powdered materials is more effective than when compact materials are coated; most effective is the combination of gas-thermal coating with processes of heat treatment of powder-metallurgy products

  17. Pressure measurement using thermal properties of materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Pessoa, Jose Dalton; Calbo, Adonai Gimenes

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a design and two methods, one isothermal and one isovolumetric, for pressure measurements based on the compressibility coefficient (κ) and thermal expansibility (α) of the fluid under test. The setup and relevant construction details are described. To demonstrate the applicability of the isovolumetric measurement method, the setup was calibrated with respect to a Bourdon-type manometer; the other isothermic method was analyzed to determine construction details that could realize resolution requirements. The authors determined the effect of ambient temperature on device operation and the time response of the isovolumetric method. The device can be used to estimate the compressibility of a fluid and, in addition, could become an alternative for direct plant cell turgor measurement

  18. Thermal Materials Drive Professional Apparel Line

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Johnson Space Center investigated phase change materials (PCMs) to use in spacesuit gloves to help maintain comfortable temperatures. Years later, Boston-based Ministry of Supply developed a dress shirt that incorporated the NASA-derived PCMs, could wick away moisture, and also control odors and bacterial growth. Deemed Apollo, the shirt performs like active wear and is available in white and oxford blue.

  19. Dynamic Test Method Based on Strong Electromagnetic Pulse for Electromagnetic Shielding Materials with Field-Induced Insulator-Conductor Phase Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Zhao, Min; Wang, Qingguo

    2018-01-01

    In order to measure the pulse shielding performance of materials with the characteristic of field-induced insulator-conductor phase transition when materials are used for electromagnetic shielding, a dynamic test method was proposed based on a coaxial fixture. Experiment system was built by square pulse source, coaxial cable, coaxial fixture, attenuator, and oscilloscope and insulating components. S11 parameter of the test system was obtained, which suggested that the working frequency ranges from 300 KHz to 7.36 GHz. Insulating performance is good enough to avoid discharge between conductors when material samples is exposed in the strong electromagnetic pulse field up to 831 kV/m. This method is suitable for materials with annular shape, certain thickness and the characteristic of field-induced insulator-conductor phase transition to get their shielding performances of strong electromagnetic pulse.

  20. Experimental study of carbon materials behavior under high temperature and VUV radiation: Application to Solar Probe+ heat shield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eck, J.; Sans, J.-L.; Balat-Pichelin, M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the Solar Probe Plus (SP+) mission is to understand how the solar corona is heated and how the solar wind is accelerated. To achieve these goals, in situ measurements are necessary and the spacecraft has to approach the Sun as close as 9.5 solar radii. This trajectory induces extreme environmental conditions such as high temperatures and intense Vacuum Ultraviolet radiation (VUV). To protect the measurement and communication instruments, a heat shield constituted of a carbon material is placed on the top of the probe. In this study, the physical and chemical behavior of carbon materials is experimentally investigated under high temperatures (1600-2100 K), high vacuum (10 -4 Pa) and VUV radiation in conditions near those at perihelion for SP+. Thanks to several in situ and ex situ characterizations, it was found that VUV radiation induced modification of outgassing and of mass loss rate together with alteration of microstructure and morphology.

  1. Thermal Vacuum Test of Ice as a Phase Change Material Integrated with a Radiator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steve A.; Leimkuehler, Thomas O.; Stephan, Ryan; Le, Hung V.

    2010-01-01

    Water may be used as radiation shielding for Solar Particle Events (SPE) to protect crewmembers in the Lunar Electric Rover (LER). Because the water is already present for radiation protection, it could also provide a mass efficient solution to the vehicle's thermal control system. This water can be frozen by heat rejection from a radiator and used as a Phase Change Material (PC1V1) for thermal storage. Use of this water as a PCM can eliminate the need for a pumped fluid loop thermal control system as well as reduce the required size of the radiator. This paper describes the testing and analysis performed for the Rover Engineering Development Unit (REDU), a scaled-down version of a water PCM heat sink for the LER. The REDU was tested in a thermal-vacuum chamber at environmental temperatures similar to those of a horizontal radiator panel on the lunar surface. Testing included complete freeze and melt cycles along with scaled transient heat load profiles simulating a 24-hour day for the rover.

  2. The Shielding of the ATLAS Forward Region from the point of view of Materials Technology and some Construction Aspects

    CERN Document Server

    Sodomka, J; Palla, J; Pospisvil, S; Vstekl, I

    1998-01-01

    The aim of this note is to discuss a concept and a construction of the ATLAS forward region shielding as a contribution to the chapter on shielding for the ATLAS infrastructure TDR. It follows our previous remarks on this question.

  3. Thermal shock behaviour of mullite-cordierite refractory materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Boccaccini, D. N.; Leonelli, C.; Romagnoli, M.; Pellacani, G. C.; Veronesi, P.; Dlouhý, Ivo; Boccaccini, A. R.

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 106, č. 3 (2007), s. 142-148 ISSN 1743-6753 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA200410502 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : refraktory materials * thermal shock * fracutre toughness Subject RIV: JH - Ceramics, Fire-Resistant Materials and Glass Impact factor: 1.074, year: 2007

  4. Experimental and Theoretical Investigations of Ferro Boron as In-vessel Shield Material in FBRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keshavamurthy, R.S.; Raju, S.; Anthonysamy, S.; Murugan, S.; Sunil Kumar, D.; Rajan Babu, V.; Ravi Chandar, S.C.; Venkiteswaran, C.N.; Chetal, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Neutron attenuation characteristics of Ferroboron has been investigated both theoretically and experimentally and Fe-B has been found to be favourable for use in FBRs. • Its use will result in significant savings in cost, without impairing shielding capabilities. • Extensive and in-depth out of pile characterization thermophysical properties and high temperature metallurgial compatibility tests with SS 304L clad were carried out. These as well as effects studied of interaction of sodium and Fe-B together on clad at high temparatures show excellent compatibility with clad. • Design of two types Ferro-Boron capsules was done for conducting an irradiation test in FBTR simulating 60 years of neutron fluence in FBRs, • Fabrication of the capsules was successfully carried out. • The capsule was loaded in FBTR and the capsule has been discharged after the intended 45 days of irradiation. • Post Irradiation Examination will be carried out to look for any possible effect due to irradiation

  5. Shielding requirements for particle bed propulsion systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruneisen, S. J.

    1991-06-01

    Nuclear Thermal Propulsion systems present unique challenges in reliability and safety. Due to the radiation incident upon all components of the propulsion system, shielding must be used to keep nuclear heating in the materials within limits; in addition, electronic control systems must be protected. This report analyzes the nuclear heating due to the radiation and the shielding required to meet the established criteria while also minimizing the shield mass. Heating rates were determined in a 2000 MWt Particle Bed Reactor (PBR) system for all materials in the interstage region, between the reactor vessel and the propellant tank, with special emphasis on meeting the silicon dose criteria. Using a Lithium Hydride/Tungsten shield, the optimum shield design was found to be: 50 cm LiH/2 cm W on the axial reflector in the reactor vessel and 50 cm LiH/2 cm W in a collar extension of the inside shield outside of the pressure vessel. Within these parameters, the radiation doses in all of the components in the interstage and lower tank regions would be within acceptable limits for mission requirements.

  6. New flexible thermal control material for long-life satellite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Shigekuni; Hasuda, Yoshinori; Ichino, Toshihiro

    1986-01-01

    Flexible thermal control materials are light weight, cheap and excellent in the practical applicability, and are expected to be applied to future long life, large capacity satellites. However, the flexible thermal control materials used at present have the defect that either the space environment withstanding capability or the thermal control performance is poor. Therefore, the authors examined the flexible thermal control materials which are excellent in both these properties, and have developed the thermal control material PEI-OSR using polyether imide films as the substrate. In this study, while comparing with the FEP Teflon with silver vapor deposition, which has been used so far for short life satellites, the long term reliability of the PEI-OSR supposing the use for seven years was examined. As the results, the FEP Teflon with silver vapor deposition caused cracking and separation by irradiation and heat cycle test, and became unusable, but the PEI-OSR did not change its flexibility at all. Also the thermal control performance of the PEI-OSR after the test equivalent to seven years was superior to the initial performance of the Kaptone with aluminum vapor deposition, which has excellent space environment endurance, thus it was clarified that the PEI-OSR is the most excellent for this purpose. (Kako, I.)

  7. Round robin testing of thermal conductivity reference materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hulstrom, L.C.; Tye, R.P.; Smith, S.E.

    1985-07-01

    The Basalt Waste Isolation Project (BWIP), operated by Rockwell Hanford Operations, has a need to determine the thermal properties of basalt in the region being considered for a nuclear waste repository in basalt. Experimental data on thermal conductivity and its variation with temperature are information required for the characterization of basalt. To establish thermal conductivity values for the reference materials, an interlaboratory measurements program was undertaken. The program was planned to meet the objectives of performing an experimental characterization of the new stock and providing a detailed analysis of the results such that reference values of thermal conductivity could be determined. This program of measurements of the thermal conductivity of Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 has produced recommended values that are within +- 1% of those accepted previously. These measurements together with those of density indicate that the present lots of material are similar to those previously available. Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 can continue to be used with confidence as thermal conductivity reference materials for studies on rocks and minerals and other materials of similar thermal conductivity. The uncertainty range for Pyrex 7740 and Pyroceram 9606 up to 300 0 C is +- 10.3% and +- 5.6%, respectively. This range is similar to that indicated for the previously recommended values proposed some 18 years ago. It would appear that the overall state of the art in thermal conductivity measurements for materials in this range has changed little in the intervening years. The above uncertainties, which would have been greater had not three data sets been eliminated, are greater than those which are normally claimed for each individual method. Analyses of these differences through refinements in techniques and additional measurements to higher temperatures are required. 13 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  8. Neutron guide shielding for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS

    OpenAIRE

    Mantulnikovs, K.; Bertelsen, M.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Lefmann, K.; Klinkby, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the study of fast-neutron background for the BIFROST spectrometerat ESS. We investigate the effect of background radiation induced by the interaction of fast neutrons from the source with the material of the neutron guide and devise a reasonable fast, thermal/cold neutron shielding solution for the current guide geometry using McStas and MCNPX. We investigate the effectiveness of the steel shielding around the guide by running simulations with three different steel thicknesses. T...

  9. Porous materials produced from incineration ash using thermal plasma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sheng-Fu; Chiu, Wen-Tung; Wang, To-Mai; Chen, Ching-Ting; Tzeng, Chin-Ching

    2014-06-01

    This study presents a novel thermal plasma melting technique for neutralizing and recycling municipal solid waste incinerator (MSWI) ash residues. MSWI ash residues were converted into water-quenched vitrified slag using plasma vitrification, which is environmentally benign. Slag is adopted as a raw material in producing porous materials for architectural and decorative applications, eliminating the problem of its disposal. Porous materials are produced using water-quenched vitrified slag with Portland cement and foaming agent. The true density, bulk density, porosity and water absorption ratio of the foamed specimens are studied here by varying the size of the slag particles, the water-to-solid ratio, and the ratio of the weights of the core materials, including the water-quenched vitrified slag and cement. The thermal conductivity and flexural strength of porous panels are also determined. The experimental results show the bulk density and the porosity of the porous materials are 0.9-1.2 g cm(-3) and 50-60%, respectively, and the pore structure has a closed form. The thermal conductivity of the porous material is 0.1946 W m(-1) K(-1). Therefore, the slag composite materials are lightweight and thermal insulators having considerable potential for building applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Negative thermal expansion in functional materials: controllable thermal expansion by chemical modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jun; Hu, Lei; Deng, Jinxia; Xing, Xianran

    2015-06-07

    Negative thermal expansion (NTE) is an intriguing physical property of solids, which is a consequence of a complex interplay among the lattice, phonons, and electrons. Interestingly, a large number of NTE materials have been found in various types of functional materials. In the last two decades good progress has been achieved to discover new phenomena and mechanisms of NTE. In the present review article, NTE is reviewed in functional materials of ferroelectrics, magnetics, multiferroics, superconductors, temperature-induced electron configuration change and so on. Zero thermal expansion (ZTE) of functional materials is emphasized due to the importance for practical applications. The NTE functional materials present a general physical picture to reveal a strong coupling role between physical properties and NTE. There is a general nature of NTE for both ferroelectrics and magnetics, in which NTE is determined by either ferroelectric order or magnetic one. In NTE functional materials, a multi-way to control thermal expansion can be established through the coupling roles of ferroelectricity-NTE, magnetism-NTE, change of electron configuration-NTE, open-framework-NTE, and so on. Chemical modification has been proved to be an effective method to control thermal expansion. Finally, challenges and questions are discussed for the development of NTE materials. There remains a challenge to discover a "perfect" NTE material for each specific application for chemists. The future studies on NTE functional materials will definitely promote the development of NTE materials.

  11. Design of materials with extreme thermal expansion using a three-phase topology optimization method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigmund, Ole; Torquato, S.

    1997-01-01

    Composites with extremal or unusual thermal expansion coefficients are designed using a three-phase topology optimization method. The composites are made of two different material phases and a void phase. The topology optimization method consists in finding the distribution of material phases...... materials having maximum directional thermal expansion (thermal actuators), zero isotropic thermal expansion, and negative isotropic thermal expansion. It is shown that materials with effective negative thermal expansion coefficients can be obtained by mixing two phases with positive thermal expansion...

  12. Investigations on construction material and construction concepts in order to obtain dose-reducing effects in the dismantling of the biological shield of a 1300 MWe-PWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bittner, A.; Jungwirth, D.; Knell, M.; Schnitzler, L.

    1984-04-01

    Numerical values of neutron fluxes, activations, dose rates etc. as a function of characteristic values of materials required for optimization purposes to reduce the radiation effect of the biological shield of a PWR are not available. Design concepts are presented for biological shields of PWRs made of concrete with respect to both the most suitable application of materials and the design principles aiming at reduced radiation exposure as compared to present designs during entering, waste disposal and ultimate storage. To evaluate the present-state design the above values have been calculated. Suggested alternative designs are biological shields with selective material application, built from precast elements with or without boron carbide layer arranged in front of it. (orig./HP) [de

  13. Thermal properties and application of potential lithium silicate breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokan, A.; Wedemeyer, H.; Vollath, D.; Gunther, E.

    1987-01-01

    Phase relations, thermal stability and preparation methods of the Li 2 O-rich silicates Li 8 SiO 6 and ''Li 6 SiO 5 '' have been investigated experimentally, the application of these compounds as solid breeder materials is discussed. In the second part of this contribution, the results of thermal expansion measurements on the silicates Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 8 SiO 6 are presented

  14. Thermal properties and application of potential lithium silicate breeder materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokan, A.; Wedemeyer, H.; Vollath, D.; Guenther, E.

    1986-01-01

    Phase relations, thermal stability and preparation methods of the Li 2 O-rich silicates Li 8 SiO 6 and 'Li 6 SiO 5 ' have been investigated experimentally, the application of these compounds as solid breeder materials is discussed. In the second part of this contribution, the results of thermal expansion measurements on the silicates Li 2 SiO 3 , Li 4 SiO 4 and Li 8 SiO 6 are presented. (author)

  15. Ultra-low thermal expansion realized in giant negative thermal expansion materials through self-compensation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Fei-Ran; Kuang, Hao; Hu, Feng-Xia; Wu, Hui; Huang, Qing-Zhen; Liang, Fei-Xiang; Qiao, Kai-Ming; Li, Jia; Wang, Jing; Liu, Yao; Zhang, Lei; He, Min; Zhang, Ying; Zuo, Wen-Liang; Sun, Ji-Rong; Shen, Bao-Gen

    2017-10-01

    Materials with zero thermal expansion (ZTE) or precisely tailored thermal expansion are in urgent demand of modern industries. However, the overwhelming majority of materials show positive thermal expansion. To develop ZTE or negative thermal expansion (NTE) materials as compensators has become an important challenge. Here, we present the evidence for the realization of ultra-low thermal expansion in Mn-Co-Ge-In particles. The bulk with the Ni2In-type hexagonal structure undergoes giant NTE owing to a martensitic magnetostructural transition. The major finding is that the thermal expansion behavior can be totally controlled by modulating the crystallinity degree and phase transition from atomic scale. Self-compensation effect leads to ultra-low thermal expansion with a linear expansion coefficient as small as +0.68 × 10-6/K over a wide temperature range around room temperature. The present study opens an avenue to reach ZTE particularly from the large class of giant NTE materials based on phase transition.

  16. Ultra-low thermal expansion realized in giant negative thermal expansion materials through self-compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei-Ran Shen

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Materials with zero thermal expansion (ZTE or precisely tailored thermal expansion are in urgent demand of modern industries. However, the overwhelming majority of materials show positive thermal expansion. To develop ZTE or negative thermal expansion (NTE materials as compensators has become an important challenge. Here, we present the evidence for the realization of ultra-low thermal expansion in Mn–Co–Ge–In particles. The bulk with the Ni2In-type hexagonal structure undergoes giant NTE owing to a martensitic magnetostructural transition. The major finding is that the thermal expansion behavior can be totally controlled by modulating the crystallinity degree and phase transition from atomic scale. Self-compensation effect leads to ultra-low thermal expansion with a linear expansion coefficient as small as +0.68 × 10−6/K over a wide temperature range around room temperature. The present study opens an avenue to reach ZTE particularly from the large class of giant NTE materials based on phase transition.

  17. Thermal energy storage based on cementitious materials: A review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khadim Ndiaye

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Renewable energy storage is now essential to enhance the energy performance of buildings and to reduce their environmental impact. Many heat storage materials can be used in the building sector in order to avoid the phase shift between solar radiation and thermal energy demand. However, the use of storage material in the building sector is hampered by problems of investment cost, space requirements, mechanical performance, material stability, and high storage temperature. Cementitious material is increasingly being used as a heat storage material thanks to its low price, mechanical performance and low storage temperature (generally lower than 100 °C. In addition, cementitious materials for heat storage have the prominent advantage of being easy to incorporate into the building landscape as self-supporting structures or even supporting structures (walls, floor, etc.. Concrete solutions for thermal energy storage are usually based on sensible heat transfer and thermal inertia. Phase Change Materials (PCM incorporated in concrete wall have been widely investigated in the aim of improving building energy performance. Cementitious material with high ettringite content stores heat by a combination of physical (adsorption and chemical (chemical reaction processes usable in both the short (daily, weekly and long (seasonal term. Ettringite materials have the advantage of high energy storage density at low temperature (around 60 °C. The encouraging experimental results in the literature on heat storage using cementitious materials suggest that they could be attractive in a number of applications. This paper summarizes the investigation and analysis of the available thermal energy storage systems using cementitious materials for use in various applications.

  18. Double-layer neutron shield design as neutron shielding application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariyer, Demet; Küçer, Rahmi

    2018-02-01

    The shield design in particle accelerators and other high energy facilities are mainly connected to the high-energy neutrons. The deep penetration of neutrons through massive shield has become a very serious problem. For shielding to be efficient, most of these neutrons should be confined to the shielding volume. If the interior space will become limited, the sufficient thickness of multilayer shield must be used. Concrete and iron are widely used as a multilayer shield material. Two layers shield material was selected to guarantee radiation safety outside of the shield against neutrons generated in the interaction of the different proton energies. One of them was one meter of concrete, the other was iron-contained material (FeB, Fe2B and stainless-steel) to be determined shield thicknesses. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used for shield design geometry and required neutron dose distributions. The resulting two layered shields are shown better performance than single used concrete, thus the shield design could leave more space in the interior shielded areas.

  19. Thermally joining and/or coating or thermally separating the workpieces having heat-sensitive coating, comprises restoring coating by thermally coating the coating material after thermally joining and/or coating or thermally separating

    OpenAIRE

    Riedel, Frank; Winkelmann, Ralf; Puschmann, Markus

    2011-01-01

    The method for thermally joining and/or coating or thermally separating the workpieces (1), which have a heat-sensitive coating (2), comprises restoring the coating by thermally coating a coating material (3) after thermally joining and/or coating or thermally separating the workpieces. A part of the thermal energy introduced in the workpiece for joining and/or coating or separating or in the workpieces is used for thermally coating the coating material. Two workpieces are welded or soldered ...

  20. Thermal analysis of charring materials based on pyrolysis interface model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Hai-Ming

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Charring thermal protection systems have been used to protect hypersonic vehicles from high heat loads. The pyrolysis of charring materials is a complicated physical and chemical phenomenon. Based on the pyrolysis interface model, a simulating approach for charring ablation has been designed in order to obtain one dimensional transient thermal behavior of homogeneous charring materials in reentry capsules. As the numerical results indicate, the pyrolysis rate and the surface temperature under a given heat flux rise abruptly in the beginning, then reach a plateau, but the temperature at the bottom rises very slowly to prevent the structural materials from being heated seriously. Pyrolysis mechanism can play an important role in thermal protection systems subjected to serious aerodynamic heat.

  1. XRD Investigation of Some Thermal Degraded Starch Based Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai Todica

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermal degradation of some starch based materials was investigated using XRD method. The samples were obtained by thermal extrusion of mixtures of different proportions of starch, glycerol, and water. Such materials are suitable for the manufacturing of low pollutant packaging. Thermal degradation is one of the simplest ways to destroy such materials and this process is followed by structural modification of the local ordering of samples, water evaporation, crystallization, oxidation, or destruction of the chemical bonds. These modifications need to be studied in order to reduce to the minimum production of pollutant residues by burning process. XRD measurements show modification of the local ordering of the starch molecules depending on the temperature and initial composition of the samples. The molecular ordering perturbation is more pronounced in samples with low content of starch.

  2. Thermal interface material characterization for cryogenic electronic packaging solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillon, A.; McCusker, K.; Van Dyke, J.; Isler, B.; Christiansen, M.

    2017-12-01

    As applications of superconducting logic technologies continue to grow, the need for efficient and reliable cryogenic packaging becomes crucial to development and testing. A trade study of materials was done to develop a practical understanding of the properties of interface materials around 4 K. While literature exists for varying interface tests, discrepancies are found in the reported performance of different materials and in the ranges of applied force in which they are optimal. In considering applications extending from top cooling a silicon chip to clamping a heat sink, a range of forces from approximately 44 N to approximately 445 N was chosen for testing different interface materials. For each range of forces a single material was identified to optimize the thermal conductance of the joint. Of the tested interfaces, indium foil clamped at approximately 445 N showed the highest thermal conductance. Results are presented from these characterizations and useful methodologies for efficient testing are defined.

  3. ZnO-PbO-B2O3 glasses as gamma-ray shielding materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, H.; Singh, K.; Gerward, Leif

    2003-01-01

    Values of the gamma-ray mass-attenuation coefficient, the photon mean free path (MFP), the effective atomic number and the effective electron density have been determined experimentally for xZnO.2xPbO.(1-3x)B2O3 (x = 0.1-0.26) glasses at photon energies 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV and compared wi...... with theoretical data. The specific volume of the glasses has been derived from density measurements and studied as a function of composition. It is pointed out that these glasses have potential applications in radiation shielding.......Values of the gamma-ray mass-attenuation coefficient, the photon mean free path (MFP), the effective atomic number and the effective electron density have been determined experimentally for xZnO.2xPbO.(1-3x)B2O3 (x = 0.1-0.26) glasses at photon energies 511, 662, 1173 and 1332 keV and compared...

  4. The performance test of anti-scattering x-ray grid with inclined shielding material by MCNP code simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, Jun Woo; Kim, Hee Reyoung [Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    The scattered photons cause reduction of the contrast of radiographic image and it results in the degradation of the quality of the image. In order to acquire better quality image, an anti-scattering x-ray gird should be equipped in radiography system. The X-ray anti-scattering grid of the inclined type based on the hybrid concept for that of parallel and focused type was tested by MCNP code. The MCNPX 2.7.0 was used for the simulation based test. The geometry for the test was based on the IEC 60627 which was an international standard for diagnostic X-ray imaging equipment-Characteristics of general purpose and mammographic anti-scatter grids. The performance of grids with four inclined shielding material types was compared with that of the parallel type. The grid with completely tapered type the best performance where there were little performance difference according to the degree of inclination.

  5. Experimental Evaluation of Geopolymer and ‘Lunamer’ Binders as Radioactive Shielding Materials for Space Applications

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Geopolymers are inorganic cementitious binders produced by polymeric reaction between an aluminosilica rich material and an alkali metal hydroxide/silicate liquid,...

  6. Preparation, characterization, and thermal properties of microencapsulated phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alkan, Cemil; Sari, Ahmet; Karaipekli, Ali [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey); Uzun, Orhan [Department of Physics, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)

    2009-01-15

    This study is focused on the preparation, characterization, and determination of thermal properties of microencapsulated docosane with polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) as phase change material for thermal energy storage. Microencapsulation of docosane has been carried out by emulsion polymerization. The microencapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) was characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy. Thermal properties and thermal stability of MEPCM were measured by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). DSC analysis indicated that the docosane in the microcapsules melts at 41.0 C and crystallizes at 40.6 C. It has latent heats of 54.6 and -48.7 J/g for melting and crystallization, respectively. TGA showed that the MEPCM degraded in three distinguishable steps and had good chemical stability. Accelerated thermal cycling tests also indicated that the MEPCM had good thermal reliability. Based on all these results, it can be concluded that the microencapsulated docosane as MEPCMs have good potential for thermal energy storage purposes such as solar space heating applications. (author)

  7. A new high power thermal battery cathode material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faul, I.

    1986-01-01

    Smaller and lighter thermal batteries are major aims of the battery research programme at RAE Farnborough. Modern designs of thermal batteries, for use as power supplies in weapon systems, almost invariably use the Li:molten salt:FeS/sub 2/ system because of the significant increase in energy density achieved in comparison with the earlier Ca/CaCrO/sub 4/ couple. The disadvantage of the FeS/sub 2/ system is that the working cell voltage, between 1.5 and 2.0 V, is significantly lower so leading to more cells per battery than the earlier system. Further work at RAE and MSA (Britain) Ltd showed that the poor thermal stability of TiS/sub 2/ limited its use in thermal batteries, whilst the more stable V/sub 6/O/sub 13/ oxidised the electrolyte, giving poor efficiencies. However, the resulting reduced vanadium oxide material, subsequently called lithiated vanadium oxide (LVO), was found to be an excellent high voltage thermal battery cathode, being the subject of both UK and US patents. In this study both V/sub 6/O/sub 13/ made by the direct stoichiometric reaction of V/sub 2/O/sub 5/ and V and also by thermal decomposition of NH/sub 4/VO/sub 3/ under argon, have been used with equal success as the starting material for the preparation of LVO

  8. Handbook on dielectric and thermal properties of microwaveable materials

    CERN Document Server

    Komarov, Vyacheslav V

    2012-01-01

    The application of microwave energy for thermal processing of different materials and substances is a rapidly growing trend in modern science and engineering. In fact, optimal design work involving microwaves is impossible without solid knowledge of the properties of these materials. Here s a practical reference that collects essential data on the dielectric and thermal properties of microwaveable materials, saving you countless hours on projects in a wide range of areas, including microwave design and heating, applied electrodynamics, food science, and medical technology. This unique book provides hard-to-find information on complex dielectric permittivity of media at industrial, scientific, and medical frequencies (430 MHz, 915MHz, 2.45GHz, 5.8 GHz, and 24.125GHz). Written by a leading expert in the field, this authoritative book does an exceptional job at presenting critical data on various materials and explaining what their key characteristics are concerning microwaves.

  9. Materials and Manufacturing Technology Directorate Thermal Sciences and Materials Branch (Overview)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Molecular Mechanics for thermo-mechanical response Materials Characterization • CNT modified durable thermal interface ( DTI ) • MEMS-based RTD micro...stabilization. Surface Characterization by Atomic Force Microscopy: Probing Thermal, Electrical, and Mechanical Properties Heater Current Path Anchor Leg 50 µm

  10. Cellular and Porous Materials Thermal Properties Simulation and Prediction

    CERN Document Server

    Öchsner, Andreas; de Lemos, Marcelo J S

    2008-01-01

    Providing the reader with a solid understanding of the fundamentals as well as an awareness of recent advances in properties and applications of cellular and porous materials, this handbook and ready reference covers all important analytical and numerical methods for characterizing and predicting thermal properties. In so doing it directly addresses the special characteristics of foam-like and hole-riddled materials, combining theoretical and experimental aspects for characterization purposes.

  11. Rapid charging of thermal energy storage materials through plasmonic heating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongyong; Tao, Peng; Liu, Yang; Xu, Hao; Ye, Qinxian; Hu, Hang; Song, Chengyi; Chen, Zhaoping; Shang, Wen; Deng, Tao

    2014-09-01

    Direct collection, conversion and storage of solar radiation as thermal energy are crucial to the efficient utilization of renewable solar energy and the reduction of global carbon footprint. This work reports a facile approach for rapid and efficient charging of thermal energy storage materials by the instant and intense photothermal effect of uniformly distributed plasmonic nanoparticles. Upon illumination with both green laser light and sunlight, the prepared plasmonic nanocomposites with volumetric ppm level of filler concentration demonstrated a faster heating rate, a higher heating temperature and a larger heating area than the conventional thermal diffusion based approach. With controlled dispersion, we further demonstrated that the light-to-heat conversion and thermal storage properties of the plasmonic nanocomposites can be fine-tuned by engineering the composition of the nanocomposites.

  12. Novel Magnetic-to-Thermal Conversion and Thermal Energy Management Composite Phase Change Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqiao Fan

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Superparamagnetic materials have elicited increasing interest due to their high-efficiency magnetothermal conversion. However, it is difficult to effectively manage the magnetothermal energy due to the continuous magnetothermal effect at present. In this study, we designed and synthesized a novel Fe3O4/PEG/SiO2 composite phase change material (PCM that can simultaneously realize magnetic-to-thermal conversion and thermal energy management because of outstanding thermal energy storage ability of PCM. The composite was fabricated by in situ doping of superparamagnetic Fe3O4 nanoclusters through a simple sol–gel method. The synthesized Fe3O4/PEG/SiO2 PCM exhibited good thermal stability, high phase change enthalpy, and excellent shape-stabilized property. This study provides an additional promising route for application of the magnetothermal effect.

  13. Characterization of the heat transfer properties of thermal interface materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fullem, Travis Z.

    Physicists have studied the thermal conductivity of solids for decades. As a result of these efforts, thermal conduction in crystalline solids is well understood; there are detailed theories describing thermal conduction due to electrons and phonons. Phonon scattering and transmission at solid/solid interfaces, particularly above cryogenic temperatures, is not well understood and more work is needed in this area. The desire to solve engineering problems which require good thermal contact between mating surfaces has provided enhanced motivation for furthering the state of the art on this topic. Effective thermal management is an important design consideration in microelectronic systems. A common technique for removing excess heat from an electronic device is to attach a heatsink to the device; it is desirable to minimize the thermal resistance between the device and the heatsink. This can be accomplished by placing a thermal interface material (TIM) between the two surfaces. Due to the ever-increasing power densities found in electronic components, there is a desire to design better TIMs, which necessitates the ability to characterize TIM bondlines and to better understand the physics of heat conduction through TIM bondlines. A micro Fourier apparatus which employs Pt thin film thermometers of our design has been built and is capable of precisely quantifying the thermal resistance of thermal interface materials. In the present work several types of commercially available TIMs have been studied using this apparatus, including: greases, filled epoxies, and thermally conductive pads. In the case of filled epoxies, bondlines of various thicknesses, ranging from thirty microns to several hundred microns, have been measured. The microstructure of these bondlines has been investigated using optical microscopy and acoustic microscopy. Measured values of thermal conductivity are considered in terms of microstructural features such as percolation networks and filler particle

  14. MicroShield 6.20 computations to evaluate dose rate in unprotected materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaveikova, M.; Stanev, I.

    2013-01-01

    An analysis of compliance with the requirement of Art. 36 of the Regulation on the conditions and procedure of transport of radioactive material is made.This analysis is carried out in connection with the construction of sites for temporary storage of radioactive materials and radioactive wastes from decommissioning activities of the Kozloduy NPP units 1-4. The aim is to assess the dose in unprotected materials. An analysis of the conformity with the requirements of the Bulgarian legislation to assess the dose rate of material in the absence of physical or other barriers. Many calculations are carried out to assess the dose rate around a piece of metal from the dismantling of the primary circuit, which is conservatively assumed that contamination is greatest

  15. Neutron shielding properties of boron-containing ore and epoxy composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Zhifu; Xue Xiangxin

    2011-01-01

    Using the boron-containing iron ore concentrate and boron-rich slag as studying object, the starting materials were got after the specific green ore containing boron dressing in China and blast furnace separation respectively. Monte-Carlo method was used to study the effect of the boron-containing iron ore concentrate and boron-rich slag and their composites with epoxy on the neutron shielding abilities. The reasons that affecting the shielding materials properties was discussed and the suitable proportioning of boron-containing ore to epoxy composites was confirmed; the 14.1 MeV fast neutron removal cross section and the total thermal neutron attenuation coefficient were obtained and compared with that of the common used concrete. The results show that the shielding property of 14.1 MeV fast neutron is mainly concerned with the low-Z elements in the shielding materials, the thermal neutron shielding ability is mainly concerned with boron concentrate in the composite, the attenuation of the accompany γ-ray photon is mainly concerned with the high atom number elements content in the ore and the density of the shielding material. The optimum Janume fractions of composites are in the range of 0.4-0.6 and the fast neutron shielding properties are similar to concrete while the thermal neutron shielding properties are higher than concrete. The composites are expected to be used as biological concrete shields crack injection and filling of the anomalous holes through the concrete shields around the radiation fields or directly to be prepared as shielding materials.(authors)

  16. Pattern-free thermal modulator via thermal radiation between Van der Waals materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xianglei; Shen, Jiadong; Xuan, Yimin

    2017-10-01

    Modulating heat flux provides a platform for a plethora of emerging devices such as thermal diodes, thermal transistors, and thermal memories. Here, a pattern-free noncontact thermal modulator is proposed based on the mechanical rotation between two Van der Waals films with optical axes parallel to the surfaces. A modulation contrast can reach a value higher than 5 for hexagonal Boron Nitride (hBN) films separated by a nanoscale gap distance. The dominant radiative heat exchange comes from the excitation of both Type I and Type II hyperbolic surface phonon polaritons (HSPhPs) at the vacuum-hBN interface for different orientations, while the large modulation contrast is mainly attributed to the mismatching Type I HSPhPs induced by rotation. This work opens the possibility to design cheap thermal modulators without relying on nanofabrication techniques, and paves the way to apply natural Van der Waals materials in manipulating heat currents in an active way.

  17. Thermal expansion model for multiphase electronic packaging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allred, B.E.; Warren, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    Control of thermal expansion is often necessary in the design and selection of electronic packages. In some instances, it is desirable to have a coefficient of thermal expansion intermediate between values readily attainable with single or two phase materials. The addition of a third phase in the form of fillers, whiskers, or fibers can be used to attain intermediate expansions. To help design the thermal expansion of multiphase materials for specific applications, a closed form model has been developed that accurately predicts the effective elastic properties of isotropic filled materials and transversely isotropic lamina. Properties of filled matrix materials are used as inputs to the lamina model to obtain the composite elastic properties as a function of the volume fraction of each phase. Hybrid composites with two or more fiber types are easily handled with this model. This paper reports that results for glass, quartz, and Kevlar fibers with beta-eucryptite filled polymer matrices show good agreement with experimental results for X, Y, and Z thermal expansion coefficients

  18. Investigation of thermal management materials for automotive electronic control units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mallik, Sabuj; Ekere, Ndy; Best, Chris; Bhatti, Raj

    2011-01-01

    Today's electronics packages are smaller and more powerful than ever before. This leads to ever increasing thermal challenges for the systems designer. The automotive electronic control unit (ECU) package faces the same challenge of thermal management as the industry in general. This is coupled with the latest European Union legislation (Euro 6 standard) which forced the ECU manufacturers to completely re-design their ECU platform with improved hardware and software capability. This will result in increased power densities and therefore, the ability to dissipate heat will be a key factor. A higher thermal conductivity (TC) material for the ECU housing (than the currently used Aluminium) could improve heat dissipation from the ECU. This paper critically reviews the state-of-the-art in thermal management materials which may be applicable to an automotive ECU. This review shows that of the different materials currently available, the Al/SiC composites in particular have very good potential for automotive ECU application. In terms of metal composites processing, the liquid metal infiltration process is recommended as it has a lower processing cost and it also has the ability to produce near net-shape materials.

  19. Materials performance in prototype Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    Two prototype Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) columns have been metallurgically examined after retirement, to determine the causes of failure and to evaluate the performance of the column container materials in this application. Leaking of the fluid heating and cooling subsystems caused retirement of both TCAP columns, not leaking of the main hydrogen-containing column. The aluminum block design TCAP column (AHL block TCAP) used in the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, Building 773-A, failed in one nitrogen inlet tube that was crimped during fabrication, which lead to fatigue crack growth in the tube and subsequent leaking of nitrogen from this tube. The Third Generation stainless steel design TCAP column (Third generation TCAP), operated in 773-A room C-061, failed in a braze joint between the freon heating and cooling tubes (made of copper) and the main stainless steel column. In both cases, stresses from thermal cycling and local constraint likely caused the nucleation and growth of fatigue cracks. No materials compatibility problems between palladium coated kieselguhr (the material contained in the TCAP column) and either aluminum or stainless steel column materials were observed. The aluminum-stainless steel transition junction appeared to be unaffected by service in the AHL block TCAP. Also, no evidence of cracking was observed in the AHL block TCAP in a location expected to experience the highest thermal shock fatigue in this design. It is important to limit thermal stresses caused by constraint in hydride systems designed to work by temperature variation, such as hydride storage beds and TCAP columns

  20. Conduction mechanism in Polyaniline-flyash composite material for shielding against electromagnetic radiation in X-band & Ku band

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avanish Pratap Singh

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available β–Naphthalene sulphonic acid (β–NSA doped polyaniline (PANI–flyash (FA composites have been prepared by chemical oxidative polymerization route whose conductivity lies in the range 2.37–21.49 S/cm. The temperature dependence of electrical conductivity has also been recorded which shows that composites follow Mott's 3D–VRH model. SEM images demonstrate that β–NSA leads to the formation of the tubular structure with incorporated flyash phase. TGA studies show the improvement in thermal stability of composites with increase in loading level of flyash. Complex parameters i.e. permittivity (ɛ* = ɛ′- iɛ″ and permeability (μ*=μ′- iμ″ of PANI-FA composites have been calculated from experimental scattering parameters (S11 & S21 using theoretical calculations given in Nicholson–Ross and Weir algorithms. The microwave absorption properties of the composites have been studied in X-band (8.2 – 12.4 GHz & Ku–Band (12.4 – 18 GHz frequency range. The maximum shielding effectiveness observed was 32dB, which strongly depends on dielectric loss and volume fraction of flyash in PANI matrix.

  1. Foam-Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composite Radiation Shields, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — New and innovative lightweight radiation shielding materials are needed to protect humans in future manned exploration vehicles. Radiation shielding materials are...

  2. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotov, V.M.

    2012-01-01

    Existing thermal reactors are energy production scale limited because of low portion of raw uranium usage. Fast reactors are limited by reprocessing need of huge mass of raw uranium at the initial stage of development. The possibility of development of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction, which solves the problem, is discussed here. Neutron losses are decreased, uranium-thorium fuel with artificial fission materials equilibrium regime is used, additional in-core and out-core neutron sources are used for supplying of high fission materials reproduction. Liquid salt reactors can use dynamic loading regime for this purpose. Preferable construction is channel type reactor with heavy water moderator. Good materials for fuel element shells and channel walls are zirconium alloys enriched by 90Zr. Water cooled reactors with usage 12% of raw uranium and liquid metal cooled reactors with usage 25% of raw uranium are discussed. Reactors with additional neutron sources obtain full usage of raw uranium with small additional energy expenses. On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  3. Development of thermal energy storage materials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, A; Sharma, Atul; Shukla, Manjari; Chen, C R

    2015-01-01

    The phase change materials (PCMs) have been utilized widely for solar thermal energy storage (TES) devices. The quality of these materials to remain at a particular temperature during solid-liquid, liquid-solid phase transition can also be utilized for many biomedical applications as well and has been explored in recent past already. This study reports some novel PCMs developed by them, along with some existing PCMs, to be used for such biomedical applications. Interestingly, it was observed that the heating/cooling properties of these PCMs enhance the quality of a variety of biomedical applications with many advantages (non-electric, no risk of electric shock, easy to handle, easy to recharge thermally, long life, cheap and easily available, reusable) over existing applications. Results of the present study are quite interesting and exciting, opening a plethora of opportunities for more work on the subject, which require overlapping expertise of material scientists, biochemists and medical experts for broader social benefits.

  4. Transfer of fissile material through shielding coatings in emergency heating of HTGR coated particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, A.N.; Zhuravkov, S.G.; Koptev, M.A.; Kurepin, A.D.

    1990-01-01

    The measurement results of leakage dynamics of fissile material from the coated particles within a temperature range of 1200 + 2000 deg. C are given. The methods of carrying out the experiments are briefly described. The relation of the leakage rate of uranium-235 from CP (coated particles) with the pyrocarbonic coatings has been obtained. (author)

  5. Thermal properties of composite materials with a complex fractal structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cervantes-Álvarez, F; Reyes-Salgado, J J; Dossetti, V; Carrillo, J L

    2014-01-01

    In this work, we report the thermal characterization of platelike composite samples made of polyester resin and magnetite inclusions. By means of photoacoustic spectroscopy and thermal relaxation, the thermal diffusivity, conductivity and volumetric heat capacity of the samples were experimentally measured. The volume fraction of the inclusions was systematically varied in order to study the changes in the effective thermal conductivity of the composites. For some samples, a static magnetic field was applied during the polymerization process, resulting in anisotropic inclusion distributions. Our results show a decrease in the thermal conductivity of some of the anisotropic samples, compared to the isotropic randomly distributed ones. Our analysis indicates that the development of elongated inclusion structures leads to the formation of magnetite and resin domains, causing this effect. We correlate the complexity of the inclusion structure with the observed thermal response through a multifractal and lacunarity analysis. All the experimental data are contrasted with the well known Maxwell–Garnett effective media approximation for composite materials. (paper)

  6. Analytical method for thermal stress analysis of plasma facing materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, J. H.; Bolt, H.

    2001-10-01

    The thermo-mechanical response of plasma facing materials (PFMs) to heat loads from the fusion plasma is one of the crucial issues in fusion technology. In this work, a fully analytical description of the thermal stress distribution in armour tiles of plasma facing components is presented which is expected to occur under typical high heat flux (HHF) loads. The method of stress superposition is applied considering the temperature gradient and thermal expansion mismatch. Several combinations of PFMs and heat sink metals are analysed and compared. In the framework of the present theoretical model, plastic flow and the effect of residual stress can be quantitatively assessed. Possible failure features are discussed.

  7. Analytical method for thermal stress analysis of plasma facing materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    You, J.H.; Bolt, H.

    2001-01-01

    The thermo-mechanical response of plasma facing materials (PFMs) to heat loads from the fusion plasma is one of the crucial issues in fusion technology. In this work, a fully analytical description of the thermal stress distribution in armour tiles of plasma facing components is presented which is expected to occur under typical high heat flux (HHF) loads. The method of stress superposition is applied considering the temperature gradient and thermal expansion mismatch. Several combinations of PFMs and heat sink metals are analysed and compared. In the framework of the present theoretical model, plastic flow and the effect of residual stress can be quantitatively assessed. Possible failure features are discussed

  8. Instrumentation for thermal diffusivity determination of sintered materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turquetti Filho, R.

    1990-01-01

    A new procedure to measure the sinterized materials thermal diffusivity, using the heat pulse method was developed in this work. The experimental data were performed at room temperature with UO sub(2), ThO sub(2), and Al sub(2)O sub(3) samples with 94%, 95%, and 96% of theoretical densities, respectively. Nondimensional root mean square deviation for theoretical function fitting was found to be on the order, of 10 sup(-3). The total error associated with the measurements for thermal diffusivity was ± 5%. (author)

  9. Selection of materials with potential in sensible thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.I.; Martinez, M.; Segarra, M.; Martorell, I.; Cabeza, L.F.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal energy storage is a technology under investigation since the early 1970s. Since then, numerous new applications have been found and much work has been done to bring this technology to the market. Nevertheless, the materials used either for latent or for sensible storage were mostly investigated 30 years ago, and the research has lead to improvement in their performance under different conditions of applications. In those years a significant number of new materials were developed in many fields other than storage and energy, but a great effort to characterize and classify these materials was done. Taking into account the fact that thousands of materials are known and a large number of new materials are developed every year, the authors use the methodology for materials selection developed by Prof. Ashby to give an overview of other materials suitable to be used in thermal energy storage. Sensible heat storage at temperatures between 150 and 200 C is defined as a case study and two different scenarios were considered: long term sensible heat storage and short term sensible heat storage. (author)

  10. Using Ferromagnetic Material to Extend and Shield the Magnetic Field of a Coil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-14

    the application of ferromagnetic cladding on the coil. Calculations were performed for an infinitely long wire with a 2.5- × 5.0-cm rectangular...turn coil with a 20-cm diameter, metal cladding of varying permeability of µo, 10 µo, and 50 µo, and cross sections identical to the previous infinite ...1 Fig. 2 Field from a rectangular saturated ferromagnetic material and an infinitely long wire with a rectangular cross section

  11. Manufacturing method for boron carbide/carbon composite neutron shielding material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Takenori; Ukai, Shigeharu; Maruyama, Tadashi; Suya, Kiyoshi; Sunami, Yoshihiko.

    1994-01-01

    A less volatile binder pitch which is melted upon heating is used as a binder. Raw materials mainly comprising 60 to 85% by volume of a boron carbide powder and 15 to 40% by volume of a binder pitch are mixed, molded under pressure and heating at 480 to 600degC, then baked under non-pressurization, further impregnated with pitch under a reduced pressure and then baked again. The volume percentage of each of the materials is calculated based on the volume obtained by dividing the blending weight for each of raw materials with the intrinsic density respectively. The binding property relative to the boron carbide powder is improved by using a pitch having satisfactory melting performance and reduction of strength is decreased. Moreover, if the binder pitch is baked at about 2,000degC, it is easily converted into a graphitized tissues to have excellent slidability and fabricability. With such procedures, high bending strength and high heat conductivity can be ensured while keeping high boron content and neutron absorbing performance. (T.M.)

  12. Primary shield displacement and bowing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, K.V.

    1978-01-01

    The reactor primary shield is constructed of high density concrete and surrounds the reactor core. The inlet, outlet and side primary shields were constructed in-place using 2.54 cm (1 in) thick steel plates as the forms. The plates remained as an integral part of the shields. The elongation of the pressure tubes due to thermal expansion and pressurization is not moving through the inlet nozzle hardware as designed but is accommodated by outward displacement and bowing of the inlet and outlet shields. Excessive distortion of the shields may result in gas seal failures, intolerable helium gas leaks, increased argon-41 emissions, and shield cooling tube failures. The shield surveillance and testing results are presented

  13. Carbon nanotubes for thermal interface materials in microelectronic packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Wei

    As the integration scale of transistors/devices in a chip/system keeps increasing, effective cooling has become more and more important in microelectronics. To address the thermal dissipation issue, one important solution is to develop thermal interface materials with higher performance. Carbon nanotubes, given their high intrinsic thermal and mechanical properties, and their high thermal and chemical stabilities, have received extensive attention from both academia and industry as a candidate for high-performance thermal interface materials. The thesis is devoted to addressing some challenges related to the potential application of carbon nanotubes as thermal interface materials in microelectronics. These challenges include: 1) controlled synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates via chemical vapor deposition and the fundamental understanding involved; 2) development of a scalable annealing process to improve the intrinsic properties of synthesized carbon nanotubes; 3) development of a state-of-art assembling process to effectively implement high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes into a flip-chip assembly; 4) a reliable thermal measurement of intrinsic thermal transport property of vertically aligned carbon nanotube films; 5) improvement of interfacial thermal transport between carbon nanotubes and other materials. The major achievements are summarized. 1. Based on the fundamental understanding of catalytic chemical vapor deposition processes and the growth mechanism of carbon nanotube, fast synthesis of high-quality vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on various bulk substrates (e.g., copper, quartz, silicon, aluminum oxide, etc.) has been successfully achieved. The synthesis of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on the bulk copper substrate by the thermal chemical vapor deposition process has set a world record. In order to functionalize the synthesized carbon nanotubes while maintaining their good vertical alignment

  14. Preparation and thermal conductivity enhancement of composite phase change materials for electronic thermal management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Weixiong; Zhang, Guoqing; Ke, Xiufang; Yang, Xiaoqing; Wang, Ziyuan; Liu, Chenzhen

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • A kind of composite phase change material board (PCMB) is prepared and tested. • PCMB presents a large thermal storage capacity and enhanced thermal conductivity. • PCMB displays much better cooling effect in comparison to natural air cooling. • PCMB presents different cooling characteristics in comparison to ribbed radiator. - Abstract: A kind of phase change material board (PCMB) was prepared for use in the thermal management of electronics, with paraffin and expanded graphite as the phase change material and matrix, respectively. The as-prepared PCMB presented a large thermal storage capacity of 141.74 J/g and enhanced thermal conductivity of 7.654 W/(m K). As a result, PCMB displayed much better cooling effect in comparison to natural air cooling, i.e., much lower heating rate and better uniformity of temperature distribution. On the other hand, compared with ribbed radiator technology, PCMB also presented different cooling characteristics, demonstrating that they were suitable for different practical application

  15. Fabrication of High Temperature Cermet Materials for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hickman, Robert; Panda, Binayak; Shah, Sandeep

    2005-01-01

    Processing techniques are being developed to fabricate refractory metal and ceramic cermet materials for Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP). Significant advances have been made in the area of high-temperature cermet fuel processing since RoverNERVA. Cermet materials offer several advantages such as retention of fission products and fuels, thermal shock resistance, hydrogen compatibility, high conductivity, and high strength. Recent NASA h d e d research has demonstrated the net shape fabrication of W-Re-HfC and other refractory metal and ceramic components that are similar to UN/W-Re cermet fuels. This effort is focused on basic research and characterization to identify the most promising compositions and processing techniques. A particular emphasis is being placed on low cost processes to fabricate near net shape parts of practical size. Several processing methods including Vacuum Plasma Spray (VPS) and conventional PM processes are being evaluated to fabricate material property samples and components. Surrogate W-Re/ZrN cermet fuel materials are being used to develop processing techniques for both coated and uncoated ceramic particles. After process optimization, depleted uranium-based cermets will be fabricated and tested to evaluate mechanical, thermal, and hot H2 erosion properties. This paper provides details on the current results of the project.

  16. Metal-Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposite Thermal Interface Materials with Ultralow Thermal Resistances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yegin, Cengiz; Nagabandi, Nirup; Feng, Xuhui; King, Charles; Catalano, Massimo; Oh, Jun Kyun; Talib, Ansam J; Scholar, Ethan A; Verkhoturov, Stanislav V; Cagin, Tahir; Sokolov, Alexei V; Kim, Moon J; Matin, Kaiser; Narumanchi, Sreekant; Akbulut, Mustafa

    2017-03-22

    As electronic devices get smaller and more powerful, energy density of energy storage devices increases continuously, and moving components of machinery operate at higher speeds, the need for better thermal management strategies is becoming increasingly important. The removal of heat dissipated during the operation of electronic, electrochemical, and mechanical devices is facilitated by high-performance thermal interface materials (TIMs) which are utilized to couple devices to heat sinks. Herein, we report a new class of TIMs involving the chemical integration of boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS), soft organic linkers, and a copper matrix-which are prepared by the chemisorption-coupled electrodeposition approach. These hybrid nanocomposites demonstrate bulk thermal conductivities ranging from 211 to 277 W/(m K), which are very high considering their relatively low elastic modulus values on the order of 21.2-28.5 GPa. The synergistic combination of these properties led to the ultralow total thermal resistivity values in the range of 0.38-0.56 mm 2 K/W for a typical bond-line thickness of 30-50 μm, advancing the current state-of-art transformatively. Moreover, its coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) is 11 ppm/K, forming a mediation zone with a low thermally induced axial stress due to its close proximity to the CTE of most coupling surfaces needing thermal management.

  17. Effects of Heating on Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP Thermal Control Material from the Hubble Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim; Gaier, James R.; Hall, Rachelle L.; Norris, Mary Jo; Espe, Matthew P.; Cato, Daveen R.

    1999-01-01

    Metallized Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP (fluorinated ethylene propylene) thermal control material on the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) is degrading in the space environment. Teflon(Registered Trademark) FEP thermal control blankets (space-facing FEP) retrieved during the first servicing mission (SM1) were found to be embrittled on solar facing surfaces and contained microscopic cracks. During the second servicing mission (SM2) astronauts noticed that the FEP outer layer of the multi-layer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was cracked in many locations around the telescope. Large cracks were observed on the light shield, forward shell and equipment bays. A tightly curled piece of cracked FEP from the light shield was retrieved during SM2 and was severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. A Failure Review Board (FRB) was organized to determine the mechanism causing the MLI degradation. Density, x-ray crystallinity and solid state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) analyses of FEP retrieved during SM1 were inconsistent with results of FEP retrieved during SM2. Because the retrieved SM2 material curled while in space, it experienced a higher temperature extreme during thermal cycling, estimated at 200 C, than the SM1 material, estimated at 50 C. An investigation on the effects of heating pristine and FEP exposed on HST was therefore conducted. Samples of pristine. SM1, and SM2 FEP were heated to 200 C and evaluated for changes in density and morphology. Elevated temperature exposure was found to have a major impact on the density of the retrieved materials. Characterization of polymer morphology of as-received and heated FEP samples by NMR provided results that were consistent with the density results. These findings have provided insight to the damage mechanisms of FEP in the space environment.

  18. A theoretical analysis of local thermal equilibrium in fibrous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Mingwei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The internal heat exchange between each phase and the Local Thermal Equilibrium (LTE scenarios in multi-phase fibrous materials are considered in this paper. Based on the two-phase heat transfer model, a criterion is proposed to evaluate the LTE condition, using derived characteristic parameters. Furthermore, the LTE situations in isothermal/adiabatic boundary cases with two different heat sources (constant heat flux and constant temperature are assessed as special transient cases to test the proposed criterion system, and the influence of such different cases on their LTE status are elucidated. In addition, it is demonstrated that even the convective boundary problems can be generally estimated using this approach. Finally, effects on LTE of the material properties (thermal conductivity, volumetric heat capacity of each phase, sample porosity and pore hydraulic radius are investigated, illustrated and discussed in our study.

  19. Advanced homogenization strategies in material modeling of thermally sprayed TBCs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Nickel, R.; Kashko, T.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBC), obtained by atmospheric plasma spraying (APS), have a complex microstructure (lamellar, porous, micro-cracked). Process parameters take an influence on this microstructure. Two methods based on the homogenization for periodic structures are presented in this article. The methods are used to calculate the effective material behavior of APS-TBCs made of partially yttria stabilized zirconia (PYSZ) depending on the microstructure. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Impact Testing of Orbiter Thermal Protection System Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Justin

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact testing of the materials used in designing the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS). Pursuant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommendations a testing program of the TPS system was instituted. This involved using various types of impactors in different sizes shot from various sizes and strengths guns to impact the TPS tiles and the Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS). The observed damage is shown, and the resultant lessons learned are reviewed.

  1. Thermal testing transport packages for radioactive materials: Reality vs regulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovingh, J.; Carlson, R.W.

    1994-03-01

    The principle objective of this paper is to provide information that will help describe the physical thermal tests performed to demonstrate compliance with the hypothetical accident conditions specified in 10 CFR 71.73. Physical testing should be applied to packages that cannot be modeled by analysis to adequately predict their response to hypothetical accident conditions. These tests should be used when chemical decomposition or material changes occur during an accident that would be difficult to analytically predict or model

  2. Lower-Conductivity Ceramic Materials for Thermal-Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Zhu, Dongming

    2006-01-01

    Doped pyrochlore oxides of a type described below are under consideration as alternative materials for high-temperature thermal-barrier coatings (TBCs). In comparison with partially-yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), which is the state-of-the-art TBC material now in commercial use, these doped pyrochlore oxides exhibit lower thermal conductivities, which could be exploited to obtain the following advantages: For a given difference in temperature between an outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface, the coating could be thinner. Reductions in coating thicknesses could translate to reductions in weight of hot-section components of turbine engines (e.g., combustor liners, blades, and vanes) to which TBCs are typically applied. For a given coating thickness, the difference in temperature between the outer coating surface and the coating/substrate interface could be greater. For turbine engines, this could translate to higher operating temperatures, with consequent increases in efficiency and reductions in polluting emissions. TBCs are needed because the temperatures in some turbine-engine hot sections exceed the maximum temperatures that the substrate materials (superalloys, Si-based ceramics, and others) can withstand. YSZ TBCs are applied to engine components as thin layers by plasma spraying or electron-beam physical vapor deposition. During operation at higher temperatures, YSZ layers undergo sintering, which increases their thermal conductivities and thereby renders them less effective as TBCs. Moreover, the sintered YSZ TBCs are less tolerant of stress and strain and, hence, are less durable.

  3. Preparation and Study of Electromagnetic Interference Shielding Materials Comprised of Ni-Co Coated on Web-Like Biocarbon Nanofibers via Electroless Deposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohu Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Electromagnetic interference (EMI shielding materials made of Ni-Co coated on web-like biocarbon nanofibers were successfully prepared by electroless plating. Biocarbon nanofibers (CF with a novel web-like structure comprised of entangled and interconnected carbon nanoribbons were obtained using bacterial cellulose pyrolyzed at 1200°C. Paraffin wax matrix composites filled with different loadings (10, 20, and 30 wt%, resp. of CF and Ni-Co coated CF (NCCF were prepared. The electrical conductivities and electromagnetic parameters of the composites were investigated by the four-probe method and vector network analysis. From these results, the EMI shielding efficiencies (SE of NCCF composites were shown to be significantly higher than that of CF at the same mass fraction. The paraffin wax composites containing 30 wt% NCCF showed the highest EMI SE of 41.2 dB (99.99% attenuation, which are attributed to the higher electrical conductivity and permittivity of the NCCF composites than the CF composites. Additionally, EMI SE increased with an increase in CF and NCCF loading and the absorption was determined to be the primary factor governing EMI shielding. This study conclusively reveals that NCCF composites have potential applications as EMI shielding materials.

  4. Metallic Nanocomposites as Next-Generation Thermal Interface Materials: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xuhui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, Charles C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nagabandi, Nirup [Texas A& M University; Oh, Jun K. [Texas A& M University; Akbulut, Mustafa [Texas A& M University; Yegin, Cengiz [Texas A& M University

    2017-09-14

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are an integral and important part of thermal management in electronic devices. The electronic devices are becoming more compact and powerful. This increase in power processed or passing through the devices leads to higher heat fluxes and makes it a challenge to maintain temperatures at the optimal level during operation. Herein, we report a free standing nanocomposite TIM in which boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) are uniformly dispersed in copper matrices via an organic linker, thiosemicarbazide. Integration of these metal-organic-inorganic nanocomposites was made possible by a novel electrodeposition technique where the functionalized BNNS (f-BNNS) experience the Brownian motion and reach the cathode through diffusion, while the nucleation and growth of the copper on the cathode occurs via the electrochemical reduction. Once the f-BNNS bearing carbonothioyl/thiol groups on the terminal edges come into the contact with copper crystals, the chemisorption reaction takes place. We performed thermal, mechanical, and structural characterization of these nanocomposites using scanning electron microcopy (SEM), diffusive laser flash (DLF) analysis, phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectence (PSTTR), and nanoindentation. The nanocomposites exhibited a thermal conductivity ranging from 211 W/mK to 277 W/mK at a filler mass loading of 0-12 wt.percent. The nanocomposites also have about 4 times lower hardness as compared to copper, with values ranging from 0.27 GPa to 0.41 GPa. The structural characterization studies showed that most of the BNNS are localized at grain boundaries - which enable efficient thermal transport while making the material soft. PSTTR measurements revealed that the synergistic combinations of these properties yielded contact resistances on the order of 0.10 to 0.13 mm2K/W, and the total thermal resistance of 0.38 to 0.56 mm2K/W at bondline thicknesses of 30-50 um. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the

  5. Metallic Nanocomposites as Next-Generation Thermal Interface Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xuhui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Narumanchi, Sreekant V [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); King, Charles C [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Nagabandi, Nirup [Texas A& M University; Oh, Jun Kyun [Texas A& M University; Akbulut, Mustafa [Texas A& M University; Yegin, Cengiz [Texas A& M University

    2017-07-27

    Thermal interface materials (TIMs) are an integral and important part of thermal management in electronic devices. The electronic devices are becoming more compact and powerful. This increase in power processed or passing through the devices leads to higher heat fluxes and makes it a challenge to maintain temperatures at the optimal level during operation. Herein, we report a free standing nanocomposite TIM in which boron nitride nanosheets (BNNS) are uniformly dispersed in copper matrices via an organic linker, thiosemicarbazide. Integration of these metal-organic-inorganic nanocomposites was made possible by a novel electrodeposition technique where the functionalized BNNS (f-BNNS) experience the Brownian motion and reach the cathode through diffusion, while the nucleation and growth of the copper on the cathode occurs via the electrochemical reduction. Once the f-BNNS bearing carbonothioyl/thiol groups on the terminal edges come into the contact with copper crystals, the chemisorption reaction takes place. We performed thermal, mechanical, and structural characterization of these nanocomposites using scanning electron microcopy (SEM), diffusive laser flash (DLF) analysis, phase-sensitive transient thermoreflectence (PSTTR), and nanoindentation. The nanocomposites exhibited a thermal conductivity ranging from 211 W/mK to 277 W/mK at a filler mass loading of 0-12 wt.percent. The nanocomposites also have about 4 times lower hardness as compared to copper, with values ranging from 0.27 GPa to 0.41 GPa. The structural characterization studies showed that most of the BNNS are localized at grain boundaries - which enable efficient thermal transport while making the material soft. PSTTR measurements revealed that the synergistic combinations of these properties yielded contact resistances on the order of 0.10 to 0.13 mm2K/W, and the total thermal resistance of 0.38 to 0.56 mm2K/W at bondline thicknesses of 30-50 um. The coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of the

  6. Testing of High Thermal Cycling Stability of Low Strength Concrete as a Thermal Energy Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete has the potential to become a solution for thermal energy storage (TES integrated in concentrating solar power (CSP systems due to its good thermal and mechanical properties and low cost of material. In this study, a low strength concrete (C20 is tested at high temperatures up to 600 °C. Specimens are thermally cycled at temperatures in the range of 400–300 °C, 500–300 °C, and 600–300 °C, which TES can reach in operation. For comparison, specimens also cycled at temperature in the range of 400–25 °C (room temperature, 500–25 °C, and 600–25 °C. It is found from the test results that cracks are not observed on the surfaces of concrete specimens until the temperature is elevated up to 500 °C. There is mechanical deterioration of concrete after exposure to high temperature, especially to high thermal cycles. The residual compressive strength of concrete after 10 thermal cycles between 600 °C and 300 °C is about 58.3%, but the specimens remain stable without spalling, indicating possible use of low strength concrete as a TES material.

  7. External dosimetry sources and shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calisto, Washington

    1994-01-01

    A definition of external dosimetry r external sources dosimetry,physical and mathematical treatment of the interaction of gamma radiation with a minimal area in that direction. Concept of attenuation coefficient, cumulated effect by polyenergetic sources, exposition rate, units, cumulated dose,shielding, foton shielding, depth calculation, materials used for shielding.Beta shielding, consideration of range and maximum β energy , low stopping radiation by use of low Z shielding. Tables for β energy of β emitters, I (tau) factor, energy-range curves for β emitters in aqueous media, gamma attenuation factors for U, W and Pb. Y factor for bone tissue,muscle and air, build-up factors

  8. Applications of graphite-enabled phase change material composites to improve thermal performance of cementitious materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mingli; Lin, Zhibin; Wu, Lili; Wang, Jinhui; Gong, Na

    2017-11-01

    Enhancing the thermal efficiency to decrease the energy consumption of structures has been the topic of much research. In this study, a graphite-enabled microencapsulated phase change material (GE-MEPCM) was used in the production of a novel thermal energy storage engineered cementitious composite feathering high heat storage capacity and enhanced thermal conductivity. The surface morphology and particle size of the microencapsulated phase change material (MEPCM) were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Thermal properties of MEPCM was determined using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). In addition, thermal and mechanical properties of the cementitious mortar with different admixtures were explored and compared with those of a cementitious composite. It was shown that the latent heat of MEPCM was 162 J/g, offering much better thermal energy storage capacity to the cementitious composite. However, MEPCM was found to decrease the thermal conductivity of the composite, which can be effectively solved by adding natural graphite (NG). Moreover, the incorporation of MEPCM has a certain decrease in the compressive strength, mainly due to the weak interfaces between MEPCM and cement matrix.

  9. Thermal properties of a novel nanoencapsulated phase change material for thermal energy storage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuensanta, Mónica; Paiphansiri, Umaporn; Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores; Guillem, Celia; López-Buendía, Ángel M.; Landfester, Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: • A paraffin wax RT80 was encapsulated in styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer as polymer shell using miniemulsion polymerization process to obtain a novel nanoencapsulated PCM with 80 °C melting temperature. • Nano-PCMs have high compact structure, spherical morphology and thermal stability. • The nano-PCMs have potential applications as thermal energy storage materials. - Abstract: A novel nanoencapsulation of a paraffine type phase change material, RT80, in a styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer shell using the miniemulsion polymerization process was carried out. General characteristics of the RT80 nanoparticles in terms of thermal properties, morphology, chemical composition and particle size distribution were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The influence of different monomers (styrene, butyl acrylate) and the surfactant/paraffin mass ratios on nanoparticles properties such as thermal capacity, particle size and morphology were systematically investigated. In all cases studied, encapsulation efficiency was close to 80 wt% with a particle size distribution between 52 and 112 nm and regular spherical shape and uniform structure. The amount of encapsulated paraffin achieved was comprised between 8 and 20%. Melting and crystallization heats were found to be approximately 5–25 J g −1 , mainly depending on surfactant/paraffin mass ratio. Melting temperature of RT80 nanoparticles slightly decreased (1–7 °C) respect to the raw RT80. In addition, the encapsulated RT80 nanoparticles show thermal stability even after 200 thermal (heat-cooling) cycles

  10. Thermal properties of a novel nanoencapsulated phase change material for thermal energy storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuensanta, Mónica, E-mail: monica.fuensanta@aidico.es [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Paiphansiri, Umaporn [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany); Romero-Sánchez, María Dolores, E-mail: md.romero@aidico.es [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Guillem, Celia; López-Buendía, Ángel M. [AIDICO, Technological Institute of Construction, Camí de Castella, 4, 03660 Novelda, Alicante (Spain); Landfester, Katharina [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2013-08-10

    Highlights: • A paraffin wax RT80 was encapsulated in styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer as polymer shell using miniemulsion polymerization process to obtain a novel nanoencapsulated PCM with 80 °C melting temperature. • Nano-PCMs have high compact structure, spherical morphology and thermal stability. • The nano-PCMs have potential applications as thermal energy storage materials. - Abstract: A novel nanoencapsulation of a paraffine type phase change material, RT80, in a styrene–butyl acrylate copolymer shell using the miniemulsion polymerization process was carried out. General characteristics of the RT80 nanoparticles in terms of thermal properties, morphology, chemical composition and particle size distribution were characterized by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM), Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) and Dynamic Light Scattering (DLS). The influence of different monomers (styrene, butyl acrylate) and the surfactant/paraffin mass ratios on nanoparticles properties such as thermal capacity, particle size and morphology were systematically investigated. In all cases studied, encapsulation efficiency was close to 80 wt% with a particle size distribution between 52 and 112 nm and regular spherical shape and uniform structure. The amount of encapsulated paraffin achieved was comprised between 8 and 20%. Melting and crystallization heats were found to be approximately 5–25 J g{sup −1}, mainly depending on surfactant/paraffin mass ratio. Melting temperature of RT80 nanoparticles slightly decreased (1–7 °C) respect to the raw RT80. In addition, the encapsulated RT80 nanoparticles show thermal stability even after 200 thermal (heat-cooling) cycles.

  11. Measuring space radiation shielding effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Bahadori Amir; Semones Edward; Ewert Michael; Broyan James; Walker Steven

    2017-01-01

    Passive radiation shielding is one strategy to mitigate the problem of space radiation exposure. While space vehicles are constructed largely of aluminum, polyethylene has been demonstrated to have superior shielding characteristics for both galactic cosmic rays and solar particle events due to the high hydrogen content. A method to calculate the shielding effectiveness of a material relative to reference material from Bragg peak measurements performed using energetic heavy charged particles ...

  12. Radiation shielding curtain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, N.T.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation shield is described in the form of a stranded curtain made up of bead-chains whose material and geometry are selected to produce a cross-sectional density that is the equivalent of 0.25 mm or more of lead and which curtain may be mounted on various radiological devices to shield against scattered radiation while offering a minimum of obstruction to the radiologist

  13. Radiation shielding properties of high performance concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with natural and enriched boron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zorla, Eyüp; Ipbüker, Cagatay [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Biland, Alex [US Basalt Corp., Houston (United States); Kiisk, Madis [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Kovaljov, Sergei [OÜ Basaltest, Tartu (Estonia); Tkaczyk, Alan H. [University of Tartu, Institute of Physics (Estonia); Gulik, Volodymyr, E-mail: volodymyr.gulik@gmail.com [Institute for Safety Problems of Nuclear Power Plants, Lysogirska 12, of. 201, 03028 Kyiv (Ukraine)

    2017-03-15

    Highlights: • Basalt fiber infused with natural and enriched boron in varying proportions. • Gamma-ray attenuation remains stable with addition of basalt-boron fiber. • Improvement in neutron shielding for nuclear facilities producing fast fission spectrum. • Basalt-boron fiber could decrease the shielding thickness in thermal spectrum reactors. - Abstract: The importance of radiation shielding is increasing in parallel with the expansion of the application areas of nuclear technologies. This study investigates the radiation shielding properties of two types of high strength concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with 12–20% boron oxide, containing varying fractions of natural and enriched boron. The gamma-ray shielding characteristics are analyzed with the help of the WinXCom, whereas the neutron shielding characteristics are modeled and computed by Monte Carlo Serpent code. For gamma-ray shielding, the attenuation coefficients of the studied samples do not display any significant variation due to the addition of basalt-boron fibers at any mixing proportion. For neutron shielding, the addition of basalt-boron fiber has negligible effects in the case of very fast neutrons (14 MeV), but it could considerably improve the neutron shielding of concrete for nuclear facilities producing a fast fission spectrum (e.g. with reactors as BN-800, FBTR) and thermal neutron spectrum (Light Water Reactors (LWR)). It was also found that basalt-boron fiber could decrease the thickness of radiation shielding material in thermal spectrum reactors.

  14. Radiation shielding properties of high performance concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with natural and enriched boron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorla, Eyüp; Ipbüker, Cagatay; Biland, Alex; Kiisk, Madis; Kovaljov, Sergei; Tkaczyk, Alan H.; Gulik, Volodymyr

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Basalt fiber infused with natural and enriched boron in varying proportions. • Gamma-ray attenuation remains stable with addition of basalt-boron fiber. • Improvement in neutron shielding for nuclear facilities producing fast fission spectrum. • Basalt-boron fiber could decrease the shielding thickness in thermal spectrum reactors. - Abstract: The importance of radiation shielding is increasing in parallel with the expansion of the application areas of nuclear technologies. This study investigates the radiation shielding properties of two types of high strength concrete reinforced with basalt fibers infused with 12–20% boron oxide, containing varying fractions of natural and enriched boron. The gamma-ray shielding characteristics are analyzed with the help of the WinXCom, whereas the neutron shielding characteristics are modeled and computed by Monte Carlo Serpent code. For gamma-ray shielding, the attenuation coefficients of the studied samples do not display any significant variation due to the addition of basalt-boron fibers at any mixing proportion. For neutron shielding, the addition of basalt-boron fiber has negligible effects in the case of very fast neutrons (14 MeV), but it could considerably improve the neutron shielding of concrete for nuclear facilities producing a fast fission spectrum (e.g. with reactors as BN-800, FBTR) and thermal neutron spectrum (Light Water Reactors (LWR)). It was also found that basalt-boron fiber could decrease the thickness of radiation shielding material in thermal spectrum reactors.

  15. Shielding Design and Radiation Shielding Evaluation for LSDS System Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Younggook; Kim, Jeongdong; Lee, Yongdeok

    2015-01-01

    As the system characteristics, the target in the spectrometer emits approximately 1012 neutrons/s. To efficiently shield the neutron, the shielding door designs are proposed for the LSDS system through a comparison of the direct shield and maze designs. Hence, to guarantee the radiation safety for the facility, the door design is a compulsory course of the development of the LSDS system. To improve the shielding rates, 250x250 covering structure was added as a subsidiary around the spectrometer. In this study, the evaluations of the suggested shielding designs were conducted using MCNP code. The suggested door design and covering structures can shield the neutron efficiently, thus all evaluations of all conditions are satisfied within the public dose limits. From the Monte Carlo code simulation, Resin(Indoor type) and Tungsten(Outdoor type) were selected as the shielding door materials. From a comparative evaluation of the door thickness, In and Out door thickness was selected 50 cm

  16. Shielding container

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darling, K.A.M.

    1981-01-01

    A shielding container incorporates a dense shield, for example of depleted uranium, cast around a tubular member of curvilinear configuration for accommodating a radiation source capsule. A lining for the tubular member, in the form of a close-coiled flexible guide, provides easy replaceability to counter wear while the container is in service. Container life is extended, and maintenance costs are reduced. (author)

  17. Improved thermal storage material for portable life support systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    The availability of thermal storage materials that have heat absorption capabilities substantially greater than water-ice in the same temperature range would permit significant improvements in performance of projected portable thermal storage cooling systems. A method for providing increased heat absorption by the combined use of the heat of solution of certain salts and the heat of fusion of water-ice was investigated. This work has indicated that a 30 percent solution of potassium bifluoride (KHF2) in water can absorb approximately 52 percent more heat than an equal weight of water-ice, and approximately 79 percent more heat than an equal volume of water-ice. The thermal storage material can be regenerated easily by freezing, however, a lower temperature must be used, 261 K as compared to 273 K for water-ice. This work was conducted by the United Aircraft Research Laboratories as part of a program at Hamilton Standard Division of United Aircraft Corporation under contract to NASA Ames Research Center.

  18. Pressure effects on thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, J.N.

    1979-02-01

    Through analysis of existing data, an estimate is made of the effect of pressure or depth on the thermal conductivity and expansion of geologic materials which could be present in radioactive waste repositories. In the case of homogeneous dense materials, only small shifts are predicted to occur at depths less than or equal to 3 km, and these shifts will be insignificant as compared with those caused by temperature variations. As the porosity of the medium increases, the variation of conductivity and expansion with pressure becomes greater, with conductivity increasing and expansion decreasing as pressure increases. The pressure dependence of expansion can be found from data on the temperature variation of the isobaric compressibility. In a worst case estimate, a decrease in expansion of approx. 25% is predicted for 5% porous sandstone at a depth of 3 km. The thermal conductivity of a medium with gaseous inclusions increases as the porosity decreases, with the magnitude of the increase being dependent on the details of the porosity collapse. Based on analysis of existing data on tuff and sandstone, a weighted geometric mean formula is recommended for use in calculating the conductivity of porous rock. As a result of this study, it is recommended that measurement of rock porosity versus depth receive increased attention in exploration studies and that the effect of porosity on thermal conductivity and expansion should be examined in more detail

  19. Inductive thermal plasma generation applied for the materials coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, J.; Pena, R.; Cota, G.; Segovia, A.; Cruz, A.

    1996-01-01

    The coatings by thermal plasma are carried out introducing particles into a plasma system where they are accelerated and melted (total or partially) before striking the substrate to which they adhere and are suddenly cooled down. The nature of consolidation and solidification of the particles allows to have control upon the microstructure of the deposit. This technique is able to deposit any kind of material that is suitable to be merged (metal, alloy, ceramic, glass) upon any type of substrate (metal, graphite, ceramic, wood) with an adjustable thickness ranging from a few microns up to several millimeters. The applications are particularly focused to the coating of materials in order to improve their properties of resistance to corrosion, thermal and mechanical efforts as well as to preserve the properties of the so formed compound. In this work the electromagnetic induction phenomenon in an ionized medium by means of electric conductivity, is described. Emphasis is made on the devices and control systems employed in order to generate the thermal plasma and in carrying out the coatings of surfaces by the projection of particles based on plasma

  20. Development of Tailorable Electrically Conductive Thermal Control Material Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, M. S.; Harada, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The optical characteristics of surfaces on spacecraft are fundamental parameters in controlling its temperature. Passive thermal control coatings with designed solar absorptance and infrared emittance properties have been developed and have been in use for some time. In this total space environment, the coating must be stable and maintain its desired optical properties as well as mechanical properties for the course of the mission lifetime. The mission lifetimes are increasing and in our quest to save weight, newer substrates are being integrated which limit electrical grounding schemes. All of this has added to already existing concerns about spacecraft charging and related spacecraft failures or operational failures. The concern is even greater for thermal control surfaces that are very large. One way of alleviating such concerns is to design new thermal control material systems (TCMS) that can help to mitigate charging via providing charge leakage paths. The objective of this program was to develop two types of passive electrically conductive TCMS. The first was a highly absorbing/emitting black surface and the second was a low (alpha(sub s)/epsilon(sub N)) type white surface. The surface resistance goals for the black absorber was 10(exp 4) to 10(exp 9) Omega/square, and for the white surfaces it was 10(exp 6) to 10(exp 10) Omega/square. Several material system concepts were suggested and evaluated for space environment stability and electrical performance characterization. Our efforts in designing and evaluating these material systems have resulted in several developments. New concepts, pigments and binders have been developed to provide new engineering quality TCMS. Some of these have already found application on space hardware, some are waiting to be recognized by thermal designers, and some require further detailed studies to become state-of-the-art for future space hardware and space structures. Our studies on baseline state-of-the-art materials and

  1. HPGe detector shielding adjustment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trnkova, L.; Rulik, P.

    2008-01-01

    Low-level background shielding of HPGe detectors is used mainly for environmental samples with very low content of radionuclides. National Radiation Protection Institute (SURO) in Prague is equipped with 14 HPGe detectors with relative efficiency up to 150%. The detectors are placed in a room built from materials with low content of natural radionuclides and equipped with a double isolation of the floor against radon. Detectors themselves are placed in lead or steel shielding. Steel shielding with one of these detectors with relative efficiency of 100% was chosen to be rebuilt to achieve lower minimum detectable activity (MDA). Additional lead and copper shielding was built up inside the original steel shielding to reduce the volume of the inner space and filled with nitrogen by means of evaporating liquid nitrogen. The additional lead and copper shielding, consequent reduction of the inner volume and supply of evaporated nitrogen, caused a decrease of the background count and accordingly MDA values as well. The effect of nitrogen evaporation on the net areas of peaks belonging to radon daughters is significant. The enhanced shielding adjustment has the biggest influence in low energy range, what can be seen in collected data. MDA values in energy range from 30 keV to 400 keV decreased to 0.65-0.85 of original value, in energy range from 400 keV to 2 MeV they fell to 0.70-0.97 of original value. (authors)

  2. Thermal behavior of the duct applied functionally graded material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jung Sun; Yoon, Dong Young; Im, Jong Bin [Hankuk Aviation Univ., Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    In Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAV), the high temperature results from friction among the air, combustion of fuel in engine and combustion gas of a nozzle. The high temperature may cause serious damages in UAV structure. The Functionally Graded Material(FGM) is chosen as a material of the engine duct structure. Thermal stress analysis of FGM is performed in this paper. FGM is composed of two constituent materials that are mixed up according to the specific volume fraction distribution in order to withstand high temperature. Therefore, hoop stress, axial stress and shear stress of duct with 2 layers, 4 layers and 8 layers FGM are compared and analyzed respectively. In addition, the creep behavior of FGM used in duct structure of an engine is analyzed for better understanding of FGM characteristics.

  3. Standard Practice for Evaluating Solar Absorptive Materials for Thermal Applications

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This practice covers a testing methodology for evaluating absorptive materials used in flat plate or concentrating collectors, with concentrating ratios not to exceed five, for solar thermal applications. This practice is not intended to be used for the evaluation of absorptive surfaces that are (1) used in direct contact with, or suspended in, a heat-transfer liquid, (that is, trickle collectors, direct absorption fluids, etc.); (2) used in evacuated collectors; or (3) used in collectors without cover plate(s). 1.2 Test methods included in this practice are property measurement tests and aging tests. Property measurement tests provide for the determination of various properties of absorptive materials, for example, absorptance, emittance, and appearance. Aging tests provide for exposure of absorptive materials to environments that may induce changes in the properties of test specimens. Measuring properties before and after an aging test provides a means of determining the effect of the exposure. 1.3 Th...

  4. Performance of plasma facing materials under intense thermal loads in tokamaks and stellarators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Linke, J.; Hirai, T.; Roedig, M.; Singheiser, L. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM Association, Juelich (Germany)

    2003-07-01

    Beside quasi-stationary plasma operation, short transient thermal pulses with deposited energy densities in the order of several ten MJm{sup -2} are a serious concern for next step devices, in particular for tokamak devices such as ITER. The most serious of these transient events are plasma disruptions. Here a considerable fraction of the plasma energy is deposited on a localized surface area in the divertor strike zone region; the time scale of these events is typically in the order of 1 ms. In spite of the fact that a dense cloud of ablation vapour will form above the strike zone, only partial shielding of the divertor armour from incident plasma particles will occur. As a consequence, thermal shock induced crack formation, vaporization, surface melting, melt layer ejection, and particle emission induced by brittle destruction processes will limit the lifetime of the components. In addition, dust particles (neutron activated metals or tritium enriched carbon) are a serious concern form a safety point of view. Other transient heat loads which occasionally occur in magnetic confinement experiments such as instabilities in the plasma positioning (vertical displacement events) also may cause irreversible damage to plasma facing components (PFC), particularly to metals such as beryllium and tungsten. Another serious damage to PFCs is due to intense fluxes of 14 MeV neutrons in D-T-burning plasma devices. Integrated neutron fluence of several ten dpa in future thermonuclear fusion reactors will degrade essential physical properties of the components (e.g. thermal conductivity); another serious concern is the embrittlement of the heat sink and the plasma facing materials (PFM). (orig.)

  5. Electric vehicles batteries thermal management systems employing phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ianniciello, Lucia; Biwolé, Pascal Henry; Achard, Patrick

    2018-02-01

    Battery thermal management is necessary for electric vehicles (EVs), especially for Li-ion batteries, due to the heat dissipation effects on those batteries. Usually, air or coolant circuits are employed as thermal management systems in Li-ion batteries. However, those systems are expensive in terms of investment and operating costs. Phase change materials (PCMs) may represent an alternative which could be cheaper and easier to operate. In fact, PCMs can be used as passive or semi-passive systems, enabling the global system to sustain near-autonomous operations. This article presents the previous developments introducing PCMs for EVs battery cooling. Different systems are reviewed and solutions are proposed to enhance PCMs efficiency in those systems.

  6. Fiber Optic Thermal Health Monitoring of Aerospace Structures and Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.; Allison, Sidney G.

    2009-01-01

    A new technique is presented for thermographic detection of flaws in materials and structures by performing temperature measurements with fiber Bragg gratings. Individual optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors were bonded to the surfaces of structures with subsurface defects or thickness variations. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. The data obtained from grating sensors were further analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with those from conventional thermography techniques. Limitations of the technique were investigated using both experimental and numerical simulation techniques. Methods for performing in-situ structural health monitoring are discussed.

  7. Neutron guide shielding for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mantulnikovs, K.; Bertelsen, M.; Cooper-Jensen, C.P.

    2016-01-01

    We report on the study of fast-neutron background for the BIFROST spectrometer at ESS. We investigate the effect of background radiation induced by the interaction of fast neutrons from the source with the material of the neutron guide and devise a reasonable fast, thermal/cold neutron shielding...... solution for the current guide geometry using McStas and MCNPX. We investigate the effectiveness of the steel shielding around the guide by running simulations with three different steel thicknesses. The same approach is used to study the efficiencies of the steel wall a flat cylinder pierced by the guide...... in the middle and the polyethylene layer. The final model presented here has a 3 cm thick steel shielding around the guide, 30 cm of polyethylene around the shielding, two 5 mm thick B4C layers and a steel wall at position Z = 38 m, being 1 m thick and 10 m in radius. The final model finally proves...

  8. 78 FR 8202 - Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-05

    ... NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards (ACRS) Meeting of the Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and Reactor Fuels; Notice of Meeting The Joint ACRS Subcommittees on Thermal Hydraulic Phenomena and Materials, Metallurgy and...

  9. Study on welding thermal cycle and residual stress of UNS S32304 duplex steel selected as external shield for a transport packaging of Mo-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Gomes, Maurilio P.; Milagre, Mariana X.; Machado, Caruline S.C.; Reis, Luis A.M.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Rossi, Jesualdo L.; Orlando, Marcos T.D.; Luz, Temístocles S.

    2017-01-01

    Thin plates of duplex stainless steel UNS S32304 were welded using the pulsed gas tungsten arc GTAW process (butt joint) without filler addition. The used shielding gas was pure argon and 98% argon plus 2% of nitrogen. The thermal cycles were acquired during welding, in regions near the melting pool. This alloy is candidate for the external clad of a cask for the transport of high activity radiopharmaceuticals substances. For the residual stress measurements in austenite phase an X-ray diffractometer was used in a Bragg-Brentano geometry with CuKα radiation (γ= 0.154 and for ferrite phase was used a pseudo-parallel geometry with CrKα radiation (γ= 0.2291 nm). The results of residual stress using sin 2 Ψ methodology shown that the influence of the high welding temperature leads to compressive stresses in for both phase of the duplex steels mainly in heat-affected zone. It was observed a high temperature peak and an increase of the mean residual stress after addition of nitrogen to the argon shielding gas. (author)

  10. Study on welding thermal cycle and residual stress of UNS S32304 duplex steel selected as external shield for a transport packaging of Mo-99

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Betini, Evandro G.; Gomes, Maurilio P.; Milagre, Mariana X.; Machado, Caruline S.C.; Reis, Luis A.M.; Mucsi, Cristiano S.; Rossi, Jesualdo L., E-mail: egbetini@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energética s e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Orlando, Marcos T.D.; Luz, Temístocles S., E-mail: mtdorlando@gmail.com [Universidade Federal do Espirito Santo (DFIS/UFES), Vitória, ES (Brazil). Departamento de Física

    2017-07-01

    Thin plates of duplex stainless steel UNS S32304 were welded using the pulsed gas tungsten arc GTAW process (butt joint) without filler addition. The used shielding gas was pure argon and 98% argon plus 2% of nitrogen. The thermal cycles were acquired during welding, in regions near the melting pool. This alloy is candidate for the external clad of a cask for the transport of high activity radiopharmaceuticals substances. For the residual stress measurements in austenite phase an X-ray diffractometer was used in a Bragg-Brentano geometry with CuKα radiation (γ= 0.154 and for ferrite phase was used a pseudo-parallel geometry with CrKα radiation (γ= 0.2291 nm). The results of residual stress using sin{sup 2} Ψ methodology shown that the influence of the high welding temperature leads to compressive stresses in for both phase of the duplex steels mainly in heat-affected zone. It was observed a high temperature peak and an increase of the mean residual stress after addition of nitrogen to the argon shielding gas. (author)

  11. Study of improving the thermal response of a construction material containing a phase change material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laaouatni, A.; Martaj, N.; Bennacer, R.; Elomari, M.; El Ganaoui, M.

    2016-09-01

    The use of phase change materials (PCMs) for improving the thermal comfort in buildings has become an attractive application. This solution contributes to increasing the thermal inertia of the building envelope and reducing power consumption. A building element filled with a PCM and equipped with ventilation tubes is proposed, both for increasing inertia and contributing to refreshing building envelope. A numerical simulation is conducted by the finite element method in COMSOL Multiphysics, which aims to test the thermal behaviour of the developed solution. An experimental study is carried out on a concrete block containing a PCM with ventilation tubes. The objective is to see the effect of PCM coupled with ventilation on increasing the inertia of the block. The results show the ability of this new solution to ensure an important thermal inertia of a building.

  12. Investigation on mechanical properties of welded material under different types of welding filler (shielded metal arc welding)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahir, Abdullah Mohd; Lair, Noor Ajian Mohd; Wei, Foo Jun

    2018-05-01

    The Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) is (or the Stick welding) defined as a welding process, which melts and joins metals with an arc between a welding filler (electrode rod) and the workpieces. The main objective was to study the mechanical properties of welded metal under different types of welding fillers and current for SMAW. This project utilized the Design of Experiment (DOE) by adopting the Full Factorial Design. The independent variables were the types of welding filler and welding current, whereas the other welding parameters were fixed at the optimum value. The levels for types of welding filler were by the models of welding filler (E6013, E7016 and E7018) used and the levels for welding current were 80A and 90A. The responses were the mechanical properties of welded material, which include tensile strength and hardness. The experiment was analyzed using the two way ANOVA. The results prove that there are significant effects of welding filler types and current levels on the tensile strength and hardness of the welded metal. At the same time, the ANOVA results and interaction plot indicate that there are significant interactions between the welding filler types and the welding current on both the hardness and tensile strength of the welded metals, which has never been reported before. This project found that when the amount of heat input with increase, the mechanical properties such as tensile strength and hardness decrease. The optimum tensile strength for welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7016 and the optimum of hardness of welded metal is produced by the welding filler E7018 at welding current of 80A.

  13. Thermal Stability and Material Balance of Nanomaterials in Waste Incineration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paur, H.-R.; Baumann, W.; Hauser, M.; Lang, I.; Teuscher, N.; Seifert, H.; Stapf, D.

    2017-06-01

    Nanostructured materials are widely used to improve the properties of consumer products such as tires, cosmetics, light weight equipment etc. Due to their complex composition these products are hardly recycled and thermal treatment is preferred. In this study we investigated the thermal stability and material balance of nanostructured metal oxides in flames and in an industrial waste incinerator. We studied the size distribution of nanostructured metal oxides (CeO2, TiO2, SiO2) in a flame reactor and in a heated reaction tube. In the premixed ethylene/air flame, nano-structured CeO2 partly evaporates forming a new particle mode. This is probably due to chemical reactions in the flame. In addition sintering of agglomerates takes place in the flame. In the electrically heated reaction tube however only sintering of the agglomerated nanomaterials is observed. Ceria has a low background in waste incinerators and is therefore a suitable tracer for investigating the fate of nanostructured materials. Low concentrations of Ceria were introduced by a two-phase nozzle into the post-combustion zone of a waste incinerator. By the incineration of coal dust in a burning chamber the Ceria nanoparticles are mainly found in the size range of the fly ash (1 - 10 µm) because of agglomeration. With gas as a fuel less agglomeration was observed and the Ceria nanoparticles were in the particle size range below 1 µm.

  14. Thermal Stability and Material Balance of Nanomaterials in Waste Incineration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paur, H.-R.; Baumann, W.; Hauser, M.; Lang, I.; Teuscher, N.; Seifert, H.; Stapf, D.

    2017-01-01

    Nanostructured materials are widely used to improve the properties of consumer products such as tires, cosmetics, light weight equipment etc. Due to their complex composition these products are hardly recycled and thermal treatment is preferred. In this study we investigated the thermal stability and material balance of nanostructured metal oxides in flames and in an industrial waste incinerator. We studied the size distribution of nanostructured metal oxides (CeO 2 , TiO 2 , SiO 2 ) in a flame reactor and in a heated reaction tube. In the premixed ethylene/air flame, nano-structured CeO 2 partly evaporates forming a new particle mode. This is probably due to chemical reactions in the flame. In addition sintering of agglomerates takes place in the flame. In the electrically heated reaction tube however only sintering of the agglomerated nanomaterials is observed. Ceria has a low background in waste incinerators and is therefore a suitable tracer for investigating the fate of nanostructured materials. Low concentrations of Ceria were introduced by a two-phase nozzle into the post-combustion zone of a waste incinerator. By the incineration of coal dust in a burning chamber the Ceria nanoparticles are mainly found in the size range of the fly ash (1 – 10 µm) because of agglomeration. With gas as a fuel less agglomeration was observed and the Ceria nanoparticles were in the particle size range below 1 µm. (paper)

  15. Thermal Conductivity of Ceramic Thermal Barrier and Environmental Barrier Coating Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Bansal, Narottam P.; Lee, Kang N.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Thermal barrier and environmental barrier coatings (TBC's and EBC's) have been developed to protect metallic and Si-based ceramic components in gas turbine engines from high temperature attack. Zirconia-yttria based oxides and (Ba,Sr)Al2Si2O8(BSAS)/mullite based silicates have been used as the coating materials. In this study, thermal conductivity values of zirconia-yttria- and BSAS/mullite-based coating materials were determined at high temperatures using a steady-state laser heat flux technique. During the laser conductivity test, the specimen surface was heated by delivering uniformly distributed heat flux from a high power laser. One-dimensional steady-state heating was achieved by using thin disk specimen configuration (25.4 mm diam and 2 to 4 mm thickness) and the appropriate backside air-cooling. The temperature gradient across the specimen thickness was carefully measured by two surface and backside pyrometers. The thermal conductivity values were thus determined as a function of temperature based on the 1-D heat transfer equation. The radiation heat loss and laser absorption corrections of the materials were considered in the conductivity measurements. The effects of specimen porosity and sintering on measured conductivity values were also evaluated.

  16. Analysis of carbon based materials under fusion relevant thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Compan, Jeremie Saint-Helene

    2008-01-01

    Carbon based materials (CBMs) are used in fusion devices as plasma facing materials for decades. They have been selected due to the inherent advantages of carbon for fusion applications. The main ones are its low atomic number and the fact that it does not melt but sublimate (above 3000 C) under the planned working conditions. In addition, graphitic materials retain their mechanical properties at elevated temperatures and their thermal shock resistance is one of the highest, making them suitable for thermal management purpose during long or extremely short heat pulses. Nuclear grade fine grain graphite was the prime form of CBM which was set as a standard but when it comes to large fusion devices created nowadays, thermo-mechanical constraints created during transient heat loads (few GW.m-2 can be deposited in few ms) are so high that carbon/carbon composites (so-called Carbon Fiber Composites (CFCs)) have to be utilized. CFCs can achieve superior thermal conductivity as well as mechanical properties than fine grain graphite. However, all the thermo-mechanical properties of CFCs are highly dependent on the loading direction as a consequence of the graphite structure. In this work, the background on the anisotropy of the graphitic structures but also on the production of fine grain graphite and CFCs is highlighted, showing the major principles which are relevant for the further understanding of the study. Nine advanced CBMs were then compared in terms of microstructure and thermo-mechanical properties. Among them, two fine grain graphites were considered as useful reference materials to allow comparing advantages reached by the developed CFCs. The presented microstructural investigation methods permitted to make statements which can be applied for CFCs presenting similarities in terms of fiber architecture. Determination of the volumetric percentage of the major sub-units of CFCs, i.e. laminates, felt layers or needled fiber groups, lead to a better understanding on

  17. Studies on thermal properties and thermal control effectiveness of a new shape-stabilized phase change material with high thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheng Wenlong; Liu Na; Wu Wanfan

    2012-01-01

    In order to overcome the difficulty of conventional phase change materials (PCMs) in packaging, the shape-stabilized PCMs are proposed to be used in the electronic device thermal control. However, the conventional shape-stabilized PCMs have the drawback of lower thermal conductivity, so a new shape-stabilized PCM with high thermal conductivity, which is suitable for thermal control of electronic devices, is prepared. The thermal properties of n-octadecane-based shape-stabilized PCM are tested and analyzed. The heat storage/release performance is studied by numerical simulation. Its thermal control effect for electronic devices is also discussed. The results show that the expanded graphite (EG) can greatly improve the thermal conductivity of the material with little effect on latent heat and phase change temperature. When the mass fraction of EG is 5%, thermal conductivity has reached 1.76 W/(m K), which is over 4 times than that of the original one. Moreover, the material has larger latent heat and good thermal stability. The simulation results show that the material can have good heat storage/release performance. The analysis of the effect of thermal parameters on thermal control effect for electronic devices provides references to the design of phase change thermal control unit. - Highlights: ► A new shape-stabilized PCM with higher thermal conductivity is prepared. ► The material overcomes the packaging difficulty of traditional PCMs used in thermal control unit. ► The EG greatly improves thermal conductivity with little effect on latent heat. ► The material has high thermal stability and good heat storage/release performance. ► The effectiveness of the material for electronic device thermal control is proved.

  18. Workshop on technical assessment of industrial thermal insulation materials: summary

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peterson, S.

    1976-07-01

    Over 80 participants representing 50 organizations met to discuss the report, Industrial Thermal Insulation--An Assessment, ORNL/TM-5283. Presentations on the performance of available materials, economic considerations, and measurement problems were followed by discussion. A final wrap-up session concluded that the report was valuable in pointing the direction for needed effort in the area, confirmed the indicated actions needed to further industrial application of insulation, and called for future meetings to continue the dialogue between the various facets of the industry

  19. Tailored functional materials with controlled thermal expansion and excellent thermal conductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korb, G.; Sebo, P.

    1997-01-01

    Engineering materials are mainly used for structures. Therefore high-strength, stiffness and sufficient toughness are of prime importance. For a long time engineers thought first in terms of metals. Material scientists developed alloys tailored to the needs of industry. Ceramics are known to be brittle and therefore not suitable in the first place for structural application under stress. Polymers with their low modulus became attractive when reinforced with high-strength fibres. Composites processed by polymer, metal or ceramic matrices and high-strength reinforcements have been introduced into many sectors of industry. Engineering materials for structural applications fulfil a function: they withstand high stresses, temperatures, fatigue, creep etc. But usually we do not call them functional materials. Functional materials serve applications apart from classical engineering fields. Electricity conducting materials, semi conductors, memory alloys and many others are called functional materials. Because of the fact that the basic physical properties cannot be changed in single-phase materials, the combination of two and more materials with different properties lead to components with new and tailored properties. A few techniques for preparation are described as powder metallurgy, infiltration of prepegs and compaction of precoated fibres/particles. The lecture is focusing on carbon fibre/particle reinforced Metal Matrix Materials. The achievable properties, in particular the thermal conductivity originating from the base materials is depending on the orientation of the fibres and interfacial contacts in the composite. The carefully controlled expansion behaviour is the most important property to use the material as a heat sink in electronic assemblies. (author)

  20. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.