WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal dust foreground

  1. Mitigating Complex Dust Foregrounds in Future Cosmic Microwave Background Polarization Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensley, Brandon S.; Bull, Philip

    2018-02-01

    Polarized Galactic foregrounds are one of the primary sources of systematic error in measurements of the B-mode polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB). Experiments are becoming increasingly sensitive to complexities in the foreground frequency spectra that are not captured by standard parametric models, potentially affecting our ability to efficiently separate out these components. Employing a suite of dust models encompassing a variety of physical effects, we simulate observations of a future seven-band CMB experiment to assess the impact of these complexities on parametric component separation. We identify configurations of frequency bands that minimize the “model errors” caused by fitting simple parametric models to more complex “true” foreground spectra, which bias the inferred CMB signal. We find that: (a) fits employing a simple two-parameter modified blackbody (MBB) dust model tend to produce significant bias in the recovered polarized CMB signal in the presence of physically realistic dust foregrounds; (b) generalized MBB models with three additional parameters reduce this bias in most cases, but non-negligible biases can remain, and can be hard to detect; (c) line-of-sight effects, which give rise to frequency decorrelation, and the presence of iron grains are the most problematic complexities in the dust emission for recovering the true CMB signal. More sophisticated simulations will be needed to demonstrate that future CMB experiments can successfully mitigate these more physically realistic dust foregrounds.

  2. Reconceptualizing foregrounding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bálint, Katalin; Hakemulder, Frank; Kuijpers, Moniek

    2017-01-01

    The experience of deviation is often referred to as foregrounding and contrasted with the experience of feeling absorbed in a narrative. However, instead of simply assuming that foregrounding and absorption are mutually exclusive, they should also be considered as co-occurring: being absorbed...... as a result of a deviating aspect of a story. In the present paper we examine the co-occurrence of responses by means of a data-driven qualitative approach. The analysis of interviews about absorbed experiences with written and cinematic fictional narratives focused on occurrences of and responses...

  3. MHz to THz: Spectral Modeling of CMB Foreground Emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogut, Alan

    between the foreground components to map both the amplitude and spectral variation over the full sky. Data at radio frequencies constrain the synchrotron spectral curvature, while far-IR data allow a quantitative comparison of competing models of dust emission to constrain the dust curvature. These spectral constraints in turn inform the fit over the frequency range 20 -- 200 GHz critical for CMB measurements. The proposed effort will have a significant impact on current understanding of diffuse foreground emission. New radio data and self-consistent treatment of the monopole contribution allow accurate determination of the synchrotron spectrum and spectral curvature, which in turn can be compared to measurements of the cosmic ray energy spectrum to inform models of cosmic ray propagation in the Galactic magnetic field. Far- IR spectra distinguish competing models of thermal dust emission to probe the physics of interstellar dust. A quantitative assessment of foreground spectral parameters and uncertainties derived from multi-frequency data from MHz to THz frequencies can be used as priors to constrain foreground analyses of independent CMB data sets spanning a much smaller frequency range. The proposed team is highly qualified. The Principal Investigator has over 25 years of experience modeling foreground emission, including the first detection of spinning dust in the interstellar medium. The proposed effort is tightly focused and uses algorithms developed over several decades of similar studies. The team includes participation by a post-doctoral student. All results will be published in peer-reviewed journals.

  4. MODELING THERMAL DUST EMISSION WITH TWO COMPONENTS: APPLICATION TO THE PLANCK HIGH FREQUENCY INSTRUMENT MAPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meisner, Aaron M.; Finkbeiner, Douglas P., E-mail: ameisner@fas.harvard.edu, E-mail: dfinkbeiner@cfa.harvard.edu [Department of Physics, Harvard University, 17 Oxford Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States)

    2015-01-10

    We apply the Finkbeiner et al. two-component thermal dust emission model to the Planck High Frequency Instrument maps. This parameterization of the far-infrared dust spectrum as the sum of two modified blackbodies (MBBs) serves as an important alternative to the commonly adopted single-MBB dust emission model. Analyzing the joint Planck/DIRBE dust spectrum, we show that two-component models provide a better fit to the 100-3000 GHz emission than do single-MBB models, though by a lesser margin than found by Finkbeiner et al. based on FIRAS and DIRBE. We also derive full-sky 6.'1 resolution maps of dust optical depth and temperature by fitting the two-component model to Planck 217-857 GHz along with DIRBE/IRAS 100 μm data. Because our two-component model matches the dust spectrum near its peak, accounts for the spectrum's flattening at millimeter wavelengths, and specifies dust temperature at 6.'1 FWHM, our model provides reliable, high-resolution thermal dust emission foreground predictions from 100 to 3000 GHz. We find that, in diffuse sky regions, our two-component 100-217 GHz predictions are on average accurate to within 2.2%, while extrapolating the Planck Collaboration et al. single-MBB model systematically underpredicts emission by 18.8% at 100 GHz, 12.6% at 143 GHz, and 7.9% at 217 GHz. We calibrate our two-component optical depth to reddening, and compare with reddening estimates based on stellar spectra. We find the dominant systematic problems in our temperature/reddening maps to be zodiacal light on large angular scales and the cosmic infrared background anisotropy on small angular scales.

  5. Thermal Optical Properties of Lunar Dust Simulants and Their Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Ellis, Shaneise; Hanks, Nichole

    2011-01-01

    The total reflectance spectra of lunar simulant dusts (< 20 mm particles) were measured in order to determine their integrated solar absorptance (alpha) and their thermal emittance (epsilon) for the purpose of analyzing the effect of dust on the performance of thermal control surfaces. All of the simulants except one had a wavelength-dependent reflectivity (p (lambda)) near 0.10 over the wavelength range of 8 to 25 microns and so are highly emitting at room temperature and lower. The 300 K emittance (epsilon) of all the lunar simulants except one ranged from 0.78 to 0.92. The exception was Minnesota Lunar Simulant 1 (MLS-1), which has little or no glassy component. In all cases the epsilon was lower for the < 20 micron particles than for larger particles reported earlier. There was considerably more variation in the lunar simulant reflectance in the solar spectral range (250 to 2500 nm) than in the thermal infrared. As expected, the lunar highlands simulants were more reflective in this wavelength range than the lunar mare simulants. The integrated solar absorptance (alpha) of the simulants ranged from 0.39 to 0.75. This is lower than values reported earlier for larger particles of the same simulants (0.41 to 0.82), and for representative mare and highlands lunar soils (0.74 to 0.91). Since the of some mare simulants more closely matched that of highlands lunar soils, it is recommended that and values be the criteria for choosing a simulant for assessing the effects of dust on thermal control surfaces, rather than whether a simulant has been formulated as a highlands or a mare simulant.

  6. Foreground influence on primordial non-Gaussianity estimates: needlet analysis of WMAP 5-year data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabella, P.; Pietrobon, D.; Veneziani, M.; Balbi, A.; Crittenden, R.; de Gasperis, G.; Quercellini, C.; Vittorio, N.

    2010-06-01

    We constrain the amplitude of primordial non-Gaussianity in the cosmic microwave background data taking into account the presence of foreground residuals in the maps. We generalize the needlet bispectrum estimator marginalizing over the amplitudes of thermal dust, free-free and synchrotron templates. We apply our procedure to Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe 5-year data, finding fNL = 38 +/- 47 (1σ), while the analysis without marginalization provides fNL = 35 +/- 42. Splitting the marginalization over each foreground separately, we found that the estimates of fNL are positively cross-correlated of 17 and 12 per cent with the dust and synchrotron, respectively, while a negative cross-correlation of about -10 per cent is found for the free-free component.

  7. Optical properties of mineral dust aerosol in the thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Claas H.

    2017-02-01

    The optical properties of mineral dust and biomass burning aerosol in the thermal infrared (TIR) are examined by means of Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) measurements and radiative transfer (RT) simulations. The measurements were conducted within the scope of the Saharan Mineral Dust Experiment 2 (SAMUM-2) at Praia (Cape Verde) in January and February 2008. The aerosol radiative effect in the TIR atmospheric window region 800-1200 cm-1 (8-12 µm) is discussed in two case studies. The first case study employs a combination of IASI measurements and RT simulations to investigate a lofted optically thin biomass burning layer with emphasis on its potential influence on sea surface temperature (SST) retrieval. The second case study uses ground based measurements to establish the importance of particle shape and refractive index for benchmark RT simulations of dust optical properties in the TIR domain. Our research confirms earlier studies suggesting that spheroidal model particles lead to a significantly improved agreement between RT simulations and measurements compared to spheres. However, room for improvement remains, as the uncertainty originating from the refractive index data for many aerosol constituents prohibits more conclusive results.

  8. Improving Galactic foregrounds with dusty, multiphase gas from GALFA-HI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Claire; Peek, Joshua

    2018-01-01

    Resolving the initial conditions for star formation and removing foregrounds from cosmological measurements both rely on precise accounting for the structure of multiphase, dusty interstellar gas in the Milky Way. Our aim is to differentiate between distinct thermal phases of Galactic HI and their dust-bearing properties. Using machine vision techniques, we autonomously decompose spectra from GALFA-HI at the Arecibo Observatory: the highest angular (4') and velocity resolution (0.18 km/s) large-area (13,000 deg^2) survey of 21 cm emission to date. We compute temperatures for millions of spectral features, and extract coherent structures corresponding to cold and warm HI. Via comparison with far infrared emission surveys, we analyze variations in dust reddening as a function of the cold gas fraction at high Galactic latitudes, and demonstrate how this effect can be used to improve the resolution and fidelity of standard dust reddening maps.

  9. New Asia Dust Storm Detection Method Based on the Thermal Infrared Spectral Signature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Xu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available As hyperspectral instruments can provide the detailed spectral information, a new spectral similarity method for detecting and differentiating dust from non-dust scenes using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS observations has been developed. The detection is based on a pre-defined Dust Spectral Similarity Index (DSSI, which was calculated from the accumulated brightness temperature differences between selected 16 AIRS observation channels, in the thermal infrared region of 800–1250 cm−1. It has been demonstrated that DSSI can effectively separate the dust from non-dust by elevating dust signals. For underlying surface covered with dust, the DSSI tends to show values close to 1.0. However, the values of DSSI for clear sky surfaces or clouds (ice and water are basically lower than those of dust, as their spectrums have significant differences with dust. To evaluate this new simple DSSI dust detection algorithm, several Asia dust events observed in northern China were analyzed, and the results agree favorably with those from the Moderate resolution Imaging Spectro radiometer (MODIS and Cloud Aerosol LiDAR with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP observations.

  10. Planck intermediate results. L. Evidence of spatial variation of the polarized thermal dust spectral energy distribution and implications for CMB B-mode analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Naselsky, P.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Patrizii, L.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Stanco, L.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Vansyngel, F.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2017-03-01

    The characterization of the Galactic foregrounds has been shown to be the main obstacle in thechallenging quest to detect primordial B-modes in the polarized microwave sky. We make use of the Planck-HFI 2015 data release at high frequencies to place new constraints on the properties of the polarized thermal dust emission at high Galactic latitudes. Here, we specifically study the spatial variability of the dust polarized spectral energy distribution (SED), and its potential impact on the determination of the tensor-to-scalar ratio, r. We use the correlation ratio of the angular power spectra between the 217 and 353 GHz channels as a tracer of these potential variations, computed on different high Galactic latitude regions, ranging from 80% to 20% of the sky. The new insight from Planck data is a departure of the correlation ratio from unity that cannot be attributed to a spurious decorrelation due to the cosmic microwave background, instrumental noise, or instrumental systematics. The effect is marginally detected on each region, but the statistical combination of all the regions gives more than 99% confidence for this variation in polarized dust properties. In addition, we show that the decorrelation increases when there is a decrease in the mean column density of the region of the sky being considered, and we propose a simple power-law empirical model for this dependence, which matches what is seen in the Planck data. We explore the effect that this measured decorrelation has on simulations of the BICEP2-Keck Array/Planck analysis and show that the 2015 constraints from these data still allow a decorrelation between the dust at 150 and 353 GHz that is compatible with our measured value. Finally, using simplified models, we show that either spatial variation of the dust SED or of the dust polarization angle are able to produce decorrelations between 217 and 353 GHz data similar to the values we observe in the data.

  11. Extraction of Thermal Performance Values from Samples in the Lunar Dust Adhesion Bell Jar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Siamidis, John; Larkin, Elizabeth M. G.

    2010-01-01

    A simulation chamber has been developed to test the performance of thermal control surfaces under dusty lunar conditions. The lunar dust adhesion bell jar (LDAB) is a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber (10(exp -8) Torr) built to test material samples less than about 7 cm in diameter. The LDAB has the following lunar dust simulant processing capabilities: heating and cooling while stirring in order to degas and remove adsorbed water; RF air-plasma for activating the dust and for organic contaminant removal; RF H/He-plasma to simulate solar wind; dust sieving system for controlling particle sizes; and a controlled means of introducing the activated dust to the samples under study. The LDAB is also fitted with an in situ Xe arc lamp solar simulator, and a cold box that can reach 30 K. Samples of thermal control surfaces (2.5 cm diameter) are introduced into the chamber for calorimetric evaluation using thermocouple instrumentation. The object of this paper is to present a thermal model of the samples under test conditions and to outline the procedure to extract the absorptance, emittance, and thermal efficiency from the pristine and sub-monolayer dust covered samples.

  12. Study of Dust Suppression Mechanism in Kalisindh Super Thermal Power Plant Jhalawar, India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piyush Shringi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Coal emission from thermal power plants has become a major cause of environmental pollution which has many adverse effects on living beings and non living things. Now a days there is a great lead in the requirement of the electricity, to full fill the requirement of electricity we need to establish thermal power plant which emit coal and dust. To handle the coal in thermal power plant, they are equipped with coal handling plant. To handle the emitted coal particles we use several techniques. In its simplest form, dust control may involve nothing more than attention to the enclosure of the transfer point chutework or the Use Of Water Sprays To Suppress The Emitted Coal Particles. In This Paper We Study The Dust Supression Mechanism Used In The Kalisindh Super Thermal Power Plant Jhalawar, India.

  13. Planck 2015 results: XXV. Diffuse low-frequency Galactic foregrounds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A R; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I R

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the Galactic foreground emission between 20 and 100 GHz based on observations by Planck and WMAP. The total intensity in this part of the spectrum is dominated by free-free and spinning dust emission, whereas the polarized intensity is dominated by synchrotron emission. The Commander c...

  14. Thermal diffusion characteristics of atmosphere-particle two phase flow in dust storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xihua; Wang, Tijian; Tang, Jianping; Gu, Fan

    2005-02-01

    A model, coupling metrological dynamic model MM5 and dust transport model, is developed for the atmosphere-particle two phases flow of dust storm. The simulations of the dust storm events in north China with a geographic information database are performed using the model, and represent an overview of dust transport pathways and particles concentration distribution over the north China. The comparison between computations and practical observations shows that the simulations succeed in description of dust storm evolvement and particle transport behavior. Based on the computations and analysis, the characteristics of particle transport, especially well-concerning the factor of the particle thermal diffusion, are studied. A new definition of mass transfer Grd is put forward to discover the internal principle of particle thermal diffusion at various atmospheric layers. Several phenomena, such as thermal diffusion item QT Grd distribution, and relationships, Particle Grd probability function, are obtained. The investigation indicates particle thermal diffusion can be not ignored in mesoscale atmospheric-particle multiphase flow.

  15. Power electronics solution to dust emissions from thermal power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukosavić Slobodan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal power stations emit significant amounts of fly ash and ultra fine particles into the atmosphere. Electrostatic precipitators (ESP or electro filters remove flying ashes and fine particles from the flue gas before passing the gas into the chimney. Maximum allowable value of dust is 50 mg/m3 and it requires that the efficiency of the ESPs better than 99 %, which calls for an increase of active surface of the electrodes, hence increasing the filter volume and the weight of steel used for the filter. In previous decades, electrostatic precipitators in thermal power plants were fed by thyristor controlled, single phase fed devices having a high degree of reliability, but with a relatively low collection efficiency, hence requiring large effective surface of the collection plates and a large weight of steel construction in order to achieve the prescribed emission limits. Collection efficiency and energy efficiency of the electrostatic precipitator can be increased by applying high frequency high voltage power supply (HF HV. Electrical engineering faculty of the University of Belgrade (ETF has developed technology and HF HV equipment for the ESP power supply. This solution was subjected to extensive experimental investigation at TE Morava from 2008 to 2010. High frequency power supply is proven to reduce emission two times in controlled conditions while increasing energy efficiency of the precipitator, compared to the conventional thyristor controlled 50Hz supply. Two high frequency high voltage unit AR70/1000 with parameters 70 kV and 1000 mA are installed at TE Morava and thoroughly testes. It was found that the HF HV power supply of the ESP at TE Morava increases collection efficiency so that emission of fine particles and flying ashes are halved, brought down to only 50 % of the emissions encountered with conventional 50 Hz thyristor driven power supplies. On the basis of this study, conclusion is drawn that the equipment comprising HF HV

  16. Determination of thermal conductivity of pine wood dust filled epoxy composites

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    Mohapatra Ramesh Chandra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present investigation the Thermal conductivity in particulate filler filled (Pine wood dust epoxy composites at different volume fractions (6.5%, 11.3%,26.8% and 35.9% have been determined experimentally by using Forced Convection apparatus. The composites of pine wood dust particles of 150 micron size have been prepared by using hand-lay-up technique. The experimental results show that the incorporation of pine wood dust results in reduction of thermal conductivity of epoxy resin and there by improves its thermal insulation capability. From the experiments it is also observed that the composite with 35.9% volume fraction of pine wood dust exhibited lowest thermal conductivity i.e 0.246 W/m-0K on comparison to 6.5%,11.3% and26.8% volume fractions. Therefore the composite with 35.9% wood dust may be more suitable for insulation application. Experimental results (22mm pipe diameter are also compared with theoretical models such as Rule of mixture model, Maxwell model, Russell model and Baschirow & Selenew model to describe the variation of thermal conductivity versus the volume fraction of the filler. All these models exhibited results close to each other at low dust filler content. On comparison, It has been found that the errors associated with experimental (26mm Dia. along with all the above four models with respect to experimental ones (22mm Dia. lie in the range of 19.60 to 44.10%, 0.76 to 12.10%, 1.86 to 5.12% and 8.24 to 19.68% respectively.

  17. The thermal treatment of electric arc furnace dust under low gas phase pressure

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    W. Derda

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of laboratory tests on the process of thermal reduction of electric arc furnace dust (EAFD in the temperature range from 1273 to 1473 K. Before proceeding to the experimental tests, a thermodynamic analysis was made using the computer program FactSage® with the aim of determining the optimal conditions for the dust components reduction reaction to proceed. The results of tests carried out, respectively, under atmospheric pressure conditions and under reduced pressure conditions are presented, where carbon in the form of graphite and blast-furnace dust (containing approx. 40 % of carbon was used as the reducer. The test results represent the effect of reduced pressure on the potential for intensifying the process of zinc removal from the dust. The degree of zinc extraction was considerably higher compared to the results of tests carried out under atmospheric pressure conditions.

  18. Rethinking CMB foregrounds: systematic extension of foreground parametrizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chluba, Jens; Hill, James Colin; Abitbol, Maximilian H.

    2017-11-01

    Future high-sensitivity measurements of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies and energy spectrum will be limited by our understanding and modelling of foregrounds. Not only does more information need to be gathered and combined, but also novel approaches for the modelling of foregrounds, commensurate with the vast improvements in sensitivity, have to be explored. Here, we study the inevitable effects of spatial averaging on the spectral shapes of typical foreground components, introducing a moment approach, which naturally extends the list of foreground parameters that have to be determined through measurements or constrained by theoretical models. Foregrounds are thought of as a superposition of individual emitting volume elements along the line of sight and across the sky, which then are observed through an instrumental beam. The beam and line-of-sight averages are inevitable. Instead of assuming a specific model for the distributions of physical parameters, our method identifies natural new spectral shapes for each foreground component that can be used to extract parameter moments (e.g. mean, dispersion, cross terms, etc.). The method is illustrated for the superposition of power laws, free-free spectra, grey-body and modified blackbody spectra, but can be applied to more complicated fundamental spectral energy distributions. Here, we focus on intensity signals but the method can be extended to the case of polarized emission. The averaging process automatically produces scale-dependent spectral shapes and the moment method can be used to propagate the required information across scales in power spectrum estimates. The approach is not limited to applications to CMB foregrounds, but could also be useful for the modelling of X-ray emission in clusters of galaxies.

  19. Planck intermediate results XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2016-01-01

    The polarized thermal emission from diffuse Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100 GHz. In this paper we exploit the uniqueness of the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353 GHz to me...

  20. Thermal treatment of dusts from non ferrous metallurgical industries

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    Menad, Noureddine

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available Three samples of dusts generated by the non ferrous metallurgical industries are treated between 200 and 800 °C in controlled oxidizing and reducing atmospheres. The objective of this study is to recover the valuable metals from these wastes. The treatments of these solids under oxidizing conditions at 700 °C are well adapted for two samples. The totality of valuable elements are concentrated in the treatments' residues. The use of hydrogen at 600 °C, permits the removal of up to 100 % of valuable metals contained in the treated industrial wastes. The recovery rate of valuable metals (Pb, Zn, Cu as well as the Global Decontamination Factor are reported.

    Se han tratado tres muestras procedentes de la industria metalúrgica no férrea entre 200 y 800 °C, en atmósferas oxidantes o reductoras controladas. El objetivo de este estudio es recuperar cuanto sea posible de los elementos valiosos de estos residuos. Los tratamientos bajo condiciones oxidantes a 700 °C han dado buenos resultados en dos muestras, en donde la totalidad de los elementos valiosos se concentraba en los residuos de tratamiento. El uso del hidrógeno a 600 °C permite la separación de hasta el 100 % de los metales valiosos contenidos en los residuos industriales tratados. Finalmente, se detallan las tasas de recuperación de los metales plomo, zinc y cobre así como el factor de descontaminación global (GDF.

  1. Thermal Tides During the 2001 Martian Global-Scale Dust Storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzewich, Scott D.; Wilson, R. John; McConnochie, Timothy H.; Toigo, Anthony D.; Bandfield, Donald J.; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    The 2001 (Mars Year 25) global dust storm radically altered the dynamics of the Martian atmosphere. Using observations from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer onboard the Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and Mars WRF general circulation model simulations, we examine the changes to thermal tides and planetary waves caused by the storm. We find that the extratropical diurnal migrating tide is dramatically enhanced during the storm, particularly in the southern hemisphere, reaching amplitudes of more than 20 K. The tropical diurnal migrating tide is weakened to almost undetectable levels. The diurnal Kelvin waves are also significantly weakened, particularly during the period of global expansion at Ls=200deg-210deg. In contrast, the westward propagating diurnal wavenumber 2 tide strengthens to 4-8 K at altitudes above 30km. The wavenumber 1 stationary wave reaches amplitudes of 10-12 K at 50deg-70degN, far larger than is typically seen during this time of year. The phase of this stationary wave and the enhancement of the diurnal wavenumber 2 tide appear to be responses to the high-altitude westward propagating equatorial wavenumber 1 structure in dust mixing ratio observed during the storm in previous works. This work provides a global picture of dust storm wave dynamics that reveals the coupling between the tropics and high-latitude wave responses. We conclude that the zonal distribution of thermotidal forcing from atmospheric aerosol concentration is as important to understanding the atmospheric wave response as the total global mean aerosol optical depth.

  2. Dust coatings on basaltic rocks and implications for thermal infrared spectroscopy of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J. R.; Christensen, P.R.; Lucey, P.G.

    2002-01-01

    Thin coatings of atmospherically deposited dust can mask the spectral characteristics of underlying surfaces on Mars from the visible to thermal infrared wavelengths, making identification of substrate and coating mineralogy difficult from lander and orbiter spectrometer data. To study the spectral effects of dust coatings, we acquired thermal emission and hemispherical reflectance spectra (5-25 μm; 2000-400 cm-1) of basaltic andesite coated with different thicknesses of air fall-deposited palagonitic soils, fine-grained ceramic clay powders, and terrestrial loess. The results show that thin coatings (10-20 μm) reduce the spectral contrast of the rock substrate substantially, consistent with previous work. This contrast reduction continues linearly with increasing coating thickness until a "saturation thickness" is reached, after which little further change is observed. The saturation thickness of the spectrally flat palagonite coatings is ~100-120 μm, whereas that for coatings with higher spectral contrast is only ~50-75 μm. Spectral differences among coated and uncoated samples correlate with measured coating thicknesses in a quadratic manner, whereas correlations with estimated surface area coverage are better fit by linear functions. Linear mixture modeling of coated samples using the rock substrate and coating materials as end-members is also consistent with their measured coating thicknesses and areal coverage. A comparison of ratios of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) spectra of dark and bright intracrater and windstreak deposits associated with Radau crater suggests that the dark windstreak material may be coated with as much as 90% areal coverage of palagonitic dust. The data presented here also will help improve interpretations of upcoming mini-TES and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) observations of coated Mars surface materials.

  3. VLT spectroscopic analysis of HH 202. Implications on dust destruction and thermal inhomogeneities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espíritu, J. N.; Peimbert, A.; Delgado-Inglada, G.; Ruiz, M. T.

    2017-04-01

    We present a long-slit spectroscopic analysis of Herbig-Haro 202 and the surrounding gas of the Orion Nebula using data from the Very Large Telescope. We determined the spatial variation of its physical conditions and chemical abundances; our results are consistent with those from previous studies albeit with improved uncertainties in some determinations. Special attention is paid to the iron (Fe) and oxygen (O) abundances, which show a peak at the brightest part of HH 202, allowing us to estimate that 57% of the dust is the destroyed; we also calculate the amount of depletion of oxygen in dust grains, which amounts to 0.126±0.024 dex. Finally we show that O abundances determined from collisionally excited lines and recombination lines are irreconcilable at the center of the shock unless thermal inhomogeneities are considered.

  4. Using thermal infrared (TIR) data to characterize dust sources, dust fall and the linkage to climate in the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammad, R.; Ramsey, M.; Scheidt, S. P.

    2010-12-01

    Prior to mineral dust deposition affecting albedo, aerosols can have direct and indirect effects on local to regional scale climate by changing both the shortwave and longwave radiative forcing. In addition, mineral dust causes health hazards, such as respiratory-related illnesses and deaths, loss of agricultural soil, and safety hazards to aviation and motorists due to reduced visibility. Previous work utilized satellite and ground-based TIR data to describe the direct longwave radiative effect of the Saharan Air Layer (SAL) over the Atlantic Ocean originating from dust storms in the Western Sahara. TIR emission spectroscopy was used to identify the spectral absorption features of that dust. The current research focuses on Kuwait and utilizes a comprehensive set of spatial, analytical and geological tools to characterize dust emissions and its radiative effects. Surface mineral composition maps for the Kuwait region were created using ASTER images and GIS datasets in order to identify the possible sources of wind-blown dust. Backward trajectory analysis using the Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model suggests the dust source areas were located in Iraq, Syria, Jordan and Saudi Arabia. Samples collected from two dust storms (May and July 2010) were analyzed for their mineral composition and to validate the dust source areas identified by the modeling and remote sensing analysis. These air fall dust samples were collected in glass containers on a 13 meter high rooftop in the suburb of Rumaithiya in Kuwait. Additional samples will be collected to expand the analysis and their chemical compositions will be characterized by a combination of laboratory X-ray fluorescence (XRF), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and TIR emission spectroscopy. The overarching objective of this ongoing research is to both characterize the effects of mineral dust on climate as well as establish a predictive tool that can identify dust storm sources and

  5. Thermal infrared remote sensing of mineral dust over land and ocean: a spectral SVD based retrieval approach for IASI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Klüser

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available From the high spectral resolution thermal infrared observations of the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI mineral dust AOD (transferred from thermal infrared to 0.5 μm is retrieved using a Singular Vector Decomposition of brightness temperature spectra. As infrared retrieval based on 8–12 μm observations, dust observation with IASI is independent from solar illumination. Through the linear combinations of suitable independent singular vectors weighted by their contribution to the observed signal, and a projection of different a-priori dust spectra on the resulting signal the dust can be well distinguished from the influence of surface emissivity and gas absorption. In contrast to lookup-table based single-channel retrievals this method takes advantage of the spectral shape of dust extinction and surface and atmosphere influence over the total 8–12 μm window band. Using different a-priori spectra for dust extinction allows also for an estimation of dust particle size in terms of effective radius based on the respective dust model size distributions. These dust models are also used for the transfer of infrared AOD to 0.5 μm. Four months of IASI observations covering Northern Africa and Arabia are used for evaluation. Two large scale dust events, one covering the Arabian Peninsula and adjacent parts of the Indian Ocean, the other over the Atlantic Ocean off the coast of West-Africa, are analysed and compared with other satellite images. They also show the good suitability of IASI data for dust observation at day and night. Monthly means derived from IASI observations represent well the known seasonal cycles of dust activity over Northern Africa and Arabia. IASI Dust AOD0.5 μm and AERONET coarse mode AOD0.5 μm are reasonably well (linearly correlated with ρ=0.623. Moreover, comparison of time series of AERONET and IASI observations shows that the evolution of dust events is very well covered by the

  6. PIPER and Polarized Galactic Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuss, David

    2009-01-01

    In addition to probing inflationary cosmology, PIPER will measure the polarized dust emission from the Galaxy. PIPER will be capable of full (I,0,U,V) measurement over four frequency bands ' These measurements will provide insight into the physics of dust grains and a probe of the Galactic magnetic field on large and intermediate scales.

  7. Planck 2015 results. XXV. Diffuse low-frequency Galactic foregrounds

    CERN Document Server

    Ade, P.A.R.; Alves, M.I.R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit, A.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lahteenmaki, A.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prezeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A.W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vidal, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-01-01

    (abridged) We discuss the Galactic foreground emission between 20 and 100GHz based on observations by Planck/WMAP. The Commander component-separation tool has been used to separate the various astrophysical processes in total intensity. Comparison with RRL templates verifies the recovery of the free-free emission along the Galactic plane. Comparison of the high-latitude Halpha emission with our free-free map shows residuals that correlate with dust optical depth, consistent with a fraction (~30%) of Halpha having been scattered by high-latitude dust. We highlight a number of diffuse spinning dust morphological features at high latitude. There is substantial spatial variation in the spinning dust spectrum, with the emission peak ranging from below 20GHz to more than 50GHz. There is a strong tendency for the spinning dust component near many prominent HII regions to have a higher peak frequency, suggesting that this increase in peak frequency is associated with dust in the photodissociation regions around the n...

  8. Effect of Nanoclay and Microwave Thermal Treatment on Mechanical Properties of MDF Dust-PP Nanocomposite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arash Chavooshi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The effect of microwave thermal treatment on mechanical properties of composites made from MDF dust-polypropylene was investigated. In this regard, nanoclay (Cloisite 15A was added in three different (2, 4 and 6 %wt levels into the composites. Furthermore, polypropylene (PP was used as a matrix material and maleic anhydride-grafted polypropylene (MAPP was used as coupling agent at 4%wt. The medium density fibreboard (MDF dust was used as lignocellulosic material in the present study. Test samples were made, using extrusion process (twin screw, as granules. Then, samples with dimensions 30×20×1 cm were prepared with 1 g/cm3 nominal density for the polymer composites using hot pressing method. The bending strength and impact strength were measured according to the technical specifications CEN/TS15534:2007 and D-4495 regulation of ASTM standard, respectively. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM and X-ray diffraction (XRD techniques were employed to evaluate the extent of intercalation and exfoliation of silicate layers in the nanocomposites. Finally, the mechanical tests of flexural strength, flexural modulus and impact strength were performed on the samples. The results showed that the highest flexural strength, flexural modulus and impact strength were obtained at level 2 wt% nanoclay particles. The mechanical strength of the samples that were treated by microwave radiation was the highest. Also, X-ray diffraction studies showed increases in the interlayer spacing of silicate layers and intercalation of polymer chains between the clay layers. Scanning electron microscopy results showed that in the nanocomposites treated by microwave radiation, MDF dust was desirably compounded with thermoplastic materials.

  9. THERMODYNAMIC REASONS OF AGGLOMERATION OF DUST PARTICLES IN THE THERMAL DUSTY PLASMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.I.Vishnyakov

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermodynamic equilibrium of thermal dusty plasmas consisting of ionized gas (plasma and solid particles (dust grains, which interact with each other, is studied. The tendency of grains in dusty plasmas to agglomerate corresponds to the tendency of dusty plasmas to balanced states. When grains agglomerate, electrical perturbations generated by each grain concentrate inside the agglomerate. The plasma is perturbed only by the agglomerate's exterior surface. The greater number of possible states for electrons and ions in plasma depends on the volume of perturbation of grains. The fewer are the perturbations the greater is the amount of possible states for electrons and ions in plasma. If the grains collected from a distance smaller than 8 Debye lengths, the total volume of perturbations is minimized; the free energy of the plasma is also minimized.

  10. On realistic size equivalence and shape of spheroidal Saharan mineral dust particles applied in solar and thermal radiative transfer calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Otto

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Realistic size equivalence and shape of Saharan mineral dust particles are derived from in-situ particle, lidar and sun photometer measurements during SAMUM-1 in Morocco (19 May 2006, dealing with measured size- and altitude-resolved axis ratio distributions of assumed spheroidal model particles. The data were applied in optical property, radiative effect, forcing and heating effect simulations to quantify the realistic impact of particle non-sphericity. It turned out that volume-to-surface equivalent spheroids with prolate shape are most realistic: particle non-sphericity only slightly affects single scattering albedo and asymmetry parameter but may enhance extinction coefficient by up to 10 %. At the bottom of the atmosphere (BOA the Saharan mineral dust always leads to a loss of solar radiation, while the sign of the forcing at the top of the atmosphere (TOA depends on surface albedo: solar cooling/warming over a mean ocean/land surface. In the thermal spectral range the dust inhibits the emission of radiation to space and warms the BOA. The most realistic case of particle non-sphericity causes changes of total (solar plus thermal forcing by 55/5 % at the TOA over ocean/land and 15 % at the BOA over both land and ocean and enhances total radiative heating within the dust plume by up to 20 %. Large dust particles significantly contribute to all the radiative effects reported. They strongly enhance the absorbing properties and forward scattering in the solar and increase predominantly, e.g., the total TOA forcing of the dust over land.

  11. Implications of Adhesion Studies for Dust Mitigation on Thermal Control Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaier, James R.; Berkebile, Stephen P.

    2012-01-01

    Experiments measuring the adhesion forces under ultrahigh vacuum conditions (10 (exp -10) torr) between a synthetic volcanic glass and commonly used space exploration materials have recently been described. The glass has a chemistry and surface structure typical of the lunar regolith. It was found that Van der Waals forces between the glass and common spacecraft materials was negligible. Charge transfer between the materials was induced by mechanically striking the spacecraft material pin against the glass plate. No measurable adhesion occurred when striking the highly conducting materials, however, on striking insulating dielectric materials the adhesion increased dramatically. This indicates that electrostatic forces dominate over Van der Waals forces under these conditions. The presence of small amounts of surface contaminants was found to lower adhesive forces by at least two orders of magnitude, and perhaps more. Both particle and space exploration material surfaces will be cleaned by the interaction with the solar wind and other energetic processes and stay clean because of the extremely high vacuum (10 (exp -12) torr) so the atomically clean adhesion values are probably the relevant ones for the lunar surface environment. These results are used to interpret the results of dust mitigation technology experiments utilizing textured surfaces, work function matching surfaces and brushing. They have also been used to reinterpret the results of the Apollo 14 Thermal Degradation Samples experiment.

  12. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    CERN Document Server

    Abergel, A; Aghanim, N; Alina, D; Alves, M I R; Armitage-Caplan, C; Arnaud, M; Ashdown, M; Atrio-Barandela, F; Aumont, J; Baccigalupi, C; Banday, A J; Barreiro, R B; Bartlett, J G; Battaner, E; Benabed, K; Benoît, A; Benoit-Lévy, A; Bernard, J -P; Bersanelli, M; Bielewicz, P; Bobin, J; Bock, J J; Bonaldi, A; Bond, J R; Borrill, J; Bouchet, F R; Boulanger, F; Bridges, M; Bucher, M; Burigana, C; Butler, R C; Cardoso, J -F; Catalano, A; Chamballu, A; Chary, R -R; Chiang, H C; Chiang, L -Y; Christensen, P R; Church, S; Clemens, M; Clements, D L; Colombi, S; Colombo, L P L; Combet, C; Couchot, F; Coulais, A; Crill, B P; Curto, A; Cuttaia, F; Danese, L; Davies, R D; Davis, R J; de Bernardis, P; de Rosa, A; de Zotti, G; Delabrouille, J; Delouis, J -M; Désert, F -X; Dickinson, C; Diego, J M; Dole, H; Donzelli, S; Doré, O; Douspis, M; Dupac, X; Efstathiou, G; Enßlin, T A; Eriksen, H K; Falgarone, E; Finelli, F; Forni, O; Frailis, M; Fraisse, A A; Franceschi, E; Galeotta, S; Ganga, K; Ghosh, T; Giard, M; Giardino, G; Giraud-Héraud, Y; González-Nuevo, J; Górski, K M; Gratton, S; Gregorio, A; Grenier, I A; Gruppuso, A; Guillet, V; Hansen, F K; Hanson, D; Harrison, D; Helou, G; Henrot-Versillé, S; Hernández-Monteagudo, C; Herranz, D; Hildebrandt, S R; Hivon, E; Hobson, M; Holmes, W A; Hornstrup, A; Hovest, W; Huffenberger, K M; Jaffe, A H; Jaffe, T R; Jewell, J; Joncas, G; Jones, W C; Juvela, M; Keihänen, E; Keskitalo, R; Kisner, T S; Knoche, J; Knox, L; Kunz, M; Kurki-Suonio, H; Lagache, G; Lähteenmäki, A; Lamarre, J -M; Lasenby, A; Laureijs, R J; Lawrence, C R; Leonardi, R; León-Tavares, J; Lesgourgues, J; Levrier, F; Liguori, M; Lilje, P B; Linden-Vørnle, M; López-Caniego, M; Lubin, P M; Macías-Pérez, J F; Maffei, B; Maino, D; Mandolesi, N; Maris, M; Marshall, D J; Martin, P G; Martínez-González, E; Masi, S; Massardi, M; Matarrese, S; Matthai, F; Mazzotta, P; McGehee, P; Melchiorri, A; Mendes, L; Mennella, A; Migliaccio, M; Mitra, S; Miville-Deschênes, M -A; Moneti, A; Montier, L; Morgante, G; Mortlock, D; Munshi, D; Murphy, J A; Naselsky, P; Nati, F; Natoli, P; Netterfield, C B; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H U; Noviello, F; Novikov, D; Novikov, I; Osborne, S; Oxborrow, C A; Paci, F; Pagano, L; Pajot, F; Paladini, R; Paoletti, D; Pasian, F; Patanchon, G; Perdereau, O; Perotto, L; Perrotta, F; Piacentini, F; Piat, M; Pierpaoli, E; Pietrobon, D; Plaszczynski, S; Pointecouteau, E; Polenta, G; Ponthieu, N; Popa, L; Poutanen, T; Pratt, G W; Prézeau, G; Prunet, S; Puget, J -L; Rachen, J P; Reach, W T; Rebolo, R; Reinecke, M; Remazeilles, M; Renault, C; Ricciardi, S; Riller, T; Ristorcelli, I; Rocha, G; Rosset, C; Roudier, G; Rowan-Robinson, M; Rubiño-Martín, J A; Rusholme, B; Sandri, M; Santos, D; Savini, G; Scott, D; Seiffert, M D; Shellard, E P S; Spencer, L D; Starck, J -L; Stolyarov, V; Stompor, R; Sudiwala, R; Sunyaev, R; Sureau, F; Sutton, D; Suur-Uski, A -S; Sygnet, J -F; Tauber, J A; Tavagnacco, D; Terenzi, L; Toffolatti, L; Tomasi, M; Tristram, M; Tucci, M; Tuovinen, J; Türler, M; Umana, G; Valenziano, L; Valiviita, J; Van Tent, B; Vielva, P; Villa, F; Vittorio, N; Wade, L A; Wandelt, B D; Welikala, N; Yvon, D; Zacchei, A; Zonca, A

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 857, 545 and 353 GHz, and IRAS 100 micron data. Using a modified black-body fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a tight representation of the data at 5 arcmin. It shows variations of the order of 30 % compared with the widely-used model of Finkbeiner, Davis, and Schlegel. The Planck data allow us to estimate the dust temperature uniformly over the whole sky, providing an improved estimate of the dust optical depth compared to previous all-sky dust model, especially in high-contrast molecular regions. An increase of the dust opacity at 353 GHz, tau_353/N_H, from the diffuse to the denser interstellar medium (ISM) is reported. It is associated with a decrease in the observed dust temperature, T_obs, that could be due at least in part to the increased dust opacity. We also report an excess of dust emission at HI column densities lower than...

  13. Planck intermediate results. XIX. An overview of the polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the polarized sky as seen by Planck HFI at 353 GHz, which is the most sensitive Planck channel for dust polarization. We construct and analyse maps of dust polarization fraction and polarization angle at 1° resolution, taking into account noise bias and possible...

  14. Planck intermediate results. XXII. Frequency dependence of thermal emission from Galactic dust in intensity and polarization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J. F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    Planck has mapped the intensity and polarization of the sky at microwave frequencies with unprecedented sensitivity. We use these data to characterize the frequency dependence of dust emission. We make use of the Planck 353 GHz I, Q, and U Stokes maps as dust templates, and cross-correlate them w...

  15. Planck 2013 results. XI. All-sky model of thermal dust emission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abergel, A.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents an all-sky model of dust emission from the Planck 353, 545, and 857 GHz, and IRAS 100 mu m data. Using a modified blackbody fit to the data we present all-sky maps of the dust optical depth, temperature, and spectral index over the 353-3000 GHz range. This model is a good repr...

  16. Hygienic assessment of asbestos containing dust in the air of the working zone at thermal power plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moshkovskiy V.E.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Asbestos and artificial mineral fibers were used actively at thermal power plants (TPP as heat insulation of pipes, seal plates, electrical insulation, etc. But content of asbestos fibers in the air of working zone at TPP was not registered to date. Therefore, aim of the work was to assess asbestos containing dust in the air of working zone at steam turbine and gas turbine TPP in the east region of the country. It was found that old insulation at TPP is mixture of asbestoses that contains chrysotile asbestos and traces of amphibole asbestoses – crocidolite and anthophyllite. In the majority of investigated workplaces at the steam turbine TPP significant dust generation with exceed of maximum one-time exposure limits (2 mg/m3 was observed. Concentration of respirable fibers in the air of working zone in all workplaces did not exceed actual hygienic standard (1 fiber/cm3.

  17. Science teachers’ foreground for continued professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daugbjerg, Peer

    2015-01-01

    There is a lack of studies that are dedicated to qualify our understanding of the significance of lived experiences as well as foregrounds for science teachers’ participation in professional development. Seven Danish science teachers were interviewed and observed. Three of these teachers exemplify...... how present experience contributes to aspired career foregrounds. Birger’s focus on the academic basis of the in-service program reflects his aspiration to become a teacher educator. Poul is focused on improving his present teaching and aspires to keep on teaching science. Karl is focused on how...

  18. Impact Assessment of Atmospheric Dust on Foliage Pigments and Pollution Resistances of Plants Grown Nearby Coal Based Thermal Power Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hariram, Manisha; Sahu, Ravi; Elumalai, Suresh Pandian

    2018-01-01

    Plant species grown in the vicinity of thermal power plants (TPP) are one of the immobile substrates to sink most of the pollutants emitted from their stacks. The continuous exposure of toxic pollutants to these plants may affect their resistances and essential biochemical's concentrations. In the present study, we estimated the impact of dust load generated by a TPPs to plant's dust retention capacity and pollution resistances (APTI and API). The observed ambient air quality index (AQI) showed that the surroundings of TPPs are in the severe air pollution category. Observed AQI was greater than 100 in the surrounding area of TPP. The mean dust load on plant foliage was significantly greater in the polluted site compared with the control site: 4.45 ± 1.96 versus 1.38 ± 0.41 mg cm-2. Nearby, TPP highest and lowest dust load were founded in F. benghalensis (7.58 ± 0.74) and F. religiosa (2.25 ± 0.12 mg cm-2) respectively. Analysis revealed the strong negative correlation between dust load and essential pigments of foliage, such as chlorophyll content, carotenoids, pH of foliage extract, and relative water content. Conversely, strong positive correlation was observed with the ascorbic acid content of plant species. Correlation and percentage change analysis in ascorbic acid content for the polluted site against the control site showed the adverse impact on plants due to dust load. Based on their responses to dust pollution, A. scholaris, P. longifolia, and M. indica were observed as most suitable plant species. Estimation of DRC, chlorophyll a/b ratio, APTI and API revealed the A. scholaris, F. benghalensis, P. longifolia, and M. indica as the most suitable plant species for green belt formation. The high gradation was obtained in A. scholaris, F. benghalensis, P. longifolia, and M. indica for opted parameters and showed their most suitability for green belt formation. Salient features of the present study provide useful evidences to estimate the

  19. Foreground extraction for moving RGBD cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junejo, Imran N.; Ahmed, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a simple method to perform foreground extraction for a moving RGBD camera. These cameras have now been available for quite some time. Their popularity is primarily due to their low cost and ease of availability. Although the field of foreground extraction or background subtraction has been explored by the computer vision researchers since a long time, the depth-based subtraction is relatively new and has not been extensively addressed as of yet. Most of the current methods make heavy use of geometric reconstruction, making the solutions quite restrictive. In this paper, we make a novel use RGB and RGBD data: from the RGB frame, we extract corner features (FAST) and then represent these features with the histogram of oriented gradients (HoG) descriptor. We train a non-linear SVM on these descriptors. During the test phase, we make used of the fact that the foreground object has distinct depth ordering with respect to the rest of the scene. That is, we use the positively classified FAST features on the test frame to initiate a region growing to obtain the accurate segmentation of the foreground object from just the RGBD data. We demonstrate the proposed method of a synthetic datasets, and demonstrate encouraging quantitative and qualitative results.

  20. Evaluation of thermal and dynamic impacts of summer dust aerosols on the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Cahill, Bronwyn

    2017-01-16

    The seasonal response of upper ocean processes in the Red Sea to summer-time dust aerosol perturbations is investigated using an uncoupled regional ocean model. We find that the upper limit response is highly sensitive to dust-induced reductions in radiative fluxes. Sea surface cooling of −1°C and −2°C is predicted in the northern and southern regions, respectively. This cooling is associated with a net radiation reduction of −40 W m−2 and −90 W m−2 over the northern and southern regions, respectively. Larger cooling occurs below the mixed layer at 75 m in autumn, −1.2°C (north) and −1.9°C (south). SSTs adjust more rapidly (ca. 30 days) than the subsurface temperatures (seasonal time scales), due to stronger stratification and increased mixed layer stability inhibiting the extent of vertical mixing. The basin average annual heat flux reverses sign and becomes positive, +4.2 W m−2 (as compared to observed estimates −17.3 W m−2) indicating a small gain of heat from the atmosphere. When we consider missing feedbacks from atmospheric processes in our uncoupled experiment, we postulate that the magnitude of cooling and the time scales for adjustment will be much less, and that the annual heat flux will not reverse sign but nevertheless be reduced as a result of dust perturbations. While our study highlights the importance of considering coupled ocean-atmosphere processes on the net surface energy flux in dust perturbation studies, the results of our uncoupled dust experiment still provide an upper limit estimate of the response of the upper ocean to dust-induced radiative forcing perturbations.

  1. AN INFRARED CENSUS OF DUST IN NEARBY GALAXIES WITH SPITZER (DUSTINGS). I. OVERVIEW

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boyer, Martha L.; Sonneborn, George [Observational Cosmology Laboratory, Code 665, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); McQuinn, Kristen B. W.; Gehrz, Robert D.; Skillman, Evan [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, School of Physics and Astronomy, 116 Church Street SE, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Barmby, Pauline [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Western Ontario, London, ON, N6A 3K7 (Canada); Bonanos, Alceste Z. [IAASARS, National Observatory of Athens, GR-15236 Penteli (Greece); Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [STScI, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Groenewegen, M. A. T. [Royal Observatory of Belgium, Ringlaan 3, B-1180 Brussels (Belgium); Lagadec, Eric [Laboratoire Lagrange, UMR7293, Univ. Nice Sophia-Antipolis, CNRS, Observatoire de la Côte d' Azur, F-06300 Nice (France); Lennon, Daniel [ESA—European Space Astronomy Centre, Apdo. de Correo 78, E-28691 Villanueva de la Cañada, Madrid (Spain); Marengo, Massimo [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States); Sloan, G. C. [Astronomy Department, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-6801 (United States); Van Loon, Jacco Th. [Astrophysics Group, Lennard-Jones Laboratories, Keele University, Staffordshire ST5 5BG (United Kingdom); Zijlstra, Albert, E-mail: martha.boyer@nasa.gov [Jodrell Bank Centre for Astrophysics, Alan Turing Building, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2015-01-01

    Nearby resolved dwarf galaxies provide excellent opportunities for studying the dust-producing late stages of stellar evolution over a wide range of metallicity (–2.7 ≲ [Fe/H] ≲ –1.0). Here, we describe DUSTiNGS (DUST in Nearby Galaxies with Spitzer): a 3.6 and 4.5 μm post-cryogen Spitzer Space Telescope imaging survey of 50 dwarf galaxies within 1.5 Mpc that is designed to identify dust-producing asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars and massive stars. The survey includes 37 dwarf spheroidal, 8 dwarf irregular, and 5 transition-type galaxies. This near-complete sample allows for the building of statistics on these rare phases of stellar evolution over the full metallicity range. The photometry is >75% complete at the tip of the red giant branch for all targeted galaxies, with the exception of the crowded inner regions of IC 10, NGC 185, and NGC 147. This photometric depth ensures that the majority of the dust-producing stars, including the thermally pulsing AGB stars, are detected in each galaxy. The images map each galaxy to at least twice the half-light radius to ensure that the entire evolved star population is included and to facilitate the statistical subtraction of background and foreground contamination, which is severe at these wavelengths. In this overview, we describe the survey, the data products, and preliminary results. We show evidence for the presence of dust-producing AGB stars in eight of the targeted galaxies, with metallicities as low as [Fe/H] = –1.9, suggesting that dust production occurs even at low metallicity.

  2. Thermal IR radiative properties of mixed mineral dust and biomass aerosol during SAMUM-2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koehler, Claas H.; Trautmann, Thomas; Lindermeir, Erwin; Vreeling, Willem; Lieke, Kirsten; Kandler, Konrad; Weinzierl, Bernadett; Gross, Silke; Tesche, Matthias; Wendisch, Manfred

    Ground-based high spectral resolution measurements of downwelling radiances from 800 to 1200 cm(-1) were conducted between 20 January and 6 February 2008 within the scope of the SAMUM-2 field experiment. We infer the spectral signature of mixed biomass burning/mineral dust aerosols at the surface

  3. A CMB foreground study in WMAP data: Extragalactic point sources and zodiacal light emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi

    , separately, in comparison to t 0.40 from the WMAP catalogs. Our source catalogs are a good supplement to the existing WMAP source catalogs, and the method itself is proven to be both complementary to and competitive with all the current source finding techniques in WMAP maps. Scattered light and thermal emission from the interplanetary dust (IPD) within our Solar System are major contributors to the diffuse sky brightness at most infrared wavelengths. For wavelengths longer than 3.5 mm, the thermal emission of the IPD dominates over scattering, and the emission is often referred to as the Zodiacal Light Emission (ZLE). To set a limit of ZLE contribution to the WMAP data, we have performed a simultaneous fit of the yearly WMAP time-ordered data to the time variation of ZLE predicted by the DIRBE IPD model (Kelsallet al. 1998) evaluated at 240 mm, plus [cursive l] = 1 - 4 CMB components. It is found that although this fitting procedure can successfully recover the CMB dipole to a 0.5% accuracy, it is not sensitive enough to determine the ZLE signal nor the other multipole moments very accurately.

  4. Human thermal perception related to Föhn winds due to Saharan dust outbreaks in Crete Island, Greece

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nastos, P. T.; Bleta, A. G.; Matsangouras, I. T.

    2017-05-01

    Crete Island is located in the southmost border of East Mediterranean basin, facing exacerbating atmospheric conditions (mainly concentrations of particulates) due to Saharan dust outbreaks. It is worth to note that these episodes are more frequent during spring and autumn, when mild biometeorological conditions become intolerable due to the synergy of the so called Föhn winds. Cretan mountains, especially Psiloritis Mt. (summit at 2456 m), are orientated perpendicularly to the southwest air mass flow, generating the Föhn winds. Propagating from the leeward of the mountains, these dry, hot winds have an effect on prevailing biometeorological conditions. While descending to the lowlands on the leeward side of the range, the wind becomes strong, gusty, and desiccating. This wind often lasts less than an hour to several days, with gradual weakening after the first or the second day. Sometimes, it stops very abruptly. In this work, the authors examined and analyzed the abrupt changes of human thermal perception within specific case studies during which Föhn winds appeared in Heraklion city at the leeward of Psiloritis Mt, associated with extreme Saharan dust episodes, observed within the period 2006-2010. In order to verify the development of Föhn winds, Meteorological Terminal Aviation Routine Weather Reports (METARs, meteorological observations every half hour), were acquired from the Heraklion meteorological station installed by the Hellenic National Meteorological Service (HNMS). The biometeorological conditions analyzed are based on human thermal bioclimatic indices such as the Physiologically equivalent temperature (PET) and the Universal Thermal Climate Index (UTCI). METAR recordings of meteorological variables, such as air temperature, vapor pressure, wind speed, and cloudiness, were used as input variables in modeling the aforementioned thermal indices, so that to interpret the grade of the thermo-physiological stress. The PET and UTCI analysis was

  5. Solar and thermal radiative effects during the 2011 extreme desert dust episode over Portugal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, A.; Costa, M. J.; Guerrero-Rascado, J. L.; Bortoli, D.; Olmo, F. J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper analyses the influence of the extreme Saharan desert dust (DD) event on shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiation at the EARLINET/AERONET Évora station (Southern Portugal) from 4 up to 7 April 2011. There was also some cloud occurrence in the period. In this context, it is essential to quantify the effect of cloud presence on aerosol radiative forcing. A radiative transfer model was initialized with aerosol optical properties, cloud vertical properties and meteorological atmospheric vertical profiles. The intercomparison between the instantaneous TOA shortwave and longwave fluxes derived using CERES and those calculated using SBDART, which was fed with aerosol extinction coefficients derived from the CALIPSO and lidar-PAOLI observations, varying OPAC dataset parameters, was reasonably acceptable within the standard deviations. The dust aerosol type that yields the best fit was found to be the mineral accumulation mode. Therefore, SBDART model constrained with the CERES observations can be used to reliably determine aerosol radiative forcing and heating rates. Aerosol radiative forcings and heating rates were derived in the SW (ARFSw, AHRSw) and LW (ARFLw, AHRLw) spectral ranges, considering a cloud-aerosol free reference atmosphere. We found that AOD at 440 nm increased by a factor of 5 on 6 April with respect to the lower dust load on 4 April. It was responsible by a strong cooling radiative effect pointed out by the ARFSw value (-99 W/m2 for a solar zenith angle of 60°) offset by a warming radiative effect according to ARFLw value (+21.9 W/m2) at the surface. Overall, about 24% and 12% of the dust solar radiative cooling effect is compensated by its longwave warming effect at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere, respectively. Hence, larger aerosol loads could enhance the response between the absorption and re-emission processes increasing the ARFLw with respect to those associated with moderate and low aerosol loads. The unprecedented

  6. Planck 2015 results. XXV. Diffuse low-frequency Galactic foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Peel, M.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vidal, M.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We discuss the Galactic foreground emission between 20 and 100 GHz based on observations by Planck and WMAP. The total intensity in this part of the spectrum is dominated by free-free and spinning dust emission, whereas the polarized intensity is dominated by synchrotron emission. The Commander component-separation tool has been used to separate the various astrophysical processes in total intensity. Comparison with radio recombination line templates verifies the recovery of the free-free emission along the Galactic plane. Comparison of the high-latitude Hα emission with our free-free map shows residuals that correlate with dust optical depth, consistent with a fraction (≈30%) of Hα having been scattered by high-latitude dust. We highlight a number of diffuse spinning dust morphological features at high latitude. There is substantial spatial variation in the spinning dust spectrum, with the emission peak (in Iν) ranging from below 20 GHz to more than 50 GHz. There is a strong tendency for the spinning dust component near many prominent H II regions to have a higher peak frequency, suggesting that this increase in peak frequency is associated with dust in the photo-dissociation regions around the nebulae. The emissivity of spinning dust in these diffuse regions is of the same order as previous detections in the literature. Over the entire sky, the Commander solution finds more anomalous microwave emission (AME) than the WMAP component maps, at the expense of synchrotron and free-free emission. This can be explained by the difficulty in separating multiple broadband components with a limited number of frequency maps. Future surveys, particularly at 5-20 GHz, will greatly improve the separation by constraining the synchrotron spectrum. We combine Planck and WMAP data to make the highest signal-to-noise ratio maps yet of the intensity of the all-sky polarized synchrotron emission at frequencies above a few GHz. Most of the high-latitude polarized emission is

  7. Thermal IR radiative properties of mixed mineral dust and biomass aerosol during SAMUM-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koehler, Claas H.; Trautmann, Thomas; Lindermeir, Erwin (Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR), Institut fur Methodik der Fernerkundung, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)), e-mail: claas.koehler@dlr.de; Vreeling, Willem (Netherlands Inst. for Space Research (SRON), Groningen, (Netherlands)); Lieke, Kirsten; Kandler, Konrad (Institut fur Angewandte Geowissenschaften, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Darmstadt (Germany)); Weinzierl, Bernadett (Deutsches Zentrum fur Luft- und Raumfahrt (DLR) Institut fur Physik der Atmosphaere, Oberpfaffenhofen (Germany)); Gross, Silke (Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet Munchen, Meteorologisches Institut, Munchen (Germany)); Tesche, Matthias (Leibniz-Institut fur Troposphaerenforschung (IfT), Leipzig (Germany)); Wendisch, Manfred (Universitaet Leipzig, Leipziger Institut fur Meteorologie, Leipzig (Germany))

    2011-09-15

    Ground-based high spectral resolution measurements of downwelling radiances from 800 to 1200 cm-1 were conducted between 20 January and 6 February 2008 within the scope of the SAMUM-2 field experiment. We infer the spectral signature of mixed biomass burning/mineral dust aerosols at the surface from these measurements and at top of the atmosphere from IASI observations. In a case study for a day characterized by the presence of high loads of both dust and biomass we attempt a closure with radiative transfer simulations assuming spherical particles. A detailed sensitivity analysis is performed to investigate the effect of uncertainties in the measurements ingested into the simulation on the simulated radiances. Distinct deviations between modelled and observed radiances are limited to a spectral region characterized by resonance bands in the refractive index. A comparison with results obtained during recent laboratory studies and field experiments reveals, that the deviations could be caused by the aerosol particles' non-sphericity, although an unequivocal discrimination from measurement uncertainties is not possible. Based on radiative transfer simulations we estimate the aerosol's direct radiative effect in the atmospheric window region to be 8 W m-2 at the surface and 1 W m-2 at top of the atmosphere

  8. All-Sky Observational Evidence for An Inverse Correlation Between Dust Temperature and Emissivity Spectral Index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Z.; Fixsen, D. J.; Gold, B.

    2012-01-01

    We show that a one-component variable-emissivity-spectral-index model (the free- model) provides more physically motivated estimates of dust temperature at the Galactic polar caps than one- or two-component fixed-emissivity-spectral-index models (fixed- models) for interstellar dust thermal emission at far-infrared and millimeter wavelengths. For the comparison we have fit all-sky one-component dust models with fixed or variable emissivity spectral index to a new and improved version of the 210-channel dust spectra from the COBE-FIRAS, the 100-240 micrometer maps from the COBE-DIRBE and the 94 GHz dust map from the WMAP. The best model, the free-alpha model, is well constrained by data at 60-3000 GHz over 86 per cent of the total sky area. It predicts dust temperature (T(sub dust)) to be 13.7-22.7 (plus or minus 1.3) K, the emissivity spectral index (alpha) to be 1.2-3.1 (plus or minus 0.3) and the optical depth (tau) to range 0.6-46 x 10(exp -5) with a 23 per cent uncertainty. Using these estimates, we present all-sky evidence for an inverse correlation between the emissivity spectral index and dust temperature, which fits the relation alpha = 1/(delta + omega (raised dot) T(sub dust) with delta = -.0.510 plus or minus 0.011 and omega = 0.059 plus or minus 0.001. This best model will be useful to cosmic microwave background experiments for removing foreground dust contamination and it can serve as an all-sky extended-frequency reference for future higher resolution dust models.

  9. Impairment of soil health due to fly ash-fugitive dust deposition from coal-fired thermal power plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, R; Nayak, A K; Shukla, A K; Rao, K S; Gautam, Priyanka; Lal, B; Tripathi, R; Shahid, M; Panda, B B; Kumar, A; Bhattacharyya, P; Bardhan, G; Gupta, S; Patra, D K

    2015-11-01

    Thermal power stations apart from being source of energy supply are causing soil pollution leading to its degradation in fertility and contamination. Fine particle and trace element emissions from energy production in coal-fired thermal power plants are associated with significant adverse effects on human, animal, and soil health. Contamination of soil with cadmium, nickel, copper, lead, arsenic, chromium, and zinc can be a primary route of human exposure to these potentially toxic elements. The environmental evaluation of surrounding soil of thermal power plants in Odisha may serve a model study to get the insight into hazards they are causing. The study investigates the impact of fly ash-fugitive dust (FAFD) deposition from coal-fired thermal power plant emissions on soil properties including trace element concentration, pH, and soil enzymatic activities. Higher FAFD deposition was found in the close proximity of power plants, which led to high pH and greater accumulation of heavy metals. Among the three power plants, in the vicinity of NALCO, higher concentrations of soil organic carbon and nitrogen was observed whereas, higher phosphorus content was recorded in the proximity of NTPC. Multivariate statistical analysis of different variables and their association indicated that FAFD deposition and soil properties were influenced by the source of emissions and distance from source of emission. Pollution in soil profiles and high risk areas were detected and visualized using surface maps based on Kriging interpolation. The concentrations of chromium and arsenic were higher in the soil where FAFD deposition was more. Observance of relatively high concentration of heavy metals like cadmium, lead, nickel, and arsenic and a low concentration of enzymatic activity in proximity to the emission source indicated a possible link with anthropogenic emissions.

  10. Dose dependence and thermal stability of the thermoluminescence emission in inorganic dust from mint and camomile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ros, J. M.; Furetta, C.; Cruz-Zaragoza, E.; Lis, M.; Torres, A.; Monsivais, G.

    2006-10-01

    The inorganic phase extracted from mint and camomile samples obtained from commercial products in Mexico was selected according to different grain sizes and exposed to 60Co gamma radiation at different doses in the range 0.5-12 kGy. Thermoluminescence (TL) glow curves show a single broad peak, centred around 175 °C for prompt readouts. X-ray diffraction analysis indicates the inorganic dust is mainly composed by quartz, Na,K-feldspars and amphiboles, which use to be characterized by TL emissions associated to continuous distribution of trapping centres. The high fading of the TL signal during the first days of storage at room temperature can be related to the shallowest part of the distribution while the deepest traps originate the asymptotic behaviour for longer storage times. The TL intensity also increases significatively with the grain size, being linear with the absorbed dose at least up to 10 kGy.

  11. Electrodynamic Dust Shield Technology for Thermal Radiators Used in Lunar Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calle, Carlos I.; Hogue, Michael D.; Snyder, Sarah J.; Clements, Sidney J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Chen, Albert

    2011-01-01

    Two general types of thermal radiators are being considered for lunar missions: coated metallic surfaces and Second Surface Mirrors. Metallic surfaces are coated with a specially formulated white paint that withstands the space environment and adheres well to aluminium, the most common metal used in space hardware. AZ-93 White Thermal Control Paint, developed for the space program, is an electrically conductive inorganic coating that offers thermal control for spacecraft. It is currently in use on satellite surfaces (Fig 1). This paint withstands exposure to atomic oxygen, charged particle radiation, and vacuum ultraviolet radiation form 118 nm to 170 nm while reflecting 84 to 85% of the incident solar radiation and emitting 89-93% of the internal heat generated inside the spacecraft.

  12. Turbulent thermal diffusion: a way to concentrate dust in protoplanetary discs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Alexander

    2016-03-01

    Turbulence acting on mixes of gas and particles generally diffuses the latter evenly through the former. However, in the presence of background gas temperature gradients, a phenomenon known as turbulent thermal diffusion appears as a particle drift velocity (rather than a diffusive term). This process moves particles from hot regions to cold ones. We re-derive turbulent thermal diffusion using astrophysical language and demonstrate that it could play a major role in protoplanetary discs by concentrating particles by factors of tens. Such a concentration would set the stage for collective behaviour such as the streaming instability and hence planetesimal formation.

  13. A new thermal gradient ice nucleation diffusion chamber instrument: design, development and first results using Saharan mineral dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. B. McQuaid

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A new Thermal Gradient ice nucleation Diffusion Chamber (TGDC capable of investigating ice nucleation efficiency of atmospherically important aerosols, termed Ice Nuclei (IN, has been designed, constructed and validated. The TGDC can produce a range of supersaturations with respect to ice (SSi over the temperature range of −10 to −34°C for sufficiently long time needed to observe the ice nucleation by the particles. The novel aspect of this new TGDC is that the chamber is run in static mode with aerosol particles supported on a Teflon substrate, which can be raised and lowered in a controlled way through the SSi profile within the chamber, and nucleation events are directly observed using digital photography. The TGDC consists of two ice coated plates to which a thermal gradient is applied to produce the range of SSi. The design of the TGDC gives the ability to understand time-related ice nucleation event information and to perform experiments at different temperatures and SSi conditions for different IN without changing the thermal gradient within the TGDC. The temperature and SSi conditions of the experimental system are validated by observing (NH42SO4 deliquescence and the results are in good agreement with the literature data. First results are presented of the onset ice nucleation for mineral dust sampled from the Saharan Desert, including images of nucleation and statistical distributions of onset ice nucleation SSi as a function of temperature. This paper illustrates how useful this new TGDC is for process level studies of ice nucleation and more experimental investigations are needed to better quantify the role of ice formation in the atmosphere.

  14. Thermal Analysis on the Pyrolysis of Tetrabromobisphenol A and Electric Arc Furnace Dust Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harahsheh, Mohammad; Al-Otoom, Awni; Al-Jarrah, Muhannad; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Kingman, Sam

    2018-02-01

    The pyrolysis of Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) mixed with electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and theoretically analyzed using thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Mixtures of both materials with varying TBBPA loads (1:1 and 1:3) were prepared and pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere under dynamic heating conditions at heating rates of 5 and 10 °C/min. The mixtures degraded through several steps, including decomposition of TBBPA yielding mainly HBr, bromination of metal oxides, followed by their evaporation in the sequence of CuBr3, ZnBr2, PbBr2, FeBr2, MnBr2, KBr, NaBr, CaBr2, and MgBr2, and finally reduction of the remaining metal oxides by the char formed from decomposition of TBBPA. Thermodynamic calculations suggest the possibility of selective bromination of zinc and lead followed by their evaporation, leaving iron in its oxide form, while the char formed may serve as a reduction agent for iron oxides into metallic iron. However, at higher TBBPA volumes, iron bromide forms, which can also be evaporated at a temperature higher than those of ZnBr2 and PbBr2. Results from this work provide practical insight into selective recovery of valuable metals from EAFD while at the same time recycling the hazardous bromine content in TBBPA.

  15. Thermal Analysis on the Pyrolysis of Tetrabromobisphenol A and Electric Arc Furnace Dust Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Harahsheh, Mohammad; Al-Otoom, Awni; Al-Jarrah, Muhannad; Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Kingman, Sam

    2017-11-01

    The pyrolysis of Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) mixed with electric arc furnace dust (EAFD) was studied using thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) and theoretically analyzed using thermodynamic equilibrium calculations. Mixtures of both materials with varying TBBPA loads (1:1 and 1:3) were prepared and pyrolyzed in a nitrogen atmosphere under dynamic heating conditions at heating rates of 5 and 10 °C/min. The mixtures degraded through several steps, including decomposition of TBBPA yielding mainly HBr, bromination of metal oxides, followed by their evaporation in the sequence of CuBr3, ZnBr2, PbBr2, FeBr2, MnBr2, KBr, NaBr, CaBr2, and MgBr2, and finally reduction of the remaining metal oxides by the char formed from decomposition of TBBPA. Thermodynamic calculations suggest the possibility of selective bromination of zinc and lead followed by their evaporation, leaving iron in its oxide form, while the char formed may serve as a reduction agent for iron oxides into metallic iron. However, at higher TBBPA volumes, iron bromide forms, which can also be evaporated at a temperature higher than those of ZnBr2 and PbBr2. Results from this work provide practical insight into selective recovery of valuable metals from EAFD while at the same time recycling the hazardous bromine content in TBBPA.

  16. Thermal processing technology of shredder residue. Incineration; Shredder dust no netsushori gijutsu. Shokyakuho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hino, J. [Nikko Mikkaichi Recycle Co. Ltd., Toyama (Japan)

    1997-12-25

    A national project of technology development called the Recycle Mine Park plan for three years from FY 1996 has been proposed by MITI. Metal Group of Nippon Mining has participated in this project, and an incinerator modified from the zinc smelting equipment which has already shut down was renewed by Nikko Mikkaichi Recycle. Incineration tests on shredder dust (SD) have been conducted since November, 1996. This paper describes a progress of the investigation. For the incineration tests, SD mainly from abandoned automobiles was used. The SD is mainly composed of organic materials, and contains heavy metals, such as iron, aluminum, copper, zinc, and lead. Incinerating capacity of the test plant is 1.5 t/hr for SD, and 1.0 t/hr for liquid waste. Among non-ferrous metals in SD, copper is distributed mainly in the bottom ash, and lead and zinc are distributed mainly in the fly ash in the incineration process. It was found that the existing non-ferrous metal smelting process can be practically applied to the incineration of SD with some problems to be solved. 4 refs., 4 figs., 6 tabs.

  17. Planck 2015 results. X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M.I.R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D.J.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P.R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C.A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G.W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M.D.; Shellard, E.P.S.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A.W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz in temperature and seven bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive a consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-year WMAP sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided with angular resolutions varying between 7.5 arcmin and 1 deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, wi...

  18. Prospects for measuring cosmic microwave background spectral distortions in the presence of foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abitbol, Maximilian H.; Chluba, Jens; Hill, J. Colin; Johnson, Bradley R.

    2017-10-01

    Measurements of cosmic microwave background (CMB) spectral distortions have profound implications for our understanding of physical processes taking place over a vast window in cosmological history. Foreground contamination is unavoidable in such measurements and detailed signal-foreground separation will be necessary to extract cosmological science. In this paper, we present Markov chain Monte Carlo based spectral distortion detection forecasts in the presence of Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds for a range of possible experimental configurations, focusing on the Primordial Inflation Explorer (PIXIE) as a fiducial concept. We consider modifications to the baseline PIXIE mission (operating ≃ 12 months in distortion mode), searching for optimal configurations using a Fisher approach. Using only spectral information, we forecast an extended PIXIE mission to detect the expected average non-relativistic and relativistic thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich distortions at high significance (194σ and 11σ, respectively), even in the presence of foregrounds. The ΛCDM Silk damping μ-type distortion is not detected without additional modifications of the instrument or external data. Galactic synchrotron radiation is the most problematic source of contamination in this respect, an issue that could be mitigated by combining PIXIE data with future ground-based observations at low frequencies (ν ≲ 15-30 GHz). Assuming moderate external information on the synchrotron spectrum, we project an upper limit of |μ| assumptions about extra low-frequency information and would rule out many alternative inflation models and provide new constraints on decaying particle scenarios.

  19. Dust Opacities*

    OpenAIRE

    Min Michiel

    2015-01-01

    Dust particles are the dominant source of opacity at (almost) all wavelengths and in (almost) all regions of protoplanetary disks. By this they govern the transport of energy through the disk and thus the thermal structure. Furthermore, their spectral properties determine the low resolution spectral signature observed at infrared wavelengths. The infrared resonances that can be observed using low resolution infrared spectroscopy can be used to identify the composition and size distribution of...

  20. Thermal metamorphism of Si2O3 - (A circumstellar dust analog)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuth, J. A.; Donn, B.

    1984-01-01

    The thermal behavior of Si2O3, the metastable condensate from SiO vapor,has been studied experimentally. Si2O3 and its successor, amorphous quartz, have previously been shown to have infrared spectral features similar to some that appear in the spectra of grains in oxygen-rich circumstellar regions. Thermal annealing experiments show that only one Si2O3 decay process operates over the range between 750-1000 K. This process is a unimolecular disproportionation. The rate of this transformation can be expressed as k/hr = 10 to the 9th exp (-40 kcal/mole/RT). By using this rate constant, it is found that a significant fraction of freshly nucleated circumstellar grains can survive passage through a typical circumstellar shell virtually unaltered in structure. It is emphasized that this is only the first in a series of laboratory experiments intended to study the metamorphism of newly condensed circumstellar material ejected into the interstellar medium. Grains similar to these might have been incorporated into the primitive solar nebula, provided that they could also survive passage through the general interstellar medium.

  1. Two Video Analysis Applications Using Foreground/Background Segmentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zivkovic, Z.; Petkovic, M.; van Mierlo, R.; van Keulen, Maurice; van der Heijden, Ferdinand; Jonker, Willem; Rijnierse, E.

    Probably the most frequently solved problem when videos are analyzed is segmenting a foreground object from its background in an image. After some regions in an image are detected as the foreground objects, some features are extracted that describe the segmented regions. These features together with

  2. Thermally altered palagonitic tephra - A spectral and process analog to the soil and dust of Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, James F., III; Morris, Richard V.; Adams, John B.

    1993-01-01

    Six palagonitic soil samples (PH-1 through PH-6) which were collected at 30-cm intervals from a lava slab on Mauna Kea, Hawaii, are studied. The samples present an alteration sequence caused by heating during emplacement of molten lava over a preexisting tephra cone. Techniques employed include visible and near-IUR spectroscopy, Moessbauer spectroscopy, and magnetic analysis. The four samples closest to the slab (PH-1 through PH-4) were strongly altered in response to heating during its emplacement; their iron oxide mineralogy is dominated by nanophase ferric oxide. The sample adjacent to the slab (PH-1) has a factor of 3 less H2O and contains crystalline hematite and magnetite in addition to nanophase ferric oxide. It is argued that localized thermal alteration events may provide a volumetrically important mechanism for the palagonitization of basaltic glass and the production of crystalline ferric oxides on Mars.

  3. Planck early results. XVII. Origin of the submillimetre excess dust emission in the Magellanic Clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.

    2011-01-01

    to constrain the thermal dust emissivity power-law index (β). The average spectral index is found to be consistent with β = 1.5 and β = 1.2 below 500μm for the LMC and SMC respectively, significantly flatter than the values observed in the Milky Way. Also, there is evidence in the SMC of a further flattening......The integrated spectral energy distributions (SED) of the Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC) and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) appear significantly flatter than expected from dust models based on their far-infrared and radio emission. The still unexplained origin of this millimetre excess is investigated...... here using the Planck data. The integrated SED of the two galaxies before subtraction of the foreground (Milky Way) and background (CMB fluctuations) emission are in good agreement with previous determinations, confirming the presence of the millimetre excess. In the context of this preliminary...

  4. Toward an Understanding of Foreground Emission in the BICEP2 Region

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    BICEP2 has reported the detection of a degree-scale B-mode polarization pattern in the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB) and has interpreted the measurement as evidence for primordial gravitational waves. Motivated by the profound importance of the discovery of gravitational waves from the early Universe, I will discuss to what extent a combination of Galactic foregrounds and lensed E-modes could be responsible for the signal. I will present independent estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region using several different approaches. These estimates of the dust polarization signal in the BICEP2 region are consistent with each other, but the expected amplitude of the dust polarization power spectrum is uncertain by about a factor of three. The lower end of the prediction leaves room for a primordial contribution, but at the higher end the dust in combination with the standard CMB lensing signal could account for the BICEP2 observations, without requiring the existence of primordial gravitatio...

  5. Effects of thermal radiation heat transfer on flame acceleration and transition to detonation in dust cloud flames: Origins of dust explosion

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanov, Michael A Liberman M F

    2015-01-01

    We examines regimes of the hydrogen flames propagation and ignition of mixtures heated by the radiation emitted from the flame. The gaseous phase is assumed to be transparent for radiation, while the suspended particles of the dust cloud ahead of the flame absorb and reemit the radiation. The radiant heat absorbed by the particles is then lost by conduction to the surrounding unreacted gaseous phase so that the gas phase temperature lags that of the particles. The direct numerical simulations solve the full system of two phase gas dynamic time-dependent equations with a detailed chemical kinetics for a plane flames propagating through a dust cloud. Depending on the spatial distribution of the dispersed particles and on the value of radiation absorption length the consequence of the radiative preheating of the unreacted mixture can be either the increase of the flame velocity for uniformly dispersed particles or ignition deflagration or detonation ahead of the flame via the Zel'dovich gradient mechanism in the...

  6. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rouillé d'Orfeuil, B.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I. K.; White, M.; White, S. D. M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The polarized thermal emission from diffuse Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100 GHz. In this paper we exploit the uniqueness of the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353 GHz to measure the polarized dust angular power spectra CℓEE and CℓBB over the multipole range 40 <ℓ< 600 well away from the Galactic plane. These measurements will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and allow a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. Despite the non-Gaussian and anisotropic nature of Galactic dust, we show that general statistical properties of the emission can be characterized accurately over large fractions of the sky using angular power spectra. The polarization power spectra of the dust are well described by power laws in multipole, Cℓ ∝ ℓα, with exponents αEE,BB = -2.42 ± 0.02. The amplitudes of the polarization power spectra vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity power spectra. The frequency dependence of the dust polarization spectra is consistent with modified blackbody emission with βd = 1.59 and Td = 19.6 K down to the lowest Planck HFI frequencies. We find a systematic difference between the amplitudes of the Galactic B- and E-modes, CℓBB/CℓEE = 0.5. We verify that these general properties are preserved towards high Galactic latitudes with low dust column densities. We show that even in the faintest dust-emitting regions there are no "clean" windows in the sky where primordial CMB B-mode polarization measurements could be made without subtraction of foreground emission. Finally, we investigate the level of dust polarization in the specific field recently targeted by the BICEP2 experiment. Extrapolation of the Planck 353 GHz data to 150 GHz gives a dust power 𝒟ℓBB ≡ ℓ(ℓ+1)CℓBB/(2π) of 1.32 × 10-2 μKCMB2 over the multipole range

  7. Optimization of the Regularization in Background and Foreground Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Qi Wang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and foreground modeling is a typical method in the application of computer vision. The current general “low-rank + sparse” model decomposes the frames from the video sequences into low-rank background and sparse foreground. But the sparse assumption in such a model may not conform with the reality, and the model cannot directly reflect the correlation between the background and foreground either. Thus, we present a novel model to solve this problem by decomposing the arranged data matrix D into low-rank background L and moving foreground M. Here, we only need to give the priori assumption of the background to be low-rank and let the foreground be separated from the background as much as possible. Based on this division, we use a pair of dual norms, nuclear norm and spectral norm, to regularize the foreground and background, respectively. Furthermore, we use a reweighted function instead of the normal norm so as to get a better and faster approximation model. Detailed explanation based on linear algebra about our two models will be presented in this paper. By the observation of the experimental results, we can see that our model can get better background modeling, and even simplified versions of our algorithms perform better than mainstream techniques IALM and GoDec.

  8. The cascade from local to global dust storms on Mars: Temporal and spatial thresholds on thermal and dynamical feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toigo, Anthony D.; Richardson, Mark I.; Wang, Huiqun; Guzewich, Scott D.; Newman, Claire E.

    2018-03-01

    We use the MarsWRF general circulation model to examine the temporal and spatial response of the atmosphere to idealized local and regional dust storm radiative heating. The ability of storms to modify the atmosphere away from the location of dust heating is a likely prerequisite for dynamical feedbacks that aid the growth of storms beyond the local scale, while the ability of storms to modify the atmosphere after the cessation of dust radiative heating is potentially important in preconditioning the atmosphere prior to large scale storms. Experiments were conducted over a range of static, prescribed storm sizes, durations, optical depth strengths, locations, and vertical extents of dust heating. Our results show that for typical sizes (order 105 km2) and durations (1-10 sols) of local dust storms, modification of the atmosphere is less than the typical variability of the unperturbed (storm-free) state. Even if imposed on regional storm length scales (order 106 km2), a 1-sol duration storm similarly does not significantly modify the background atmosphere. Only when imposed for 10 sols does a regional dust storm create a significant impact on the background atmosphere, allowing for the possibility of self-induced dynamical storm growth. These results suggest a prototype for how the subjective observational categorization of storms may be related to objective dynamical growth feedbacks that only become available to storms after they achieve a threshold size and duration, or if they grow into an atmosphere preconditioned by a prior large and sustained storm.

  9. Planck 2015 results. X. Diffuse component separation: Foreground maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Adam, R.; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Clements, D. L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hobson, M.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Leahy, J. P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Marshall, D. J.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Meinhold, P. R.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C. B.; Nørgaard-Nielsen, H. U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Orlando, E.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T. J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Pratt, G. W.; Prézeau, G.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Seiffert, M. D.; Shellard, E. P. S.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Strong, A. W.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Wilkinson, A.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    Planck has mapped the microwave sky in temperature over nine frequency bands between 30 and 857 GHz and in polarization over seven frequency bands between 30 and 353 GHz in polarization. In this paper we consider the problem of diffuse astrophysical component separation, and process these maps within a Bayesian framework to derive an internally consistent set of full-sky astrophysical component maps. Component separation dedicated to cosmic microwave background (CMB) reconstruction is described in a companion paper. For the temperature analysis, we combine the Planck observations with the 9-yr Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP) sky maps and the Haslam et al. 408 MHz map, to derive a joint model of CMB, synchrotron, free-free, spinning dust, CO, line emission in the 94 and 100 GHz channels, and thermal dust emission. Full-sky maps are provided for each component, with an angular resolution varying between 7.´5 and 1deg. Global parameters (monopoles, dipoles, relative calibration, and bandpass errors) are fitted jointly with the sky model, and best-fit values are tabulated. For polarization, the model includes CMB, synchrotron, and thermal dust emission. These models provide excellent fits to the observed data, with rms temperature residuals smaller than 4μK over 93% of the sky for all Planck frequencies up to 353 GHz, and fractional errors smaller than 1% in the remaining 7% of the sky. The main limitations of the temperature model at the lower frequencies are internal degeneracies among the spinning dust, free-free, and synchrotron components; additional observations from external low-frequency experiments will be essential to break these degeneracies. The main limitations of the temperature model at the higher frequencies are uncertainties in the 545 and 857 GHz calibration and zero-points. For polarization, the main outstanding issues are instrumental systematics in the 100-353 GHz bands on large angular scales in the form of temperature

  10. Elemental carbon, organic carbon, and dust concentrations in snow measured with thermal optical and gravimetric methods: Variations during the 2007-2013 winters at Sapporo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Aoki, Teruo; Niwano, Masashi; Matoba, Sumito; Kodama, Yuji; Adachi, Kouji

    2015-01-01

    mass concentrations of light-absorbing snow impurities at Sapporo, Japan, were measured during six winters from 2007 to 2013. Elemental carbon (EC) and organic carbon (OC) concentrations were measured with the thermal optical method, and dust concentration was determined by filter gravimetric measurement. The measurement results using the different filters were compared to assess the filtration efficiency. Adding NH4H2PO4 coagulant to melted snow samples improved the collection efficiency for EC particles by a factor of 1.45. The mass concentrations of EC, OC, and dust in the top 2 cm layer ranged in 0.007-2.8, 0.01-13, and 0.14-260 ppmw, respectively, during the six winters. The mass concentrations and their short-term variations were larger in the surface than in the subsurface. The snow impurity concentrations varied seasonally; that is, they remained relatively low during the accumulation season and gradually increased during the melting season. Although the surface snow impurities showed no discernible trend over the six winters, they varied from year to year, with a negative correlation between the snow impurity concentrations and the amount of snowfall. The surface snow impurities generally increased with the number of days elapsed since snowfall and showed a different rate for EC (1.44), OC (9.96), and dust (6.81). The possible processes causing an increase in surface snow impurities were dry deposition of atmospheric aerosols, melting of surface snow, and sublimation/evaporation of surface snow.

  11. MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD FOREGROUND CLEANING FOR COSMIC MICROWAVE BACKGROUND POLARIMETERS IN THE PRESENCE OF SYSTEMATIC EFFECTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao, C.; Hanany, S. [University of Minnesota School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States); Baccigalupi, C. [SISSA, Astrophysics Sector, via Bonomea 265, Trieste I-34136 (Italy); Gold, B. [Hamline University, Saint Paul, MN 55104 (United States); Jaffe, A. [Imperial College, London, SW72AZ, England (United Kingdom); Stompor, R. [Laboratoire Astroparticule et Cosmologie (APC), F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2016-03-01

    We extend a general maximum likelihood foreground estimation for cosmic microwave background (CMB) polarization data to include estimation of instrumental systematic effects. We focus on two particular effects: frequency band measurement uncertainty and instrumentally induced frequency dependent polarization rotation. We assess the bias induced on the estimation of the B-mode polarization signal by these two systematic effects in the presence of instrumental noise and uncertainties in the polarization and spectral index of Galactic dust. Degeneracies between uncertainties in the band and polarization angle calibration measurements and in the dust spectral index and polarization increase the uncertainty in the extracted CMB B-mode power, and may give rise to a biased estimate. We provide a quantitative assessment of the potential bias and increased uncertainty in an example experimental configuration. For example, we find that with 10% polarized dust, a tensor to scalar ratio of r = 0.05, and the instrumental configuration of the E and B experiment balloon payload, the estimated CMB B-mode power spectrum is recovered without bias when the frequency band measurement has 5% uncertainty or less, and the polarization angle calibration has an uncertainty of up to 4°.

  12. Planck intermediate results. XXX. The angular power spectrum of polarized dust emission at intermediate and high Galactic latitudes

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Levy, A.; Bernard, J.P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Bucher, M.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.R.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Clements, D.L.; Colombi, S.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.M.; Desert, F.X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Dore, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Ensslin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Falgarone, E.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Giraud-Heraud, Y.; Gjerlow, E.; Gonzalez-Nuevo, J.; Gorski, K.M.; Gratton, S.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F.K.; Hanson, D.; Harrison, D.L.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Hernandez-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W.A.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jaffe, T.R.; Jewell, J.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihanen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T.S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Knox, L.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lagache, G.; Lamarre, J.M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C.R.; Leahy, J.P.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vornle, M.; Lopez-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P.M.; Macias-Perez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martinez-Gonzalez, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Mazzotta, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mendes, L.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Mitra, S.; Miville-Deschenes, M.A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Moss, A.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Netterfield, C.B.; Norgaard-Nielsen, H.U.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paladini, R.; Paoletti, D.; Partridge, B.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Pearson, T.J.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Perrotta, F.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Popa, L.; Pratt, G.W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reach, W.T.; Rebolo, R.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ricciardi, S.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; d'Orfeuil, B.Rouille; Rubino-Martin, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Soler, J.D.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.S.; Sygnet, J.F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vibert, L.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Watson, R.; Wehus, I.K.; White, M.; White, S.D.M.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-09

    The polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust is the main foreground present in measurements of the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) at frequencies above 100GHz. We exploit the Planck HFI polarization data from 100 to 353GHz to measure the dust angular power spectra $C_\\ell^{EE,BB}$ over the range $40<\\ell<600$. These will bring new insights into interstellar dust physics and a precise determination of the level of contamination for CMB polarization experiments. We show that statistical properties of the emission can be characterized over large fractions of the sky using $C_\\ell$. For the dust, they are well described by power laws in $\\ell$ with exponents $\\alpha^{EE,BB}=-2.42\\pm0.02$. The amplitudes of the polarization $C_\\ell$ vary with the average brightness in a way similar to the intensity ones. The dust polarization frequency dependence is consistent with modified blackbody emission with $\\beta_d=1.59$ and $T_d=19.6$K. We find a systematic ratio between the amplitudes of ...

  13. Linguistic Foregrounding and Thematic Projection in Gabriel Okara's ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... and semiotics and within the framework of stylistic criticism. Its findings identify category rule violation, selection restriction and collocation rules violation, creative transliteration, doubling of subject and verb to BE, and use of metaphors, symbols, and irony as some of the foregrounded aspects of the language of The Voice ...

  14. Some Doubts on the Validity of the Foreground Galactic Contribution ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-08-30

    Aug 30, 2007 ... First, I review the recent bibliography on the topic and discuss critically the methods of foreground subtraction: the cross-correlation with templates, analysis ... of the galaxy is not accurate enough to allow a ``precision Cosmology”; other sources of contamination (extragalactic, solar system) are also present.

  15. Foregrounding awareness of sentence construction-types in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Foregrounding awareness of sentence construction-types in the interpretive analysis of legal writing: a case study of the statute of the University of Zululand ... and lexical structure of English to give circumstantial information, these circumstances are essential in enhancing the effectiveness and communicative potential of ...

  16. Foreground removal from WMAP 7 yr polarization maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2012-01-01

    One of the fundamental problems in extracting the cosmic microwave background signal (CMB) from millimeter/submillimeter observations is the pollution by emission from the Milky Way: synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust emission. To extract the fundamental cosmological parameters from CMB sig...

  17. Nighttime Foreground Pedestrian Detection Based on Three-Dimensional Voxel Surface Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jing; Zhang, Fangbing; Wei, Lisong; Yang, Tao; Lu, Zhaoyang

    2017-10-16

    Pedestrian detection is among the most frequently-used preprocessing tasks in many surveillance application fields, from low-level people counting to high-level scene understanding. Even though many approaches perform well in the daytime with sufficient illumination, pedestrian detection at night is still a critical and challenging problem for video surveillance systems. To respond to this need, in this paper, we provide an affordable solution with a near-infrared stereo network camera, as well as a novel three-dimensional foreground pedestrian detection model. Specifically, instead of using an expensive thermal camera, we build a near-infrared stereo vision system with two calibrated network cameras and near-infrared lamps. The core of the system is a novel voxel surface model, which is able to estimate the dynamic changes of three-dimensional geometric information of the surveillance scene and to segment and locate foreground pedestrians in real time. A free update policy for unknown points is designed for model updating, and the extracted shadow of the pedestrian is adopted to remove foreground false alarms. To evaluate the performance of the proposed model, the system is deployed in several nighttime surveillance scenes. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is capable of nighttime pedestrian segmentation and detection in real time under heavy occlusion. In addition, the qualitative and quantitative comparison results show that our work outperforms classical background subtraction approaches and a recent RGB-D method, as well as achieving comparable performance with the state-of-the-art deep learning pedestrian detection method even with a much lower hardware cost.

  18. Nighttime Foreground Pedestrian Detection Based on Three-Dimensional Voxel Surface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pedestrian detection is among the most frequently-used preprocessing tasks in many surveillance application fields, from low-level people counting to high-level scene understanding. Even though many approaches perform well in the daytime with sufficient illumination, pedestrian detection at night is still a critical and challenging problem for video surveillance systems. To respond to this need, in this paper, we provide an affordable solution with a near-infrared stereo network camera, as well as a novel three-dimensional foreground pedestrian detection model. Specifically, instead of using an expensive thermal camera, we build a near-infrared stereo vision system with two calibrated network cameras and near-infrared lamps. The core of the system is a novel voxel surface model, which is able to estimate the dynamic changes of three-dimensional geometric information of the surveillance scene and to segment and locate foreground pedestrians in real time. A free update policy for unknown points is designed for model updating, and the extracted shadow of the pedestrian is adopted to remove foreground false alarms. To evaluate the performance of the proposed model, the system is deployed in several nighttime surveillance scenes. Experimental results demonstrate that our method is capable of nighttime pedestrian segmentation and detection in real time under heavy occlusion. In addition, the qualitative and quantitative comparison results show that our work outperforms classical background subtraction approaches and a recent RGB-D method, as well as achieving comparable performance with the state-of-the-art deep learning pedestrian detection method even with a much lower hardware cost.

  19. Can extragalactic foregrounds explain the large-angle CMB anomalies?

    CERN Document Server

    Rakic, A; Schwarz, Dominik J; Rakic, Aleksandar; Rasanen, Syksy; Schwarz, Dominik J

    2008-01-01

    We address the effect of an extended local foreground on the low-l anomalies found in the CMB. Recent X-ray catalogues point us to the existence of very massive superstructures at the 100 h^(-1) Mpc scale that contribute significantly to the dipole velocity profile. Being highly non-linear, these structures provide us a natural candidate to leave an imprint on the CMB sky via a local Rees-Sciama effect. We show that the Rees-Sciama effect of local foregrounds can induce CMB anisotropy of DeltaT/T ~ 10^(-5) and we analyse its impact on multipole power as well as the induced phase pattern on largest angular scales.

  20. Image segmentation via foreground and background semantic descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Ding; Qiang, Jingjing; Yin, Jihao

    2017-09-01

    In the field of image processing, it has been a challenging task to obtain a complete foreground that is not uniform in color or texture. Unlike other methods, which segment the image by only using low-level features, we present a segmentation framework, in which high-level visual features, such as semantic information, are used. First, the initial semantic labels were obtained by using the nonparametric method. Then, a subset of the training images, with a similar foreground to the input image, was selected. Consequently, the semantic labels could be further refined according to the subset. Finally, the input image was segmented by integrating the object affinity and refined semantic labels. State-of-the-art performance was achieved in experiments with the challenging MSRC 21 dataset.

  1. Word order variation and foregrounding of complement clauses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Tanya Karoli; Jensen, Torben Juel

    2015-01-01

    Through mixed models analyses of complement clauses in a corpus of spoken Danish we examine the role of sentence adverbials in relation to a word order distinction in Scandinavian signalled by the relative position of sentence adverbials and finite verb (V>Adv vs. Adv>V). The type of sentence adv...... foregrounded information, and exploit the random intercepts assigned to the individual adverbials for further exploring the functions of sentence adverbials that behave unexpectedly based on the predictions of the model....

  2. The use of fractionated fly ash of thermal power plants as binder for production of briquettes of coke breeze and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temnikova, E. Yu; Bogomolov, A. R.; Lapin, A. A.

    2017-11-01

    In this paper, we propose to use the slag and ash material of thermal power plants (TPP) operating on pulverized coal fuel. The elemental and chemical composition of fly ash of five Kuzbass thermal power plants differs insignificantly from the composition of the mineral part of coking coal because coke production uses a charge, whose composition defines the main task: obtaining coke with the required parameters for production of iron and steel. These indicators are as follows: CRI reactivity and strength of the coke residue after reaction with CO2 – CSR. The chemical composition of fly ash of thermal power plants and microsilica with bulk density of 0.3-0.6 t/m3 generated at production of ferroalloys was compared. Fly ash and microsilica are the valuable raw material for production of mineral binder in manufacturing coke breeze briquettes (fraction of 2-10 mm) and dust (0-200 μm), generated in large quantities during coking (up to 40wt%). It is shown that this binder is necessary for production of smokeless briquettes with low reactivity, high strength and cost, demanded for production of cupola iron and melting the silicate materials, basaltic rocks in low-shaft furnaces. It is determined that microsilica contains up to 90% of silicon oxide, and fly ash contains up to 60% of silicon oxide and aluminum oxide of up to 20%. On average, the rest of fly ash composition consists of basic oxides. According to calculation by the VUKHIN formula, the basicity index of briquette changes significantly, when fly ash is introduced into briquette raw material component as a binder. The technology of coke briquette production on the basis of the non-magnetic fraction of TPP fly ash in the ratio from 3.5:1 to 4.5:1 (coke breeze : coke dust) with the addition of the binder component to 10% is proposed. The produced briquettes meet the requirements by CRI and require further study on CSR requirements.

  3. Planck intermediate results. XXI. Comparison of polarized thermal emission from Galactic dust at 353 GHz with interstellar polarization in the visible

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cardoso, J.F.; Delabrouille, J.; Ganga, K.

    2015-01-01

    The Planck survey provides unprecedented full-sky coverage of the submillimetre polarized emission from Galactic dust. In addition to the information on the direction of the Galactic magnetic field, this also brings new constraints on the properties of dust. The dust grains that emit the radiatio...

  4. Planck intermediate results L. Evidence of spatial variation of the polarized thermal dust spectral energy distribution and implications for CMB B-mode analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of the Galactic foregrounds has been shown to be the main obstacle in the challenging quest to detect primordial B-modes in the polarized microwave sky. We make use of the Planck-HFI 2015 data release at high frequencies to place new constraints on the properties of the polar...

  5. Andromeda's Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Draine, B.T.; Aniano, G.; Krause, Oliver; Groves, Brent; Sandstrom, Karin; Braun, Robert; Leroy, Adam; Klaas, Ulrich; Linz, Hendrik; Rix, Hans-Walter; Schinnerer, Eva; Schmiedeke, Anika; Walter, Fabian

    2013-01-01

    Spitzer Space Telescope and Herschel Space Observatory imaging of M31 is used, with a physical dust model, to construct maps of dust surface density, dust-to-gas ratio, starlight heating intensity, and PAH abundance, out to R=25kpc. The global dust mass is M_d=5.4x10^7Msol, the global dust/H mass ratio is M_d/M_H=0.0081, and the global PAH abundance is =0.039. The dust surface density has an inner ring at R=5.6kpc, a maximum at R=11.2kpc, and an outer ring at R=15.1kpc. The dust/gas ratio var...

  6. A sensitivity study on the effects of particle chemistry, asphericity and size on the mass extinction efficiency of mineral dust in the earth's atmosphere: from the near to thermal IR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Hansell Jr.

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available To determine a plausible range of mass extinction efficiencies (MEE of terrestrial atmospheric dust from the near to thermal IR, sensitivity analyses are performed over an extended range of dust microphysical and chemistry perturbations. The IR values are subsequently compared to those in the near-IR, to evaluate spectral relationships in their optical properties. Synthesized size distributions consistent with measurements, model particle size, while composition is defined by the refractive indices of minerals routinely observed in dust, including the widely used OPAC/Hess parameterization. Single-scattering properties of representative dust particle shapes are calculated using the T-matrix, Discrete Dipole Approximation and Lorenz-Mie light-scattering codes. For the parameterizations examined, MEE ranges from nearly zero to 1.2 m2 g−1, with the higher values associated with non-spheres composed of quartz and gypsum. At near-IR wavelengths, MEE for non-spheres generally exceeds those for spheres, while in the thermal IR, shape-induced changes in MEE strongly depend on volume median diameter (VMD and wavelength, particularly for MEE evaluated at the mineral resonant frequencies. MEE spectral distributions appear to follow particle geometry and are evidence for shape dependency in the optical properties. It is also shown that non-spheres best reproduce the positions of prominent absorption peaks found in silicates. Generally, angular particles exhibit wider and more symmetric MEE spectral distribution patterns from 8–10 μm than those with smooth surfaces, likely due to their edge-effects. Lastly, MEE ratios allow for inferring dust optical properties across the visible-IR spectrum. We conclude the MEE of dust aerosol are significant for the parameter space investigated, and are a key component for remote sensing applications and the study of direct aerosol radiative effects.

  7. A Sensitivity Study on the Effects of Particle Chemistry, Asphericity and Size on the Mass Extinction Efficiency of Mineral Dust in the Earth's Atmosphere: From the Near to Thermal IR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansell, R. A., Jr.; Reid, J. S.; Tsay, S. C.; Roush, T. L.; Kalashnikova, O. V.

    2011-01-01

    To determine a plausible range of mass extinction efficiencies (MEE) of terrestrial atmospheric dust from the near to thermal IR, sensitivity analyses are performed over an extended range of dust microphysical and chemistry perturbations. The IR values are subsequently compared to those in the near-IR, to evaluate spectral relationships in their optical properties. Synthesized size distributions consistent with measurements, model particle size, while composition is defined by the refractive indices of minerals routinely observed in dust, including the widely used OPAC/Hess parameterization. Single-scattering properties of representative dust particle shapes are calculated using the T-matrix, Discrete Dipole Approximation and Lorenz-Mie light-scattering codes. For the parameterizations examined, MEE ranges from nearly zero to 1.2 square meters per gram, with the higher values associated with non-spheres composed of quartz and gypsum. At near-IR wavelengths, MEE for non-spheres generally exceeds those for spheres, while in the thermal IR, shape-induced changes in MEE strongly depend on volume median diameter (VMD) and wavelength, particularly for MEE evaluated at the mineral resonant frequencies. MEE spectral distributions appear to follow particle geometry and are evidence for shape dependency in the optical properties. It is also shown that non-spheres best reproduce the positions of prominent absorption peaks found in silicates. Generally, angular particles exhibit wider and more symmetric MEE spectral distribution patterns from 8-10 micrometers than those with smooth surfaces, likely due to their edge-effects. Lastly, MEE ratios allow for inferring dust optical properties across the visible-IR spectrum. We conclude the MEE of dust aerosol are significant for the parameter space investigated, and are a key component for remote sensing applications and the study of direct aerosol radiative effects.

  8. Markov random fields for static foreground classification in surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimons, Jack K.; Lu, Thomas T.

    2014-09-01

    We present a novel technique for classifying static foreground in automated airport surveillance systems between abandoned and removed objects by representing the image as a Markov Random Field. The proposed algorithm computes and compares the net probability of the region of interest before and after the event occurs, hence finding which fits more naturally with their respective backgrounds. Having tested on a dataset from the PETS 2006, PETS 2007, AVSS20074, CVSG, VISOR, CANDELA and WCAM datasets, the algorithm has shown capable of matching the results of the state-of-the-art, is highly parallel and has a degree of robustness to noise and illumination changes.

  9. Improved Gaussian Mixture Models for Adaptive Foreground Segmentation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Katsarakis, Nikolaos; Pnevmatikakis, Aristodemos; Tan, Zheng-Hua

    2016-01-01

    elements to the baseline algorithm: The learning rate can change across space and time, while the Gaussian distributions can be merged together if they become similar due to their adaptation process. We quantify the importance of our enhancements and the effect of parameter tuning using an annotated......Adaptive foreground segmentation is traditionally performed using Stauffer & Grimson’s algorithm that models every pixel of the frame by a mixture of Gaussian distributions with continuously adapted parameters. In this paper we provide an enhancement of the algorithm by adding two important dynamic...

  10. Parameterizing the interstellar dust temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hocuk, S.; Szűcs, L.; Caselli, P.; Cazaux, S.; Spaans, M.; Esplugues, G. B.

    2017-08-01

    The temperature of interstellar dust particles is of great importance to astronomers. It plays a crucial role in the thermodynamics of interstellar clouds, because of the gas-dust collisional coupling. It is also a key parameter in astrochemical studies that governs the rate at which molecules form on dust. In 3D (magneto)hydrodynamic simulations often a simple expression for the dust temperature is adopted, because of computational constraints, while astrochemical modelers tend to keep the dust temperature constant over a large range of parameter space. Our aim is to provide an easy-to-use parametric expression for the dust temperature as a function of visual extinction (AV) and to shed light on the critical dependencies of the dust temperature on the grain composition. We obtain an expression for the dust temperature by semi-analytically solving the dust thermal balance for different types of grains and compare to a collection of recent observational measurements. We also explore the effect of ices on the dust temperature. Our results show that a mixed carbonaceous-silicate type dust with a high carbon volume fraction matches the observations best. We find that ice formation allows the dust to be warmer by up to 15% at high optical depths (AV> 20 mag) in the interstellar medium. Our parametric expression for the dust temperature is presented as Td = [ 11 + 5.7 × tanh(0.61 - log 10(AV) ]χuv1/5.9, where χuv is in units of the Draine (1978, ApJS, 36, 595) UV field.

  11. Risk of fire and dust explosions analysis in thermal Power station of ''As Pontes''; Analisis del Riesgo de fuego y Explosion en la Central Termica As Pontes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2000-07-01

    Among the numerous difficulties come up in the industrial processes that operate with coal, the handling of combustible solids constitutes a priority objective because of the potential risk of fire and dust explosions that implies. The aim of this project was to determine the coal usage conditions that assure total safety in its manipulation avoiding every risks at the Thermal Power Station. Several variables had to be considered starting with the basis concept of coal, which ranges very different types, compositions and origins and studying the coal handling and operation condition on different areas in the Thermal Power Station. (Author)

  12. Joint Estimation of the Epoch of Reionization Power Spectrum and Foregrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Peter; Pober, Jonathan

    2018-01-01

    Bright astrophysical foregrounds present a significant impediment to the detection of redshifted 21-cm emission from the Epoch of Reionization on large spatial scales. In this talk I present a framework for the joint modeling of the power spectral contamination by astrophysical foregrounds and the power spectrum of the Epoch of Reionization. I show how informative priors on the power spectral contamination by astrophysical foregrounds at high redshifts, where emission from both the Epoch of Reionization and its foregrounds is present in the data, can be obtained through analysis of foreground-only emission at lower redshifts. Finally, I demonstrate how, by using such informative foreground priors, joint modeling can be employed to mitigate bias in estimates of the power spectrum of the Epoch of Reionization signal and, in particular, to enable recovery of more robust power spectral estimates on large spatial scales.

  13. Estimating the tensor-to-scalar ratio and the effect of residual foreground contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fantaye, Y.; Leach, S.M.; Baccigalupi, C. [SISSA, Astrophysics Sector, via Bonomea 265, Trieste 34136 (Italy); Stivoli, F. [INRIA, Laboratoire de Recherche en Informatique, Université Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 490, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Grain, J. [CNRS, Institut d' Astrophysique Spatiale, Université Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiments 120-121, 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Tristram, M. [CNRS, Laboratoire de l' Accélérateur Linéaire, Université Paris-Sud 11, Bâtiment 200, 91898 Orsay Cedex (France); Stompor, R., E-mail: fantaye@sissa.it, E-mail: stivoli@gmail.com, E-mail: julien.grain@ias.u-psud.fr, E-mail: leach@sissa.it, E-mail: tristram@lal.in2p3.fr, E-mail: bacci@sissa.it, E-mail: radek@apc.univ-paris7.fr [CNRS, Laboratoire Astroparticule and Cosmologie, 10 rue A. Domon et L. Duquet, F-75205 Paris Cedex 13 (France)

    2011-08-01

    We consider future balloon-borne and ground-based suborbital experiments designed to search for inflationary gravitational waves, and investigate the impact of residual foregrounds that remain in the estimated cosmic microwave background maps. This is achieved by propagating foreground modelling uncertainties from the component separation, under the assumption of a spatially uniform foreground frequency scaling, through to the power spectrum estimates, and up to measurement of the tensor to scalar ratio in the parameter estimation step. We characterize the error covariance due to subtracted foregrounds, and find it to be subdominant compared to instrumental noise and sample variance in our simulated data analysis. We model the unsubtracted residual foreground contribution using a two-parameter power law and show that marginalization over these foreground parameters is effective in accounting for a bias due to excess foreground power at low l. We conclude that, at least in the suborbital experimental setups we have simulated, foreground errors may be modeled and propagated up to parameter estimation with only a slight degradation of the target sensitivity of these experiments derived neglecting the presence of the foregrounds.

  14. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Angeli, M.; Maddaluno, G.; Laguardia, L.; Ripamonti, D.; Perelli Cippo, E.; Apicella, M. L.; Conti, C.; Giacomi, G.; Grosso, G.

    2015-08-01

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO2, LiOH, and Li2CO3. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li2CO3 is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  15. Illumination and Reflectance Estimation with its Application in Foreground Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Gang Jun; Karstoft, Henrik; Pedersen, Lene Juul; Jørgensen, Erik

    2015-08-28

    In this paper, we introduce a novel approach to estimate the illumination and reflectance of an image. The approach is based on illumination-reflectance model and wavelet theory. We use a homomorphic wavelet filter (HWF) and define a wavelet quotient image (WQI) model based on dyadic wavelet transform. The illumination and reflectance components are estimated by using HWF and WQI, respectively. Based on the illumination and reflectance estimation we develop an algorithm to segment sows in grayscale video recordings which are captured in complex farrowing pens. Experimental results demonstrate that the algorithm can be applied to detect the domestic animals in complex environments such as light changes, motionless foreground objects and dynamic background.

  16. Coupling Mars' Dust and Water Cycles: Effects on Dust Lifting Vigor, Spatial Extent and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Haberle, R. M.; Montmessin, F.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is an important component of Mars' current climate system. Airborne dust affects the radiative balance of the atmosphere, thus greatly influencing the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere. Dust raising events on Mars occur at spatial scales ranging from meters to planet-wide. Although the occurrence and season of large regional and global dust storms are highly variable from one year to the next, there are many features of the dust cycle that occur year after year. Generally, a low-level dust haze is maintained during northern spring and summer, while elevated levels of atmospheric dust occur during northern autumn and winter. During years without global-scale dust storms, two peaks in total dust loading were observed by MGS/TES: one peak occurred before northern winter solstice at Ls 200-240, and one peak occurred after northern winter solstice at L(sub s) 305-340. These maxima in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere, which has been observed to maximize pre- and post-solstice. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading. Interactive dust cycle studies typically have not included the formation of water ice clouds or their radiative effects. Water ice clouds can influence the dust cycle by scavenging dust from atmosphere and by interacting with solar and infrared radiation

  17. The effect of foreground mitigation strategy on EoR window recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, Emma; Zaroubi, Saleem; Abdalla, Filipe B.; Dulwich, Fred; Jelić, Vibor; Mort, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The removal of the Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds remains a major challenge for those wishing to make a detection of the Epoch of Reionization (EoR) 21 cm signal. Multiple methods of modelling these foregrounds with varying levels of assumption have been trialled and shown promising

  18. Initiating GrabCut by Color Difference for Automatic Foreground Extraction of Passport Imagery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sangüesa, Adriá Arbués; Jørgensen, Nicolai Krogh; Larsen, Christian Aagaard

    2016-01-01

    an initial extraction of the foreground. Then, the obtained initial estimation of the foreground is used as input to the GrabCut algorithm, thus avoiding the need of interaction. Moreover, this paper is focused on passport images, which require an almost pixel-perfect segmentation in order to be a valid...

  19. Planck 2015 results. XXII. A map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartlett, J. G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J. J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R. C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D. L.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Comis, B.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W. A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-09-01

    We have constructed all-sky Compton parameters maps, y-maps, of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 30 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck satellite. These reconstructed y-maps are delivered as part of the Planck 2015 release. The y-maps are characterized in terms of noise properties and residual foreground contamination, mainly thermal dust emission at large angular scales, and cosmic infrared background and extragalactic point sources at small angular scales. Specific masks are defined to minimize foreground residuals and systematics. Using these masks, we compute the y-map angular power spectrum and higher order statistics. From these we conclude that the y-map is dominated by tSZ signal in the multipole range, 20 <ℓ< 600. We compare the measured tSZ power spectrum and higher order statistics to various physically motivated models and discuss the implications of our results in terms of cluster physics and cosmology.

  20. Planck 2015 results. XXII. A map of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich effect

    CERN Document Server

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A.J.; Barreiro, R.B.; Bartlett, J.G.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Battye, R.; Benabed, K.; Benoît, A.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bock, J.J.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J.R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F.R.; Burigana, C.; Butler, R.C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Challinor, A.; Chiang, H.C.; Christensen, P.R.; Churazov, E.; Clements, D.L.; Colombo, L.P.L.; Combet, C.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B.P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R.D.; Davis, R.J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Désert, F.-X.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J.M.; Dolag, K.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T.A.; Eriksen, H.K.; Fergusson, J.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A.A.; Franceschi, E.; Frejsel, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R.T.; Giard, M.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K.M.; Gregorio, A.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J.E.; Hansen, F.K.; Harrison, D.L.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S.R.; Hivon, E.; Holmes, W.A.; Hornstrup, A.; Huffenberger, K.M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, A.H.; Jones, W.C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lacasa, F.; Lagache, G.; Lähteenmäki, A.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Leonardi, R.; Lesgourgues, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P.B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Macías-Pérez, J.F.; Maffei, B.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P.G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; Melchiorri, A.; Melin, J.-B.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J.A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Noviello, F.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Paci, F.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Pietrobon, D.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G.W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J.P.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J.A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Sauvé, A.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Spencer, L.D.; Stolyarov, V.; Stompor, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Sutton, D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J.A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tramonte, D.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Tuovinen, J.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L.A.; Wandelt, B.D.; Wehus, I.K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.

    2016-01-01

    We have constructed all-sky y-maps of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect by applying specifically tailored component separation algorithms to the 30 to 857 GHz frequency channel maps from the Planck satellite survey. These reconstructed y-maps are delivered as part of the Planck 2015 release. The y-maps are characterised in terms of noise properties and residual foreground contamination, mainly thermal dust emission at large angular scales and CIB and extragalactic point sources at small angular scales. Specific masks are defined to minimize foreground residuals and systematics. Using these masks we compute the y-map angular power spectrum and higher order statistics. From these we conclude that the y-map is dominated by tSZ signal in the multipole range, 20-600. We compare the measured tSZ power spectrum and higher order statistics to various physically motivated models and discuss the implications of our results in terms of cluster physics and cosmology.

  1. Dust storms

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Bihui; Rousseau, Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Dust storms are remarkable natural phenomena. They affect many countries in the Northern Hemisphere and, as such, have become an interesting research topic. We show that nowadays China is the number one publishing country of articles related to their study. On a world scale the number of publications on this topic is increasing exponentially.

  2. EnviroAtlas - MSPA connectivity with water as foreground for the conterminous United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This EnviroAtlas dataset categorizes land cover into structural elements (e.g. core, edge, connector, etc.). Water is treated as foreground in this dataset. This...

  3. Molecules and dust in Cassiopeia A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biscaro, Chiara; Cherchneff, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    -rich clumps that correspond to the outermost carbon-rich ejecta zone. We consider the various dust components that form in the supernova, several reverse shock velocities and inter-clump gas temperatures, and derive grain-size distributions and masses for the dust as a function of time. Both non...... and size, and the shock velocity in the clump. A Type II-b SN forms small grains that are sputtered within the clumps and in the inter-clump medium. For Cas A, silicate grains do not survive thermal sputtering in the inter-clump medium, while alumina, silicon carbide, and carbon dust may survive......We study the dust evolution in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A. We follow the processing of dust grains that formed in the Type II-b supernova ejecta by modelling the sputtering of grains. The dust is located in dense ejecta clumps that are crossed by the reverse shock. We also investigate...

  4. Interstellar Dust

    OpenAIRE

    Compiegne, M.

    2003-01-01

    In the interstellar medium of the Milky Way, certain elements -- e.g., Mg, Si, Al, Ca, Ti, Fe -- reside predominantly in interstellar dust grains. These grains absorb, scatter, and emit electromagnetic radiation, heat the interstellar medium by photoelectric emission, play a role in the ionization balance of the gas, and catalyze the formation of molecules, particularly H2. I review the state of our knowledge of the composition and sizes of interstellar grains, including what we can learn fro...

  5. Rocket dust storms and detached dust layers in the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, Aymeric; Faure, Julien; Madeleine, Jean-Baptiste; Määttänen, Anni; Forget, François

    2013-04-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling that includes the transport of radiatively active dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA on board Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, rather than by latent heating as in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm," or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30-50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms produce detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Since nighttime sedimentation is less efficient than daytime convective transport, and the detached dust layers can convect during the daytime, these layers can be stable for several days. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear seasons (late northern winter to late northern summer), which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maxima unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Dust-driven deep convection has strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.

  6. Foreground and Sensitivity Analysis for Broadband (2D) 21 cm-Lyα and 21 cm-Hα Correlation Experiments Probing the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neben, Abraham R.; Stalder, Brian; Hewitt, Jacqueline N.; Tonry, John L.

    2017-11-01

    A detection of the predicted anticorrelation between 21 cm and either Lyα or Hα from the epoch of reionization (EOR) would be a powerful probe of the first galaxies. While 3D intensity maps isolate foregrounds in low-{k}\\parallel modes, infrared surveys cannot yet match the field of view and redshift resolution of radio intensity mapping experiments. In contrast, 2D (I.e., broadband) infrared intensity maps can be measured with current experiments and are limited by foregrounds instead of photon or thermal noise. We show that 2D experiments can measure most of the 3D fluctuation power at k181 ({\\text{kJy sr}}-1 {{mK}}) (95%) at {\\ell }˜ 800. We predict levels of foreground correlation and sample variance noise in future experiments, showing that higher-resolution surveys such as LOFAR, SKA-LOW, and the Dark Energy Survey can start to probe models of the 21 cm-Lyα EOR cross spectrum.

  7. A Polarimetric Approach for Constraining the Dynamic Foreground Spectrum for Cosmological Global 21 cm Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nhan, Bang D.; Bradley, Richard F.; Burns, Jack O.

    2017-02-01

    The cosmological global (sky-averaged) 21 cm signal is a powerful tool to probe the evolution of the intergalactic medium in high-redshift universe (z≤slant 6). One of the biggest observational challenges is to remove the foreground spectrum which is at least four orders of magnitude brighter than the cosmological 21 cm emission. Conventional global 21 cm experiments rely on the spectral smoothness of the foreground synchrotron emission to separate it from the unique 21 cm spectral structures in a single total-power spectrum. However, frequency-dependent instrumental and observational effects are known to corrupt such smoothness and complicate the foreground subtraction. We introduce a polarimetric approach to measure the projection-induced polarization of the anisotropic foreground onto a stationary dual-polarized antenna. Due to Earth rotation, when pointing the antenna at a celestial pole, the revolving foreground will modulate this polarization with a unique frequency-dependent sinusoidal signature as a function of time. In our simulations, by harmonic decomposing this dynamic polarization, our technique produces two separate spectra in parallel from the same observation: (I) a total sky power consisting both the foreground and the 21 cm background and (II) a model-independent measurement of the foreground spectrum at a harmonic consistent to twice the sky rotation rate. In the absence of any instrumental effects, by scaling and subtracting the latter from the former, we recover the injected global 21 cm model within the assumed uncertainty. We further discuss several limiting factors and potential remedies for future implementation.

  8. Dust agglomeration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-01-01

    John Marshall, an investigator at Ames Research Center and a principal investigator in the microgravity fluid physics program, is studying the adhesion and cohesion of particles in order to shed light on how granular systems behave. These systems include everything from giant dust clouds that form planets to tiny compressed pellets, such as the ones you swallow as tablets. This knowledge should help us control the grains, dust, and powders that we encounter or use on a daily basis. Marshall investigated electrostatic charge in microgravity on the first and second U.S. Microgravity Laboratory shuttle missions to see how grains aggregate, or stick together. With gravity's effects eliminated on orbit, Marshall found that the grains of sand that behaved ever so freely on Earth now behaved like flour. They would just glom together in clumps and were quite difficult to disperse. That led to an understanding of the prevalence of the electrostatic forces. The granules wanted to aggregate as little chains, like little hairs, and stack end to end. Some of the chains had 20 or 30 grains. This phenomenon indicated that another force, what Marshall believes to be an electrostatic dipole, was at work.(The diagram on the right emphasizes the aggregating particles in the photo on the left, taken during the USML-2 mission in 1995.)

  9. Extracting foreground ensemble features to detect abnormal crowd behavior in intelligent video-surveillance systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yi-Tung; Wang, Shuenn-Jyi; Tsai, Chung-Hsien

    2017-09-01

    Public safety is a matter of national security and people's livelihoods. In recent years, intelligent video-surveillance systems have become important active-protection systems. A surveillance system that provides early detection and threat assessment could protect people from crowd-related disasters and ensure public safety. Image processing is commonly used to extract features, e.g., people, from a surveillance video. However, little research has been conducted on the relationship between foreground detection and feature extraction. Most current video-surveillance research has been developed for restricted environments, in which the extracted features are limited by having information from a single foreground; they do not effectively represent the diversity of crowd behavior. This paper presents a general framework based on extracting ensemble features from the foreground of a surveillance video to analyze a crowd. The proposed method can flexibly integrate different foreground-detection technologies to adapt to various monitored environments. Furthermore, the extractable representative features depend on the heterogeneous foreground data. Finally, a classification algorithm is applied to these features to automatically model crowd behavior and distinguish an abnormal event from normal patterns. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method's performance is both comparable to that of state-of-the-art methods and satisfies the requirements of real-time applications.

  10. GPU-Accelerated Foreground Segmentation and Labeling for Real-Time Video Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Song

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Real-time and accurate background modeling is an important researching topic in the fields of remote monitoring and video surveillance. Meanwhile, effective foreground detection is a preliminary requirement and decision-making basis for sustainable energy management, especially in smart meters. The environment monitoring results provide a decision-making basis for energy-saving strategies. For real-time moving object detection in video, this paper applies a parallel computing technology to develop a feedback foreground–background segmentation method and a parallel connected component labeling (PCCL algorithm. In the background modeling method, pixel-wise color histograms in graphics processing unit (GPU memory is generated from sequential images. If a pixel color in the current image does not locate around the peaks of its histogram, it is segmented as a foreground pixel. From the foreground segmentation results, a PCCL algorithm is proposed to cluster the foreground pixels into several groups in order to distinguish separate blobs. Because the noisy spot and sparkle in the foreground segmentation results always contain a small quantity of pixels, the small blobs are removed as noise in order to refine the segmentation results. The proposed GPU-based image processing algorithms are implemented using the compute unified device architecture (CUDA toolkit. The testing results show a significant enhancement in both speed and accuracy.

  11. Dust characterization in FTU tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Angeli, M., E-mail: deangeli@ifp.cnr.it [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Maddaluno, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Laguardia, L. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Ripamonti, D. [Istituto per l’Energetica e le Interfasi – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Perelli Cippo, E. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy); Apicella, M.L. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Conti, C. [Istituto per la Conservazione e la Valorizzazione dei Beni Culturali – CNR, Milan (Italy); Giacomi, G. [ENEA Unità Tecnica Fusione, C.R. ENEA Frascati, CP65, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Grosso, G. [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma – Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, Milan (Italy)

    2015-08-15

    Dust present in the vessel of FTU has been collected and analysed. Being FTU a device with full metal plasma facing components for the whole life and equipped with a liquid lithium limiter (LLL) make FTU of special interest from a point of view of dust studies. Analyses were conducted by standard dust analysis methods and by dedicated analysis, as X-rays and neutron diffraction, to investigate the presence of lithium compounds due the presence of the LLL in FTU. Dust collected near the LLL presents a different elemental composition, namely Li compounds, compared to the dust collected in the rest of the vessel; in particular LiO{sub 2}, LiOH, and Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3}. On the basis of these results, the formation of Li{sub 2}CO{sub 3} is proposed via a two steps process. Results of fuel retention measured by thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) method show that fuel retention should not be an issue for FTU.

  12. Foreground and Background Lexicons and Word Sense Disambiguation for Information Extraction

    CERN Document Server

    Kilgarriff, A

    1999-01-01

    Lexicon acquisition from machine-readable dictionaries and corpora is currently a dynamic field of research, yet it is often not clear how lexical information so acquired can be used, or how it relates to structured meaning representations. In this paper I look at this issue in relation to Information Extraction (hereafter IE), and one subtask for which both lexical and general knowledge are required, Word Sense Disambiguation (WSD). The analysis is based on the widely-used, but little-discussed distinction between an IE system's foreground lexicon, containing the domain's key terms which map onto the database fields of the output formalism, and the background lexicon, containing the remainder of the vocabulary. For the foreground lexicon, human lexicography is required. For the background lexicon, automatic acquisition is appropriate. For the foreground lexicon, WSD will occur as a by-product of finding a coherent semantic interpretation of the input. WSD techniques as discussed in recent literature are suit...

  13. Foreground removal from CMB temperature maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Jørgensen, H.E.

    2008-01-01

    CMB signal it is essential to minimize the systematic errors in the CMB temperature determinations. Following the available knowledge of the spectral behavior of the Galactic foregrounds simple power law-like spectra have been assumed. The feasibility of using a simple neural network for extracting...... the CMB temperature signal from the combined signal CMB and the foregrounds has been investigated. As a specific example, we have analysed simulated data, as expected from the ESA Planck CMB mission. A simple multilayer perceptron neural network with 2 hidden layers can provide temperature estimates over...... more than 80 per cent of the sky that are to a high degree uncorrelated with the foreground signals. A single network will be able to cover the dynamic range of the Planck noise level over the entire sky....

  14. Using dynamic mode decomposition for real-time background/foreground separation in video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutz, Jose Nathan; Grosek, Jacob; Brunton, Steven; Fu, Xing; Pendergrass, Seth

    2017-06-06

    The technique of dynamic mode decomposition (DMD) is disclosed herein for the purpose of robustly separating video frames into background (low-rank) and foreground (sparse) components in real-time. Foreground/background separation is achieved at the computational cost of just one singular value decomposition (SVD) and one linear equation solve, thus producing results orders of magnitude faster than robust principal component analysis (RPCA). Additional techniques, including techniques for analyzing the video for multi-resolution time-scale components, and techniques for reusing computations to allow processing of streaming video in real time, are also described herein.

  15. Iterative elimination algorithm for thermal image processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Alkali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Segmentation is employed in everyday image processing, in order to remove unwanted objects present in the image. There are scenarios where segmentation alone does not do the intended job automatically. In such cases, subjective means are required to eliminate the remnants which are time consuming especially when multiple images are involved. It is also not feasible when real-time applications are involved. This is even compounded when thermal imaging is involved as both foreground and background objects can have similar thermal distribution, thus making it impossible for straight segmentation to distinguish between the two. In this study, a real-time Iterative Elimination Algorithm (IEA was developed and it was shown that false foreground was removed in thermal images where segmentation failed to do so. The algorithm was tested on thermal images that were segmented using the inter-variance thresholding. The thermal images contained human subjects as foreground with some background objects having similar thermal distribution as the subject. Informed consent was obtained from the subject that voluntarily took part in the study. The IEA was only tested on thermal images and failed when false background object was connected to the foreground after segmentation.

  16. A New 3D Map of Milky Way Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Gregory Maurice; Schlafly, Edward; Finkbeiner, Douglas

    2018-01-01

    Interstellar dust is an important foreground for observations across a wide range of wavelengths. Dust grains scatter and absorb UV, optical and near-infrared light. These processes heat dust grains, causing them to radiate in the far-infrared. As a tracer of mass in the interstellar medium, dust correlates strongly with diffuse gamma-ray emission generated by cosmic-ray pion production. Thus, while dust makes up just 1% of the mass of the interstellar medium, it plays an outsize role in our efforts to address questions as diverse as the chemical evolution of the Milky Way galaxy and the existence of primordial B-mode polarizations in the CMB.We present a new 3D map of Milky Way dust, covering three-quarters of the sky (δ > -30°). The map is based on high-quality photometry of more than 800 million stars observed by Pan-STARRS 1, with matched photometry from 2MASS for approximately 200 million stars. We infer the distribution of dust vs. distance along sightlines with a typical angular scale of 6'. Out of the midplane of the Galaxy, our map agrees well with 2D maps based on far-infrared dust emission. After accounting for a 15% difference in scale, we find a mean scatter of approximately 10% between our map and the Planck 2D dust map, out to a depth of 0.8 mag in E(r-z). Our map can be downloaded at http://argonaut.skymaps.info.In order to extend our map, we have surveyed the southern Galactic plane with DECam, which is mounted on the 4m Blanco telescope on Cerro Tololo. The resulting survey, the Dark Energy Camera Plane Survey (DECaPS), is now publicly available. See Edward Schlafly's poster for more information on DECaPS.

  17. Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization Foreground Removal with the SKA

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chapman, E.; Bonaldi, A.; Harker, G.; Jelic, V.; Abdalla, F. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bobin, J.; Dulwich, F.; Mort, B.; Santos, M.; Starck, J. L.

    2015-01-01

    The exceptional sensitivity of the SKA will allow observations of the Cosmic Dawn and Epoch of Reionization (CD/EoR) in unprecedented detail, both spectrally and spatially. This wealth of information is buried under Galactic and extragalactic foregrounds, which must be removed accurately and

  18. Realistic simulations of the Galactic polarized foreground : consequences for 21-cm reionization detection experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelic, Vibor; Zaroubi, Saleem; Labropoulos, Panagiotis; Bernardi, Gianni; de Bruyn, A. G.; Koopmans, Leon V. E.

    2010-01-01

    Experiments designed to measure the redshifted 21-cm line from the epoch of reionization (EoR) are challenged by strong astrophysical foreground contamination, ionospheric distortions, complex instrumental response and other different types of noise (e.g. radio frequency interference). The

  19. NIC: a robust background extraction algorithm for foreground detection in dynamic scenes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huynh-The, Thien; Banos Legran, Oresti; Lee, Sungyoung; Kang, Byeong Ho; Kim, Eun-Soo; Le-Tien, Thuong

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a robust foreground detection method capable of adapting to different motion speeds in scenes. A key contribution of this paper is the background estimation using a proposed novel algorithm, neighbor-based intensity correction (NIC), that identifies and modifies the motion pixels

  20. Understanding (Galactic) Foreground Emission: A Road To Success For The LOFAR-EoR Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jelic, Vibor; Lofar Eor Team, [Unknown

    The LOFAR-EoR experiment will use the innovative technology and capabilities of the radio telescope LOFAR to study the Epoch of Reionization (EoR). However, feeble cosmological radiation is swamped by the prominent foreground emission of our Galaxy and other extragalactic radio sources. This

  1. Influence of nonlinear thermal radiation and Magnetic field on upper-convected Maxwell fluid flow due to a convectively heated stretching sheet in the presence of dust particles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koneri L. Krupalakshmi

    Full Text Available A numerical investigation of two-dimensional MHD boundary layer flow and thermal characteristics of an electrically conducting dusty non-Newtonian fluid over a convectively heated stretching sheet has been considered. The effects of nonlinear thermal radiation, heat source or sink and viscous dissipation are also taken into the account. The Rosseland approximation is used to model the nonlinear thermal radiation. Suitable similarity transformations are used to transform the flow governing equations into a set of nonlinear differential equations of one independent variable. The Shooting method is adopted to solve transformed equations. The effects of various material parameters on the flow and heat transfer in terms of velocity and temperature distributions are drawn in the form of graphs and are briefly discussed. The numerical computations for the Nusselt number and skin friction drag are also carried out for the emerging parameters of interest in the problem. The obtained numerical results show the good agreement with the existing one for limiting case.

  2. Dust as a Working Fluid for Heat Transfer Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, James G.

    2015-01-01

    The project known as "Dust as a Working Fluid" demonstrates the feasibility of a dust-based system for transferring heat radiatively into space for those space applications requiring higher efficiency, lower mass, and the need to operate in extreme vacuum and thermal environments - including operating in low or zero gravity conditions in which the dust can be conveyed much more easily than on Earth.

  3. Rocket dust storms and detached layers in the Martian atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiga, A.; Faure, J.; Madeleine, J.; Maattanen, A. E.; Forget, F.

    2012-12-01

    Airborne dust is the main climatic agent in the Martian environment. Local dust storms play a key role in the dust cycle; yet their life cycle is poorly known. Here we use mesoscale modeling with radiatively-active transported dust to predict the evolution of a local dust storm monitored by OMEGA onboard Mars Express. We show that the evolution of this dust storm is governed by deep convective motions. The supply of convective energy is provided by the absorption of incoming sunlight by dust particles, in lieu of latent heating in moist convection on Earth. We propose to use the terminology "rocket dust storm", or conio-cumulonimbus, to describe those storms in which rapid and efficient vertical transport takes place, injecting dust particles at high altitudes in the Martian troposphere (30 to 50 km). Combined to horizontal transport by large-scale winds, rocket dust storms form detached layers of dust reminiscent of those observed with instruments onboard Mars Global Surveyor and Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Detached layers are stable over several days owing to nighttime sedimentation being unable to counteract daytime convective transport, and to the resupply of convective energy at sunrise. The peak activity of rocket dust storms is expected in low-latitude regions at clear season, which accounts for the high-altitude tropical dust maximum unveiled by Mars Climate Sounder. Our findings on dust-driven deep convection have strong implications for the Martian dust cycle, thermal structure, atmospheric dynamics, cloud microphysics, chemistry, and robotic and human exploration.ensity-scaled dust optical depth at local times 1400 1600 and 1800 (lat 2.5°S, Ls 135°) hortwave heating rate at local time 1500 and latitude 2.5°S.

  4. Planck intermediate results XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.

    2016-01-01

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at h...

  5. Nuclear Weapons Effects: Dust and Air Temperature Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    The report presents a computer program for calculating the dust and air temperature environment resulting from nuclear weapons detonations. The...cessation of blast winds. Air temperature is treated as a dust-related phenomenon. The ground, heated by thermal radiation prior to arrival of the air

  6. Occupational asthma due to unheated polyvinylchloride resin dust.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, H S; Yap, J; Wang, Y T; Lee, C S; Tan, K T; Poh, S C

    1989-01-01

    Polyvinylchloride (PVC) resins are widely used in industry. Asthma due to the thermal degradation products of PVC are well documented. In this first case of occupational asthma due to unheated PVC resin dust the patient was exposed to PVC resin dust during the mixing of chemicals used for making plastic seals for bottle caps.

  7. LADEE LUNAR DUST EXPERIMENT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This archive bundle includes data taken by the Lunar Dust Experiment (LDEX) instrument aboard the Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE) spacecraft....

  8. Allergies, asthma, and dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... furnace filters frequently. Use high efficiency particulate air (HEPA) filters. When cleaning: Wipe away dust with a damp ... a week. Use a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter to help control the dust that vacuuming stirs ...

  9. Construction dust amelioration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-01

    Dust produced on seasonal road construction sites in Alaska is both a traffic safety and environmental concern. Dust emanating from : unpaved road surfaces during construction severely reduces visibility and impacts stopping sight distance, and contr...

  10. Large-scale Inference Problems in Astronomy: Building a 3D Galactic Dust Map

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkbeiner, Douglas

    2016-03-01

    The term ''Big Data'' has become trite, as modern technology has made data sets of terabytes or even petabytes easy to store. Such data sets provide a sandbox in which to develop new statistical inference techniques that can extract interesting results from increasingly rich (and large) databases. I will give an example from my work on mapping the interstellar dust of the Milky Way. 2D emission-based maps have been used for decades to estimate the reddening and emission from interstellar dust, with applications from CMB foregrounds to surveys of large-scale structure. For studies within the Milky Way, however, the third dimension is required. I will present our work on a 3D dust map based on Pan-STARRS1 and 2MASS over 3/4 of the sky (http://arxiv.org/abs/1507.01005), assess its usefulness relative to other dust maps, and discuss future work. Supported by the NSF.

  11. House-Dust Allergy

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, C A

    1982-01-01

    House-dust allergy is a common cause of perennial allergic rhinitis and extrinsic asthma. Symptoms tend to be worse when the patient is in bed. A positive skin test properly performed and interpreted confirms the diagnosis. The house-dust mite is the most important antigenic component of house-dust. Treatment consists of environmental control directed at reducing the mite content of bedroom dust, plus control of symptoms with drugs. Immunotherapy is controversial.

  12. Physics of interstellar dust

    CERN Document Server

    Krugel, Endrik

    2002-01-01

    The dielectric permeability; How to evaluate grain cross sections; Very small and very big particles; Case studies of Mie calculus; Particle statistics; The radiative transition probability; Structure and composition of dust; Dust radiation; Dust and its environment; Polarization; Grain alignment; PAHs and spectral features of dust; Radiative transport; Diffuse matter in the Milky Way; Stars and their formation; Emission from young stars. Appendices Mathematical formulae; List of symbols.

  13. Dust-off

    OpenAIRE

    Maycroft, Neil; Cheang, Shu Lea

    2015-01-01

    The fan of a motherboard switches on and off intermittently. It blows household dust, removed from the inside of a computer carcass, into the air. The dust then settles onto the motherboard, to be blown off again. This continual movement of dust is contained in the piece. However, it should remind us that the ceaseless creation and motion of unconfined dust accompanies all stages of the e-waste journey.

  14. Bayesian foreground and shadow detection in uncertain frame rate surveillance videos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, C; Sziranyi, T

    2008-04-01

    In in this paper, we propose a new model regarding foreground and shadow detection in video sequences. The model works without detailed a priori object-shape information, and it is also appropriate for low and unstable frame rate video sources. Contribution is presented in three key issues: 1) we propose a novel adaptive shadow model, and show the improvements versus previous approaches in scenes with difficult lighting and coloring effects; 2) we give a novel description for the foreground based on spatial statistics of the neighboring pixel values, which enhances the detection of background or shadow-colored object parts; 3) we show how microstructure analysis can be used in the proposed framework as additional feature components improving the results. Finally, a Markov random field model is used to enhance the accuracy of the separation. We validate our method on outdoor and indoor sequences including real surveillance videos and well-known benchmark test sets.

  15. Learning-based hierarchical graph for unsupervised matting and foreground estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Chen-Yu; Wang, Sheng-Jyh

    2014-12-01

    Automatically extracting foreground objects from a natural image remains a challenging task. This paper presents a learning-based hierarchical graph for unsupervised matting. The proposed hierarchical framework progressively condenses image data from pixels into cells, from cells into components, and finally from components into matting layers. First, in the proposed framework, a graph-based contraction process is proposed to condense image pixels into cells in order to reduce the computational loads in the subsequent processes. Cells are further mapped into matting components using spectral clustering over a learning based graph. The graph affinity is efficiently learnt from image patches of different resolutions and the inclusion of multiscale information can effectively improve the performance of spectral clustering. In the final stage of the hierarchical scheme, we propose a multilayer foreground estimation process to assemble matting components into a set of matting layers. Unlike conventional approaches, which typically address binary foreground/background partitioning, the proposed method provides a set of multilayer interpretations for unsupervised matting. Experimental results show that the proposed approach can generate more consistent and accurate results as compared with state-of-the-art techniques.

  16. Erasing the Variable: Empirical Foreground Discovery for Global 21 cm Spectrum Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Switzer, Eric R.; Liu, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Spectral measurements of the 21 cm monopole background have the promise of revealing the bulk energetic properties and ionization state of our universe from z approx. 6 - 30. Synchrotron foregrounds are orders of magnitude larger than the cosmological signal, and are the principal challenge faced by these experiments. While synchrotron radiation is thought to be spectrally smooth and described by relatively few degrees of freedom, the instrumental response to bright foregrounds may be much more complex. To deal with such complexities, we develop an approach that discovers contaminated spectral modes using spatial fluctuations of the measured data. This approach exploits the fact that foregrounds vary across the sky while the signal does not. The discovered modes are projected out of each line-of-sight of a data cube. An angular weighting then optimizes the cosmological signal amplitude estimate by giving preference to lower-noise regions. Using this method, we show that it is essential for the passband to be stable to at least approx. 10(exp -4). In contrast, the constraints on the spectral smoothness of the absolute calibration are mainly aesthetic if one is able to take advantage of spatial information. To the extent it is understood, controlling polarization to intensity leakage at the approx. 10(exp -2) level will also be essential to rejecting Faraday rotation of the polarized synchrotron emission. Subject headings: dark ages, reionization, first stars - methods: data analysis - methods: statistical

  17. Attenuation Modified by DIG and Dust as Seen in M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomičić, Neven; Kreckel, Kathryn; Schinnerer, Eva [Max Planck Institute for Astronomy (MPIA), Königstuhl 17, 69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Groves, Brent [School of Astronomy and Astrophysics, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT 2611 (Australia); Sandstrom, Karin [Center for Astrophysics and Space Sciences, Department of Physics, University of California, San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Kapala, Maria [Department of Astronomy, University of Cape Town, Republic of South Africa (South Africa); Blanc, Guillermo A. [Observatories of the Carnegie Institution for Science, 813 Santa Barbara Street, Pasadena, CA 91101 (United States); Leroy, Adam, E-mail: tomicic@mpia-hd.mpg.de [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The spatial distribution of dust in galaxies affects the global attenuation, and hence inferred properties, of galaxies. We trace the spatial distribution of dust in five approximately kiloparsec fields of M31 by comparing optical attenuation with the total dust mass distribution. We measure the attenuation from the Balmer decrement using Integral Field Spectroscopy and the dust mass from Herschel far-IR observations. Our results show that M31's dust attenuation closely follows a foreground screen model, contrary to what was previously found in other nearby galaxies. By smoothing the M31 data, we find that spatial resolution is not the cause for this difference. Based on the emission-line ratios and two simple models, we conclude that previous models of dust/gas geometry need to include a weakly or non-attenuated diffuse ionized gas (DIG) component. Due to the variation of dust and DIG scale heights with galactic radius, we conclude that different locations in galaxies will have different vertical distributions of gas and dust and therefore different measured attenuation. The difference between our result in M31 with that found in other nearby galaxies can be explained by our fields in M31 lying at larger galactic radii than the previous studies that focused on the centers of galaxies.

  18. Attenuation Modified by DIG and Dust as Seen in M31

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomičić, Neven; Kreckel, Kathryn; Groves, Brent; Schinnerer, Eva; Sandstrom, Karin; Kapala, Maria; Blanc, Guillermo A.; Leroy, Adam

    2017-08-01

    The spatial distribution of dust in galaxies affects the global attenuation, and hence inferred properties, of galaxies. We trace the spatial distribution of dust in five approximately kiloparsec fields of M31 by comparing optical attenuation with the total dust mass distribution. We measure the attenuation from the Balmer decrement using Integral Field Spectroscopy and the dust mass from Herschel far-IR observations. Our results show that M31's dust attenuation closely follows a foreground screen model, contrary to what was previously found in other nearby galaxies. By smoothing the M31 data, we find that spatial resolution is not the cause for this difference. Based on the emission-line ratios and two simple models, we conclude that previous models of dust/gas geometry need to include a weakly or non-attenuated diffuse ionized gas (DIG) component. Due to the variation of dust and DIG scale heights with galactic radius, we conclude that different locations in galaxies will have different vertical distributions of gas and dust and therefore different measured attenuation. The difference between our result in M31 with that found in other nearby galaxies can be explained by our fields in M31 lying at larger galactic radii than the previous studies that focused on the centers of galaxies.

  19. A joint analysis of Planck and BICEP2 B modes including dust polarization uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortonson, Michael J.; Seljak, Uroš

    2014-10-01

    We analyze BICEP2 and Planck data using a model that includes CMB lensing, gravity waves, and polarized dust. Recently published Planck dust polarization maps have highlighted the difficulty of estimating the amount of dust polarization in low intensity regions, suggesting that the polarization fractions have considerable uncertainties and may be significantly higher than previous predictions. In this paper, we start by assuming nothing about the dust polarization except for the power spectrum shape, which we take to be ClBB,dust propto l-2.42. The resulting joint BICEP2+Planck analysis favors solutions without gravity waves, and the upper limit on the tensor-to-scalar ratio is r0.14 are excluded with 99.5% confidence). We address the cross-correlation analysis of BICEP2 at 150 GHz with BICEP1 at 100 GHz as a test of foreground contamination. We find that the null hypothesis of dust and lensing with 0r= gives Δ χ2 < 2 relative to the hypothesis of no dust, so the frequency analysis does not strongly favor either model over the other. We also discuss how more accurate dust polarization maps may improve our constraints. If the dust polarization is measured perfectly, the limit can reach r < 0.05 (or the corresponding detection significance if the observed dust signal plus the expected lensing signal is below the BICEP2 observations), but this degrades quickly to almost no improvement if the dust calibration error is 20% or larger or if the dust maps are not processed through the BICEP2 pipeline, inducing sampling variance noise.

  20. Interstellar Dust - A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2012-01-01

    The study of the formation and the destruction processes of cosmic dust is essential to understand and to quantify the budget of extraterrestrial organic materials. Although dust with all its components plays an important role in the evolution of interstellar physics and chemistry and in the formation of organic materials, little is known on the formation and destruction processes of carbonaceous dust. Laboratory experiments that are performed under conditions that simulate interstellar and circumstellar environments to provide information on the nature, the size and the structure of interstellar dust particles, the growth and the destruction processes of interstellar dust and the resulting budget of extraterrestrial organic molecules. A review of the properties of dust and of the laboratory experiments that are conducted to study the formation processes of dust grains from molecular precursors will be given.

  1. Impact of galactic and intergalactic dust on the stellar EBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vavryčuk, V.

    2016-06-01

    Current theories assume that the low intensity of the stellar extragalactic background light (stellar EBL) is caused by finite age of the Universe because the finite-age factor limits the number of photons that have been pumped into the space by galaxies and thus the sky is dark in the night. We oppose this opinion and show that two main factors are responsible for the extremely low intensity of the observed stellar EBL. The first factor is a low mean surface brightness of galaxies, which causes a low luminosity density in the local Universe. The second factor is light extinction due to absorption by galactic and intergalactic dust. Dust produces a partial opacity of galaxies and of the Universe. The galactic opacity reduces the intensity of light from more distant background galaxies obscured by foreground galaxies. The inclination-averaged values of the effective extinction AV for light passing through a galaxy is about 0.2 mag. This causes that distant background galaxies become apparently faint and do not contribute to the EBL significantly. In addition, light of distant galaxies is dimmed due to absorption by intergalactic dust. Even a minute intergalactic opacity of 1 × 10^{-2} mag per Gpc is high enough to produce significant effects on the EBL. As a consequence, the EBL is comparable with or lower than the mean surface brightness of galaxies. Comparing both extinction effects, the impact of the intergalactic opacity on the EBL is more significant than the obscuration of distant galaxies by partially opaque foreground galaxies by factor of 10 or more. The absorbed starlight heats up the galactic and intergalactic dust and is further re-radiated at IR, FIR and micro-wave spectrum. Assuming static infinite universe with no galactic or intergalactic dust, the stellar EBL should be as high as the surface brightness of stars. However, if dust is considered, the predicted stellar EBL is about 290 nW m^{-2} sr^{-1}, which is only 5 times higher than the observed

  2. The origin of dust polarization in molecular outflows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reissl, S.; Seifried, D.; Wolf, S.; Banerjee, R.; Klessen, R. S.

    2017-07-01

    Aims: Polarization measurements of dust grains aligned with the magnetic field direction are an established technique for tracing large-scale field structures. In this paper we present a case study to investigate the conditions that need to be met to detect a characteristic magnetic field substructure that is embedded in such a large-scale field. A helical magnetic field with a surrounding hourglass-shaped field is expected from theoretical predictions and self-consistent magnetohydrodynamical (MHD) simulations to be present in the specific case of protostellar outflows. Hence, such an outflow environment is the perfect environment for our study. Methods: We present synthetic polarization maps in the infrared and millimeter regime of simulations of protostellar outflows. The simulations were performed with the newly developed radiative transfer and polarization code POLARIS. The code is the first to include a self-consistent description of various alignment mechanisms such as the imperfect Davis-Greenstein (IDG) and the radiative torque (RAT) alignment. We investigated the effects of the grain size distribution, inclination, and applied alignment mechanism. Results: We find that the IDG mechanism cannot produce any measurable polarization degree (≥1%), whereas the RAT alignment produced polarization degrees of a few percent. Furthermore, we developed a method for identifying the origin of the polarization. We show that the helical magnetic field in the outflow can only be observed close to the outflow axis and at its tip, whereas in the surrounding regions the hourglass field in the foreground dominates the polarization. Furthermore, the polarization degree in the outflow lobe is lower than in the surroundings, in agreement with observations. We also find that the orientation of the polarization vector flips around at about a few hundred micrometers because of the transition from dichroic extinction to thermal re-emission. In order to avoid ambiguities when

  3. Combustibility Determination for Cotton Gin Dust and Almond Huller Dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughs, Sidney E; Wakelyn, Phillip J

    2017-04-26

    It has been documented that some dusts generated while processing agricultural products, such as grain and sugar, can constitute combustible dust hazards. After a catastrophic dust explosion in a sugar refinery in 2008, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) initiated action to develop a mandatory standard to comprehensively address the fire and explosion hazards of combustible dusts. Cotton fiber and related materials from cotton ginning, in loose form, can support smoldering combustion if ignited by an outside source. However, dust fires and other more hazardous events, such as dust explosions, are unknown in the cotton ginning industry. Dust material that accumulates inside cotton gins and almond huller plants during normal processing was collected for testing to determine combustibility. Cotton gin dust is composed of greater than 50% inert inorganic mineral dust (ash content), while almond huller dust is composed of at least 7% inert inorganic material. Inorganic mineral dust is not a combustible dust. The collected samples of cotton gin dust and almond huller dust were sieved to a known particle size range for testing to determine combustibility potential. Combustibility testing was conducted on the cotton gin dust and almond huller dust samples using the UN test for combustibility suggested in NFPA 652.. This testing indicated that neither the cotton gin dust nor the almond huller dust should be considered combustible dusts (i.e., not a Division 4.1 flammable hazard per 49 CFR 173.124). Copyright© by the American Society of Agricultural Engineers.

  4. Background noise exerts diverse effects on the cortical encoding of foreground sounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malone, B J; Heiser, Marc A; Beitel, Ralph E; Schreiner, Christoph E

    2017-08-01

    In natural listening conditions, many sounds must be detected and identified in the context of competing sound sources, which function as background noise. Traditionally, noise is thought to degrade the cortical representation of sounds by suppressing responses and increasing response variability. However, recent studies of neural network models and brain slices have shown that background synaptic noise can improve the detection of signals. Because acoustic noise affects the synaptic background activity of cortical networks, it may improve the cortical responses to signals. We used spike train decoding techniques to determine the functional effects of a continuous white noise background on the responses of clusters of neurons in auditory cortex to foreground signals, specifically frequency-modulated sweeps (FMs) of different velocities, directions, and amplitudes. Whereas the addition of noise progressively suppressed the FM responses of some cortical sites in the core fields with decreasing signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs), the stimulus representation remained robust or was even significantly enhanced at specific SNRs in many others. Even though the background noise level was typically not explicitly encoded in cortical responses, significant information about noise context could be decoded from cortical responses on the basis of how the neural representation of the foreground sweeps was affected. These findings demonstrate significant diversity in signal in noise processing even within the core auditory fields that could support noise-robust hearing across a wide range of listening conditions. NEW & NOTEWORTHY The ability to detect and discriminate sounds in background noise is critical for our ability to communicate. The neural basis of robust perceptual performance in noise is not well understood. We identified neuronal populations in core auditory cortex of squirrel monkeys that differ in how they process foreground signals in background noise and that may

  5. Foreground removal from Planck Sky Model temperature maps using a MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik; Hebert, K.

    2009-01-01

    with no systematic errors. To demonstrate the feasibility of a simple multilayer perceptron (MLP) neural network for extracting the CMB temperature signal, we have analyzed a specific data set, namely the Planck Sky Model maps, developed for evaluation of different component separation methods before including them...... in the Planck data analysis pipeline. It is found that a MLP neural network can provide a CMB map of about 80% of the sky to a very high degree uncorrelated with the foreground components. Also the derived power spectrum shows little evidence for systematic errors....

  6. Saharan dust detection using multi-sensor satellite measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sriharsha Madhavan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary scientists have vested interest in trying to understand the climatology of the North Atlantic Basin since this region is considered as the genesis for hurricane formation that eventually get shipped to the tropical Atlantic region and the Caribbean. The effects of atmospheric water cycle and the climate of West Africa and the Atlantic basin are hugely impacted by the radiative forcing of Saharan dust. The focus area in this paper would be to improve the dust detection schemes by employing the use of multi sensor measurements in the thermal emissive wavelengths using legacy sensors such as Terra (T and Aqua (A MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS, fusing with Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI. Previous work by Hao and Qu (2007 had considered a limited number of thermal infrared channels which led to a correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.765 between the Aerosol Optical Thickness (AOT at 550 nm and the modeled dust index. In this work, we extend the thermal infrared based dust detection by employing additional channels: the 8.55 μm which has shown high sensitivity to the Saharan dust, along with water vapor channel of 7.1 μm and cloud top channel of 13.1 μm. Also, the dust pixels were clearly identified using the OMI based aerosol types. The dust pixels were cleanly segregated from the other aerosol types such as sulfates, biomass, and other carbonaceous aerosols. These improvements led to a much higher correlation coefficient R2 value of 0.85 between the modified dust index and the AOT in comparison to the previous work. The key limitations from the current AOT products based on MODIS and were put to test by validating the improved dust detection algorithm. Two improvements were noted. First, the dust measurement radiometry using MODIS is significantly improved by at least an order of 2. Second the spatial measurements are enhanced by a factor of at least 10.

  7. The Complexities of Interstellar Dust and the Implications for the Small-scale Structure in the Cosmic Microwave Background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verschuur, G. L.; Schmelz, J. T.

    2018-02-01

    A detailed comparison of the full range of PLANCK and Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe data for small (2° × 2°) areas of sky and the Cosmic Microwave Background Internal Linear Combination (ILC) maps reveals that the structure of foreground dust may be more complex than previously thought. If 857 and 353 GHz emission is dominated by galactic dust at a distance investigation of these data will lead to a definitive answer to the question above and, possibly, to new scientific insights on interstellar matter, the Cosmic Microwave Background, or both.

  8. Communication plan for windblown dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Windblown dust events occur in Arizona, and blowing dust has been considered a contributing factor to serious crashes on the : segment of Interstate 10 (I10) between Phoenix and Tucson, as well as on other Arizona roadways. Arizonas dust events...

  9. An Improved Statistical Point-source Foreground Model for the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, S. G.; Trott, C. M.; Jordan, C. H.

    2017-08-01

    We present a sophisticated statistical point-source foreground model for low-frequency radio Epoch of Reionization (EoR) experiments using the 21 cm neutral hydrogen emission line. Motivated by our understanding of the low-frequency radio sky, we enhance the realism of two model components compared with existing models: the source count distributions as a function of flux density and spatial position (source clustering), extending current formalisms for the foreground covariance of 2D power-spectral modes in 21 cm EoR experiments. The former we generalize to an arbitrarily broken power law, and the latter to an arbitrary isotropically correlated field. This paper presents expressions for the modified covariance under these extensions, and shows that for a more realistic source spatial distribution, extra covariance arises in the EoR window that was previously unaccounted for. Failure to include this contribution can yield bias in the final power-spectrum and under-estimate uncertainties, potentially leading to a false detection of signal. The extent of this effect is uncertain, owing to ignorance of physical model parameters, but we show that it is dependent on the relative abundance of faint sources, to the effect that our extension will become more important for future deep surveys. Finally, we show that under some parameter choices, ignoring source clustering can lead to false detections on large scales, due to both the induced bias and an artificial reduction in the estimated measurement uncertainty.

  10. Foreground marker controlled watershed on digital radiographic image for weld discontinuity detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd Halim, Suhaila; Zahid, Akhma; Abdul Razak, Nurul Syafinaz; Ibrahim, Arsmah; Manurung, Yupiter HP; Jayes, Mohd Idris

    2013-04-01

    Radiography is one of the most common and widely used non-destructive testing (NDT) technique in inspecting weld discontinuity in welded joints. Conventionally, radiography inspector is requires to do the inspection analysis manually on weld discontinuity based on visual characteristics such as location, shape, length and density. The results can be very subjective, time consuming and inconsistent. Hence, semi-automated inspection using digital image processing and segmentation technique can be applied for weld discontinuity detection. The goal of this work is to detect the weld discontinuity on digital radiographic image using Foreground Marker Controlled Watershed. It is usually implemented in image processing because it always generates closed contour for each region in the image. In this paper, image enhancement on radiographic image is aim to remove image noise and improve image contrast. Then, marker controlled watershed with foreground markers is applied on the image to detect the discontinuity. The accuracy of the technique is evaluated using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) curve. The accuracy of the technique has been compared with the ground truth and the result shows that the accuracy is 67% and area under the curve is 0.7134. The application of image processing technique in detecting weld discontinuity is able to assist radiographer to improve the inconsistent results in evaluating the radiographic image.

  11. Using binocular rivalry to tag foreground sounds: Towards an objective visual measure for auditory multistability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einhäuser, Wolfgang; Thomassen, Sabine; Bendixen, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    In binocular rivalry, paradigms have been proposed for unobtrusive moment-by-moment readout of observers' perceptual experience ("no-report paradigms"). Here, we take a first step to extend this concept to auditory multistability. Observers continuously reported which of two concurrent tone sequences they perceived in the foreground: high-pitch (1008 Hz) or low-pitch (400 Hz) tones. Interstimulus intervals were either fixed per sequence (Experiments 1 and 2) or random with tones alternating (Experiment 3). A horizontally drifting grating was presented to each eye; to induce binocular rivalry, gratings had distinct colors and motion directions. To associate each grating with one tone sequence, a pattern on the grating jumped vertically whenever the respective tone occurred. We found that the direction of the optokinetic nystagmus (OKN)-induced by the visually dominant grating-could be used to decode the tone (high/low) that was perceived in the foreground well above chance. This OKN-based readout improved after observers had gained experience with the auditory task (Experiments 1 and 2) and for simpler auditory tasks (Experiment 3). We found no evidence that the visual stimulus affected auditory multistability. Although decoding performance is still far from perfect, our paradigm may eventually provide a continuous estimate of the currently dominant percept in auditory multistability.

  12. Dust in Space

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    "They cannot look out far·IThey cannot look in deep. I. But when was that ever a bar ITo any watch they keep?" - Robert Frost, (Neither Out Far Nor In Deep'. Dust grains in space, which absorb and redden starlight, were once considered to be a nuisance for astronomers, but the study of dust has be- come important in ...

  13. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M L; Organiscak, J; Klima, S; Perera, I E

    2017-05-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH's Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners' exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device.

  14. Respirable dust measured downwind during rock dust application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, M.L.; Organiscak, J.; Klima, S.; Perera, I.E.

    2017-01-01

    The Pittsburgh Mining Research Division of the U.S. National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) conducted underground evaluations in an attempt to quantify respirable rock dust generation when using untreated rock dust and rock dust treated with an anticaking additive. Using personal dust monitors, these evaluations measured respirable rock dust levels arising from a flinger-type application of rock dust on rib and roof surfaces. Rock dust with a majority of the respirable component removed was also applied in NIOSH’s Bruceton Experimental Mine using a bantam duster. The respirable dust measurements obtained downwind from both of these tests are presented and discussed. This testing did not measure miners’ exposure to respirable coal mine dust under acceptable mining practices, but indicates the need for effective continuous administrative controls to be exercised when rock dusting to minimize the measured amount of rock dust in the sampling device. PMID:28706322

  15. Simulating Mars' Dust Cycle with a Mars General Circulation Model: Effects of Water Ice Cloud Formation on Dust Lifting Strength and Seasonality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Haberle, Robert; Hollingsworth, Jeffery L.

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere [1,2,3]. Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer [4]. Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across [5]. Regional storm activity is enhanced before northern winter solstice (Ls200 degrees - 240 degrees), and after northern solstice (Ls305 degrees - 340 degrees ), which produces elevated atmospheric dust loadings during these periods [5,6,7]. These pre- and post- solstice increases in dust loading are thought to be associated with transient eddy activity in the northern hemisphere with cross-equatorial transport of dust leading to enhanced dust lifting in the southern hemisphere [6]. Interactive dust cycle studies with Mars General Circulation Models (MGCMs) have included the lifting, transport, and sedimentation of radiatively active dust. Although the predicted global dust loadings from these simulations capture some aspects of the observed dust cycle, there are marked differences between the simulated and observed dust cycles [8,9,10]. Most notably, the maximum dust loading is robustly predicted by models to occur near northern winter solstice and is due to dust lifting associated with down slope flows on the flanks of the Hellas basin. Thus far, models have had difficulty simulating the observed pre- and post- solstice peaks in dust loading.

  16. The Dust Emissivity Spectral Index in Cores and Filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnee, Scott; Chitsazzadeh, Shadi; Di Francesco, James; Friesen, Rachel; Makiwa, Gibion; Mason, Brian; Naylor, David; van der Wiel, Matthijs H. D.; Stanke, Thomas

    2013-07-01

    Thermal dust emission is a tracer of mass within star-forming regions, so continuum maps trace the distribution of dense material involved in the star formation process. Deriving the mass from measurements of dust continuum emission is complicated by also needing to know (or simultaneously determine) the dust temperature and dust opacity. This opacity has a frequency dependence in the form of a power law, with the exponent called the emissivity spectral index. By deriving accurate values of the emissivity spectral index, we will be able to determine more accurate core masses, temperatures, and the dust grain size distribution. Here we present a preliminary analysis of the emissivity spectral index in the OMC-2/3 filament and a sample of nearby starless and protostellar cores.

  17. Positive response of Indian summer rainfall to Middle East dust

    KAUST Repository

    Jin, Qinjian

    2014-06-02

    Using observational and reanalyses data, we investigated the impact of dust aerosols over the Middle East and the Arabian Sea (AS) on the Indian summer monsoon (ISM) rainfall. Satellite and aerosol reanalysis data show extremely heavy aerosol loading, mainly mineral dust, over the Middle East and AS during the ISM season. Multivariate empirical orthogonal function analyses suggest an aerosol-monsoon connection. This connection may be attributed to dust-induced atmospheric heating centered over the Iranian Plateau (IP), which enhances the meridional thermal contrast and strengthens the ISM circulation and rainfall. The enhanced circulation further transports more dust to the AS and IP, heating the atmosphere (positive feedback). The aerosols over the AS and the Arabian Peninsula have a significant correlation with rainfall over central and eastern India about 2 weeks later. This finding highlights the nonlocal radiative effect of dust on the ISM circulation and rainfall and may improve ISM rainfall forecasts. © 2014. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  18. Study of Dust Accumulation on Air Cooled Heat Sink with Fan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsushima, Hitoshi; Ohashi, Shigeo

    We have studied about dust accumulation on a heat sink with fan used for mobile PC. We found the mixture of wool fragments and cotton linter was suitable as a test dust for present study. Experimental result showed rapid reduction of dust accumulation between fin gap of 1.3 mm to 2.0 mm when increased the fin gap. We have found that the structure that set opening above and parallel to the heat sink reduced the dust accumulation effectively instead of increasing thermal resistance of fan heat sink so much. And, the structure could keep the thermal resistance constant for long time.

  19. Rapid formation of large dust grains in the luminous supernova 2010jl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Christa; Hjorth, Jens; Watson, Darach; Dwek, Eli; Maund, Justyn R; Fox, Ori; Leloudas, Giorgos; Malesani, Daniele; Day-Jones, Avril C

    2014-07-17

    The origin of dust in galaxies is still a mystery. The majority of the refractory elements are produced in supernova explosions, but it is unclear how and where dust grains condense and grow, and how they avoid destruction in the harsh environments of star-forming galaxies. The recent detection of 0.1 to 0.5 solar masses of dust in nearby supernova remnants suggests in situ dust formation, while other observations reveal very little dust in supernovae in the first few years after explosion. Observations of the spectral evolution of the bright SN 2010jl have been interpreted as pre-existing dust, dust formation or no dust at all. Here we report the rapid (40 to 240 days) formation of dust in its dense circumstellar medium. The wavelength-dependent extinction of this dust reveals the presence of very large (exceeding one micrometre) grains, which resist destruction. At later times (500 to 900 days), the near-infrared thermal emission shows an accelerated growth in dust mass, marking the transition of the dust source from the circumstellar medium to the ejecta. This provides the link between the early and late dust mass evolution in supernovae with dense circumstellar media.

  20. Discovery of nucler tracks in interplanetary dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J P; Brownlee, D E; Fraundorf, P

    1984-12-21

    Nuclear tracks have been identified in interplanetary dust particles (IDP's) collected from the stratosphere. The presence of tracks unambiguously confirms the extraterrestrial nature of IDP's, and the high track densities (10(10) to 10(11) per square centimeter) suggest an exposure age of approximately 10(4) years within the inner solar system. Tracks also provide an upper temperature limit for the heating of IDP's during atmospheric entry, thereby making it possible to distinguish between pristine and thermally modified micrometeorites.

  1. Desert Dust Satellite Retrieval Intercomparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carboni, E.; Thomas, G. E.; Sayer, A. M.; Siddans, R.; Poulsen, C. A.; Grainger, R. G.; Ahn, C.; Antoine, D.; Bevan, S.; Braak, R.; hide

    2012-01-01

    This work provides a comparison of satellite retrievals of Saharan desert dust aerosol optical depth (AOD) during a strong dust event through March 2006. In this event, a large dust plume was transported over desert, vegetated, and ocean surfaces. The aim is to identify and understand the differences between current algorithms, and hence improve future retrieval algorithms. The satellite instruments considered are AATSR, AIRS, MERIS, MISR, MODIS, OMI, POLDER, and SEVIRI. An interesting aspect is that the different algorithms make use of different instrument characteristics to obtain retrievals over bright surfaces. These include multi-angle approaches (MISR, AATSR), polarisation measurements (POLDER), single-view approaches using solar wavelengths (OMI, MODIS), and the thermal infrared spectral region (SEVIRI, AIRS). Differences between instruments, together with the comparison of different retrieval algorithms applied to measurements from the same instrument, provide a unique insight into the performance and characteristics of the various techniques employed. As well as the intercomparison between different satellite products, the AODs have also been compared to co-located AERONET data. Despite the fact that the agreement between satellite and AERONET AODs is reasonably good for all of the datasets, there are significant differences between them when compared to each other, especially over land. These differences are partially due to differences in the algorithms, such as as20 sumptions about aerosol model and surface properties. However, in this comparison of spatially and temporally averaged data, at least as significant as these differences are sampling issues related to the actual footprint of each instrument on the heterogeneous aerosol field, cloud identification and the quality control flags of each dataset.

  2. Time course of competition for visual processing resources between emotional pictures and foreground task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias M; Andersen, Søren K; Keil, Andreas

    2008-08-01

    High-arousing emotional stimuli facilitate early visual cortex, thereby acting as strong competitors for processing resources in visual cortex. The present study used an electrophysiological approach for continuously measuring the time course of competition for processing resources in the visual pathway arising from emotionally salient but task-irrelevant input while performing a foreground target detection task. Steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) were recorded to rapidly flickering squares superimposed upon neutral and emotionally high-arousing pictures, and variations in SSVEP amplitude over time were calculated. As reflected in SSVEP amplitude and target detection rates, arousing emotional background pictures withdrew processing resources from the detection task compared with neutral ones for several hundred milliseconds after stimulus onset. SSVEP amplitude was found to bear a close temporal relationship with accurate target detection as a function of time after stimulus onset.

  3. Foreground removal from WMAP 5 yr temperature maps using an MLP neural network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard-Nielsen, Hans Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    CMB signal makes it essential to minimize the systematic errors in the CMB temperature determinations. Methods. The feasibility of using simple neural networks to extract the CMB signal from detailed simulated data has already been demonstrated. Here, simple neural networks are applied to the WMAP 5...... yr temperature data without using any auxiliary data. Results. A simple multilayer perceptron neural network with two hidden layers provides temperature estimates over more than 75 per cent of the sky with random errors significantly below those previously extracted from these data. Also......, the systematic errors, i.e. errors correlated with the Galactic foregrounds, are very small. Conclusions. With these results the neural network method is well prepared for dealing with the high-quality CMB data from the ESA Planck Surveyor satellite. © ESO, 2010....

  4. The aeolian dust accumulation curve

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goossens, D.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents a simple physical concept of aeolian dust accumulation, based on the behaviour of the subprocesses of dust deposition and dust erosion. The concept is tested in an aeolian dust wind tunnel. The agreement between the accumulation curve predicted by the model and the accumulation

  5. Electrodynamic Dust Shield for Space Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackey, Paul J.; Johansen, Michael R.; Olsen, Robert C.; Raines, Matthew G.; Phillips, James R., III; Cox, Rachel E.; Hogue, Michael D.; Calle, Carlos I.; Pollard, Jacob R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Exploration Coordination Group (ISECG) has chosen dust mitigation technology as a Global Exploration Roadmap (GER) critical technology need in order to reduce life cycle cost and risk, and increase the probability of mission success. NASA has also included Particulate Contamination Prevention and Mitigation as a cross-cutting technology to be developed for contamination prevention, cleaning and protection. This technology has been highlighted due to the detrimental effect of dust on both human and robotic missions. During manned Apollo missions, dust caused issues with both equipment and crew. Contamination of equipment caused many issues including incorrect instrument readings and increased temperatures due to masking of thermal radiators. The astronauts were directly affected by dust that covered space suits, obscured face shields and later propagated to the cabin and into the crew's eyes and lungs. Robotic missions on Mars were affected when solar panels were obscured by dust thereby reducing the effectiveness of the solar panels. The Electrostatics and Surface Physics Lab in Swamp Works at the Kennedy Space Center has been developing an Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) to remove dust from multiple surfaces, including glass shields and thermal radiators. This technology has been tested in lab environments and has evolved over several years. Tests of the technology include reduced gravity flights (6g) in which Apollo Lunar dust samples were successfully removed from glass shields while under vacuum (1 millipascal). Further development of the technology is underway to reduce the size of the EDS as well as to perform material and component testing outside of the International Space Station (ISS) on the Materials on International Space Station Experiment X (MISSE-X). This experiment is designed to verify that the EDS can withstand the harsh environment of space and will look to closely replicate the solar environment experienced on the moon

  6. The Foregrounding Function of Praesens Historicum in Russian Translated Adventure Narratives (20th Century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasia V. Urzha

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research focuses on the functioning of praesens historicum forms which Russian translators use to substitute for English narrative forms referring to past events. The study applies the Theory of Grounding and Russian Communicative Functional Grammar to the comparative discourse analysis of English-language adventure stories and novels created in the 19th and 20th centuries and their Russian translations. The Theory of Grounding is still not widely used in Russian translation studies, nor have its concepts and fruitful ideas been related to the achievements of Russian Narratology and Functional Grammar. This article presents an attempt to find a common basis in these academic traditions as they relate to discourse analysis and to describe the role of praesens historicum forms in Russian translated adventure narratives. The corpus includes 22 original texts and 72 Russian translations, and the case study involves six Russian translations of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, focusing on the translation made by Korney Chukovsky, who employed historic present more often than in other translations of the novel. It is shown that the translation strategy of substituting the original English-language past forms with Russian present forms is realized in foregrounded and focalized segments of the text, giving them additional saliency. This strategy relates the use of historic present to the functions of deictic words and words denoting visual or audial perception, locating the deictic center of the narrative in the spacetime of the events and allowing the reader to join the focalizing WHO (a narrator or a hero. Translations that regularly mark the foreground through the use of the historic present and accompanying lexical-grammatical means are often addressed to young readers.

  7. Mechanisms of metal dusting corrosion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hummelshøj, Thomas Strabo

    In this thesis the early stages of metal dusting corrosion is addressed; the development of carbon expanded austenite, C, and the decomposition hereof into carbides. Later stages of metal dusting corrosion are explored by a systematic study of stainless steel foils exposed to metal dusting...... influence of oxygen and carbon on the metal dusting corrosion is explored. The results indicate that exposure to metal dusting conditions have a detrimental effect on the resistance against oxidation and, conversely, that exposure to oxidation has a detrimental effect on the resistance towards metal dusting....... Consequently, a combination of carburizing and oxidizing conditions has a strong mutual catalyzing effect on the metal dusting corrosion....

  8. Nano Dust Analyzer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a new highly sensitive instrument to confirm the existence of the so-called nano-dust particles, characterize their impact parameters, and...

  9. The Lunar Dust Pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Kip; Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Farrell, William M.

    2011-01-01

    Shadowed regions on the lunar surface acquire a negative potential. In particular, shadowed craters can have a negative potential with respect to the surrounding lunar regolith in sunlight, especially near the terminator regions. Here we analyze the motion of a positively charged lnnar dust grain in the presence of a shadowed crater at a negative potential in vacuum. Previous models describing the transport of charged lunar dust close to the surface have typically been limited to one-dimensional motion in the vertical direction, e.g. electrostatic levitation; however. the electric fields in the vicinity of shadowed craters will also have significant components in the horizontal directions. We propose a model that includes both the horizontal and vertical motion of charged dust grains near shadowed craters. We show that the dust grains execute oscillatory trajectories and present an expression for the period of oscillation drawing an analogy to the motion of a pendulum.

  10. Dust mite (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a magnified photograph of a dust mite. Mites are carriers (vectors) of many important diseases including typhus (scrub and murine) and rickettsialpox. (Image courtesy of the Centers for Disease ...

  11. Adhesion of Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, Otis R.

    2007-01-01

    This paper reviews the physical characteristics of lunar dust and the effects of various fundamental forces acting on dust particles on surfaces in a lunar environment. There are transport forces and adhesion forces after contact. Mechanical forces (i.e., from rover wheels, astronaut boots and rocket engine blast) and static electric effects (from UV photo-ionization and/or tribo-electric charging) are likely to be the major contributors to the transport of dust particles. If fine regolith particles are deposited on a surface, then surface energy-related (e.g., van der Walls) adhesion forces and static-electric-image forces are likely to be the strongest contributors to adhesion. Some measurement techniques are offered to quantify the strength of adhesion forces. And finally some dust removal techniques are discussed.

  12. Cosmic Dust Catalog

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Since May 1981, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has used aircraft to collect cosmic dust (CD) particles from Earth's stratosphere. Specially...

  13. Effect of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation on dust ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The effects of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation of dust grains on the small but finite amplitude nonlinear dust ion-acoustic shock waves, in an unmagnetized multi-ion dusty plasma which contains negative ions, positive ions and electrons, are studied in this paper. A Burgers equation and its stationary ...

  14. Planck intermediate results. XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Ballardini, M.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Basak, S.; Benabed, K.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Carron, J.; Chiang, H. C.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Comis, B.; Couchot, F.; Coulais, A.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; de Bernardis, P.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Di Valentino, E.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Ducout, A.; Dupac, X.; Dusini, S.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Fantaye, Y.; Finelli, F.; Forastieri, F.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Génova-Santos, R. T.; Gerbino, M.; Ghosh, T.; Giraud-Héraud, Y.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Gudmundsson, J. E.; Hansen, F. K.; Helou, G.; Henrot-Versillé, S.; Herranz, D.; Hivon, E.; Huang, Z.; Jaffe, A. H.; Jones, W. C.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kiiveri, K.; Kisner, T. S.; Krachmalnicoff, N.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Langer, M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Le Jeune, M.; Levrier, F.; Lilje, P. B.; Lilley, M.; Lindholm, V.; López-Caniego, M.; Ma, Y.-Z.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maggio, G.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Mangilli, A.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Matarrese, S.; Mauri, N.; McEwen, J. D.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Molinari, D.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Moss, A.; Natoli, P.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Paoletti, D.; Patanchon, G.; Perdereau, O.; Perotto, L.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Plaszczynski, S.; Polastri, L.; Polenta, G.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Racine, B.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renzi, A.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Ruiz-Granados, B.; Salvati, L.; Sandri, M.; Savelainen, M.; Scott, D.; Sirignano, C.; Sirri, G.; Soler, J. D.; Spencer, L. D.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Tauber, J. A.; Tavagnacco, D.; Tenti, M.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Trombetti, T.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, F.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Vittorio, N.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-12-01

    Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combination (GNILC) method, which uses spatial information (the angular powerspectra) to disentangle the Galactic dust emission and CIB anisotropies. We produce significantly improved all-sky maps of Planck thermal dust emission, with reduced CIB contamination, at 353, 545, and 857 GHz. By reducing the CIB contamination of the thermal dust maps, we provide more accurate estimates of the local dust temperature and dust spectral index over the sky with reduced dispersion, especially at high Galactic latitudes above b = ±20°. We find that the dust temperature is T = (19.4 ± 1.3) K and the dust spectral index is β = 1.6 ± 0.1 averaged over the whole sky, while T = (19.4 ± 1.5) K and β = 1.6 ± 0.2 on 21% of the sky at high latitudes. Moreover, subtracting the new CIB-removed thermal dust maps from the CMB-removed Planck maps gives access to the CIB anisotropies over 60% of the sky at Galactic latitudes |b| > 20°. Because they are a significant improvement over previous Planck products, the GNILC maps are recommended for thermal dust science. The new CIB maps can be regarded as indirect tracers of the dark matter and they are recommended for exploring cross-correlations with lensing and large-scale structure optical surveys. The reconstructed GNILC thermal dust and CIB maps are delivered as Planck products.

  15. Selecting baghouse dust collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, S.; Rubak, J.; Jolin, M. [Farr Co., El Segundo, CA (United States)]|[Farr Co., Laval, Quebec (Canada)

    1996-10-01

    Control of nuisance or process dusts generated within a plant is a vital concern with today`s growing emphasis on indoor air quality. In the past, many companies simply moved these contaminants away from workers and discharged them into the atmosphere. More stringent pollution control requirements now make this course of action unacceptable. Also, in some cases there is a need to recover high-value dusts, such as chemicals or precious metals. As a result, proper design and selection of a dust collection system are more critical than ever. There are two types of fabric filter dust collection systems commonly used today: baghouses and cartridges. Baghouses were the first collection systems with fabric media (in the form of long tubes, or bags) for removal of contaminants. The versatility of the baghouse--coupled with constant technological refinements--have made it a long-standing favorite among specifiers of pollution control equipment. In fact, baghouses account for more than 80% of all fabric filter dust collection systems in use today. Cartridge dust collectors use rigidly pleated filter elements instead of bags, making it possible to accommodate a large amount of filter surface area in a comparatively small package. Cartridge collectors also offer high efficiency and low pressure drop.

  16. Newton to Einstein - dust to dust

    OpenAIRE

    Kopp, Michael; Uhlemann, Cora; Haugg, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the relation between the standard Newtonian equations for a pressureless fluid (dust) and the Einstein equations in a double expansion in small scales and small metric perturbations. We find that parts of the Einstein equations can be rewritten as a closed system of two coupled differential equations for the scalar and transverse vector metric perturbations in Poisson gauge. It is then shown that this system is equivalent to the Newtonian system of continuity and Euler equation...

  17. Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. P.

    2003-12-01

    micrometeorites) containing layer silicates indicative of parent-body aqueous alteration and the more distant anhydrous P and D asteroids exhibiting no evidence of (aqueous) alteration (Gradie and Tedesco, 1982). This gradation in spectral properties presumably extends several hundred AU out to the Kuiper belt, the source region of most short-period comets, where the distinction between comets and outer asteroids may simply be one of the orbital parameters ( Luu, 1993; Brownlee, 1994; Jessberger et al., 2001). The mineralogy and petrography of meteorites provides direct confirmation of aqueous alteration, melting, fractionation, and thermal metamorphism among the inner asteroids ( Zolensky and McSween, 1988; Farinella et al., 1993; Brearley and Jones, 1998). Because the most common grains in the ISM (silicates and carbonaceous matter) are not as refractory as those found in meteorites, it is unlikely that they have survived in significant quantities in meteorites. Despite a prolonged search, not a single presolar silicate grain has yet been identified in any meteorite.Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) are the smallest and most fine-grained meteoritic objects available for laboratory investigation (Figure 1). In contrast to meteorites, IDPs are derived from a broad range of dust-producing bodies extending from the inner main belt of the asteroids to the Kuiper belt (Flynn, 1996, 1990; Dermott et al., 1994; Liou et al., 1996). After release from their asteroidal or cometary parent bodies the orbits of IDPs evolve by Poynting-Robertson (PR) drag (the combined influence of light pressure and radiation drag) ( Dermott et al., 2001). Irrespective of the location of their parent bodies nearly all IDPs under the influence of PR drag can eventually reach Earth-crossing orbits. IDPs are collected in the stratosphere at 20-25 km altitude using NASA ER2 aircraft ( Sandford, 1987; Warren and Zolensky, 1994). Laboratory measurements of implanted rare gases, solar flare tracks ( Figure 2

  18. The Mars Dust Cycle: Investigating the Effects of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Surface Stresses and Dust Lifting Potential with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is a critically important component of Mars' current climate system. Dust is present in the atmosphere of Mars year-round but the dust loading varies with season in a generally repeatable manner. Dust has a significant influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation. The dust cycle is the most difficult of the three climate cycles (CO2, water, and dust) to model realistically with general circulation models. Until recently, numerical modeling investigations of the dust cycle have typically not included the effects of couplings to the water cycle through cloud formation. In the Martian atmosphere, dust particles likely provide the seed nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation of water ice clouds. As ice coats atmospheric dust grains, the newly formed cloud particles exhibit different physical and radiative characteristics. Thus, the coupling between the dust and water cycles likely affects the distributions of dust, water vapor and water ice, and thus atmospheric heating and cooling and the resulting circulations. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to investigate the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on surface stress and the potential for dust lifting. The model includes a state-of-the-art water ice cloud microphysics package and a radiative transfer scheme that accounts for the radiative effects of CO2 gas, dust, and water ice clouds. We focus on simulations that are radiatively forced by a prescribed dust map, and we compare simulations that do and do not include radiatively active clouds. Preliminary results suggest that the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface stress (and thus dust lifting potential) are substantial influenced by the radiative effects of water ice clouds.

  19. Reconstruction of Holocene and LGM atmospheric dust aerosol concentrations from paleoclimatic archives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, F.; Kug, J. S.; Park, R. J.; Mahowald, N.; Abe-Ouchi, A.; O'Ishi, R.; Winckler, G.; Takemura, T.

    2012-04-01

    Atmospheric mineral dust aerosols affect the global climate by scattering and absorbing solar and thermal radiation, as well as providing micronutrients to primary production regions. Present and past global atmospheric dust concentrations have so far been deduced from model simulations. We present a new estimate of atmospheric dust concentrations and dust aerosol radiative forcing based on measurements of dust deposition in paleoclimate archives (mainly the DIRTMAP 3 dataset). Using a kriging technique, the dust deposition data from terrestrial, marine, and ice core records was interpolated to a global grid for both average Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum climatic conditions. By combining the data with some parameters from dust models we reconstructed Holocene and LGM surface and atmospheric dust concentrations. This new dataset's dust concentrations and radiative forcing is compared to the results from dust model simulations. We show how this new dataset can be used by calculating dust radiative forcing in polar areas. Dust appears to play an important role in the polar amplification phenomenon during dusty times by cooling down the surface and heating the upper atmospheric layers.

  20. Levitation of dust at the surface of protoplanetary disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wurm, Gerhard; Haack, Henning

    2009-01-01

    In recent years photophoretic forces acting on dust particles have been shown to be important for optically thin parts of protoplanetary disks. The optical surface (photosphere) of protoplanetary disks is a transitional region where the thermal radiation of the disk can escape. We show here...... that photophoresis by the thermal radiation is sufficient to levitate dust particles at several pressure scale heights. Under certain conditions these particles can constitute the surface layer. In this case only the particles which are most susceptible to photophoresis are observed at the surface of protoplanetary...

  1. AzTEC Survey of the Central Molecular Zone: Modeling Dust SEDs and N-PDF with Hierarchical Bayesian Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuping; Wang, Daniel; Wilson, Grant; Gutermuth, Robert; Heyer, Mark

    2018-01-01

    We present the AzTEC/LMT survey of dust continuum at 1.1mm on the central ˜ 200pc (CMZ) of our Galaxy. A joint SED analysis of all existing dust continuum surveys on the CMZ is performed, from 160µm to 1.1mm. Our analysis follows a MCMC sampling strategy incorporating the knowledge of PSFs in different maps, which provides unprecedented spacial resolution on distributions of dust temperature, column density and emissivity index. The dense clumps in the CMZ typically show low dust temperature ( 20K), with no significant sign of buried star formation, and a weak evolution of higher emissivity index toward dense peak. A new model is proposed, allowing for varying dust temperature inside a cloud and self-shielding of dust emission, which leads to similar conclusions on dust temperature and grain properties. We further apply a hierarchical Bayesian analysis to infer the column density probability distribution function (N-PDF), while simultaneously removing the Galactic foreground and background emission. The N-PDF shows a steep power-law profile with α > 3, indicating that formation of dense structures are suppressed.

  2. Survivability of dust in tokamaks: dust transport in the divertor sheath

    CERN Document Server

    Delzanno, Gian Luca

    2014-01-01

    The survivability of dust being transported in the magnetized sheath near the divertor plate of a tokamak and its impact on the mandatory balance of erosion and redeposition for a steady-state reactor are investigated. Two different divertor scenarios are considered. The first is characterized by an energy flux perpendicular to the plate $q_0\\simeq 1$ MW/m$^2$ typical of current short-pulse tokamaks. The second has $q_0\\simeq 10$ MW/m$^2$ and is relevant to long-pulse machines like ITER or DEMO. It is shown that micrometer dust particles can survive rather easily near the plates of a divertor plasma with $q_0\\simeq 1$ MW/m$^2$ because thermal radiation provides adequate cooling for the dust particle. On the other hand, the survivability of micrometer dust particles near the divertor plates is drastically reduced when $q_0\\simeq 10$ MW/m$^2$. Micrometer dust particles redeposit their material non-locally, leading to a net poloidal mass migration across the divertor. Smaller particles (with radius $\\sim 0.1$ $\\...

  3. Dust Storms: Why Are Dust Storms a Concern?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Shed Sheep Ranching Shellfishing Shipping Shipyard Storms and Floods Stormwater and Sewage Trash Burning Tree Farm and ... attacks. Exposure to dust in dust storms can cause coughing, wheezing, and runny noses. Breathing a lot ...

  4. Interstellar dust and extinction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathis, John S.

    It is noted that the term 'interstellar dust' refers to materials with rather different properties, and that the mean extinction law of Seaton (1979) or Savage and Mathis (1979) should be replaced by the expression given by Cardelli et al. (1989), using the appropriate value of total-to-selective extinction. The older laws were appropriate for the diffuse ISM but dust in clouds differs dramatically in its extinction law. Dust is heavily processed while in the ISM by being included within clouds and cycled back into the diffuse ISM many times during its lifetime. Hence, grains probably reflect only a trace of their origin, although meteoritic inclusions with isotopic anomalies demonstrate that some tiny particles survive intact from a supernova origin to the present.

  5. Selecting baghouse dust collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moore, S.; Rubak, J.; Jolin, M. [Farr Co., El Segundo, CA (United States)]|[Farr Co., Laval, Quebec (Canada)

    1997-04-01

    A thorough analysis of the dust to be captured and determination of specific application requirements are necessary when designing a baghouse collection system. Independent consultants specializing in pollution control equipment and manufacturers with experience in several types of collectors are possible sources of assistance. These experts typically have testing facilities to analyze the dust characteristics. This final article of a two-part series on baghouse design and selection concentrates on application considerations created by the type of dust handled, selecting the best filtration media, selecting the best filtration media, and determining the air-to-cloth (A/C) ratio. The first article discussed bag sizing and cleaning methods and housing and hopper designs.

  6. Effects of non-extensive electrons and positive/negative dust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-12-09

    Dec 9, 2016 ... where all variables satisfy the reality condition A−l = A∗ l. , and the ... increased by the presence of non-thermal electron (the parameter C1) and that is decreased when the net dust- charge number density is positive (s = 1), but it is increased when the net dust-charge number density is negative (s = −1).

  7. Using foreground/background analysis to determine leaf and canopy chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinzon, J. E.; Ustin, S. L.; Hart, Q. J.; Jacquemoud, S.; Smith, M. O.

    1995-01-01

    Spectral Mixture Analysis (SMA) has become a well established procedure for analyzing imaging spectrometry data, however, the technique is relatively insensitive to minor sources of spectral variation (e.g., discriminating stressed from unstressed vegetation and variations in canopy chemistry). Other statistical approaches have been tried e.g., stepwise multiple linear regression analysis to predict canopy chemistry. Grossman et al. reported that SMLR is sensitive to measurement error and that the prediction of minor chemical components are not independent of patterns observed in more dominant spectral components like water. Further, they observed that the relationships were strongly dependent on the mode of expressing reflectance (R, -log R) and whether chemistry was expressed on a weight (g/g) or are basis (g/sq m). Thus, alternative multivariate techniques need to be examined. Smith et al. reported a revised SMA that they termed Foreground/Background Analysis (FBA) that permits directing the analysis along any axis of variance by identifying vectors through the n-dimensional spectral volume orthonormal to each other. Here, we report an application of the FBA technique for the detection of canopy chemistry using a modified form of the analysis.

  8. Salient Region Detection by Fusing Foreground and Background Cues Extracted from Single Image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiangqiang Zhou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Saliency detection is an important preprocessing step in many application fields such as computer vision, robotics, and graphics to reduce computational cost by focusing on significant positions and neglecting the nonsignificant in the scene. Different from most previous methods which mainly utilize the contrast of low-level features, various feature maps are fused in a simple linear weighting form. In this paper, we propose a novel salient object detection algorithm which takes both background and foreground cues into consideration and integrate a bottom-up coarse salient regions extraction and a top-down background measure via boundary labels propagation into a unified optimization framework to acquire a refined saliency detection result. Wherein the coarse saliency map is also fused by three components, the first is local contrast map which is in more accordance with the psychological law, the second is global frequency prior map, and the third is global color distribution map. During the formation of background map, first we construct an affinity matrix and select some nodes which lie on border as labels to represent the background and then carry out a propagation to generate the regional background map. The evaluation of the proposed model has been implemented on four datasets. As demonstrated in the experiments, our proposed method outperforms most existing saliency detection models with a robust performance.

  9. Detection of Asian Dust Storm Using MODIS Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Xie

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Every year, a large number of aerosols are released from dust storms into the atmosphere, which may have potential impacts on the climate, environment, and air quality. Detecting dust aerosols and monitoring their movements and evolutions in a timely manner is a very significant task. Satellite remote sensing has been demonstrated as an effective means for observing dust aerosols. In this paper, an algorithm based on the multi-spectral technique for detecting dust aerosols was developed by combining measurements of moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS reflective solar bands and thermal emissive bands. Data from dust events that occurred during the past several years were collected as training data for spectral and statistical analyses. According to the spectral curves of various scene types, a series of spectral bands was selected individually or jointly, and corresponding thresholds were defined for step-by-step scene classification. The multi-spectral algorithm was applied mainly to detect dust storms in Asia. The detection results were validated not only visually with MODIS true color images, but also quantitatively with products of Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI and Cloud Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization (CALIOP. The validations showed that this multi-spectral detection algorithm was suitable to monitor dust aerosols in the selected study areas.

  10. Simulating Galaxy Clusters with Dust Formation and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjergo, Eda; Granato, Gian Luigi; Murante, Giuseppe; Ragone-Figueroa, Cinthia

    2017-07-01

    In order to investigate basic properties of galaxies, such as the star formation rate and the masses of baryonic components, it is important to account for dust reprocessing. Dust particles absorb and scatter the stars' optical/UV emission, and they re-radiate thermally in the infrared. A combination of simulations and post-processing radiative transfer computations can produce mock data, which can be compared directly to observations. Until now, however, dust properties have only been included in our simulations by means of post-processing assumptions, leaving room for uncertainties, particularly significant at wavelengths shorter than 100 microns. To reduce these uncertainties, we implemented a state-of-the-art treatment of the production and evolution of dust grains within our simulation code, P-GADGET3. This model traces the creation, evolution, and destruction of dust through various processes. It accounts for the diameter of dust particles with a two-grain-size approximation proposed by H. Hirashita. We will present a first result of our new code applied to zoom-in simulations of massive (M_{200} > 3 × 10^4 M_{⊙}) galaxy clusters, focusing in particular to the early stages of assembly of the cluster at high redshift, around z = 2, where the SF activity is at its maximum and the proto-cluster regions are rich of cold, dust-polluted gas.

  11. Compacting of fly dusts from cupola and electric arc furnace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Baricová

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling and utilization of dust waste is important not only from the point of view of its usage as an alternative source of raw materials, but regarding the environmental problems also. Dust emissions arise from thermal and chemical or physical processes and mechanical actions. Two kinds of fl y dusts from cupola furnaces (hot and cold blast cupola furnace and fl y dust from electric arc furnace were used by experiments. They were pelletized only with addition of water and briquetted with diff erent addition of water glass, bentonite and cement. Quality of briquettes was tested by compression – strength test and by break down test in green state, after drying and afterstoring (1 month.

  12. THE PANCHROMATIC HUBBLE ANDROMEDA TREASURY. VIII. A WIDE-AREA, HIGH-RESOLUTION MAP OF DUST EXTINCTION IN M31

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalcanton, Julianne J.; Fouesneau, Morgan; Weisz, Daniel R.; Williams, Benjamin F. [Department of Astronomy, Box 351580, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Hogg, David W. [Center for Cosmology and Particle Physics, Department of Physics, New York University, 4 Washington Pl #424, New York, NY 10003 (United States); Lang, Dustin [McWilliams Center for Cosmology, Department of Physics, Carnegie Mellon University, 5000 Forbes Ave, Pittsburgh, PA 15213 (United States); Leroy, Adam K. [National Radio Astronomy Observatory, 520 Edgemont Road, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Gordon, Karl D.; Gilbert, Karoline M. [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Sandstrom, Karin [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, 933 N Cherry Ave, Tucson, AZ 85721 (United States); Bell, Eric F. [Department of Astronomy, University of Michigan, 500 Church St., Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Dong, Hui; Lauer, Tod R. [National Optical Astronomy Observatory, 950 North Cherry Avenue, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Gouliermis, Dimitrios A. [Max Planck Institute für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117, Heidelberg (Germany); Guhathakurta, Puragra [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of California Santa Cruz, 1156 High Street, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Schruba, Andreas [California Institute of Technology, Cahill Center for Astrophysics, 1200 E. California Blvd, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Seth, Anil C. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Skillman, Evan D., E-mail: jd@astro.washington.edu [Minnesota Institute for Astrophysics, University of Minnesota, 116 Church Street SE, Minneapolis, MN 55455 (United States)

    2015-11-20

    We map the distribution of dust in M31 at 25 pc resolution using stellar photometry from the Panchromatic Hubble Andromeda Treasury survey. The map is derived with a new technique that models the near-infrared color–magnitude diagram (CMD) of red giant branch (RGB) stars. The model CMDs combine an unreddened foreground of RGB stars with a reddened background population viewed through a log-normal column density distribution of dust. Fits to the model constrain the median extinction, the width of the extinction distribution, and the fraction of reddened stars in each 25 pc cell. The resulting extinction map has a factor of ≳4 times better resolution than maps of dust emission, while providing a more direct measurement of the dust column. There is superb morphological agreement between the new map and maps of the extinction inferred from dust emission by Draine et al. However, the widely used Draine and Li dust models overpredict the observed extinction by a factor of ∼2.5, suggesting that M31's true dust mass is lower and that dust grains are significantly more emissive than assumed in Draine et al. The observed factor of ∼2.5 discrepancy is consistent with similar findings in the Milky Way by the Plank Collaboration et al., but we find a more complex dependence on parameters from the Draine and Li dust models. We also show that the the discrepancy with the Draine et al. map is lowest where the current interstellar radiation field has a harder spectrum than average. We discuss possible improvements to the CMD dust mapping technique, and explore further applications in both M31 and other galaxies.

  13. Coupling the Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Investigating the Role of Clouds in Controlling the Vertical Distribution of Dust During N. H. Summer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Wilson, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    The dust cycle is critically important for the current climate of Mars. The radiative effects of dust impact the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere (Gierasch and Goody, 1968; Haberle et al., 1982; Zurek et al., 1992). Although dust is present in the Martian atmosphere throughout the year, the level of dustiness varies with season. The atmosphere is generally the dustiest during northern fall and winter and the least dusty during northern spring and summer (Smith, 2004). Dust particles are lifted into the atmosphere by dust storms that range in size from meters to thousands of kilometers across (Cantor et al., 2001). During some years, regional storms combine to produce hemispheric or planet encircling dust clouds that obscure the surface and raise atmospheric temperatures by as much as 40 K (Smith et al., 2002). Key recent observations of the vertical distribution of dust indicate that elevated layers of dust exist in the tropics and sub-tropics throughout much of the year (Heavens et al., 2011). These observations have brought particular focus on the processes that control the vertical distribution of dust in the Martian atmosphere. The goal of this work is to further our understanding of how clouds in particular control the vertical distribution of dust, particularly during N. H. spring and summer

  14. Identification of the exploatation dust in road dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gajdzik

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this publication is to determine models of explore dust from vehicle brake systems and the presentationof measurement results of the exploitation dust, which is separate from road dust. The following methods and measuring devices were used: T-01M device, screen analysis, analysis of chemical composition with the use of a scanning microscope with Energy Dispersive x-ray Spectroscopy (EDS analyser. The measurements for identifying this type of dust were conducted on marked sections of roads: motorway, city road and mountain road. The explored dust was distinguished in the following car systems: brakes, clutch plates, tyres and catalytic converters.

  15. On the possibility of dust condensation in the ejecta of supernova 1987a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrz, R D; Ney, E P

    1987-10-01

    We suggest that supernova 1987a may condense dust of substantial visual optical thickness as do many novae. The dust will act as a calorimeter of the photon luminosity of any central engine that is dominant at the time of dust formation. Observations of novae suggest that dust formation may occur when the expanding ejecta reach a temperature of 1000 K. The early luminosity of the supernova may be dominated by radioactivity that is unrelated to the central engine that determines the energy balance for the long-term development of the supernova. We discuss the possibility that a constant luminosity central power source such as a pulsar dominates the luminosity of the supernova ejecta by the time that dust can condense and argue that, if a shell mass of more than a few tenths of one solar mass was ejected, emission from dust may be observable in the thermal infrared spectral region. Maximum dust optical depth should occur by late 1987 or early 1988. If the dust becomes optically thick, the visual light from the supernova may drop precipitously. The characteristics of an optically thick dust shell as a calorimeter of the luminosity of the central engine are discussed and are related to previous observations of dust formation in type II supernovae. It is suggested that dust of several chemical compositions may form at different epochs.

  16. Dust Obscures Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    The dust cloud over eastern Asia was so thick on March 21, 2002, that the Korean Peninsula completely disappeared from view in this Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) image of the region. Parts of South Korea report that visibility at the surface is less than 50 m (165 feet). Airports throughout the region canceled flights due to the poor visibility. Eyewitnesses in China report that the dust was so thick in Beijing at times that visibility was limited to 100 m (330 feet), while in parts of the Gansu Province visibility was reported at less than 10 m (33 feet). Chinese officials say this is the worst dust storm to hit in more than 10 years. Dust from an earlier event still colors the air to the east of Japan. (The island of Honshu is just peeking out from under the cloud cover in these images.) Image courtesy the SeaWiFS Project, NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center, and ORBIMAGE

  17. Dust Mite Allergy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... more likely to develop infections of the sinuses (sinusitis). Asthma. People with asthma and dust mite allergy often have difficulty managing asthma symptoms. They may be at risk of asthma attacks that require immediate medical treatment or emergency care. By Mayo Clinic Staff . Mayo ...

  18. Longwave indirect effect of mineral dusts on ice clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Min

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In addition to microphysical changes in clouds, changes in nucleation processes of ice cloud due to aerosols would result in substantial changes in cloud top temperature as mildly supercooled clouds are glaciated through heterogenous nucleation processes. Measurements from multiple sensors on multiple observing platforms over the Atlantic Ocean show that the cloud effective temperature increases with mineral dust loading with a slope of +3.06 °C per unit aerosol optical depth. The macrophysical changes in ice cloud top distributions as a consequence of mineral dust-cloud interaction exert a strong cooling effect (up to 16 Wm−2 of thermal infrared radiation on cloud systems. Induced changes of ice particle size by mineral dusts influence cloud emissivity and play a minor role in modulating the outgoing longwave radiation for optically thin ice clouds. Such a strong cooling forcing of thermal infrared radiation would have significant impacts on cloud systems and subsequently on climate.

  19. Fingerprints in the Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    These MISR nadir-camera images of eastern China compare a somewhat hazy summer view from July 9, 2000 (left) with a spectacularly dusty spring view from April 7, 2001 (middle). The left-hand and middle images are from Terra orbits 2967 and 6928, respectively, and extend from central Manchuria near the top to portions of North and South Korea at the bottom. They are approximately 380 kilometers in width.Asia's desert areas are prone to soil erosion, as underground water tables are lowered by prolonged drought and by industrial and agricultural water use. Heavy winds blowing eastward across the arid and sparsely vegetated surfaces of Mongolia and western China pick up large quantities of yellow dust. Airborne dust clouds from the April 2001 storm blew across the Pacific Ocean and were carried as far as North America. The minerals transported in this manner are believed to provide nutrients for both oceanic and land ecosystems.According to the Xinhua News Agency in China, nearly one million tons of Gobi Desert dust blow into Beijing each year. During a similar dust outbreak last year, the Associated Press reported that the visibility in Beijing had been reduced the point where buildings were barely visible across city streets, and airline schedules were significantly disrupted. The dust has also been implicated in adverse health effects such as respiratory discomfort and eye irritation.The image on the right is a higher resolution MISR nadir-camera view of a portion of the April 7, 2001 dust cloud. It covers an area roughly 250 kilometers wide by 470 kilometers high. When viewed at full magnification, a number of atmospheric wave features, like the ridges and valleys of a fingerprint, are apparent. These are probably induced by surface topography, which can disturb the wind flow. A few small cumulus clouds are also visible, and are casting shadows on the thick lower dust layer.Analyses of images such as these constitute one phase of MISR's participation in the Asian

  20. Back- and fore-grounding ontology: exploring the linkages between critical realism, pragmatism, and methodologies in health & rehabilitation sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForge, Ryan; Shaw, Jay

    2012-03-01

    Back- and fore-grounding ontology: exploring the linkages between critical realism, pragmatism, and methodologies in health & rehabilitation sciences As two doctoral candidates in a health and rehabilitation sciences program, we describe in this paper our respective paradigmatic locations along a quite nonlinear ontological-epistemological-axiological-methodological chain. In a turn-taking fashion, we unpack the tenets of critical realism and pragmatism, and then trace the linkages from these paradigmatic locations through to the methodological choices that address a community-based research problem. Beyond serving as an answer to calls for academics in training to demonstrate philosophical-theoretical-methodological integrity and coherence in their scholarship, this paper represents critical realism and its fore-grounding of a deeply stratified ontology in reflexive relation to pragmatism and its back-grounding of ontology. We conclude by considering the merits and challenges of conducting research from within singular versus proliferate paradigmatic perspectives. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  1. Dance into the fire: dust survival inside supernova remnants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micelotta, Elisabetta R.; Dwek, Eli; Slavin, Jonathan D.

    2016-06-01

    Core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are important sources of interstellar dust, potentially capable of producing 1 M_{⊙}) of dust in their explosively expelled ejecta. However, unlike other dust sources, the dust has to survive the passage of the reverse shock, generated by the interaction of the supernova blast wave with its surrounding medium. Knowledge of the net amount of dust produced by CCSNe is crucial for understanding the origin and evolution of dust in the local and high-redshift universe. Our goal is to identify the dust destruction mechanisms in the ejecta, and derive the net amount of dust that survives the passage of the reverse shock. To do so, we have developed analytical models for the evolution of a supernova blast wave and of the reverse shock, and the simultaneous processing of the dust inside the cavity of the supernova remnant. We have applied our models to the special case of the clumpy ejecta of the remnant of Cassiopeia A (Cas A), assuming that the dust (silicates and carbon grains) resides in cool oxygen-rich ejecta clumps which are uniformly distributed within the remnant and surrounded by a hot X-ray emitting plasma (smooth ejecta). The passage of the reverse shock through the clumps gives rise to a relative gas-grain motion and also destroys the clumps. While residing in the ejecta clouds, dust is processed via kinetic sputtering, which is terminated either when the grains escape the clumps, or when the clumps are destroyed by the reverse shock. In either case, grain destruction proceeds thereafter by thermal sputtering in the hot shocked smooth ejecta. We find that 12 and 16 percent of silicate and carbon dust, respectively, survive the passage of the reverse shock by the time the shock has reached the center of the remnant. These fractions depend on the morphology of the ejecta and the medium into which the remnant is expanding, as well as the composition and size distribution of the grains that formed in the ejecta. Results will

  2. Effect of dust size distribution and dust charge fluctuation on dust ion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-06-17

    Jun 17, 2016 ... Dusty plasma; dust-acoustic shock wave; dust size distribution; adiabatic dust charge variation; negative ions. PACS Nos 52.27.Lw; 52.35.Tc; 52.35.Mw. 1. Introduction ... processes has relation to some phenomena including. Landau damping, collisions between charged particles and neutrals and ...

  3. Size Dependence of Dust Distribution around the Earth Orbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Takahiro; Takeuchi, Taku [Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Meguro, Tokyo, 152-8551 (Japan); Kobayashi, Hiroshi; Ishihara, Daisuke; Kondo, Toru; Kaneda, Hidehiro, E-mail: t.ueda@geo.titech.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi, 464-8602 (Japan)

    2017-05-01

    In the solar system, interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) originating mainly from asteroid collisions and cometary activities drift to Earth orbit due to Poynting–Robertson drag. We analyzed the thermal emission from IDPs that was observed by the first Japanese infrared astronomical satellite, AKARI . The observed surface brightness in the trailing direction of the Earth orbit is 3.7% greater than that in the leading direction in the 9 μ m band and 3.0% in the 18 μ m band. In order to reveal dust properties causing leading–trailing surface brightness asymmetry, we numerically integrated orbits of the Sun, the Earth, and a dust particle as a restricted three-body problem including radiation from the Sun. The initial orbits of particles are determined according to the orbits of main-belt asteroids or Jupiter-family comets. Orbital trapping in mean motion resonances results in a significant leading–trailing asymmetry so that intermediate sized dust (∼10–100 μ m) produces a greater asymmetry than zodiacal light. The leading–trailing surface brightness difference integrated over the size distribution of the asteroidal dust is obtained to be 27.7% and 25.3% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively. In contrast, the brightness difference for cometary dust is calculated as 3.6% and 3.1% in the 9 μ m and 18 μ m bands, respectively, if the maximum dust radius is set to be s {sub max} = 3000 μ m. Taking into account these values and their errors, we conclude that the contribution of asteroidal dust to the zodiacal infrared emission is less than ∼10%, while cometary dust of the order of 1 mm mainly accounts for the zodiacal light in infrared.

  4. Cometary coma dust size distribution from in situ IR spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, G.; Della Corte, V.; Fulle, M.; Capaccioni, F.; Rotundi, A.; Ivanovski, S. L.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Filacchione, G.; D'Aversa, E.; Capria, M. T.; Tozzi, G. P.; Erard, S.; Leyrat, C.; Palomba, E.; Longobardo, A.; Ciarniello, M.; Taylor, F.; Mottola, S.; Salatti, M.

    2017-07-01

    Dust is the most abundant component in cometary comae. Here, we investigate the dust size distribution in 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (67P/CG) using data from the Rosetta spacecraft that was in close proximity to the comet from 2014 August to 2016 September. The Visual, Infrared and Thermal Imaging Spectrometer (VIRTIS-M), spectral range of 0.25-5 μm, and the Grain Impact Analyser and Dust Accumulator (GIADA), both part of the Rosetta payload, together provide a powerful means to characterize the dust coma properties. On March 28, Rosetta performed a flyby close to the nucleus that allowed GIADA to detect a large amount of dust particles used to constraint the differential size distribution power-law index of -2.2 ± 0.3. In April 2015, VIRTIS-M observed the spectral radiance in the wavelength range of 1-5 μm. A simple radiative transfer model has been applied to simulate the VIRTIS-M radiances, thus allowing to infer the dust properties. We assumed an optically thin dust coma and spherical amorphous carbon particles in the size range between 0.1 to 1000 μm. We obtained the infrared data best fit with a differential dust size distribution power-law index of -3.1_{-0.1}^{+3}. This index matches the one determined using GIADA March 2015 data indicating that, before perihelion, the inner coma radiance is dominated by particles larger than 10 μm; and the dust coma did not change its properties during most of the 67P/CG inbound orbit.

  5. “Before dividing we have to add”: inter-viewing the foregrounds of indigenous students “Antes de dividir temos que somar”: ‘entre-vistando’ foregrounds de estudantes indígenas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ole Skovsmose

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Students’ cultural diversity is an important factor to consider in a mathematics education concerned with equity. We argue that the significance of mathematics education is not only given by the understanding of mathematical concepts but also by students’ foreground, that is, the students’ perception of their future possibilities in life as made apparent to the individual by his/her social-political context. For students in a cultural borderline position, different reasons and intentions for engaging in mathematics learning may be related to the construction of meaning in mathematics. Through inter-viewing Brazilian Indian students’ foreground, we illuminate the different types of significance given to mathematics education in their particular situation. Keywords: Inter-viewing. Foreground. Cultural Borderline Position.A diversidade cultural dos estudantes é um fator importante a ser considerado na educação matemática que se preocupa com a igualdade. Sustenta-se que o significado da educação matemática não está vinculado apenas à compreensão de conceitos matemáticos mas, também, ao foreground dos estudantes, isto é, à percepção de suas possibilidades futuras na vida tal como aparecem ao indivíduo em seu contexto sociopolítico. Para os estudantes que estão em uma posição cultural de fronteira, as diferentes razões e intenções que os levam a envolver-se com a aprendizagem matemática podem estar relacionadas à construção de significado em Matemática. Entre-vistas com alguns estudantes indígenas do Brasil trazem à cena diferentes tipos de significados por eles atribuídos à Educação Matemática em suas situações particulares. Palavras chave: Entre-vista. Foreground. Posição Cultural de Fronteira.

  6. Robust foreground detection: a fusion of masked grey world, probabilistic gradient information and extended conditional random field approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf; Moran, Bill; Rawlinson, David

    2012-01-01

    Foreground detection has been used extensively in many applications such as people counting, traffic monitoring and face recognition. However, most of the existing detectors can only work under limited conditions. This happens because of the inability of the detector to distinguish foreground and background pixels, especially in complex situations. Our aim is to improve the robustness of foreground detection under sudden and gradual illumination change, colour similarity issue, moving background and shadow noise. Since it is hard to achieve robustness using a single model, we have combined several methods into an integrated system. The masked grey world algorithm is introduced to handle sudden illumination change. Colour co-occurrence modelling is then fused with the probabilistic edge-based background modelling. Colour co-occurrence modelling is good in filtering moving background and robust to gradual illumination change, while an edge-based modelling is used for solving a colour similarity problem. Finally, an extended conditional random field approach is used to filter out shadow and afterimage noise. Simulation results show that our algorithm performs better compared to the existing methods, which makes it suitable for higher-level applications.

  7. Robust Foreground Detection: A Fusion of Masked GreyWorld, Probabilistic Gradient Information and Extended Conditional Random Field Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Rawlinson

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Foreground detection has been used extensively in many applications such as people counting, traffic monitoring and face recognition. However, most of the existing detectors can only work under limited conditions. This happens because of the inability of the detector to distinguish foreground and background pixels, especially in complex situations. Our aim is to improve the robustness of foreground detection under sudden and gradual illumination change, colour similarity issue, moving background and shadow noise. Since it is hard to achieve robustness using a single model, we have combined several methods into an integrated system. The masked grey world algorithm is introduced to handle sudden illumination change. Colour co-occurrence modelling is then fused with the probabilistic edge-based background modelling. Colour co-occurrence modelling is good infiltering moving background and robust to gradual illumination change, while an edge-based modelling is used for solving a colour similarity problem. Finally, an extended conditional random field approach is used to filter out shadow and afterimage noise. Simulation results show that our algorithm performs better compared to the existing methods, which makes it suitable for higher-level applications.

  8. Competition for attentional resources between low spatial frequency content of emotional images and a foreground task in early visual cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Matthias M; Gundlach, Christopher

    2017-03-01

    Low spatial frequency (LSF) image content has been proposed to play a superior functional role in emotional content extraction via the magnocellular pathway biasing attentional resources toward emotional content in visual cortex. We investigated whether emotionally unpleasant complex images that were presented either unfiltered or with LSF content only in the background while subjects performed a foreground task will withdraw more attentional resources from the task compared to unemotional, neutral images (distraction paradigm). We measured steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) driven by flickering stimuli of a foreground task. Unfiltered unpleasant images resulted in a significant reduction of SSVEP amplitude compared to neutral images. No statistically significant differences were found with LSF background images. In a behavioral control experiment, we found no significant differences for complexity ratings between unfiltered and LSF pictures. Content identification was possible for unfiltered and LSF picture (correct responses > 74%). An additional EEG study examined typical emotion-related components for complex images presented either as unfiltered, LSF, or high spatial frequency (HSF, as an additional control) filtered, unpleasant, and neutral images. We found a significant main effect of emotional valence in the early posterior negativity. Late positive potential differences were only found for unfiltered and HSF images. Results suggest that, while LSF content is sufficient to allow for content and emotional cue extraction when images were presented alone, LSF content is not salient enough to serve as emotional distractor that withdraws attentional resources from a foreground task in early visual cortex. © 2016 Society for Psychophysiological Research.

  9. SWIFT ULTRAVIOLET OBSERVATIONS OF SUPERNOVA 2014J IN M82: LARGE EXTINCTION FROM INTERSTELLAR DUST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Peter J.; Smitka, Michael T.; Wang, Lifan; Krisciunas, Kevin [George P. and Cynthia Woods Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics and Astronomy, Texas A. and M. University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4242 TAMU, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Breeveld, Alice; Kuin, N. Paul; Page, Mat [Mullard Space Science Laboratory, University College London, Holmbury St. Mary, Dorking Surrey, RH5 6NT (United Kingdom); De Pasquale, Massimiliano [Instituto di Astrofisica Spaziale e Fisica Cosmica di Palermo Via Ugo la Malfa 153 90146 Palermo (Italy); Hartmann, Dieter H. [Clemson University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Kinard Lab of Physics, Clemson, SC 29634-0978 (United States); Milne, Peter A. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Siegel, Michael [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2015-05-20

    We present optical and ultraviolet (UV) photometry and spectra of the very nearby and highly reddened supernova (SN) 2014J in M82 obtained with the Swift Ultra-Violet/Optical Telescope (UVOT). Comparison of the UVOT grism spectra of SN 2014J with Hubble Space Telescope observations of SN2011fe or UVOT grism spectra of SN 2012fr are consistent with an extinction law with a low value of R{sub V} ∼1.4. The high reddening causes the detected photon distribution in the broadband UV filters to have a much longer effective wavelength than for an unreddened SN. The light curve evolution is consistent with this shift and does not show a flattening due to photons being scattered back into the line of sight (LOS). The light curve shapes and color evolution are inconsistent with a contribution scattered into the LOS by circumstellar dust. We conclude that most or all of the high reddening must come from interstellar dust. We show that even for a single dust composition, there is not a unique reddening law caused by circumstellar scattering. Rather, when considering scattering from a time-variable source, we confirm earlier studies that the reddening law is a function of the dust geometry, column density, and epoch. We also show how an assumed geometry of dust as a foreground sheet in mixed stellar/dust systems will lead to a higher inferred R{sub V}. Rather than assuming the dust around SNe is peculiar, SNe may be useful probes of the interstellar reddening laws in other galaxies.

  10. Characteristics of extreme dust events observed over two urban areas in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidokhti, Abbas-Ali A.; Gharaylou, Maryam; Pegahfar, Nafiseh; Sabetghadam, Samaneh; Rezazadeh, Maryam

    2016-03-01

    Determination of dust loading in the atmosphere is important not only from the public health point of view, but also for regional climate changes. The present study focuses on the characteristics of two major dust events for two urban areas in Iran, Kermanshah and Tehran, over the period of 4 years from 2006 to 2009. To detect extreme dust outbreaks, various datasets including synoptic data, dust concentration, reanalysis data and numerical results of WRF and HYSPLIT models were used. The weather maps demonstrate that for these events dusts are mainly generated when wind velocity is high and humidity is low in the lower troposphere and the region is under the influence of a thermal low. The event lasts until the atmospheric stability prevails and the surface wind speed weakens. The thermal low nature of the synoptic conditions of these major events is also responsible for deep boundary layer development with its thermals affecting the vertical dust flux over the region. Trajectory studies show that the dust events originated from deserts in Iraq and Syria and transported towards Iran. The main distinction between the two types of mobilizations seems to affect the dust concentrations in the Tehran urban area.

  11. Distribution of dust during two dust storms in Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ösp Magnúsdóttir, Agnes; Dagsson-Waldhauserova, Pavla; Arnalds, Ólafur; Ólafsson, Haraldur

    2017-04-01

    Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 ?g?m?3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 ?g?m?3). The mean PM1 concentrations were 97-241 ?g?m?3 with a maximum of 261 ?g?m?3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34-0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  12. Temperature measurement of a dust particle in a RF plasma GEC reference cell

    CERN Document Server

    Kong, Jie; Matthews, Lorin S; Hyde, Truell W

    2016-01-01

    The thermal motion of a dust particle levitated in a plasma chamber is similar to that described by Brownian motion in many ways. The primary differences between a dust particle in a plasma system and a free Brownian particle is that in addition to the random collisions between the dust particle and the neutral gas atoms, there are electric field fluctuations, dust charge fluctuations, and correlated motions from the unwanted continuous signals originating within the plasma system itself. This last contribution does not include random motion and is therefore separable from the random motion in a normal temperature measurement. In this paper, we discuss how to separate random and coherent motion of a dust particle confined in a glass box in a Gaseous Electronic Conference radio frequency reference cell employing experimentally determined dust particle fluctuation data analyzed using the mean square displacement technique.

  13. Transport of dust particles in tokamak devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A.Yu. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States)]. E-mail: apigarov@uscd.edu; Smirnov, R.D. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Krasheninnikov, S.I. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Rognlien, T.D. [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, CA (United States); Rosenberg, M. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Soboleva, T.K. [UNAM, Mexico, DistritoFederal (Mexico)

    2007-06-15

    Recent advances in the dust transport modeling in tokamak devices are discussed. Topics include: (1) physical model for dust transport; (2) modeling results on dynamics of dust particles in plasma; (3) conditions necessary for particle growth in plasma; (4) dust spreading over the tokamak; (5) density profiles for dust particles and impurity atoms associated with dust ablation in tokamak plasma; and (6) roles of dust in material/tritium migration.

  14. [House dust mite allergy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrard, A; Pichler, C

    2012-04-01

    House dust mites can be found all over the world where human beings live independent from the climate. Proteins from the gastrointestinal tract- almost all known as enzymes - are the allergens which induce chronic allergic diseases. The inhalation of small amounts of allergens on a regular base all night leads to a slow beginning of the disease with chronically stuffed nose and an exercise induced asthma which later on persists. House dust mites grow well in a humid climate - this can be in well isolated dwellings or in the tropical climate - and nourish from human skin dander. Scales are found in mattresses, upholstered furniture and carpets. The clinical picture with slowly aggravating complaints leads quite often to a delayed diagnosis, which is accidently done on the occasion of a wider spectrum of allergy skin testing. The beginning of a medical therapy with topical steroids as nasal spray or inhalation leads to a fast relief of the complaints. Although discussed in extensive controversies in the literature - at least in Switzerland with the cold winter and dry climate - the recommendation of house dust mite avoidance measures is given to patients with good clinical results. The frequent ventilation of the dwelling with cold air in winter time cause a lower indoor humidity. Covering encasings on mattresses, pillow, and duvets reduces the possibility of chronic contact with mite allergens as well as the weekly changing the bed linen. Another option of therapy is the specific immunotherapy with extracts of house dust mites showing good results in children and adults. Using recombinant allergens will show a better quality in diagnostic as well as in therapeutic specific immunotherapy.

  15. Dust in External Galaxies

    OpenAIRE

    Calzetti, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Existing (Spitzer Space Telescope) and upcoming (Herschel Space Telescope) facilities are deepening our understanding of the role of dust in tracing the energy budget and chemical evolution of galaxies. The tools we are developing while exploring the local Universe will in turn become pivotal in the interpretation of the high redshift Universe when near--future facilities (the Atacama Large Millimeter Array [ALMA], the Sub--Millimeter Array [SMA], the Large Millimeter Telescope [LMT], the Jam...

  16. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health

  17. Dust, Climate, and Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    Air pollution from both natural and anthropogenic causes is considered to be one of the most serious world-wide environment-related health problems, and is expected to become worse with changes in the global climate. Dust storms from the atmospheric transport of desert soil dust that has been lifted and carried by the winds - often over significant distances - have become an increasingly important emerging air quality issue for many populations. Recent studies have shown that the dust storms can cause significant health impacts from the dust itself as well as the accompanying pollutants, pesticides, metals, salt, plant debris, and other inorganic and organic materials, including viable microorganisms (bacteria, viruses and fungi). For example, thousands of tons of Asian desert sediments, some containing pesticides and herbicides from farming regions, are commonly transported into the Arctic during dust storm events. These chemicals have been identified in animal and human tissues among Arctic indigenous populations. Millions of tons of airborne desert dust are being tracked by satellite imagery, which clearly shows the magnitude as well as the temporal and spatial variability of dust storms across the "dust belt" regions of North Africa, the Middle East, and China. This paper summarizes the most recent findings on the effects of airborne desert dust on human health as well as potential climate influences on dust and health.

  18. Gaps and rings carved by vortices in protoplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Pierre; Ricci, Luca; Carilli, Christopher Luke; Previn-Ratnasingam, Rathish

    2017-09-01

    Context. Large-scale vortices in protoplanetary disks are thought to form and survive for long periods of time. Hence, they can significantly change the global disk evolution and particularly the distribution of the solid particles embedded in the gas, possibly explaining asymmetries and dust concentrations recently observed at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths. Aims: We investigate the spatial distribution of dust grains using a simple model of protoplanetary disk hosted by a giant gaseous vortex. We explore the dependence of the results on grain size and deduce possible consequences and predictions for observations of the dust thermal emission at submillimeter and millimeter wavelengths. Methods: Global 2D simulations with a bi-fluid code are used to follow the evolution of a single population of solid particles aerodynamically coupled to the gas. Possible observational signatures of the dust thermal emission are obtained using simulators of ALMA and Nest Generation Very Large Array (ngVLA) observations. Results: We find that a giant vortex not only captures dust grains with Stokes number St< 1 but can also affect the distribution of larger grains (with St 1) carving a gap associated with a ring composed of incompletely trapped particles. The results are presented for different particle sizes and associated with their possible signatures in disk observations. Conclusions: Gap clearing in the dust spatial distribution could be due to the interaction with a giant gaseous vortex and their associated spiral waves without the gravitational assistance of a planet. Hence, strong dust concentrations at short sub-mm wavelengths associated with a gap and an irregular ring at longer mm and cm wavelengths could indicate the presence of an unseen gaseous vortex.

  19. Status of dust measurements by the Student Dust Counter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horanyi, M.; Szalay, J.; Poppe, A.

    2012-04-01

    The Student Dust Counter (SDC) experiment of the New Horizons Mission is an impact dust detector designed to map the spatial and size distribution of dust along the trajectory of the spacecraft across the solar system. The sensors are thin, permanently polarized polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) plastic films that generate an electrical signal when dust particles penetrate their surface. SDC is capable of detecting particles with masses m≥ 10-12 g, and it has a total sensitive surface area of about 0.1 m2, pointing most of the time close to the ram direction of the spacecraft. SDC provides the first dust measurements beyond 18 AU, where the Pioneer sensors stopped working. After the Pluto-Charon fly-by, SDC will continue to measure dust on in the Kuiper Belt. These observations will advance our understanding of the origin and evolution of our own solar system, and allow for comparative studies of planet formation in dust disks around other stars. This talk will briefly review the SDC instrument, the most recent data, and the constraints on the dust production rate in the Kuiper Belt, based on SDC observations and Pioneer. We will also make predictions for the Cassini spacecraft for the detection of dust originating from the Kuiper Belt.

  20. The Dust Bowl in the American West: A geochemical record of dust provenance and deposition in the Upper Fremont Glacier ice core

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, S. M.; Aciego, S.; Blakowski, M. A.; Delmonte, B.

    2016-12-01

    Mineral dust is an important component of earth surface processes, and influences the present-day climate through both direct and indirect means. Dust is also critical to biogeochemical cycles, providing limiting nutrients to both continental and marine ecosystems. Mineral dust generation, transport and deposition are detectable in paleoclimate records from land, ocean, and ice, providing valuable insight into earth surface conditions and cycles on a variety of timescales. Here, we have characterized dust from areas in the American West known for dust events and/or affected by increasing human settlement and livestock grazing during the last 150 years. Dust generation and uplift from these dust source areas depends on climate and land use practices; furthermore, the relative contribution of dust has likely changed since the expansion of industrialization and agriculture into the western United States. In tandem with the potential dust source characterization, we present elemental and isotopic analysis of dust preserved in the Upper Fremont Glacier (UFG) ice core, WY, USA through a series of 23 ice core samples. These ice core samples span 20.29-158.74 m in depth and cover a time period of 1715-1998 A.D. and were analyzed along with 28 potential dust source area samples using traditional Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) for 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd composition. Trace element concentrations were determined using Inductively Coupled Plasma Sector Field Mass Spectrometry (ICP-SFMS), and ice core dust concentration and size distribution by Coulter Counter. We find that the radiogenic isotope compositions of dust from the UFG ice core are variable over the past 150 years, and that the dust is most likely originating from a combination of source areas including the provinces of the Colorado Plateau, Mojavia, the Basin and Range, and an additional uncharacterized source. Ice core dust particle diameter increases with decreasing age, suggesting a source

  1. Improved Understanding of ice and dust processes using Data Assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, C.; Richardson, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    We use the DART Data Assimilation (DA) framework to ingest radiance observations from the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) into the PlanetWRF Mars General Circulation Model (GCM) and measure the skill of the model in reproducing the observations, and hence to test and improve understanding of the aerosol processes at the heart of Martian climate. The DA framework is used to constrain the surface ice properties in the model using the TES radiance observations and lander pressure measurements as independent constraints on the ice properties. We compare the skill of two ice models in reproducing the TES radiance observations while simultaneously matching lander pressure observations. In one model the effect of subsurface ice is contained within the surface albedo and emissivity parameterization, in the second model subsurface ice is parameterized based on Gamma Ray Spectrometer (GRS) data. Both models reproduce the pressure cycle observed by the Viking Lander instruments, but the model with subsurface ice performs significantly better at reproducing the TES radiance observations over the ice-covered poles. We also use the DA framework to investigate the model skill using the Conrath vertical dust profile (with a near surface maximum dust abundance) and a modified dust profile with high altitude maximum that has been inferred from limb observations by the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) and the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES). The GCM using the modified dust profile produces an atmosphere with thermal lapse rate closer to that measured using nadir observations from TES.

  2. Airborne dust distributions over the Tibetan Plateau and surrounding areas derived from the first year of CALIPSO lidar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Liu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Using an analysis of the first full year of CALIPSO lidar measurements, this paper derives unprecedented, altitude-resolved seasonal distributions of desert dust transported over the Tibetan Plateau (TP and the surrounding areas. The CALIPSO lidar observations include numerous large dust plumes over the northern slope and eastern part of the TP, with the largest number of dust events occurring in the spring of 2007, and some layers being lofted to altitudes of 11–12 km. Generation of the Tibetan airborne dusts appears to be largely associated with source regions to the north and on the eastern part of the plateau. Examination of the CALIPSO time history reveals an "airborne dust corridor" due to the eastward transport of dusts originating primarily in these source areas. This corridor extends from west to east and shows a seasonality largely modulated by the TP through its dynamical and thermal forcing on the atmospheric flows. On the southern side, desert dust particles originate predominately in Northwest India and Pakistan. The dust transport occurs primarily in dry seasons around the TP western and southern slopes and dust particles become mixed with local polluted aerosols. No significant amount of dust appears to be transported over the Himalayas. Extensive forward trajectory simulations are also conducted to confirm the dust transport pattern from the nearby sources observed by the CALIPSO lidar. Comparisons with the OMI and MODIS measurements show the unique capability of the CALIPSO lidar to provide unambiguous, altitude-resolved dust measurements.

  3. Thermal Spray Coatings for Coastal Infrastructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, G.R.; Covino, BernardS. Jr.; Cramer, S.D.; Bullard, S.J.

    1997-11-01

    Several protection strategies for coastal infrastructure using thermal-spray technology are presented from research at the Albany Research Center. Thermal-sprayed zinc coatings for anodes in impressed current cathodic protection systems are used to extend the service lives of reinforced concrete bridges along the Oregon coast. Thermal-sprayed Ti is examined as an alternative to the consumable zinc anode. Sealed thermal-sprayed Al is examined as an alternative coating to zinc dust filled polyurethane paint for steel structures.

  4. Which sources of dust contribute more to tropospheric dust aerosols over the Tibetan Plateau ? Assessment from five years modeling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, R.; Zhao, C.; Hu, Z.; Gong, D.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Dust aerosol over the Tibetan Plateau (TP) not only impacts local climate by cooling the atmosphere near the surface and by heating the atmosphere aloft, but also exerts influences on regional climate such as the onset and intensity of South Asian monsoon through modifying thermal forcing. It is known that the dust aerosol over the TP originates from local and remote sources such as the Taklimakan Desert to the north of the TP, the Middle East to the southwest of the TP, and the North Africa. However, relative significance of these dust sources and their seasonal changes are not clear. In this study, a Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model was employed to clarify the relative contribution of different sources to the dust aerosols over the TP and their seasonal variations. Results show that the North Africa and the Middle East are the main sources to the dust column mass over the TP with respective contribution ratios of 40%. The Taklimakan Desert contributes nearly 20% of dust column mass over the TP. The North Africa contributes more during spring and the Middle East and the Taklimakan Desert contribute more during summer. In the troposphere, the North Africa and the Middle East are comparable with contribution ratios of 30% to the dust concentration in the mid troposphere over the TP. The Taklimakan Desert contributes a bit more as compared to other sources with a contribution ratio of 40%. In the high troposphere, the North Africa and Mid East are the main sources of the dust concentration in the atmosphere over the TP, because the contribution of the Taklimakan Desert is less than 10%.

  5. Estimation of graphite dust production in ITER TBM using finite element method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Ji-Ho, E-mail: jhkang@kaeri.re.kr [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daekeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Eung Seon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111, Daekeok-Daero, Yuseong-Gu, Daejeon 305-353 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Mu-Young; Lee, Youngmin; Park, Yi-Hyun; Cho, Seungyon [National Fusion Research Institute, 169-148, Gwahak-ro, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Highlights: • Graphite dust production was estimated for the Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector. • Wear amount was calculated by Archard model using finite element analysis results. • Life time estimation of graphite dust production was done. - Abstract: In this study, an estimation method of graphite dust production in the pebble-bed type reflector region of the Korean Helium Cooled Ceramic Reflector (HCCR) Test Blanket Module (TBM) of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) project using Finite Element Method (FEM) was proposed and the total amount of dust production was calculated. A unit-cell model of uniformly arranged pebbles was defined with thermal and mechanical loadings. A commercial FEM program, Abaqus V6.10, was used to model and solve the stress field under multiple contact constraints between pebbles in the unit-cell. Resultant normal contact forces and slip distances on the contact points were applied into the Archard adhesive wear model to calculate the amount of graphite dust. The Finite Element (FE) analysis was repeated at 27 unit-cell locations chosen to form an interpolated dust density function for the entire region of the reflector. The dust production calculation was extended to the life time of the HCCR and the total graphite dust production was estimated to 0.279 g at the end of the life time with the maximum graphite dust density of 0.149 μg/mm{sup 3}. The dust explosion could be a safety issue with the calculated dust density level and it requires that an appropriate maintenance to remove sufficient amount of graphite dust regularly to prevent the possibility of dust explosion.

  6. Planck intermediate results. XXXVIII. E- and B-modes of dust polarization from the magnetized filamentary structure of the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planck Collaboration; Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Arnaud, M.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.; Baccigalupi, C.; Banday, A. J.; Barreiro, R. B.; Bartolo, N.; Battaner, E.; Benabed, K.; Benoit-Lévy, A.; Bernard, J.-P.; Bersanelli, M.; Bielewicz, P.; Bonaldi, A.; Bonavera, L.; Bond, J. R.; Borrill, J.; Bouchet, F. R.; Boulanger, F.; Bracco, A.; Burigana, C.; Calabrese, E.; Cardoso, J.-F.; Catalano, A.; Chamballu, A.; Chary, R.-R.; Chiang, H. C.; Christensen, P. R.; Colombo, L. P. L.; Combet, C.; Crill, B. P.; Curto, A.; Cuttaia, F.; Danese, L.; Davies, R. D.; Davis, R. J.; de Bernardis, P.; de Rosa, A.; de Zotti, G.; Delabrouille, J.; Delouis, J.-M.; Dickinson, C.; Diego, J. M.; Dole, H.; Donzelli, S.; Doré, O.; Douspis, M.; Dunkley, J.; Dupac, X.; Efstathiou, G.; Elsner, F.; Enßlin, T. A.; Eriksen, H. K.; Falgarone, E.; Ferrière, K.; Finelli, F.; Forni, O.; Frailis, M.; Fraisse, A. A.; Franceschi, E.; Frolov, A.; Galeotta, S.; Galli, S.; Ganga, K.; Ghosh, T.; Giard, M.; Gjerløw, E.; González-Nuevo, J.; Górski, K. M.; Gruppuso, A.; Guillet, V.; Hansen, F. K.; Harrison, D. L.; Helou, G.; Hernández-Monteagudo, C.; Herranz, D.; Hildebrandt, S. R.; Hivon, E.; Hornstrup, A.; Hovest, W.; Huang, Z.; Huffenberger, K. M.; Hurier, G.; Jaffe, T. R.; Jones, W. C.; Juvela, M.; Keihänen, E.; Keskitalo, R.; Kisner, T. S.; Kneissl, R.; Knoche, J.; Kunz, M.; Kurki-Suonio, H.; Lamarre, J.-M.; Lasenby, A.; Lattanzi, M.; Lawrence, C. R.; Leonardi, R.; León-Tavares, J.; Levrier, F.; Liguori, M.; Lilje, P. B.; Linden-Vørnle, M.; López-Caniego, M.; Lubin, P. M.; Macías-Pérez, J. F.; Maffei, B.; Maino, D.; Mandolesi, N.; Maris, M.; Martin, P. G.; Martínez-González, E.; Masi, S.; Matarrese, S.; McGehee, P.; Melchiorri, A.; Mennella, A.; Migliaccio, M.; Miville-Deschênes, M.-A.; Moneti, A.; Montier, L.; Morgante, G.; Mortlock, D.; Munshi, D.; Murphy, J. A.; Naselsky, P.; Nati, F.; Natoli, P.; Novikov, D.; Novikov, I.; Oppermann, N.; Oxborrow, C. A.; Pagano, L.; Pajot, F.; Paoletti, D.; Pasian, F.; Perdereau, O.; Pettorino, V.; Piacentini, F.; Piat, M.; Pierpaoli, E.; Plaszczynski, S.; Pointecouteau, E.; Polenta, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Pratt, G. W.; Prunet, S.; Puget, J.-L.; Rachen, J. P.; Reach, W. T.; Rebolo, R.; Reinecke, M.; Remazeilles, M.; Renault, C.; Renzi, A.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rocha, G.; Rosset, C.; Rossetti, M.; Roudier, G.; Rubiño-Martín, J. A.; Rusholme, B.; Sandri, M.; Santos, D.; Savelainen, M.; Savini, G.; Scott, D.; Serra, P.; Soler, J. D.; Stolyarov, V.; Sudiwala, R.; Sunyaev, R.; Suur-Uski, A.-S.; Sygnet, J.-F.; Tauber, J. A.; Terenzi, L.; Toffolatti, L.; Tomasi, M.; Tristram, M.; Tucci, M.; Umana, G.; Valenziano, L.; Valiviita, J.; Van Tent, B.; Vielva, P.; Villa, F.; Wade, L. A.; Wandelt, B. D.; Wehus, I. K.; Yvon, D.; Zacchei, A.; Zonca, A.

    2016-02-01

    The quest for a B-mode imprint from primordial gravity waves on the polarization of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) requires the characterization of foreground polarization from Galactic dust. We present a statistical study of the filamentary structure of the 353 GHz Planck Stokes maps at high Galactic latitude, relevant to the study of dust emission as a polarized foreground to the CMB. We filter the intensity and polarization maps to isolate filaments in the range of angular scales where the power asymmetry between E-modes and B-modes is observed. Using the Smoothed Hessian Major Axis Filament Finder (SMAFF), we identify 259 filaments at high Galactic latitude, with lengths larger or equal to 2° (corresponding to 3.5 pc in length for a typical distance of 100 pc). Thesefilaments show a preferred orientation parallel to the magnetic field projected onto the plane of the sky, derived from their polarization angles. We present mean maps of the filaments in Stokes I, Q, U, E, and B, computed by stacking individual images rotated to align the orientations of the filaments. Combining the stacked images and the histogram of relative orientations, we estimate the mean polarization fraction of the filaments to be 11%. Furthermore, we show that the correlation between the filaments and the magnetic field orientations may account for the E and B asymmetry and the CℓTE/CℓEE ratio, reported in the power spectra analysis of the Planck353 GHz polarization maps. Future models of the dust foreground for CMB polarization studies will need to take into account the observed correlation between the dust polarization and the structure of interstellar matter.

  7. Antenna Design and Foreground Characterization for Improved Detection of the Redshifted 21 cm Global Signature During the Epoch of Reionization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzen, Thomas J.; Bowman, Judd D.; Monsalve, Raul A.; Rogers, Alan E. E.

    2018-01-01

    The Experiment to Detect the Global Epoch of Reionization (EoR) Signature (EDGES) is an effort to measure the sky-averaged redshifted 21 cm difference temperature, Tb, with a single wide field-of-view well-calibrated antenna placed in Western Australia. Tb is due to interactions of the hyperfine ground state of HI with the CMB and is four to five orders of magnitude dimmer than the foreground synchrotron radiation whose removal requires very low systematic errors in data collection. I analyzed two different antenna designs, a rectangular blade-shaped antenna and a fourpoint-shaped antenna, by comparing and quantifying the impact of the chromatic nature of the antenna beam directivity. Foreground removal of simulated antenna temperatures, formed by convolving a frequency scaled Haslam 408 MHz sky map with each of the antenna’s chromatic beams, resulted in a factor of 10 lower rms error for the blade antenna when using a five term polynomial for the sky foreground. The signal to noise ratio was at a maximum when five terms were used to represent the sky foreground and was superior for the blade antenna by factors between 1.35 and 1.95. These results led to the conversion of all EDGES antenna designs to the blade design. The spectral index, β, of the sky was measured, using 211 nights of data, to be ‑2.60 > β > ‑2.62 in lower LST regions, increasing to ‑2.50 near the Galactic plane. I compared our measurements with spectral index simulations derived from two published sky maps and found good agreement at the transit of the Galactic Center, but at other LST values tended to overpredict by at most by Δβ < 0.05 for one map and by Δβ < 0.12 for the other. The EDGES instrument is shown to be very stable throughout the observations as the data scatter is very low, σβ < 0.003, and the total systematic uncertainty in β is 0.02. The improved systematic error enhances our ability to detect EoR signatures. I present preliminary results that show an EoR model by

  8. Gravimetric dust sampling for control purposes and occupational dust sampling.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1997-02-01

    Full Text Available Prior to the introduction of gravimetric dust sampling, konimeters had been used for dust sampling, which was largely for control purposes. Whether or not absolute results were achievable was not an issue since relative results were used to evaluate...

  9. Simulating the Regional Impact of Dust on the Middle East Climate and the Red Sea

    KAUST Repository

    Osipov, Sergey

    2018-01-19

    The Red Sea is located between North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula, the largest sources of dust in the world. Satellite retrievals show very high aerosol optical depth in the region, which increases during the summer season, especially over the southern Red Sea. Previously estimated and validated radiative effect from dust is expected to have a profound thermal and dynamic impact on the Red Sea, but that impact has not yet been studied or evaluated. Due to the strong dust radiative effect at the sea surface, uncoupled ocean modeling approaches with prescribed atmospheric boundary conditions result in an unrealistic ocean response. Therefore, to study the impact of dust on the regional climate of the Middle East and the Red Sea, we employed the Regional Ocean Modeling System fully coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting model. We modified the atmospheric model to account for the radiative effect of dust. The simulations show that, in the equilibrium response, dust cools the Red Sea, reduces the surface wind speed, and weakens both the exchange at the Bab-el-Mandeb strait and the overturning circulation. The salinity distribution, freshwater, and heat budgets are significantly altered. A validation of the simulations against satellite products indicates that accounting for radiative effect from dust almost completely removes the bias and reduces errors in the top of the atmosphere fluxes and sea surface temperature. Our results suggest that dust plays an important role in the energy balance, thermal, and circulation regimes in the Red Sea.

  10. The Coupled Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Understanding How Clouds Affect the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are crucial to the current Martian climate, and they are coupled through cloud formation. Dust strongly impacts the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation, while clouds provide radiative forcing and control the hemispheric exchange of water through the modification of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent improvements in the quality and sophistication of both observations and climate models allow for a more comprehensive understanding of how the interaction between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) affects the dust and water cycles individually. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distribution of dust and water, and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. For this study, we utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) combined with the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM). We demonstrate that the magnitude and nature of the net meridional transport of water between the northern and southern hemispheres during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. We further examine how clouds influence the atmospheric thermal structure and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to identify and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  11. Large Eddy Simulation of Dust Devils on Mars Using MarsWRF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhaopeng; Richardson, Mark I.; Newman, Claire E.; Zhang, Xi

    2017-10-01

    Large eddy simulations (LES) of convective cells and vortices in the Martian convective boundary layer are performed employing a Mars version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model (WRF), adapted to use periodic boundary conditions. A wind stress dust lifting scheme is used to determine dust lifting, and the lifted dust is entrained into the vortices to form dust devils. Several cases are run at various locations in 1 deg x 1 deg domains at horizontal resolutions of 100 to 300m. Surface albedo, thermal inertia and solar forcing are set uniform across the domain, using values obtained from the MarsWRF General Circulation Model (GCM) at the same locations. This is for greater realism, and to facilitate later comparison with planetary boundary layer (PBL) and dust devil predictions based on sub-grid scale parameterizations in the GCM.An initial case with passive dust (no radiative response to the dust lifted) enables the tracking of dust in the vortices during the evolution of dust devils. The wind stress threshold that controls dust particle lifting from the surface is tuned to make the column dust opacity match that of the MarsWRF GCM. The simulation is run from 5 am to 6 pm to cover the whole Martian daytime period. From 11 am, near-surface convection begins to grow intensively due to the rapidly increasing solar heating, and dust devils start to form. The dust height as well as the PBL height reach the highest level in the afternoon. Another case with radiatively active dust is performed to investigate the feedback of dust devils to the background atmosphere. Relationships between the size of convective cells, the number of dust devils, and the PBL height are also investigated. The LES results are then compared with those of the GCM at the same location to evaluate the existing PBL and dust devil parameterization schemes. The information obtained in this work can be used to improve our understanding of dust devils on Mars and to improve parameterizations

  12. Of data and dust

    CERN Multimedia

    Stephanie Hills

    2016-01-01

    The traditional image of an archive is one of dusty old boxes, books and papers. When your archive is digital, dust spells disaster. An innovative environmental sensor designed and built by a CERN IT specialist has become an essential element in the Laboratory’s data-preservation strategy.   The novel air particle monitoring sensor designed by CERN's Julien Leduc. CERN’s archive holds more than 130 petabytes of data from past and present high-energy physics experiments. Some of it is 40 years old, most of it needs to be kept forever, and all of it is held on tape cartridges (over 20,000 of them). The cartridges are held inside tape libraries with robotic arms that load them into tape drives where they can be read and written. Tape cartridges have many advantages over other data storage media, notably cost and long-term reliability, but topping the list of drawbacks is their vulnerability to contamination from airborne dust particles; a tiny piece of g...

  13. Dust in planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloan, G. C.

    2017-10-01

    Infrared spectra from the Spitzer Space Telescope trace the evolution of carbon-rich dust from the asymptotic giant branch (AGB) to young planetary nebulae (PNe). On the AGB, amorphous carbon dominates the dust, but SiC and MgS also appear. In more evolved systems with warmer central stars, the spectra reveal the unidentified 21 μm feature, features from aliphatic hydrocarbons, and spectra from polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), often with shifted feature positions indicative of the presence of aliphatics. More evolved systems with hot central stars show more typical PAH spectra, along with fullerenes and/or an emission feature known as the big-11 feature at ~11 μm. This features arises from a combination of SiC and PAHs, and it is usually accompanied by a shoulder at 18 μm, which while unidentified might be from cool silicate grains. The strong emission from MgS and SiC in young PNe probably arises from coatings on carbonaceous grains.

  14. Dust on Mars: An Aeolian Threat to Human Exploration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.

    1999-09-01

    The NASA HEDS Program is duly concerned for human explorers regarding the potential hazard posed by the ubiquitous dust mantle on Mars. To evaluate properties of dust that could be hazardous to humans, the NMS 2001 Lander payload will include the Mars Environmental Compatibility Assessment (MECA) experiment. This includes optical and atomic-force microscopy to evaluate soil grains for shape and size, wet chemistry to evaluate toxic substances, electrometry to evaluate triboelectric charging, and test-material palets to evaluate electrostatic and magnetic adhesion, and the hardness/abrasiveness of soil grains; these experimental subcomponents are delivered samples by the camera-equipped robotic arm of the lander which will acquire material from depths of 0.5 to 1.0 m in the soil. Data returned by MECA will be of value to both the hEDS and planetary/astrobiology communities. Dust poses a threat to human exploration because the martian system does not hydrologically or chemically remove fine particles that are being continuously generated by thermal, aeolian, and colluvial weathering, and by volcanism and impact over billions of years. The dust is extremely fine-grained, in copious quantities, ubiquitous in distribution, continually mobile, and a source of poorly-grounded static charges -- a suite of characteristics posing a particulate and electrical threat to explorers and their equipment. Dust is mobilized on global and regional scales, but probably also unpredictably and violently at local scales by dust devils. The latter might be expected in great abundance owing to near surface atmospheric instability (dust devils were detected by Pathfinder during its brief lifetime). Preliminary laboratory experiments suggest that space-suit materials subjected to windblown dust may acquire a uniform, highly adhesive dust layer that is also highly cohesive laterally owing to electrostatic forces. This layer will obscure visibility through the helmet visor, penetrate joints

  15. Long-lived Dust Asymmetries at Dead Zone Edges in Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, Ryan; Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Jin, Sheng

    2017-02-01

    A number of transition disks exhibit significant azimuthal asymmetries in thermal dust emission. One possible origin for these asymmetries is dust trapping in vortices formed at the edges of dead zones. We carry out high-resolution, two-dimensional hydrodynamic simulations of this scenario, including the effects of dust feedback. We find that, although feedback weakens the vortices and slows down the process of dust accumulation, the dust distribution in the disk can nonetheless remain asymmetric for many thousands of orbits. We show that even after 104 orbits, or 2.5 Myr when scaled to the parameters of Oph IRS 48 (a significant fraction of its age), the dust is not dispersed into an axisymmetric ring, in contrast to the case of a vortex formed by a planet. This is because accumulation of mass at the dead zone edge constantly replenishes the vortex, preventing it from being fully destroyed. We produce synthetic dust emission images using our simulation results. We find that multiple small clumps of dust may be distributed azimuthally. These clumps, if not resolved from one another, appear as a single large feature. A defining characteristic of a disk with a dead zone edge is that an asymmetric feature is accompanied by a ring of dust located about twice as far from the central star.

  16. Dust Formation, Evolution, and Obscuration Effects in the Very High-Redshift Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwek, Eli; Staguhn, Johannes; Arendt, Richard G.; Kovacs, Attila; Su, Ting; Benford, Dominic J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z > or approx. 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally-condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production comported to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This "silicate-UV break" may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxies' photometric redshift. In this paper we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution (SED) of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high redshift universe. Subject headings: galaxies: high-redshift - galaxies: evolution - galaxies: individual (MACS1149- JD) - Interstellar medium (ISM), nebulae: dust, extinction - physical data and processes: nuclear reactions, nucleosynthesis, abundances.

  17. Dust and the Sick Building Syndrome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gyntelberg, Finn; Suadicani, Poul; Wohlfahrt Nielsen, Jan

    1994-01-01

    Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome......Farmakologi, bacteria, dust, histamine, disease, gram-negative, indoor climate, sick building syndrome...

  18. Dust Migration in Gravitationally Active Protoplanetary Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backus, I.; Quinn, T.

    2017-05-01

    Solid growth and planet formation may require dense regions of dust. I investigate dust migration concentration, in gravitationally active protoplanetary disks using high resolution, 3D SPH simulations.

  19. Selective attention to task-irrelevant emotional distractors is unaffected by the perceptual load associated with a foreground task.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Hindi Attar

    Full Text Available A number of studies have shown that emotionally arousing stimuli are preferentially processed in the human brain. Whether or not this preference persists under increased perceptual load associated with a task at hand remains an open question. Here we manipulated two possible determinants of the attentional selection process, perceptual load associated with a foreground task and the emotional valence of concurrently presented task-irrelevant distractors. As a direct measure of sustained attentional resource allocation in early visual cortex we used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs elicited by distinct flicker frequencies of task and distractor stimuli. Subjects either performed a detection (low load or discrimination (high load task at a centrally presented symbol stream that flickered at 8.6 Hz while task-irrelevant neutral or unpleasant pictures from the International Affective Picture System (IAPS flickered at a frequency of 12 Hz in the background of the stream. As reflected in target detection rates and SSVEP amplitudes to both task and distractor stimuli, unpleasant relative to neutral background pictures more strongly withdrew processing resources from the foreground task. Importantly, this finding was unaffected by the factor 'load' which turned out to be a weak modulator of attentional processing in human visual cortex.

  20. Dust in protoplanetary disks: observations*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waters L.B.F.M.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Solid particles, usually referred to as dust, are a crucial component of interstellar matter and of planet forming disks surrounding young stars. Despite the relatively small mass fraction of ≈1% (in the solar neighborhood of our galaxy; this number may differ substantially in other galaxies that interstellar grains represent of the total mass budget of interstellar matter, dust grains play an important role in the physics and chemistry of interstellar matter. This is because of the opacity dust grains at short (optical, UV wavelengths, and the surface they provide for chemical reactions. In addition, dust grains play a pivotal role in the planet formation process: in the core accretion model of planet formation, the growth of dust grains from the microscopic size range to large, cm-sized or larger grains is the first step in planet formation. Not only the grain size distribution is affected by planet formation. Chemical and physical processes alter the structure and chemical composition of dust grains as they enter the protoplanetary disk and move closer to the forming star. Therefore, a lot can be learned about the way stars and planets are formed by observations of dust in protoplanetary disks. Ideally, one would like to measure the dust mass, the grain size distribution, grain structure (porosity, fluffiness, the chemical composition, and all of these as a function of position in the disk. Fortunately, several observational diagnostics are available to derive constrains on these quantities. In combination with rapidly increasing quality of the data (spatial and spectral resolution, a lot of progress has been made in our understanding of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks. An excellent review of dust evolution in protoplanetary disks can be found in Testi et al. (2014.

  1. Reducing Contact Resistance Errors In Measuring Thermal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Values of thermal conductivity (k) of glass beads, quartz sand, stone dust and clay were determined using a thermal probe with and without heat sink compounds (arctic silver grease (ASG) and white grease (WG)) at different water contents, bulk densities and particle sizes. The heat sink compounds (HSC) increased k at ...

  2. Radiative shocks create environments for dust formation in classical novae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derdzinski, Andrea M.; Metzger, Brian D.; Lazzati, Davide

    2017-08-01

    Classical novae commonly show evidence of rapid dust formation within months of the outburst. However, it is unclear how molecules and grains are able to condense within the ejecta, given the potentially harsh environment created by ionizing radiation from the white dwarf. Motivated by the evidence for powerful radiative shocks within nova outflows, we propose that dust formation occurs within the cool, dense shell behind these shocks. We incorporate a simple molecular chemistry network and classical nucleation theory with a model for the thermodynamic evolution of the post-shock gas, in order to demonstrate the formation of both carbon and forsterite (Mg2SiO4) grains. The high densities due to radiative shock compression (n ˜ 1014 cm-3) result in CO saturation and rapid dust nucleation. Grains grow efficiently to large sizes ≳ 0.1 μm, in agreement with IR observations of dust-producing novae, and with total dust masses sufficient to explain massive extinction events such as V705 Cas. As in dense stellar winds, dust formation is CO-regulated, with carbon-rich flows producing carbon-rich grains and oxygen-rich flows primarily forming silicates. CO is destroyed by non-thermal particles accelerated at the shock, allowing additional grain formation at late times, but the efficiency of this process appears to be low. Given observations showing that individual novae produce both carbonaceous and silicate grains, we concur with previous works attributing this bimodality to chemical heterogeneity of the ejecta. Nova outflows are diverse and inhomogeneous, and the observed variety of dust formation events can be reconciled by different abundances, the range of shock properties, and the observer viewing angle. The latter may govern the magnitude of extinction, with the deepest extinction events occurring for observers within the binary equatorial plane.

  3. COAL DUST EMISSION PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The article aims to develop 2D numerical models for the prediction of atmospheric pollution during transportation of coal in the railway car, as well as the ways to protect the environment and the areas near to the mainline from the dust emission due to the air injection installation. Methodology. To solve this problem there were developed numerical models based on the use of the equations of motion of an inviscid incompressible fluid and mass transfer. For the numerical integration of the transport equation of the pollutant the implicit alternating-triangular difference scheme was used. For numerical integration of the 2D equation for the velocity potential the method of total approximation was used. The developed numerical models are the basis of established software package. On the basis of the constructed numerical models it was carried out a computational experiment to assess the level of air pollution when transporting bulk cargo by rail when the railway car has the air injection. Findings. 2D numerical models that belong to the class «diagnostic models» were developed. These models take into account the main physical factors affecting the process of dispersion of dust pollution in the atmosphere during transportation of bulk cargo. The developed numerical models make it possible to calculate the dust loss process, taking into account the use of the air injection of the car. They require a small cost of the computer time during practical realization at the low and medium power machines. There were submitted computational calculations to determine pollutant concentrations and the formation of the zone of pollution near the train with bulk cargo in «microscale» scale taking into account the air curtains. Originality. 2D numerical models taking into account the relevant factors influencing the process of dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere, and the formation of the zone of pollution during transportation of bulk cargo by

  4. Destruction of Interstellar Dust in Evolving Supernova Remnant Shock Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavin, Jonathan D.; Dwek, Eli; Jones, Anthony P.

    2015-01-01

    Supernova generated shock waves are responsible for most of the destruction of dust grains in the interstellar medium (ISM). Calculations of the dust destruction timescale have so far been carried out using plane parallel steady shocks, however that approximation breaks down when the destruction timescale becomes longer than that for the evolution of the supernova remnant (SNR) shock. In this paper we present new calculations of grain destruction in evolving, radiative SNRs. To facilitate comparison with the previous study by Jones et al. (1996), we adopt the same dust properties as in that paper. We find that the efficiencies of grain destruction are most divergent from those for a steady shock when the thermal history of a shocked gas parcel in the SNR differs significantly from that behind a steady shock. This occurs in shocks with velocities 200 km s(exp -1) for which the remnant is just beginning to go radiative. Assuming SNRs evolve in a warm phase dominated ISM, we find dust destruction timescales are increased by a factor of approximately 2 compared to those of Jones et al. (1996), who assumed a hot gas dominated ISM. Recent estimates of supernova rates and ISM mass lead to another factor of approximately 3 increase in the destruction timescales, resulting in a silicate grain destruction timescale of approximately 2-3 Gyr. These increases, while not able resolve the problem of the discrepant timescales for silicate grain destruction and creation, are an important step towards understanding the origin, and evolution of dust in the ISM.

  5. Spectrophotometry of Dust in Comet Hale-Bopp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witteborn, Fred C. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Comets, such as Hale-Bopp (C/1995 O1), are frozen reservoirs of primitive solar nebula dust grains and ices. Analysis of the composition of cometary dust grains from infrared spectroscopic techniques permits an estimation of the types of organic and inorganic materials that constituted the early primitive solar nebula. In addition, the cometary bombardment of the Earth (approximately 3.5 Gy ago) supplied the water for the oceans and brought organic materials to Earth which may have been biogenic. Spectroscopic observations of comet Hale-Bopp suggest the possible presence of organic hydrocarbon species, silicate and olivine dust grains, and water ice. Spectroscopy near 3 microns obtained in Nov 1996 r=2.393 AU, delta=3.034 AU) shows a feature which we attribute to PAH emission. The spatial morphology of the 3.28 microns PAH feature is also presented. Optical and infrared spectrophotometric observations of comets convey valuable information about the spatial distribution and properties of dust and gas within the inner coma. In the optical and NIR shortward of 2 microns, the observed light is primarily scattered sunlight from the dust grains. At longer wavelengths, particularly in the 10 gm window, thermal emission from these grains dominates the radiation allowing an accurate estimate of grain sizes and chemical composition. Here we present an initial analysis of spectra taken with the NASA HIFOGS at 7-14 microns as part of a multiwavelength temporal study of the "comet of the century".

  6. Dust removal and filter technology. Entstaubungs- und Filtertechnik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stockmann, H.W. (DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany). DMT-Institut fuer Staubbekaempfung, Gefahrstoffe und Ergonomie); Henke, B. (DMT-Gesellschaft fuer Forschung und Pruefung mbH, Essen (Germany). DMT-Institut fuer Staubbekaempfung, Gefahrstoffe und Ergonomie)

    1991-01-01

    New approaches were adopted in filter technology to respond to technological changes in mechanized mining and to allow perfect dust removal in keeping with occupational hygiene requirements. Self-supporting filter materials based on ceramic fibres and synthetic granulates were taken to develop filter elements allowing lamination to enhance their separation-active surface area. Filter materials made from thermally fixed fibre nonwovens were processed to form plicated filter bags of the same structural volume but with a surface area increased by a factor of 2.5. Integrated inlet nozzles were developed to allow these elements to be cleaned of dust deposits. These nozzles were also studied in basic filter-technology tests. A test rig supplied design findings which were included in a study to develop new generations of dedusters. A reduction of design volume and an increase of through-put rate greater than 20% could be predicted. Service tests with modified filter materials were run for ventilation-air dust dust removal both for whole faces and for face segments. The benefits of filter technology for face, face opening and drifting were highlighted. New methods for wetting and transport of the dust removed from the dedusters were developed. New concepts of exhaust-air filter separators allow flat storage bunkers to be used in pneumatic conveyance of building materials at the face. (orig.)

  7. Dust interferometers in plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Chaudhuri, M; Thomas, H M

    2016-01-01

    An interferometric imaging technique has been proposed to instantly measure the diameter of individual spherical dust particles suspended in a gas discharge plasma. The technique is based on the defocused image analysis of both spherical particles and their binary agglomerates. Above a critical diameter, the defocused images of spherical particles contain stationary interference fringe patterns and the fringe number increases with particle diameters. Below this critical diameter, the particle size has been measured using the rotational interference fringe patterns which appear only on the defocused images of binary agglomerates. In this case, a lower cut-off limit of particle diameter has been predicted, below which no such rotational fringe patterns are observed for the binary agglomerates. The method can be useful as a diagnostics for complex plasma experiments on earth as well as under microgravity condition.

  8. Measurements of Selected Air Pollutants in Danish Homes and Ozone Interaction with Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibenholt, Anni

    dust samples collected in Danish homes and offices. This high concentration was necessary in order to measure and determine the consumption of ozone in the outlet air from the FLEC. Measurements were corrected for FLEC wall effects by subtraction of the steady state reaction rate between ozone...... in the Field and Laboratory Emission Cell (FLEC) at different ozone concentrations and relative humidities (0, 25, and 50 % RH). One gram of dust was spread on a clean stainless steel plate which was placed in the FLEC. Steady state reaction rate (kDust) at 2.2 ppm ozone was determined for four different floor...... and a FLEC on a stainless steel plate without dust (kFLEC). The composition of organic compounds in the dust was analyzed by pressurized liquid extraction and thermal desorption GC-MS before and after ozone exposure. KFLEC was independent of the ozone concentration and the reaction was treated as first order...

  9. A Study of Mars Dust Environment Simulation at NASA Johnson Space Center Energy Systems Test Area Resource Conversion Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuan-Liang Albert

    1999-01-01

    The dust environment on Mars is planned to be simulated in a 20 foot thermal-vacuum chamber at the Johnson Space Center, Energy Systems Test Area Resource Conversion Test Facility in Houston, Texas. This vacuum chamber will be used to perform tests and study the interactions between the dust in Martian air and ISPP hardware. This project is to research, theorize, quantify, and document the Mars dust/wind environment needed for the 20 foot simulation chamber. This simulation work is to support the safety, endurance, and cost reduction of the hardware for the future missions. The Martian dust environment conditions is discussed. Two issues of Martian dust, (1) Dust Contamination related hazards, and (2) Dust Charging caused electrical hazards, are of our interest. The different methods of dust particles measurement are given. The design trade off and feasibility were studied. A glass bell jar system is used to evaluate various concepts for the Mars dust/wind environment simulation. It was observed that the external dust source injection is the best method to introduce the dust into the simulation system. The dust concentration of 30 Mg/M3 should be employed for preparing for the worst possible Martian atmosphere condition in the future. Two approaches thermal-panel shroud for the hardware conditioning are discussed. It is suggested the wind tunnel approach be used to study the dust charging characteristics then to be apply to the close-system cyclone approach. For the operation cost reduction purpose, a dehumidified ambient air could be used to replace the expensive CO2 mixture for some tests.

  10. Climatology of atmospheric circulation patterns of Arabian dust in western Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Mohammad Saeed; Sarraf, B S; Zarrin, A; Rasouli, A A

    2017-08-28

    Being in vicinity of vast deserts, the west and southwest of Iran are characterized by high levels of dust events, which have adverse consequences on human health, ecosystems, and environment. Using ground based dataset of dust events in western Iran and NCEP/NCAR reanalysis data, the atmospheric circulation patterns of dust events in the Arabian region and west of Iran are identified. The atmospheric circulation patterns which lead to dust events in the Arabian region and western Iran were classified into two main categories: the Shamal dust events that occurs in warm period of year and the frontal dust events as cold period pattern. In frontal dust events, the western trough or blocking pattern at mid-level leads to frontogenesis, instability, and air uplift at lower levels of troposphere in the southwest of Asia. Non-frontal is other pattern of dust event in the cold period and dust generation are due to the regional circulation systems at the lower level of troposphere. In Shamal wind pattern, the Saudi Arabian anticyclone, Turkmenistan anticyclone, and Zagros thermal low play the key roles in formation of this pattern. Summer and transitional patterns are two sub-categories of summer Shamal wind pattern. In summer trough pattern, the mid-tropospheric trough leads to intensify the surface thermal systems in the Middle East and causes instability and rising of wind speed in the region. In synthetic pattern of Shamal wind and summer trough, dust is created by the impact of a trough in mid-levels of troposphere as well as existing the mentioned regional systems which are contributed in formation of summer Shamal wind pattern.

  11. Dust lattice waves in Debye binary dust chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Kerong; Chen, Hui; Liu, Sanqiu

    2017-12-01

    The dust lattice waves in a one-dimensional Debye binary dust chain consisting of two distinct dust particle species with different charges and masses are investigated. It is found that there are two branches for both longitudinal and transverse modes, namely the optical mode of high frequency and the acoustic mode of low frequency, which will be merged into one ordinary longitudinal (transverse) mode of single dust chain. The influence of the parameters, i.e., the dimensionless lattice parameter α, the mass ratio σ, and the charge ratio ɛ of the two particles, on the dispersion relation of longitudinal and transverse waves is discussed. Furthermore, the branching and the merging of longitudinal and transverse waves are discussed in detail.

  12. The implications of dust for high-redshift protogalaxies and the formation of binary disks

    OpenAIRE

    Latif, M. A.; Schleicher, D. R. G.; Spaans, M.

    2012-01-01

    Numerical simulations suggest that the first galaxies are formed in protogalactic halos with virial temperatures ≥104 K. It is likely that such halos are polluted with trace amounts of metals produced by the first generation of stars. The presence of dust can significantly change the chemistry and dynamics of early galaxies. In this article, we aim to assess the role of dust on the thermal and dynamical evolution of the first galaxies in the presence of a background UV flux, and its ...

  13. Clumpy Dust Tori in Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hönig, Sebastian F.

    2008-01-01

    correlated fluxes than in the total fluxes, as observed with VLTI/MIDI in the 8-13 micron band. Comparison with the NGC 1068 multi-wavelength SED from Radio to the infrared shows that most of the unresolved MIR flux comes from thermal dust emission inside the torus, while in the NIR a possible synchrotron source or the accretion disk might be seen through "holes" in the clumpy torus. To get a better idea how much the accretion disk contributes to the NIR emission of AGN, we studied NIR colors of a sample of type 1 AGN which were observed in J-, H-, and K-band with HST/NICMOS. By comparing the observed colors with those expected from torus models, we found out that the accretion disk contributes typically reverberation radii of type 1 AGN were compared to theoretical predictions for the dust sublimation radius. Apparently, the reverberation radii are about a factor of 3 smaller than the expected sublimation radius for standard ISM dust grains. This discrepancy can be solved if the inner torus region is dominated by large carbon grains. We studied the feedback of AGN radiation on the dust torus. It was found out that dust which is smoothly distributed cannot withstand the radiation pressure from the AGN. On the other hand, self-gravitating clouds in clumpy tori can efficiently compensate the AGN radiation pressure. A physically-motivated clumpy torus model was used to study the impact of the AGN radiation on obscuration properties of the torus. We showed that below an AGN luminosity of ~10^42 erg/s, the associated low accretion rates can no longer support an obscuring torus. In the high-luminosity regime, large clouds become unbound so that the torus is dominated by smaller clouds. As a result, the covering factor and apparent scale height decrease with luminosity, so that the fraction of type 1 AGN should become larger at higher luminosities (and high radiative efficiencies). This picture offers a physical explanation for the long-standing "receding torus" phenomenon. One of

  14. [Causation, prevention and treatment of dust explosion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Maolong; Jia, Wenbin; Wang, Hongtao; Han, Fei; Li, Xiao-Qiang; Hu, Dahai

    2014-10-01

    With the development of industrial technology, dust explosion accidents have increased, causing serious losses of people's lives and property. With the development of economy, we should lay further emphasis on causation, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion. This article summarizes the background, mechanism, prevention, and treatment of dust explosion, which may provide some professional knowledge and reference for the treatment of dust explosion.

  15. 3D radiative transfer of intrinsically polarized dust emission based on aligned aspherical grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrang, G. H.-M.; Wolf, S.

    2017-08-01

    (Sub-)millimetre observations of the polarized emission of aligned aspherical dust grains enable us to study the magnetic fields within protoplanetary disc. However, the interpretation of these observations is complex. One must consider the various effects that alter the measured polarized signal, such as the shape of dust grains, the efficiency of grain alignment, the magnetic field properties and the projection of the signal along the line of sight. We aim at analysing observations of the polarized dust emission by disentangling the effects on the polarization signal in the context of 3D radiative transfer simulations. For this purpose, we developed a code capable of simulating dust grain alignment of aspherical grains and intrinsical polarization of thermal dust emission. We find that the influence of thermal polarization and dust grain alignment on the polarized emission displayed as spatially resolved polarization map or as spectral energy distribution trace disc properties that are not traced in total (unpolarized) emission such as the magnetic field topology. The radiative transfer simulations presented in this work enable the 3D analysis of intrinsically polarized dust emission - observed with e.g. Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) - which is essential to constrain magnetic field properties.

  16. PERSPECTIVE: Dust, fertilization and sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remer, Lorraine A.

    2006-11-01

    Aerosols, tiny suspended particles in the atmosphere, play an important role in modifying the Earth's energy balance and are essential for the formation of cloud droplets. Suspended dust particles lifted from the world's arid regions by strong winds contain essential minerals that can be transported great distances and deposited into the ocean or on other continents where productivity is limited by lack of usable minerals [1]. Dust can transport pathogens as well as minerals great distance, contributing to the spread of human and agricultural diseases, and a portion of dust can be attributed to human activity suggesting that dust radiative effects should be included in estimates of anthropogenic climate forcing. The greenish and brownish tints in figure 1 show the wide extent of monthly mean mineral dust transport, as viewed by the MODerate resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) satellite sensor. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite Figure 1. The monthly mean global aerosol system for February 2006 from the MODIS aboard the Terra satellite. The brighter the color, the greater the aerosol loading. Red and reddish tints indicate aerosol dominated by small particles created primarily from combustion processes. Green and brownish tints indicate larger particles created from wind-driven processes, usually transported desert dust. Note the bright green band at the southern edge of the Saharan desert, the reddish band it must cross if transported to the southwest and the long brownish transport path as it crosses the Atlantic to South America. Image courtesy of the NASA Earth Observatory (http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov). Even though qualitatively we recognize the extent and importance of dust transport and the role that it plays in fertilizing nutrient-limited regions, there is much that is still unknown. We are just now beginning to quantify the amount of dust that exits one continental region and the

  17. Infrared dust bubble CS51 and its interaction with the surrounding interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Swagat R.; Tej, Anandmayee; Vig, Sarita; Liu, Hong-Li; Liu, Tie; Ishwara Chandra, C. H.; Ghosh, Swarna K.

    2017-12-01

    A multiwavelength investigation of the southern infrared dust bubble CS51 is presented in this paper. We probe the associated ionized, cold dust, molecular and stellar components. Radio continuum emission mapped at 610 and 1300 MHz, using the Giant Metrewave Radio Telescope, India, reveals the presence of three compact emission components (A, B, and C) apart from large-scale diffuse emission within the bubble interior. Radio spectral index map shows the co-existence of thermal and non-thermal emission components. Modified blackbody fits to the thermal dust emission using Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer and Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver data is performed to generate dust temperature and column density maps. We identify five dust clumps associated with CS51 with masses and radius in the range 810-4600 M⊙ and 1.0-1.9 pc, respectively. We further construct the column density probability distribution functions of the surrounding cold dust which display the impact of ionization feedback from high-mass stars. The estimated dynamical and fragmentation time-scales indicate the possibility of collect and collapse mechanism in play at the bubble border. Molecular line emission from the Millimeter Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz survey is used to understand the nature of two clumps which show signatures of expansion of CS51.

  18. Surface System Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed effort will perform a detailed examination of dust mitigation and tolerance strategies for connections and mechanisms to be employed on the lunar...

  19. Regarding Electrified Martian Dust Storms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.

    2017-06-01

    We examine the dynamic competition between dust devil/storm charging currents and dissipating atmospheric currents. A question: Can high-current lightning be a dissipation product of this competition? Most likely not but there are exceptions.

  20. Loess and Eolian Dust Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Records of past environment derived from Loess and Eolian dust (silt-sized material deposited on the Earth surface by the surface winds. Parameter keywords describe...

  1. History and Flight Devleopment of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansen, Michael R.; Mackey, Paul J.; Hogue, Michael D.; Cox, Rachel E.; Phillips, James R., III; Calle, Carlos I.

    2015-01-01

    The surfaces of the moon, Mars, and that of some asteroids are covered with a layer of dust that may hinder robotic and human exploration missions. During the Apollo missions, for example, lunar dust caused a number of issues including vision obscuration, false instrument readings, contamination, and elevated temperatures. In fact, some equipment neared failure after only 75 hours on the lunar surface due to effects of lunar dust. NASA's Kennedy Space Center has developed an active technology to remove dust from surfaces during exploration missions. The Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS), which consists of a series of embedded electrodes in a high dielectric strength substrate, uses a low power, low frequency signal that produces an electric field wave that travels across the surface. This non-uniform electric field generates dielectrophoretic and electrostatic forces capable of moving dust out of these surfaces. Implementations of the EDS have been developed for solar radiators, optical systems, camera lenses, visors, windows, thermal radiators, and fabrics The EDS implementation for transparent applications (solar panels, optical systems, windows, etc.) uses transparent indium tin oxide electrodes on glass or transparent lm. Extensive testing was performed in a roughly simulated lunar environment (one-sixth gravity at 1 mPa atmospheric pressure) with lunar simulant dust. EDS panels over solar radiators showed dust removal that restored solar panel output reaching values very close to their initial output. EDS implementations for thermal radiator protection (metallic spacecraft surfaces with white thermal paint and reflective films) were also extensively tested at similar high vacuum conditions. Reflectance spectra for these types of implementations showed dust removal efficiencies in the 96% to 99% range. These tests indicate that the EDS technology is now at a Technology Readiness Level of 4 to 5. As part of EDS development, a flight version is being prepared for

  2. Building ceramics with improved thermal insulation parameters

    OpenAIRE

    Rzepa Karol; Wons Wojciech; Reben Manuela

    2016-01-01

    One of the most important performance characteristics of masonry units is their high thermal insulation. There are many different ways to improve this parameter, however the most popular methods in case of ceramic masonry units are: addition of pore-creating raw materials and application of proper hole pattern. This study was an attempt to improve thermal insulation of ceramics by applying thermal insulation additives. Perlite dust created as a subgrain from expansion of perlite rock was used...

  3. Laboratory study of asteroid surface processes due to electrostatic dust mobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu; Schwan, Joseph; Hood, Noah; Hsu, Hsiang-Wen; Horanyi, Mihaly

    2017-10-01

    Our recent laboratory work has shown a strong evidence that dust particles on the surface of airless bodies such as asteroids are expected to be electrostatically lofted or mobilized due to exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation or energetic electrons. These electrostatic processes may have a significant contribution in shaping the surfaces of asteroids or other airless bodies. One critical question is how efficient these processes can be in changing the surface physical characteristics of asteroids. Here we report a series of laboratory experiments that record dust activities as a function of the fluxes of UV photons or energetic electrons over a long exposure time. Our preliminary results show that the surface morphology is changed significantly due to dust mobilization and becomes smoothened over time, on millimeter-to-centimeter scale under Earth gravity. Our results also indicate that the dynamics of dust mobilization may be complicated by temporal charging effect as dust moves. It was found that dust mobilization largely depends on the size and type of dust particles. These new experimental data will help us better characterize the dynamics of electrostatic dust mobilization and can be ultimately extrapolated to the space situations in order to estimate the timescale of the electrostatic processes in comparison to other surface processes, e.g., thermal fragmentation.

  4. DUST FORMATION, EVOLUTION, AND OBSCURATION EFFECTS IN THE VERY HIGH-REDSHIFT UNIVERSE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwek, Eli; Benford, Dominic J. [Observational Cosmology Lab., Code 665, NASA at Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Staguhn, Johannes; Su, Ting [Also at Department of Physics and Astronomy, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD 21218, USA. (United States); Arendt, Richard G. [Also at CRESST, University of Maryland Baltimore County, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA. (United States); Kovacks, Attila, E-mail: eli.dwek@nasa.gov [Also at Astronomy Department, CalTech, Pasadena, CA 90025, USA. (United States)

    2014-06-20

    The evolution of dust at redshifts z ≳ 9, and consequently the dust properties, differs greatly from that in the local universe. In contrast to the local universe, core collapse supernovae (CCSNe) are the only source of thermally condensed dust. Because of the low initial dust-to-gas mass ratio, grain destruction rates are low, so that CCSNe are net producers of interstellar dust. Galaxies with large initial gas mass or high mass infall rate will therefore have a more rapid net rate of dust production compared to galaxies with lower gas mass, even at the same star formation rate. The dust composition is dominated by silicates, which exhibit a strong rise in the UV opacity near the Lyman break. This ''silicate-UV break'' may be confused with the Lyman break, resulting in a misidentification of a galaxy's photometric redshift. In this Letter we demonstrate these effects by analyzing the spectral energy distribution of MACS1149-JD, a lensed galaxy at z = 9.6. A potential 2 mm counterpart of MACS1149-JD has been identified with GISMO. While additional observations are required to corroborate this identification, we use this possible association to illustrate the physical processes and the observational effects of dust in the very high-redshift universe.

  5. Mineralogical analysis of dust collected from typical recycling line of waste printed circuit boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangfang; Zhao, Yuemin; Zhang, Tao; Duan, Chenlong; Wang, Lizhang

    2015-09-01

    As dust is one of the byproducts originating in the mechanical recycling process of waste printed circuit boards such as crushing and separating, from the viewpoints of resource reuse and environmental protection, an effective recycling method to recover valuable materials from this kind of dust is in urgent need. In this paper, detailed mineralogical analysis on the dust collected from a typical recycling line of waste printed circuit boards is investigated by coupling several analytical techniques. The results demonstrate that there are 73.1wt.% organic matters, 4.65wt.% Al, 4.55wt.% Fe, 2.67wt.% Cu and 1.06wt.% Pb in the dust, which reveals the dust is worthy of reuse and harmful to environment. The concentration ratios of Fe, Mn and Zn can reach 12.35, 12.33 and 6.67 respectively by magnetic separation. The yield of dust in each size fraction is nonuniform, while the yield of -0.75mm size fraction is up to 51.15wt.%; as the particle size decreases, the content of liberated metals and magnetic materials increase, and metals are mainly in elemental forms. The F, Cl and Br elements combing to C in the dust would make thermal treatment dangerous to the environment. Based on these results, a flowsheet to recycle the dust is proposed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Constraining the Dust Opacity Law in Three Small and Isolated Molecular Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, K. A.; Di Francesco, J.; Sadavoy, S.; Thanjavur, K.; Launhardt, R.; Shirley, Y.; Stutz, A.; Abreu Vicente, J.; Kainulainen, J.

    2017-11-01

    Density profiles of isolated cores derived from thermal dust continuum emission rely on models of dust properties, such as mass opacity, that are poorly constrained. With complementary measures from near-infrared extinction maps, we can assess the reliability of commonly used dust models. In this work, we compare Herschel-derived maps of the optical depth with equivalent maps derived from CFHT WIRCAM near-infrared observations for three isolated cores: CB 68, L 429, and L 1552. We assess the dust opacities provided from four models: OH1a, OH5a, Orm1, and Orm4. Although the consistency of the models differs between the three sources, the results suggest that the optical properties of dust in the envelopes of the cores are best described by either silicate and bare graphite grains (e.g., Orm1) or carbonaceous grains with some coagulation and either thin or no ice mantles (e.g., OH5a). None of the models, however, individually produced the most consistent optical depth maps for every source. The results suggest that either the dust in the cores is not well-described by any one dust property model, the application of the dust models cannot be extended beyond the very center of the cores, or more complex SED fitting functions are necessary.

  7. The Mars Dust and Water Cycles: Investigating the Influence of Clouds on the Vertical Distribution and Meridional Transport of Dust and Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Brecht, A. S.; Urata, R.

    2015-01-01

    The dust and water cycles are critical to the current Martian climate, and they interact with each other through cloud formation. Dust modulates the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly influences atmospheric circulation. Clouds provide radiative forcing and control the net hemispheric transport of water through the alteration of the vertical distributions of water and dust. Recent advancements in the quality and sophistication of both climate models and observations enable an increased understanding of how the coupling between the dust and water cycles (through cloud formation) impacts the dust and water cycles. We focus here on the effects of clouds on the vertical distributions of dust and water and how those vertical distributions control the net meridional transport of water. We utilize observations of temperature, dust and water ice from the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO) and the NASA ARC Mars Global Climate Model (MGCM) to show that the magnitude and nature of the hemispheric exchange of water during NH summer is sensitive to the vertical structure of the simulated aphelion cloud belt. Further, we investigate how clouds influence atmospheric temperatures and thus the vertical structure of the cloud belt. Our goal is to isolate and understand the importance of radiative/dynamic feedbacks due to the physical processes involved with cloud formation and evolution on the current climate of Mars.

  8. EVOLUTION OF THE DUST IN V4332 SAGITTARII

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Dipankar P. K.; Ashok, N. M. [Astronomy and Astrophysics Division, Physical Research Laboratory, Ahmedabad, 380009 (India); Nuth, Joseph A. III [NASA/GSFC, Mail Code: 690, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Misselt, Karl A.; Su, K. Y. L. [Steward Observatory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721-0065 (United States); Varricatt, Watson P. [United Kingdom Infrared Telescope, 660 N. Aohoku Place, University Park Hilo, Hawaii-96720 (United States); Sand, David [Physics Department, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79409 (United States); Marion, G. H. [University of Texas at Austin, 1 University Station C1400, Austin, TX 78712-0259 (United States); Marengo, Massimo [Physics and Astronomy Department, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011 (United States)

    2015-12-01

    An eruptive nova-like event took place in 1994 in the stellar-merger candidate V4332 Sgr. Following the eruption, dust consisting of refractory silicate-rich dust grains containing a significant component of AlO bonding was formed sometime between 1998 and 2003. Observations using Spitzer between 2005 and 2009 show significant changes in the 10 μm silicate stretch feature. There is a deepening of the 10 μm silicate stretch as well as the development of a feature between about 13 and 20 μm consistent with a blend of the MgO and FeO stretching features and the O–Si–O bending mode of increasingly ordered silicate dust. Near-infrared observations show the presence of AlO and water vapor in the outflow in 2003, 2004, and 2005: the AlO has significantly decreased in spectra obtained in 2014 while the water vapor remains largely unchanged. An attempt is made to correlate these observations and understand the significance of these changes using DUSTY modeling. The observations appear consistent with the kinetically controlled condensation of highly underoxidized SiO/AlO/Fe/Mg dust grains in the outflow followed by the continuous evolution of the initial condensate due to thermal annealing and oxidation of the dust via reaction with ambient O, OH, and H{sub 2}O in the expanding, cooling shell. Periodic monitoring of this dust shell over the mid-infrared spectral range could yield useful information on the evolution of underoxidized silicate condensates exposed to hot water vapor in more conventional circumstellar environments.

  9. Line-of-sight extrapolation noise in dust polarization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poh, Jason; Dodelson, Scott

    2017-05-19

    The B-modes of polarization at frequencies ranging from 50-1000 GHz are produced by Galactic dust, lensing of primordial E-modes in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) by intervening large scale structure, and possibly by primordial B-modes in the CMB imprinted by gravitational waves produced during inflation. The conventional method used to separate the dust component of the signal is to assume that the signal at high frequencies (e.g., 350 GHz) is due solely to dust and then extrapolate the signal down to lower frequency (e.g., 150 GHz) using the measured scaling of the polarized dust signal amplitude with frequency. For typical Galactic thermal dust temperatures of about 20K, these frequencies are not fully in the Rayleigh-Jeans limit. Therefore, deviations in the dust cloud temperatures from cloud to cloud will lead to different scaling factors for clouds of different temperatures. Hence, when multiple clouds of different temperatures and polarization angles contribute to the integrated line-of-sight polarization signal, the relative contribution of individual clouds to the integrated signal can change between frequencies. This can cause the integrated signal to be decorrelated in both amplitude and direction when extrapolating in frequency. Here we carry out a Monte Carlo analysis on the impact of this line-of-sight extrapolation noise, enabling us to quantify its effect. Using results from the Planck experiment, we find that this effect is small, more than an order of magnitude smaller than the current uncertainties. However, line-of-sight extrapolation noise may be a significant source of uncertainty in future low-noise primordial B-mode experiments. Scaling from Planck results, we find that accounting for this uncertainty becomes potentially important when experiments are sensitive to primordial B-mode signals with amplitude r < 0.0015 .

  10. Geochemical characterization of critical dust source regions in the American West

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aarons, Sarah M.; Blakowski, Molly A.; Aciego, Sarah M.; Stevenson, Emily I.; Sims, Kenneth W. W.; Scott, Sean R.; Aarons, Charles

    2017-10-01

    The generation, transport, and deposition of mineral dust are detectable in paleoclimate records from land, ocean, and ice, providing valuable insight into earth surface conditions and cycles on a range of timescales. Dust deposited in marine and terrestrial ecosystems can provide critical nutrients to nutrient-limited ecosystems, and variations in dust provenance can indicate changes in dust production, sources and transport pathways as a function of climate variability and land use change. Thus, temporal changes in locations of dust source areas and transport pathways have implications for understanding interactions between mineral dust, global climate, and biogeochemical cycles. This work characterizes dust from areas in the American West known for dust events and/or affected by increasing human settlement and livestock grazing during the last 150 years. Dust generation and uplift from these dust source areas depends on climate and land use practices, and the relative contribution of dust has likely changed since the expansion of industrialization and agriculture into the western United States. We present elemental and isotopic analysis of 28 potential dust source area samples analyzed using Thermal Ionization Mass Spectrometry (TIMS) for 87Sr/86Sr and 143Nd/144Nd composition and Multi-Collector Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometer (MC-ICPMS) for 176Hf/177Hf composition, and ICPMS for major and trace element concentrations. We find significant variability in the Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope compositions of potential source areas of dust throughout western North America, ranging from 87Sr/86Sr = 0.703699 to 0.740236, εNd = -26.6 to 2.4, and εHf = -21.7 to -0.1. We also report differences in the trace metal and phosphorus concentrations in the geologic provinces sampled. This research provides an important resource for the geochemical tracing of dust sources and sinks in western North America, and will aid in modeling the biogeochemical impacts of increased

  11. Ice nucleation by surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust and mineral dust/sulfate particles at cirrus temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Archuleta

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examines the potential role of some types of mineral dust and mineral dust with sulfuric acid coatings as heterogeneous ice nuclei at cirrus temperatures. Commercially-available nanoscale powder samples of aluminum oxide, alumina-silicate and iron oxide were used as surrogates for atmospheric mineral dust particles, with and without multilayer coverage of sulfuric acid. A sample of Asian dust aerosol particles was also studied. Measurements of ice nucleation were made using a continuous-flow ice-thermal diffusion chamber (CFDC operated to expose size-selected aerosol particles to temperatures between -45 and -60°C and a range of relative humidity above ice-saturated conditions. Pure metal oxide particles supported heterogeneous ice nucleation at lower relative humidities than those required to homogeneously freeze sulfuric acid solution particles at sizes larger than about 50 nm. The ice nucleation behavior of the same metal oxides coated with sulfuric acid indicate heterogeneous freezing at lower relative humidities than those calculated for homogeneous freezing of the diluted particle coatings. The effect of soluble coatings on the ice activation relative humidity varied with the respective uncoated core particle types, but for all types the heterogeneous freezing rates increased with particle size for the same thermodynamic conditions. For a selected size of 200 nm, the natural mineral dust particles were the most effective ice nuclei tested, supporting heterogeneous ice formation at an ice relative humidity of approximately 135%, irrespective of temperature. Modified homogeneous freezing parameterizations and theoretical formulations are shown to have application to the description of heterogeneous freezing of mineral dust-like particles with soluble coatings.

  12. 2002 Kuiper prize lecture: Dust Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grün, Eberhard; Srama, Ralf; Krüger, Harald; Kempf, Sascha; Dikarev, Valeri; Helfert, Stefan; Moragas-Klostermeyer, Georg

    2005-03-01

    Dust particles, like photons, carry information from remote sites in space and time. From knowledge of the dust particles' birthplace and their bulk properties, we can learn about the remote environment out of which the particles were formed. This approach is called "Dust Astronomy" which is carried out by means of a dust telescope on a Dust Observatory in space. Targets for a dust telescope are the local interstellar medium and nearby star forming regions, as well as comets and asteroids. Dust from interstellar and interplanetary sources is distinguished by accurately sensing their trajectories. Trajectory sensors may use the electric charge signals that are induced when charged grains fly through the detector. Modern in-situ dust impact detectors are capable of providing mass, speed, physical and chemical information of dust grains in space. A Dust Observatory mission is feasible with state-of-the-art technology. It will (1) provide the distinction between interstellar dust and interplanetary dust of cometary and asteroidal origin, (2) determine the elemental composition of impacting dust particles, and (3) monitor the fluxes of various dust components as a function of direction and particle masses.

  13. Theoretical aspects of Dust in fusion devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pigarov, A.Yu.; Smirnov, R.D. [University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA (United States); Soboleva, T.K. [ICN, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Krasheninnikov, S.I.

    2010-05-15

    It is known that micro-particles (dust) exist in fusion devices. However, an impact of dust on plasma contamination, material migration, and performance of fusion devices is still under debate. In burning plasma experiments like ITER dust can also pose safety problems related to it's chemical activity, toxicity, tritium retention, and radioactive content. In order to address all these issues we need to understand the physics of dust generation, dynamics, and transport. In this paper, the results of recent theoretical studies of dust in fusion plasmas are reviewed. Different aspects of the physics of dust in fusion plasmas, including the processes of dust generation, charging, heating, destruction, spinning, forces acting on dust, dust collision with material walls, etc are discussed. The numerical models of these processes have been incorporated into the dust transport code DUSTT, which is capable of tracking of dust particles in fusion devices in 3D geometry. The results of the simulations of dust particle dynamics, transport, and the impact on edge plasma performance are considered. The latest results on nonlinear interactions of dust grain with tokamak plasma as well as remaining gaps in the understanding of physics of dust in fusion devices are discussed (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  14. Boundary Layer Dust Occurrence III Atmospheric Dust Over Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-05-01

    valley of the Syr - Darya , near easily-blown sands. Conditions analogous to Takhiatash and, consequently, a number of 358 dust storm days exceeding an...1 AD Reports Control Syr OSD-1366 ECOM DR 75-2 pt.3 c.l RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT TECHNICAL REPORT ECOM-DR-77-2 t.ND AFB, N. M...dust stream was 60 and even 100 units in the lower Don region and in the eastern and northern Azov region, 30 to 40 units in the Don and Volga delta

  15. PROPERTIES OF NEWLY FORMED DUST GRAINS IN THE LUMINOUS TYPE IIn SUPERNOVA 2010jl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeda, K.; Nozawa, T.; Folatelli, G.; Moriya, T. J.; Nomoto, K.; Bersten, M.; Quimby, R. [Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (WPI), Todai Institutes for Advanced Study, University of Tokyo, 5-1-5 Kashiwanoha, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); Sahu, D. K.; Anupama, G. C. [Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Koramangala, Bangalore 560 034 (India); Minowa, Y.; Pyo, T.-S. [Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan, 650 North A' ohoku Place, Hilo, HI 96720 (United States); Motohara, K.; Kitagawa, Y. [Institute of Astronomy, University of Tokyo, 2-21-1 Osawa, Mitaka, Tokyo 181-0015 (Japan); Ueno, I.; Kawabata, K. S.; Yamanaka, M. [Hiroshima Astrophysical Science Center, Hiroshima University, 1-3-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8526 (Japan); Kozasa, T. [Department of Cosmosciences, Graduate School of Science, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-0810 (Japan); Iye, M., E-mail: keiichi.maeda@ipmu.jp [National Astronomical Observatory, Mitaka, Tokyo (Japan)

    2013-10-10

    Supernovae (SNe) have been proposed to be the main production sites of dust grains in the universe. However, our knowledge of their importance to dust production is limited by observationally poor constraints on the nature and amount of dust particles produced by individual SNe. In this paper, we present a spectrum covering optical through near-Infrared (NIR) light of the luminous Type IIn supernova 2010jl around one and a half years after the explosion. This unique data set reveals multiple signatures of newly formed dust particles. The NIR portion of the spectrum provides a rare example where thermal emission from newly formed hot dust grains is clearly detected. We determine the main population of the dust species to be carbon grains at a temperature of ∼1350-1450 K at this epoch. The mass of the dust grains is derived to be ∼(7.5-8.5) × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉}. Hydrogen emission lines show wavelength-dependent absorption, which provides a good estimate of the typical size of the newly formed dust grains (∼< 0.1 μm, and most likely ∼< 0.01 μm). We believe the dust grains were formed in a dense cooling shell as a result of a strong SN-circumstellar media (CSM) interaction. The dust grains occupy ∼10% of the emitting volume, suggesting an inhomogeneous, clumpy structure. The average CSM density must be ∼> 3 × 10{sup 7} cm{sup –3}, corresponding to a mass loss rate of ∼> 0.02 M{sub ☉} yr{sup –1} (for a mass loss wind velocity of ∼100 km s{sup –1}). This strongly supports a scenario in which SN 2010jl and probably other luminous SNe IIn are powered by strong interactions within very dense CSM, perhaps created by Luminous-Blue-Variable-like eruptions within the last century before the explosion.

  16. Image computing techniques to extrapolate data for dust tracking in case of an experimental accident simulation in a nuclear fusion plant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camplani, M; Malizia, A; Gelfusa, M; Barbato, F; Antonelli, L; Poggi, L A; Ciparisse, J F; Salgado, L; Richetta, M; Gaudio, P

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a preliminary shadowgraph-based analysis of dust particles re-suspension due to loss of vacuum accident (LOVA) in ITER-like nuclear fusion reactors has been presented. Dust particles are produced through different mechanisms in nuclear fusion devices, one of the main issues is that dust particles are capable of being re-suspended in case of events such as LOVA. Shadowgraph is based on an expanded collimated beam of light emitted by a laser or a lamp that emits light transversely compared to the flow field direction. In the STARDUST facility, the dust moves in the flow, and it causes variations of refractive index that can be detected by using a CCD camera. The STARDUST fast camera setup allows to detect and to track dust particles moving in the vessel and then to obtain information about the velocity field of dust mobilized. In particular, the acquired images are processed such that per each frame the moving dust particles are detected by applying a background subtraction technique based on the mixture of Gaussian algorithm. The obtained foreground masks are eventually filtered with morphological operations. Finally, a multi-object tracking algorithm is used to track the detected particles along the experiment. For each particle, a Kalman filter-based tracker is applied; the particles dynamic is described by taking into account position, velocity, and acceleration as state variable. The results demonstrate that it is possible to obtain dust particles' velocity field during LOVA by automatically processing the data obtained with the shadowgraph approach.

  17. Image computing techniques to extrapolate data for dust tracking in case of an experimental accident simulation in a nuclear fusion plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Camplani, M. [Visual Information Laboratory, University of Bristol, Bristol (United Kingdom); Grupo de Tratamiento de Imágenes, E.T.S.I de Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Malizia, A.; Gelfusa, M.; Poggi, L. A.; Ciparisse, J. F.; Richetta, M.; Gaudio, P. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Barbato, F. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); EPMA, Materials Science and Technology, Uberlandstrasse 129, Dubendorf CH-8600 (Switzerland); Antonelli, L. [Associazione EUROFUSION-ENEA, Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Rome “Tor Vergata,” Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dipartimento di Scienze di base e applicate per l’Ingegneria, Universita degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Roma (Italy); Salgado, L. [Grupo de Tratamiento de Imágenes, E.T.S.I de Telecomunicación, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Madrid (Spain); Video Processing and Understanding Laboratory, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-01-15

    In this paper, a preliminary shadowgraph-based analysis of dust particles re-suspension due to loss of vacuum accident (LOVA) in ITER-like nuclear fusion reactors has been presented. Dust particles are produced through different mechanisms in nuclear fusion devices, one of the main issues is that dust particles are capable of being re-suspended in case of events such as LOVA. Shadowgraph is based on an expanded collimated beam of light emitted by a laser or a lamp that emits light transversely compared to the flow field direction. In the STARDUST facility, the dust moves in the flow, and it causes variations of refractive index that can be detected by using a CCD camera. The STARDUST fast camera setup allows to detect and to track dust particles moving in the vessel and then to obtain information about the velocity field of dust mobilized. In particular, the acquired images are processed such that per each frame the moving dust particles are detected by applying a background subtraction technique based on the mixture of Gaussian algorithm. The obtained foreground masks are eventually filtered with morphological operations. Finally, a multi-object tracking algorithm is used to track the detected particles along the experiment. For each particle, a Kalman filter-based tracker is applied; the particles dynamic is described by taking into account position, velocity, and acceleration as state variable. The results demonstrate that it is possible to obtain dust particles’ velocity field during LOVA by automatically processing the data obtained with the shadowgraph approach.

  18. Desert Dust and Monsoon Rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, William K. M.; Kim, Kyu-Myong

    2014-01-01

    For centuries, inhabitants of the Indian subcontinent have know that heavy dust events brought on by strong winds occur frequently in the pre-monsoon season, before the onset of heavy rain. Yet scientists have never seriously considered the possibility that natural dust can affect monsoon rainfall. Up to now, most studies of the impacts of aerosols on Indian monsoon rainfall have focused on anthropogenic aerosols in the context of climate change. However, a few recent studies have show that aerosols from antropogenic and natural sources over the Indian subcontinent may affect the transition from break to active monsoon phases on short timescales of days to weeks. Writing in Nature Geoscience, Vinoj and colleagues describe how they have shown that desert dust aerosols over the Arabian Sea and West Asia can strenghten the summer monsoon over the Indial subcontinent in a matter of days.

  19. Dust remobilization in fusion plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Tolias, P; De Angeli, M; De Temmerman, G; Ripamonti, D; Riva, G; Bykov, I; Shalpegin, A; Vignitchouk, L; Brochard, F; Bystrov, K; Bardin, S; Litnovsky, A

    2016-01-01

    The first combined experimental and theoretical studies of dust remobilization by plasma forces are reported. The main theoretical aspects of remobilization are analyzed. In particular, the dominant role of adhesive forces is highlighted and generic remobilization conditions - detachment, sliding, rolling - are formulated. A novel experimental technique is proposed, based on controlled adhesion of dust grains on tungsten samples combined with detailed mapping of the dust deposition profile prior and post plasma exposure. Proof-of-principle experiments in the TEXTOR tokamak and the EXTRAP-T2R reversed-field pinch are presented. The versatile environment of the linear device Pilot-PSI allowed for experiments with different magnetic field topologies and varying plasma conditions that were complemented with camera observations.

  20. [Dust lung or dust-induced lung disease ( discussion on chronic dust-induced lung disease)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosarev, V V

    1989-01-01

    The comment on the article by D. M. Zislin (Occupational Hygiene and Industrial Diseases, 1988, N 10) is presented. Proceeding from the author's own experience and literary data, the main statement of D. M. Zislin disputing the concept of dust pulmonary disease (DPD) in the modern occupational pulmonology, is analyzed. The common cause of pneumoconiosis and dust bronchitis has been identified as fibrogenic dust, allergic, carcinogenic and toxic characteristics of which can be only condition affecting the disease clinical character. The article shows that neither generality, nor the differences in the functional changes of external respiration can serve as a convincing argument for or against the existence of the concept of DPD. Modern histomorphologic studies give evidence that low-fibrogenic dusts practically simultaneously cause the onset of the pathologic process both in the interstitial tissue and in the bronchi, the outcome of the process being diffuse pneumosclerosis. The concept of DPD caused by low-fibrogenic dusts has been substantiated on the basis of common etiology and similar pathogenetic, clinical and functional manifestations.

  1. Review of dust transport and mitigation technologies in lunar and Martian atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afshar-Mohajer, Nima; Wu, Chang-Yu; Curtis, Jennifer Sinclair; Gaier, James R.

    2015-09-01

    Dust resuspension and deposition is a ubiquitous phenomenon in all lunar and Martian missions. The near-term plans to return to the Moon as a stepping stone to further exploration of Mars and beyond bring scientists' attention to development and evaluation of lunar and Martian dust mitigation technologies. In this paper, different lunar and Martian dust transport mechanisms are presented, followed by a review of previously developed dust mitigation technologies including fluidal, mechanical, electrical and passive self-cleaning methods for lunar/Martian installed surfaces along with filtration for dust control inside cabins. Key factors in choosing the most effective dust mitigation technology are recognized to be the dust transport mechanism, energy consumption, environment, type of surface materials, area of the surface and surface functionality. While electrical methods operating at higher voltages are identified to be suitable for small but light sensitive surfaces, pre-treatment of the surface is effective for cleaning thermal control surfaces, and mechanical methods are appropriate for surfaces with no concerns of light blockage, surface abrasion and 100% cleaning efficiency. Findings from this paper can help choose proper surface protection/cleaning for future space explorations. Hybrid techniques combining the advantages of different methods are recommended.

  2. Durable Dust Repellent Coating for Metals Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Durable Dust Repellent Coating (DDRC) consists of nano-phase silica, titania, or other oxide coatings to repel dust in a vacuum environment over a wide range of...

  3. Dust/Regolith for Surface Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Benjamin

    2017-01-01

    System-wide dust protection is a key design driver for xEMUsurface operations, and development of dust proof mechanisms, bearings, materials, and coatings coupled with specific operations and surface architecture development is critical for success.

  4. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is to a large extent covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it poses a hazard in the form of dust clouds being...

  5. "Dust Devils": Gardening Agents on the Surface of Mars, and Hidden Hazards to Human Exploration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Smith, P.; White, B.; Farrell, W.

    1999-01-01

    Dust devils are familiar sites in the and regions of the world: they can produce quite spectacular displays of dust lofting when the vortices scavenge very loose dust from a dry lake bed or from recently disturbed agricultural fields. If one were to arrive at the center of an arid region, take one photograph, or even a series of photographs over a period of several days, then return the images for laboratory analysis, it would be most likely concluded that the region was inactive from an aeolian perspective. No images of general dust movement were obtained, nor were any dust devils "caught on camera" owing to their ephemeral and unpredictable appearance, and the fact that there was deceptively little residue of their actions. If, however, a camera were to take a 360 degree continuous recording over a period of a year, and the film were then to be shown at high speed over a period a several minutes, the impression might be that of a region ravaged by air vorticity and dust movement. Extrapolate this over geological time, and it is possible to visualize dust devils as prime aeolian agents, rather than insignificant vagaries of nature, On Mars, the thin atmosphere permits the surface of the planet to be heated but it does not itself retain heat with the capacity of the earth's atmosphere. This gives rise to greater thermal instability near the surface of Mars as "warm" air pockets diapiritically inject themselves into higher atmospheric layers. Resulting boundary-layer vorticity on Mars might therefore be expected to produce dust devils in abundance, if only seasonally. The spectacular images of dust devils obtained by Pathfinder within its brief functional period on the planet testify to the probability of highly frequent surface vorticity in light of the above reasoning about observational probability. Notably, the Pathfinder devils appeared to be at least a kilometer in height. There are several consequences for the geology of Mars, and for human exploration, if

  6. Maps of Structured Aerosol Activity During the MY 25 Planet-encircling Dust Storm on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, J.; Wilson, R. J.; Cantor, B. A.; Kahre, M. A.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Bridger, A. F. C.; Haberle, R. M.; Barnes, J.

    2016-12-01

    We have produced a sequence of 42 global maps from Ls=165.1-187.7° that delimit the areal extent of structured aerosol activity based on a synthesis of Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) data, including Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) daily global maps (DGMs) and wide angle imagery, Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) dust and H2O ice opacity, and Mars general circulation model (MGCM) derived dust opacity. The primary motivation of this work is to examine the temporal and spatial relationship between dust storms observed by MOC and baroclinic eddies inferred from Fast Fourier Synoptic Mapping (FFSM) of TES temperatures in order to study the initiation and evolution of Mars year (MY) 25 planet-encircling dust storm (PDS) precursor phase dust storms. A secondary motivation is to provide improved input to MGCM simulations. Assuming that structured dust storms indicate active dust lifting, these maps allow us to define potential dust lifting regions. This work has two implications for martian atmospheric science. First, integration of MGS data has enabled us to develop improved quantitative and qualitative descriptions of storm evolution that may be used to constrain estimates of dust lifting regions, horizontal dust distribution, and to infer associated circulations. Second, we believe that these maps provide better bases and constraints for modeling storm initiation. Based on our analysis of these MGS data, we propose the following working hypothesis to explain the dynamical processes responsible for PDS initiation and expansion. Six eastward-traveling transient baroclinic eddies triggered the MY 25 precursor storms in Hellas during Ls=176.2-184.6° due to the enhanced dust lifting associated with their low-level wind and stress fields. This was followed by a seventh eddy that contributed to expansion on Ls=186.3°. Increased opacity and temperatures from dust lifting associated with the first three eddies enhanced thermal tides which supported further storm initiation and

  7. 13 Years of Dust Devil Monitoring and In-situ Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, S.; Balme, M.; Bos, B.; Farrell, W.; Towner, M.; Ringrose, T. J.

    2008-12-01

    Dust devil thermal vortex columns are a ubiquitous feature in the atmospheric boundary layer over arid surfaces of Earth and Mars. Utilizing several desert field sites in the US southwest and Peru, we seek to (1) characterize the desert surfaces over which dust devils do or do not develop, (2) characterize dust devil dimensions, especially the height to which material is lofted, as well as the frequency of their activity, and (3) determine the flux of particulate material raised by dust devils. The erosive effectiveness of dust devil vortices is due, in part, to wind speeds gusting 10 ms-1 within 0.15 m of the ground (even among frictional grass-covered surfaces), and only a mature desert pavement surface appears sufficiently armored to deny them a dust source. Furthermore, patches of highly aerodynamically rough ground (such as fields of 3 m diameter boulders) can readily serve as thermal plume "breeding grounds" sheltered from conventional shear wind surface. A portable field wind tunnel examined the aeolian susceptibility and sediment-shedding behavior of 35 undisturbed desert sites. Actively mobile in-situ sampling of several hundred natural dust devil vortices using a vertical profiling instrumentation mast indicates very high total suspended particle (TSP) and fine dust loadings (PM10), low-pressure cores, and triboelectric charge and RF electromagnetic noise generation. Mean TSP values were 296 mgm-3 and PM10 values ranged from 15.1 to 43.8 mgm-3. Concurrent 3- dimensional wind profiles showed mean tangential rotation of 12.3 ms-1 and vertical uplift of 2.7 ms-1 driving mean vertical TSP flux of 1689 mgm-3 and fine particle flux of ~ 1.0 to ~50.0 mgm-3. Peak PM10 dust loading and flux within the dust column are 3 times greater than mean values. UV occultation, saltation activity, and airborne dust opacity were used to determine dust column geometry and therefore the first flux calculations for column mean as well as peak measurements. Such results are

  8. Dust investigations in TEXTOR: Impact of dust on plasma–wall interactions and on plasma performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Litnovsky, A.; Rudakov, D. L.; Bozhenkov, S.; Smirnov, R. D.; Ratynskaia, S.; H. Bergsåker,; I. Bykov,; Ashikawa, N.; De Temmerman, G.; Xu, Y.; S.I. Krasheninnikov,; Biel, W.; Brezinsek, S.; Coenen, J. W.; Kreter, A.; Kantor, M.; H.T. Lambertz,; Philipps, V.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Samm, U.; Sergienko, G.; Schmitz, O.; Stoschus, H.

    2013-01-01

    Dust will have severe impact on ITER performance since the accumulation of tritium in dust represents a safety issue, a possible reaction of dust with air and steam imposes an explosion hazard and the penetration of dust in core plasmas may degrade plasma performance by increasing radiative losses.

  9. A climatology of Northeast Asian dust events

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Y. [City Univ. of Hong Kong, Kowloon (China). Dept. of Physics and Materials Science; Wang, J. [Academy of Meteorological Sciences, Beijing, BJ (China). State Meteorological Administration, National Meteorological Centre

    2003-08-01

    In this paper, the synoptic features of Northeast Asian dust events in spring are studied. Using surface meteorological records for March, April and May of 2000, 2001 and 2002, the distribution of dust-event frequencies, possible dust-source regions and the synoptic conditions responsible for dust activities are examined. Four regions of frequent dust events are found in the domain of analysis. These are the Tarim Basin, the southern Mongolia and the Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region of China, the Hexi (Yellow River West) Corridor and the northern part of the Indian Subcontinent. The Tarim Basin has the highest dust-event frequency, with most of the events being weak ones (classified as dust-in-suspension). Dust events occur less frequently in the Gobi Desert, but they are often severe and widespread. Dust concentrations in the Tarim and the Gobi regions are found to be of similar order of magnitude with (averaged) maximum values reaching 1 mg m{sup -3}. In different regions, dust events are generated by different synoptic systems. Over the Gobi, almost all dust events arise from the strong northwesterly winds associated with low-pressure systems. In the Tarim Basin, dust events are mostly associated with light winds. Strong northeasterly winds may affect the eastern and southeastern parts of the basin, generating dust storms. It is shown that topography plays a significant role in the transport of dust particles. A preferred route of dust transport is found to exist along the northeastern boundary, and another along the southern boundary, of the Tibetan Plateau. It is suggested the mechanisms for dust emission in the Tarim Basin requires further investigation. (orig.)

  10. On dust in tokamak edge plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasheninnikov, S.I. [Jacobs School of Engineering, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, Engineering Building II, room 474, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0411 (United States)]. E-mail: skrash@mae.ucsd.edu; Soboleva, T.K. [UNAM, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Kurchatov Institute, Moscow (Russian Federation); Tomita, Y. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Smirnov, R.D. [Graduate University for Advanced Studies, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Janev, R.K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2005-03-01

    We study the dust particle dynamics in tokamak edge plasmas, with special emphasis on dust particle transport in the sheath and plasma recycling regions. The characteristics of this transport have been examined for both smooth and corrugated wall surfaces. The implications of dust particle transport in the divertor region on the core plasma contamination with impurities have also been examined.

  11. 29 CFR 1910.1043 - Cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Cotton dust. 1910.1043 Section 1910.1043 Labor Regulations...) OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS (CONTINUED) Toxic and Hazardous Substances § 1910.1043 Cotton dust. (a... cotton dust in all workplaces where employees engage in yarn manufacturing, engage in slashing and...

  12. Radio frequency discharge with dust particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chutov, Y. I.; W. J. Goedheer,; Kravchenko, O. Y.; Zuz, V. M.; Yan, M.; Martins, R.; Ferreira, I.; Fortunato, E.; Kroesen, G.

    2000-01-01

    A 1D PIC/MCC method has been developed for computer simulations of low-pressure RF discharges with dust particles using the method for dust-free discharges. A RF discharge in argon with dust particles distributed uniformly in the interelectrode gap is simulated at parameters providing a possibility

  13. Thirteen years of Aeolian dust dynamics in a desert region (Negev desert, Israel): analysis of horizontal and vertical dust flux, vertical dust distribution and dust grain size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Offer, Z.Y.; Goossens, D.

    2004-01-01

    At Sede Boqer (northern Negev desert, Israel), aeolian dust dynamics have been measured during the period 1988–2000. This study focuses on temporal records of the vertical and horizontal dust flux, the vertical distribution of the dust particles in the atmosphere, and the grain size of the

  14. Impact of atmospheric circulation types on southwest Asian dust and Indian summer monsoon rainfall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskaoutis, D. G.; Houssos, E. E.; Solmon, F.; Legrand, M.; Rashki, A.; Dumka, U. C.; Francois, P.; Gautam, R.; Singh, R. P.

    2018-03-01

    This study examines the meteorological feedback on dust aerosols and rainfall over the Arabian Sea and India during the summer monsoon using satellite data, re-analysis and a regional climate model. Based on days with excess aerosol loading over the central Ganges basin during May - September, two distinct atmospheric circulation types (weather clusters) are identified, which are associated with different dust-aerosol and rainfall distributions over south Asia, highlighting the role of meteorology on dust emissions and monsoon rainfall. Each cluster is characterized by different patterns of mean sea level pressure (MSLP), geopotential height at 700 hPa (Z700) and wind fields at 1000 hPa and at 700 hPa, thus modulating changes in dust-aerosol loading over the Arabian Sea. One cluster is associated with deepening of the Indian/Pakistan thermal low leading to (i) increased cyclonicity and thermal convection over northwestern India and Arabian Peninsula, (ii) intensification of the southwest monsoon off the Horn of Africa, iii) increase in dust emissions from Rub-Al-Khali and Somalian deserts, (iv) excess dust accumulation over the Arabian Sea and, (v) strengthening of the convergence of humid air masses and larger precipitation over Indian landmass compared to the other cluster. The RegCM4.4 model simulations for dust-aerosol and precipitation distributions support the meteorological fields and satellite observations, while the precipitation over India is positively correlated with the aerosol loading over the Arabian Sea on daily basis for both weather clusters. This study highlights the key role of meteorology and atmospheric dynamics on dust life cycle and rainfall over the monsoon-influenced south Asia.

  15. The global transport of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Dale W.; Kellogg, C.A.; Garrison, V.H.; Shinn, E.A.

    2002-01-01

    By some estimates as much as two billion metric tons of dust are lifted into the Earth's atmosphere every year. Most of this dust is stirred up by storms, the more dramatic of which are aptly named dust storms. But more than mere dirt is carried aloft. Drifting with the suspended dust particles are soil pollutants such as herbicides and pesticides and a significant number of microorganisms-bacteria, viruses and fungi. We can gain some appreciation of how much microbial life is actually floating in our atmosphere by performing a quick calculation. There are typically about one million bacteria per gram of soil, but let's be conservative and suppose there are only 10,000 bacteria per gram of airborne sediment. Assuming a modest one billion metric tons of sediment in the atmosphere, these numbers translate into a quintillion (1018) sediment-borne bacteria moving around the planet each year-enough to form a microbial bridge between Earth and Jupiter. Here we consider what we've learned about the airborne transport of sediment across the globe, and review some of the remarkable studies in this reemerging field that had it origins more than 100 years ago.

  16. Keeping the dust off festoons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-06-01

    Coal handling equipment presents a difficult challenge for power system suppliers. Two of the more difficult applications are heavy duty festoon systems that are exposed to coal dust and cable reels on stockyard machines where very long travel distances are involved. Examples are given of their use in Australia. 3 photos.

  17. Cosmological constraints from AGN dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barthel, PD

    1997-01-01

    The far-infrared emission of radio-loud active galaxies and quasars is a composite of various types of radiation with their own specific signatures. These different components can be isolated by combining radiometric and spectrographic measurements. The warm dust component re-radiating the AGN

  18. House Dust Mite Respiratory Allergy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Calderón, Moisés A; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Linneberg, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Although house dust mite (HDM) allergy is a major cause of respiratory allergic disease, specific diagnosis and effective treatment both present unresolved challenges. Guidelines for the treatment of allergic rhinitis and asthma are well supported in the literature, but specific evidence on the e...

  19. Dust tori in radio galaxies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Wolk, G.; Barthel, P. D.; Peletier, R. F.; Pel, J. W.

    Aims. We investigate the quasar - radio galaxy unification scenario and detect dust tori within radio galaxies of various types. Methods. Using VISIR on the VLT, we acquired sub-arcsecond (similar to 0.40 '') resolution N-band images, at a wavelength of 11.85 mu m, of the nuclei of a sample of 27

  20. 75 FR 3881 - Combustible Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-25

    ... may form combustible dust include, but are not limited to, wood, coal, plastics, biosolids, candy..., pharmaceutical manufacturing, tire manufacturing, production of rubber and plastics, plastics and rubber products manufacturing, recycling, wastewater treatment, and coal handling. OSHA is developing a standard that will...

  1. Trapping Dust to Form Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-10-01

    Growing a planet from a dust grain is hard work! A new study explores how vortices in protoplanetary disks can assist this process.When Dust Growth FailsTop: ALMA image of the protoplanetary disk of V1247 Orionis, with different emission components labeled. Bottom: Synthetic image constructed from the best-fit model. [Kraus et al. 2017]Gradual accretion onto a seed particle seems like a reasonable way to grow a planet from a grain of dust; after all, planetary embryos orbit within dusty protoplanetary disks, which provides them with plenty of fuel to accrete so they can grow. Theres a challenge to this picture, though: the radial drift problem.The radial drift problem acknowledges that, as growing dust grains orbit within the disk, the drag force on them continues to grow as well. For large enough dust grains perhaps around 1 millimeter the drag force will cause the grains orbits to decay, and the particles drift into the star before they are able to grow into planetesimals and planets.A Close-Up Look with ALMASo how do we overcome the radial drift problem in order to form planets? A commonly proposed mechanism is dust trapping, in which long-lived vortices in the disk trap the dust particles, preventing them from falling inwards. This allows the particles to persist for millions of years long enough to grow beyond the radial drift barrier.Observationally, these dust-trapping vortices should have signatures: we would expect to see, at millimeter wavelengths, specific bright, asymmetric structures where the trapping occurs in protoplanetary disks. Such disk structures have been difficult to spot with past instrumentation, but the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) has made some new observations of the disk V1247 Orionis that might be just what were looking for.Schematic of the authors model for the disk of V1247 Orionis. [Kraus et al. 2017]Trapped in a Vortex?ALMAs observations of V1247 Orionis are reported by a team of scientists led by Stefan

  2. Long-term EARLINET dust observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Amiridis, Vassilis; Amodeo, Aldo; Binietoglou, Ioannis; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Schwarz, Anja; Papagiannopoulos, Nikolaos; Papayannis, Alexandros; Sicard, Michael; Comeron, Adolfo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2015-04-01

    Systematic observations of Saharan dust events over Europe are performed from May 2000 by EARLINET, the European Aerosol Research LIdar NETwork. EARLINET is a coordinated network of stations that make use of advanced lidar methods for the vertical profiling of aerosols. The backbone of EARLINET network is a common schedule for performing the measurements and the quality assurance of instruments/data. Particular attention is paid to monitoring the Saharan dust intrusions over the European continent. The geographical distribution of the EARLINET stations is particularly appealing for the dust observation, with stations located all around the Mediterranean and in the center of the Mediterranean (Italian stations) where dust intrusions are frequent, and with several stations in the central Europe where dust penetrates occasionally. All aerosol backscatter and extinction profiles related to observations collected during these alerts are grouped in the devoted "Saharan dust" category of the EARLINET database. This category consists of about 4700 files (as of December 2013). Case studies involving several stations around Europe selected from this long-term database have been provided the opportunity to investigate dust modification processes during transport over the continent. More important, the long term EARLINET dust monitoring allows the investigation of the horizontal and vertical extent of dust outbreaks over Europe and the climatological analysis of dust optical intensive and extensive properties at continental scale. This long-term database is also a unique tool for a systematic comparison with dust model outputs and satellite-derived dust products. Because of the relevance for both dust modeling and satellite retrievals improvement, results about desert dust layers extensive properties as a function of season and source regions are investigated and will be presented at the conference. First comparisons with models outputs and CALIPSO dust products will be

  3. Respiratory Toxicity of Lunar Highland Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-wing; Wallace, William T.

    2009-01-01

    Lunar dust exposures occurred during the Apollo missions while the crew was on the lunar surface and especially when microgravity conditions were attained during rendezvous in lunar orbit. Crews reported that the dust was irritating to the eyes and in some cases respiratory symptoms were elicited. NASA s vision for lunar exploration includes stays of 6 months on the lunar surface hence the health effects of periodic exposure to lunar dust need to be assessed. NASA has performed this assessment with a series of in vitro and in vivo tests on authentic lunar dust. Our approach is to "calibrate" the intrinsic toxicity of lunar dust by comparison to a nontoxic dust (TiO2) and a highly toxic dust (quartz) using intratrachael instillation of the dusts in mice. A battery of indices of toxicity is assessed at various time points after the instillations. Cultures of selected cells are exposed to test dusts to assess the adverse effects on the cells. Finally, chemical systems are used to assess the nature of the reactivity of various dusts and to determine the persistence of reactivity under various environmental conditions that are relevant to a space habitat. Similar systems are used to assess the dissolution of the dust. From these studies we will be able to set a defensible inhalation exposure standard for aged dust and predict whether we need a separate standard for reactive dust. Presently-available data suggest that aged lunar highland dust is slightly toxic, that it can adversely affect cultured cells, and that the surface reactivity induced by grinding the dust persists for a few hours after activation.

  4. Design and development of a dust dispersion chamber to quantify the dispersibility of rock dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Inoka E; Sapko, Michael J; Harris, Marcia L; Zlochower, Isaac A; Weiss, Eric S

    2016-01-01

    Dispersible rock dust must be applied to the surfaces of entries in underground coal mines in order to inert the coal dust entrained or made airborne during an explosion and prevent propagating explosions. 30 CFR. 75.2 states that "… [rock dust particles] when wetted and dried will not cohere to form a cake which will not be dispersed into separate particles by a light blast of air …" However, a proper definition or quantification of "light blast of air" is not provided. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has, consequently, designed a dust dispersion chamber to conduct quantitative laboratory-scale dispersibility experiments as a screening tool for candidate rock dusts. A reproducible pulse of air is injected into the chamber and across a shallow tray of rock dust. The dust dispersed and carried downwind is monitored. The mass loss of the dust tray and the airborne dust measurements determine the relative dispersibility of the dust with respect to a Reference rock dust. This report describes the design and the methodology to evaluate the relative dispersibility of rock dusts with and without anti-caking agents. Further, the results of this study indicate that the dispersibility of rock dusts varies with particle size, type of anti-caking agent used, and with the untapped bulk density. Untreated rock dusts, when wetted and dried forming a cake that was much less dispersible than the reference rock dust used in supporting the 80% total incombustible content rule.

  5. Planck intermediate results: XLVIII. Disentangling Galactic dust emission and cosmic infrared background anisotropies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aghanim, N.; Ashdown, M.; Aumont, J.

    2016-01-01

    Using the Planck 2015 data release (PR2) temperature maps, we separate Galactic thermal dust emission from cosmic infrared background (CIB) anisotropies. For this purpose, we implement a specifically tailored component-separation method, the so-called generalized needlet internal linear combinati...

  6. Magnetopause displacements: the possible role of dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. A. Treumann

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Large compressions of the magnetopause are proposed to occasionally result from temporary encounters of the magnetosphere with dust streams in interplanetary space. Such streams may have their origin in cometary dust tails or asteroids which cross the inner heliosphere or in meteoroids in Earth's vicinity. Dust ejected from such objects when embedding the magnetosphere for their limited transition time should cause substantial global deformations of the magnetopause/magnetosphere due to the very large dust grain mass and momentum which compensates for the low dust density when contributing to the upstream pressure variation.

  7. Model Dust Envelopes Around Silicate Carbon Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Suh

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available We have modeled dust envelopes around silicate carbon stars using optical properties for a mixture of amorphous carbon and silicate dust grains paying close attention to the infrared observations of the stars. The 4 stars show various properties in chemistry and location of the dust shell. We expect that the objects that fit a simple detached silicate dust shell model could be in the transition phase of the stellar chemistry. For binary system objects, we find that a mixed dust chemistry model would be necessary.

  8. Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates in indoor Floor Dust

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wolkoff, Peder; Madsen, Jørgen Øgaard

    1999-01-01

    The amount of Linear Alkylbenzenesulfonates (LAS) in the particle fraction of floor dust sampled from 7 selected public buildings varied between 34 and 1500 microgram per gram dust, while the contents of the fibre fractions generally were higher with up to 3500 microgram LAS/g dust. The use...... of a cleaning agent with LAS resulted in an increase of the amount of LAS in the floor dust after floor wash relative to just before floor wash. However, the most important source of LAS in the indoor floor dust appears to be residues of detergent in clothing. Thus, a newly washed shirt contained 2960 microgram...

  9. Time-Dependent Dust Formation in Novae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Suh

    1991-06-01

    Full Text Available The dust formation processes in novae are investigated with close attention to recent infrared observations. Using mainly the classical nucleation theory, we have calculated the time scales of dust formation and growth in the environments of novae. Those time scales roughly resemble the typical observations. We have classified the dust-forming novae into three classes according to their explosion properties and the thermodynamic properties of dust grains. Oxygen grains from much later than carbon grains because of their thermodynamic properties. The effect of grain formation to the efficiency of stellar winds to drive the material outward is tested with newly obtained Planck mean values of dust grains.

  10. An assessment of SEVIRI imagery at different temporal resolutions and the effect on accurate dust emission mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennen, Mark; White, Kevin; Shahgedanova, Maria

    2017-04-01

    This paper compares Dust RGB products derived from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) data at 15 minute, 30 minute and hourly temporal resolutions. From January 2006 to December 2006, observations of dust emission point sources were observed at each temporal resolution across the entire Middle East region (38.50N; 30.00E - 10.00N; 65.50E). Previous work has demonstrated that 15-minute resolution SEVIRI data can be used to map dust sources across the Sahara by observing dust storms back through sequential images to the point of first emission (Schepanski et al., 2007; 2009; 2012). These observations have improved upon lower resolution maps, based on daily retrievals of aerosol optical depth (AOD), whose maxima can be biased by prevalent transport routes, not necessarily coinciding with sources of emissions. Based on the thermal contrast of atmospheric dust to the surface, brightness temperature differences (BTD's) in the thermal infrared (TIR) wavelengths (8.7, 10.8 and 12.0 µm) highlight dust in the scene irrespective of solar illumination, giving both increased accuracy of dust source areas and a greater understanding of diurnal emission behaviour. However, the highest temporal resolution available (15-minute repeat capture) produces 96 images per day, resulting in significantly higher data storage demands than 30 minute or hourly data. To aid future research planning, this paper investigates what effect lowering the temporal resolution has on the number and spatial distribution of the observed dust sources. The results show a reduction in number of dust emission events observed with each step decrease in temporal resolution, reducing by 17% for 30-minute resolution and 50% for hourly. These differences change seasonally, with the highest reduction observed in summer (34% and 64% reduction respectively). Each resolution shows a similar spatial distribution, with the biggest difference seen near the coastlines, where near-shore convective

  11. Hubble space telescope imaging of decoupled dust clouds in the ram pressure stripped Virgo spirals NGC 4402 and NGC 4522

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abramson, Anne; Kenney, Jeffrey D. P., E-mail: anne.abramson@yale.edu, E-mail: jeff.kenney@yale.edu [Department of Astronomy, Yale University, P.O. Box 208101, New Haven, CT 06520 (United States)

    2014-03-01

    We present the highest-resolution study to date of the interstellar medium (ISM) in galaxies undergoing ram pressure stripping, using Hubble Space Telescope BVI imaging of NGC 4522 and NGC 4402, Virgo Cluster spirals that are well known to be experiencing intracluster medium (ICM) ram pressure. We find that throughout most of both galaxies, the main dust lane has a fairly well-defined edge, with a population of giant molecular cloud (GMC) sized (tens- to hundreds-of-pc scale), isolated, highly extincting dust clouds located up to ∼1.5 kpc radially beyond it. Outside of these dense clouds, the area has little or no diffuse dust extinction, indicating that the clouds have decoupled from the lower-density ISM material that has already been stripped. Several of the dust clouds have elongated morphologies that indicate active ram pressure, including two large (kpc scale) filaments in NGC 4402 that are elongated in the projected ICM wind direction. We calculate a lower limit on the H I + H{sub 2} masses of these clouds based on their dust extinctions and find that a correction factor of ∼10 gives cloud masses consistent with those measured in CO for clouds of similar diameters, probably due to the complicating factors of foreground light, cloud substructure, and resolution limitations. Assuming that the clouds' actual masses are consistent with those of GMCs of similar diameters (∼10{sup 4}-10{sup 5} M {sub ☉}), we estimate that only a small fraction (∼1%-10%) of the original H I + H{sub 2} remains in the parts of the disks with decoupled clouds. Based on Hα images, a similar fraction of star formation persists in these regions, 2%-3% of the estimated pre-stripping star formation rate. We find that the decoupled cloud lifetimes may be up to 150-200 Myr.

  12. ORIGIN OF DUST AROUND V1309 SCO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu, Chunhua; Lü, Guoliang; Wang, Zhaojun, E-mail: guolianglv@gmail.com [School of Physical Science and Technology, Xinjiang University, Urumqi, 830046 (China)

    2013-11-01

    The origin of dust grains in the interstellar medium is still an unanswered problem. Nicholls et al. found the presence of a significant amount of dust around V1309 Sco, which may originate from the merger of a contact binary. We investigate the origin of dust around V1309 Sco and suggest that these dust grains are produced in the binary-merger ejecta. By means of the AGBDUST code, we estimate that ∼5.2 × 10{sup –4} M{sub ☉} dust grains are produced with a radii of ∼10{sup –5} cm. These dust grains are mainly composed of silicate and iron grains. Because the mass of the binary merger ejecta is very small, the contribution of dust produced by binary merger ejecta to the overall dust production in the interstellar medium is negligible. However, it is important to note that the discovery of a significant amount of dust around V1309 Sco offers a direct support for the idea that common-envelope ejecta provides an ideal environment for dust formation and growth. Therefore, we confirm that common envelope ejecta can be important source of cosmic dust.

  13. A New Database of Digits Extracted from Coins with Hard-to-Segment Foreground for Optical Character Recognition Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingyu Pan

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the release date struck on a coin is important information of its monetary type, recognition of extracted digits may assist in identification of monetary types. However, digit images extracted from coins are challenging for conventional optical character recognition methods because the foreground of such digits has very often the same color as their background. In addition, other noises, including the wear of coin metal, make it more difficult to obtain a correct segmentation of the character shape. To address those challenges, this article presents the CoinNUMS database for automatic digit recognition. The database CoinNUMS, containing 3,006 digit images, is divided into three subsets. The first subset CoinNUMS_geni consists of 606 digit images manually cropped from high-resolution photographs of well-conserved coins from GENI coin photographs; the second subset CoinNUMS_pcgs_a consists of 1,200 digit images automatically extracted from a subset of the USA_Grading numismatic database containing coins in different quality; the last subset CoinNUMS_pcgs_m consists of 1,200 digit images manually extracted from the same coin photographs as CoinNUMS_pcgs_a. In CoinNUMS_pcgs_a and CoinNUMS_pcgs_m, the digit images are extracted from the release date. In CoinNUMS_geni, the digit images can come from the cropped date, the face value, or any other legends containing digits in the coin. To show the difficulty of these databases, we have tested recognition algorithms of the literature. The database and the results of the tested algorithms will be freely available on a dedicated website.1

  14. Global 21 cm Signal Extraction from Foreground and Instrumental Effects. I. Pattern Recognition Framework for Separation Using Training Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tauscher, Keith; Rapetti, David; Burns, Jack O.; Switzer, Eric

    2018-02-01

    The sky-averaged (global) highly redshifted 21 cm spectrum from neutral hydrogen is expected to appear in the VHF range of ∼20–200 MHz and its spectral shape and strength are determined by the heating properties of the first stars and black holes, by the nature and duration of reionization, and by the presence or absence of exotic physics. Measurements of the global signal would therefore provide us with a wealth of astrophysical and cosmological knowledge. However, the signal has not yet been detected because it must be seen through strong foregrounds weighted by a large beam, instrumental calibration errors, and ionospheric, ground, and radio-frequency-interference effects, which we collectively refer to as “systematics.” Here, we present a signal extraction method for global signal experiments which uses Singular Value Decomposition of “training sets” to produce systematics basis functions specifically suited to each observation. Instead of requiring precise absolute knowledge of the systematics, our method effectively requires precise knowledge of how the systematics can vary. After calculating eigenmodes for the signal and systematics, we perform a weighted least square fit of the corresponding coefficients and select the number of modes to include by minimizing an information criterion. We compare the performance of the signal extraction when minimizing various information criteria and find that minimizing the Deviance Information Criterion most consistently yields unbiased fits. The methods used here are built into our widely applicable, publicly available Python package, pylinex, which analytically calculates constraints on signals and systematics from given data, errors, and training sets.

  15. A lunar dust simulant: CLDS-i

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hong; Li, Xiongyao; Zhang, Sensen; Wang, Shijie; Liu, Jianzhong; Li, Shijie; Li, Yang; Wu, Yanxue

    2017-02-01

    Lunar dust can make serious damage to the spacecrafts, space suits, and health of astronauts, which is one of the most important problems faced in lunar exploration. In the case of rare lunar dust sample, CLDS-i with high similarity to the real lunar dust is an important objective for studying dust protection and dust toxicity. The CLDS-i developed by the Institute of Geochemistry Chinese Academy Sciences contains ∼75 vol% glass and a little nanophase metal iron (np-Fe0), and with a median particle size about 500 nm. The CLDS-i particles also have complicated shape and sharp edges. These properties are similar to those of lunar dust, and make the CLDS-i can be applied to many fields such as the scientific researches, the treatment technology and toxicological study of lunar dust.

  16. Properties of dust and clouds in the Mars atmosphere: Analysis of Viking IRTM emission phase function sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.

    1991-01-01

    An analysis of emission-phase-function (EPF) observations from the Viking Orbiter Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) yields a wide variety of results regarding dust and cloud scattering in the Mars atmosphere and atmospheric-corrected albedos for the surface of Mars. A multiple scattering radiative transfer model incorporating a bidirectional phase function for the surface and atmospheric scattering by dust and clouds is used to derive surface albedos and dust and ice optical properties and optical depths for these various conditions on Mars.

  17. DIRTMAP: the geological record of dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohfeld, Karen E.; Harrison, Sandy P.

    2001-06-01

    Atmospheric dust is an important feedback in the climate system, potentially affecting the radiative balance and chemical composition of the atmosphere and providing nutrients to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. Yet the potential impact of dust on the climate system, both in the anthropogenically disturbed future and the naturally varying past, remains to be quantified. The geologic record of dust provides the opportunity to test earth system models designed to simulate dust. Records of dust can be obtained from ice cores, marine sediments, and terrestrial (loess) deposits. Although rarely unequivocal, these records document a variety of processes (source, transport and deposition) in the dust cycle, stored in each archive as changes in clay mineralogy, isotopes, grain size, and concentration of terrigenous materials. Although the extraction of information from each type of archive is slightly different, the basic controls on these dust indicators are the same. Changes in the dust flux and particle size might be controlled by a combination of (a) source area extent, (b) dust emission efficiency (wind speed) and atmospheric transport, (c) atmospheric residence time of dust, and/or (d) relative contributions of dry settling and rainout of dust. Similarly, changes in mineralogy reflect (a) source area mineralogy and weathering and (b) shifts in atmospheric transport. The combination of these geological data with process-based, forward-modelling schemes in global earth system models provides an excellent means of achieving a comprehensive picture of the global pattern of dust accumulation rates, their controlling mechanisms, and how those mechanisms may vary regionally. The Dust Indicators and Records of Terrestrial and MArine Palaeoenvironments (DIRTMAP) data base has been established to provide a global palaeoenvironmental data set that can be used to validate earth system model simulations of the dust cycle over the past 150,000 years.

  18. Planck early results. XXV. Thermal dust in nearby molecular clouds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.; Polenta, G.

    2011-01-01

    Planck allows unbiased mapping of Galactic sub-millimetre and millimetre emission from the most diffuse regions to the densest parts of molecular clouds. We present an early analysis of the Taurus molecular complex, on line-of-sight-averaged data and without component separation. The emission...... spectrum measured by Planck and IRAS can be fitted pixel by pixel using a single modified blackbody. Some systematic residuals are detected at 353 GHz and 143 GHz, with amplitudes around -7% and +13%, respectively, indicating that the measured spectra are likely more complex than a simple modified...

  19. Thermal condensation mode in a dusty plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... in the presence of dust charge fluctuations. We find that the charge variability of the grain reduces the growth rate of radiative mode only for fluctuation wavelength smaller or of the order of the Debye length and this reduction is not very large. Far from the Debye sphere, radiative mode can damp due to thermal conduction ...

  20. Thermal Imaging with AGA Thermovision 780.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-12-01

    industrial products . Stratospheric aerosols contain sulphate with an occasional addition of * volcanic dust. [Ref. 3: p. 17-14] Scattering by molecules...The subsequent error in temperature calculations due to thermal value error was: dT = aT/aI i dIi = [(T 2 /IiB) / (1 - I/A)] dI i (5-5) Subsituting

  1. Industrial applications of thermal plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szente, Roberto Nunes

    1995-09-01

    The main characteristics and applications of thermal plasmas are reviewed here. The industrial applications of thermal plasmas can be divided in: low power-cutting, welding, spraying; metallurgical and steelmaking; materials; environment. Some of the processes described in this article include: powder spraying, metal refining, tundish and laddle heating, production of ferroalloys and ceramic materials, and treatment of residues (aluminum scrap, steel dusts, ashes, hospital wastes, electroplating mud). The use of thermal plasmas in the environment arena in particular has attracted increasingly attention as the regulations for disposal of residues become tougher. More research and development is needed particularly for decreasing the erosion of the electrodes of plasma torches and fundamental understanding of high temperature chemistry, heat transfer, and electric arcs for broadening the applications of thermal plasmas.

  2. Reducing aluminum dust explosion hazards: case study of dust inerting in an aluminum buffing operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Timothy J

    2008-11-15

    Metal powders or dusts can represent significant dust explosion hazards in industry, due to their relatively low ignition energy and high explosivity. The hazard is well known in industries that produce or use aluminum powders, but is sometimes not recognized by facilities that produce aluminum dust as a byproduct of bulk aluminum processing. As demonstrated by the 2003 dust explosion at aluminum wheel manufacturer Hayes Lemmerz, facilities that process bulk metals are at risk due to dust generated during machining and finishing operations [U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board, Investigation Report, Aluminum Dust Explosion Hayes Lemmerz International, Inc., Huntington, Indiana, Report No. 2004-01-I-IN, September 2005]. Previous studies have shown that aluminum dust explosions are more difficult to suppress with flame retardants or inerting agents than dust explosions fueled by other materials such as coal [A.G. Dastidar, P.R. Amyotte, J. Going, K. Chatrathi, Flammability limits of dust-minimum inerting concentrations, Proc. Saf. Progr., 18-1 (1999) 56-63]. In this paper, an inerting method is discussed to reduce the dust explosion hazard of residue created in an aluminum buffing operation as the residue is generated. This technique reduces the dust explosion hazard throughout the buffing process and within the dust collector systems making the process inherently safer. Dust explosion testing results are presented for process dusts produced during trials with varying amounts of flame retardant additives.

  3. Physicochemical Characteristics of Dust Particles in HVOF Spraying and Occupational Hazards: Case Study in a Chinese Company

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haihong; Li, Haijun; Li, Xinyu

    2016-06-01

    Dust particles generated in thermal spray process can cause serious health problems to the workers. Dust particles generated in high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spraying WC-Co coatings were characterized in terms of mass concentrations, particle size distribution, micro morphologies, and composition. Results show that the highest instantaneous exposure concentration of dust particles in the investigated thermal spray workshop is 140 mg/m3 and the time-weighted average concentration is 34.2 mg/m3, which are approximately 8 and 4 times higher than the occupational exposure limits in China, respectively. The large dust particles above 10 μm in size present a unique morphology of polygonal or irregular block of crushed powder, and smaller dust particles mainly exist in the form of irregular or flocculent agglomerates. Some heavy metals, such as chromium, cobalt, and nickel, are also found in the air of the workshop and their concentrations are higher than the limits. Potential occupational hazards of the dust particles in the thermal spray process are further analyzed based on their characteristics and the workers' exposure to the nanoparticles is assessed using a control banding tool.

  4. Human detection for underground autonomous mine vehicles using thermal imaging

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dickens, JS

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available they are in relation to a vehicle. Thermal infrared (IR) imaging provides the advantages of vision based detection without the problems of sensitivity to illumination and obscuring dust. Unlike visible range imaging, the illumination for thermal images is radiated... by the objects being imaged, in this case people. The long wavelength (7-14 ?m) of thermal IR allows it to penetrate dust and smoke [6]. The IR spectrum can be divided into four main regions. The main regions are near- infrared, short-wavelength, mid...

  5. Analysis of dust in the coma of comet 67P using VIRTIS-M observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinaldi, G.; Tozzi, G. P.; Fink, U.; Doose, L.; Capaccioni, F.; Filacchione, G.; Bockelée-Morvan, D.; Leyrat, C.; Piccioni, G.; Blecka, M.; Ciarniello, M.; Irwin, P.; Combi, M.; Palomba, E.; Migliorini, A.; Capria, M. T.; Faggi, S.; Tosi, F.

    2015-10-01

    We present a preliminary overview of the analysis on the dust spectrophotometry in the inner coma of comet 67/P that was obtained during the escort phase (started on December 2014) with the imaging spectrometer VIRTIS-M onboard the Rosetta mission [1]. The morphology and behavior of the dust coma has been monitored by VIRTIS-M from the arrival at the comet (~August 2014) throughout the early escort phase. The data reveal intricate details and numerous radial jets coming from different regions on the surface. On March 15, 2015, VIRTIS-M performed a set of 22 coma observations, each about 23 minutes in duration and offset from the nucleus by about 1 km. The 22 observations lasted about 12 hours and thus covered a complete rotation of the comet. The maps of the dust distribution in the coma reveal three major structures: a roughly uniform background dusty coma, several enhanced radiance jet features and a region that shows a thermal radiation component between 3.5 and 5.0 μm. (Figure 1 and Figure 2) The jets features can be traced back to several region of the comet, neck,body and head. We shall analyse the three major structures to provide the basis to understand coma composition and properties and the relation between gas and dust. We will discuss the morphology of the background coma, the jet and the enhanced thermal radiation. We will also examine correlations between the water vapor column density and the coma/ jet /thermal radiation intensity. For the thermal radiation component there are several explanations, viz: stray instrumental scattered light or instrumental ghosts from heated part of the nucleus, or thermal rad iation emanating from the nucleus and scattered by the dust in closest proximity or a region of small particles in the coma heated by solar radiation.

  6. Observation and simulation of dust aerosol cycle and impact on radiative fluxes during the FENNEC campaign in summer 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minvielle, Fanny; Derimian, Yevgeny; Pere, Jean-Christophe; Flamant, Cyrille; Brogniez, Gérard

    2013-04-01

    The Sahara desert is one of the principal worldwide sources of dust aerosol emissions that play significant role in the climatic system. In the framework of the FENNEC campaign, conducted during the summer 2011, we focus on dust radiative effect and impact on the atmospheric dynamics and profile structure. We study the variability of the measured radiative parameters and model atmospheric dynamics during dust plume observations at the FENNEC sites, therefore, trying to understand the link between the Saharan heat low system and dust aerosols. Due to its large size the airborne dust can absorb and scatter not only solar, but also thermal infrared radiation, which requires consideration of both spectral ranges. Analysis of AERONET and other optical observations during the period of intensive campaign in summer 2011 provides information on variability of aerosol optical characteristics and perturbation of solar and TIR flux. We use these observations in conjunction with the meso-scale model RAMS to understand the impact of the dust plumes on the atmospheric dynamics. We also simulate the dust cycle in order to find the contribution of the different emission sources and identify structure of transport over an extended domain. Then, coupling the radiative code (GAME) we calculate the radiative forcing of dust and compare it to the radiative flux observed and computed based on the AERONET observations. Validation of simulations is made using measurements from space-borne CALIOP lidar, SEVIRI and OMI satellites, AERONET ground-based stations and observations acquired onboard the SAFIRE Falcon 20 research aircraft.

  7. Sensitization to Asian dust and allergic rhinoconjunctivitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mimura, Tatsuya; Yamagami, Satoru; Fujishima, Hiroshi; Noma, Hidetaka; Kamei, Yuko; Goto, Mari; Kondo, Aki; Matsubara, Masao

    2014-07-01

    Asian dust storms frequently occur in northeast Asia and the dust occasionally even spreads as far as North America during spring. Asian dust can be harmful to human health and the environment, and thus has become one of the most serious problems for Asian countries. In the present study, we evaluated sensitization to Asian dust in Japanese patients with rhinoconjunctivitis. In March 2011, a prospective, non-randomized, cross-sectional study was conducted in 10 patients with allergic rhinoconjunctivitis (allergic group), 3 patients with atopic keratoconjunctivitis (atopic group), and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (control group). Skin prick tests (SPT) were performed with untreated Asian dust, Asian dust extract, heat-sterilized Asian dust, silicon dioxide (SiO2), and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A panel of 14 allergen extracts was also tested, comprising extracts of pollens (cedar, orchard grass, ragweed, and mugwort), house dust (house dust mixture and Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus), animal dander (cat and dog), fungi (Alternaria tenuis, Candida, and Aspergillus), and foods (milk, egg, and wheat). Then the SPT-positive rate and the mean wheal diameter for each allergen were compared among the three groups. The SPT-positive rates for untreated Asian dust, Asian dust extract, and sterilized Asian dust were significantly higher in the allergic and atopic groups than in the control group (all pAsian dust (70%), Asian dust extract (50%), sterilized Asian dust (20%), SiO2 (20%), and PBS (0%) (p=0.0068). The SPT response to untreated Asian dust was correlated with the mean wheal diameters for four plant pollens (r=0.71, p=0.0104) and for three fungi (r=0.57, p=0.0426). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that significant predictors of the SPT reaction to untreated Asian dust were the mean wheal diameter for the four plant pollen (odds ratio=2.54, p=0.0138) and that for the three fungi (odds ratio=1.84, p=0.0273). Asian dust may act

  8. Dust-Tolerant Intelligent Electrical Connection System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mark; Dokos, Adam; Perotti, Jose; Calle, Carlos; Mueller, Robert; Bastin, Gary; Carlson, Jeffrey; Townsend, Ivan, III; Immer, Chirstopher; Medelius, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Faults in wiring systems are a serious concern for the aerospace and aeronautic (commercial, military, and civilian) industries. Circuit failures and vehicle accidents have occurred and have been attributed to faulty wiring created by open and/or short circuits. Often, such circuit failures occur due to vibration during vehicle launch or operation. Therefore, developing non-intrusive fault-tolerant techniques is necessary to detect circuit faults and automatically route signals through alternate recovery paths while the vehicle or lunar surface systems equipment is in operation. Electrical connector concepts combining dust mitigation strategies and cable diagnostic technologies have significant application for lunar and Martian surface systems, as well as for dusty terrestrial applications. The dust-tolerant intelligent electrical connection system has several novel concepts and unique features. It combines intelligent cable diagnostics (health monitoring) and automatic circuit routing capabilities into a dust-tolerant electrical umbilical. It retrofits a clamshell protective dust cover to an existing connector for reduced gravity operation, and features a universal connector housing with three styles of dust protection: inverted cap, rotating cap, and clamshell. It uses a self-healing membrane as a dust barrier for electrical connectors where required, while also combining lotus leaf technology for applications where a dust-resistant coating providing low surface tension is needed to mitigate Van der Waals forces, thereby disallowing dust particle adhesion to connector surfaces. It also permits using a ruggedized iris mechanism with an embedded electrodynamic dust shield as a dust barrier for electrical connectors where required.

  9. Simulating Dust Regional Impact on the Middle East Climate and the Red Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osipov, Sergey; Stenchikov, Georgiy

    2017-04-01

    Dust is one of the most abundant aerosols, however, currently only a few regional climate downscalings account for dust. This study focuses on the Middle East and the Red Sea regional climate response to the dust aerosol radiative forcing. The Red Sea is located between North Africa and Arabian Peninsula, which are first and third largest source regions of dust, respectively. MODIS and SEVIRI satellite observations show extremely high dust optical depths in the region, especially over the southern Red Sea during the summer season. The significant north-to-south gradient of the dust optical depth over the Red Sea persists throughout the entire year. Modeled atmospheric radiative forcing at the surface, top of the atmosphere and absorption in the atmospheric column indicate that dust significantly perturbs radiative balance. Top of the atmosphere modeled forcing is validated against independently derived GERB satellite product. Due to strong radiative forcing at the sea surface (daily mean forcing during summer reaches -32 Wm-2 and 10 Wm-2 in SW and LW, respectively), using uncoupled ocean model with prescribed atmospheric boundary conditions would result in an unrealistic ocean response. Therefore, here we employ the Regional Ocean Modeling system (ROMS) fully coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to study the impact of dust on the Red Sea thermal regime and circulation. The WRF was modified to interactively account for the radiative effect of dust. Daily spectral optical properties of dust are computed using Mie, T-matrix, and geometric optics approaches, and are based on the SEVIRI climatological optical depth. The WRF model parent and nested domains are configured over the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and over the Red Sea with 30 and 10 km resolution, respectively. The ROMS model over the Red Sea has 2 km grid spacing. The simulations show that, in the equilibrium response, dust causes 0.3-0.5 K cooling of the Red Sea surface

  10. Longwave radiative effects of Saharan dust during the ICE-D campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooke, Jennifer; Havemann, Stephan; Ryder, Claire; O'Sullivan, Debbie

    2017-04-01

    The Havemann-Taylor Fast Radiative Transfer Code (HT-FRTC) is a fast radiative transfer model based on Principal Components. Scattering has been incorporated into HT-FRTC which allows simulations of aerosol as well as clear-sky atmospheres. This work evaluates the scattering scheme in HT-FRTC and investigates dust-affected brightness temperatures using in-situ observations from Ice in Clouds Experiment - Dust (ICE-D) campaign. The ICE-D campaign occurred during August 2015 and was based from Cape Verde. The ICE-D campaign is a multidisciplinary project which achieved measurements of in-situ mineral dust properties of the dust advected from the Sahara, and on the aerosol-cloud interactions using the FAAM BAe-146 research aircraft. ICE-D encountered a range of low (0.3), intermediate (0.8) and high (1.3) aerosol optical depths, AODs, and therefore provides a range of atmospheric dust loadings in the assessment of dust scattering in HT-FRTC. Spectral radiances in the thermal infrared window region (800 - 1200 cm-1) are sensitive to the presence of mineral dust; mineral dust acts to reduce the upwelling infrared radiation caused by the absorption and re-emission of radiation by the dust layer. ARIES (Airborne Research Interferometer Evaluation System) is a nadir-facing interferometer, measuring infrared radiances between 550 and 3000 cm-1. The ARIES spectral radiances are converted to brightness temperatures by inversion of the Planck function. The mineral dust size distribution is important for radiative transfer applications as it provides a measure of aerosol scattering. The longwave spectral mineral dust optical properties including the mass extinction coefficients, single scattering albedos and the asymmetry parameter have been derived from the mean ICE-D size distribution. HT-FRTC scattering simulations are initialised with vertical mass fractions which can be derived from extinction profiles from the lidar along with the specific extinction coefficient, kext (m2

  11. Stereoscopy of dust density waves under microgravity: Velocity distributions and phase-resolved single-particle analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Himpel, Michael, E-mail: himpel@physik.uni-greifswald.de; Killer, Carsten; Melzer, André [Institute of Physics, Ernst-Moritz-Arndt-University, 17489 Greifswald (Germany); Bockwoldt, Tim; Piel, Alexander [IEAP, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel, D-24098 Kiel (Germany); Ole Menzel, Kristoffer [ABB Switzerland Ltd, Corporate Research Center, 5405 Dättwil (Switzerland)

    2014-03-15

    Experiments on dust-density waves have been performed in dusty plasmas under the microgravity conditions of parabolic flights. Three-dimensional measurements of a dust density wave on a single particle level are presented. The dust particles have been tracked for many oscillation periods. A Hilbert analysis is applied to obtain trajectory parameters such as oscillation amplitude and three-dimensional velocity amplitude. While the transverse motion is found to be thermal, the velocity distribution in wave propagation direction can be explained by harmonic oscillations with added Gaussian (thermal) noise. Additionally, it is shown that the wave properties can be reconstructed by means of a pseudo-stroboscopic approach. Finally, the energy dissipation mechanism from the kinetic oscillation energy to thermal motion is discussed and presented using phase-resolved analysis.

  12. DUST EVOLUTION CAN PRODUCE SCATTERED LIGHT GAPS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birnstiel, Tilman; Andrews, Sean M. [Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Pinilla, Paola; Kama, Mihkel, E-mail: tbirnstiel@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: sandrews@cfa.harvard.edu, E-mail: pinilla@strw.leidenuniv.nl, E-mail: mkama@strw.leidenuniv.nl [Leiden Observatory, P.O. Box 9513, 2300 RA, Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-11-01

    Recent imaging of protoplanetary disks with high resolution and contrast have revealed a striking variety of substructure. Of particular interest are cases where near-infrared scattered light images show evidence for low-intensity annular “gaps.” The origins of such structures are still uncertain, but the interaction of the gas disk with planets is a common interpretation. We study the impact that the evolution of the solid material can have on the observable properties of disks in a simple scenario without any gravitational or hydrodynamical disturbances to the gas disk structure. Even with a smooth and continuous gas density profile, we find that the scattered light emission produced by small dust grains can exhibit ring-like depressions similar to those presented in recent observations. The physical mechanisms responsible for these features rely on the inefficient fragmentation of dust particles. The occurrence and position of the proposed “gap” features depend most strongly on the dust-to-gas ratio, the fragmentation threshold velocity, the strength of the turbulence, and the age of the disk, and should be generic (at some radius) for typically adopted disk parameters. The same physical processes can affect the thermal emission at optically thin wavelengths (∼1 mm), although the behavior can be more complex; unlike for disk–planet interactions, a “gap” should not be present at these longer wavelengths.

  13. Mars dust and cloud opacities and scattering properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.

    1992-01-01

    We have recently completed an analysis of the visible emission-phase function (EPF) sequences obtained with the solar-band channel of the Infrared Thermal Mapping (IRTM) instrument onboard the two Viking Orbiters. Roughly 100 of these EPF sequences were gathered during the 1977-1980 period, in which the total broadband (.3-3.0 microns) reflectances of the atmosphere/surface above specific locations on Mars were measured versus emission angle as the spacecraft passed overhead. A multiple scattering radiative transfer program was employed to model the EPF observations in terms of the optical depths of dust/clouds, their single scattering albedos and phase functions, and the Lambert albedos and phase coefficient of the underlying surfaces. Due to the predominance of atmospheric scattering at large atmospheric pathlengths and/or large dust opacities, we were able to obtain strong constraints on the scattering properties of dust/clouds and their opacities for a wide range of latitudes, longitudes, and seasons on Mars.

  14. Confirmation of dust condensation in the ejecta of supernova 1987a.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrz, R D; Ney, E P

    1990-06-01

    Shortly after its outburst, we suggested that supernova 1987a might condense a dust shell of substantial visual optical thickness as many classical novae do and predicted that dust might form within a year after the explosion. A critical examination of recent optical and infrared observations reported by others confirms that dust grains had begun to grow at a temperature of 1000 K after 300 days and that the dust shell had become optically thick by day 600. After day 600, the infrared luminosity closely followed the intrinsic luminosity expected for thermalized 56Co gamma rays, demonstrating that the luminosity is powered by radioactivity and that the dust is outside the radioactivity zone. The infrared luminosity sets an upper limit to the soft intrinsic bolometric luminosity of a pulsar central engine. This upper limit for the pulsar in supernova 1987a is the same luminosity as the Crab pulsar has today 936 years after its formation. It is unlikely that the rotation rate for a pulsar in supernova 1987a can be much higher than approximately 30 revolutions per sec. The relatively long time required for the shell to grow to maximum optical depth as compared with the dust in nova shells may be related to the relatively low outflow velocity of the condensible ejecta.

  15. A Fractal Model for the Capacitance of Lunar Dust and Lunar Dust Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collier, Michael R.; Stubbs, Timothy J.; Keller, John W.; Farrell, William M.; Marshall, John; Richard, Denis Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Lunar dust grains and dust aggregates exhibit clumping, with an uneven mass distribution, as well as features that span many spatial scales. It has been observed that these aggregates display an almost fractal repetition of geometry with scale. Furthermore, lunar dust grains typically have sharp protrusions and jagged features that result from the lack of aeolian weathering (as opposed to space weathering) on the Moon. A perfectly spherical geometry, frequently used as a model for lunar dust grains, has none of these characteristics (although a sphere may be a reasonable proxy for the very smallest grains and some glasses). We present a fractal model for a lunar dust grain or aggregate of grains that reproduces (1) the irregular clumpy nature of lunar dust, (2) the presence of sharp points, and (3) dust features that span multiple scale lengths. We calculate the capacitance of the fractal lunar dust analytically assuming fixed dust mass (i.e. volume) for an arbitrary number of fractal levels and compare the capacitance to that of a non-fractal object with the same volume, surface area, and characteristic width. The fractal capacitance is larger than that of the equivalent non-fractal object suggesting that for a given potential, electrostatic forces on lunar dust grains and aggregates are greater than one might infer from assuming dust grains are sphericaL Consequently, electrostatic transport of lunar dust grains, for example lofting, appears more plausible than might be inferred by calculations based on less realistic assumptions about dust shape and associated capacitance.

  16. Migration of Asteroidal Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.; Taylor, P. A.

    2003-08-01

    We numerically investigated the migration of dust particles with initial velocities and positions same as those of the numbered asteroids using the Bulirsh-Stoer method of integration and took into account the gravitational influence of 8 planets, radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag, for values of the ratio between the radiation pressure force and the gravitational force β equal to 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.25, and 0.4. For silicate particles such values of β correspond to diameters of 40, 9, 4, 1.6, and 1 microns, respectively. For each β >= 0.05 we considered N=500 particles (N=250 for β =0.01). In our runs, planets were considered as material points, but, based on orbital elements obtained with a step of probability of a collision of a particle with a terrestrial planet during the lifetime of the particle. For smaller particles, the ratio of the number of particles that collided with the Sun to the total number of simulated particles and the probability of collisions of particles with the terrestrial planets are smaller. The probability of a collision of a migrating dust particle with the Earth for β =0.01 is greater by a factor of 220 than for β =0.4. The mean time ta during which an asteroidal dust particle had a semi-major axis 'a' in intervals with a fixed width is greater for smaller β (for the same initial number of particles) at a3.5 AU than at 'a' between 1 and 3 AU, and are usually maximum at 'a' about 2.3 AU. For β =0.01 the local maxima of ta corresponding to the 5:6, 6:7, 3:4, and 2:3 resonances with the Earth are greater than the maximum at 2.4 AU. The peaks in distribution of migrating asteroidal dust particles with semi-major axis corresponding to the n/(n+1) resonances with Earth and Venus and the gaps associated with the 1:1 resonances with these planets are more pronounced for larger particles. The spatial density of a simulated dust cloud and its luminosity (as seen from outside) were greater for smaller distance

  17. Infrared Spectroscopy of HR 4796A's Bright Outer Cometary Ring + Tenuous Inner Hot Dust Cloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisse, C. M.; Sitko, M. L.; Marengo, M.; Vervack, R. J., Jr.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Mittal, T.; Chen, C. H.

    2017-11-01

    We have obtained new NASA/IRTF SpeX spectra of the HR 4796A debris ring system. We find a unique red excess flux that extends out to ˜9 μm in Spitzer IRS spectra, where thermal emission from cold, ˜100 K dust from the system’s ring at ˜75 au takes over. Matching imaging ring photometry, we find the excess consists of NIR reflectance from the ring, which is as red as that of old, processed comet nuclei, plus a tenuous thermal emission component from close-in, T ˜ 850 K circumstellar material evincing an organic/silicate emission feature complex at 7-13 μm. Unusual, emission-like features due to atomic Si, S, Ca, and Sr were found at 0.96-1.07 μm, likely sourced by rocky dust evaporating in the 850 K component. An empirical cometary dust phase function can reproduce the scattered light excess and 1:5 balance of scattered versus thermal energy for the ring with optical depth ≥slant 0.10 in an 8 au wide belt of 4 au vertical height and M dust > 0.1-0.7 M Mars. Our results are consistent with HR 4796A, consisting of a narrow shepherded ring of devolatilized cometary material associated with multiple rocky planetesimal subcores and a small steady stream of dust inflowing from this belt to a rock sublimation zone at ˜1 au from the primary. These subcores were built from comets that have been actively emitting large, reddish dust for >0.4 Myr at ˜100 K, the temperature at which cometary activity onset is seen in our solar system.

  18. Characterisation of mineral dust emission in the Middle EAST using the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennen, M.; Shahgedanova, M.; White, K.

    2015-12-01

    Using the Spinning Enhanced Visual and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) on-board Meteosat's second generation satellite (MSG), mineral dust emissions from the Middle East were observed at a high temporal and spatial resolution between the years 2006 and 2013. This research provides a subjective derivation of mineral dust source locations in the Middle East using the thermal infrared Dust RGB product. Focusing on the brightness temperature difference around 10.8 µm channel and their spectral contrast with clear sky conditions, the Dust RGB product has been recognised as a major asset in detecting dust. While the product has already been used to map dust emissions in Sahara and south Africa, this research is the first to map dust emissions in the Middle East using SEVIRI, one of the dustiest regions in the world second only to the Sahara Desert. For every dust storm activation within the Middle East, the point of first emission is derived from visual inspection of each 15 minute image, these points were then recorded in a dust source climatology (DSC) database, along with time and direction of dust movement. To take account of potential errors inherent in this subjective detection method, a degree of confidence is associated with each data point with relevance to time of day (which has a strong effect on ability to detect dust in these products) and weather conditions, in particular presence of clouds. These results are compared with an automated retrieval using Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) measurements form the Moderate Resolution Image Spectrometer (MODIS); which, due to its sun-synchronous orbit allows a measurement of dust in the atmosphere once a day. Differences in the spatial distribution of SEVIRI dust sources and MODIS inferred dust source regions can be explained by inherent transport bias in the latter's low sampling rate and prevailing wind conditions. This database will provide an important tool in further understanding dust emission processes in the region

  19. Planck early results. XX. New light on anomalous microwave emission from spinning dust grains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lähteenmäki, A.; Poutanen, T.; Natoli, P.

    2011-01-01

    Anomalous microwave emission (AME) has been observed by numerous experiments in the frequency range ~10-60 GHz. Using Planck maps and multi-frequency ancillary data, we have constructed spectra for two known AME regions: the Perseus and ρ Ophiuchi molecular clouds. The spectra are well fitted...... of the synchrotron, free-free, and thermal dust. We present spectra for two of the candidates; S140 and S235 are bright Hii regions that show evidence for AME, and are well fitted by spinning dust models. © ESO, 2011....

  20. Mechanisms of dust grain charging in plasma with allowance for electron emission processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mol’kov, S. I.; Savin, V. N., E-mail: moped@onego.ru [Petrozavodsk State University (Russian Federation)

    2017-02-15

    The process of dust grain charging is described with allowance for secondary, ion-induced, photoelectric, and thermal electron emission from the grain surface. The roughness of the grain surface is taken into account. An intermediate charging regime involving ion–atom collisions and electron ionization in the perturbed plasma region is analyzed using the moment equations and Poisson’s equation. A calculation method is proposed that allows one to take into account the influence of all the above effects and determine the radius of the plasma region perturbed by the dust grain.

  1. Mechanisms of dust grain charging in plasma with allowance for electron emission processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mol'kov, S. I.; Savin, V. N.

    2017-02-01

    The process of dust grain charging is described with allowance for secondary, ion-induced, photoelectric, and thermal electron emission from the grain surface. The roughness of the grain surface is taken into account. An intermediate charging regime involving ion-atom collisions and electron ionization in the perturbed plasma region is analyzed using the moment equations and Poisson's equation. A calculation method is proposed that allows one to take into account the influence of all the above effects and determine the radius of the plasma region perturbed by the dust grain.

  2. Consistent dust and gas models for protoplanetary disks. I. Disk shape, dust settling, opacities, and PAHs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Woitke, P; Min, M; Pinte, C; Thi, W. -F; Kamp, I; Rab, C; Anthonioz, F; Antonellini, S; Baldovin-Saavea, C; Carmona, A; Dominik, C; Dionatos, O; Greaves, J; Güdel, M; Ilee, J. D; Liebhart, A; Ménard, F; Rigon, L; Waters, L. B. F. M; Aresu, G; Meijerink, R; Spaans, M

    2016-01-01

    ..., and line radiative transfer from optical to cm wavelengths. The first paper of this series focuses on the assumptions about the shape of the disk, the dust opacities, dust settling, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs...

  3. Analysis of influence factors on dust removal efficiency for novel photovoltaic lunar dust removal technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Zhao, Hongyue; Wang, Lei; Yue, Honghao; Hou, Xuyan

    2017-12-01

    The deposition of lunar dust on the surface of a lunar probe has an adverse effect on the performance of the equipment. This paper proposes novel lunar dust removal technology, which is triggered by UV light isolated from sunlight, to clean the adhered dust using the high voltage produced by the anomalous photovoltaic effect of lanthanum modified lead zirconate titanate. Based on the equivalent electrical model, the mathematical model of electrostatic field force used for removing lunar dust particles is established. Based on the mathematical model the influencing factors of dust removal efficiency are proposed and analyzed by experiments. To improve the dust removal efficiency, a conductive dust removal electrode is designed, coated with a layer of insulating film to avoid the reciprocating motion of dust particles, and the feasibility of the configuration is proved by experiments.

  4. DUST AND GAS IN THE MAGELLANIC CLOUDS FROM THE HERITAGE HERSCHEL KEY PROJECT. II. GAS-TO-DUST RATIO VARIATIONS ACROSS INTERSTELLAR MEDIUM PHASES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman-Duval, Julia; Gordon, Karl D.; Meixner, Margaret [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Bot, Caroline [Observatoire astronomique de Strasbourg, Université de Strasbourg, CNRS, UMR 7550, 11 rue de l' université, F-67000 Strasbourg (France); Bolatto, Alberto; Jameson, Katherine [Department of Astronomy, Lab for Millimeter-wave Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-2421 (United States); Hughes, Annie; Hony, Sacha [Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie, Königstuhl 17, D-69117 Heidelberg (Germany); Wong, Tony [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, 1002 W. Green St., Urbana, IL 61801 (United States); Babler, Brian [Department of Astronomy, University of Wisconsin, 475 North Charter St., Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Bernard, Jean-Philippe [CNRS, IRAP, 9 Av. colonel Roche, BP 44346, F-31028 Toulouse Cedex 4 (France); Clayton, Geoffrey C. [Louisiana State University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, 233-A Nicholson Hall, Tower Dr., Baton Rouge, LA 70803-4001 (United States); Fukui, Yasuo [Department of Physics, Nagoya University, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya 464-8602 (Japan); Galametz, Maud [European Southern Observatory, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str 2, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Galliano, Frederic; Lebouteiller, Vianney; Lee, Min-Young [CEA, Laboratoire AIM, Irfu/SAp, Orme des Merisiers, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Glover, Simon [Zentrum für Astronomie, Institut für Theoretische Astrophysik, Universität Heidelberg, Albert-Ueberle Strasse 2, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); Israel, Frank [Sterrewacht Leiden, Leiden University, P.O. Box 9513, NL-2300 RA Leiden (Netherlands); Li, Aigen, E-mail: duval@stsci.edu [314 Physics Building, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States); and others

    2014-12-20

    and observations are required to break the degeneracy between dust grain coagulation, accretion, and CO-dark H{sub 2}. Our analysis demonstrates that obtaining robust ISM masses remains a non-trivial endeavor even in the local Universe using state-of-the-art maps of thermal dust emission.

  5. Assessment of dust activity and dust-plume pathways over Jazmurian Basin, southeast Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashki, A.; Arjmand, M.; Kaskaoutis, D. G.

    2017-02-01

    Jazmurian (or hamun-e Jaz Murian) is a dried lake located in a topographic-low basin in southeast Iran and a major source for high dust emissions under favorable weather conditions. This work examines for the first time the dust activity over the basin by classifying the dust events (DEs, visibility western Pakistan, while air masses from the arid/desert areas of central-eastern Iran and Arabia seem to further aggravate the dust-aerosol loading over Jazmurian.

  6. Desert Dust Properties, Modelling, and Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Kahn, Ralph A.; Gupta, Pawan; Jayaraman, Achuthan; Bartzokas, Aristides

    2013-01-01

    This paper is just the three-page introduction to a Special Issue of Advances in Meteorology focusing on desert dust. It provides a paragraph each on 13 accepted papers, most relating to the used of satellite data to assess attributes or distribution of airborne desert dust. As guest Associate Editors of this issue, we organized the papers into a systematic whole, beginning with large-scale transport and seasonal behavior, then to regional dust transport, transport history, and climate impacts, first in the Mediterranean region, then India and central Asia, and finally focusing on transport model assessment and the use of lidar as a technique to constrain dust spatial-temporal distribution.

  7. Modern dust aerosol availability in northwestern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xunming; Cheng, Hong; Che, Huizheng; Sun, Jimin; Lu, Huayu; Qiang, Mingrui; Hua, Ting; Zhu, Bingqi; Li, Hui; Ma, Wenyong; Lang, Lili; Jiao, Linlin; Li, Danfeng

    2017-08-18

    The sources of modern dust aerosols and their emission magnitudes are fundamental for linking dust with climate and environment. Using field sample data, wind tunnel experiments and statistical analysis, we determined the contributions of wadis, gobi (stony desert), lakebeds, riverbeds, and interdunes to modern dust aerosol availability in the three important potential dust sources including the Tarim Basin, Qaidam Basin, and Ala Shan Plateau of China. The results show that riverbeds are the dominant landscape for modern dust aerosol availabilities in the Qaidam Basin, while wadis, gobi, and interdunes are the main landscapes over the Ala Shan Plateau and Tarim Basin. The Ala Shan Plateau and Tarim Basin are potential dust sources in northwestern China, while the Qaidam Basin is not a major source of the modern dust aerosols nowadays, and it is not acting in a significant way to the Loess Plateau presently. Moreover, most of modern dust aerosol emissions from China originated from aeolian processes with low intensities rather than from major dust events.

  8. SPARCLE: Electrostatic Tool for Lunar Dust Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Minetto, F.; Cheung, C. Y.; Keller, J. F.; Moore, M.; Calle, C. I.

    2009-03-01

    Successful exploration of most planetary surfaces, with their impact-generated dusty regoliths, will depend on the capabilities to keep surfaces free of the dust which could compromise performance and to collect dust for characterization. Solving the dust problem is essential before we return to the Moon. During the Apollo missions, the discovery was made that regolith fines, or dust, behaved like abrasive velcro, coating surfaces, clogging mechanisms, and making movement progressively more difficult as it was mechanically stirred up during surface operations, and abrading surfaces, including spacesuits, when attempts were made to remove it manually. In addition, some of the astronauts experienced breathing difficulties when exposed to dust that got into the crew compartment. The successful strategy will deal with dust dynamics resulting from interaction between mechanical and electrostatic forces. Here we will describe the surface properties of dust particles, the basis for their behavior, and an electrostatically-based approach and methodology for addressing this issue confirmed by our preliminary results. Our device concept utilizes a focused electron beam to control the electrostatic potential of the surface. A plate of the opposite potential is then used to induce dust migration in the presence of an electrical field. Our goal is a compact device of harness the removal of dust for sampling as part of the extended exploration process on Mercury, Mars, asteroids or outer solar system satellites, as well as the Moon.

  9. The cosmic dust rate across the Universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gioannini, L.; Matteucci, F.; Calura, F.

    2017-11-01

    We investigate the evolution of interstellar dust in the Universe by means of chemical evolution models of galaxies of different morphological types, reproducing the main observed features of present-day galaxies. We adopt the most updated prescriptions for dust production from supernovae and asymptotic giant branch stars as well as for dust accretion and destruction processes. Then, we study the cosmic dust rate in the framework of three different cosmological scenarios for galaxy formation: (I) a pure luminosity scenario, (II) a number density evolution scenario, as suggested by the classical hierarchical clustering scenario and (III) an alternative scenario, in which both spirals and ellipticals are allowed to evolve in number on an observationally motivated basis. Our results give predictions about the evolution of the dust content in different galaxies as well as the cosmic dust rate as a function of redshift. Concerning the cosmic dust rate, the best scenario is the alternative one, which predicts a peak at 2 < z < 3 and reproduces the cosmic star formation rate. We compute the evolution of the comoving dust density parameter Ωdust and find agreement with data for z < 0.5 in the framework of DE and alternative scenarios. Finally, the evolution of the average cosmic metallicity is presented and it shows a quite fast increase in each scenario, reaching the solar value at the present time, although most of the heavy elements are incorporated into solid grains, and therefore not observable in the gas phase.

  10. Transmisi Harga Teh Hitam Grade Dust Indonesia

    OpenAIRE

    Adinugroho, Muhammad Fadhil; Harmini, Harmini

    2011-01-01

    The objectives of this paper are (1) to analyze the relationship of “dust grade” tea price at Jakarta, Colombo and Guwahati Tea Auction Markets, and (2) to perform Vector Autoregression (VAR) models in order to forecast the “dust grade” tea price at Jakarta Tea Auction Market. Grade dust tea is used to make the tea bag. The average weekly price of dust grade tea from the third week of February 2009 until the second week of April 2011 was used in this analysis. The results showed that firstly,...

  11. Saharan dust storms: nature and consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goudie, A. S.; Middleton, N. J.

    2001-12-01

    This paper reviews recent work on the role of Saharan dust in environmental change, the location and strength of source areas, the transport paths of material away from the desert, the rates of Saharan dust deposition, the nature of that material (including PeriSaharan loess) and the changing rates of dust activity in response to long and short-term climatic changes. The Sahara produces more aeolian soil dust than any other world desert, and Saharan dust has an important impact on climatic processes, nutrient cycles, soil formation and sediment cycles. These influences spread far beyond Africa, thanks to the great distances over which Saharan dust is transported. The precise locations of Saharan dust source areas are not well known, but data from the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) suggest two major source areas: the Bodélé depression and an area covering eastern Mauritania, western Mali and southern Algeria. Trajectories of long-distance transport are relatively well documented, but the links between source areas and seasonal Saharan dust pathways are not. However, it is possible that Harmattan dust from the Bodélé depression may not be the source of the prominent winter plume over the tropical North Atlantic, as is often suggested in the literature. Few of the data on particle size characteristics of Saharan dust are derived from major source areas or from Africa itself. Saharan dusts sampled from the Harmattan plume and over Europe are dominated by SiO 2 and Al 2O 3, a characteristic they share with North American and Chinese dusts. The concentrations of these two major elements are similar to those found in world rocks. PeriSaharan loess is conspicuous by its relative absence, considering the Sahara's dominance of the global desert dust cycle both in the contemporary era and through the geological past. In recent decades, the frequency of Saharan dust events has varied markedly in response to climatic factors such as drought and anthropogenic

  12. Dust coagulation and fragmentation in molecular clouds. II. The opacity of the dust aggregate size distribution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, C.W.; Min, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/277318416; Tielens, A. G. G. M.; Dominik, C.; Paszun, D.

    2011-01-01

    The dust size distribution in molecular clouds can be strongly affected by ice-mantle formation and (subsequent) grain coagulation. Following previous work where the dust size distribution has been calculated from a state-of-the art collision model for dust aggregates that involves both coagulation

  13. Development of a dust collector inlet hood for enhanced surface mine drill dust capture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John A. Organiscak; Steven J. Page [National Institute for Occupational Safety & Health, Pittsburgh, PA (United States). Pittsburgh Research Laboratory, Department of Health & Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    2005-03-01

    Surface mine drill operators have the highest frequency of overexposure to quartz dust, and drilling is one of the occupations associated with the highest incidence of silicosis. Previous field assessment studies of drilling machines indicate that they can emit some of the highest airborne respirable quartz dust concentrations found at surface mining operations. Typically, the surface mine drills are equipped with dry dust collector systems to capture the dust being flushed with compressed air from the hole during the drilling process. The overall control effectiveness of the dust collector system is initially dependent on capturing the dust cloud at the source via the collector inlet. To assist the initial capture of the dust being flushed from the drill hole, the bottom of the drill deck is typically shrouded or enclosed on all sides to help contain the dust for the collector inlet plenum located on the underside perimeter of the drill deck. Openings, gaps and breaches in the shroud enclosure permit dust to escape dust collector capture. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has developed a collector inlet hood that reconfigures the inlet plenum around the drill steel and above the hole to enhance dust capture. Laboratory development and testing show that this inlet hood improves dust capture by an average of nearly 50% over a wide range of collector flows and shroud leakage areas. This report describes the laboratory and subsequent field testing of this inlet hood concept.

  14. THE MAIN CULPRIT IN ALLERGIC RHINITIS - HOUSE DUST OR HOUSE DUST MITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhey

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Allergic rhinitis especially perennial type makes life miserable for the patient. House dust mite is one of the major players causing it. This study is to compare the allergen i n city of house dust mite versus house dust and evaluate any cross - allergenicity between them. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study in a tertiary referral hospital. MATERIALS & METHODS: Forty patients of allergic rhinitis and well matched controls were subjected to intradermal skin tests to house dust and house dust mite allergen. The skin tests were graded as per standard norms and the responses matched after correlating with different parameters. Statistical analysis was done and the results evaluated. RESULTS: House dust mite was the main allergen, as compared to house dust, responsible for causing allergic rhinitis. The allergen reactivity potential of house dust mite was significantly more as compared to house dust. And, as such there was no statistically significant cross - allergenicity between the two groups. CONCLUSION: House dust mite rather than house dust is the main culprit in causing allergic rhinitis. Hence, precautionary and preventive measures to control the exposure to house dust mite can be undertaken

  15. Dust deposition: the best way to constrain the simulated dust mass budget?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergametti, Gilles

    2010-05-01

    Dust deposition is a key process of the dust cycle. In term of mass, deposition is equal to emissions and dust deposition being a size dependent process, the evolution of the size distribution during transport is in a large part controlled by the intensity of the deposition pathways. Moreover, the dust material removed from the atmosphere is a key component of many biogeochemical cycles: far from the source regions, atmospheric dust deposition supplies surface seawater with soil-derived elements, many of them (Fe, P. . .) being suspected to be limiting nutrients for oceanic ecosystems while in the continental areas, deposition contributes to soil formation in many surrounding desert areas. Finally, dust archives from deep ocean sediments, ice cores, lakes or continental loess deposits are used as proxies of past environmental and climate conditions. Thus, dust deposition is of high environmental interest and a special attention should be given to properly assess its intensity and spatio-temporal fields. Despite the major role and the various impacts of dust deposition, little attention was given to both deposition measurements and modelling. However, a better knowledge of the spatial and temporal distribution of the deposition field would greatly help to better constrain the dust cycle. Indeed, even if recent progresses have been made in dust emission modelling, it could remain large uncertainties on the intensity of the simulated dust emissions. Having a good estimate of the deposition will contribute to better assess the relevance of simulated dust emissions.

  16. Briquetting of EAF Dust for its Utilisation in Metallurgical Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdziarz Aneta

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Dust generated at an electric arc furnace during steel production industry is still not a solved problem. Electric arc furnace dust (EAF is a hazardous solid waste. Sintering of well-prepared briquetted mixtures in a shaft furnace is one of possible methods of EAFD utilisation. Simultaneously some metal oxides from exhaust gases can be separated. In this way, various metals are obtained, particularly zinc is recovered. As a result, zinc-free briquettes are received with high iron content which can be used in the steelmaking process. The purpose of the research was selecting the appropriate chemical composition of briquettes of the required strength and coke content necessary for the reduction of zinc oxide in a shaft furnace. Based on the results of the research the composition of the briquettes was selected. The best binder hydrated lime and sugar molasses and the range of proper moisture of mixture to receive briquettes of high mechanical strength were also chosen and tested. Additionally, in order to determine the thermal stability for the selected mixtures for briquetting thermal analysis was performed. A technological line of briquetting was developed to apply in a steelworks.

  17. Planning thermal radiation experiments at high flux. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knasel, M.; Houghton, A.J.; Sievers, R.H.; Gordon, B.A.; McDonnell, M.D.

    1981-10-27

    This report covers analyses; experimentation; equipment design and fabrication; instrumentation design, selection, fabrication, and tests; and recording-equipment selection in preparation for high-thermal-flux experiments on soil surfaces. The reported effort is preparatory to a continuing program to obtain empirical data and examine parametric relationships on the response of different surfaces and the formation of an overlying thermal and dust layer resulting from the thermal pulse of a nuclear weapon.

  18. Migration of Interplanetary Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.; Guillory, J. U.

    2004-05-01

    We studied the orbital evolution of dust particles under the gravitational influence of planets (excluding Pluto), radiation pressure, Poynting--Robertson drag, and solar wind drag. Initial positions and velocities of considered asteroidal and kuiperoidal particles were the same as those of the discovered main-belt asteroids and trans-Neptunian objects, respectively. We considered cometary particles started from Comet 2P Encke. The values of the ratio β between the radiation pressure force and the gravitational force varied from 0.0004 to 0.4 (for silicates, such values correspond to particle diameters d between 1000 and 1 microns; for water ice, the diameters are greater by a factor of 3 than those for silicates). The mean probabilities P of collisions of asteroidal and cometary dust particles with Earth and Venus during lifetimes of particles were maximum at β ˜0.002-0.004 (i.e., at d ˜100-200 microns for silicate particles). At β ≥0.01 the values of P and the mean times T spent by particles in Earth-crossing and Venus-crossing orbits quickly decrease with an increase of β (usually P∝1/β and T∝1/β ). At β ˜0.0004-0.001 the values of P and T for asteroidal dust particles were smaller than those at β ˜0.002-0.004, though maximum times until collisions of particles with the Sun were greater for smaller β (greater times were needed for larger particles to migrate to the orbits of the terrestrial planets). Cratering records showed that the peak of diameters of dust particles colliding with the Earth was at 200 microns. This is in accordance with our simulations, if the number of particles with diameters greater than D is proportional to D-α , where α ˜2-3. At β ≥0.02 and β ≤0.001 some asteroidal particles (≤4 % at β ≤0.1) migrated beyond Jupiter's orbit. A few asteroidal particles collided with the Sun after moving outside Jupiter's orbit for a long time. The peaks in the distribution of migrating asteroidal dust particles with semi

  19. Dust formation in dense CSM behind the shock: A study based on SN2010jl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarangi, Arkaprabha; Dwek, Eli

    2016-06-01

    Dust is known to form in the quiescent outflows of AGB stars and in the explosively ejected matter of core collapse supernovae (CCSNe). Recent optical and near-infrared (IR) observations of the light curve of the ultraluminous CCSN SN2010jl has shown evidence for the rapid rise of a thermal IR emission component from newly forming dust in its spectrum. The UV-optical light curve from the SN cannot be powered by the radioactivities in the ejecta, and is powered by the interaction of the SN blast wave with the ambient dense circumstellar (CSM) shell. Observations of the evolution of the broad H and He lines in the spectra show that the dust could not have formed in the SN ejecta, but must have formed in the CSM instead. The supernova blast-wave traverses the CSM heating and ionizing the gas and destroying all pre-existing molecules and dust grains. The shocked CSM gas cools rapidly behind the shock to temperatures below the dust condensation temperatures. However, the radiation emanating from the shocked CSM plays a pivotal role in determining the earliest epoch after which seed nucleation centers can form and survive in the post-shock region. We use X-ray and UV-optical data from SN2010jl to follow the evolution of the shock through the CSM, and solve for the time-dependent temperature and density profile of the post-shock gas. Embedding a 10°. A seed nucleation center in the dense cooling shell, we calculate its temperature, and the earliest epoch beyond which such grain can survive evaporation and rapidly grow to large submicron grains. Thereafter, we study the formation of possible dust species through nucleation of condensable elements, and trace their evolution in time through accretion and coagulation. The final dust mass yield has been calculated and compared with other known dust sources in the galaxy. Detection of the IR excess as early as 67 days post-explosion poses new challenges to our understanding of the dust scenario behind shocks. Our model, first

  20. The role of aeolian dust in ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    McTainsh, Grant; Strong, Craig

    2007-09-01

    The recent upsurge in research attention to aeolian dust has shown that dust transport systems operate on very large spatial and temporal scales, and involve much larger quantities of sediment than was previously realized. An inevitable consequence of this is that researchers from a range of neighbouring disciplines, including ecology, are beginning to realize that this new knowledge has important implications for their study areas. In the present paper, we examine the ecological implications (real and potential) of this expanding knowledge of dust transport systems, with a particular emphasis upon the Australian dust transport system. We track these ecological effects from source to sink. At source, wind erosion-soil-vegetation relationships are often dominated by temporal changes in rainfall. Nine years of measurements in the Channel Country of the Lake Eyre Basin, Australia show that vegetation and soils in dune fields can recover from drought, whereas on inter-fluve grasslands uni-directional and negative successional vegetation changes can result from wind erosion during drought. On floodplains, both wind erosion and vegetation responses are complicated by flood frequency. Up to 1999 flooding of saline claypans did not increase vegetation but did increase wind erosion through the supply of alluvial fines. However, after three floods within as many months vegetation became established and wind erosion rates were dramatically reduced. Wind erosion research attention is now gradually turning from the physical to the organic content of eroded dusts. In Australia organic matter content can reach 65% by mass, but this cannot be explained by removal of soil organic matter alone. Biological soil crusts not only stabilize soils against wind erosion but contribute to some of the organic dusts. The role of dust as a vector for pathogens is an area which deserves greater research attention in the future. Downwind from source, we show that dust contributions to soils are

  1. Galaxy simulation with dust formation and destruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyama, Shohei; Hou, Kuan-Chou; Shimizu, Ikkoh; Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Todoroki, Keita; Choi, Jun-Hwan; Nagamine, Kentaro

    2017-04-01

    We perform smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) simulations of an isolated galaxy with a new treatment for dust formation and destruction. To this aim, we treat dust and metal production self-consistently with star formation and supernova (SN) feedback. For dust, we consider a simplified model of grain size distribution by representing the entire range of grain sizes with large and small grains. We include dust production in stellar ejecta, dust destruction by SN shocks, grain growth by accretion and coagulation and grain disruption by shattering. We find that the assumption of fixed dust-to-metal mass ratio becomes no longer valid when the galaxy is older than 0.2 Gyr, at which point the grain growth by accretion starts to contribute to the non-linear rise of dust-to-gas ratio. As expected in our previous one-zone model, shattering triggers grain growth by accretion since it increases the total surface area of grains. Coagulation becomes significant when the galaxy age is greater than ˜ 1 Gyr; at this epoch, the abundance of small grains becomes high enough to raise the coagulation rate of small grains. We further compare the radial profiles of dust-to-gas ratio (D) and dust-to-metal ratio (D/Z, I.e. depletion) at various ages with observational data. We find that our simulations broadly reproduce the radial gradients of dust-to-gas ratio and depletion. In the early epoch (≲ 0.3 Gyr), the radial gradient of D follows the metallicity gradient with D/Z determined by the dust condensation efficiency in stellar ejecta, while the D gradient is steeper than the Z gradient at the later epochs because of grain growth by accretion. The framework developed in this paper is applicable to any SPH-based galaxy evolution simulations including cosmological ones.

  2. Desert dust hazards: A global review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, N. J.

    2017-02-01

    Dust storms originate in many of the world's drylands and frequently present hazards to human society, both within the drylands themselves but also outside drylands due to long-range transport of aeolian sediments. Major sources of desert dust include the Sahara, the Middle East, central and eastern Asia, and parts of Australia, but dust-raising occurs all across the global drylands and, on occasion, beyond. Dust storms occur throughout the year and they vary in frequency and intensity over a number of timescales. Long-range transport of desert dust typically takes place along seasonal transport paths. Desert dust hazards are here reviewed according to the three phases of the wind erosion system: where dust is entrained, during the transport phase, and on deposition. This paper presents a synthesis of these hazards. It draws on empirical examples in physical geography, medical geology and geomorphology to discuss case studies from all over the world and in various fields. These include accelerated soil erosion in agricultural zones - where dust storms represent a severe form of accelerated soil erosion - the health effects of air pollution caused by desert aerosols via their physical, chemical and biological properties, transport accidents caused by poor visibility during desert dust events, and impacts on electricity generation and distribution. Given the importance of desert dust as a hazard to human societies, it is surprising to note that there have been relatively few attempts to assess their impact in economic terms. Existing studies in this regard are also reviewed, but the wide range of impacts discussed in this paper indicates that desert dust storms deserve more attention in this respect.

  3. Perchlorate in dust fall and indoor dust in Malta: An effect of fireworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vella, Alfred J; Chircop, Cynthia; Micallef, Tamara; Pace, Colette

    2015-07-15

    We report on the presence of perchlorate in the settleable dust of Malta, a small central Mediterranean island. Both dust fall collected directly as it precipitated from atmosphere over a period of one month and deposited indoor dust from domestic residences were studied. Perchlorate was determined by ion chromatography of water extracts of the collected dusts. Dust fall was collected from 43 towns during 2011 to 2013 and indoor dust was sampled from homes in the same localities. Perchlorate was detected in 108 of 153 samples of dust fall (71%) and in 28 of 37 indoor dust samples (76%). Detectable perchlorate in dust fall ranged from 0.52μgg(-1) to 561μgg(-1) with a median value of 6.2μgg(-1); in indoor dust, levels were from 0.79μgg(-1) to 53μgg(-1) with a median value of 7.8μgg(-1), the highest recorded anywhere to date. Statistical analysis suggested that there was no significant difference in perchlorate content of indoor dust and dust fall. Perchlorate levels in dust fall escalate during the summer in response to numerous religious feasts celebrated with fireworks and perchlorate persists at low μgg(-1) concentrations for several months beyond the summer festive period. In Malta, perchlorate derives exclusively from KClO4, imported for fireworks manufacture. Its residue in dust presents an exposure risk to the population, especially via ingestion by hand to mouth transfer. Our results suggest that wherever intensive burning of fireworks takes place, the environmental impact may be much longer lived than realised, mainly due to re-suspension and deposition of contaminated settled dust in the urban environment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Observation of self-excited dust acoustic wave in dusty plasma with nanometer size dust grains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deka, Tonuj; Boruah, A.; Sharma, S. K.; Bailung, H.

    2017-09-01

    Dusty plasma with a nanometer size dust grain is produced by externally injecting carbon nanopowder into a radio frequency discharge argon plasma. A self-excited dust acoustic wave with a characteristic frequency of ˜100 Hz is observed in the dust cloud. The average dust charge is estimated from the Orbital Motion Limited theory using experimentally measured parameters. The measured wave parameters are used to determine dusty plasma parameters such as dust density and average inter particle distance. The screening parameter and the coupling strength of the dusty plasma indicate that the system is very close to the strongly coupled state.

  5. Uniform Dust Distributor for Testing Radiative Emittance of Dust-Coated Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlbert, Kathryn Miller; Witte, Larry C.; Hollingsworth, D. Keith

    2012-01-01

    This apparatus distributes dust (typical of the Martian surface) in a uniform fashion on the surface of multiple samples simultaneously. The primary innovation is that the amount of dust deposited on the multiple surfaces can be controlled by the time that the apparatus operates, and each sample will be subject to the same amount of dust deposition. The exact weight of dust that is added per unit of sample area is determined by the use of slides that can be removed sequentially after each dusting.

  6. Biomonitoring and speciation of road dust for heavy metals using Calotropis procera and Delbergia sissoo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Prajapati

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study was conducted for identifying the important heavy metals present in the road dust and at the same time biomonitor them using Calotropis procera and Delbergia sissoo leaves. The study clearly indicated that both the plants can be used as biomonitor for As, Pb, Fe, V, Cd, Cr, Zn and Cu. The heavy metals were estimated using AAS-7000 (Shimadzu. Reason for selecting the plants were their abundance in the area and high air pollution indices. Presence of these heavy metals in the road dust can be attributed to the red soil and more importantly thermal power plants operating in the study area. Since plants are able to capture the road dust, they can also prevent the particulate pollution which is having adverse health impacts for humans.

  7. Comet Dust After Deep Impact

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, Diane H.; Harker, David E.; Woodward, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    When the Deep Impact Mission hit Jupiter Family comet 9P/Tempel 1, an ejecta crater was formed and an pocket of volatile gases and ices from 10-30 m below the surface was exposed (A Hearn et aI. 2005). This resulted in a gas geyser that persisted for a few hours (Sugita et al, 2005). The gas geyser pushed dust grains into the coma (Sugita et a1. 2005), as well as ice grains (Schulz et al. 2006). The smaller of the dust grains were submicron in radii (0-25.3 micron), and were primarily composed of highly refractory minerals including amorphous (non-graphitic) carbon, and silicate minerals including amorphous (disordered) olivine (Fe,Mg)2SiO4 and pyroxene (Fe,Mg)SiO3 and crystalline Mg-rich olivine. The smaller grains moved faster, as expected from the size-dependent velocity law produced by gas-drag on grains. The mineralogy evolved with time: progressively larger grains persisted in the near nuclear region, having been imparted with slower velocities, and the mineralogies of these larger grains appeared simpler and without crystals. The smaller 0.2-0.3 micron grains reached the coma in about 1.5 hours (1 arc sec = 740 km), were more diverse in mineralogy than the larger grains and contained crystals, and appeared to travel through the coma together. No smaller grains appeared at larger coma distances later (with slower velocities), implying that if grain fragmentation occurred, it happened within the gas acceleration zone. These results of the high spatial resolution spectroscopy (GEMINI+Michelle: Harker et 4. 2005, 2006; Subaru+COMICS: Sugita et al. 2005) revealed that the grains released from the interior were different from the nominally active areas of this comet by their: (a) crystalline content, (b) smaller size, (c) more diverse mineralogy. The temporal changes in the spectra, recorded by GEMIM+Michelle every 7 minutes, indicated that the dust mineralogy is inhomogeneous and, unexpectedly, the portion of the size distribution dominated by smaller grains has

  8. Where does galactic dust come from?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginolfi, M.; Graziani, L.; Schneider, R.; Marassi, S.; Valiante, R.; Dell'Agli, F.; Ventura, P.; Hunt, L. K.

    2018-02-01

    Here we investigate the origin of the dust mass (Mdust) observed in the Milky Way (MW) and of dust scaling relations found in a sample of local galaxies from the DGS and KINGFISH surveys. To this aim, we model dust production from Asymptotic Giant Branch (AGB) stars and supernovae (SNe) in simulated galaxies forming along the assembly of a MW-like halo in a well-resolved cosmic volume of 4 cMpc using the GAMESH pipeline. We explore the impact of different sets of metallicity and mass-dependent AGB and SN dust yields on the predicted Mdust. Our results show that models accounting for grain destruction by the SN reverse shock predict a total dust mass in the MW, that is a factor of ∼4 less than observed, and cannot reproduce the observed galaxy-scale relations between dust and stellar masses, and dust-to-gas ratios and metallicity, with a smaller discrepancy in galaxies with low metallicity (12 + log(O/H) < 7.5) and low stellar masses (Mstar < 107 M⊙). In agreement with previous studies, we suggest that competing processes in the interstellar medium must be at play to explain the observed trends. Our result reinforces this conclusion by showing that it holds independently of the adopted AGB and SN dust yields.

  9. Correlation between Yellow Dust and Radioactivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AIZaabia, Mouza A [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung-Jik [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In East Asia, yellow dust or Asian Dust (AD) outbreaks are among the largest contributors of wind-blown dust that carry natural and anthropogenic radionuclides and subsequently alter their concentration and distribution throughout the environment. Although the Korean Peninsula has been experiencing AD events since ancient times, the research has tended to focus on the transport routes and characteristics of AD, rather than on its impact on radionuclide activity levels. This paper examines the relationship between radionuclide concentration in the air and the frequency of dusty days in South Korea during AD intrusion events. It also investigates whether increased radionuclide concentration is a function of either more mass or more dust contamination. In this study, significant linear correlations of gamma-emitting radionuclides were found with mass of dust and occurrence frequency of AD. Regardless of the source origin of the dust, {sup 137}Cs and {sup 7}Be concentration primarily depended on dust mass in the filter. Nonetheless, the correlations were greatly distorted in 2011 and in the spring season, particularly the correlations with AD days that were far below that of the correlations obtained for the whole study period. A possible explanation of these conflicting results is that a change in the dust source could appreciably alter the concentration, deposition, and distribution of airborne radionuclides.

  10. Airborne microorganisms and dust from livestock houses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhao, Y.; Aarnink, A.J.A.; Jong, de M.C.M.; Groot Koerkamp, P.W.G.

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficiencies and suitability of samplers for airborne microorganisms and dust, which could be used in practical livestock houses. Two studies were performed: 1) Testing impaction and cyclone pre-separators for dust sampling in livestock houses; 2)

  11. 30 CFR 56.9315 - Dust control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Dust control. 56.9315 Section 56.9315 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND... control. Dust shall be controlled at muck piles, material transfer points, crushers, and on haulage roads...

  12. Personal gravimetric dust sampling and risk assessment.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Unsted, AD

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available . At all the sampling sites extremely large variation in dust concentrations were measured on a day to day and shift basis. Correlation of dust concentrations between personal and stationary samples was very poor as was the correlation between quartz...

  13. The Fate of Saharan Dust Across the Atlantic and Implications for a Central American Dust Barrier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowottnick, E.; Colarco, P.; da Silva, A.; Hlavka, D.; McGill, M.

    2011-01-01

    Saharan dust was observed over the Caribbean basin during the summer 2007 NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4) field experiment. Airborne Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and satellite observations from MODIS suggest a barrier to dust transport across Central America into the eastern Pacific. We use the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric transport model with online aerosol tracers to perform simulations of the TC4 time period in order to understand the nature of this barrier. Our simulations are driven by the Modem Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) meteorological analyses. We evaluate our baseline simulated dust distributions using MODIS and CALIOP satellite and ground-based AERONET sun photometer observations. GEOS-5 reproduces the observed location, magnitude, and timing of major dust events, but our baseline simulation does not develop as strong a barrier to dust transport across Central America as observations suggest. Analysis of the dust transport dynamics and lost processes suggest that while both mechanisms play a role in defining the dust transport barrier, loss processes by wet removal of dust are about twice as important as transport. Sensitivity analyses with our model showed that the dust barrier would not exist without convective scavenging over the Caribbean. The best agreement between our model and the observations was obtained when dust wet removal was parameterized to be more aggressive, treating the dust as we do hydrophilic aerosols.

  14. ULYSSES DUST DETECTION SYSTEM V2.0

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dataset Overview ================ This data set contains information on dust the dust environment in interplanetary space within the inner solar system, between...

  15. Hydrolysis and heat treatment of aluminum dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, F A; Peña, M C; López-Delgado, A

    2001-06-01

    Aluminum dust is a toxic and hazardous byproduct of Al remelting. The present research was performed to characterize and evaluate its behavior in water. The materials obtained by hydrolysis were also characterized, and the gases generated during the process were qualitatively analyzed. The effects of hydrolysis reaction time and temperature on the dust were also explored. The hydrolysis of Al dust is an exothermic reaction that gave rise to a solid composed of aluminum oxide, silicon oxide, and spinel (MgAl2O4). Most of the CH4, NH3, and SH2 gases generated were emitted immediately upon the start of the reaction, though their production continued for a long time. This slow reaction, which was moderately accelerated by temperature, led to the formation of a material less reactive than the untreated dust. On the other hand, heat treatment of the dust gave rise to an inert material composed of spinel, alumina, and magnesium and aluminum silicates.

  16. Model of Image Artifacts from Dust Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, Reg

    2008-01-01

    A mathematical model of image artifacts produced by dust particles on lenses has been derived. Machine-vision systems often have to work with camera lenses that become dusty during use. Dust particles on the front surface of a lens produce image artifacts that can potentially affect the performance of a machine-vision algorithm. The present model satisfies a need for a means of synthesizing dust image artifacts for testing machine-vision algorithms for robustness (or the lack thereof) in the presence of dust on lenses. A dust particle can absorb light or scatter light out of some pixels, thereby giving rise to a dark dust artifact. It can also scatter light into other pixels, thereby giving rise to a bright dust artifact. For the sake of simplicity, this model deals only with dark dust artifacts. The model effectively represents dark dust artifacts as an attenuation image consisting of an array of diffuse darkened spots centered at image locations corresponding to the locations of dust particles. The dust artifacts are computationally incorporated into a given test image by simply multiplying the brightness value of each pixel by a transmission factor that incorporates the factor of attenuation, by dust particles, of the light incident on that pixel. With respect to computation of the attenuation and transmission factors, the model is based on a first-order geometric (ray)-optics treatment of the shadows cast by dust particles on the image detector. In this model, the light collected by a pixel is deemed to be confined to a pair of cones defined by the location of the pixel s image in object space, the entrance pupil of the lens, and the location of the pixel in the image plane (see Figure 1). For simplicity, it is assumed that the size of a dust particle is somewhat less than the diameter, at the front surface of the lens, of any collection cone containing all or part of that dust particle. Under this assumption, the shape of any individual dust particle artifact

  17. Recycling of steelmaking dusts: The Radust concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalkanen H.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Recycling of dusts and other wastes of steelmaking is becoming to a necessity of two reasons: due to high contents of iron oxides dusts are valuable raw material for steelmaking and tightening environmental legislation makes the landfill disposal of wastes more expensive. Fine dust fractions from various stages of steelmaking route contain besides iron and carbon heavy metals especially zinc and lead and heavy hydrocarbons that are acceptable neither for landfill disposal nor for recycling back to processes without any spe4cial treatments. Some theoretical and practical aspects concerning high temperature treatments of steelmaking dusts for removal of hazardous components and production of clean high iron raw material for recycling is discussed in this paper. The Radust technology developed at Koverhar steelwork in Finland for treatment of the most problematic fine fractions of blast furnace and oxygen converter dusts is shortly presented and discussed.

  18. Structure of the Kuiper Belt Dust Disk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C.; Kaufmann, D. E.

    An overview of the Kuiper belt dust disk is provided in this chapter. Mutual collisions among Kuiper belt objects should produce a dust disk in the outer solar system similar to the observed circumstellar dust disks. As the Kuiper belt dust particles migrate toward the Sun due to Poynting-Robertson drag, they are perturbed by the giant planets. Mean-motion resonances with Neptune and gravitational scattering by Saturn and Jupiter alter their orbital evolution dramatically. Asa result, large-scale structures are created in the disk. Descriptions of the dynamics involved, and the numerical simulations required to unveil the disk features, are included. Implications for extrasolar planet detection from circumstellar dust disk modeling are also discussed.

  19. Mesospheric dust observations during the MAXIDUSTY campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonsen, Tarjei; Havnes, Ove; Fredriksen, Åshild; Friedrich, Martin; Sternovsky, Zoltan; Plane, John; Hartquist, Tom; Olsen, Sveinung; Eilertsen, Yngve; Trondsen, Espen; Mann, Ingrid; Hedin, Jonas; Gumbel, Jörg; Moen, Jøran; Latteck, Ralph; Baumgarten, Gerd; Höffner, Josef; Williams, Bifford; Hoppe, Ulf-Peter; Karlberg, Jan-Ove

    2017-04-01

    The MAXIDUSTY rocket payloads, launched from Andøya June 30 and July 8 2016, were equipped with dust impact detectors aiming to characterize mesospheric dust charge state, mass distribution of impact fragments and NLC/PMSE structure. One of the main scientific objectives for the campaign was to confirm that material of meteoric origin is abundant inside the icy mesospheric dust particles. The rockets were launched simultaneously with PMSE and NLC (MAXIDUSTY-1) and PMSE (MAXIDUSTY-1B) respectively, and radar measurements were made coincident with the rocket flight path. We report here on the initial results from the rocket probes and remote soundings, with emphasis on the dust impact detector results. Results from the Multiple Dust Detector (MUDD) confirm that NLC ice particles probably have a relatively high content of meteoric smoke particles with a filling factor of up to several percent. Comparisons of the DUSTY faraday bucket and PMSE show that there is no simple correlation between the two.

  20. Dust measurement in thick seam mining

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gillies, A.D.S.; Wu, H.W. [University of Queensland, Brisbane, Qld. (Australia)

    2001-12-01

    An Australian Coal Association Research Program (ACARP) funded scoping study was undertaken to examine dust problems being faced by Australian thick seam longwall mine operators, evaluate options and recommended priorities for improvement. The study involved a number of stages. A detailed survey of six Australian thick seam mine operators was undertaken to identify individual mine issues. A comprehensive literature review on Australian and foreign developments, with emphasis on publications from the last ten years, was undertaken. Views and advice from recognised dust experts both within Australia and overseas were sought. Some approaches to assessment of dust compliance and analysis of trends exhibited were undertaken; and both analysis and evaluation were undertaken on some options for improvement. This paper describes results from the questionnaire survey and presents some potential thick seam longwall dust issue based on the analysis of dust survey results from both published US data and from Joint Coal Board (JCB) data. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  1. High Latitude Dust in the Earth System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullard, Joanna E.; Baddock, Matthew; Bradwell, Tom; Crusius, John; Darlington, Eleanor; Gaiero, Diego; Gasso, Santiago; Gisladottir, Gudrun; Hodgkins, Richard; McCulloch, Robert; hide

    2016-01-01

    Natural dust is often associated with hot, subtropical deserts, but significant dust events have been reported from cold, high latitudes. This review synthesizes current understanding of high-latitude (> or = 50degN and > or = 40degS) dust source geography and dynamics and provides a prospectus for future research on the topic. Although the fundamental processes controlling aeolian dust emissions in high latitudes are essentially the same as in temperate regions, there are additional processes specific to or enhanced in cold regions. These include low temperatures, humidity, strong winds, permafrost and niveo-aeolian processes all of which can affect the efficiency of dust emission and distribution of sediments. Dust deposition at high latitudes can provide nutrients to the marine system, specifically by contributing iron to high-nutrient, low-chlorophyll oceans; it also affects ice albedo and melt rates. There have been no attempts to quantify systematically the expanse, characteristics, or dynamics of high-latitude dust sources. To address this, we identify and compare the main sources and drivers of dust emissions in the Northern (Alaska, Canada, Greenland, and Iceland) and Southern (Antarctica, New Zealand, and Patagonia) Hemispheres. The scarcity of year-round observations and limitations of satellite remote sensing data at high latitudes are discussed. It is estimated that under contemporary conditions high-latitude sources cover >500,000 sq km and contribute at least 80-100 Tg/yr1 of dust to the Earth system (approx. 5% of the global dust budget); both are projected to increase under future climate change scenarios.

  2. Ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyers Valerie E

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dust exposure is a well-known occupational hazard for terrestrial workers and astronauts alike and will continue to be a concern as humankind pursues exploration and habitation of objects beyond Earth. Humankind’s limited exploration experience with the Apollo Program indicates that exposure to dust will be unavoidable. Therefore, NASA must assess potential toxicity and recommend appropriate mitigation measures to ensure that explorers are adequately protected. Visual acuity is critical during exploration activities and operations aboard spacecraft. Therefore, the present research was performed to ascertain the ocular toxicity of authentic lunar dust. Methods Small (mean particle diameter = 2.9 ± 1.0 μm, reactive lunar dust particles were produced by grinding bulk dust under ultrapure nitrogen conditions. Chemical reactivity and cytotoxicity testing were performed using the commercially available EpiOcularTM assay. Subsequent in vivo Draize testing utilized a larger size fraction of unground lunar dust that is more relevant to ocular exposures (particles Results In vitro testing indicated minimal irritancy potential based on the time required to reduce cell viability by 50% (ET50. Follow-up testing using the Draize standard protocol confirmed that the lunar dust was minimally irritating. Minor irritation of the upper eyelids was noted at the 1-hour observation point, but these effects resolved within 24 hours. In addition, no corneal scratching was observed using fluorescein stain. Conclusions Low-titanium mare lunar dust is minimally irritating to the eyes and is considered a nuisance dust for ocular exposure. No special precautions are recommended to protect against ocular exposures, but fully shielded goggles may be used if dust becomes a nuisance.

  3. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available wider range of temperature limits, saving energy while still satisfying the majority of building occupants. It is also noted that thermal comfort varies significantly between individuals and it is generally not possible to provide a thermal environment...

  4. Dust in the Solar System - Properties and Origins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messenger, Scott; Keller, Lindsay; Nakamura-Messenger, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    Interplanetary dust pervades the inner Solar System, giving rise to a prominent glow above the horizon at sunrise and sunset known as the zodiacal light. This dust derives from the disintegration of comets as they approach the Sun and from collisions among main-belt asteroids. The Earth accretes roughly 4x10(exp 6) kg/year of 1 - 1,000 micron dust particles as they spiral into the Sun under the influence of Poynting-Robertson drag and solar wind drag. Samples of these grains have been collected from deep sea sediments, Antarctic ice and by high-altitude aircraft and balloon flights. Interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) collected in the stratosphere have been classified by their IR spectra into olivine, pyroxene, and hydrated silicate-dominated classes. Most IDPs have bulk major and minor element abundances that are similar to carbonaceous chondrite meteorites. Hydrated silicate-rich IDPs are thought to derive from asteroids based on their mineralogy and low atmospheric entry velocities estimated from peak temperatures reached during atmospheric entry. Anhydrous IDPs are typically aggregates of 0.1 - approx. 1 micron Mg-rich olivine and pyroxene, amorphous silicates (GEMS), Fe, Nisulfides and rare spinel and oxides bound together by carbonaceous material. These IDPs are often argued to derive from comets based on compositional similarities and high atmospheric entry velocities that imply high eccentricity orbits. Infrared spectra obtained from anhydrous IDPs closely match remote IR spectra obtained from comets. The most primitive (anhydrous) IDPs appear to have escaped the parent-body thermal and aqueous alteration that has affected meteorites. These samples thus consist entirely of grains that formed in the ancient solar nebula and pre-solar interstellar and circumstellar environments. Isotopic studies of IDPs have identified silicate stardust grains that formed in the outflows of red giant and asymptotic giant branch stars and supernovae]. These stardust grains

  5. A 2 GSps, 8-Bit Folding and Interpolation ADC with Foreground Calibration in 90 nm CMOS Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A single channel 2 GSps, 8-bit folding and interpolation (F&I analog-to-digital converter (ADC with foreground calibration in TSMC 90 nm CMOS technology is presented in this paper. The ADC utilizes cascaded folding, which incorporates an interstage sample-and-hold amplifier between the two stages of folding circuits to enhance the quantization time. A master-slave track-and-hold amplifier (THA with bootstrapped switch is taken as the front-end circuit to improve ADC’s performance. The foreground digital assisted calibration has also been employed to correct the error of zero-crossing point caused by the circuit offset, thus improving the linearity of the ADC. Chip area of the whole ADC including pads is 930 μm × 930 μm. Postsimulation results demonstrate that, under a single supply of 1.2 volts, the power consumption is 210 mW. For the sampling rate of 2 GSps, the signal to noise and distortion ratio (SNDR is 45.93 dB for Nyquist input signal.

  6. Constraining dust properties in circumstellar envelopes of C-stars in the Small Magellanic Cloud: optical constants and grain size of carbon dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nanni, Ambra; Marigo, Paola; Groenewegen, Martin A. T.; Aringer, Bernhard; Girardi, Léo; Pastorelli, Giada; Bressan, Alessandro; Bladh, Sara

    2016-10-01

    We present a new approach aimed at constraining the typical size and optical properties of carbon dust grains in circumstellar envelopes (CSEs) of carbon-rich stars (C-stars) in the Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC). To achieve this goal, we apply our recent dust growth description, coupled with a radiative transfer code to the CSEs of C-stars evolving along the thermally pulsing asymptotic giant branch, for which we compute spectra and colours. Then, we compare our modelled colours in the near- and mid-infrared (NIR and MIR) bands with the observed ones, testing different assumptions in our dust scheme and employing several data sets of optical constants for carbon dust available in the literature. Different assumptions adopted in our dust scheme change the typical size of the carbon grains produced. We constrain carbon dust properties by selecting the combination of grain size and optical constants which best reproduce several colours in the NIR and MIR at the same time. The different choices of optical properties and grain size lead to differences in the NIR and MIR colours greater than 2 mag in some cases. We conclude that the complete set of observed NIR and MIR colours are best reproduced by small grains, with sizes between ˜0.035 and ˜0.12 μm, rather than by large grains between ˜0.2 and 0.7 μm. The inability of large grains to reproduce NIR and MIR colours seems independent of the adopted optical data set. We also find a possible trend of the grain size with mass-loss and/or carbon excess in the CSEs of these stars.

  7. Fire increases dust production from chaparral soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabet, Emmanuel J.

    2014-07-01

    By altering the physical and chemical properties of a landscape, fire may increase its vulnerability to erosive processes. Whereas sediment transport by surface runoff after fires has been often investigated, less is known about the role of wind erosion in burned terrain. To examine how fire might increase a soil's vulnerability to aeolian transport, intact soil samples were collected from a chaparral landscape in southern California and heated with a propane torch with temperatures ranging from 250 to 1025 °C and for durations of 5-60 min to simulate a variety of burn severities. The samples were then subjected to simulated wind and the amounts of eroded sediment were measured. Results indicate a linear increase in the production of wind-erodible sediment with applied heat up to ~ 10 MJ/m2. The increase was not due to a reduction in the threshold shear velocity of the soil surface but, instead, to the role of heat in detaching erodible material. In these soils, organic material may be an important binding agent destroyed at high temperatures. The relationship between fire and erodibility is complex, however, because heating may also help to aggregate soil particles. Experiments performed here also suggest a synergistic effect between fire and rain whereby heated soils are more vulnerable to the erosive power of raindrop impacts. Additionally, the soil heating experiments were used to measure and compare the thermal conductivities of intact and disturbed soils. Finally, it is concluded that soil heating may increase the emission of dust through the detachment of erodible particles, a result that may help in the anticipation of respiratory problems for those living downwind of burned areas.

  8. Reconstruction of global atmospheric dust concentrations using dust flux measurements in paleoclimatic archives and dust model variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, F.; Rojas, M.; Gallardo, L.; Mahowald, N. M.; Takemura, T.; KUG, J.; Winckler, G.; Park, R.; Abe-Ouchi, A.

    2013-12-01

    Aerosols are the second most potent agent affecting anthropogenic radiative forcing after greenhouse gases. However, despite some progress in the field, the uncertainty of aerosol impact on present and past climate remains much larger than for other species. The total atmospheric dust load is an important factor for the radiative budget of the atmosphere, and for the micronutrient supply to terrestrial and marine ecosystems. We have collected published dust flux (mass accumulation rate) measurements from marine sediment cores, ice cores, loess fields, and peat bogs. These measurements are interpolated to two global grids of average Holocene and Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) climatic conditions. The interpolation is performed using a kriging algorithm and its uncertainty shows regions where new measurements are most needed. We have developed a new method that combines observational dust flux measurements with dust depositional variables from climate models to reconstruct average Holocene and LGM atmospheric dust concentrations. Here we use dust simulations from two different coupled GCMs (CAM3-CCSM3 and SPRINTARS-MIROC) to give an idea of the uncertainties due to model variables. Our reconstructions give a different perspective on Holocene and LGM atmospheric dust loads from pure model simulations. The discrepancies between modeled and reconstructed dust concentrations and radiative forcing gives insights on regions and variables that may be improved in the models. In addition, this method allows to follow the temporal and spatial evolution of dust loads (and the resulting changes in radiative forcing and iron fertilization) through the glacial-interglacial transition. Top row: Interpolated Mass Accumulation Rates (MAR) for average Holocene (left column) and Last Glacial Maximum (right column) climatic conditions. The second and third row show simulated MAR from two different coupled climate models.

  9. Particle sizes and composition of Mars atmospheric dust based upon Viking and Mariner 9 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clancy, R. T.; Lee, S. W.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    Mars atmospheric dust can play an important role in the thermal structure of the Mars atmosphere during periods of high dust loading. However, the radiative properties of Mars atmospheric dust remain uncertain due to uncertain definitions of the dust composition and size distribution. The analysis by Toon et al., of Mariner 9 IRIS spectra during the 1971-1972 global dust storm indicated a reasonable match between the modeled 9-micron absorption of montmorillinite and the observed 9-micron absorption. Toon et al. also determined that an effective (cross-section weighted) mean radius of 2.5 microns (R(sub mode) = 0.4 microns) provided a consistent fit of montmorillinite to the IRIS dust spectra at 9 microns. Pollack et al. analyzed Viking lander observations of atmospheric extinction and scattering at visible-near IR wavelengths (0.5-1.0 microns), and obtained consistency with the Toon et al. dust size distribution when the effects of nonspherical particle shapes were included. An additional, minor (1 percent) component of visible-ultraviolet absorbing material was required to model the derived visible (0.86) and ultraviolet (0.4-0.6) single-scattering albedos of the dust, since montmorillinite does not absorb sufficiently in this wavelength region. A combined analysis of the Viking IRTM and Mariner 9 observations was conducted to reassess the model of Mars atmospheric ultraviolet-to-infrared measurements of dust absorption and scattering. The optical constants for palagonite are incorporated in a doubling-adding radiative transfer model of the Mars atmosphere to simulate Mariner 9 IRIS spectra as well as the Viking IRTM IR band observations. Visible and ultraviolet single-scattering albedos based on the Hansen and Travis Mie scattering code were also derived. A tentative conclusion is that smaller dust particles (R(sub mode) = 0.15 microns, cross-section weighted mean R = 1.2 microns) composed of palagonite provide a much improved fit to the Mariner 9 IRIS spectra

  10. Nine martian years of dust optical depth observations: A reference dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montabone, Luca; Forget, Francois; Kleinboehl, Armin; Kass, David; Wilson, R. John; Millour, Ehouarn; Smith, Michael; Lewis, Stephen; Cantor, Bruce; Lemmon, Mark; Wolff, Michael

    2016-07-01

    We present a multi-annual reference dataset of the horizontal distribution of airborne dust from martian year 24 to 32 using observations of the martian atmosphere from April 1999 to June 2015 made by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) aboard Mars Global Surveyor, the Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) aboard Mars Odyssey, and the Mars Climate Sounder (MCS) aboard Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). Our methodology to build the dataset works by gridding the available retrievals of column dust optical depth (CDOD) from TES and THEMIS nadir observations, as well as the estimates of this quantity from MCS limb observations. The resulting (irregularly) gridded maps (one per sol) were validated with independent observations of CDOD by PanCam cameras and Mini-TES spectrometers aboard the Mars Exploration Rovers "Spirit" and "Opportunity", by the Surface Stereo Imager aboard the Phoenix lander, and by the Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars aboard MRO. Finally, regular maps of CDOD are produced by spatially interpolating the irregularly gridded maps using a kriging method. These latter maps are used as dust scenarios in the Mars Climate Database (MCD) version 5, and are useful in many modelling applications. The two datasets (daily irregularly gridded maps and regularly kriged maps) for the nine available martian years are publicly available as NetCDF files and can be downloaded from the MCD website at the URL: http://www-mars.lmd.jussieu.fr/mars/dust_climatology/index.html

  11. Asian dust events of April 1998

    Science.gov (United States)

    Husar, R.B.; Tratt, D.M.; Schichtel, B.A.; Falke, S.R.; Li, F.; Jaffe, D.; Gasso, S.; Gill, T.; Laulainen, N.S.; Lu, F.; Reheis, M.C.; Chun, Y.; Westphal, D.; Holben, B.N.; Gueymard, C.; McKendry, I.; Kuring, N.; Feldman, G.C.; McClain, C.; Frouin, R.J.; Merrill, J.; DuBois, D.; Vignola, F.; Murayama, T.; Nickovic, S.; Wilson, W.E.; Sassen, K.; Sugimoto, N.; Malm, W.C.

    2001-01-01

    On April 15 and 19, 1998, two intense dust storms were generated over the Gobi desert by springtime low-pressure systems descending from the northwest. The windblown dust was detected and its evolution followed by its yellow color on SeaWiFS satellite images, routine surface-based monitoring, and through serendipitous observations. The April 15 dust cloud was recirculating, and it was removed by a precipitating weather system over east Asia. The April 19 dust cloud crossed the Pacific Ocean in 5 days, subsided to the surface along the mountain ranges between British Columbia and California, and impacted severely the optical and the concentration environments of the region. In east Asia the dust clouds increased the albedo over the cloudless ocean and land by up to 10-20%, but it reduced the near-UV cloud reflectance, causing a yellow coloration of all surfaces. The yellow colored backscattering by the dust eludes a plausible explanation using simple Mie theory with constant refractive index. Over the West Coast the dust layer has increased the spectrally uniform optical depth to about 0.4, reduced the direct solar radiation by 30-40%, doubled the diffuse radiation, and caused a whitish discoloration of the blue sky. On April 29 the average excess surface-level dust aerosol concentration over the valleys of the West Coast was about 20-50 ??g/m3 with local peaks >100 ??g/m3. The dust mass mean diameter was 2-3 ??m, and the dust chemical fingerprints were evident throughout the West Coast and extended to Minnesota. The April 1998 dust event has impacted the surface aerosol concentration 2-4 times more than any other dust event since 1988. The dust events were observed and interpreted by an ad hoc international web-based virtual community. It would be useful to set up a community-supported web-based infrastructure to monitor the global aerosol pattern for such extreme aerosol events, to alert and to inform the interested communities, and to facilitate collaborative

  12. Pedestrian detection for underground mine vehicles using thermal images

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dickens, JS

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available close to vehicles [5]. Thermal infrared (IR) imag- ing provides the advantages of vision based detection without the problems of sensitivity to illumination and obscuring dust. The illumination for thermal images is radiated by people and the long... wavelength (7-14 m) allows it to penetrate dust and smoke [6]. The IR spectrum can be divided into four main regions. The main regions are near-infrared, short-wavelength, mid- wavelength and long-wavelength IR [7]. Near-infrared (0.7 to 1.4 m...

  13. Human tracking with thermal omnidirectional vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Y.; Li, Y. F.; Chen, H.

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we explore a new tracking system for human tracking in thermal catadioptric omnidirectional vision. Due to very limited features can be adopted in thermal image except for contour information, we proposed to use Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) feature to represent the contour information and employ Support Vector Machine (SVM) to classify the foreground and background. In this paper, there are three novel points. First, the classification posterior probability of SVM will be adopted to relate the observation likelihood of particle filter to guide the particles for tracking purpose instead of neglect in previous tracking method. Second, due to no existing thermal catadioptric omnidirectional vision database available in public, a thermal catadioptric omnidirectional video database and extracted human samples have been established for academic studies. Third, tracking window distribution of particle filter has been adjusted to fit the characteristic of catadioptric omnidirectional vision on account of the size of target in image is varying when the distance between target and omni-sensor changed in world coordinate. In addition, the catadioptric omnidirectional imaging is different with traditional imaging for inherent distortion, so the polar coordinate will be used. The experimental results show that the proposed tracking approach has a stable performance.

  14. The Spatial Variation of Dust Particulate Matter Concentrations during Two Icelandic Dust Storms in 2015

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavla Dagsson-Waldhauserova

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Particulate matter mass concentrations and size fractions of PM1, PM2.5, PM4, PM10, and PM15 measured in transversal horizontal profile of two dust storms in southwestern Iceland are presented. Images from a camera network were used to estimate the visibility and spatial extent of measured dust events. Numerical simulations were used to calculate the total dust flux from the sources as 180,000 and 280,000 tons for each storm. The mean PM15 concentrations inside of the dust plumes varied from 10 to 1600 µg·m−3 (PM10 = 7 to 583 µg·m−3. The mean PM1 concentrations were 97–241 µg·m−3 with a maximum of 261 µg·m−3 for the first storm. The PM1/PM2.5 ratios of >0.9 and PM1/PM10 ratios of 0.34–0.63 show that suspension of volcanic materials in Iceland causes air pollution with extremely high PM1 concentrations, similar to polluted urban areas in Europe or Asia. Icelandic volcanic dust consists of a higher proportion of submicron particles compared to crustal dust. Both dust storms occurred in relatively densely inhabited areas of Iceland. First results on size partitioning of Icelandic dust presented here should challenge health authorities to enhance research in relation to dust and shows the need for public dust warning systems.

  15. The fate of saharan dust across the atlantic and implications for a central american dust barrier

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Nowottnick

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Saharan dust was observed over the Caribbean basin during the summer 2007 NASA Tropical Composition, Cloud, and Climate Coupling (TC4 field experiment. Airborne Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL and satellite observations from MODIS suggest a barrier to dust transport across Central America into the eastern Pacific. We use the NASA GEOS-5 atmospheric transport model with online aerosol tracers to perform simulations of the TC4 time period in order to understand the nature of this barrier. Our simulations are driven by the Modern Era Retrospective-Analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA meteorological analyses. Compared to observations from MODIS and CALIOP, GEOS-5 reproduces the observed location and magnitude of observed dust events, but our baseline simulation does not develop as strong a barrier to dust transport across Central America as observations suggest. Analysis of the dust transport dynamics and loss processes suggest that while both mechanisms play a role in defining the dust transport barrier, loss processes by wet removal of dust are about twice as important as transport. Sensitivity analyses with our model showed that the dust barrier would not exist without convective scavenging over the Caribbean. The best agreement between our model and the observations was obtained when dust wet removal was parameterized to be more aggressive, treating the dust as we do hydrophilic aerosols.

  16. Dust in the planetary system: Dust interactions in space plasmas of the solar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Meyer-Vernet, Nicole; Czechowski, Andrzej

    2014-03-01

    Cosmic dust particles are small solid objects observed in the solar planetary system and in many astronomical objects like the surrounding of stars, the interstellar and even the intergalactic medium. In the solar system the dust is best observed and most often found within the region of the orbits of terrestrial planets where the dust interactions and dynamics are observed directly from spacecraft. Dust is observed in space near Earth and also enters the atmosphere of the Earth where it takes part in physical and chemical processes. Hence space offers a laboratory to study dust-plasma interactions and dust dynamics. A recent example is the observation of nanodust of sizes smaller than 10 nm. We outline the theoretical considerations on which our knowledge of dust electric charges in space plasmas are founded. We discuss the dynamics of the dust particles and show how the small charged particles are accelerated by the solar wind that carries a magnetic field. Finally, as examples for the space observation of cosmic dust interactions, we describe the first detection of fast nanodust in the solar wind near Earth orbit and the first bi-static observations of PMSE, the radar echoes that are observed in the Earth ionosphere in the presence of charged dust.

  17. Modelling ice nucleation due to dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Petkovic, Slavko; Pejanovic, Goran; Madonna, Fabio

    2015-04-01

    Formation of cold clouds is enhanced if ice nuclei (IN) are available. Cold clouds contribute at global scale with 60% in average in precipitation and their presence significantly affects the atmospheric radiation properties. It is expected that better description of the IN process should substantially improve cloud parameterization in climate and numerical weather prediction models. Observations show that mineral dust particles are the dominant residuals found in cloud ice. In this study we employ the regional dust DREAM model based on high horizontal and vertical grid resolution to parameterize IN caused by mineral dust. DREAM has been already deployed in a study related to IN process (Klein et al, 2010), also in model experiments using several IN parameterization schemes in support of the IN field experiment CALIMA over Canaries. The model has been also extended by adding the major dust mineral fractions as tracers in order to facilitate staying a role of dust mineralogy in ice nucleation. This study will present parameterization of IN using the simulated dust concentration, water moisture and temperature. Preliminary results of simulated IN will be shown, as well as IN validation against lidar aerosol profiles and ice cloud water profiles observed by cloud radar in the Potenza EARLINET site. This study is an initial step in improving a cloud physics parameterization using IN as an input variable in an integrated dust-atmospheric modelling system.

  18. Electric Field Generation in Martian Dust Devils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Erika L.; Farrell, William M.; Rafkin, Scot C. R.

    2015-01-01

    Terrestrial dust devils are known to generate electric fields from the vertical separation of charged dust particles. The particles present within the dust devils on Mars may also be subject to similar charging processes and so likely contribute to electric field generation there as well. However, to date, no Marsin situ instrumentation has been deployed to measure electric field strength. In order to explore the electric environment of dust devils on Mars, the triboelectric dust charging physics from the MacroscopicTriboelectric Simulation (MTS) code has been coupled to the Mars Regional Atmospheric ModelingSystem (MRAMS). Using this model, we examine how macroscopic electric fields are generated within martian dust disturbances and attempt to quantify the time evolution of the electrodynamical system.Electric fields peak for several minutes within the dust devil simulations. The magnitude of the electric field is a strong function of the size of the particles present, the average charge on the particles and the number of particles lifted. Varying these parameters results in peak electric fields between tens of millivolts per meter and tens of kilovolts per meter.

  19. Featured Image: Making Dust in the Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-12-01

    This remarkable photograph (which spans only 10 m across; click for a full view) reveals what happens when you form dust grains in a laboratory under conditions similar to those of interstellar space. The cosmic life cycle of dust grains is not well understood we know that in the interstellar medium (ISM), dust is destroyed at a higher rate than it is produced by stellar sources. Since the amount of dust in the ISM stays constant, however, there must be additional sources of dust production besides stars. A team of scientists led by Daniele Fulvio (Pontifical Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena) have now studied formation mechanisms of dust grains in the lab by mimicking low-temperature ISM conditions and exploring how, under these conditions, carbonaceous materials condense from gas phase to form dust grains. To read more about their results and see additional images, check out the paper below.CitationDaniele Fulvio et al 2017 ApJS 233 14. doi:10.3847/1538-4365/aa9224

  20. On the reflectance of dust in comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zubko, Evgenij; Videen, Gorden; Shkuratov, Yuriy; Hines, Dean C.

    2017-11-01

    Reflectance of cometary dust is a key parameter used in the characterization of comets. In the literature, the reflectance of single-scattering cometary dust particles is widely assumed to be the same as that of the cometary nucleus. We discuss this assumption and demonstrate its inconsistency with photometric observations of comets, laboratory optical measurements, and numerical simulation of light scattering from single-scattering dust particles and particulate surfaces composed of the same particles. We estimate the reflectance of cometary dust particles using a comprehensive physical model of polarization measured in comets over wide range of phase angle and at different wavelengths in the visible. The model predicts that the reflectance of dust in comets inversely correlates with their maximum of positive polarization Pmax. We find that even the darkest dust particles appearing in comets with the highest Pmax, reflect considerably more incident solar-radiation energy, up to 200%, compared to what is thought for cometary nuclei. We also find that the reflectance retrieved from polarimetry in the visible appears in good quantitative accordance with previous estimations from infrared observations of comets. Our findings suggest that the dust production of comets is currently overestimated and may require revision.

  1. THE MEASUREMENT AND DISTRIBUTION OF WOOD DUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Rosario Proto

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In Italy, the woodworking industry presents many issues in terms of occupational health and safety. This study on exposure to wood dust could contribute to the realization of a prevention model in order to limit exposure to carcinogenic agents to the worker. The sampling methodology illustrated the analysis of dust emissions from the woodworking machinery in operation throughout the various processing cycles. The quantitative and qualitative assessment of exposure was performed using two different methodologies. The levels of wood dust were determined according to EN indications and sampling was conducted using IOM and Cyclon personal samplers. The qualitative research of wood dust was performed using an advanced laser air particle counter. This allowed the number of particles present to be counted in real time. The results obtained allowed for an accurate assessment of the quality of the dust emitted inside the workplace during the various processing phases. The study highlighted the distribution of air particles within the different size classes, the exact number of both thin and ultra-thin dusts, and confirmed the high concentration of thin dust particles which can be very harmful to humans.

  2. Arsenic immobilization of Teniente furnace dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ichimura, R. [Japan Oil, Gas, and Metals National Corp., Kawasaki (Japan); Tateiwa, H. [Mitsui Mining and Smelting Co. Ltd., Saitama (Japan); Almendares, C. [Centro de Investigacion Minera y Metalurgica, Santiago (Chile); Sanchez, G. [CODELCO, Santiago (Chile). Division Ventanas

    2007-07-01

    A 5-year joint Japanese-Chilean project to modify the treatment of furnace dust from a converter in Chile producing harmful amounts of arsenic and lead was described. A pilot plant was constructed to evaluate the method's commercialization potential. Flue dust was recovered by a dust collector installed to capture suspended dust generated by the smelting furnace. Arsenic content was approximately 15 per cent. Ninety per cent of the arsenic was then liquidated to lixivia and dissolved by leaching flue dust with sulphuric acid. The leaching rate decreased when flue dust had a high content of residual sulfide ore. A flotation device was then incorporated in the treatment process in order to increase the copper recovery rate. A solvent recovery process was then adopted to recover the copper and zinc contained in the solution after the arsenic recovery. An economic evaluation of the process indicated that efforts should be made to improve the efficiency of the dust treatment method. 5 refs., 6 tabs., 10 figs.

  3. Subtropical Dust Storms and Downslope Wind Events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokharel, Ashok Kumar; Kaplan, Michael L.; Fiedler, Stephanie

    2017-10-01

    We performed detailed mesoscale observational analyses and Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model simulations to study the terrain-induced downslope winds that generated dust-emitting winds at the beginning of three strong subtropical dust storms in three distinctly different regions of North Africa and the Arabian Peninsula. We revisit the Harmattan dust storm of 2 March 2004, the Saudi dust storm of 9 March 2009, and the Bodélé Depression dust storm of 8 December 2011 and use high-resolution WRF modeling to assess the dynamical processes during the onset of the storms in more depth. Our results highlight the generation of terrain-induced downslope winds in response to the transition of the atmospheric flow from a subcritical to supercritical state in all three cases. These events precede the unbalanced adjustment processes in the lee of the mountain ranges that produced larger-scale dust aerosol mobilization and transport. We see that only the higher-resolution data sets can resolve the mesoscale processes, which are mainly responsible for creating strong low-level terrain-induced downslope winds leading to the initial dust storms.

  4. Simulation of Dust Radiative Impact on the Red Sea Using Coupled Regional Ocean/Atmosphere Modeling System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenchikov, G. L.; Osipov, S.

    2016-12-01

    This study focuses on the Middle East regional climate response to the dust aerosol radiative forcing. MODIS and SEVIRI satellite observations show extremely high (exceeding 1) dust optical depths over the southern Red Sea during the summer season. The significant north-to-south gradient of the dust optical depth over the Red Sea persists throughout the entire year. The radiative forcing of dust at the sea surface exceeds 120 Wm-2. The effect of this forcing to the Red Sea thermal regime and circulations is not well quantified yet. Therefore here we employ the Regional Ocean Modeling system (ROMS) fully coupled with the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model to study the impact of dust on the Red Sea. The WRF was modified to interactively account for the radiative effect of dust. Daily spectral optical properties of dust are computed using Mie, T-matrix and geometric optics approaches, and are based on the SEVIRI climatological optical depth. The WRF model parent and nested domains are configured over the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region and over the Red Sea with 30 and 10 km resolution, respectively. The ROMS model over the Red Sea has 2 km grid spacing. The simulations show that, in the equilibrium response, dust causes 0.5-0.7K cooling of the Red Sea surface waters, and weakens the overturning circulation in the Red Sea. The salinity distribution, fresh water and heat budgets are significantly perturbed. This indicates that dust plays an important role in formation of the Red Sea energy balance and circulation regimes, and has to be thoroughly accounted for in the future modeling studies.

  5. Itokawa dust particles: a direct link between S-type asteroids and ordinary chondrites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Tomoki; Noguchi, Takaaki; Tanaka, Masahiko; Zolensky, Michael E; Kimura, Makoto; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Nakato, Aiko; Ogami, Toshihiro; Ishida, Hatsumi; Uesugi, Masayuki; Yada, Toru; Shirai, Kei; Fujimura, Akio; Okazaki, Ryuji; Sandford, Scott A; Ishibashi, Yukihiro; Abe, Masanao; Okada, Tatsuaki; Ueno, Munetaka; Mukai, Toshifumi; Yoshikawa, Makoto; Kawaguchi, Junichiro

    2011-08-26

    The Hayabusa spacecraft successfully recovered dust particles from the surface of near-Earth asteroid 25143 Itokawa. Synchrotron-radiation x-ray diffraction and transmission and scanning electron microscope analyses indicate that the mineralogy and mineral chemistry of the Itokawa dust particles are identical to those of thermally metamorphosed LL chondrites, consistent with spectroscopic observations made from Earth and by the Hayabusa spacecraft. Our results directly demonstrate that ordinary chondrites, the most abundant meteorites found on Earth, come from S-type asteroids. Mineral chemistry indicates that the majority of regolith surface particles suffered long-term thermal annealing and subsequent impact shock, suggesting that Itokawa is an asteroid made of reassembled pieces of the interior portions of a once larger asteroid.

  6. Water Ice Clouds and Dust in the Martian Atmosphere Observed by Mars Climate Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Jennifer L.; Kass, David; Heavens, Nicholas; Kleinbohl, Armin

    2011-01-01

    The water ice clouds are primarily controlled by the temperature structure and form at the water condensation level. Clouds in all regions presented show day/night differences. Cloud altitude varies between night and day in the SPH and tropics: (1) NPH water ice opacity is greater at night than day at some seasons (2) The diurnal thermal tide controls the daily variability. (3) Strong day/night changes indicate that the amount of gas in the atmosphere varies significantly. See significant mixtures of dust and ice at the same altitude planet-wide (1) Points to a complex radiative and thermal balance between dust heating (in the visible) and ice heating or cooling in the infrared. Aerosol layering: (1) Early seasons reveal a zonally banded spatial distribution (2) Some localized longitudinal structure of aerosol layers (3) Later seasons show no consistent large scale organization

  7. Asian dust exposure triggers acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kojima, Sunao; Michikawa, Takehiro; Ueda, Kayo; Sakamoto, Tetsuo; Matsui, Kunihiko; Kojima, Tomoko; Tsujita, Kenichi; Ogawa, Hisao; Nitta, Hiroshi; Takami, Akinori

    2017-08-29

    To elucidate whether Asian dust is associated with the incidence of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and to clarify whether patients who are highly sensitive to Asian dust will develop AMI. Twenty-one participating institutions located throughout Kumamoto Prefecture and capable of performing coronary intervention were included in the study. Data for ground-level observations of Asian dust events were measured at the Kumamoto Local Meteorological Observatory. Data collected between 1 April 2010 and 31 March 2015 were analysed, and 3713 consecutive AMI patients were included. A time-stratified case-crossover design was applied to examine the association between Asian dust exposure and AMI. The occurrence of Asian dust events at 1 day before the onset of AMI was associated with the incidence of AMI [odds ratio (OR), 1.46; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.09-1.95] and especially, non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction was significant (OR 2.03; 95% CI, 1.30-3.15). A significant association between AMI and Asian dust was observed in patients with age ≥75 years, male sex, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, never-smoking status, and chronic kidney disease (CKD). However, Asian dust events had a great impact on AMI onset in patients with CKD (P Asian dust events was found to be significantly associated with AMI incidence among patients with a risk score of 5-6 (OR 2.45; 95% CI: 1.14-5.27). Asian dust events may lead to AMI and have a great impact on its onset in patients with CKD.

  8. Pebble Bed Reactor Dust Production Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abderrafi M. Ougouag; Joshua J. Cogliati

    2008-09-01

    The operation of pebble bed reactors, including fuel circulation, can generate graphite dust, which in turn could be a concern for internal components; and to the near field in the remote event of a break in the coolant circuits. The design of the reactor system must, therefore, take the dust into account and the operation must include contingencies for dust removal and for mitigation of potential releases. Such planning requires a proper assessment of the dust inventory. This paper presents a predictive model of dust generation in an operating pebble bed with recirculating fuel. In this preliminary work the production model is based on the use of the assumption of proportionality between the dust production and the normal force and distance traveled. The model developed in this work uses the slip distances and the inter-pebble forces computed by the authors’ PEBBLES. The code, based on the discrete element method, simulates the relevant static and kinetic friction interactions between the pebbles as well as the recirculation of the pebbles through the reactor vessel. The interaction between pebbles and walls of the reactor vat is treated using the same approach. The amount of dust produced is proportional to the wear coefficient for adhesive wear (taken from literature) and to the slip volume, the product of the contact area and the slip distance. The paper will compare the predicted volume with the measured production rates. The simulation tallies the dust production based on the location of creation. Two peak production zones from intra pebble forces are predicted within the bed. The first zone is located near the pebble inlet chute due to the speed of the dropping pebbles. The second peak zone occurs lower in the reactor with increased pebble contact force due to the weight of supported pebbles. This paper presents the first use of a Discrete Element Method simulation of pebble bed dust production.

  9. Mars containers - Dust on teflon sealing surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Allton, J. H.

    As part of an evaluation of suitable hermetic seals for containers for Martian rock and soil samples, teflon o-ring static face seals were challenged with silica gel, basalt, and bentonite dust in several size ranges: 20-45 microns, 45-75 microns, and 75-125 microns. Seals were most tolerant of the soft bentonite dust and least tolerant of angular silica gel dust. Small amounts of 75-125 micron size particles can be accommodated by the teflon o-ring; however, the seals do not work well if smaller particles are concentrated enough to form layers more than 1 grain thick.

  10. Baghouse and cartridge dust collectors: A comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grafe, T.; Kelley, G. (Torit and Day, Minneapolis, MN (United States))

    1993-09-01

    Increased demands are being placed on air filtration systems. The particular application will determine whether a baghouse or cartridge type is best. Baghouse and cartridge dust collectors both have their place in modern air filtering systems. Baghouses have been in use much longer, but cartridge types offer significant advantages for particular applications. The task facing the site engineer is to match the requirements of the specific application with the inherent characteristics of the dust collector. This article presents basic information about both types of dust collectors that can help provide the best solution to that problem.

  11. Gazification of coal dust particles in the blast furnace tuyere apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvydky, V. S.; Yaroshenko, Yu G.; Spirin, N. A.; Lavrov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    The mathematical statement of the problem on gasification of coal dust particles in the blast-furnace tuyere apparatus is given, which includes the motion equation of a variable mass particle, heat equation of a particle and the heat-balance equation of the blast flow. The results of calculations are obtained by using mathematical software packages (Mathcad, Maple). Relatively weak effect of the volatiles combustion process on the thermal state of the tuyere zone is shown.

  12. Dynamic Dust Accumulation and Dust Removal Observed on the Mars Exploration Rover Magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertelsen, P.; Bell, J. F., III; Goetz, W.; Gunnlaugsson, H. P.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Hviid, S. F.; Johnson, J. R.; Kinch, K. M.; Knudsen, J. M.; Madsen, M. B.

    2005-01-01

    The Mars Exploration Rovers each carry a set of Magnetic Properties Experiments designed to investigate the properties of the airborne dust in the Martian atmosphere. It is a preferred interpretation of previous experiments that the airborne dust in the Martian atmosphere is primarily composed by composite silicate particles containing one or more highly magnetic minerals as a minor constituent. The ultimate goal of the magnetic properties experiments on the Mars Exploration Rover mission is to provide some information/ constraints on whether the dust is formed by volcanic, meteoritic, aqueous, or other processes. The first problem is to identify the magnetic mineral(s) in the airborne dust on Mars. While the overall results of the magnetic properties experiments are presented in, this abstract will focus on dust deposition and dust removal on some of the magnets.

  13. Dust storm detection using random forests and physical-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Random forests; dust detection; MODIS; decision tree. Abstract. Dust storms are important phenomena over large regions of the arid and semi-arid areas of the Middle East. Due to the influences of dust aerosols on climate and human daily activities, dust detection plays a crucial role in environmental and climatic ...

  14. Can dust emission mechanisms be determined from field measurements?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field observations are needed to develop and test theories on dust emission for use in dust modeling systems. The dust emission mechanism (aerodynamic entrainment, saltation bombardment, aggregate disintegration) as well as the amount and particle-size distribution of emitted dust may vary under sed...

  15. 30 CFR 33.32 - Determination of dust concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Determination of dust concentration. 33.32... MINES Test Requirements § 33.32 Determination of dust concentration. (a) Concentrations of airborne dust... microscopic technique shall be employed in determining concentrations of dust in terms of millions of...

  16. 30 CFR 33.33 - Allowable limits of dust concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Allowable limits of dust concentration. 33.33... MINES Test Requirements § 33.33 Allowable limits of dust concentration. (a) The concentration of dust determined by the control sample shall be subtracted from the average concentration of dust determined by the...

  17. Automatic detection of typical dust devils from Mars landscape images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogohara, Kazunori; Watanabe, Takeru; Okumura, Susumu; Hatanaka, Yuji

    2018-02-01

    This paper presents an improved algorithm for automatic detection of Martian dust devils that successfully extracts tiny bright dust devils and obscured large dust devils from two subtracted landscape images. These dust devils are frequently observed using visible cameras onboard landers or rovers. Nevertheless, previous research on automated detection of dust devils has not focused on these common types of dust devils, but on dust devils that appear on images to be irregularly bright and large. In this study, we detect these common dust devils automatically using two kinds of parameter sets for thresholding when binarizing subtracted images. We automatically extract dust devils from 266 images taken by the Spirit rover to evaluate our algorithm. Taking dust devils detected by visual inspection to be ground truth, the precision, recall and F-measure values are 0.77, 0.86, and 0.81, respectively.

  18. Experimental Method for Measuring Dust Load on Surfaces in Rooms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lengweiler, Philip; Nielsen, Peter V.; Moser, Alfred

    A new experimental setup to investigate the physical process of dust deposition and resuspension on and from surfaces is introduced. Dust deposition can reduce the airborne dust concentration considerably. As a basis for developing methods to eliminate dust-related problems in rooms, there is a n......A new experimental setup to investigate the physical process of dust deposition and resuspension on and from surfaces is introduced. Dust deposition can reduce the airborne dust concentration considerably. As a basis for developing methods to eliminate dust-related problems in rooms......, there is a need for better understanding of the mechanism of dust deposition and resuspension. With the presented experimental setup, the dust load on surfaces in a channel can be measured as a function of the environmental and surface conditions and the type of particles under controlled laboratory conditions....

  19. Lunar Dust Analysis Package - LDAP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalkley, S. A.; Richter, L.; Goepel, M.; Sovago, M.; Pike, W. T.; Yang, S.; Rodenburg, J.; Claus, D.

    2012-09-01

    The Lunar Dust Analysis package (L-DAP) is a suite of payloads which have been designed to operate in synergy with each other at the Lunar Surface. The benefits of combining these payloads in a single package allow very precise measurements of a particular regolith sample. At the same time the integration allows mass savings since common resources are shared and this also means that interfaces with the Lander are simplified significantly leading to benefits of integration and development of the overall mission. Lunar Dust represents a real hazard for lunar exploration due to its invasive, fine microscopic structure and toxic properties. However it is also valuable resource which could be exploited for future exploration if the characteristics and chemical composition is well known. Scientifically, the regolith provides an insight into the moon formation process and there are areas on the Moon which have never been ex-plored before. For example the Lunar South Pole Aitken Basin is the oldest and largest on the moon, providing excavated deep crust which has not been found on the previous lunar landing missions. The SEA-led team has been designing a compact package, known as LDAP, which will provide key data on the lunar dust properties. The intention is for this package to be part of the payload suite deployed on the ESA Lunar Lander Mission in 2018. The LDAP has a centralised power and data electronics, including front end electronics for the detectors as well as sample handling subsystem for the following set of internal instruments : • Optical Microscope - with a 1μm resolution to provide context of the regolith samples • Raman and LIBS spectrographic instrumentation providing quantification of mineral and elemental composition information of the soil at close to grain scale. This includes the capability to detect (and measure abundance of) crystalline and adsorbed volatile phases, from their Raman signature. The LIBS equipment will also allow chemical

  20. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J. J.; Déprez, G.; Farrell, W. M.; Houghton, I. M. P.; Renno, N. O.; Nicoll, K. A.; Tripathi, S. N.; Zimmerman, M.

    2016-11-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m-1 to 100 kV m-1 have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m-1 can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface)—MicroARES ( Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  1. Inactivation of dust mites, dust mite allergen, and mold from carpet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Kee-Hean; Lewis, Roger D; Dixit, Anupma; MacDonald, Maureen; Yang, Mingan; Qian, Zhengmin

    2014-01-01

    Carpet is known to be a reservoir for biological contaminants, such as dust mites, dust mite allergen, and mold, if it is not kept clean. The accumulation of these contaminants in carpet might trigger allergies or asthma symptoms in both children and adults. The purpose of this study is to compare methods for removal of dust mites, dust mite allergens, and mold from carpet. Carpets were artificially worn to simulate 1 to 2 years of wear in a four-person household. The worn carpets were inoculated together with a common indoor mold (Cladosporium species) and house dust mites and incubated for 6 weeks to allow time for dust mite growth on the carpet. The carpets were randomly assigned to one of the four treatment groups. Available treatment regimens for controlling carpet contaminants were evaluated through a literature review and experimentation. Four moderately low-hazard, nondestructive methods were selected as treatments: vacuuming, steam-vapor, Neem oil (a natural tree extract), and benzalkonium chloride (a quaternary ammonium compound). Steam vapor treatment demonstrated the greatest dust mite population reduction (p mold in carpet (p > 0.05) for both physical and chemical methods. The steam-vapor treatment effectively killed dust mites and denatured dust mite allergen in the laboratory environment.

  2. Dust explosion hazard in ITER: limiting oxygen concentration measurements of ITER-relevant dusts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denkevits, A. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    The work aim is to support inert-gas dilution mitigation methods proposed recently to prevent accidental explosions of dusts accumulated inside the ITER vacuum vessel during the machine operation. A standard method of 20-l-sphere is used to test 4 micron graphite dust and 1 micron tungsten dust to measure their Limiting Oxygen Concentration (LOC) values, below which no self-sustained flame propagation is possible in the dust cloud at any dust concentrations. The tested dust clouds are formed inside the 20-l spherical explosion bomb in nitrogen-diluted air atmospheres at normal initial conditions. The oxygen content in the pre-explosion atmospheres is varied from normal (about 21 vol. %) down to 9 vol. %. The tested dust cloud concentrations are 150-300 g/m{sup 3} of the graphite dust and 3000 g/m3 of the tungsten dust. The dust clouds are ignited with 2, 5, or 10 kJ igniters. The dependences of maximum overpressures and maximum rates of pressure rise generated in course of the dust cloud explosions are measured as functions of oxygen content in the pre-explosion atmospheres. The maximum overpressure generated by the graphite dust clouds ignited with 2 kJ reduces from 4 bar at normal oxygen content to 0.5 bar at 17 vol. % O2. In case of a stronger 10 kJ ignition the maximum overpressure is higher 0.5 bar down to 11 vol. % oxygen. The tungsten dust ignited by 5 kJ generate 4 bar overpressure in normal air. With reducing oxygen content the overpressure decreases to 0.5 bar at 13 vol. % oxygen. However, the observed regimes of the tungsten dust explosions seem to be overdriven under the tested conditions because of too high ignition energy (5 kJ) for rather a small combustion volume (20 l). Even the value of 15 vol. % oxygen can be considered as a conservative estimate of LOC for 1 micron tungsten dust. The results obtained indicate that only a weak dilution of accidental atmosphere in ITER vacuum vessel can suppress the dust explosions in case of severe accident

  3. Mineralogy of Interplanetary Dust Particles from the Comet Giacobini-Zinner Dust Stream Collections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura-Messenger, K.; Messenger, S.; Westphal, A. J.; Palma, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    The Draconoid meteor shower, originating from comet 21P/Giacobini-Zinner, is a low-velocity Earth-crossing dust stream that had a peak anticipated flux on Oct. 8, 2012. In response to this prediction, NASA performed dedicated stratospheric dust collections to target interplanetary dust particles (IDPs) from this comet stream on Oct 15-17, 2012 [3]. Twelve dust particles from this targeted collection were allocated to our coordinated analysis team for studies of noble gas (Univ. Minnesota, Minnesota State Univ.), SXRF and Fe-XANES (SSL Berkeley) and mineralogy/isotopes (JSC). Here we report a mineralogical study of 3 IDPs from the Draconoid collection..

  4. Applications of Electrified Dust and Dust Devil Electrodynamics to Martian Atmospheric Electricity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, R. G.; Barth, E.; Esposito, F.; Merrison, J.; Montmessin, F.; Aplin, K. L.; Borlina, C.; Berthelier, J J.; Deprez, G.; Farrell, William M.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Atmospheric transport and suspension of dust frequently brings electrification, which may be substantial. Electric fields of 10 kV m(exp. -1) to 100 kV m(exp. -1) have been observed at the surface beneath suspended dust in the terrestrial atmosphere, and some electrification has been observed to persist in dust at levels to 5 km, as well as in volcanic plumes. The interaction between individual particles which causes the electrification is incompletely understood, and multiple processes are thought to be acting. A variation in particle charge with particle size, and the effect of gravitational separation explains to, some extent, the charge structures observed in terrestrial dust storms. More extensive flow-based modelling demonstrates that bulk electric fields in excess of 10 kV m(exp. -1) can be obtained rapidly (in less than 10 s) from rotating dust systems (dust devils) and that terrestrial breakdown fields can be obtained. Modelled profiles of electrical conductivity in the Martian atmosphere suggest the possibility of dust electrification, and dust devils have been suggested as a mechanism of charge separation able to maintain current flow between one region of the atmosphere and another, through a global circuit. Fundamental new understanding of Martian atmospheric electricity will result from the ExoMars mission, which carries the DREAMS (Dust characterization, Risk Assessment, and Environment Analyser on the Martian Surface) MicroARES (Atmospheric Radiation and Electricity Sensor) Instrumentation to Mars in 2016 for the first in situ electrical measurements.

  5. Surface acoustic wave dust deposition monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fasching, G.E.; Smith, N.S. Jr.

    1988-02-12

    A system is disclosed for using the attenuation of surface acoustic waves to monitor real time dust deposition rates on surfaces. The system includes a signal generator, a tone-burst generator/amplifier connected to a transmitting transducer for converting electrical signals into acoustic waves. These waves are transmitted through a path defining means adjacent to a layer of dust and then, in turn, transmitted to a receiving transducer for changing the attenuated acoustic wave to electrical signals. The signals representing the attenuated acoustic waves may be amplified and used in a means for analyzing the output signals to produce an output indicative of the dust deposition rates and/or values of dust in the layer. 8 figs.

  6. Waste-moulding dusts modified with polyelectrolytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Baliński

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In the article described problems of the influence of advanced oxidizing process, the supersonic tooling of waste - moulding dusts and their modification with polyelectrolytes, on the technological proprieties of the moulding sands prepared with their participation.Physicochemical characterization of the used polyelectrolytes PSS (poli 4-styreno sodium sulfonate and PEI (poli etyleno imine, in theaspect of their modificatory influences on the waste - moulding dust, was described. Defined the influence of adsorption proprieties ofthe polyelectrolyte PEI on the surface of small parts of the waste - dust, on technological proprieties of the sandmix. Ascertained theprofitable influence of this electrolyte on mechanical proprieties of the moulding sands, that is to say the increase in value of thecompression strength (about 10% and tensile strenght (about 13%, comparatively to analogous proprieties of the moulding sandsprepared with the participation of the not modified waste- dust.

  7. Spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust collapse in higher ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We consider a collapsing spherically symmetric inhomogeneous dust cloud in higher dimensional space-time. We show that the central singularity of collapse can be a strong curvature or a weak curvature naked singularity depending on the initial density distribution.

  8. The Marriage of Gas and Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, D. J.; Laibe, G.

    2015-10-01

    Dust-gas mixtures are the simplest example of a two fluid mixture. We show that when simulating such mixtures with particles or with particles coupled to grids a problem arises due to the need to resolve a very small length scale when the coupling is strong. Since this is occurs in the limit when the fluids are well coupled, we show how the dust-gas equations can be reformulated to describe a single fluid mixture. The equations are similar to the usual fluid equations supplemented by a diffusion equation for the dust-to-gas ratio or alternatively the dust fraction. This solves a number of numerical problems as well as making the physics clear.

  9. Regenerable Lunar Airborne Dust Filter Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Effective methods are needed to control pervasive Lunar Dust within spacecraft and surface habitations. Once inside, airborne transmission is the primary mode of...

  10. House dust mite control measures for asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gøtzsche, Peter C.; Johansen, Helle Krogh

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The major allergen in house dust comes from mites. Chemical, physical and combined methods of reducing mite allergen levels are intended to reduce asthma symptoms in people who are sensitive to house dust mites. OBJECTIVES: To assess the effects of reducing exposure to house dust mite...... antigens in the homes of people with mite-sensitive asthma. SEARCH STRATEGY: PubMed and The Cochrane Library (last searches Nov 2007), reference lists. SELECTION CRITERIA: Randomised trials of mite control measures vs placebo or no treatment in people with asthma known to be sensitive to house dust mites......), the standardised mean difference was 0.00 (95% confidence interval (CI) -0.10 to 0.10). There were no statistically significant differences either in number of patients improved (relative risk 1.01, 95% CI 0.80 to 1.27), asthma symptom scores (standardised mean difference -0.04, 95% CI -0.15 to 0...

  11. The composition of circumstellar and interstellar dust

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tielens, AGGM; Woodward, CE; Biscay, MD; Shull, JM

    2001-01-01

    A large number of solid dust components have been identified through analysis of stardust recovered from meteorites, and analysis of IR observations of circumstellar shells and the interstellar medium. These include graphite, hydrogenated amorphous carbon, diamond, PAHs, silicon-, iron-, and

  12. High-Fidelity Lunar Dust Simulant Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The severity of the lunar dust problems encountered during the Apollo missions were consistently underestimated by ground tests, illustrating the need to develop...

  13. Solar-Panel Dust Accumulation and Cleanings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Air-fall dust accumulates on the solar panels of NASA's Mars Exploration Rovers, reducing the amount of sunlight reaching the solar arrays. Pre-launch models predicted steady dust accumulation. However, the rovers have been blessed with occasional wind events that clear significant amounts of dust from the solar panels. This graph shows the effects of those panel-cleaning events on the amount of electricity generated by Spirit's solar panels. The horizontal scale is the number of Martian days (sols) after Spirit's Jan. 4, 2005, (Universal Time) landing on Mars. The vertical scale indicates output from the rover's solar panels as a fraction of the amount produced when the clean panels first opened. Note that the gradual declines are interrupted by occasional sharp increases, such as a dust-cleaning event on sol 420.

  14. Dust Mitigation for the Lunar Surface Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The lunar surface is, to a large extent, covered with a dust layer several meters thick. Known as lunar regolith, it has been produced by meteorite impacts since the...

  15. Coping with Dust for Extraterrestrial Exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creel, R.

    2017-10-01

    Dust presented challenges for previous lunar exploration missions. Astronauts indicated more extensive pursuits are not possible unless solutions are found to mitigate/avoid exposure. I will present evidence along with mitigation proposals.

  16. Airborne Dust Models in Valley Fever Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprigg, W. A.; Galgiani, J. N.; Vujadinovic, M.; Pejanovic, G.; Vukovic, A. J.; Prasad, A. K.; Djurdjevic, V.; Nickovic, S.

    2011-12-01

    Dust storms (haboobs) struck Phoenix, Arizona, in 2011 on July 5th and again on July 18th. One potential consequence: an estimated 3,600 new cases of Valley Fever in Maricopa County from the first storm alone. The fungi, Coccidioides immitis, the cause of the respiratory infection, Valley Fever, lives in the dry desert soils of the American southwest and southward through Mexico, Central America and South America. The fungi become part of the dust storm and, a few weeks after inhalation, symptoms of Valley Fever may appear, including pneumonia-like illness, rashes, and severe fatigue. Some fatalities occur. Our airborne dust forecast system predicted the timing and extent of the storm, as it has done with other, often different, dust events. Atmosphere/land surface models can be part of public health services to reduce risk of Valley Fever and exacerbation of other respiratory and cardiovascular illness.

  17. Modelling dust production in AGB stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dell'Agli, Flavia

    2017-10-01

    Asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars are among the most important gas and dust polluters of the Universe. The latest AGB evolutionary models take into account dust production in the circumstellar envelope of these stars, starting from a detailed computation of the main physical processes and chemical surface variations occurring in this evolutionary phase. Following the formation and growth of dust particles, they provide the unique possibility of interpreting the AGB population observed in resolved galaxies. The first application was for the Spitzer observations of dusty AGBs in the Magellanic Clouds, characterising carbon-rich and oxygen-rich stars in terms of initial mass, epoch of star formation, evolutionary time on the AGB and dust contribution. The same set of models are able to interpret the CNO surface abundances observed for the PNe of the same galaxies.

  18. Nanotube Electrodes for Dust Mitigation Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Dust mitigation is critical to the survivability of vehicle and infrastructure components and systems and to the safety of astronauts during EVAs and planetary...

  19. Managing Stormwater and Dust at Demolition Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Learn how to manage stormwater and dust at demolition sites, including developing a stormwater solution prevention plan, best practices for erosion, runoff and sediment control to reduce environmental impacts and comply with environmental regulations.

  20. Stochastic Models of Molecule Formation on Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charnley, Steven; Wirstroem, Eva

    2011-01-01

    We will present new theoretical models for the formation of molecules on dust. The growth of ice mantles and their layered structure is accounted for and compared directly to observations through simulation of the expected ice absorption spectra

  1. Cosmic rays, gas and dust in nearby anticentre clouds. I. CO-to-H2 conversion factors and dust opacities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remy, Q.; Grenier, I. A.; Marshall, D. J.; Casandjian, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    Aims: We aim to explore the capabilities of dust emission and γ rays for probing the properties of the interstellar medium in the nearby anti-centre region, using γ-ray observations with the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT), and the thermal dust optical depth inferred from Planck and IRAS observations. We also aim to study massive star-forming clouds including the well known Taurus, Auriga, Perseus, and California molecular clouds, as well as a more diffuse structure which we refer to as Cetus. In particular, we aim at quantifying potential variations in cosmic-ray density and dust properties per gas nucleon across the different gas phases and different clouds, and at measuring the CO-to-H2 conversion factor, XCO, in different environments. Methods: We have separated six nearby anti-centre clouds that are coherent in velocities and distances, from the Galactic-disc background in H I 21-cm and 12CO 2.6-mm line emission. We have jointly modelled the γ-ray intensity recorded between 0.4 and 100 GeV, and the dust optical depth τ353 at 353 GHz as a combination of H I-bright, CO-bright, and ionised gas components. The complementary information from dust emission and γ rays was used to reveal the gas not seen, or poorly traced, by H I, free-free, and 12CO emissions, namely (I) the opaque H iand diffuse H2 present in the Dark Neutral Medium at the atomic-molecular transition, and (II) the dense H2 to be added where 12CO lines saturate. Results: The measured interstellar γ-ray spectra support a uniform penetration of the cosmic rays with energies above a few GeV through the clouds, from the atomic envelopes to the 12CO-bright cores, and with a small ± 9% cloud-to-cloud dispersion in particle flux. We detect the ionised gas from the H iiregion NGC 1499 in the dust and γ-ray emissions and measure its mean electron density and temperature. We find a gradual increase in grain opacity as the gas (atomic or molecular) becomes more dense. The increase reaches a factor of

  2. The Dust Accelerator Facility at CCLDAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, A. J.; Collette, A.; Drake, K.; Gruen, E.; Horanyi, M.; Leblanc, S.; Munsat, T.; Northway, P.; Robertson, S. H.; Srama, R.; Sternovsky, Z.; Thomas, E.; Wagner, M.; Colorado CenterLunar Dust; Atmospheric Studies

    2010-12-01

    At the Colorado Center for Lunar Dust and Atmospheric Science (CCLDAS) we are in the process of assembling a 3MV macroscopic (~1um) dust particle accelerator. The acceleration unit is being made by the National Electrostatics Corporation (NEC). The accelerator consists of a pelletron generator and potential rings encased in an enclosure held at 6 atm of SF6. A pulsed dust source is used to inject particles into the accelerator. Here we describe advancements in dust accelerator technology at CCLDAS to allow more functionality and ease of use, focusing primarily on dust source control, and the capability to select a precise range in dust mass and velocity. Previously, the dust source was controlled by long plastic rods turning potentiometers inside the SF6 environment providing little to no feedback and repeatability. We describe a fiber optic control system that allows full control of the pulse characteristics being sent to the dust source using a LabVIEW control program to increase usability. An electrostatic Einzel lens is being designed using the ion-optics code SIMION to determine the properties of the electrodes needed for the optimum focusing of the dust beam. Our simulations studies indicate that the dust beam can be directed into a 0.5mm diameter spot. Our planned experiments require a high degree of control over particles size, speed, charge and other characteristics. In order to ensure that only particles of the desired characteristics are allowed to pass into the target chamber, two deflection plates are used to eliminate unwanted particles from the beam. Further simulations are being done to determine the possibility of bending the beamline to allow active selection of particles. The current design of the selection unit uses nuclear accelerator techniques to determine the velocity and charge of each particle and digital timing and logic to choose particles that will be allowed to pass. This requires a high signal to noise ratio due to the need for a well

  3. Electrostatic Dust Control for Planetary Rovers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, P. E.; Curtis, S. A.; Farrell, W. M.; Nuth, J. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Rilee, M. L.

    2005-12-01

    Detailed study of the physical and chemical nature of the fine particulate portion of the regoliths of these bodies is a key to understanding micrometeorite bombardment and the nature of regolith formation. Thus, missions to sample the surfaces of atmosphereless bodies, including the Moon, asteroids, and Mercury, have been identified as crucial components of solar system exploration over the next decades. We have proposed autonomous reconfigurable robotic manual assistants and lander/rovers for such missions. On the other hand, dust poses problems for mechanisms and exposed surfaces on landers/rovers sent to such bodies. Compromise of seals and loss of sample material, as well as mechanical damage to systems and surfaces, occurred after hours of operation during the Apollo missions. Thus both dust mitigation and dust collection are issues which must be addressed for sampling missions. Dust activity on atmosphereless bodies is ubiquitous and induced by complex interactions of fine particulates, environmentally-dependent fields, and charged particles with vehicle surfaces and mechanisms. Dust particles are both abrasive and adhesive as a result of the melting and crushing from micrometeorite bombardment. Thus, dust dynamics result from the interplay between mechanical and electrostatic forces and are a critical environmental factor with which all rover technologies must deal. We have considered various strategies for dust mitigation. Passive ones include the use of conducting surfaces and O-ring sealing of all mechanisms. Several active mechanisms for not only removing but collecting dust are under consideration. Our inter-disciplinary team is investigating the feasibility of an electrostatically based concept for a dust control. Relatively little work has been done on empirically simulating what happens when another surface is introduced into a non-conducting, dusty regolith. We plan to test our concept by performing empirical simulations of the interaction between

  4. Investigations of Wind/WAVES Dust Impacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    St Cyr, O. C.; Wilson, L. B., III; Rockcliffe, K.; Mills, A.; Nieves-Chinchilla, T.; Adrian, M. L.; Malaspina, D. M.

    2017-12-01

    The Wind spacecraft launched in November 1994 with a primary goal to observe and understand the interaction between the solar wind and Earth's magnetosphere. The waveform capture detector, TDS, of the radio and plasma wave investigation, WAVES [Bougeret et al., 1995], onboard Wind incidentally detected micron-sized dust as electric field pulses from the recollection of the impact plasma clouds (an unintended objective). TDS has detected over 100,000 dust impacts spanning almost two solar cycles; a dataset of these impacts has been created and was described in Malaspina & Wilson [2016]. The spacecraft continues to collect data about plasma, energetic particles, and interplanetary dust impacts. Here we report on two investigations recently conducted on the Wind/WAVES TDS database of dust impacts. One possible source of dust particles is the annually-recurring meteor showers. Using the nine major showers defined by the American Meteor Society, we compared dust count rates before, during, and after the peak of the showers using averaging windows of varying duration. However, we found no statistically significant change in the dust count rates due to major meteor showers. This appears to be an expected result since smaller grains, like the micron particles that Wind is sensitive to, are affected by electromagnetic interactions and Poynting-Robertson drag, and so are scattered away from their initial orbits. Larger grains tend to be more gravitationally dominated and stay on the initial trajectory of the parent body so that only the largest dust grains (those that create streaks as they burn up in the atmosphere) are left in the orbit of the parent body. Ragot and Kahler [2003] predicted that coronal mass ejections (CMEs) near the Sun could effectively scatter dust grains of comparable size to those observed by Wind. Thus, we examined the dust count rates immediately before, during, and after the passage of the 350 interplanetary CMEs observed by Wind over its 20+ year

  5. LADEE Search for a Dust Exosphere: A Historical Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenar, D. A.; Stubbs, T. J.; Elphic, R.

    2014-01-01

    The LADEE search for exospheric dust is strongly motivated by putative detections of forward-scattered sunlight from exospheric dust grains which were observed during the Apollo era. This dust population, if it exists, has been associated with charging and transport of dust near the terminators. It is likely that the concentration of these dust grains is governed by a saltation mechanism originated by micrometeoroid impacts, which are the source of the more tenuous ejecta cloud.

  6. Waste and dust utilisation in shaft furnaces

    OpenAIRE

    Senk, D.; Babich, A.; Gudenau, H. W.

    2005-01-01

    Wastes and dusts from steel industry, non-ferrous metallurgy and other branches can be utilized e.g. in agglomeration processes (sintering, pelletizing or briquetting) and by injection into shaft furnaces. This paper deals with the second way. Combustion and reduction behaviour of iron- and carbon-rich metallurgical dusts and sludges containing lead, zinc and alkali as well as other wastes with and without pulverized coal (PC) has been studied when injecting into shaft furnaces. Following sha...

  7. Cometary Dust: The Diversity of Primitive Matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.; Ishiiii, H. A.; Zolensky, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    The connections between comet dust and primitive chondrites from asteroids has strengthened considerably over the past decade. Understanding the importance of the connections between Stardust samples and chondrites requires geochemistry lingo as well as a perspective of other cometary dust samples besides Stardust. We present the principal findings of an extensive review prepared for by us for the June 2016 "Cometary Science After Rosetta" meeting at The Royal Society, London.

  8. Dust Accumulation and Solar Panel Array Performance on the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgay, Eren H.

    2004-01-01

    One of the most fundamental design considerations for any space vehicle is its power supply system. Many options exist, including batteries, fuel cells, nuclear reactors, radioisotopic thermal generators (RTGs), and solar panel arrays. Solar arrays have many advantages over other types of power generation. They are lightweight and relatively inexpensive, allowing more mass and funding to be allocated for other important devices, such as scientific instruments. For Mars applications, solar power is an excellent option, especially for long missions. One might think that dust storms would be a problem; however, while dust blocks some solar energy, it also scatters it, making it diffuse rather than beamed. Solar cells are still able to capture this diffuse energy and convert it into substantial electrical power. For these reasons, solar power was chosen to be used on the 1997 Mars Pathfinder mission. The success of this mission set a precedent, as NASA engineers have selected solar power as the energy system of choice for all future Mars missions, including the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Project. Solar sells have their drawbacks, however. They are difficult to manufacture and are relatively fragile. In addition, solar cells are highly sensitive to different parts of the solar spectrum, and finding the correct balance is crucial to the success of space missions. Another drawback is that the power generated is not a constant with respect to time, but rather changes with the relative angle to the sun. On Mars, dust accumulation also becomes a factor. Over time, dust settles out of the atmosphere and onto solar panels. This dust blocks and shifts the frequency of the incoming light, degrading solar cell performance. My goal is to analyze solar panel telemetry data from the two MERs (Spirit and Opportunity) in an effort to accurately model the effect of dust accumulation on solar panels. This is no easy process due to the large number of factors involved. Changing solar

  9. Dust Explosion Characteristics of Aluminum, Titanium, Zinc, and Iron-Based Alloy Powders Used in Cold Spray Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakata, K.; Tagomori, K.; Sugiyama, N.; Sasaki, S.; Shinya, Y.; Nanbu, T.; Kawashita, Y.; Narita, I.; Kuwatori, K.; Ikeda, T.; Hara, R.; Miyahara, H.

    2014-01-01

    Compared to conventional thermal spray coating, cold spray processing typically employs finer, smaller-diameter metal powders. Furthermore, cold-sprayed particles exhibit fewer surface oxides than thermally sprayed particles due to the absence of particle melting during spraying. For these reasons, it is important to consider the potential for dust explosions or fires during cold spray processing, for both industrial and R&D applications. This work examined the dust explosion characteristics of metal powders typically used in cold spray coating, for the purpose of preventing dust explosions and fires and thus protecting the health and safety of workers and guarding against property damage. In order to safely make use of the new cold spray technology in industrial settings, it is necessary to manage the risks based on an appropriate assessment of the hazards. However, there have been few research reports focused on such risk management. Therefore, in this study, the dust explosion characteristics of aluminum, titanium, zinc, carbonyl iron, and eutectoid steel containing chromium at 4 wt.% (4 wt.% Cr-eutectoid steel) powders were evaluated according to the standard protocols JIS Z 8818, IEC61241-2-3(1994-09) section 3, and JIS Z 8817. This paper reports our results concerning the dust explosion properties of the above-mentioned metal powders.

  10. Thermoluminescence response of gamma-irradiated sesame with mineral dust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez L, Y. [CSIC, Instituto de Estructura de la Materia, Calle Serrano 121, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Correcher, V. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J. [CSIC, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Calle Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Cruz Z, E., E-mail: y.r.l@csic.es [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior s/n, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2011-10-15

    The thermoluminescence (Tl) emission of minerals isolated from Mexican and Indian sesame seeds appear as a good tool to discern between irradiated and non-irradiated samples. According to the X-ray diffraction and environmental scanning microscope, the adhered dust in both samples is mainly composed by different amounts of quartz and feldspars. These mineral phases exhibit (i) enough sensitivity to ionizing radiation inducing good Tl intensity, (ii) high stability of the Tl signal during the storage of the material (i.e. low fading) and (iii) are thermally and chemically stable. Blind tests performed under laboratory conditions, but simulating industrial preservation processes (similar temperature and moisture, and presence of white light), allows to distinguish between 1 KGy gamma-irradiated and non-irradiated samples even 11000 hours (15 months) after the irradiation proceeding. (Author)

  11. Micropropulsion in space via dust-plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avinash, K.; Zank, G. P.

    2007-05-01

    A new engine for propulsion in space, i.e., the dust-plasma thruster, is proposed. The scheme uses plasma thermal energy to charge externally injected sub-micrometer-sized particles and simultaneously create electric fields in the plasma that accelerates them. Particles are subsequently charge stripped and exhausted to produce electrically neutral thrust obviating the need of a charge neutralizer. For reasonable plasma and particle parameters, thrust and specific impulse over a broad range may be produced. The dependence of thrust on particle size, number of injected particles, and plasma temperature density allows for a better thruster precision. The scheme is shown to have modest power requirements. It may be realized in a simple design where there are no high voltage grids or electrodes, charge neutralizer, valves, pressurized gases, etc., and can operate in space or vacuum. A layout for the possible configuration is described.

  12. Micro-propulsion in space via dust - plasma thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zank, Gary; Avinash, Khare

    2007-11-01

    A new scheme of micro propulsion in space i.e. the dust -- plasma thruster is proposed. The scheme uses plasma thermal energy to charge externally injected sub micron sized particles and simultaneously create electric fields in the plasma which accelerates them. Particles are subsequently charge stripped and exhausted to produce electrically neutral thrust obviating the need of a charge neutralizer. For reasonable plasma and particle parameters, thrust and specific impulse over a broad range may be produced. The dependence of thrust on particle size and other plasma parameters allows for a better thruster precision. The scheme is shown to have modest power requirements. It may be realized in a simple design where there are no high voltage grids or electrodes, charge neutralizer, valves, pressurized gases etc and can operate in space or vacuum. A layout for the possible configuration is described.

  13. Continuous respirable mine dust monitor development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cantrell, B.K.; Williams, K.L.; Stein, S.W. [and others

    1996-12-31

    In June 1992, the Mine Safety and Health Administration (MSHA) published the Report of the Coal Mine Respirable Dust Task Group, Review of the Program to Control Respirable Coal Mine Dust in the United States. As one of its recommendations, the report called for the accelerated development of two mine dust monitors: (1) a fixed-site monitor capable of providing continuous information on dust levels to the miner, mine operator, and to MSHA, if necessary, and (2) a personal sampling device capable of providing both a short-term personal exposure measurement as well as a full-shift measurement. In response to this recommendation, the U.S. Bureau of Mines initiated the development of a fixed-site machine-mounted continuous respirable dust monitor. The technology chosen for monitor development is the Rupprecht and Patashnick Co., Inc. tapered element oscillating microbalance. Laboratory and in-mine tests have indicated that, with modification, this sensor can meet the humidity and vibration requirements for underground coal mine use. The U.S. Department of Energy Pittsburgh Research Center (DOE-PRC) is continuing that effort by developing prototypes of a continuous dust monitor based on this technology. These prototypes are being evaluated in underground coal mines as they become available. This effort, conducted as a joint venture with MSHA, is nearing completion with every promise of success.

  14. Lunar Dust Separation for Toxicology Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Bonnie L.; McKay, D. S.; Riofrio, L. M.; Taylor, L. A.; Gonzalex, C. P.

    2010-01-01

    During the Apollo missions, crewmembers were briefly exposed to dust in the lunar module, brought in after extravehicular activity. When the lunar ascent module returned to micro-gravity, the dust that had settled on the floor now floated into the air, causing eye discomfort and occasional respiratory symptoms. Because our goal is to set an exposure standard for 6 months of episodic exposure to lunar dust for crew on the lunar surface, these brief exposures of a few days are not conclusive. Based on experience with industrial minerals such as sandblasting quartz, an exposure of several months may cause serious damage, while a short exposure may cause none. The detailed characteristics of sub-micrometer lunar dust are only poorly known, and this is the size range of particles that are of greatest concern. We have developed a method for extracting respirable dust (<2.5 micron) from Apollo lunar soils. This method meets stringent requirements that the soil must be kept dry, exposed only to pure nitrogen, and must conserve and recover the maximum amount of both respirable dust and coarser soil. In addition, we have developed a method for grinding coarser lunar soil to produce sufficient respirable soil for animal toxicity testing while preserving the freshly exposed grain surfaces in a pristine state.

  15. Modeling Respiratory Toxicity of Authentic Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santana, Patricia A.; James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-Wing

    2010-01-01

    The lunar expeditions of the Apollo operations from the 60 s and early 70 s have generated awareness about lunar dust exposures and their implication towards future lunar explorations. Critical analyses on the reports from the Apollo crew members suggest that lunar dust is a mild respiratory and ocular irritant. Currently, NASA s space toxicology group is functioning with the Lunar Airborne Dust Toxicity Assessment Group (LADTAG) and the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) to investigate and examine toxic effects to the respiratory system of rats in order to establish permissible exposure levels (PELs) for human exposure to lunar dust. In collaboration with the space toxicology group, LADTAG and NIOSH the goal of the present research is to analyze dose-response curves from rat exposures seven and twenty-eight days after intrapharyngeal instillations, and model the response using BenchMark Dose Software (BMDS) from the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Via this analysis, the relative toxicities of three types of Apollo 14 lunar dust samples and two control dust samples, titanium dioxide (TiO2) and quartz will be determined. This will be executed for several toxicity endpoints such as cell counts and biochemical markers in bronchoaveolar lavage fluid (BALF) harvested from the rats.

  16. Dust Shells around OH/IR Stars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Won Suh

    1988-12-01

    Full Text Available We have made new models for mass-losing OH/IR stars to explain the properties of the dust shells around them using more accurate information about the material in the shell and the physical processes including pulsations. We have applied our dust opacity which has been deduced from observations and experimental data to various density distributions, calculated the model emergent spectra, and compared with observations. Contrary to previous suggestions, we could fit observations fairly well using density distribution ρ∝r-2, which is physically plausible, with proper choice of opacities. The time scales for dust formation, growth, and movement are calculated to be compared with pulsation periods. The change of the emergent spectrum depending of the phase of pulsation can be explained fairly well by changing dust condensation radius(for fixed dust condensation temperature in step with the change in stellar luminosity. The effects of stellar wind models and pulsation models on dust shells with attention to emergent spectra are discussed.

  17. Design features of vortex dust collectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puring Svetlana

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This article states that during the construction of industrial buildings it is necessary to provide engineering communications (including systems of supply and exhaust ventilation which ensure uninterrupted production, its technological and environmental safety. It is necessary to use cleaning devices to remove pollutants from ventilation emissions in local exhaust systems. As for devices for removing highly disperse non-sticky dust, it is possible to offer vortex dust collectors, the efficiency of which depends on the design and operating mode. A method is proposed to increase the efficiency of a vortex dust collector, to improve the quality of the purified air, and to reduce energy consumption during air purification by installing watering nozzles in primary and secondary air pipes made in the form of a Venturi tube. In consequence of multidirectional movement of dust particles and sprayed water, active coagulation of dust particles takes place, as a result of which the separation increases. Apart from that, watering dusty air flows leads to the formation of a liquid film on the inner surface of the separation chamber, which prevents dust particles from rebounding off the separation chamber and facilitates their capture and flushing into the collecting hopper

  18. Looking for Dust-Scattering Light Echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brianna; Heinz, Sebastian; Corrales, Lia

    2018-01-01

    Galactic X-ray transient sources such as neutron stars or black holes sometimes undergo an outburst in X-rays. Ring structures have been observed around three such sources, produced by the X-ray photons being scattered by interstellar dust grains along our line of sight. These dust-scattering light echoes have proven to be a useful tool for measuring and constraining Galactic distances, mapping the dust structure of the Milky Way, and determining the dust composition in the clouds producing the echo. Detectable light echoes require a sufficient quantity of dust along our line of sight, as well as bright, short-lived Galactic X-ray flares. Using data from the Monitor of All-Sky X-ray Image (MAXI) on-board the International Space Station, we ran a peak finding algorithm in Python to look for characteristic flare events. Each flare was characterized by its fluence, the integrated flux of the flare over time. We measured the distribution of flare fluences to show how many observably bright flares were recorded by MAXI. This work provides a parent set for dust echo searches in archival X-ray data and will inform observing strategies with current and future X-ray missions such as Athena and Lynx.

  19. The Cosmic Dust Experiment of AIM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppe, A.; James, D.; Horanyi, M.

    2008-12-01

    The Cosmic Dust Experiment (CDE) onboard the Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere (AIM) mission is a dust impact experiment designed to monitor the variability of the cosmic dust in ux. The instrument consists of fourteen permanently polarized thin plastic film sensors that generate an electrical signal when an impacting dust particle penetrates them. The total surface area is about 0.1 square meters and the detection threshold is about a micron in particle radius. The variability of these small grains is assumed to follow the variability of the dominant 100 micron radius particles, hence the measured flux can be used in correlation studies with various Noctilucent Cloud (NLC) activity indexes. CDE has been observing the cosmic dust influx since June 2007. In this talk, we present the first nine months of reduced data, focusing on the observed temporal and spatial variability of the dust influx. Data collected after February 2008 show increased levels of background noise and preliminary work on reducing this data will also be presented.

  20. House dust mite fauna of tropical Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chew, F T; Zhang, L; Ho, T M; Lee, B W

    1999-02-01

    Sensitization to house dust mites is very common in the tropics. This study evaluated the dust mite fauna in Singaporean homes. A total of 134 dust samples from 50 homes were evaluated. Dust mites were isolated, identified and quantified by standard techniques. Dust mites were isolated from 130/134 (97%) samples, with mites identified in all samples from sofas (n = 21) and carpets (n = 13), and 49/50 (98%) and 47/50 (94%) from mattresses and bedroom floors, respectively. All samples from sofas and carpets had more than 500 mites/g compared with 47/50 (94%) and 23/50 (46%) from mattresses and floors, respectively. Blomia tropicalis was the predominant mite (62% of total mites) followed by D. pteronyssinus (16% of total mites). Eight samples had a predominance of Sturnophagoides brasiliensis and Tarsonemus granarius. Other species that accounted approximately 1% of mites identified included D. farinae, Austroglycyphagus malaysiensis, Cheyletus malaccensis, Malayoglyphus intermedius, Suidasia pontifica and Tyrophagus putrescentiae. Dust mites were highly prevalent and present in high densities in Singaporean homes with B. tropicalis being the most prevalent species.

  1. The Dust Management Project: Final Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyatt, Mark J.; Straka, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    A return to the Moon to extend human presence, pursue scientific activities, use the Moon to prepare for future human missions to Mars, and expand Earth s economic sphere, will require investment in developing new technologies and capabilities to achieve affordable and sustainable human exploration. From the operational experience gained and lessons learned during the Apollo missions, conducting longterm operations in the lunar environment will be a particular challenge, given the difficulties presented by the unique physical properties and other characteristics of lunar regolith, including dust. The Apollo missions and other lunar explorations have identified significant lunar dust-related problems that will challenge future mission success. Comprised of regolith particles ranging in size from tens of nanometers to microns, lunar dust is a manifestation of the complex interaction of the lunar soil with multiple mechanical, electrical, and gravitational effects. The environmental and anthropogenic factors effecting the perturbation, transport, and deposition of lunar dust must be studied in order to mitigate it s potentially harmful effects on exploration systems and human explorers. The Dust Management Project (DMP) is tasked with the evaluation of lunar dust effects, assessment of the resulting risks, and development of mitigation and management strategies and technologies related to Exploration Systems architectures. To this end, the DMP supports the overall goal of the Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) of addressing the relevant high priority technology needs of multiple elements within the Constellation Program (CxP) and sister ETDP projects. Project scope, approach, accomplishments, summary of deliverables, and lessons learned are presented.

  2. ESA's experts are ready for a storm of comet dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    storm is likely to receive one hit penetrating aluminium to a depth of 0.4 millimetre. A larger spacecraft has a greater chance of being hit by a more penetrating dust grain. Operators are therefore advised to turn their spacecraft to present as small a target as possible, and to try to ensure that sensitive parts do not face the meteor stream. "Bullet-like damage caused by large particles is only part of the story," says Walter Flury of ESOC's mission analysis section. "Fine grains are far more numerous and can sand-blast optical systems, thermal blankets and solar cells. And in a cloud of charged particles created by the impacts, lightning-like discharges can cause faults in the electronic systems of the spacecraft. The very high speed of the Leonids aggravates that risk, so it may be advisable to switch off sensitive equipment. Damage due to electrical discharges may be the most serious hazard from the Leonids." Predictions are very uncertain and effects are very chancy, so one recommendation is simply to reinforce the spacecraft operation teams on 17 November, to cope with any emergency that arises. The direction of arrival of the Leonids is favourable for satellites in one respect. The dust grains will come from a direction almost at right angles to the direction of the Sun. Flat solar panels in their normal orientation, facing the Sun, present only a narrow edge as a target for the Leonids. Controllers of ESA's Earth observation satellites ERS-1 and ERS-2 will switch off the instruments during the hazardous period to reduce the risk of electrically-induced damage. ESA's solar spacecraft SOHO, stationed 1.5 million kilometres out in space, is likely to experience an even stronger storm of Leonids than satellites in the Earth's vicinity. Measures to reduce the hazard may include rotating the spacecraft to screen vital equipment, and switching off scientific instruments. The view from the ground When the Leonids are at their peak, Leo will just be rising on Europe

  3. Gone with the heat: a fundamental constraint on the imaging of dust and molecular gas in the early Universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhi-Yu; Papadopoulos, Padelis P; Ivison, R J; Galametz, Maud; Smith, M W L; Xilouris, Emmanuel M

    2016-06-01

    Images of dust continuum and carbon monoxide (CO) line emission are powerful tools for deducing structural characteristics of galaxies, such as disc sizes, H2 gas velocity fields and enclosed H2 and dynamical masses. We report on a fundamental constraint set by the cosmic microwave background (CMB) on the observed structural and dynamical characteristics of galaxies, as deduced from dust continuum and CO-line imaging at high redshifts. As the CMB temperature rises in the distant Universe, the ensuing thermal equilibrium between the CMB and the cold dust and H2 gas progressively erases all spatial and spectral contrasts between their brightness distributions and the CMB. For high-redshift galaxies, this strongly biases the recoverable H2 gas and dust mass distributions, scale lengths, gas velocity fields and dynamical mass estimates. This limitation is unique to millimetre/submillimetre wavelengths and unlike its known effect on the global dust continuum and molecular line emission of galaxies, it cannot be addressed simply. We nevertheless identify a unique signature of CMB-affected continuum brightness distributions, namely an increasing rather than diminishing contrast between such brightness distributions and the CMB when the cold dust in distant galaxies is imaged at frequencies beyond the Raleigh-Jeans limit. For the molecular gas tracers, the same effect makes the atomic carbon lines maintain a larger contrast than the CO lines against the CMB.

  4. High Energy Studies of Astrophysical Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrales, Lia Racquel

    Astrophysical dust---any condensed matter ranging from tens of atoms to micron sized grains---accounts for about one third of the heavy elements produced in stars and disseminated into space. These tiny pollutants are responsible for producing the mottled appearance in the spray of light we call the "Milky Way." However these seemingly inert particles play a strong role in the physics of the interstellar medium, aiding star and planet formation, and perhaps helping to guide galaxy evolution. Most dust grains are transparent to X-ray light, leaving a signature of atomic absorption, but also scattering the light over small angles. Bright X-ray objects serendipitously situated behind large columns of dust and gas provide a unique opportunity to study the dust along the line of sight. I focus primarily on X-ray scattering through dust, which produces a diffuse halo image around a central point source. Such objects have been observed around X-ray bright Galactic binaries and extragalactic objects that happen to shine through the plane of the Milky Way. I use the Chandra X-ray Observatory, a space-based laboratory operated by NASA, which has imaging resolution ideal for studying X-ray scattering halos. I examine several bright X-ray objects with dust-free sight lines to test their viability as templates and develop a parametric model for the Chandra HETG point spread function (PSF). The PSF describes the instrument's imaging response to a point source, an understanding of which is necessary for properly measuring the surface brightness of X-ray scattering halos. I use an HETG observation of Cygnus X-3, one of the brightest objects available in the Chandra archive, to derive a dust grain size distribution. There exist degenerate solutions for the dust scattering halo, but with the aid of Bayesian analytics I am able to apply prior knowledge about the Cyg X-3 sight line to measure the relative abundance of dust in intervening Milky Way spiral arms. I also demonstrate how

  5. DUST AND GAS IN THE DISK OF HL TAURI: SURFACE DENSITY, DUST SETTLING, AND DUST-TO-GAS RATIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinte, C.; Ménard, F. [UMI-FCA, CNRS/INSU, France (UMI 3386), and Dept. de Astronomía, Universidad de Chile, Santiago (Chile); Dent, W. R. F.; Hales, A.; Hill, T.; Cortes, P.; Gregorio-Monsalvo, I. de, E-mail: christophe.pinte@obs.ujf-grenoble.fr [Atacama Large Millimeter/Submillimeter Array, Joint ALMA Observatory, Alonso de Córdova 3107, Vitacura 763-0355, Santiago (Chile)

    2016-01-01

    The recent ALMA observations of the disk surrounding HL Tau reveal a very complex dust spatial distribution. We present a radiative transfer model accounting for the observed gaps and bright rings as well as radial changes of the emissivity index. We find that the dust density is depleted by at least a factor of 10 in the main gaps compared to the surrounding rings. Ring masses range from 10–100 M{sub ⊕} in dust, and we find that each of the deepest gaps is consistent with the removal of up to 40 M{sub ⊕} of dust. If this material has accumulated into rocky bodies, these would be close to the point of runaway gas accretion. Our model indicates that the outermost ring is depleted in millimeter grains compared to the central rings. This suggests faster grain growth in the central regions and/or radial migration of the larger grains. The morphology of the gaps observed by ALMA—well separated and showing a high degree of contrast with the bright rings over all azimuths—indicates that the millimeter dust disk is geometrically thin (scale height ≈1 AU at 100 AU) and that a large amount of settling of large grains has already occurred. Assuming a standard dust settling model, we find that the observations are consistent with a turbulent viscosity coefficient of a few 10{sup −4}. We estimate the gas/dust ratio in this thin layer to be of the order of 5 if the initial ratio is 100. The HCO{sup +} and CO emission is consistent with gas in Keplerian motion around a 1.7 M{sub ⊙} star at radii from ≤10–120 AU.

  6. COMET 22P/KOPFF: DUST ENVIRONMENT AND GRAIN EJECTION ANISOTROPY FROM VISIBLE AND INFRARED OBSERVATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moreno, Fernando; Pozuelos, Francisco; Aceituno, Francisco; Casanova, Victor; Sota, Alfredo [Instituto de Astrofisica de Andalucia, CSIC, Glorieta de la Astronomia s/n, 18008 Granada (Spain); Castellano, Julio; Reina, Esteban, E-mail: fernando@iaa.es [Amateur Association Cometas-Obs (Spain)

    2012-06-20

    We present optical observations and Monte Carlo models of the dust coma, tail, and trail structures of the comet 22P/Kopff during the 2002 and 2009 apparitions. Dust loss rates, ejection velocities, and power-law size distribution functions are derived as functions of the heliocentric distance using pre- and post-perihelion imaging observations during both apparitions. The 2009 post-perihelion images can be accurately fitted by an isotropic ejection model. On the other hand, strong dust ejection anisotropies are required to fit the near-coma regions at large heliocentric distances (both inbound at r{sub h} = 2.5 AU and outbound at r{sub h} = 2.6 AU) for the 2002 apparition. These asymmetries are compatible with a scenario where dust ejection is mostly seasonally driven, coming mainly from regions near subsolar latitudes at far heliocentric distances inbound and outbound. At intermediate to near-perihelion heliocentric distances, the outgassing would affect much more extended latitude regions, the emission becoming almost isotropic near perihelion. We derived a maximum dust production rate of 260 kg s{sup -1} at perihelion, and an averaged production rate over one orbit of 40 kg s{sup -1}. An enhanced emission rate, also accompanied by a large ejection velocity, is predicted at r{sub h} > 2.5 pre-perihelion. The model has also been extended to the thermal infrared in order to be applied to available trail observations of this comet taken with IRAS and Infrared Space Observatory spacecrafts. The modeled trail intensities are in good agreement with those observations, which is remarkable taking into account that those data are sensitive to dust ejection patterns corresponding to several orbits before the 2002 and 2009 apparitions.

  7. Dynamics and Distribution of Interplanetary Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ipatov, S. I.; Mather, J. C.

    2005-08-01

    We integrated the orbital evolution of 12,000 asteroidal, cometary, and trans-Neptunian dust particles, under the gravitational influence of planets, Poynting-Robertson drag, radiation pressure, and solar wind drag (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, v. 1017, 66-80, 2004; Advances in Space Research, in press, 2005). The orbital evolution of 30,000 Jupiter-family comets (JFCs) was also integrated (Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, v. 1017, 46-65, 2004). For asteroidal and cometary particles, the values of the ratio β between the radiation pressure force and the gravitational force varied from 1000 and 1 microns). The considered cometary particles started from comets 2P, 10P, and 39P. The probability of a collision of an asteroidal or cometary dust particle with the Earth during a lifetime of the particle was maximum at diameter about 100 microns; this is in accordance with cratering records. Our different studies of migration of dust particles and small bodies testify that the fraction of cometary dust particles of the overall dust population inside Saturn's orbit is considerable and can be dominant: (1) Some JFCs can reach orbits entirely located inside Jupiter's orbit and remain in such orbits for millions of years. Such former comets could disintegrate during millions of years and produce a lot of mini-comets and dust. (2) The spatial density of migrating trans-Neptunian particles near Jupiter's orbit is smaller by a factor of several than that beyond Saturn's orbit. Only a small fraction of asteroidal particles can migrate outside Jupiter's orbit. Therefore cometary dust particles are needed to explain the observed constant spatial density of dust particles at 3-18 AU from the Sun. (3) Comparison of the velocities of zodiacal dust particles obtained in our runs with the observations of velocities of these particles made by Reynolds et al. (Ap.J., 2004, v. 612, 1206-1213) shows that only asteroidal dust particles cannot explain these

  8. Dust Accumulation on MER Solar Panels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guinness, E. A.; Arvidson, R. E.; McEwen, A. S.; Cull, S.

    2011-12-01

    HiRISE acquired in March 2011 a color image of the Spirit Mars Exploration Rover from orbit that shows an exceptionally bright reflection from the rover solar panels. HiRISE data combined with laboratory measurements of MER solar cell reflectance provide a method for constraining the thickness of dust on the solar panels. Spirit is the brightest object in the HiRISE scene with a reflectance that is about 3 times higher at 500 nm and about 1.5 times higher at 700 and 850 nm than bright outcrop and soil near the rover. The rover is also less red than these nearby materials and less red than a typical Mars dust spectrum modeled with the same geometry and seen through similar atmospheric conditions as the HiRISE image. Lighting and viewing angles for the HiRISE image of Spirit are close to a specular reflection geometry when factoring in the rover orientation, the sun position, and the location of HiRISE during image acquisition. Laboratory photometric measurements of clean and dust-coated MER solar cells show a strong specular reflection for dust coating thicknesses up to at least 45 micrometers. The specular reflection was not present in the laboratory data when the solar cell was covered with about a 135 micrometer thick layer. The dust used in the experiments consisted of less than 10 micrometer sized particles derived from a palagonitic tephra from Mauna Kea that is spectrally similar to Mars dust. A survey of MER Pancam color images acquired by Spirit and Opportunity also shows several examples of specular reflections from the solar panels. These examples correspond to times when the solar cells were moderately clean to dusty as inferred from the amount of power generated by the cells. Specular reflections in Pancam images have been observed when the solar cell output was only 45% that of a dust-free cell. Spirit HiRISE data indicate that the rover was not covered by an optical thick layer of dust because some of the reflected light must have come from the

  9. ADONIS Discovers Dust Disk around a Star with a Planet

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-10-01

    , HD 210277 and epsilon Eridani . 55 Cancri is another possible candidate under investigation. [3]: Several arguments speak in favour of a disk structure, rather than a (near-)spherical dust halo. A disk is a more stable configuration than a halo. It is also rather unlikely that there would be a dust halo around an otherwise seemingly normal G0 zero-age-main-sequence star like iota Horologii . Moreover, mid-infrared observations with the Infrared Space Observatory (ISO) show an excess of infrared radiation. In the case of a star like iota Horologii , this is indicative of a circumstellar dust disk (the dust emits thermal radiation in the infrared part of the spectrum - hence the radiation from a star with a dust disk is usually relatively stronger in the infrared, as compared to stars without circumstellar dust). Furthermore, radio observations with the SEST at La Silla did not find any molecular carbon monoxide (CO) emission; thus the star did not retain a part of its parent cloud. It is also not located in the proximity of a star-forming region and it is extremely unlikely that there would be material along the line-of-sight that may mimic a halo. The circumstellar dust around iota Horologii is therefore most likely to be arranged in a disk. Technical information about the photo PR Photo 27/00 : The intensity scale ranges from 0.1 (deep red) to 100 (white) mJy/arcsec 2 (surface brightness). The diameter of the mask is 1.0 arcsec, corresponding to 17 AU (2550 million km) at the distance of iota Horologii (56 light-years). The images are based on 150 integrations of 4 seconds each, i.e. a total exposure time of 10 min. The observing conditions were excellent (0.6 arcsec seeing) and the achieved image resolution by the adaptive optics system (approx. 0.11 arcsec) is near the best possible (the "diffraction limit") at this wavelength (H-band at 1.64 µm).

  10. Origin of Harmattan dust settled in Northern Ghana – Long transported or local dust?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsie, Gry; Awadzi, Theodore W; Breuning-Madsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    is that the majority of dust deposited in northern Ghana may not be from the original Harmattan source in the Bodélé Depression. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the origin of deposited dust in Tamale, Ghana. This is examined by comparing wind data, grain size distribution, mineralogical...

  11. Dust Destruction in the ISM: A Re-Evaluation of Dust Lifetimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. P.; Nuth, J. A., III

    2011-01-01

    There is a long-standing conundrum in interstellar dust studies relating to the discrepancy between the time-scales for dust formation from evolved stars and the apparently more rapid destruction in supernova-generated shock waves. Aims. We re-examine some of the key issues relating to dust evolution and processing in the interstellar medium. Methods. We use recent and new constraints from observations, experiments, modelling and theory to re-evaluate dust formation in the interstellar medium (ISM). Results. We find that the discrepancy between the dust formation and destruction time-scales may not be as significant as has previously been assumed because of the very large uncertainties involved. Conclusions. The derived silicate dust lifetime could be compatible with its injection time-scale, given the inherent uncertainties in the dust lifetime calculation. The apparent need to re-form significant quantities of silicate dust in the tenuous interstellar medium may therefore not be a strong requirement. Carbonaceous matter, on the other hand, appears to be rapidly recycled in the ISM and, in contrast to silicates, there are viable mechanisms for its re-formation in the ISM.

  12. CHARACTERIZATION OF THE DUST GENERATED IN THE RECYCLING PROCESS OF THE ELECTRIC ARC FURNACE DUST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábio Gonçalves Rizz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Electric Arc Furnace Dust (EAFD is a solid waste generated by the production of steel through the Electric Arc Furnace. This waste is labeled dangerous, which motivates studies aiming its recycling. Experiments were made to study a pyrometallurgical process for the recycling of the dust, using the insertion of dust briquettes in molten pig iron in three temperatures. In the briquettes, there were made additions of calcium fluoride in four different concentrations. This paper has the objective to characterize the dust that results from this process, verifying the influence of the temperature and the concentration of calcium fluoride in the briquette in the morphology and chemical composition of the new dust, determining the optimal conditions for the recovery of the zinc content of the dust. This newly generated dust was analyzed in an Scanning Electronic Microscope, used to capture micrographs and chemical composition by EDS. The micrographs show that the temperature and the calcium fluoride concentration interfere in the way the dust particles agglomerate. Chemical analysis points that the higher zinc recuperation occurrs in the experiments at 1500°C with 7% addition of calcium fluoride.

  13. Planar dust-acoustic waves in electron–positron–ion–dust plasmas ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-09-19

    Sep 19, 2014 ... Abstract. Propagation of small but finite nonlinear dust-acoustic solitary waves are investigated in a planar unmagnetized dusty plasma, which consists of electrons, positrons, ions and negatively charged dust particles with different sizes and masses. A Kadomtsev–Petviashvili (KP) equation is obtained by ...

  14. Study on simultaneous recycling of EAF dust and plastic waste containing TBBPA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grabda, Mariusz, E-mail: mariusz@mail.tagen.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 1,1 Katahira, 2-Chome, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute of Environmental Engineering of the Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Sklodowska-Curie 34, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Oleszek, Sylwia [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 1,1 Katahira, 2-Chome, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan); Institute of Environmental Engineering of the Polish Academy of Sciences, M. Sklodowska-Curie 34, 41-819 Zabrze (Poland); Shibata, Etsuro; Nakamura, Takashi [Institute of Multidisciplinary Research for Advanced Materials (IMRAM), Tohoku University, 1,1 Katahira, 2-Chome, Aoba-ku, Sendai 980-8577 (Japan)

    2014-08-15

    Highlights: • Thermal treatment of EAF dust with TBBPADGE (a constituent of epoxy resins). • High reactivity of evolved HBr gas with Zn (ZnO, ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and Pb present in EAFD. • High separation of Zn, Pb from Fe-rich residue by a bromination–evaporation process. • Complete evaporation of the formed metallic bromides from the residue at 550 °C. - Abstract: In the present work we investigated the fates of zinc, lead, and iron present in electric arc furnace dust during thermal treatment of the dust with tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and tetrabromobisphenol A diglycidyl ether (TBBPADGE). Mixtures of these materials were compressed into pellets and heated in a laboratory-scale furnace at 550 °C for 80 min, under oxidizing and inert conditions. The solid, condensed, and gaseous-phase products were characterized using an array of analytical methods: scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, electron probe microscopy, inductively coupled plasma, ion chromatography, and gas chromatography. The results indicated that heating the mixtures under specific conditions enabled high separation of zinc and lead from iron-rich residues, by a bromination–evaporation process. In the case of TBBPADGE, a maximum of 85% of zinc and 81% of lead were effectively separated under the above conditions. The process is based on the reaction between the highly reactive HBr gas evolved during thermal degradation of the flame-retarded materials with zinc (ZnO and ZnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}) and lead in the dust, followed by complete evaporation of the formed metallic bromides from the solid residue.

  15. A Dynamic Fountain Model for Lunar Dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, T. J.; Vondrak, R. R.; Farrell, W. M.

    2005-01-01

    During the Apollo era of exploration it was discovered that sunlight was scattered at the terminators giving rise to horizon glow and streamers above the lunar surface. This was observed from the dark side of the Moon during sunset and sunrise by both surface landers and astronauts in orbit. These observations were quite unexpected, as the Moon was thought to be a pristine environment with a negligible atmosphere or exosphere. Subsequent investigations have shown that the sunlight was most likely scattered by electrostatically charged dust grains originating from the surface. It has since been demonstrated that this dust population could have serious implications for astronomical observations from the lunar surface. The lunar surface is electrostatically charged by the Moon s large-scale interaction with the local plasma environment and the photoemission of electrons due to solar ultra-violet (UV) light and X-rays. The like-charged surface and dust grains then act to repel each other, such that under certain conditions the dust grains are lifted above the surface. We present a dynamic fountain model which can explain how sub-micron dust is able to reach altitudes of up to approximately 100 km above the lunar surface. Previous static dust levitation models are most applicable to the heavier micron-sized grains in close proximity proximity to the surface, but they cannot explain the presence of extremely light grains at high altitudes. If we relax the static constraint applied to previous models, and instead assume that the grains are in constant motion (under the action of dynamic forces), a new picture emerges for the behavior of sub-micron lunar dust.

  16. Dust Combustion Safety Issues for Fusion Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L. C. Cadwallader

    2003-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of a safety research task to identify the safety issues and phenomenology of metallic dust fires and explosions that are postulated for fusion experiments. There are a variety of metal dusts that are created by plasma erosion and disruptions within the plasma chamber, as well as normal industrial dusts generated in the more conventional equipment in the balance of plant. For fusion, in-vessel dusts are generally mixtures of several elements; that is, the constituent elements in alloys and the variety of elements used for in-vessel materials. For example, in-vessel dust could be composed of beryllium from a first wall coating, tungsten from a divertor plate, copper from a plasma heating antenna or diagnostic, and perhaps some iron and chromium from the steel vessel wall or titanium and vanadium from the vessel wall. Each of these elements has its own unique combustion characteristics, and mixtures of elements must be evaluated for the mixture’s combustion properties. Issues of particle size, dust temperature, and presence of other combustible materials (i.e., deuterium and tritium) also affect combustion in air. Combustion in other gases has also been investigated to determine if there are safety concerns with “inert” atmospheres, such as nitrogen. Several coolants have also been reviewed to determine if coolant breach into the plasma chamber would enhance the combustion threat; for example, in-vessel steam from a water coolant breach will react with metal dust. The results of this review are presented here.

  17. Electrostatic Dust Detection and Removal for ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.H. Skinner; A. Campos; H. Kugel; J. Leisure; A.L. Roquemore; S. Wagner

    2008-09-01

    We present some recent results on two innovative applications of microelectronics technology to dust inventory measurement and dust removal in ITER. A novel device to detect the settling of dust particles on a remote surface has been developed in the laboratory. A circuit board with a grid of two interlocking conductive traces with 25 μm spacing is biased to 30 – 50 V. Carbon particles landing on the energized grid create a transient short circuit. The current flowing through the short circuit creates a voltage pulse that is recorded by standard nuclear counting electronics and the total number of counts is related to the mass of dust impinging on the grid. The particles typically vaporize in a few seconds restoring the previous voltage standoff. Experience on NSTX however, showed that in a tokamak environment it was still possible for large particles or fibers to remain on the grid causing a long term short circuit. We report on the development of a gas puff system that uses helium to clear such particles. Experiments with varying nozzle designs, backing pressures, puff durations, and exit flow orientations have given an optimal configuration that effectively removes particles from an area up to 25 cm² with a single nozzle. In a separate experiment we are developing an advanced circuit grid of three interlocking traces that can generate a miniature electrostatic traveling wave for transporting dust to a suitable exit port. We have fabricated such a 3-pole circuit board with 25 micron insulated traces that operates with voltages up to 200 V. Recent results showed motion of dust particles with the application of only 50 V bias voltage. Such a device could potentially remove dust continuously without dedicated interventions and without loss of machine availability for plasma operations.

  18. Deuterium enrichment of interstellar dusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ankan; Chakrabarti, Sandip Kumar; Majumdar, Liton; Sahu, Dipen

    2016-07-01

    High abundance of some abundant and simple interstellar species could be explained by considering the chemistry that occurs on interstellar dusts. Because of its simplicity, the rate equation method is widely used to study the surface chemistry. However, because the recombination efficiency for the formation of any surface species is highly dependent on various physical and chemical parameters, the Monte Carlo method is best suited for addressing the randomness of the processes. We carry out Monte-Carlo simulation to study deuterium enrichment of interstellar grain mantle under various physical conditions. Based on the physical properties, various types of clouds are considered. We find that in diffuse cloud regions, very strong radiation fields persists and hardly a few layers of surface species are formed. In translucent cloud regions with a moderate radiation field, significant number of layers would be produced and surface coverage is mainly dominated by photo-dissociation products such as, C, CH_3, CH_2D, OH and OD. In the intermediate dense cloud regions (having number density of total hydrogen nuclei in all forms ˜2 × 10^4 cm^{-3}), water and methanol along with their deuterated derivatives are efficiently formed. For much higher density regions (˜10^6 cm^{-3}), water and methanol productions are suppressed but surface coverage of CO, CO_2, O_2, O_3 are dramatically increased. We find a very high degree of fractionation of water and methanol. Observational results support a high fractionation of methanol but surprisingly water fractionation is found to be low. This is in contradiction with our model results indicating alternative routes for de-fractionation of water.

  19. Dust evolution with active galactic nucleus feedback in elliptical galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashita, Hiroyuki; Nozawa, Takaya

    2017-12-01

    We have recently suggested that dust growth in the cold gas phase dominates the dust abundance in elliptical galaxies while dust is efficiently destroyed in the hot X-ray emitting plasma (hot gas). In order to understand the dust evolution in elliptical galaxies, we construct a simple model that includes dust growth in the cold gas and dust destruction in the hot gas. We also take into account the effect of mass exchange between these two gas components induced by active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback. We survey reasonable ranges of the relevant parameters in the model and find that AGN feedback cycles actually produce a variety in cold gas mass and dust-to-gas ratio. By comparing with an observational sample of nearby elliptical galaxies, we find that, although the dust-to-gas ratio varies by an order of magnitude in our model, the entire range of the observed dust-to-gas ratios is difficult to be reproduced under a single parameter set. Variation of the dust growth efficiency is the most probable solution to explain the large variety in dust-to-gas ratio of the observational sample. Therefore, dust growth can play a central role in creating the variation in dust-to-gas ratio through the AGN feedback cycle and through the variation in dust growth efficiency.

  20. A simplified Suomi NPP VIIRS dust detection algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yikun; Sun, Lin; Zhu, Jinshan; Wei, Jing; Su, Qinghua; Sun, Wenxiao; Liu, Fangwei; Shu, Meiyan

    2017-11-01

    Due to the complex characteristics of dust and sparse ground-based monitoring stations, dust monitoring is facing severe challenges, especially in dust storm-prone areas. Aim at constructing a high-precision dust storm detection model, a pixel database, consisted of dusts over a variety of typical feature types such as cloud, vegetation, Gobi and ice/snow, was constructed, and their distributions of reflectance and Brightness Temperatures (BT) were analysed, based on which, a new Simplified Dust Detection Algorithm (SDDA) for the Suomi National Polar-Orbiting Partnership Visible infrared Imaging Radiometer (NPP VIIRS) is proposed. NPP VIIRS images covering the northern China and Mongolian regions, where features serious dust storms, were selected to perform the dust detection experiments. The monitoring results were compared with the true colour composite images, and results showed that most of the dust areas can be accurately detected, except for fragmented thin dusts over bright surfaces. The dust ground-based measurements obtained from the Meteorological Information Comprehensive Analysis and Process System (MICAPS) and the Ozone Monitoring Instrument Aerosol Index (OMI AI) products were selected for comparison purposes. Results showed that the dust monitoring results agreed well in the spatial distribution with OMI AI dust products and the MICAPS ground-measured data with an average high accuracy of 83.10%. The SDDA is relatively robust and can realize automatic monitoring for dust storms.

  1. Investigation of interplanetary dust from out-of-ecliptic space probes. [astronomical models of interplanetary dust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fechtig, H.; Giese, R. H.; Hanner, M. S.; Zook, H. A.

    1976-01-01

    Measurements of interplanetary dust via zodiacal light observations and direct detection are discussed for an out-of-ecliptic space probe. Particle fluxes and zodiacal light brightnesses were predicted for three models of the dust distribution. These models predict that most of the information will be obtained at space probe distances less than 1 A.U. from the ecliptic plane. Joint interpretation of the direct particle measurements and the zodiacal light data can yield the best knowledge of the three-dimensional particle dynamics, spatial distribution, and physical characteristics of the interplanetary dust. Such measurements are important for an understanding of the origin and role of the dust in relation to meteoroids, asteroids, and comets, as well as the interaction of the dust with solar forces.

  2. Mixing of Dust and NH3 Observed Globally over Anthropogenic Dust Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginoux, P.; Clarisse, L.; Clerbaux, C.; Coheur, P.-F.; Dubovik, O.; Hsu, N. C.; Van Damme, M.

    2012-01-01

    The global distribution of dust column burden derived from MODIS Deep Blue aerosol products is compared to NH3 column burden retrieved from IASI infrared spectra. We found similarities in their spatial distributions, in particular their hot spots are often collocated over croplands and to a lesser extent pastures. Globally, we found 22% of dust burden collocated with NH3, with only 1% difference between land-use databases. This confirms the importance of anthropogenic dust from agriculture. Regionally, the Indian subcontinent has the highest amount of dust mixed with NH3 (26 %), mostly over cropland and during the pre-monsoon season. North Africa represents 50% of total dust burden but accounts for only 4% of mixed dust, which is found over croplands and pastures in Sahel and the coastal region of the Mediterranean. In order to evaluate the radiative effect of this mixing on dust optical properties, we derive the mass extinction efficiency for various mixtures of dust and NH3, using AERONET sunphotometers data. We found that for dusty days the coarse mode mass extinction efficiency decreases from 0.62 to 0.48 square meters per gram as NH3 burden increases from 0 to 40 milligrams per square meter. The fine mode extinction efficiency, ranging from 4 to 16 square mters per gram, does not appear to depend on NH3 concentration or relative humidity but rather on mineralogical composition and mixing with other aerosols. Our results imply that a significant amount of dust is already mixed with ammonium salt before its long range transport. This in turn will affect dust lifetime, and its interactions with radiation and cloud properties

  3. Analysis of two Saharan dust events of North Africa in the Mediterranean region by Using SKIRON/Eta model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benaouda, D.; Kallos, G.; Azzi, A.; Louka, P.; Benlefki, A.

    2009-04-01

    As it is well known established that significant ecosystems effects can be produced by pollutants generated many hundreds of kilometres away. Desert is natural laboratories containing valuable mineral deposits that were formed in the arid environment or that were exposed by erosion. Dust is a key species of many biogeochemical. One important effect of the dust cycle is triggering of various biochemical reactions between dust ingredients and the environment. The biogeochemical impact of desert dust also remains a matter of discussion regarding its contribution for different major and minor elements to terrestrial and marine systems and especially its potential fertilising role for remote oceanic areas by supplying micronutrients such as phosphorus and iron. Saharan dust is responsible for the supply of nutrients resulting in the increase of the production of the pelagic system, but competitively may remove phosphorus, through the adsorption on dust particles, contributing to the oligotrophy of the system, in addition, the presence of Si and Fe in the dust deposition may change the phytoplankton communities resulting in fast growth rates leading to blooms. In addition to direct radiative forcing, dust participates in indirect climate forcing through its role as a cloud-condensation nucleus and potential atmospheric CO2 regulator via biospheric nutrient delivery. Scattering and absorption of radiation by dust have impacts on the Earth's radiation budget, the thermal structure of the troposphere, and actinic fluxes, altering dynamical and photochemical processes. Coating of dust particles under polluted conditions can change microphysical properties and promote surface chemical. The Mediterranean Sea is a semi-enclosed basin, which receives substances sporadically from the arid regions of the Sahara desert. In such processes, dust modifies biochemistry of the Mediterranean water, changes features of the terrestrial ecosystems, and neutralises acid rains. Mineral dust

  4. Investigating the Feasibility of Utilizing Carbon Nanotube Fibers for Spacesuit Dust Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manyapu, Kavya K.; de Leon, Pablo; Peltz, Leora; Tsentalovich, Dmitri; Gaier, James R.; Calle, Carlos; Mackey, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Historical data from the Apollo missions has compelled NASA to identify dust mitigation of spacesuits and other components as a critical path prior to sending humans on potential future lunar exploration missions. Several studies thus far have proposed passive and active countermeasures to address this challenge. However, these technologies have been primarily developed and proven for rigid surfaces such as solar cells and thermal radiators. Integration of these technologies for spacesuit dust mitigation has remained an open challenge due to the complexity of suit design. Current research investigates novel methods to enhance integration of the Electrodynamic Dust Shield (EDS) concept for spacesuits. We leverage previously proven EDS concept developed by NASA for rigid surfaces and apply new techniques to integrate the technology into spacesuits to mitigate