WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal dominant state

  1. Thermalization of squeezed states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, Allan I

    2005-01-01

    Starting with a thermal squeezed state defined as a conventional thermal state based on an appropriate Hamiltonian, we show how an important physical property, the signal-to-noise ratio, is degraded, and propose a simple model of thermalization (Kraus thermalization)

  2. On the thermal stability of radiation-dominated accretion disks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yan-Fei; Stone, James M. [Department of Astrophysical Sciences, Princeton University, Princeton, NJ 08544 (United States); Davis, Shane W. [Canadian Institute for Theoretical Astrophysics, Toronto, ON M5S3H4 (Canada)

    2013-11-20

    We study the long-term thermal stability of radiation-dominated disks in which the vertical structure is determined self-consistently by the balance of heating due to the dissipation of MHD turbulence driven by magneto-rotational instability (MRI) and cooling due to radiation emitted at the photosphere. The calculations adopt the local shearing box approximation and utilize the recently developed radiation transfer module in the Athena MHD code based on a variable Eddington tensor rather than an assumed local closure. After saturation of the MRI, in many cases the disk maintains a steady vertical structure for many thermal times. However, in every case in which the box size in the horizontal directions are at least one pressure scale height, fluctuations associated with MRI turbulence and dynamo action in the disk eventually trigger a thermal runaway that causes the disk to either expand or contract until the calculation must be terminated. During runaway, the dependence of the heating and cooling rates on total pressure satisfy the simplest criterion for classical thermal instability. We identify several physical reasons why the thermal runaway observed in our simulations differ from the standard α disk model; for example, the advection of radiation contributes a non-negligible fraction to the vertical energy flux at the largest radiation pressure, most of the dissipation does not happen in the disk mid-plane, and the change of dissipation scale height with mid-plane pressure is slower than the change of density scale height. We discuss how and why our results differ from those published previously. Such thermal runaway behavior might have important implications for interpreting temporal variability in observed systems, but fully global simulations are required to study the saturated state before detailed predictions can be made.

  3. Floating plant dominance as a stable state

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheffer, M.; Szabo, S.; Gragnani, A.; Nes, van E.H.; Rinaldi, S.; Kautsky, N.; Norberg, J.; Roijackers, R.M.M.; Franken, R.J.M.

    2003-01-01

    The authors demonstrate that floating-plant dominance can be a self-stabilizing ecosystem state, which may explain its notorious persistence in many situations. Their results, based on experiments, field data, and models (in Dutch ditches and Lake Kariba, Zimbabwe), represent evidence for

  4. Predator control promotes invasive dominated ecological states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Arian D; Johnson, Christopher N; Ritchie, Euan G; O'Neill, Adam J

    2010-08-01

    Invasive species are regarded as one of the top five drivers of the global extinction crisis. In response, extreme measures have been applied in an attempt to control or eradicate invasives, with little success overall. We tested the idea that state shifts to invasive dominance are symptomatic of losses in ecosystem resilience, due to the suppression of apex predators. This concept was investigated in Australia where the high rate of mammalian extinctions is largely attributed to the destructive influence of invasive species. Intensive pest control is widely applied across the continent, simultaneously eliminating Australia's apex predator, the dingo (Canis lupus dingo). We show that predator management accounts for shifts between two main ecosystem states. Lethal control fractures dingo social structure and leads to bottom-up driven increases in invasive mesopredators and herbivores. Where control is relaxed, dingoes re-establish top-down regulation of ecosystems, allowing for the recovery of biodiversity and productivity.

  5. Solid state thermal rectifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    None

    2016-07-05

    Thermal rectifiers using linear nanostructures as core thermal conductors have been fabricated. A high mass density material is added preferentially to one end of the nanostructures to produce an axially non-uniform mass distribution. The resulting nanoscale system conducts heat asymmetrically with greatest heat flow in the direction of decreasing mass density. Thermal rectification has been demonstrated for linear nanostructures that are electrical insulators, such as boron nitride nanotubes, and for nanostructures that are conductive, such as carbon nanotubes.

  6. State, power, and domination. An approach on its mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola García Reyes

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This article offers an approach to the interactions between State and social actors, based on the analysis of three cases in which opportunistic or violent actors were associated with policies to promote growing of palm oil in Colombia. We move away from other approaches which describe these interactions as cooptation and suggest they can be better understood as processes associated with the exercise of indirect domination by the State. To this end, we present an overall framework of analysis, review relevant policies, offer a description of the cases, and propose three mechanisms of indirect state domination: privateers, friends and Gullivers.

  7. Germany versus the United States: Monetary Dominance in the Eurozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chee-Heong Quah

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study inspects if there is greater convergence with Germany amongst the Eurozone founding members and if their relations with the hegemonic economy have been more symmetrical after “euroization”. The dimensions explored are those inspired by the optimum currency areas (OCA framework. To some extent, the findings could signify if real convergence has been significantly endogenous. At the same time, to assess the relative dominance of Germany, the features against Germany are compared to those against US. In addition, the paper also appraises some aspects of economic performance to check whether economic conditions across the states have improved and converged after unification. In some convergence aspects, findings suggest remarkable convergence with Germany and across the states but also relative convergence with US. On economic performance, results indicate substantial improvements in inflation and unemployment. Amongst the founding states, Ireland has idiosyncratically shown serious divergences in a number of the convergence and performance measures.

  8. State companies dominate non-U.S. OGJ100

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.J.; Thrash, L.A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on state owned oil and gas companies which dominate the OGJ100 list of major non U.S. holders of petroleum reserves. Many state companies report only production and reserves information and do not report financial data. Therefore, the companies cannot be ranked by financial data, as they are in the OGJ300. They instead are listed by region, based on location of companies' corporate headquarters. The top 20 companies in crude oil production and reserves are shown. The leading nongovernment company in both reserves and production is Royal Dutch/Shell Group - No. 11 in worldwide liquids reserves and No. 6 in liquids production. Crude oil reserves of the top 20 companies moved up less than 1% last year, increasing 401.5 billion bbl. The year before, when there were substantial reserves adjustments, the top 20 posted an increase of 139.3 billion bbl

  9. The Dominance of Indirect Taxes in Estonian State Budget

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olev Raju

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recession has sharply erected the question of tax burden and the optimal proportion of different kinds of taxes among the incomes of the budget. Indirect taxes and consumption taxes, which proportion is different according to different methodologies, dominate in Estonian state budget. The buoyancy of a tax system based on taxes of that kind is especially weak during the recession. Difficulties concerning the incomes of budget have arisen the necessity for lifting taxes, which is possible as the tax burden is low now. But a sharp question of the optimal level of taxes is going to be raised. A formula for indirect tax optimum according to Ramsey taxes and Slutski decomposition has been proposed in the article.

  10. Steady state plasma operation in RF dominated regimes on EAST

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X. J.; Zhao, Y. P.; Gong, X. Z.; Hu, C. D.; Liu, F. K.; Hu, L. Q.; Wan, B. N., E-mail: bnwan@ipp.ac.cn; Li, J. G. [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2015-12-10

    Significant progress has recently been made on EAST in the 2014 campaign, including the enhanced CW H&CD system over 20MW heating power (LHCD, ICRH and NBI), more than 70 diagnostics, ITER-like W-monoblock on upper divertor, two inner cryo-pumps and RMP coils, enabling EAST to investigate long pulse H mode operation with dominant electron heating and low torque to address the critical issues for ITER. H-mode plasmas were achieved by new H&CD system or 4.6GHz LHCD alone for the first time. Long pulse high performance H mode has been obtained by LHCD alone up to 28s at H{sub 98}∼1.2 or by combing of ICRH and LHCD, no or small ELM was found in RF plasmas, which is essential for steady state operation in the future Tokamak. Plasma operation in low collision regimes were implemented by new 4.6GHz LHCD with core Te∼4.5keV. The non-inductive scenarios with high performance at high bootstrap current fraction have been demonstrated in RF dominated regimes for long pulse operation. Near full non-inductive CD discharges have been achieved. In addition, effective heating and decoupling method under multi-transmitter for ICRF system were developed in this campaign, etc. EAST could be in operation with over 30MW CW heating and current drive power (LHCD ICRH NBI and ECRH), enhanced diagnostic capabilities and full actively-cooled metal wall from 2015. It will therefore allow to access new confinement regimes and to extend these regimes towards to steady state operation.

  11. Thermal Analysis of a Finite Element Model in a Radiation Dominated Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Arthur T.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a brief overview of thermal analysis, evaluating the University of Arizona mirror design, for the Next Generation Space Telescope (NGST) Pre-Phase A vehicle concept. Model building begins using Thermal Desktop(TM), by Cullimore and Ring Technologies, to import a NASTRAN bulk data file from the structural model of the mirror assembly. Using AutoCAD(R) capabilities, additional surfaces are added to simulate the thermal aspects of the problem which, for due reason, are not part of the structural model. Surfaces are then available to accept thermophysical and thermo-optical properties. Thermal Desktop(TM) calculates radiation conductors using Monte Carlo simulations. Then Thermal Desktop(TM) generates the SINDA input file having a one-to-one correspondence with the NASTRAN node and element definitions. A model is now available to evaluate the mirror design in the radiation dominated environment, conduct parametric trade studies of the thermal design, and provide temperatures to the finite element structural model.

  12. The diversity in thermal behavior of novel catanionic cholates: The dominant effect of quaternary ammonium centers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihelj, Tea; Vojta, Danijela; Tomašić, Vlasta

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quaternary ammonium cholates characterized as crystal smectics at room temperature. • The domination of quaternary ammonium center seen through diverse thermal behavior. • Thermal changes of cholates keto–enol balance results with prevalence of one form. • Polynomial regression of isotropisation temperatures vs. dodecyl chain number. • Linear descending trend of isotropisation temperatures with higher headgroup number. - Abstract: The thermal behavior of novel catanionic compounds based on cholate anion was examined. The study explains the effect of the raising dodecyl chain number, as well as of the raising headgroup number in quaternary ammonium salts on their physico-chemical properties. The examined samples are crystal smectic phases at room temperature. Their rich and diverse thermal behavior is seen through polymorphic phase transitions, thermotropic mesomorphism of smectic nature and in some cases, kinetically managed crystallization that lasts in days. The changes of the cholates keto–enol isomer balance during thermal treatment are obtained. For both groups of samples temperatures of isotropisation and the thermodynamic parameters follow polynomial regression. Introduction of the new dodecyl chain leads to more ordered structure, while implementation the new headgroup leads to advanced polymer-like structure. The obtained results demonstrate an effort for getting and controlling the regularity of the physico-chemical and thermotropic properties for new compounds by systematic changing of cationic part of the molecule. These informations could provide in the future the easiest way for selection of potentially new and targeted applicable materials

  13. The diversity in thermal behavior of novel catanionic cholates: The dominant effect of quaternary ammonium centers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihelj, Tea, E-mail: tmihelj@irb.hr [Department of Physical Chemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, POB 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Vojta, Danijela [Department of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, POB 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Tomašić, Vlasta [Department of Physical Chemistry, Ruđer Bošković Institute, POB 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia)

    2014-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Quaternary ammonium cholates characterized as crystal smectics at room temperature. • The domination of quaternary ammonium center seen through diverse thermal behavior. • Thermal changes of cholates keto–enol balance results with prevalence of one form. • Polynomial regression of isotropisation temperatures vs. dodecyl chain number. • Linear descending trend of isotropisation temperatures with higher headgroup number. - Abstract: The thermal behavior of novel catanionic compounds based on cholate anion was examined. The study explains the effect of the raising dodecyl chain number, as well as of the raising headgroup number in quaternary ammonium salts on their physico-chemical properties. The examined samples are crystal smectic phases at room temperature. Their rich and diverse thermal behavior is seen through polymorphic phase transitions, thermotropic mesomorphism of smectic nature and in some cases, kinetically managed crystallization that lasts in days. The changes of the cholates keto–enol isomer balance during thermal treatment are obtained. For both groups of samples temperatures of isotropisation and the thermodynamic parameters follow polynomial regression. Introduction of the new dodecyl chain leads to more ordered structure, while implementation the new headgroup leads to advanced polymer-like structure. The obtained results demonstrate an effort for getting and controlling the regularity of the physico-chemical and thermotropic properties for new compounds by systematic changing of cationic part of the molecule. These informations could provide in the future the easiest way for selection of potentially new and targeted applicable materials.

  14. Thermal states of anyonic systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iblisdir, S., E-mail: iblisdir@ecm.ub.e [Dpt. Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Universitat Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Perez-Garcia, D. [Dpt. Analisis Matematico, Universitad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Aguado, M. [Max Planck Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Garching D-85748 (Germany); Pachos, J. [School of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT (United Kingdom)

    2010-04-21

    A study of the thermal properties of two-dimensional topological lattice models is presented. This work is relevant to assess the usefulness of these systems as a quantum memory. For our purposes, we use the topological mutual information I{sub topo} as a 'topological order parameter'. For Abelian models, we show how I{sub topo} depends on the thermal topological charge probability distribution. More generally, we present a conjecture that I{sub topo} can (asymptotically) be written as a Kullback-Leitner distance between this probability distribution and that induced by the quantum dimensions of the model at hand. We also explain why I{sub topo} is more suitable for our purposes than the more familiar entanglement entropy S{sub topo}. A scaling law, encoding the interplay of volume and temperature effects, as well as different limit procedures, are derived in detail. A non-Abelian model is next analyzed and similar results are found. Finally, we also consider, in the case of a one-plaquette toric code, an environment model giving rise to a simulation of thermal effects in time.

  15. Stress responses during aerobic exercise in relation to motivational dominance and state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thatcher, Joanne; Kuroda, Yusuke; Legrand, Fabien D; Thatcher, Rhys

    2011-02-01

    We examined the hypothesis that congruence between motivational dominance and state results in optimal psychological responses and performance during exercise. Twenty participants (10 telic dominant and 10 paratelic dominant) rated their stress at 5 min intervals as they cycled on an ergometer at gas exchange threshold for 30 min in both telic and paratelic state manipulated conditions. Participants then performed a test to exhaustion at a resistance equivalent to 110% of VO(2max). The hypothesized interaction between condition and dominance was significant for internal tension stress, as paratelic dominants were more stressed than telic dominants when exercising in the telic state and telic dominants were more stressed than paratelic dominants when exercising in the paratelic state. Similarly, the condition × dominance interaction for internal stress discrepancy was significant, as paratelic dominants reported greater internal stress discrepancy exercising in the telic compared with the paratelic state. Findings are discussed in relation to the application of reversal theory for understanding stress responses during aerobic exercise.

  16. Thermal management of solid state lighting module

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.

    2014-01-01

    Solid-State Lighting (SSL), powered by Light-Emitting Diodes (LEDs), is an energy-efficient technology for lighting systems. In contrast to incandescent lights which obtain high efficiency at high temperatures, the highest efficiency of LEDs is reached at low temperatures. The thermal management in

  17. Thermal Wigner Operator in Coherent Thermal State Representation and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FAN HongYi

    2002-01-01

    In the coherent thermal state representation we introduce thermal Wigner operator and find that it is"squeezed" under the thermal transformation. The thermal Wigner operator provides us with a new direct and neatapproach for deriving Wigner functions of thermal states.

  18. Thermal Wigner Operator in Coherent Thermal State Representation and Its Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FANHong-Yi

    2002-01-01

    In the coherent thermal state representation we introduce thermal Wigner operator and find that it is “squeezed” under the thermal transformation.The thermal Wigner operator provides us with a new direct and neat approach for deriving Wigner functions of thermal states.

  19. Decomposition of thermal-equilibrium states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Lei

    2010-01-01

    It is shown that a thermal-equilibrium state can be decomposed into a tensor product of the operators in subspaces of single-particle energy. On the basis of this form, a straightforward derivation of the Fermi-Dirac and the Bose-Einstein distribution is performed. The derivation can be generalized for systems with weak interaction to obtain an approximate distribution in momentum.

  20. Entanglement properties of boundary state and thermalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Wu-zhong

    2018-06-01

    We discuss the regularized boundary state {e}^{-{τ}_0H}\\Big|{.B>}_a on two aspects in both 2D CFT and higher dimensional free field theory. One is its entanglement and correlation properties, which exhibit exponential decay in 2D CFT, the parameter 1 /τ 0 works as a mass scale. The other concerns with its time evolution, i.e., {e}^{-itH}{e}^{-{τ}_0H}\\Big|{.B>}_a . We investigate the Kubo-Martin-Schwinger (KMS) condition on correlation function of local operators to detect the thermal properties. Interestingly we find the correlation functions in the initial state {e}^{-{τ}_0H}\\Big|{.B>}_a also partially satisfy the KMS condition. In the limit t → ∞, the correlators will exactly satisfy the KMS condition. We generally analyse quantum quench by a pure state and obtain some constraints on the possible form of 2-point correlation function in the initial state if assuming they satisfies KMS condition in the final state. As a byproduct we find in an large τ 0 limit the thermal property of 2-point function in {e}^{-{τ}_0H}\\Big|{.B>}_a also appears.

  1. Local temperature in quantum thermal states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Saez, Artur; Ferraro, Alessandro; Acin, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    We consider blocks of quantum spins in a chain at thermal equilibrium, focusing on their properties from a thermodynamical perspective. In a classical system the temperature behaves as an intensive magnitude, above a certain block size, regardless of the actual value of the temperature itself. However, a deviation from this behavior is expected in quantum systems. In particular, we see that under some conditions the description of the blocks as thermal states with the same global temperature as the whole chain fails. We analyze this issue by employing the quantum fidelity as a figure of merit, singling out in detail the departure from the classical behavior. As it may be expected, we see that quantum features are more prominent at low temperatures and are affected by the presence of zero-temperature quantum phase transitions. Interestingly, we show that the blocks can be considered indeed as thermal states with a high fidelity, provided an effective local temperature is properly identified. Such a result may originate from typical properties of reduced subsystems of energy-constrained Hilbert spaces. Finally, the relation between local and global temperatures is analyzed as a function of the size of the blocks and the system parameters.

  2. The dominance of indirect taxes in Estonian state budget. Summary:Kaudsete maksude dominant Eesti riigieelarve tuludes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olev Raju

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Recession has sharply erected the question of tax burden and the optimal proportion of different kinds of taxes among the incomes of the budget. Indirect taxes and consumption taxes, which proportion is different according to different methodologies, dominate in Estonian state budget. The buoyancy of a tax system based on taxes of that kind is especially weak during the recession. The purpose of Estonian government’s economic policy during the highest peak of crisis was to keep the budget in balance. Instead of recovering economy the taxes were arisen and costs were reduced. The results of such a policy aren’t still clear. Difficulties concerning the incomes of budget have arisen the necessity for lifting taxes, which is possible as the tax burden is low now. But a sharp question of the optimal level of taxes is going to be raised. A formula for indirect tax optimum according to Ramsey taxes and Slutski decomposition has been proposed in the article

  3. Thermal state of a turbofan rotor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bileka, B D; Diachenko, A M; Orinichev, I S

    1988-01-01

    Results of an experimental study of the thermal state of a combined turbofan rotor consisting of a peripheral turbine stage and a central fan stage are reported. In particular, attention is given to the effect of gas temperature, air flow rate, and rotation speed on temperature distributions at characteristic points of the rotor. The relative dimensionless temperatures of the turbofan rotor are shown to be constant under all the regimes investigated. An approximate method is proposed for calculating the temperature of the rotor elements, and the results of calculations are compared with experimental data.

  4. On the Current Thermal State of Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grott, M.; Breuer, D.

    2008-09-01

    Introduction: The current thermal state of Mars is a fundamental unknown in Mars science. Although is has a huge influence on the planet's current geodynamic activity and controls the possibility for basal melting at the polar caps [1], constraints on this quantities are very scarce. This situation has lately been improved by the study of lithospheric deformation at the north polar cap [2] which constrained the current Martian elastic lithosphere thickness Te, an indirect measure of the temperatures in the planetary interior. Using radar sounding data obtained bySHARAD, the shallow radar onboard the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, [2] found that the current Martian lithosphere is extremely stiff and Te is larger than 300 km today. This is surprising as this value is almost twice as large as previously estimated from theoretical considerations and flexure studies [3][1]. In order to be consistent with the planets thermal evolution, [2] argue that the amount of radioactive elements in the Martian interior needs to be subchondritic. This appears to be problematic as geochemical analysis of the SNC meteorites implies higher concentrations of radioactive elements [4]. Furthermore, if the concentration of heat producing elements is indeed reduced, the resulting low interior temperatures will inhibit partial mantle melting and magmatism. However, geological evidence suggests that Mars has been volcanically active in the recent past [5]. In order to address these inconsistencies, we reinvestigate the thermal evolution of Mars and examine its current thermal state for a wide range of initial condition using the current elastic thickness Te and the potential for partial mantle melting to constrain our models. Modeling: We investigate the thermal evolution of Mars by solving the energy balance equations for the core and mantle, treating the mantle energy transport by parametrized convection models. This is done using scaling laws for stagnant lid convection and our model is

  5. 75 FR 52378 - International Product Change-United States Postal Service Inbound Market-Dominant Multi-Service...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... POSTAL SERVICE International Product Change--United States Postal Service Inbound Market-Dominant... Inbound Market-Dominant Multi- Service Agreements to the Market-Dominant Products List pursuant to 39 U.S... the Postal Regulatory Commission to Add Market-Dominant Multi-Service Agreements with Foreign Postal...

  6. Rethinking State Politics: The Withering of State Dominant Machines in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Borges

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Research on Brazilian federalism and state politics has focused mainly on the impact of federal arrangements on national political systems, whereas comparative analyses of the workings of state political institutions and patterns of political competition and decision-making have often been neglected. The article contributes to an emerging comparative literature on state politics by developing a typology that systematizes the variation in political competitiveness and the extent of state elites’ control over the electoral arena across Brazilian states. It relies on factor analysis to create an index of “electoral dominance”, comprised of a set of indicators of party and electoral competitiveness at the state level, which measures state elites’ capacity to control the state electoral arena over time. Based on this composite index and on available case-study evidence, the article applies the typological classificatory scheme to all 27 Brazilian states. Further, the article relies on the typological classification to assess the recent evolution of state-level political competitiveness. The empirical analysis demonstrates that state politics is becoming more competitive and fragmented, including in those states that have been characterized as bastions of oligarchism and political bossism. In view of these findings, the article argues that the power of state political machines rests on fragile foundations: in Brazil’s multiparty federalism, vertical competition between the federal and state governments in the provision of social policies works as a constraint on state bosses’ machine-building strategies. It is concluded that our previous views on state political dynamics are in serious need of re-evaluation.

  7. Finite Correlation Length Implies Efficient Preparation of Quantum Thermal States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Kastoryano, Michael J.

    2018-05-01

    Preparing quantum thermal states on a quantum computer is in general a difficult task. We provide a procedure to prepare a thermal state on a quantum computer with a logarithmic depth circuit of local quantum channels assuming that the thermal state correlations satisfy the following two properties: (i) the correlations between two regions are exponentially decaying in the distance between the regions, and (ii) the thermal state is an approximate Markov state for shielded regions. We require both properties to hold for the thermal state of the Hamiltonian on any induced subgraph of the original lattice. Assumption (ii) is satisfied for all commuting Gibbs states, while assumption (i) is satisfied for every model above a critical temperature. Both assumptions are satisfied in one spatial dimension. Moreover, both assumptions are expected to hold above the thermal phase transition for models without any topological order at finite temperature. As a building block, we show that exponential decay of correlation (for thermal states of Hamiltonians on all induced subgraphs) is sufficient to efficiently estimate the expectation value of a local observable. Our proof uses quantum belief propagation, a recent strengthening of strong sub-additivity, and naturally breaks down for states with topological order.

  8. Thermal microwave states acting on a superconducting qubit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetz, Jan; Mueting, Miriam; Haeberlein, Max; Wulschner, Friedrich; Fischer, Michael; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Xie, Edwar; Eder, Peter; Deppe, Frank; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, 85748 Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Schellingstrasse 4, 80799 Muenchen (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    We analyze the influence of broadband thermal states in the microwave regime on the coherence properties of a superconducting (transmon) qubit coupled to a transmission line resonator. We generate the thermal states inside the resonator by heating a 30 dB attenuator to emit blackbody radiation into a transmission line. In the absence of thermal fluctuations, the qubit coherence time is limited by relaxation. We find that the relaxation rate is almost unaffected by the presence of a thermal field inside the resonator. However, such states induce significant dephasing which increases quadratically with the number of thermal photons, whereas for a coherent population of the resonator, the increase shows a linear behavior. These results confirm the different photon statistics, being Poissonian for a coherent population and super-Poissonian for a thermal population of the resonator.

  9. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahi, A. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Duraschlag, H. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Elliott, D. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Hartsough, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Shukla, N. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States); Kosny, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems, Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulk insulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosed reflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  10. Internal Roof and Attic Thermal Radiation Control Retrofit Strategies for Cooling-Dominated Climates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallahi, A. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Durschlag, H. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Elliott, D. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Hartsough, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Shukla, N. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States); Kosny, J. [Fraunhofer Center for Sustainable Energy Systems (CSE), Boston, MA (United States)

    2013-12-01

    This project evaluates the cooling energy savings and cost effectiveness of radiation control retrofit strategies for residential attics in U.S. cooling-dominated climates. Usually, in residential applications, radiation control retrofit strategies are applied below the roof deck or on top of the attic floor insulation. They offer an alternative option to the addition of conventional bulkinsulation such as fiberglass or cellulose insulation. Radiation control is a potentially low-cost energy efficiency retrofit strategy that does not require significant changes to existing homes. In this project, two groups of low-cost radiation control strategies were evaluated for southern U.S. applications. One uses a radiant barrier composed of two aluminum foils combined with an enclosedreflective air space and the second uses spray-applied interior radiation control coatings (IRCC).

  11. First exploration of a single thermal interface between the two dominant phases of the interstellar medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gry, Cecile

    2017-08-01

    Two phases of the interstellar medium, the Warm Neutral Medium (WNM) and the Hot Ionized Medium (HIM) occupy most the volume of space in the plane of our Galaxy. Because the boundaries between these phases are important sources of energy loss for the hot gas, they are supposed to play an important role in the thermal structure and evolution of the ISM and of galaxies.Many theorists have created descriptions of the nature of such boundaries and have derived two fundamental concepts: (1) a conductive interface and (2) a turbulent mixing layer.We have yet to observe in detail either kind of boundary. This is achieved by using UV absorption lines of moderately high ionization stages of heavy elements. Yet, over most lines of sight the diagnostics are blurred out by the superposition of different regions with vastly different physical conditions, making them difficult to interpret. To characterize the nature of the physical processes at a boundary one must observe along a sight line that penetrates just one such region. The simplest configuration is the outer boundary of the Local Cloud, the WNM ((T 7000 K) that surrounds the Sun and which is embedded in a very low density, soft X-ray emitting hot medium ( 10^6 K) that fills a cavity ( 200 pc in diameter) called the Local Bubble.We propose to observe an ideal target: a nearby, bright B9V star (i.e. hot enough to provide a high-SNR continuum, but not enough to contaminate it with absorptions from circumstellar high-ionization species), located in a direction where the relative orientation of the magnetic field and the cloud boundary does not quench thermal conduction and thus favors a full extent of the interface.

  12. Microscale solid-state thermal diodes enabling ambient temperature thermal circuits for energy applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Song

    2017-05-10

    Thermal diodes, or devices that transport thermal energy asymmetrically, analogous to electrical diodes, hold promise for thermal energy harvesting and conservation, as well as for phononics or information processing. The junction of a phase change material and phase invariant material can form a thermal diode; however, there are limited constituent materials available for a given target temperature, particularly near ambient. In this work, we demonstrate that a micro and nanoporous polystyrene foam can house a paraffin-based phase change material, fused to PMMA, to produce mechanically robust, solid-state thermal diodes capable of ambient operation with Young\\'s moduli larger than 11.5 MPa and 55.2 MPa above and below the melting transition point, respectively. Moreover, the composites show significant changes in thermal conductivity above and below the melting point of the constituent paraffin and rectification that is well-described by our previous theory and the Maxwell–Eucken model. Maximum thermal rectifications range from 1.18 to 1.34. We show that such devices perform reliably enough to operate in thermal diode bridges, dynamic thermal circuits capable of transforming oscillating temperature inputs into single polarity temperature differences – analogous to an electrical diode bridge with widespread implications for transient thermal energy harvesting and conservation. Overall, our approach yields mechanically robust, solid-state thermal diodes capable of engineering design from a mathematical model of phase change and thermal transport, with implications for energy harvesting.

  13. Electrical Conductivity of Rocks and Dominant Charge Carriers. Part 1; Thermally Activated Positive Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freund, Friedemann T.; Freund, Minoru M.

    2012-01-01

    The prevailing view in the geophysics community is that the electrical conductivity structure of the Earth's continental crust over the 5-35 km depth range can best be understood by assuming the presence of intergranular fluids and/or of intragranular carbon films. Based on single crystal studies of melt-grown MgO, magma-derived sanidine and anorthosite feldspars and upper mantle olivine, we present evidence for the presence of electronic charge carriers, which derive from peroxy defects that are introduced during cooling, under non-equilibrium conditions, through a redox conversion of pairs of solute hydroxyl arising from dissolution of H2O.The peroxy defects become thermally activated in a 2-step process, leading to the release of defect electrons in the oxygen anion sublattice. Known as positive holes and symbolized by h(dot), these electronic charge carriers are highly mobile. Chemically equivalent to O(-) in a matrix of O(2-) they are highly oxidizing. Being metastable they can exist in the matrix of minerals, which crystallized in highly reduced environments. The h(dot) are highly mobile. They appear to control the electrical conductivity of crustal rocks in much of the 5-35 km depth range.

  14. High power solid state retrofit lamp thermal characterization and modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jakovenko, J.; Formánek, J.; Vladimír, J.; Husák, M.; Werkhoven, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Thermal and thermo-mechanical modeling and characterization of solid state lightening (SSL) retrofit LED Lamp are presented in this paper. Paramount Importance is to design SSL lamps for reliability, in which thermal and thermo-mechanical aspects are key points. The main goal is to get a precise 3D

  15. Thermal physics of gas-thermal coatings formation processes. State of investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fialko, N.M.; Prokopov, V.G.; Meranova, N.O.; Borisov, Yu.S.; Korzhik, V.N.; Sherenkovskaya, G.P.; AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev

    1993-01-01

    The analysis of state of investigations of gas-thermal coatings formation processes in presented. Classification of approaches to mathematical simulation of thermal phenomena studies is offered. The general characteristics of three main approaches to the analysis of heat transport processes is given. Some problems of mathematical simulation of single particle thermal interaction with solid surface are considered in details. The main physical assumptions are analysed

  16. Quantum corrections in thermal states of fermions on anti-de Sitter space-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambruş, Victor E.; Winstanley, Elizabeth

    2017-12-01

    We study the energy density and pressure of a relativistic thermal gas of massless fermions on four-dimensional Minkowski and anti-de Sitter space-times using relativistic kinetic theory. The corresponding quantum field theory quantities are given by components of the renormalized expectation value of the stress-energy tensor operator acting on a thermal state. On Minkowski space-time, the renormalized vacuum expectation value of the stress-energy tensor is by definition zero, while on anti-de Sitter space-time the vacuum contribution to this expectation value is in general nonzero. We compare the properties of the vacuum and thermal expectation values of the energy density and pressure for massless fermions and discuss the circumstances in which the thermal contribution dominates over the vacuum one.

  17. Multidimensional Welfare Comparisons of EU Member States Before, During, and After the Financial Crisis: A Dominance Approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, M. Azhar; Siersbæk, Nikolaj; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    How did the financial crisis affect population welfare in EU member states in key dimensions such as income, health, and education? Using EU-SILC data, we seek to answer this question by way of first order dominance comparisons between countries and over time. The novel feature of our study...... is that we perform welfare comparisons on the basis of multi-level multidimensional ordinal data. We nd that the countries most often dominated are southern and eastern European member states, and the dominant countries are mostly northern and western European member states. However, for most country...

  18. Local thermal equilibrium and KMS states in curved spacetime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solveen, Christoph

    2012-01-01

    On the example of a free massless and conformally coupled scalar field, it is argued that in quantum field theory in curved spacetimes with the time-like Killing field, the corresponding KMS states (generalized Gibbs ensembles) at parameter β > 0 need not possess a definite temperature in the sense of the zeroth law. In fact, these states, although passive in the sense of the second law, are not always in local thermal equilibrium (LTE). A criterion characterizing LTE states with sharp local temperature is discussed. Moreover, a proposal is made for fixing the renormalization freedom of composite fields which serve as ‘thermal observables’ and a new definition of the thermal energy of LTE states is introduced. Based on these results, a general relation between the local temperature and the parameter β is established for KMS states in (anti) de Sitter spacetime. (paper)

  19. Teleportation with Tripartite Entangled State via Thermal Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XUE Zheng-Yuan; YI You-Min; CAO Zhuo-Liang

    2006-01-01

    Teleportation schemes with a tripartite entangled state in cavity QED are investigated. The schemes do not need Bell state measurements and the successful probabilities reach optimality. In addition, the schemes are insensitive to both the cavity decay and the thermal field. We first consider two teleportation schemes via a tripartite GHZ state.The first one is a controlled one for an unknown single-qubit state. The second scheme is teleportation of unknown two-atom entangled state. Then we consider teleporting of single-qubit arbitrary state via a tripartite W state.

  20. Thermal entanglement and teleportation of a thermally mixed entangled state of a Heisenberg chain through a Werner state

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huang Li-Yuan; Fang Mao-Fa

    2008-01-01

    The thermal entanglement and teleportation of a thermally mixed entangled state of a two-qubit Heisenberg XXX chain under the Dzyaloshinski-Moriya (DM) anisotropic antisymmetric interaction through a noisy quantum channel given by a Werner state is investigated. The dependences of the thermal entanglement of the teleported state on the DM coupling constant, the temperature and the entanglement of the noisy quantum channel are studied in detail for both the ferromagnetic and the antiferromagnetic cases. The result shows that a minimum entanglement of the noisy quantum channel must be provided in order to realize the entanglement teleportation. The values of fidelity of the teleported state are also studied for these two cases. It is found that under certain conditions, we can transfer an initial state with a better fidelity than that for any classical communication protocol.

  1. Dynamic thermal analysis of machines in running state

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Lihui

    2014-01-01

    With the increasing complexity and dynamism in today’s machine design and development, more precise, robust and practical approaches and systems are needed to support machine design. Existing design methods treat the targeted machine as stationery. Analysis and simulation are mostly performed at the component level. Although there are some computer-aided engineering tools capable of motion analysis and vibration simulation etc., the machine itself is in the dry-run state. For effective machine design, understanding its thermal behaviours is crucial in achieving the desired performance in real situation. Dynamic Thermal Analysis of Machines in Running State presents a set of innovative solutions to dynamic thermal analysis of machines when they are put under actual working conditions. The objective is to better understand the thermal behaviours of a machine in real situation while at the design stage. The book has two major sections, with the first section presenting a broad-based review of the key areas of ...

  2. Role of collective effects in dominance of scattering off thermal ions over Langmuir wave decay: Analysis, simulations, and space applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-01-01

    Langmuir waves driven to high levels by beam instabilities are subject to nonlinear processes, including the closely related processes of scattering off thermal ions (STI) and a decay process in which the ion response is organized into a product ion acoustic wave. Calculations of the nonlinear growth rates predict that the decay process should always dominate STI, creating two paradoxes. The first is that three independent computer simulation studies show STI proceeding, with no evidence for the decay at all. The second is that observations in space of type III solar radio bursts and Earth's foreshock, which the simulations were intended to model, show evidence for the decay proceeding but no evidence for STI. Resolutions to these paradoxes follow from the realization that a nonlinear process cannot proceed when its growth rate exceeds the minimum frequency of the participating waves, since the required collective response cannot be maintained and the waves cannot respond appropriately, and that a significant number of e-foldings and wave periods must be contained in the time available. It is shown that application of these ''collective'' and ''time scale'' constraints to the simulations explains why the decay does not proceed in them, as well as why STI proceeds in specific simulations. This appears to be the first demonstration that collective constraints are important in understanding nonlinear phenomena. Furthermore, applying these constraints to space observations, it is predicted that the decay should proceed (and dominate STI) in type III sources and the high beam speed regions of Earth's foreshock for a specific range of wave levels, with a possible role for STI alone at slightly higher wave levels. Deeper in the foreshock, for slower beams and weaker wave levels, the decay and STI are predicted to become ineffective. Suggestions are given for future testing of the collective constraint and an explanation for why waves in space are usually much weaker than

  3. State-owned companies dominate list of largest non-U.S. producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.J.; Williamson, M.

    1994-01-01

    Because state-owned oil and gas companies dominate Oil and Gas Journal's list of largest non-US producers, data aren't fully comparable with those of the OGJ300. Many state companies report only production and reserves, with little or no financial data. Companies on the OGJ100, therefore, cannot be ranked by assets or revenues. Instead, they are listed by regions, based on location of corporate headquarters. There was no change in makeup of the top 20 holders of crude oil reserves. These companies' reserves totaled 872.3 billion bbl in 1993. The top 20 non-US companies now control 87.3 % of total world crude oil reserves, according to OGJ estimates. This is up marginally from 87.2 % of total world oil reserves in 1992. The top 20 had 87.7 % of total world reserves in 1991 and 85.5 % in 1990. The table lists company name, total assets, revenues, net income, capital and exploratory expenditures, worldwide oil production, gas production, oil and gas reserves worldwide

  4. Experimental Realization of a Thermal Squeezed State of Levitated Optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Muddassar; Tufarelli, Tommaso; Bateman, James; Vovrosh, Jamie; Hempston, David; Kim, M. S.; Ulbricht, Hendrik

    2016-12-01

    We experimentally squeeze the thermal motional state of an optically levitated nanosphere by fast switching between two trapping frequencies. The measured phase-space distribution of the center of mass of our particle shows the typical shape of a squeezed thermal state, from which we infer up to 2.7 dB of squeezing along one motional direction. In these experiments the average thermal occupancy is high and, even after squeezing, the motional state remains in the remit of classical statistical mechanics. Nevertheless, we argue that the manipulation scheme described here could be used to achieve squeezing in the quantum regime if preceded by cooling of the levitated mechanical oscillator. Additionally, a higher degree of squeezing could, in principle, be achieved by repeating the frequency-switching protocol multiple times.

  5. State companies dominate OGJ100 list of non-U.S. oil producers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1993-01-01

    State owned oil and gas companies dominate the OGJ100 list of non-U.S. producers. Because many of them report only operating information, companies on the worldwide list cannot be ranked by assets or revenues. The list, therefore, is organized regionally, based on location of companies' corporate headquarters. The leading nongovernment company in both reserves and production is Royal Dutch/Shell. It ranks sixth in the world in liquids production and 11th in liquids reserves, as it has for the past 2 years. British Petroleum is the next largest nongovernment company. BP ranks 11th in liquids production and 16th in liquids reserves. Elf Aquitaine, 55.8% government-controlled, ranked 17th in liquids production. AGIP was 20th in liquids production. Kuwait Petroleum returned to the list of top 20 producers, ranking 12th, as it restored production shut in by facilities damage sustained during the Persian Gulf crisis. New to the top 20 reserves list is Petroleo Brasileiro, which moved to 20th position. The top 20 companies in the OGJ100 held reserves estimated at 869.3 billion bbl in 1992 vs. 869.5 billion bbl in 1991 and 854.2 billion bbl in 1990

  6. Thermal Stir Welding: A New Solid State Welding Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, R. Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Thermal stir welding is a new welding process developed at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, AL. Thermal stir welding is similar to friction stir welding in that it joins similar or dissimilar materials without melting the parent material. However, unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the process are all independent of each other and are separately controlled. Furthermore, the heating element of the process can be either a solid-state process (such as a thermal blanket, induction type process, etc), or, a fusion process (YG laser, plasma torch, etc.) The separation of the heating, stirring, forging elements of the process allows more degrees of freedom for greater process control. This paper introduces the mechanics of the thermal stir welding process. In addition, weld mechanical property data is presented for selected alloys as well as metallurgical analysis.

  7. Role of collective effects in dominance of scattering off thermal ions over Langmuir wave decay: Analysis, simulations, and space applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cairns, Iver H.

    2000-12-01

    Langmuir waves driven to high levels by beam instabilities are subject to nonlinear processes, including the closely related processes of scattering off thermal ions (STI) and a decay process in which the ion response is organized into a product ion acoustic wave. Calculations of the nonlinear growth rates predict that the decay process should always dominate STI, creating two paradoxes. The first is that three independent computer simulation studies show STI proceeding, with no evidence for the decay at all. The second is that observations in space of type III solar radio bursts and Earth's foreshock, which the simulations were intended to model, show evidence for the decay proceeding but no evidence for STI. Resolutions to these paradoxes follow from the realization that a nonlinear process cannot proceed when its growth rate exceeds the minimum frequency of the participating waves, since the required collective response cannot be maintained and the waves cannot respond appropriately, and that a significant number of e-foldings and wave periods must be contained in the time available. It is shown that application of these ''collective'' and ''time scale'' constraints to the simulations explains why the decay does not proceed in them, as well as why STI proceeds in specific simulations. This appears to be the first demonstration that collective constraints are important in understanding nonlinear phenomena. Furthermore, applying these constraints to space observations, it is predicted that the decay should proceed (and dominate STI) in type III sources and the high beam speed regions of Earth's foreshock for a specific range of wave levels, with a possible role for STI alone at slightly higher wave levels. Deeper in the foreshock, for slower beams and weaker wave levels, the decay and STI are predicted to become ineffective. Suggestions are given for future testing of the collective constraint and an explanation

  8. Thermal state of the general time-dependent harmonic oscillator

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Taking advantage of dynamical invariant operator, we derived quantum mechanical solution of general time-dependent harmonic oscillator. The uncertainty relation of the system is always larger than ħ=2 not only in number but also in the thermal state as expected. We used the diagonal elements of density operator ...

  9. Thermalization dynamics in a quenched many-body state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Adam; Preiss, Philipp; Tai, Eric; Lukin, Alex; Rispoli, Matthew; Schittko, Robert; Greiner, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Quantum and classical many-body systems appear to have disparate behavior due to the different mechanisms that govern their evolution. The dynamics of a classical many-body system equilibrate to maximally entropic states and quickly re-thermalize when perturbed. The assumptions of ergodicity and unbiased configurations lead to a successful framework of describing classical systems by a sampling of thermal ensembles that are blind to the system's microscopic details. By contrast, an isolated quantum many-body system is governed by unitary evolution: the system retains memory of past dynamics and constant global entropy. However, even with differing characteristics, the long-term behavior for local observables in quenched, non-integrable quantum systems are often well described by the same thermal framework. We explore the onset of this convergence in a many-body system of bosonic atoms in an optical lattice. Our system's finite size allows us to verify full state purity and measure local observables. We observe rapid growth and saturation of the entanglement entropy with constant global purity. The combination of global purity and thermalized local observables agree with the Eigenstate Thermalization Hypothesis in the presence of a near-volume law in the entanglement entropy.

  10. Thermal insulation of high confinement mode with dominant electron heating in comparison to dominant ion heating and corresponding changes of torque input

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sommer, Fabian H.D.

    2013-01-01

    The ratio of heating power going to electrons and ions will undergo a transition from mixed electron and ion heating as it is in current fusion experiments to dominant electron heating in future experiments and reactors. In order to make valid projections towards future devices the connected changes in plasma response and performance are important to be study and understand: Do electron heated plasmas behave systematically different or is the change of heated species fully compensated by heat exchange from electrons to ions? How does particle transport influence the density profile? Is the energy confinement and the H-mode pedestal reduced with reduced torque input? Does the turbulent transport regime change fundamentally? The unique capabilities of the ECRH system at ASDEX Upgrade enable this change of heated species by replacing NBI with ECRH power and thereby offer the possibility to discuss these and other questions. For low heating powers corresponding to high collisionalities the transition from mixed electron and ion heating to pure electron heating showed next to no degradation of the global plasma parameters and no change of the edge values of kinetic profiles. The electron density shows an increased central peaking with increased ECRH power. The central electron temperature stays constant while the ion temperature decreases slightly. The toroidal rotation decreases with reduced NBI fraction, but does not influence the profile stability. The power balance analysis shows a large energy transfer from electrons to ions, so that the electron heat flux approaches zero at the edge whereas the ion heat flux is independent of heating mix. The ion heat diffusivity exceeds the electron one. For high power, low collisionality discharges global plasma parameters show a slight degradation with increasing electron heating. The density profile shows a strong peaking which remains unchanged when modifying the heating mix. The electron temperature profile is unchanged

  11. Design Considerations of a Solid State Thermal Energy Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janbozorgi, Mohammad; Houssainy, Sammy; Thacker, Ariana; Ip, Peggy; Ismail, Walid; Kavehpour, Pirouz

    2016-11-01

    With the growing governmental restrictions on carbon emission, renewable energies are becoming more prevalent. A reliable use of a renewable source however requires a built-in storage to overcome the inherent intermittent nature of the available energy. Thermal design of a solid state energy storage has been investigated for optimal performance. The impact of flow regime, laminar vs. turbulent, on the design and sizing of the system is also studied. The implications of low thermal conductivity of the storage material are discussed and a design that maximizes the round trip efficiency is presented. This study was supported by Award No. EPC-14-027 Granted by California Energy Commission (CEC).

  12. Effect of thermal state and thermal comfort on cycling performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Emiel; Daanen, Hein A M; Levels, Koen; Casadio, Julia R; Plews, Daniel J; Kilding, Andrew E; Siegel, Rodney; Laursen, Paul B

    2015-07-01

    To determine the effect of thermal state and thermal comfort on cycling performance in the heat. Seven well-trained male triathletes completed 3 performance trials consisting of 60 min cycling at a fixed rating of perceived exertion (14) followed immediately by a 20-km time trial in hot (30°C) and humid (80% relative humidity) conditions. In a randomized order, cyclists either drank ambient-temperature (30°C) fluid ad libitum during exercise (CON), drank ice slurry (-1°C) ad libitum during exercise (ICE), or precooled with iced towels and ice slurry ingestion (15 g/kg) before drinking ice slurry ad libitum during exercise (PC+ICE). Power output, rectal temperature, and ratings of thermal comfort were measured. Overall mean power output was possibly higher in ICE (+1.4%±1.8% [90% confidence limit]; 0.4> smallest worthwhile change [SWC]) and likely higher PC+ICE (+2.5%±1.9%; 1.5>SWC) than in CON; however, no substantial differences were shown between PC+ICE and ICE (unclear). Time-trial performance was likely enhanced in ICE compared with CON (+2.4%±2.7%; 1.4>SWC) and PC+ICE (+2.9%±3.2%; 1.9>SWC). Differences in mean rectal temperature during exercise were unclear between trials. Ratings of thermal comfort were likely and very likely lower during exercise in ICE and PC+ICE, respectively, than in CON. While PC+ICE had a stronger effect on mean power output compared with CON than ICE did, the ICE strategy enhanced late-stage time-trial performance the most. Findings suggest that thermal comfort may be as important as thermal state for maximizing performance in the heat.

  13. LDPE and PP thermal diffusivity in molten state

    OpenAIRE

    Yánez, G.; Rodríguez - Pérez, M. A; Almanza, O. A.

    2013-01-01

    Experimental results are reported for measuring the thermal diffusivity of two polymer species: low density polyethylene (LDPE) and polypropylene (PP). Measurements were taken in unsteady state heat flow conditions around the materials' melting temperature, using a device specially constructed for this purpose. The experimental results for the sample's temperature profile (temperature gradient product) were adjusted with the theoretical results obtained by solving the heat conduction equation...

  14. Phytoplankton abundance, dominance and coexistence in an eutrophic reservoir in the state of Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lira, Giulliari A S T; Araújo, Elcida L; Bittencourt-Oliveira, Maria Do Carmo; Moura, Ariadne N

    2011-12-01

    The present study reports the phytoplankton abundance, dominance and co-existence relationships in the eutrophic Carpina reservoir, Pernambuco, Brazil. Sampling was carried out at six different depths bimonthly at a single reservoir spanning two climatic periods: dry season (January, September, and November 2006) and rainy season (March, May, and July 2006). Density, abundance, dominance, specific diversity and equitability of the community were determined, along with chlorophyll a, and physical and chemical variables of the environment. Eight species were considered abundant, and their densities corresponded to more than 90% of the total phytoplankton community quantified. Cyanobacteria represented more than 80% of this density. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii was the only dominant taxon in the dry season, and was co-dominant in the rainy season. C. raciborskii, Planktothrix agardhii and Geitlerinema amphibium had the greatest densities and lowest vertical variation coefficients. The statistical analysis indicated relationships with vertical and seasonal variations in the phytoplankton community and the following variables: total dissolved solids, water temperature, electrical conductivity and pH. The changes in the environmental variables were discrete and regulated by the establishment of precipitation however, they were able to promote vertical and seasonal instability in the structure of the phytoplankton community.

  15. Dominant root locus in state estimator design for material flow processes: A case study of hot strip rolling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fišer, Jaromír; Zítek, Pavel; Skopec, Pavel; Knobloch, Jan; Vyhlídal, Tomáš

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the paper is to achieve a constrained estimation of process state variables using the anisochronic state observer tuned by the dominant root locus technique. The anisochronic state observer is based on the state-space time delay model of the process. Moreover the process model is identified not only as delayed but also as non-linear. This model is developed to describe a material flow process. The root locus technique combined with the magnitude optimum method is utilized to investigate the estimation process. Resulting dominant roots location serves as a measure of estimation process performance. The higher the dominant (natural) frequency in the leftmost position of the complex plane the more enhanced performance with good robustness is achieved. Also the model based observer control methodology for material flow processes is provided by means of the separation principle. For demonstration purposes, the computer-based anisochronic state observer is applied to the strip temperatures estimation in the hot strip finishing mill composed of seven stands. This application was the original motivation to the presented research. Copyright © 2017 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H3+ -dominated plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-01-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H 3 + -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77–200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H 3 + on a relative population of para-H 2 in a source H 2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H 3 + ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H 3 + ions in a specific nuclear spin state. (paper)

  17. Nuclear spin state-resolved cavity ring-down spectroscopy diagnostics of a low-temperature H_3^+ -dominated plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejduk, Michal; Dohnal, Petr; Varju, Jozef; Rubovič, Peter; Plašil, Radek; Glosík, Juraj

    2012-04-01

    We have applied a continuous-wave near-infrared cavity ring-down spectroscopy method to study the parameters of a H_3^+ -dominated plasma at temperatures in the range 77-200 K. We monitor populations of three rotational states of the ground vibrational state corresponding to para and ortho nuclear spin states in the discharge and the afterglow plasma in time and conclude that abundances of para and ortho states and rotational temperatures are well defined and stable. The non-trivial dependence of a relative population of para- H_3^+ on a relative population of para-H2 in a source H2 gas is described. The results described in this paper are valuable for studies of state-selective dissociative recombination of H_3^+ ions with electrons in the afterglow plasma and for the design of sources of H_3^+ ions in a specific nuclear spin state.

  18. Design for thermal sensation and comfort states in vehicles cabins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alahmer, Ali; Abdelhamid, Mahmoud; Omar, Mohammed

    2012-01-01

    This manuscript investigates the analysis and modeling of vehicular thermal comfort parameters using a set of designed experiments aided by thermography measurements. The experiments are conducted using a full size climatic chamber to host the test vehicle, to accurately assess the transient and steady state temperature distributions of the test vehicle cabin. Further investigate the thermal sensation (overall and local) and the human comfort states under artificially created relative humidity scenarios. The thermal images are calibrated through a thermocouples network, while the outside temperature and relative humidity are manipulated through the climatic environmental chamber with controlled soaking periods to guarantee the steady state conditions for each test scenario. The relative humidity inside the passenger cabin is controlled using a Total Humidity Controller (THC). The simulation uses the experimentally extracted boundary conditions via a 3-D Berkeley model that is set to be fully transient to account for the interactions in the velocity and temperature fields in the passenger compartment, which included interactions from turbulent flow, thermal buoyancy and the three modes of heat transfer conduction, convection and radiation. The model investigates the human comfort by analyzing the effect of the in-cabin relative humidity from two specific perspectives; firstly its effect on the body temporal variation of temperature within the cabin. Secondly, the Local Sensation (LS) and Comfort (LC) are analyzed for the different body segments in addition to the Overall Sensation (OS) and the Overall Comfort (OC). Furthermore, the human sensation is computed using the Fanger model in terms of the Predicted Mean Value (PMV) and the Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied (PPD) indices. The experimental and simulation results show that controlling the RH levels during the heating and the cooling processes (winter and summer conditions respectively) aid the A/C system to

  19. A modified gravitational search algorithm based on a non-dominated sorting genetic approach for hydro-thermal-wind economic emission dispatching

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fang; Zhou, Jianzhong; Wang, Chao; Li, Chunlong; Lu, Peng

    2017-01-01

    Wind power is a type of clean and renewable energy, and reasonable utilization of wind power is beneficial to environmental protection and economic development. Therefore, a short-term hydro-thermal-wind economic emission dispatching (SHTW-EED) problem is presented in this paper. The proposed problem aims to distribute the load among hydro, thermal and wind power units to simultaneously minimize economic cost and pollutant emission. To solve the SHTW-EED problem with complex constraints, a modified gravitational search algorithm based on the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm-III (MGSA-NSGA-III) is proposed. In the proposed MGSA-NSGA-III, a non-dominated sorting approach, reference-point based selection mechanism and chaotic mutation strategy are applied to improve the evolutionary process of the original gravitational search algorithm (GSA) and maintain the distribution diversity of Pareto optimal solutions. Moreover, a parallel computing strategy is introduced to improve the computational efficiency. Finally, the proposed MGSA-NSGA-III is applied to a typical hydro-thermal-wind system to verify its feasibility and effectiveness. The simulation results indicate that the proposed algorithm can obtain low economic cost and small pollutant emission when dealing with the SHTW-EED problem. - Highlights: • A hybrid algorithm is proposed to handle hydro-thermal-wind power dispatching. • Several improvement strategies are applied to the algorithm. • A parallel computing strategy is applied to improve computational efficiency. • Two cases are analyzed to verify the efficiency of the optimize mode.

  20. Steady State Thermal Analyses of SCEPTOR X-57 Wingtip Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnulo, Sydney L.; Chin, Jeffrey C.; Smith, Andrew D.; Dubois, Arthur

    2017-01-01

    Electric aircraft concepts enable advanced propulsion airframe integration approaches that promise increased efficiency as well as reduced emissions and noise. NASA's fully electric Maxwell X-57, developed under the SCEPTOR program, features distributed propulsion across a high aspect ratio wing. There are 14 propulsors in all: 12 high lift motor that are only active during take off and climb, and 2 larger motors positioned on the wingtips that operate over the entire mission. The power electronics involved in the wingtip propulsion are temperature sensitive and therefore require thermal management. This work focuses on the high and low fidelity heat transfer analysis methods performed to ensure that the wingtip motor inverters do not reach their temperature limits. It also explores different geometry configurations involved in the X-57 development and any thermal concerns. All analyses presented are performed at steady state under stressful operating conditions, therefore predicting temperatures which are considered the worst-case scenario to remain conservative.

  1. Phytoplankton abundance, dominance and coexistence in an eutrophic reservoir in the state of Pernambuco, Northeast Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulliari A. S. T. Lira

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports the phytoplankton abundance, dominance and co-existence relationships in the eutrophic Carpina reservoir, Pernambuco, Brazil. Sampling was carried out at six different depths bimonthly at a single reservoir spanning two climatic periods: dry season (January, September, and November 2006 and rainy season (March, May, and July 2006. Density, abundance, dominance, specific diversity and equitability of the community were determined, along with chlorophyll a, and physical and chemical variables of the environment. Eight species were considered abundant, and their densities corresponded to more than 90% of the total phytoplankton community quantified. Cyanobacteria represented more than 80% of this density. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii was the only dominant taxon in the dry season, and was co-dominant in the rainy season. C. raciborskii, Planktothrix agardhii and Geitlerinema amphibium had the greatest densities and lowest vertical variation coefficients. The statistical analysis indicated relationships with vertical and seasonal variations in the phytoplankton community and the following variables: total dissolved solids, water temperature, electrical conductivity and pH. The changes in the environmental variables were discrete and regulated by the establishment of precipitation however, they were able to promote vertical and seasonal instability in the structure of the phytoplankton community.O presente estudo remete às relações de abundância, dominância e co-existência fitoplanctônica no reservatório eutrófico de Carpina, Pernambuco, Brasil. Foram realizadas amostragens bimensalmente, em seis profundidades, em um único ponto do reservatório, contemplando dois períodos sazonais: seco (janeiro, setembro e novembro/2006 e chuvoso (março, maio e julho/2006. A densidade, abundância, dominância, diversidade específica e equitabilidade foram determinadas, além da clorofila a e algumas variáveis físicas e qu

  2. Stability of global entanglement in thermal states of spin chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brennen, Gavin K.; Bullock, Stephen S.

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the entanglement properties of a one-dimensional chain of qubits coupled via nearest-neighbor spin-spin interactions. The entanglement measure used is the n-concurrence, which is distinct from other measures on spin chains such as bipartite entanglement in that it can quantify 'global' entanglement across the spin chain. Specifically, it computes the overlap of a quantum state with its time-reversed state. As such, this measure is well suited to study ground states of spin-chain Hamiltonians that are intrinsically time-reversal-symmetric. We study the robustness of n-concurrence of ground states when the interaction is subject to a time-reversal antisymmetric magnetic field perturbation. The n-concurrence in the ground state of the isotropic XX model is computed and it is shown that there is a critical magnetic field strength at which the entanglement experiences a jump discontinuity from the maximum value to zero. The n-concurrence for thermal mixed states is derived and a threshold temperature is computed below which the system has nonzero entanglement

  3. Predictive control of thermal state of blast furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbasova, T. A.; Filimonova, A. A.

    2018-05-01

    The work describes the structure of the model for predictive control of the thermal state of a blast furnace. The proposed model contains the following input parameters: coke rate; theoretical combustion temperature, comprising: natural gas consumption, blasting temperature, humidity, oxygen, blast furnace cooling water; blast furnace gas utilization rate. The output parameter is the cast iron temperature. The results for determining the cast iron temperature were obtained following the identification using the Hammerstein-Wiener model. The result of solving the cast iron temperature stabilization problem was provided for the calculated values of process parameters of the target area of the respective blast furnace operation mode.

  4. Heat flow in vapor dominated areas of the Yellowstone Plateau volcanic field: implications for the thermal budget of the Yellowstone Caldera

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Shaul; Harris, Robert; Werner, Cynthia Anne; Murphy, Fred

    2012-01-01

    Characterizing the vigor of magmatic activity in Yellowstone requires knowledge of the mechanisms and rates of heat transport between magma and the ground surface. We present results from a heat flow study in two vapor dominated, acid-sulfate thermal areas in the Yellowstone Caldera, the 0.11 km2 Obsidian Pool Thermal Area (OPTA) and the 0.25 km2 Solfatara Plateau Thermal Area (SPTA). Conductive heat flux through a low permeability layer capping large vapor reservoirs is calculated from soil temperature measurements at >600 locations and from laboratory measurements of soil properties. The conductive heat output is 3.6 ± 0.4 MW and 7.5 ± 0.4 MW from the OPTA and the SPTA, respectively. The advective heat output from soils is 1.3 ± 0.3 MW and 1.2 ± 0.3 MW from the OPTA and the SPTA, respectively and the heat output from thermal pools in the OPTA is 6.8 ± 1.4 MW. These estimates result in a total heat output of 11.8 ± 1.4 MW and 8.8 ± 0.4 MW from OPTA and SPTA, respectively. Focused zones of high heat flux in both thermal areas are roughly aligned with regional faults suggesting that faults in both areas serve as conduits for the rising acid vapor. Extrapolation of the average heat flux from the OPTA (103 ± 2 W·m−2) and SPTA (35 ± 3 W·m−2) to the ~35 km2 of vapor dominated areas in Yellowstone yields 3.6 and 1.2 GW, respectively, which is less than the total heat output transported by steam from the Yellowstone Caldera as estimated by the chloride inventory method (4.0 to 8.0 GW).

  5. Quantum fields on manifolds: PCT and gravitationally induced thermal states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sewell, G.L.

    1982-01-01

    We formulate an axiomatic scheme, designed to provide a framework for a general, rigorous theory of relativistic quantum fields on a class of manifolds, that includes Kruskal's extension of Schwarzchild space-time, as well as Minkowski space-time. The scheme is an adaptation of Wightman's to this class of manifolds. We infer from it that, given an arbitrary field (in general, interacting) on a manifold X, the restriction of the field to a certain open submanifold X/sup( + ), whose boundaries are event horizons, satisfies the Kubo--Martin--Schwinger (KMS) thermal equilibrium conditions. This amounts to a rigorous, model-independent proof of a generalized Hawking--Unruh effect. Further, in cases where the field enjoys a certain PCT symmetry, the conjugation governing the KMS condition is just the PCT operator. The key to these results is an analogue, that we prove, of the Bisognano--Wichmann theorem [J. Math. Phys. 17, (1976), Theorem 1]. We also construct an alternative scheme by replacing a regularity condition at an event horizon by the assumption that the field in X/sup( + ) is in a ground, rather then a thermal, state. We show that, in this case, the observables in X/sup( + ) are uncorrelated to those in its causal complement, X/sup( - ), and thus that the event horizons act as physical barriers. Finally, we argue that the choice between the two schemes must be dictated by the prevailing conditions governing the state of the field

  6. Among other strategies of control and domination: state, agriculture and settlement in the nineteenth century Amazon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francivaldo Alves Nunes

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to analyze the relationship between the discourse built around agriculture and colonization, characterized by the moralization of society under the rule of the imperial state. Based on government reports and expeditions, we try to show how these values, associated with agricultural activity, required the State a performance not only to maintain order, but as institution promoting social politics that would elevate the habits of people in the Amazon. The understanding is that it was not a State which claimed only by using military forces, but took its authority to the interior of the provinces of Para and Amazonas by using a discourse of order promotion, modernity and civilization.

  7. Healthy lifestyle as contemporary dominant of state youth policy in Ukraine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. I. Khozhylo

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Article deals with actual issue of healthy lifestyle promotion as component of native state youth policy. The review of main legislative and regulatory legal acts on healthy lifestyle promotion of Ukraine is conducted. The main focus is on analysis of perspective regulatory legal acts that regulate activities on healthy lifestyle promotion and realization at the context of execution of international liabilities of Ukraine. Structure of program provision of international liabilities execution on healthy lifestyle promotion and realization in youth environment by Ukrainian state at the context of legal, organizational, financial and social mechanisms of public administration is thoroughly analyzed.

  8. Dominant male song performance reflects current immune state in a cooperatively breeding songbird

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    York, Jenny E.; Radford, Andrew N.; Groothuis, Ton G.; Young, Andrew J.

    Conspicuous displays are thought to have evolved as signals of individual quality, though precisely what they encode remains a focus of debate. While high quality signals may be produced by high quality individuals due to good genes or favourable early-life conditions, whether current immune state

  9. Thermal state of permafrost in North America: A contribution to the international polar year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S.L.; Romanovsky, V.E.; Lewkowicz, A.G.; Burn, C.R.; Allard, M.; Clow, G.D.; Yoshikawa, K.; Throop, J.

    2010-01-01

    A snapshot of the thermal state of permafrost in northern North America during the International Polar Year (IPY) was developed using ground temperature data collected from 350 boreholes. More than half these were established during IPY to enhance the network in sparsely monitored regions. The measurement sites span a diverse range of ecoclimatic and geological conditions across the continent and are at various elevations within the Cordillera. The ground temperatures within the discontinuous permafrost zone are generally above -3°C, and range down to -15°C in the continuous zone. Ground temperature envelopes vary according to substrate, with shallow depths of zero annual amplitude for peat and mineral soils, and much greater depths for bedrock. New monitoring sites in the mountains of southern and central Yukon suggest that permafrost may be limited in extent. In concert with regional air temperatures, permafrost has generally been warming across North America for the past several decades, as indicated by measurements from the western Arctic since the 1970s and from parts of eastern Canada since the early 1990s. The rates of ground warming have been variable, but are generally greater north of the treeline. Latent heat effects in the southern discontinuous zone dominate the permafrost thermal regime close to 0°C and allow permafrost to persist under a warming climate. Consequently, the spatial diversity of permafrost thermal conditions is decreasing over time.

  10. Dominant Indicators of Bank Crises: Comparative Analysis for States with Different Levels of Economic Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kozlov Vladislav I.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to identification of common and distinctive regularities of development of banking systems with different levels of development of economy through study of the most important macro-economic and financial indicators. The article uses instruments of the applied statistics. The study is based on comparison of mean values of indicators in two groups of countries (countries with a high level of income and countries with a medium level of income, each of which is divided into two sub-groups based on whether there was banking crisis in 2008 or not. In the result of the study the article shows that there are both common and distinctive features of development of banking systems of countries with different levels of economic development. Thus, a typical scenario, characteristic for countries with developed economy that had banking crisis in 2008, includes availability of a relatively large-scale crediting of the economy under conditions of relatively low rates of economic growth and close connections of the national banking systems with banking systems of other countries. Development of banking systems of developing countries during the pre-crisis period is characterised with the following specific features: relatively high rates of growth of scales of crediting of the economy and high rates of economic growth under conditions of use of significant volumes of resources, borrowed in financial markets, and close connection of the national banking systems with banking systems of other countries. The study allows a more efficient use of experience of states with developed economy, since the described results give a possibility to adjust experience of other states, taking into account characteristic features of banking systems of developing countries. Also the study identified states, experience of which should be studied. The conducted analysis of interrelations of indicators could be used for building models of assessment of

  11. Thermal Environment Evaluation in Commercial Kitchens of United States

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simone, Angela; Olesen, Bjarne W.

    The indoor climate in commercial kitchens is often unsatisfactory and the working conditions can have a significant effect on employees’ comfort and productivity. The differences between type (fast food, dining, etc.) and climatic zone can have an influence on the environment conditions and on th......The indoor climate in commercial kitchens is often unsatisfactory and the working conditions can have a significant effect on employees’ comfort and productivity. The differences between type (fast food, dining, etc.) and climatic zone can have an influence on the environment conditions...... of defining the values of thermal comfort parameters in kitchens. It can also help to evaluate if the standardized methods are applicable for such non-uniform environment, like commercial kitchens. By using an established method and procedure for evaluating the indoor thermal comfort in commercial kitchens...... more than 100 kitchens environments in the United States were investigated in summer and winter. Results show the influence due to type of kitchen (fast food, casual, etc.) and climatic region. Physical measurement confirmed that communally the workers are exposed to a warm or hot environment...

  12. Reversibility and two state behaviour in the thermal unfolding of oligomeric TIM barrel proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Romero, Sergio; Costas, Miguel; Rodríguez-Romero, Adela; Alejandro Fernández-Velasco, D

    2015-08-28

    Temperature is one of the main variables that modulate protein function and stability. Thermodynamic studies of oligomeric proteins, the dominant protein natural form, have been often hampered because irreversible aggregation and/or slow reactions are common. There are no reports on the reversible equilibrium thermal unfolding of proteins composed of (β/α)8 barrel subunits, albeit this "TIM barrel" topology is one of the most abundant and versatile in nature. We studied the eponymous TIM barrel, triosephosphate isomerase (TIM), belonging to five species of different bacterial taxa. All of them were found to be catalytically efficient dimers. The three-dimensional structure of four enzymes was solved at high/medium resolution. Irreversibility and kinetic control were observed in the thermal unfolding of two TIMs, while for the other three the thermal unfolding was found to follow a two-state equilibrium reversible process. Shifts in the global stability curves of these three proteins are related to the organismal temperature range of optimal growth and modulated by variations in maximum stability temperature and in the enthalpy change at that temperature. Reversibility appears to correlate with the low isoelectric point, the absence of a residual structure in the unfolded state, small cavity volume in the native state, low conformational stability and a low melting temperature. Furthermore, the strong coupling between dimer dissociation and monomer unfolding may reduce aggregation and favour reversibility. It is therefore very thought-provoking to find that a common topological ensemble, such as the TIM barrel, can unfold/refold in the Anfinsen way, i.e. without the help of the cellular machinery.

  13. Phases of capitalism, welfare states, medical dominance, and health care in Ontario.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, D

    1999-01-01

    There has been a lacuna in previous studies of medicine and health care of concepts or structures relating changes in health care with their contextualizing social structures. That is, there is a need to more adequately account for health care and social structure in terms of dynamic rather than static concepts. This article reports the application of a general schema outlining the transformation of capitalism through the phases of entrepreneurial, monopoly, and global capitalism, first presented by Ross and Trachte, to help understand both the changing role of medicine in Canada and the historical trajectory of the development of health insurance. These related events are shown to be partly reflective of the transformed class dynamic involved in a changing capitalist mode of production. The recent history of challenges to medicare in Canada as well as evidence of the declining power of medicine are both related directly and indirectly to the increased power of business and the decline in the relative autonomy of the state accompanying globalization. The application of the phases of capitalism sequence does roughly fit the Canadian instance although some modifications will be required to account for the specifics of the Canadian case. The schema also helps resolve two previously competing class arguments about the rise of health insurance in Canada.

  14. Aragonite saturation state in a tropical coastal embayment dominated by phytoplankton blooms (Guanabara Bay - Brazil).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotovicz, Luiz C; Knoppers, Bastiaan A; Brandini, Nilva; Poirier, Dominique; Costa Santos, Suzan J; Abril, Gwenaël

    2018-04-01

    The dynamics of the aragonite saturation state (Ω arag ) were investigated in the eutrophic coastal waters of Guanabara Bay (RJ-Brazil). Large phytoplankton blooms stimulated by a high nutrient enrichment promoted the production of organic matter with strong uptake of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) in surface waters, lowering the concentrations of dissolved carbon dioxide (CO 2aq ), and increasing the pH, Ω arag and carbonate ion (CO 3 2- ), especially during summer. The increase of Ω arag related to biological activity was also evident comparing the negative relationship between the Ω arag and the apparent utilization of oxygen (AOU), with a very close behavior between the slopes of the linear regression and the Redfield ratio. The lowest values of Ω arag were found at low-buffered waters in regions that receive direct discharges from domestic effluents and polluted rivers, with episodic evidences of corrosive waters (Ω arag <1). This study showed that the eutrophication controlled the variations of Ω arag in Guanabara Bay. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Thermal Conductivity of EB-PVD Thermal Barrier Coatings Evaluated by a Steady-State Laser Heat Flux Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dongming; Miller, Robert A.; Nagaraj, Ben A.; Bruce, Robert W.

    2000-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of electron beam-physical vapor deposited (EB-PVD) Zr02-8wt%Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings was determined by a steady-state heat flux laser technique. Thermal conductivity change kinetics of the EB-PVD ceramic coatings were also obtained in real time, at high temperatures, under the laser high heat flux, long term test conditions. The thermal conductivity increase due to micro-pore sintering and the decrease due to coating micro-delaminations in the EB-PVD coatings were evaluated for grooved and non-grooved EB-PVD coating systems under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions. The coating failure modes under the high heat flux test conditions were also investigated. The test technique provides a viable means for obtaining coating thermal conductivity data for use in design, development, and life prediction for engine applications.

  16. COOLOD, Steady-State Thermal Hydraulics of Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1997-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: The COOLOD-N2 code provides a capability for the analyses of the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of research reactors. This code is a revised version of the COOLOD-N code, and is applicable not only for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted, but also for research reactors in which rod-type fuel is adopted. In the code, subroutines to calculate temperature distribution in rod-type fuel have been newly added to the COOLOD-N code. The COOLOD-N2 code can calculate fuel temperatures under both forced convection cooling mode and natural convection cooling mode. A 'Heat Transfer package' is used for calculating heat transfer coefficient, DNB heat flux etc. The 'Heat Transfer package' is a subroutine program and is especially developed for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted. In case of rod-type fuel, DNB heat flux is calculated by both the 'Heat Transfer package' and Lund DNB heat flux correlation which is popular for TRIGA reactor. The COOLOD-N2 code also has a capability of calculating ONB temperature, the heat flux at onset of flow instability as well as DNB heat flux. 2 - Method of solution: The 'Heat Transfer Package' is a subprogram for calculating heat transfer coefficients, ONB temperature, heat flux at onset of flow instability and DNB heat flux. The 'Heat transfer package' was especially developed for research reactors which are operated under low pressure and low temperature conditions using plate-type fuel, just like the JRR-3M. Heat transfer correlations adopted in the 'Heat Transfer Package' were obtained or estimated based on the heat transfer experiments in which thermal-hydraulic features of the upgraded JRR-3 core were properly reflected. The 'Heat Transfer Package' is applicable to upward and downward flow

  17. A mechanistic model to study the thermal ecology of a southeastern pacific dominant intertidal mussel and implications for climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finke, G R; Bozinovic, F; Navarrete, S A

    2009-01-01

    Developing mechanistic models to predict an organism's body temperature facilitates the study of physiological stresses caused by extreme climatic conditions the species might have faced in the past or making predictions about changes to come in the near future. Because the models combine empirical observation of different climatic variables with essential morphological attributes of the species, it is possible to examine specific aspects of predicted climatic changes. Here, we develop a model for the competitively dominant intertidal mussel Perumytilus purpuratus that estimates body temperature on the basis of meteorological and tidal data with an average difference (+/-SE) of 0.410 degrees +/- 0.0315 degrees C in comparison with a field-deployed temperature logger. Modeled body temperatures of P. purpuratus in central Chile regularly exceeded 30 degrees C in summer months, and values as high as 38 degrees C were found. These results suggest that the temperatures reached by mussels in the intertidal zone in central Chile are not sufficiently high to induce significant mortality on adults of this species; however, because body temperatures >40 degrees C can be lethal for this species, sublethal effects on physiological performance warrant further investigation. Body temperatures of mussels increased sigmoidally with increasing tidal height. Body temperatures of individuals from approximately 70% of the tidal range leveled off and did not increase any further with increasing tidal height. Finally, body size played an important role in determining body temperature. A hypothetical 5-cm-long mussel (only 1 cm longer than mussels found in nature) did reach potentially lethal body temperatures, suggesting that the biophysical environment may play a role in limiting the size of this small species.

  18. Microscale solid-state thermal diodes enabling ambient temperature thermal circuits for energy applications

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Song; Cottrill, Anton L.; Kunai, Yuichiro; Toland, Aubrey R.; Liu, Pingwei; Wang, Wen-Jun; Strano, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    rectifications range from 1.18 to 1.34. We show that such devices perform reliably enough to operate in thermal diode bridges, dynamic thermal circuits capable of transforming oscillating temperature inputs into single polarity temperature differences – analogous

  19. Quantum-teleportation benchmarks for independent and identically distributed spin states and displaced thermal states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guta, Madalin; Bowles, Peter; Adesso, Gerardo

    2010-01-01

    A successful state-transfer (or teleportation) experiment must perform better than the benchmark set by the 'best' measure and prepare procedure. We consider the benchmark problem for the following families of states: (i) displaced thermal equilibrium states of a given temperature; (ii) independent identically prepared qubits with a completely unknown state. For the first family we show that the optimal procedure is heterodyne measurement followed by the preparation of a coherent state. This procedure was known to be optimal for coherent states and for squeezed states with the 'overlap fidelity' as the figure of merit. Here, we prove its optimality with respect to the trace norm distance and supremum risk. For the second problem we consider n independent and identically distributed (i.i.d.) spin-(1/2) systems in an arbitrary unknown state ρ and look for the measurement-preparation pair (M n ,P n ) for which the reconstructed state ω n :=P n circle M n (ρ xn ) is as close as possible to the input state (i.e., parallel ω n -ρ xn parallel 1 is small). The figure of merit is based on the trace norm distance between the input and output states. We show that asymptotically with n this problem is equivalent to the first one. The proof and construction of (M n ,P n ) uses the theory of local asymptotic normality developed for state estimation which shows that i.i.d. quantum models can be approximated in a strong sense by quantum Gaussian models. The measurement part is identical to 'optimal estimation', showing that 'benchmarking' and estimation are closely related problems in the asymptotic set up.

  20. Thermal degradation of polyoxymethylene produced by solid-state polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pearson, A.W.N.; Groves, G.W.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal degradation of polyoxymethylene produced by the solid-state polymerization of trioxane crystals was studied. Changes in small-angle and wide-angle x-ray patterns, weight loss, and density were measured in specimens heated in air at 175, 185, and 195 0 C. The polyoxymethylene contained materials in two different crystallographic orientations which behaved differently. Material in the so-called ''twin'' orientation melted preferentially at 185 and 195 0 C, and at 185 0 C resolidified on cooling in parallel to the main orientation, in a lamellar structure. At 195 0 C, randomly oriented material was produced on resolidification. At 175 0 C, there was no evidence of melting or the formation of a lamellar structure, but the twin material was preferentially degraded so that only material in the main orientation remained after a time of 1500 min. The more rapid loss by degradation of the twin material was attributed to its having a lower molecular weight than the material in the main orientation

  1. Thermal State-of-Charge in Solar Heat Receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Carsie, A., III; Glakpe, Emmanuel K.; Cannon, Joseph N.; Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1998-01-01

    A theoretical framework is developed to determine the so-called thermal state-of-charge (SOC) in solar heat receivers employing encapsulated phase change materials (PCMS) that undergo cyclic melting and freezing. The present problem is relevant to space solar dynamic power systems that would typically operate in low-Earth-orbit (LEO). The solar heat receiver is integrated into a closed-cycle Brayton engine that produces electric power during sunlight and eclipse periods of the orbit cycle. The concepts of available power and virtual source temperature, both on a finite-time basis, are used as the basis for determining the SOC. Analytic expressions for the available power crossing the aperture plane of the receiver, available power stored in the receiver, and available power delivered to the working fluid are derived, all of which are related to the SOC through measurable parameters. Lower and upper bounds on the SOC are proposed in order to delineate absolute limiting cases for a range of input parameters (orbital, geometric, etc.). SOC characterization is also performed in the subcooled, two-phase, and superheat regimes. Finally, a previously-developed physical and numerical model of the solar heat receiver component of NASA Lewis Research Center's Ground Test Demonstration (GTD) system is used in order to predict the SOC as a function of measurable parameters.

  2. Tendency to occupy a statistically dominant spatial state of the flow as a driving force for turbulent transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekmarev, Sergei F

    2013-03-01

    The transition from laminar to turbulent fluid motion occurring at large Reynolds numbers is generally associated with the instability of the laminar flow. On the other hand, since the turbulent flow characteristically appears in the form of spatially localized structures (e.g., eddies) filling the flow field, a tendency to occupy such a structured state of the flow cannot be ruled out as a driving force for turbulent transition. To examine this possibility, we propose a simple analytical model that treats the flow as a collection of localized spatial structures, each of which consists of elementary cells in which the behavior of the particles (atoms or molecules) is uncorrelated. This allows us to introduce the Reynolds number, associating it with the ratio between the total phase volume for the system and that for the elementary cell. Using the principle of maximum entropy to calculate the most probable size distribution of the localized structures, we show that as the Reynolds number increases, the elementary cells group into the localized structures, which successfully explains turbulent transition and some other general properties of turbulent flows. An important feature of the present model is that a bridge between the spatial-statistical description of the flow and hydrodynamic equations is established. We show that the basic assumptions underlying the model, i.e., that the particles are indistinguishable and elementary volumes of phase space exist in which the state of the particles is uncertain, are involved in the derivation of the Navier-Stokes equation. Taking into account that the model captures essential features of turbulent flows, this suggests that the driving force for the turbulent transition is basically the same as in the present model, i.e., the tendency of the system to occupy a statistically dominant state plays a key role. The instability of the flow at high Reynolds numbers can then be a mechanism to initiate structural rearrangement of

  3. Teleportation of an Arbitrary Two-Atom Entangled State via Thermal Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Dong; LIU Yi-Min; GAO Gan; SHI Shou-Hua; ZHANG Zhan-Jun

    2007-01-01

    We present an experimentally feasible scheme for teleportation of an arbitrary unknown two-atom entangled state by using two-atom Bell states in driven thermal cavities.In this scheme,the effects of thermal field and cavity decay can be all eliminated.Moreover,the present scheme is feasible according to current technologies.

  4. Thermal history, thermal state, and related tectonism of a moon of fission origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Binder, A.B.; Lange, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal history of an initially totally molten moon of fission origin properly accounts for (1) the mare basalt epoch, in terms of its duration, the depth of the source region, and degrees of partial melting which produced the magmas; (2) the present-day heat flow of 17--18 ergs cm -2 s -1 ; and (3) the current high temperatures of the lower mantle as deduced from magnetic and seismic data. The model moon has a radius decrease of 5.4 km (3.1 x 10 -3 R) during lunar history. This value is within the rather poorly defined limits for the maximum change of the lunar radius of 10 -3 -10 -2 R. The majority of the thermoelastic stresses produced by the cooling of the moon have been dissipated via aseismic creep in the upper parts of the lunar mantle, not via faulting activity. A lower limit of 10 24 P for the viscosity of the mantle of the moon (at subsolidus temperatures) is suggested, based on the apparent absence of solid state convection in the moon at any time during its history. This is 10 3 times larger than that for the terrestrial mantle. The energy derived from the thermoelastic stresses in the type A moonquake zone is orders of magnitude smaller than the available tidal energy. Hence the thermoelastic stresses are not an important energy source for the tidal moon-quakes. The thermoelastic stresses can easily supply the energy for the high-frequency tele-seismic moonquakes. The relative rarity of HFT's is explained by the long times (10 8 -10 9 years) needed to accumulate the energy required to initiate faulting in the predicted source regions. These regions are in the uppermost mantle (depths between 80 and 200 km), where tensional quakes can occur, and at 10-km depths in the crust, where compressional quakes can occur. The consistency between our thermal history model results and the corresponding characteristics now known for the moon add further support for the fission model for the origin of the moon

  5. Parametrisation of the niobium thermal conductivity in the superconducting state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koechlin, F.; Bonin, B.

    1996-01-01

    Thermal conductivity measurements of niobium sheets manufactured for deep-drawing of superconducting cavities have been gathered. Due to various histories of the niobium samples and a wide range of metal purities (35< RRR<1750) the data offer a large scatter of thermal conductivities. An attempt is made to obtain an analytical expression with realistic parameters for the thermal conductivity between 1.8 K and 9.25 K. The set of parameters deduced from a least square fit of experimental data is not very different from those yielded by the theory of superconducting metals, taken as a starting point. This should make possible to obtain a reasonable guess of the thermal conductivity of niobium in this temperature range, once the RRR and the past history of the metal samples have been determined. (author)

  6. LANSCE steady state unperturbed thermal neutron fluxes at 100 μA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, G.J.

    1989-01-01

    The ''maximum'' unperturbed, steady state thermal neutron flux for LANSCE is calculated to be 2 /times/ 10 13 n/cm 2 -s for 100 μA of 800-MeV protons. This LANSCE neutron flux is a comparable entity to a steady state reactor thermal neutron flux. LANSCE perturbed steady state thermal neutron fluxes have also been calculated. Because LANSCE is a pulsed neutron source, much higher ''peak'' (in time) neutron fluxes can be generated than at a steady state reactor source. 5 refs., 5 figs

  7. Nonclassical thermal-state superpositions: Analytical evolution law and decoherence behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xiang-guo; Goan, Hsi-Sheng; Wang, Ji-suo; Zhang, Ran

    2018-03-01

    Employing the integration technique within normal products of bosonic operators, we present normal product representations of thermal-state superpositions and investigate their nonclassical features, such as quadrature squeezing, sub-Poissonian distribution, and partial negativity of the Wigner function. We also analytically and numerically investigate their evolution law and decoherence characteristics in an amplitude-decay model via the variations of the probability distributions and the negative volumes of Wigner functions in phase space. The results indicate that the evolution formulas of two thermal component states for amplitude decay can be viewed as the same integral form as a displaced thermal state ρ(V , d) , but governed by the combined action of photon loss and thermal noise. In addition, the larger values of the displacement d and noise V lead to faster decoherence for thermal-state superpositions.

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF CAPITALISM AND OF STATE IN PORTUGAL: PASSAGE OF ECONOMIC AND FINANCIAL GROUPS DOMINATED BY THE PORTUGUESE CAPITAL FOR GROUPS DOMINATED BY MULTINATIONAL CAPITAL, AND OF A PROTECTOR STATE FOR A SUBSERVIENT STATE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénio Rosa

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the capitalism characteristics in the Portuguese social formation, considering economic groups in Portugal before and after of April 25. Detailing the characteristics of these economic groups, the author concludes that the principal shareholders of most economic and financial groups operating in Portugal, are transnational groups, some companies belonging to foreign States and other large economic and financial groups operating on a global scale. Accordingly, the State role, given the fragility towards these groups, is of simple server and executor of policies dictated by these groups directly or, indirectly by international organizations that represent and defend their interests, like the IMF, the Commission European, the World Bank, even the OECD, etc. Argues that given the growing globalization and increased threats of all kinds, one needs in Portugal is a strong State that defend the national sovereignty, able of promote the growth and sustained development of the country, and to defend the Portuguese of threats and constant attacks to a life with a minimum of human dignity.

  9. Thermal Destruction of Riboflavin in Different Aggregate States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astanov, S.; Sharipov, M. Z.; Faizullaev, A. R.; Kurtaliev, E. N.; Nizomov, N.

    2014-03-01

    The influence of temperature on the spectroscopic properties of powders and aqueous solutions of riboflavin was studied using NMR, linear dichroism, IR and UV absorption spectroscopy, and luminescence. It was found that exposure of riboflavin powders over a wide temperature range (290-423 K) did not change significantly its properties and spectral characteristics. The absorbance and fluorescence of aqueous solutions of riboflavin decreased under the same conditions due to riboflavin thermal destruction. The fraction of destroyed molecules in aqueous solutions of riboflavin was in the range 4-28% and depended on the drug concentration and thermal conditions.

  10. [The physiological classification of human thermal states under high environmental temperatures].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrov, A F; Kuznets, E I

    1995-01-01

    The paper deals with the physiological classification of human thermal states in a hot environment. A review of the basic systems of classifications of thermal states is given, their main drawbacks are discussed. On the basis of human functional state research in a broad range of environmental temperatures the system of evaluation and classification of human thermal states is proposed. New integral one-dimensional multi-parametric criteria for evaluation are used. For the development of these criteria methods of factor, cluster and canonical correlation analyses are applied. Stochastic nomograms capable of identification of human thermal state for different intensity of influence are given. In this case evaluation of intensity is estimated according to one-dimensional criteria taking into account environmental temperature, physical load and time of man's staying in overheating conditions.

  11. Thermal equation of state for lattice Boltzmann gases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zheng, Ran

    2009-01-01

    The Galilean invariance and the induced thermo-hydrodynamics of the lattice Boltzmann Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook model are proposed together with their rigorous theoretical background. From the viewpoint of group invariance, recovering the Galilean invariance for the isothermal lattice Boltzmann Bhatnagar–Gross–Krook equation (LBGKE) induces a new natural thermal-dynamical system, which is compatible with the elementary statistical thermodynamics

  12. A synthesis of the basal thermal state of the Greenland Ice Sheet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Fahnestock, Mark A; Catania, Ginny A; Aschwanden, Andy; Clow, Gary D; Colgan, William T; Gogineni, S Prasad; Morlighem, Mathieu; Nowicki, Sophie M J; Paden, John D; Price, Stephen F; Seroussi, Hélène

    2016-08-10

    The basal thermal state of an ice sheet (frozen or thawed) is an important control upon its evolution, dynamics and response to external forcings. However, this state can only be observed directly within sparse boreholes or inferred conclusively from the presence of subglacial lakes. Here we synthesize spatially extensive inferences of the basal thermal state of the Greenland Ice Sheet to better constrain this state. Existing inferences include outputs from the eight thermomechanical ice-flow models included in the SeaRISE effort. New remote-sensing inferences of the basal thermal state are derived from Holocene radiostratigraphy, modern surface velocity and MODIS imagery. Both thermomechanical modeling and remote inferences generally agree that the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream and large portions of the southwestern ice-drainage systems are thawed at the bed, whereas the bed beneath the central ice divides, particularly their west-facing slopes, is frozen. Elsewhere, there is poor agreement regarding the basal thermal state. Both models and remote inferences rarely represent the borehole-observed basal thermal state accurately near NorthGRIP and DYE-3. This synthesis identifies a large portion of the Greenland Ice Sheet (about one third by area) where additional observations would most improve knowledge of its overall basal thermal state.

  13. A synthesis of the basal thermal state of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacGregor, Joseph A; Fahnestock, Mark A; Catania, Ginny A; Aschwanden, Andy; Clow, Gary D.; Colgan, William T.; Gogineni, Prasad S.; Morlighem, Mathieu; Nowicki, Sophie M .J.; Paden, John D; Price, Stephen F.; Seroussi, Helene

    2016-01-01

    The basal thermal state of an ice sheet (frozen or thawed) is an important control upon its evolution, dynamics and response to external forcings. However, this state can only be observed directly within sparse boreholes or inferred conclusively from the presence of subglacial lakes. Here we synthesize spatially extensive inferences of the basal thermal state of the Greenland Ice Sheet to better constrain this state. Existing inferences include outputs from the eight thermomechanical ice-flow models included in the SeaRISE effort. New remote-sensing inferences of the basal thermal state are derived from Holocene radiostratigraphy, modern surface velocity and MODIS imagery. Both thermomechanical modeling and remote inferences generally agree that the Northeast Greenland Ice Stream and large portions of the southwestern ice-drainage systems are thawed at the bed, whereas the bed beneath the central ice divides, particularly their west-facing slopes, is frozen. Elsewhere, there is poor agreement regarding the basal thermal state. Both models and remote inferences rarely represent the borehole-observed basal thermal state accurately near NorthGRIP and DYE-3. This synthesis identifies a large portion of the Greenland Ice Sheet (about one third by area) where additional observations would most improve knowledge of its overall basal thermal state.

  14. State of the art of thermal-hydraulics of BWRs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rouhani, Z.

    1980-10-01

    The present report is a summary review of the developments in the field of thermal-hydraulics of Boiling Water Reactors. It covers briefly the development of BWR systems, including some comparison of the main features of the modern BWRs that are marketed by different vendors. The analytical aspects of BWR are also covered briefly with some remarks on the problem areas and limitations in this field. (author)

  15. Radiation dominated relativistic current sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaroschek, C.H.

    2008-01-01

    Relativistic Current Sheets (RCS) feature plasma instabilities considered as potential key to magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation in Poynting flux dominated plasma flows. We show in a series of kinetic plasma simulations that the physical nature of non-linear RCS evolution changes in the presence of incoherent radiation losses: In the ultra-relativistic regime (i.e. magnetization parameter sigma = 104 defined as the ratio of magnetic to plasma rest frame energy density) the combination of non-linear RCS dynamics and synchrotron emission introduces a temperature anisotropy triggering the growth of the Relativistic Tearing Mode (RTM). As direct consequence the RTM prevails over the Relativistic Drift Kink (RDK) Mode as competitive RCS instability. This is in contrast to the previously studied situation of weakly relativistic RCS (sigma ∼ 1) where the RDK is dominant and most of the plasma is thermalized. The simulations witness the typical life cycle of ultra-relativistic RCS evolving from a violent radiation induced collapse towards a radiation quiescent state in rather classical Sweet-Parker topology. Such a transition towards Sweet-Parker configuration in the late non-linear evolution has immediate consequences for the efficiency of magnetic energy dissipation and non-thermal particle generation. Ceasing dissipation rates directly affect our present understanding of non-linear RCS evolution in conventional striped wind scenarios. (author)

  16. Bounds on the entanglement attainable from unitary transformed thermal states in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Terri M.; Brown, Kenneth R.; Chuang, Isaac L.

    2005-01-01

    The role of mixed-state entanglement in liquid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) quantum computation is not yet well understood. In particular, despite the success of quantum-information processing with NMR, recent work has shown that quantum states used in most of those experiments were not entangled. This is because these states, derived by unitary transforms from the thermal equilibrium state, were too close to the maximally mixed state. We are thus motivated to determine whether a given NMR state is entanglable - that is, does there exist a unitary transform that entangles the state? The boundary between entanglable and nonentanglable thermal states is a function of the spin system size N and its temperature T. We provide bounds on the location of this boundary using analytical and numerical methods; our tightest bound scales as N∼T, giving a lower bound requiring at least N∼22 000 proton spins to realize an entanglable thermal state at typical laboratory NMR magnetic fields. These bounds are tighter than known bounds on the entanglability of effective pure states

  17. Phason thermal transport of three-helix state in insulating chiral magnets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatara, Gen

    2018-06-01

    Thermal dynamics of the three-helix state in a chiral magnet is studied based on a phason representation. Although phason representation is convenient for intuitive description, it is not straightforwardly compatible with microscopic linear response calculation of transport phenomena, because it is a (semi)macroscopic picture obtained by a coarse graining. By separating the slow phason mode and fast magnon mode, we show that phason thermal dynamics is driven by thermal magnon flow via the spin-transfer effect. The magnon and phason velocities are calculated by use of thermal vector potential formalism.

  18. Thermality and excited state Rényi entropy in two-dimensional CFT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Feng-Li [Department of Physics, National Taiwan Normal University,Taipei 11677, Taiwan (China); Wang, Huajia [Department of Physics, University of Illinois,Urbana-Champaign, IL 61801 (United States); Zhang, Jia-ju [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano-Bicocca,Piazza della Scienza 3, I-20126 Milano (Italy); Theoretical Physics Division, Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences,19B Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049 (China); Theoretical Physics Center for Science Facilities, Chinese Academy of Sciences,19B Yuquan Rd, Beijing 100049 (China)

    2016-11-21

    We evaluate one-interval Rényi entropy and entanglement entropy for the excited states of two-dimensional conformal field theory (CFT) on a cylinder, and examine their differences from the ones for the thermal state. We assume the interval to be short so that we can use operator product expansion (OPE) of twist operators to calculate Rényi entropy in terms of sum of one-point functions of OPE blocks. We find that the entanglement entropy for highly excited state and thermal state behave the same way after appropriate identification of the conformal weight of the state with the temperature. However, there exists no such universal identification for the Rényi entropy in the short-interval expansion. Therefore, the highly excited state does not look thermal when comparing its Rényi entropy to the thermal state one. As the Rényi entropy captures the higher moments of the reduced density matrix but the entanglement entropy only the average, our results imply that the emergence of thermality depends on how refined we look into the entanglement structure of the underlying pure excited state.

  19. Achieving dynamic behaviour and thermal expansion in the organic solid state via co-crystallization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kristin M; Groeneman, Ryan H; Reinheimer, Eric W; Swenson, Dale C; MacGillivray, Leonard R

    2015-08-01

    Thermal expansion involves a response of a material to an external stimulus that typically involves an increase in a crystallographic axis (positive thermal expansion (PTE)), although shrinking with applied heat (negative thermal expansion (NTE)) is known in rarer cases. Here, we demonstrate a means to achieve dynamic molecular motion and thermal expansions in organic solids via co-crystallizations. One co-crystal component is known to exhibit dynamic behaviour in the solid state while the second, when varied systematically, affords co-crystals with linear thermal expansion coefficients that range from colossal to nearly zero. Two co-crystals exhibit rare NTE. We expect the approach to guide the design of molecular solids that enable predesigned motion related to thermal expansion processes.

  20. State and development of the technology of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, F.; Schueller, K.H.

    1981-01-01

    Like in the past thermal power plants shall have to be designed also in the future in a way that a sufficient, low-priced and environment-preserving electricity and heat supply can be granted. The technology applied today in fossil-fuel and nuclear power plants and its further development is outlined under the aspects of a better utilization of primary energy, the substitution of petroleum and, in the long term, also of natural gas and coal, and of the extended protection of the environment against harmful influences. (orig.) [de

  1. Bioenergy harvest impacts to biodiversity and resilience vary across aspen-dominated forest ecosystems in the Lake States region, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda T. Curzon; Anthony W. D' Amato; Brian J. Palik; Kris Verheyen

    2016-01-01

    Questions: Does the increase in disturbance associated with removing harvest residues negatively impact biodiversity and resilience in aspen-dominated forest ecosystems? How do responses of functional diversity measures relate to community recovery and standing biomass? Location: Aspen (Populus tremuloides, Michx.) mixedwood forests in Minnesota...

  2. Wood-inhabiting, polyporoid fungi in aspen-dominated forests managed for biomass in the U.S. Lake States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholas J. Brazee; Daniel L. Lindner; Shawn Fraver; Anthony W. D' Amato; Amy M. Milo

    2012-01-01

    To better understand the potential long-term effects of biomass harvesting on biodiversity, the polyporoid fungi community was characterized from 120 plots in four aspen-dominated forests in Minnesota. Four deadwood variables (substratum species, substratum type, decay class and diameter class) were recorded for each polyporoid species occurrence. A total of 2358...

  3. Generation of Werner-like stationary states of two qubits in a thermal reservoir

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakobczyk, Lech

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of entanglement between two-level atoms immersed in the common photon reservoir at finite temperature is investigated. It is shown that in the regime of strong correlations there are nontrivial asymptotic states which can be interpreted in terms of thermal generalization of Werner states.

  4. Generation of Werner-like stationary states of two qubits in a thermal reservoir

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobczyk, Lech, E-mail: ljak@ift.uni.wroc.p [Institute of Theoretical Physics, University of Wroclaw, Plac Maxa Borna 9, 50-204 Wroclaw (Poland)

    2010-01-14

    The dynamics of entanglement between two-level atoms immersed in the common photon reservoir at finite temperature is investigated. It is shown that in the regime of strong correlations there are nontrivial asymptotic states which can be interpreted in terms of thermal generalization of Werner states.

  5. State-resolved Thermal/Hyperthermal Dynamics of Atmospheric Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-23

    M. Zolot, W. W. Harper , B. G. Perkins, P. J. Dagdigian, and D. J. Nesbitt, J. Chem. Phys. 125 (2) (2006). 4 B. G. Perkins and D. J. Nesbitt, Proc...Quantum Dots to Biomolecules,” Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry , Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL, March 18, 2011. DISTRIBUTION A

  6. Anderson localized state as a predissipative state: irreversible emission of thermalized quanta from a dynamically delocalized state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Hiroaki; Ikeda, Kensuke S

    2002-04-01

    It was shown that localization in one-dimensional disordered (quantum) electronic system is destroyed against coherent harmonic perturbations and the delocalized electron exhibits an unlimited diffusive motion [Yamada and Ikeda, Phys. Rev. E 59, 5214 (1999)]. The appearance of diffusion implies that the system has potential for irreversibility and dissipation. In the present paper, we investigate dissipative property of the dynamically delocalized state, and we show that an irreversible quasistationary energy flow indeed appears in the form of a "heat" flow when we couple the system with another dynamical degree of freedom. In the concrete we numerically investigate dissipative properties of a one-dimensional tight-binding electronic system perturbed by time-dependent harmonic forces, by coupling it with a quantum harmonic oscillator or a quantum anharmonic oscillator. It is demonstrated that if the on-site potential is spatially irregular an irreversible energy transfer from the scattered electron to the test oscillator occurs. Moreover, the test oscillator promptly approaches a thermalized state characterized by a well-defined time-dependent temperature. On the contrary, such a relaxation process cannot be observed at all for periodic potential systems. Our system is one of the minimal quantum systems in which a distinct nonequilibrium statistical behavior is self-induced.

  7. Study of ionizing collisions involving excited states in a potassium-rubidium mixture at thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Djerad, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    This study concerns mainly ionising collisions involving excited states in a saturated mixture of K-Rb vapours, at thermal energy. The experimental method consists into continuous resonant two steps laser excitation of the atoms (n ≤ 10) and mass spectrometry of ion currents. Radiative and collisional relaxation of the atoms create a complex medium. The most efficient collisional processes are Penning ionisation and Hornbeck-Molnar ionisation. In the heteronuclear system Rb(n1) + K(4P), the following exit channels may be operative: Rb(n1) + K(4P) → Rb + + e - + K Rb(n1) + K(4p) → K + + e - + Rb Rb(n1) + K(4P) → KRb + + e - . The measurements show that the first channel has an average cross section ∼ 10 -13 cm 2 . Those of the other channels are at least three orders of magnitude smaller and thus comparatively negligible. The data obtained from 5D to 10S allow to conclude that the flux in the entrance channel ionises at large separation between Rb(n1) and K(4P). The process of ionisation is dominated by polarisation forces, exchange forces being negligible. In the present mixture, Hornbeck-Molnar ionisation leads to homonuclear molecular ions K 2 + , Rb 2 + as well as the heteronuclear one KRb + . We have measured the rate coefficients for the systems: K(n1) + Rb → KRb + + e - Rb(n1) + K → KRb + + e - . The rate coefficients increase with the excitation energy of the level n1; they do not exhibit fundamental differences with those measured in pure alkali vapours [fr

  8. Time-optimal thermalization of single-mode Gaussian states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlini, Alberto; Mari, Andrea; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2014-11-01

    We consider the problem of time-optimal control of a continuous bosonic quantum system subject to the action of a Markovian dissipation. In particular, we consider the case of a one-mode Gaussian quantum system prepared in an arbitrary initial state and which relaxes to the steady state due to the action of the dissipative channel. We assume that the unitary part of the dynamics is represented by Gaussian operations which preserve the Gaussian nature of the quantum state, i.e., arbitrary phase rotations, bounded squeezing, and unlimited displacements. In the ideal ansatz of unconstrained quantum control (i.e., when the unitary phase rotations, squeezing, and displacement of the mode can be performed instantaneously), we study how control can be optimized for speeding up the relaxation towards the fixed point of the dynamics and we analytically derive the optimal relaxation time. Our model has potential and interesting applications to the control of modes of electromagnetic radiation and of trapped levitated nanospheres.

  9. A method for statistical steady state thermal analysis of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetton, P.A.

    1981-01-01

    In a previous publication the author presented a method for undertaking statistical steady state thermal analyses of reactor cores. The present paper extends the technique to an assessment of confidence limits for the resulting probability functions which define the probability that a given thermal response value will be exceeded in a reactor core. Establishing such confidence limits is considered an integral part of any statistical thermal analysis and essential if such analysis are to be considered in any regulatory process. In certain applications the use of a best estimate probability function may be justifiable but it is recognised that a demonstrably conservative probability function is required for any regulatory considerations. (orig.)

  10. Ground-state splitting of ultrashallow thermal donors with negative central-cell corrections in silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Akito; Awano, Teruyoshi

    2017-06-01

    Ultrashallow thermal donors (USTDs), which consist of light element impurities such as carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen, have been found in Czochralski silicon (CZ Si) crystals. To the best of our knowledge, these are the shallowest hydrogen-like donors with negative central-cell corrections in Si. We observed the ground-state splitting of USTDs by far-infrared optical absorption at different temperatures. The upper ground-state levels are approximately 4 meV higher than the ground-state levels. This energy level splitting is also consistent with that obtained by thermal excitation from the ground state to the upper ground state. This is direct evidence that the wave function of the USTD ground state is made up of a linear combination of conduction band minimums.

  11. Generation of a Kind of Displaced Thermal States in the Diffusion Process and its Statistical Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang-Guo, Meng; Hong-Yi, Fan; Ji-Suo, Wang

    2018-04-01

    This paper proposes a kind of displaced thermal states (DTS) and explores how this kind of optical field emerges using the entangled state representation. The results show that the DTS can be generated by a coherent state passing through a diffusion channel with the diffusion coefficient ϰ only when there exists κ t = (e^{\\hbar ν /kBT} - 1 )^{-1}. Also, its statistical properties, such as mean photon number, Wigner function and entropy, are investigated.

  12. Solid state phase change materials for thermal energy storage in passive solar heated buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, D. K.; Christensen, C.

    1983-11-01

    A set of solid state phase change materials was evaluated for possible use in passive solar thermal energy storage systems. The most promising materials are organic solid solutions of pentaerythritol, pentaglycerine and neopentyl glycol. Solid solution mixtures of these compounds can be tailored so that they exhibit solid-to-solid phase transformations at any desired temperature within the range from less than 25 deg to 188 deg. Thermophysical properties such as thermal conductivity, density and volumetric expansion were measured. Computer simulations were used to predict the performance of various Trombe wall designs incorporating solid state phase change materials. Optimum performance was found to be sensitive to the choice of phase change temperatures and to the thermal conductivity of the phase change material. A molecular mechanism of the solid state phase transition is proposed and supported by infrared spectroscopic evidence.

  13. Finite-element analysis of elastic sound-proof coupling thermal state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsyss, V. G.; Strokov, I. M.; Sergaeva, M. Yu

    2018-01-01

    The aim is in calculated determining of the elastic rubber-metal element thermal state of soundproof coupling ship shafting under variable influence during loads in time. Thermal coupling calculation is performed with finite element method using NX Simens software with Nastran solver. As a result of studies, the following results were obtained: - a volumetric picture of the temperature distribution over the array of the deformed coupling body is obtained; - time to reach steady-state thermal coupling mode has been determined; - dependences of maximum temperature and time to reach state on the established operation mode on rotation frequency and ambient temperature are determined. The findings prove the conclusion that usage of finite element analysis modern software can significantly speed up problem solving.

  14. Thermal Equation of State of Natural Ti-Bearing Clinohumite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Fei; Wu, Xiang; Zhang, Dongzhou; Qin, Shan; Jacobsen, Steven D.

    2017-11-01

    The natural occurrence of clinohumite in metabasalts and hydrothermally altered peridotites provides a source of water-rich minerals in subducted slabs, making knowledge of their phase relations and crystal chemistry under high pressure-temperature (P-T) conditions important for understating volatile recycling and geodynamic process in the Earth's mantle. Here we present a synchrotron-based, single-crystal X-ray diffraction study on two natural Ti-bearing clinohumites up to 28 GPa and 750 K in order to simulate conditions within subducted slabs. No phase transition occurs in clinohumite over this P-T range. Pressure-volume relationships of both compositions at room temperature were fitted to a third-order Birch-Murnaghan equation of state (EoS) with V0 = 650.4(3) Å3, KT0 = 141(4) GPa, and KT0' = 4.0(6) for Ti-poor clinohumite (0.07 Ti per formula unit, pfu) and V0 = 650.8(3) Å3, KT0 = 144(4) GPa, and KT0' = 3.6(7) for Ti-rich clinohumite (0.21 Ti pfu). Both clinohumites exhibit anisotropic compression with βb > βc > βa. We also refined P-V-T equation of state parameters using the high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan EoS, yielding (∂KT0/∂T)P = -0.040(10) GPa/K and αT = 5.1(6) × 10-5 K-1 for Ti-poor clinohumite and (∂KT0/∂T)P = -0.045(11) GPa/K and αT = 5.7(6) × 10-5 K-1 for Ti-rich clinohumite. Ti-poor and Ti-rich clinohumites display similar equations of state but are 20% more incompressible than Mg-pure clinohumite and display 5% higher bulk sound velocity than olivine at upper mantle conditions. Our results provide constraints for modeling geodynamic process related to the subduction and transport of potentially water-rich slabs in the mantle.

  15. Fluctuations in the large-scale atmospheric circulation and ocean conditions associated with the dominant modes of wintertime precipitation variability for the contiguous United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, T.P.; Blier, W.

    1994-01-01

    The historical Climatic Division record of monthly- and seasonal-mean wintertime precipitation totals are analyzed to document the dominant patterns of precipitation variability for the contiguous United States. The analysis technique employed is the Rotated Principal Component analysis. Time series for the leading patterns are related to global sea-surface temperatures (SSTs), and to gridded surface and upper-air analyses for the Northern Hemisphere

  16. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries.

  17. Three-party quantum teleportation using thermal states in Heisenberg XX model with open boundary condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhan, Jaemi; Kwon, Younghun

    2007-01-01

    Recently Yeo showed that thermal states in Heisenberg XX model with periodic boundary condition could be used for three-party quantum teleportation. However it is hard to implement the periodic boundary condition in spin chain. So instead of imposing the periodic boundary condition, we consider open boundary condition in Heisenberg XX model and investigate the possibility of using thermal states in Heisenberg XX model with open boundary condition. Using this way, we find the best fidelity conditions to three known protocols in three-party quantum teleportation. It turns out that the best fidelity in every protocol would be 23

  18. SUPERENERGY-2: a multiassembly, steady-state computer code for LMFBR core thermal-hydraulic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basehore, K.L.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-08-01

    Core thermal-hydraulic design and performance analyses for Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactors (LMFBRs) require repeated detailed multiassembly calculations to determine radial temperature profiles and subchannel outlet temperatures for various core configurations and subassembly structural analyses. At steady-state, detailed core-wide temperature profiles are required for core restraint calculations and subassembly structural analysis. In addition, sodium outlet temperatures are routinely needed for each reactor operating cycle. The SUPERENERGY-2 thermal-hydraulic code was designed specifically to meet these designer needs. It is applicable only to steady-state, forced-convection flow in LMFBR core geometries

  19. Risperidone – Solid-state characterization and pharmaceutical compatibility using thermal and non-thermal techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Josiane Souza Pereira; Veronez, Isabela Pianna; Rodrigues, Larissa Lopes [Laboratório de Análise e Caracterização de Fármacos – LACFar, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Alfenas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Trevisan, Marcello G. [Laboratório de Análise e Caracterização de Fármacos – LACFar, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Alfenas, Minas Gerais (Brazil); National Institute of Bioanalytics Science and Technology – INCTBio, Institute of Chemistry – UNICAMP, 13084-653, Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil); Garcia, Jerusa Simone, E-mail: jerusa.garcia@unifal-mg.edu.br [Laboratório de Análise e Caracterização de Fármacos – LACFar, Instituto de Química, Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Alfenas, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: • DSC was used to characterize Risperidone and study its compatibility with excipients. • FT-IR associated with PCA was used to complement DSC data. • LC analyzes confirmed the DSC and FT-IR/PCA results. • Risperidone was incompatible with three among five excipients evaluated. - Abstract: A full solid-state characterization of risperidone was conducted using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), thermogravimetry (TG), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine its physicochemical properties and polymorphism. The primary aim of this work was to study the compatibility of risperidone with pharmaceutical excipients using DSC to obtain and compare the curves of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) and the excipients with their 1:1 (w/w) binary mixtures. These same binary mixtures were turned to room temperature and analyzed by FT-IR combined with principal component analysis (PCA) to evaluate solid-state incompatibilities. The chemical incompatibilities of these samples were verified using a stability-indicating liquid chromatography (LC) method to assay for the API and evaluate the formation of degradation products. All of these methods showed incompatibilities between risperidone and the excipients magnesium stearate, lactose and cellulose microcrystalline.

  20. Molecularly Engineered Azobenzene Derivatives for High Energy Density Solid-State Solar Thermal Fuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Eugene N; Zhitomirsky, David; Han, Grace G D; Liu, Yun; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2017-03-15

    Solar thermal fuels (STFs) harvest and store solar energy in a closed cycle system through conformational change of molecules and can release the energy in the form of heat on demand. With the aim of developing tunable and optimized STFs for solid-state applications, we designed three azobenzene derivatives functionalized with bulky aromatic groups (phenyl, biphenyl, and tert-butyl phenyl groups). In contrast to pristine azobenzene, which crystallizes and makes nonuniform films, the bulky azobenzene derivatives formed uniform amorphous films that can be charged and discharged with light and heat for many cycles. Thermal stability of the films, a critical metric for thermally triggerable STFs, was greatly increased by the bulky functionalization (up to 180 °C), and we were able to achieve record high energy density of 135 J/g for solid-state STFs, over a 30% improvement compared to previous solid-state reports. Furthermore, the chargeability in the solid state was improved, up to 80% charged from 40% charged in previous solid-state reports. Our results point toward molecular engineering as an effective method to increase energy storage in STFs, improve chargeability, and improve the thermal stability of the thin film.

  1. Thermal neutron detection by means of an organic solid-state track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doerschel, B.; Streubel, G.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal neutrons can be detected by means of organic solid-state track detectors if they are combined with radiators in which charged secondary particles are produced in neutron interaction processes. The secondary particles can produce etchable tracks in the detector material. For thermal neutron fluence determination from the track densities, the thermal neutron sensitivity was calculated for cellulose triacetate detectors with LiF radiators, taking into account energy and angular distribution of the alpha particles produced in the LiF radiator. This value is in good agreement with the sensitivity measured during irradiation in different neutron fields if corrections are considered the production of etchable or visuable tracks. Measuring range and measuring accuracy meet the requirements of thermal neutron detection in personnel dosimetry. Possibilities of extending the measuring range are discussed. (author)

  2. Thermal imagers: from ancient analog video output to state-of-the-art video streaming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, Hubertus; Feuchter, Timo; Münzberg, Mario; Fritze, Jörg; Schlemmer, Harry

    2013-06-01

    The video output of thermal imagers stayed constant over almost two decades. When the famous Common Modules were employed a thermal image at first was presented to the observer in the eye piece only. In the early 1990s TV cameras were attached and the standard output was CCIR. In the civil camera market output standards changed to digital formats a decade ago with digital video streaming being nowadays state-of-the-art. The reasons why the output technique in the thermal world stayed unchanged over such a long time are: the very conservative view of the military community, long planning and turn-around times of programs and a slower growth of pixel number of TIs in comparison to consumer cameras. With megapixel detectors the CCIR output format is not sufficient any longer. The paper discusses the state-of-the-art compression and streaming solutions for TIs.

  3. Steady-state entanglement and thermalization of coupled qubits in two common heat baths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li-Zhen; Man, Zhong-Xiao; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2018-03-01

    In this work, we study the steady-state entanglement and thermalization of two coupled qubits embedded in two common baths with different temperatures. The common bath is relevant when the two qubits are difficult to be isolated to only contact with their local baths. With the quantum master equation constructed in the eigenstate representation of the coupled qubits, we have demonstrated the variations of steady-state entanglement with respect to various parameters of the qubits' system in both equilibrium and nonequilibrium cases of the baths. The coupling strength and energy detuning of the qubits as well as the temperature gradient of the baths are found to be beneficial to the enhancement of the entanglement. We note a dark state of the qubits that is free from time-evolution and its initial population can greatly influence the steady-state entanglement. By virtues of effective temperatures, we also study the thermalization of the coupled qubits and their variations with energy detuning.

  4. Decoherence and Fidelity in Teleportation of Coherent Photon-Added Two-Mode Squeezed Thermal States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Heng-Mei; Yuan, Hong-Chun; Wan, Zhi-Long; Wang, Zhen

    2018-04-01

    We theoretically introduce a kind of non-Gaussian entangled resources, i.e., coherent photon-added two-mode squeezed thermal states (CPA-TMSTS), by successively performing coherent photon addition operation to the two-mode squeezed thermal states. The normalization factor related to bivariate Hermite polynomials is obtained. Based upon it, the nonclassicality and decoherence process are analyzed by virtue of the Wigner function. It is shown that the coherent photon addition operation is an effective way in generating partial negative values of Wigner function, which clearly manifests the nonclassicality and non-Gaussianity of the target states. Additionally, the fidelity in teleporting coherent states using CPA-TMSTS as entangled resource is quantified both analytically and numerically. It is found that the CPA-TMSTS is an entangled resource of high-efficiency and high-fidelity in quantum teleportation.

  5. Forest Disturbance Across the Conterminous United States from 1985-2012: The Emerging Dominance of Forest Decline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Warren B.; Yang, Zhiqiang; Stehman, Stephen; Schroeder, Todd; Bell, David M.; Masek, Jeffrey; Huang, Chengquan; Meigs, Garrett W.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence of shifting dominance among major forest disturbance agent classes regionally to globally has been emerging in the literature. For example, climate-related stress and secondary stressors on forests (e.g., insect and disease, fire) have dramatically increased since the turn of the century globally, while harvest rates in the western US and elsewhere have declined. For shifts to be quantified, accurate historical forest disturbance estimates are required as a baseline for examining current trends. We report annual disturbance rates (with uncertainties) in the aggregate and by major change causal agent class for the conterminous US and five geographic subregions between 1985 and 2012. Results are based on human interpretations of Landsat time series from a probability sample of 7200 plots (30 m) distributed throughout the study area. Forest disturbance information was recorded with a Landsat time series visualization and data collection tool that incorporates ancillary high-resolution data. National rates of disturbance varied between 1.5% and 4.5% of forest area per year, with trends being strongly affected by shifting dominance among specific disturbance agent influences at the regional scale. Throughout the time series, national harvest disturbance rates varied between one and two percent, and were largely a function of harvest in the more heavily forested regions of the US (Mountain West, Northeast, and Southeast). During the first part of the time series, national disturbance rates largely reflected trends in harvest disturbance. Beginning in the mid-90s, forest decline-related disturbances associated with diminishing forest health (e.g., physiological stress leading to tree canopy cover loss, increases in tree mortality above background levels), especially in the Mountain West and Lowland West regions of the US, increased dramatically. Consequently, national disturbance rates greatly increased by 2000, and remained high for much of the decade. Decline

  6. Transitions in the computational power of thermal states for measurement-based quantum computation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Sean D.; Bartlett, Stephen D.; Jennings, David; Doherty, Andrew C.; Rudolph, Terry

    2009-01-01

    We show that the usefulness of the thermal state of a specific spin-lattice model for measurement-based quantum computing exhibits a transition between two distinct 'phases' - one in which every state is a universal resource for quantum computation, and another in which any local measurement sequence can be simulated efficiently on a classical computer. Remarkably, this transition in computational power does not coincide with any phase transition, classical, or quantum in the underlying spin-lattice model.

  7. Vibrational-state-selected ion--molecule reaction cross sections at thermal energies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijkeren, D. van; Boltjes, E.; Eck, J. van; Niehaus, A.

    1984-01-01

    A method designed to measure relative ion—molecule reaction rates at thermal collision energies for selected reactant ion vibrational states is described. Relative reaction rates are determined for the three endothermic reactions: H2+ (υ)(He,H)HeH+, H2+ (υ)(Ne,H)NeH+, D2+(υ)(Ne, D)NeD+, and for the

  8. Teleportation via thermally entangled states of a two-qubit Heisenberg XXZ chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIN Meng; TAO Ying-Juan; TIAN Dong-Ping

    2008-01-01

    We investigate quantum teleportation as a tool to study the thermally entangled state of a twoqubit Heisenberg XXZ chain.Our work is mainly to investigate the characteristics of a Heisenberg XXZ chain and get some analytical results of the fully entangled fraction.We also consider the entanglement teleportation via a two-qubit Heisenberg XXZ chain.

  9. CEN standards for solar thermal systems - State of the art and expectted impact

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ree, B.G.C. van der; Pauschinger, Th.

    1996-01-01

    Since 1994, the European Committee for Standardization (CEN) Technical Committee TC 312 has been active in producing European Standards for thermal solar energy systems and components. In this paper, an overview of the present State of the Art of the draft standards is presented. These standards

  10. Quasi-steady state thermal performances of a solar air heater with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Quasi-steady state thermal performance of a solar air heater with a combined absorber is studied. The whole energy balance equations related to the system were articulated as a linear system of temperature equations. Solutions to this linear system were assessed from program based on an iterative process. The mean ...

  11. Effects of microwave heating on the thermal states of biological tissues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of microwave heating on the thermal states of biological tissues. Nabil TM El-dabe, Mona AA Mohamed, Asma F El-Sayed. Abstract. A mathematical analysis of microwave heating equations in one-dimensional multi-layer model has been discussed. Maxwell's equations and transient bioheat transfer equation were ...

  12. Numerical modeling of thermal performance: Natural convection and radiation of solid state lighting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ye, H.; Gielen, A.W.J.; Zeijl, H.W. van; Werkhoven, R.J.; Zhang, G.Q.

    2011-01-01

    The increased electrical currents used to drive light emitting diode (LED) cause significant heat generation in the solid state lighting (SSL) system. As the temperature will directly affect the maximum light output, quality, reliability and the life time of the SSL system, thermal management is a

  13. Early thermal history of Rhea: the role of serpentinization and liquid state convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Leszek; Losiak, Anna

    2015-04-01

    SSC is modelled simply by multiplying the coefficient of the heat conduction in the considered layer, i.e.: kconv =Nu k. This approach is used successfully in parameterized theory of convection for SSC in the Earth and other planets (e.g. [3], [4]). Parameterization of liquid state convection (LSC) is even simpler. Ra in molten region is very high (usually higher than 1016). The LSC could be very intensive resulting in almost adiabatic temperature gradient given by: dT-= gαmT-, dr cpm where αm and cpm are thermal expansion coefficient and specific heat in molten region, g is the local gravity. In Enceladus and Mimas the adiabatic gradient is low and therefore LSC region is almost isothermal. 2. Results: 1. We found that time of beginning of accretion and duration of accretion are crucial for early evolution, especially for differentiation. 2. Viscosity of ice close to melting point, activation energy in formula for viscosity E, and ammonia content X are very important for evolution, but not dramatic differences are found if realistic values are considered. 3. The energy of serpentinization is important for evolution, but its role is also not dominant. 4. LSC operating in molten part could delay the differentiation and the core formation for a few hundreds Myr. 5. The gravity data could be interpreted that Rhea is fully differentiated only if its core has high porosity and low density ~1300 kg m-3. In fact, there is not mechanism that could remove the water from molten core and the core of Rhea is probably porous. Acknowledgements: The research is partly supported by National Science Centre (grant 2011/ 01/ B/ ST10/06653). References : [1] Czechowski, L. (2014) Some remarks on the early evolution of Enceladus. Planet. Sp. Sc. 104, 185-199. [2] Merk, R., Breuer, D., Spohn, T. (2002). Numerical modeling of 26Al induced radioactive melting of asteroids concerning accretion. Icarus 199, 183-191. [3] Sharpe, H.N., Peltier, W.R., (1978) Parameterized mantle convection and

  14. Keeping wetlands wet in the western United States: adaptations to drought in agriculture-dominated human-natural systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downard, Rebekah; Endter-Wada, Joanna

    2013-12-15

    Water is critical to protecting wetlands in arid regions, especially in agriculture-dominated watersheds. This comparative case study analyzes three federal wildlife refuges in the Bear River Basin of the U.S. West where refuge managers secured water supplies by adapting to their local environmental context and their refuge's relationship to agriculture in being either irrigation-dependent, reservoir-adjacent or diked-delta wetlands. We found that each refuge's position confers different opportunities for securing a water supply and entails unique management challenges linked to agricultural water uses. Acquiring contextually-appropriate water rights portfolios was important for protecting these arid region wetlands and was accomplished through various strategies. Once acquired, water is managed to buffer wetlands against fluctuations caused by a dynamic climate and agricultural demands, especially during droughts. Management plans are responsive to needs of neighboring water users and values of the public at large. Such context-specific adaptations will be critical as the West faces climate change and population growth that threaten wetlands and agricultural systems to which they are linked. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Glassy-state stabilization of a dominant negative inhibitor anthrax vaccine containing aluminum hydroxide and glycopyranoside lipid A adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Kimberly J; Vance, David J; Jain, Nishant K; Sahni, Neha; Rabia, Lilia A; Cousins, Megan C; Joshi, Sangeeta; Volkin, David B; Middaugh, C Russell; Mantis, Nicholas J; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2015-02-01

    During transport and storage, vaccines may be exposed to temperatures outside of the range recommended for storage, potentially causing efficacy losses. To better understand and prevent such losses, dominant negative inhibitor (DNI), a recombinant protein antigen for a candidate vaccine against anthrax, was formulated as a liquid and as a glassy lyophilized powder with the adjuvants aluminum hydroxide and glycopyranoside lipid A (GLA). Freeze-thawing of the liquid vaccine caused the adjuvants to aggregate and decreased its immunogenicity in mice. Immunogenicity of liquid vaccines also decreased when stored at 40°C for 8 weeks, as measured by decreases in neutralizing antibody titers in vaccinated mice. Concomitant with efficacy losses at elevated temperatures, changes in DNI structure were detected by fluorescence spectroscopy and increased deamidation was observed by capillary isoelectric focusing (cIEF) after only 1 week of storage of the liquid formulation at 40°C. In contrast, upon lyophilization, no additional deamidation after 4 weeks at 40°C and no detectable changes in DNI structure or reduction in immunogenicity after 16 weeks at 40°C were observed. Vaccines containing aluminum hydroxide and GLA elicited higher immune responses than vaccines adjuvanted with only aluminum hydroxide, with more mice responding to a single dose. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  16. Nonclassicality of Photon-Added Displaced Thermal State via Quantum Phase-Space Distributions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ran; Meng, Xiang-Guo; Du, Chuan-Xun; Wang, Ji-Suo

    2018-02-01

    We introduce a new kind of nonclassical mixed state generated by adding arbitrary photons to a displaced thermal state, i.e., the photon-added displaced thermal state (PADTS), and obtain the normalization factor, which is simply related to two-variable Hermite polynomials. We also discuss the nonclassicality of the PADTS by considering quantum phase-space distributions. The results indicate that the value of the photon count statistics is maximum when the number of detected photons is equal to the number of added photons, and that the photon-added operation has a similar modulation effect with increasing displacement. Moreover, the negative volume of the Wigner function for the PADTS takes a maximal value for a specific photon-added number.

  17. Analysis of equations of state and temperature dependence of thermal expansivity and bulk modulus for silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandya, Tushar C; Bhatt, Apoorva D; Thakar, Nilesh A

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper an attempt has been made for the comparative study of different equations of state for silicon (Phase-1, cubic diamond structure) in the pressure range of 0-11 GPa. We compare the results of different equations of state (EOS) with available experimental data. The Kwon and Kim EOS is found to give far better agreement with the available experimental data. Results obtained by Poirier-Tarantola, Vinet, Tait and Suzuki's equations of state are not giving satisfactory agreement with the available experimental data. In the present study simple methods based on thermodynamic functions are presented to investigate the temperature dependence of thermal expansivity and bulk modulus for silicon. The results are reported for silicon. The calculated values of thermal expansivity are in good agreement with experimental data.

  18. Steady state ensembles of thermal radiation in a layered media with a constant heat flux

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes steady-state ensembles of thermally excited electromagnetic radiation in nano-scale layered media with a constant non-vanishing heat flux across the layers. It is shown that Planck's law of thermal radiation, the principle of equivalence, and the laws of wave propagation in layered media, imply that in order for the ensemble of thermally excited electromagnetic fields to exist in a medium consisting of a stack of layers between two half-space, the net heat flux across the layers must exceed a certain threshold that is determined by the temperatures of the half spaces and by the reflective properties of the entire structure. The obtained results provide a way for estimating the radiative heat transfer coefficient of nano-scale layered structures. (copyright 2013 by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. Thermal conductivity of the vortex lattice state involving the antiferromagnetism around the core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takigawa, Mitsuaki; Ichioka, Masanori; Machida, Kazushige

    2004-01-01

    The thermal conductivity κ xx is the difference between higher and lower temperature regions, because the spatially-resolved thermal conductivity κ xx (r) is localized around the vortex core at lower temperature and delocalized at higher temperature. On one hand, much attention is focused on the spin and charge ordering around the vortex. When the antiferromagnetism appears around the core, the energy gap suppresses the density of states on the Fermi energy, and the zero-energy peak at the vortex core splits or vanishes. The κ xx under the Neel temperature is suppressed by the antiferromagnetism. We solve the Bogoliubov-de Gennes equation self-consistently by two-dimensional extended Hubbard model including the repulsive interaction U, and calculate the κ xx on the basis of the linear response theory. The picture of the spatial variation of the thermal conductivity κ(r) through the spin resolved local DOS well explains recent experiments

  20. Thermal characterization of polymer matrix composites containing microencapsulated paraffin in solid or liquid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari-Bey, Sana; Fois, Magali; Krupa, Igor; Ibos, Laurent; Benyoucef, Boumédiène

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Thermal characterization of PCL/Micronal composites. • Melting enthalpy and heat capacity measured by DSC. • Interest: have measured thermal properties at different temperatures. • Thermophysical properties measurement temperatures chosen outside phase changes. • Characteristics useful to model composites heat transfer for LHTES applications. - Abstract: This work focuses on the study of heat transfer mechanisms in composites materials which may be used for Latent Heat Thermal Energy Storage applications. These composites contain phase change material (PCM) which can absorb and release energy during thermal cycling. PCM’s used here are paraffins microencapsulated in poly(methylmethacrylate); microencapsulation avoids the flow of paraffin when it is in the liquid state. Samples with different paraffin weight fractions and particles shape and distribution were studied in this work. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Differential Scanning Calorimetry were used to determine morphology and perform measurements of phase changes temperatures, enthalpies and heat capacity respectively. Further, a periodic method (DICO) allowed measuring thermal conductivity (λ) and diffusivity (a) of the composites at temperatures below and above of the paraffin phase change from crystalline solid to isotropic liquid

  1. A method for statistical steady state thermal analysis of reactor cores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whetton, P.A.

    1980-01-01

    This paper presents a method for performing a statistical steady state thermal analysis of a reactor core. The technique is only outlined here since detailed thermal equations are dependent on the core geometry. The method has been applied to a pressurised water reactor core and the results are presented for illustration purposes. Random hypothetical cores are generated using the Monte-Carlo method. The technique shows that by splitting the parameters into two types, denoted core-wise and in-core, the Monte Carlo method may be used inexpensively. The idea of using extremal statistics to characterise the low probability events (i.e. the tails of a distribution) is introduced together with a method of forming the final probability distribution. After establishing an acceptable probability of exceeding a thermal design criterion, the final probability distribution may be used to determine the corresponding thermal response value. If statistical and deterministic (i.e. conservative) thermal response values are compared, information on the degree of pessimism in the deterministic method of analysis may be inferred and the restrictive performance limitations imposed by this method relieved. (orig.)

  2. A Tunable Mid-Infrared Solid-State Laser with a Compact Thermal Control System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deyang Yu

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Tunable mid-infrared lasers are widely used in laser spectroscopy, gas sensing and many other related areas. In order to solve heat dissipation problems and improve the environmental temperature adaptability of solid-state laser sources, a tunable all-fiber laser pumped optical parametric oscillator (OPO was established, and a compact thermal control system based on thermoelectric coolers, an automatic temperature control circuit, cooling fins, fans and heat pipes was integrated and designed for the laser. This system is compact, light and air-cooling which satisfies the demand for miniaturization of lasers. A mathematical model and method was established to estimate the cooling capacity of this thermal control system under different ambient environments. A finite-element model was built and simulated to analyze the thermal transfer process. Experiments in room and high temperature environments were carried out and showed that the substrate temperature of a pump module could be maintained at a stable value with controlled precision to 0.2 degrees, while the output power stability of the laser was within ±1%. The experimental results indicate that this compact air-cooling thermal control system could effectively solve the heat dissipation problem of mid-infrared solid-state lasers with a one hundred watts level pump module in room and high temperature environments.

  3. Unsteady-state human-body exergy consumption rate and its relation to subjective assessment of dynamic thermal environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiker, Marcel; Kolarik, Jakub; Dovjak, Mateja

    2016-01-01

    of the present study confirmed previously indicated trends that lowest human body exergy consumption rate is associated with thermal sensation close to neutrality. Moreover, higher acceptability was in general associated with lower human body exergy consumption rate. (C) 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.......Few examples studied applicability of exergy analysis on human thermal comfort. These examples relate the human-body exergy consumption rate with subjectively obtained thermal sensation votes and had been based on steady-state calculation methods. However, humans are rarely exposed to steady...... between the human-body exergy consumption rate and subjective assessment of thermal environment represented by thermal sensation as well as to extend the investigation towards thermal acceptability votes. Comparison of steady-state and unsteady-state model showed that results from both models were...

  4. Bound-state formation for thermal relic dark matter and unitarity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, Benedict von; Petraki, Kalliopi

    2014-01-01

    We show that the relic abundance of thermal dark matter annihilating via a long-range interaction, is significantly affected by the formation and decay of dark matter bound states in the early universe, if the dark matter mass is above a few TeV . We determine the coupling required to obtain the observed dark matter density, taking into account both the direct 2-to-2 annihilations and the formation of bound states, and provide an analytical fit. We argue that the unitarity limit on the inelastic cross-section is realized only if dark matter annihilates via a long-range interaction, and we determine the upper bound on the mass of thermal-relic dark matter to be about 197 (139) TeV for (non)-self-conjugate dark matter

  5. Domination versus disjunctive domination in graphs | Henning ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Domination versus disjunctive domination in graphs. Michael A Henning, Sinclair A Marcon. Abstract. A dominating set in a graph G is a set S of vertices of G such that every vertex not in S is adjacent to a vertex of S. The domination number of G is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of G. For a positive integer b, ...

  6. [Thermal comfort and indoor air quality in some of the italian state police workplaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirico, Francesco; Rulli, Giuseppina

    2017-12-01

    Little can be found in the literature about thermal comfort and indoor air quality (IAQ) in law enforcement workplaces. This study, based on environmental surveys carried out by the Centro Sanitario Polifunzionale of Milan (Italian State Police Health Service Department), aims to assess the thermal comfort and IAQ in some of the Italian State Police workplaces. Measurements were performed in some indoor workplaces such as offices, archives, laboratories and guard-houses in various regions (Lombardia, Emilia Romagna, Liguria, Veneto, Trentino Alto-Adige) of Northern Italy. The PMV/PPD model developed by Fangar for the evaluation of the thermal comfort was used. We measured both CO2 concentration and relative humidity indoor levels for the evaluation of IAQ. We used Chi square and t Student tests to study both prevalence of thermal discomfort and low IAQ, and their differences between summer and winter. For the purposes of the present study we carried out 488 measurements in 36 buildings (260 in winter and 228 in summer). Our results showed that thermal comfort was reached in 95% and 68% of environmental measurements (in winter and summer, respectively). In summer, we measured different types of thermal discomfort. As regard to IAQ, CO2 exceeded the threshold limit value (1000 ppm) in 39% (winter) and 9% (summer) of our measurements. Chi-square test showed a statistically significant difference between summer and winter for all outcomes considered. Indeed, thermal comfort was better in winter than summer (X2 = 61.0795), while IAQ was found to be better in the summer than winter considering both the CO2 1000 ppm and 1200 ppm threshold values (X2 = 56.9004 and X2 = 8.8845 respectively). Prevalence of low relative humidity in winter was higher than in summer (X2 = 124.7764). Even though this study did not report any situation of risk to Italian police officers health and safety, it has highlighted some potential issues in some of the examined workplaces, concerning

  7. Rapid Thermal Annealing of Cathode-Garnet Interface toward High-Temperature Solid State Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Boyang; Fu, Kun; Gong, Yunhui; Yang, Chunpeng; Yao, Yonggang; Wang, Yanbin; Wang, Chengwei; Kuang, Yudi; Pastel, Glenn; Xie, Hua; Wachsman, Eric D; Hu, Liangbing

    2017-08-09

    High-temperature batteries require the battery components to be thermally stable and function properly at high temperatures. Conventional batteries have high-temperature safety issues such as thermal runaway, which are mainly attributed to the properties of liquid organic electrolytes such as low boiling points and high flammability. In this work, we demonstrate a truly all-solid-state high-temperature battery using a thermally stable garnet solid-state electrolyte, a lithium metal anode, and a V 2 O 5 cathode, which can operate well at 100 °C. To address the high interfacial resistance between the solid electrolyte and cathode, a rapid thermal annealing method was developed to melt the cathode and form a continuous contact. The resulting interfacial resistance of the solid electrolyte and V 2 O 5 cathode was significantly decreased from 2.5 × 10 4 to 71 Ω·cm 2 at room temperature and from 170 to 31 Ω·cm 2 at 100 °C. Additionally, the diffusion resistance in the V 2 O 5 cathode significantly decreased as well. The demonstrated high-temperature solid-state full cell has an interfacial resistance of 45 Ω·cm 2 and 97% Coulombic efficiency cycling at 100 °C. This work provides a strategy to develop high-temperature all-solid-state batteries using garnet solid electrolytes and successfully addresses the high contact resistance between the V 2 O 5 cathode and garnet solid electrolyte without compromising battery safety or performance.

  8. Physicochemical properties and thermal stability of quercetin hydrates in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borghetti, G.S., E-mail: greicefarm@yahoo.com.br [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Carini, J.P. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Honorato, S.B.; Ayala, A.P. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade Federal do Ceara, Caixa Postal 6030, CEP 60.455-970, Fortaleza, CE (Brazil); Moreira, J.C.F. [Departamento de Bioquimica, Instituto de Ciencias Basicas da Saude, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Rua Ramiro Barcelos 2600, CEP 90035-003, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Bassani, V.L. [Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Faculdade de Farmacia, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Av. Ipiranga 2752, CEP 90.610-000, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil)

    2012-07-10

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin raw materials may present different degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal stability of quercetin in the solid state depends on its degree of hydration. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Quercetin dehydrate is thermodynamically more stable than the other crystal forms. - Abstract: In the present work three samples of quercetin raw materials (QCTa, QCTb and QCTc), purchased from different Brazilian suppliers, were characterized employing scanning electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, simultaneous thermogravimetry and infrared spectroscopy, differential scanning calorimetry, and variable temperature-powder X-ray diffraction, in order to know their physicochemical properties, specially the thermal stability in solid state. The results demonstrated that the raw materials of quercetin analyzed present distinct crystalline structures, ascribed to the different degree of hydration of their crystal lattice. The thermal stability of these quercetin raw materials in the solid state was highly dependent on their degree of hydration, where QCTa (quercetin dihydrate) was thermodynamically more stable than the other two samples.

  9. Simulation of classical thermal states on a quantum computer: A transfer-matrix approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yung, Man-Hong; Nagaj, Daniel; Whitfield, James D.; Aspuru-Guzik, Alan

    2010-01-01

    We present a hybrid quantum-classical algorithm to simulate thermal states of classical Hamiltonians on a quantum computer. Our scheme employs a sequence of locally controlled rotations, building up the desired state by adding qubits one at a time. We identified a class of classical models for which our method is efficient and avoids potential exponential overheads encountered by Grover-like or quantum Metropolis schemes. Our algorithm also gives an exponential advantage for two-dimensional Ising models with magnetic field on a square lattice, compared with the previously known Zalka's algorithm.

  10. Domination, Eternal Domination, and Clique Covering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klostermeyer William F.

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Eternal and m-eternal domination are concerned with using mobile guards to protect a graph against infinite sequences of attacks at vertices. Eternal domination allows one guard to move per attack, whereas more than one guard may move per attack in the m-eternal domination model. Inequality chains consisting of the domination, eternal domination, m-eternal domination, independence, and clique covering numbers of graph are explored in this paper.

  11. A simplified method for evaluating thermal performance of unglazed transpired solar collectors under steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Xiaoliang; Lei, Bo; Bi, Haiquan; Yu, Tao

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A simplified method for evaluating thermal performance of UTC is developed. • Experiments, numerical simulations, dimensional analysis and data fitting are used. • The correlation of absorber plate temperature for UTC is established. • The empirical correlation of heat exchange effectiveness for UTC is proposed. - Abstract: Due to the advantages of low investment and high energy efficiency, unglazed transpired solar collectors (UTC) have been widely used for heating in buildings. However, it is difficult for designers to quickly evaluate the thermal performance of UTC based on the conventional methods such as experiments and numerical simulations. Therefore, a simple and fast method to determine the thermal performance of UTC is indispensable. The objective of this work is to provide a simplified calculation method to easily evaluate the thermal performance of UTC under steady state. Different parameters are considered in the simplified method, including pitch, perforation diameter, solar radiation, solar absorptivity, approach velocity, ambient air temperature, absorber plate temperature, and so on. Based on existing design parameters and operating conditions, correlations for the absorber plate temperature and the heat exchange effectiveness are developed using dimensional analysis and data fitting, respectively. Results show that the proposed simplified method has a high accuracy and can be employed to evaluate the collector efficiency, the heat exchange effectiveness and the air temperature rise. The proposed method in this paper is beneficial to directly determine design parameters and operating status for UTC.

  12. Absolute efficiency calibration of 6LiF-based solid state thermal neutron detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finocchiaro, Paolo; Cosentino, Luigi; Lo Meo, Sergio; Nolte, Ralf; Radeck, Desiree

    2018-03-01

    The demand for new thermal neutron detectors as an alternative to 3He tubes in research, industrial, safety and homeland security applications, is growing. These needs have triggered research and development activities about new generations of thermal neutron detectors, characterized by reasonable efficiency and gamma rejection comparable to 3He tubes. In this paper we show the state of the art of a promising low-cost technique, based on commercial solid state silicon detectors coupled with thin neutron converter layers of 6LiF deposited onto carbon fiber substrates. A few configurations were studied with the GEANT4 simulation code, and the intrinsic efficiency of the corresponding detectors was calibrated at the PTB Thermal Neutron Calibration Facility. The results show that the measured intrinsic detection efficiency is well reproduced by the simulations, therefore validating the simulation tool in view of new designs. These neutron detectors have also been tested at neutron beam facilities like ISIS (Rutherford Appleton Laboratory, UK) and n_TOF (CERN) where a few samples are already in operation for beam flux and 2D profile measurements. Forthcoming applications are foreseen for the online monitoring of spent nuclear fuel casks in interim storage sites.

  13. An experimental and theoretical investigation of stick-slip, steady-state and roughness dominated sliding in fiber-reinforced composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackin, T.J.

    1995-01-01

    The mechanical properties of fiber reinforced composites depends strongly upon the properties of the fiber/matrix interface. Enhanced fracture resistance and strain to failure are synonymous with debonding and sliding of the reinforcement phase. Thus, the two key properties of the composite are the interfacial toughness and the post-debond sliding stress. After debonding a variety of interfacial sliding phenomena are noted, including: stick-slip, steady-state, and roughness dominated sliding. The interfacial properties, including the coefficient of friction, the radial clamping pressure, asperity amplitude, the elastic properties of the constituents, and the compliance of the test machine, each play a role in the operative sliding phenomenon. Experiments have been conducted to explore each of these phenomena. In addition, models have been developed that rationalize all of the observed behavior

  14. Transient Thermal State of an Active Braille Matrix with Incorporated Thermal Actuators by Means of Finite Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alutei, Alexandra-Maria; Szelitzky, Emoke; Mandru, Dan

    2013-01-01

    In this article the authors present the transient thermal analysis for a developed thermal linear actuator based on wax paraffin used to drive the cells of a Braille device. A numerical investigation of transient heat transfer phenomenon during paraffin melting and solidification in an encapsulated recipient has been carried out using the ANSYS…

  15. Early Thermal History of Rhea: The Role of Serpentinization and Liquid State Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czechowski, Leszek; Łosiak, Anna

    2016-12-01

    Early thermal history of Rhea is investigated. The role of the following parameters of the model is investigated: time of beginning of accretion, tini, duration of accretion, tac, viscosity of ice close to the melting point, η0, activation energy in the formula for viscosity, E, thermal conductivity of silicate component, ksil, ammonia content, XNH3, and energy of serpentinization, cserp. We found that tini and tac are crucial for evolution. All other parameters are also important, but no dramatic differences are found for realistic values. The process of differentiation is also investigated. It is found that liquid state convection could delay the differentiation for hundreds of My. The results are confronted with observational data from Cassini spacecraft. It is possible that differentiation is fully completed but the density of formed core is close to the mean density. If this interpretation is correct, then Rhea could have accreted any time before 3-4 My after formation of CAI.

  16. Efficient thermal desalination technologies with renewable energy systems: A state-of-the-art review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Esfahani, Iman Janghorban; Rashidi, Jouan; Ifaei, Pouya; Yoo, ChangKyoo

    2016-01-01

    Due to the current fossil fuel crisis and associated adverse environmental impacts, renewable energy sources (RES) have drawn interest as alternatives to fossil fuels for powering water desalination systems. Over the last few decades the utility of renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, and wind to run desalination processes has been explored. However, the expansion of these technologies to larger scales is hampered by techno-economic and thermo-economic challenges. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the field of renewable energy-powered thermal desalination systems (RE-PTD) to compare their productivity and efficiency through thermodynamic, economic, and environmental analyses. We performed a comparative study using published data to classify RE-PTD systems technologies on the basis of the energy collection systems that they use. Among RE-PTD systems, solar energy powered-thermal desalination systems demonstrate high thermo-environ-economic efficiency to produce fresh water to meet various scales of demand.

  17. The SESAME project. State of the art liquid metal thermal hydraulics and beyond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roelofs, F.; Shams, A.; Batta, A.; Moreau, V.; Di Piazza, I.; Gerschenfeld, A.; Planquart, P.; Tarantino, M. [Nuclear Research and Consultancy Group (NRG), Petten (Netherlands)

    2017-08-15

    The European Sustainable Nuclear Industry Initiative (ESNII) aims at industrial application of fast reactor technology for a sustainable nuclear energy production. Currently four demonstration projects have a promising outlook in Europe, i.e. the ASTRID project in France, the MYRRHA project in Belgium, the ALFRED pan-European project to be realized in Romania, and SEALER in Sweden. Sodium and lead(-alloys) are envisaged as coolants for these reactors. Obviously, in the development of these reactors, thermal-hydraulics is recognized as a key challenge with emphasis on safety issues. This paper discusses the state-of-the-art knowledge with respect to experiments and simulation techniques as pursued in the Horizon 2020 SESAME (thermal hydraulics Simulations and Experiments for the Safety Assessment of MEtal cooled reactors) project.

  18. Efficient thermal desalination technologies with renewable energy systems: A state-of-the-art review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Esfahani, Iman Janghorban; Rashidi, Jouan; Ifaei, Pouya; Yoo, ChangKyoo [Center for Environmental Studies, Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-15

    Due to the current fossil fuel crisis and associated adverse environmental impacts, renewable energy sources (RES) have drawn interest as alternatives to fossil fuels for powering water desalination systems. Over the last few decades the utility of renewable energy sources such as solar, geothermal, and wind to run desalination processes has been explored. However, the expansion of these technologies to larger scales is hampered by techno-economic and thermo-economic challenges. This paper reviews the state-of-the-art in the field of renewable energy-powered thermal desalination systems (RE-PTD) to compare their productivity and efficiency through thermodynamic, economic, and environmental analyses. We performed a comparative study using published data to classify RE-PTD systems technologies on the basis of the energy collection systems that they use. Among RE-PTD systems, solar energy powered-thermal desalination systems demonstrate high thermo-environ-economic efficiency to produce fresh water to meet various scales of demand.

  19. Thermal Conductivity of Superconductors in the Intermediate State: Size Effect in a Longitudinal Lamellar Structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suter, J.M.; Rinderer, L.

    1978-01-01

    The thermal conductivity of type I superconductors has been measured in a well-defined, optically controlled intermediate-state configuration the so-called longitudinal lamellar structure (LLS). A regular arrangement of alternating normal and superconducting lamellas is obtained in an elongated plate by applying the magnetic field obliquely (following Sharvin) and decreasing it from the critical values. The heat current is set parallel to the lamellas. Due to the peculiar reflection law governing the quasiparticle reflections at a normal-superconductor interphase boundary, the thermal conductivity of the LLS is reduced when the electronic mean free path is larger than or comparable to the width of the lamellas. As first pointed out by Andreev, the reflection occurs with vecotr-momentum conservation, and only the quasiparticles moving nearly parallel to the lamellas can transport heat efficiently. The corresponding reduction of the thermal conductivity is a size effect.Systematic measurements of the thermal conductivity of the LLS in high-purity lead and tin are interpreted in terms of the size-effect model. The parameters of the model were experimentally determined in a preliminary study, to enable an unambiguous comparison with the theory. In particular, the geometrical aspects of the structures were studied using a magnetooptical technique. Interesting results on the characteristics of the LLS were obtained. The thermal conductivity data on lead essentially confirm the size-effect description. In tin heat transport by the lamellas of both types takes place, the heat carriers being the electrons (T > or approx. = 1.6 K). The discrepancy between the predictions of the size-effect model and the observed values in tin are attributed to an oversimplified calculation of the contribution of the superconducting lamellas to the conductivity

  20. Thermal state and complex geology of a heterogeneous salty crust of Jupiter's satellite, Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto-Ballesteros, O.; Kargel, J.S.

    2005-01-01

    The complex geology of Europa is evidenced by many tectonic and cryomagmatic resurfacing structures, some of which are "painted" into a more visible expression by exogenic alteration processes acting on the principal endogenic cryopetrology. The surface materials emplaced and affected by this activity are mainly composed of water ice in some areas, but in other places there are other minerals involved. Non-ice minerals are visually recognized by their low albedo and reddish color either when first emplaced or, more likely, after alteration by Europan weathering processes, especially sublimation and alteration by ionizing radiation. While red chromophoric material could be due to endogenic production of solid sulfur allotropes or other compounds, most likely the red substance is an impurity produced by radiation alteration of hydrated sulfate salts or sulphuric acid of mainly internal origin. If the non-ice red materials or their precursors have a source in the satellite interior, and if they are not merely trace contaminants, then they can play an important role in the evolution of the icy crust, including structural differentiation and the internal dynamics. Here we assume that these substances are major components of Europa's cryo/hydrosphere, as some models have predicted they should be. If this is an accurate assumption, then these substances should not be neglected in physical, chemical, and biological models of Europa, even if major uncertainties remain as to the exact identity, abundance, and distribution of the non-ice materials. The physical chemical properties of the ice-associated materials will contribute to the physical state of the crust today and in the geological past. In order to model the influence of them on the thermal state and the geology, we have determined the thermal properties of the hydrated salts. Our new lab data reveal very low thermal conductivities for hydrated salts compared to water ice. Lower conductivities of salty ice would

  1. The effects of state anxiety and thermal comfort on sleep quality and eye fatigue in shift work nurses

    OpenAIRE

    Dehghan, Habibollah; Azmoon, Hiva; Souri, Shiva; Akbari, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Psychological problems as state anxiety (SA) in the work environment has negative effect on the employees life especially shift work nurses, i.e. negative effect on mental and physical health (sleep quality, eye fatigue and comfort thermal). The purpose of this study was determination of effects of state anxiety and thermal comfort on sleep quality and eye fatigue in shift work nurses. Methods: This cross-sectional research conducted on 82 shift-work personnel of 18 nursing workstations of Is...

  2. Chimera states in a Hodgkin-Huxley model of thermally sensitive neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaze, Tera A.; Lewis, Scott; Bahar, Sonya

    2016-08-01

    Chimera states occur when identically coupled groups of nonlinear oscillators exhibit radically different dynamics, with one group exhibiting synchronized oscillations and the other desynchronized behavior. This dynamical phenomenon has recently been studied in computational models and demonstrated experimentally in mechanical, optical, and chemical systems. The theoretical basis of these states is currently under active investigation. Chimera behavior is of particular relevance in the context of neural synchronization, given the phenomenon of unihemispheric sleep and the recent observation of asymmetric sleep in human patients with sleep apnea. The similarity of neural chimera states to neural "bump" states, which have been suggested as a model for working memory and visual orientation tuning in the cortex, adds to their interest as objects of study. Chimera states have been demonstrated in the FitzHugh-Nagumo model of excitable cells and in the Hindmarsh-Rose neural model. Here, we demonstrate chimera states and chimera-like behaviors in a Hodgkin-Huxley-type model of thermally sensitive neurons both in a system with Abrams-Strogatz (mean field) coupling and in a system with Kuramoto (distance-dependent) coupling. We map the regions of parameter space for which chimera behavior occurs in each of the two coupling schemes.

  3. Decoherence and thermalization of a pure quantum state in quantum field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud, Alexandre; Serreau, Julien

    2010-06-11

    We study the real-time evolution of a self-interacting O(N) scalar field initially prepared in a pure, coherent quantum state. We present a complete solution of the nonequilibrium quantum dynamics from a 1/N expansion of the two-particle-irreducible effective action at next-to-leading order, which includes scattering and memory effects. We demonstrate that, restricting one's attention (or ability to measure) to a subset of the infinite hierarchy of correlation functions, one observes an effective loss of purity or coherence and, on longer time scales, thermalization. We point out that the physics of decoherence is well described by classical statistical field theory.

  4. Quasiclassical calculation of the quasiparticle thermal conductivity in a mixed state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adachi, Hiroto; Miranovic, Predrag; Ichioka, Masanori; Machida, Kazushige

    2007-01-01

    We report the result of calculation of the quasiparticle thermal conductivity κ xx (∇T orthogonal B) in the vortex state of a two-dimensional superconductor. We compute κ xx for both s-wave and d-wave superconductors, taking account of the spatial dependence of normal Green's function g, which is neglected in the previous studies using the Brandt-Pesch-Tewordt (BPT) method. Our results indicate that κ xx based on the BPT method is slightly underestimated due to its incoherent spatial averaging procedure

  5. ANTEO: An optimised PC computer code for the steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of rod bundles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cevolani, S.

    1996-07-01

    The paper deals with the description of a Personal Computer oriented subchannel code, devoted to the steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of nuclear reactor fuel bundles. The development of a such code was made possible by two facts: first, the increase the computing power of the desk machines; secondly, the fact several years of experience into operate subchannels codes have shown how to simplify many of the physical models without a sensible loss of accuracy. For sake of validation, the developed code was compared with a traditional subchannel code, the COBRA one. The results of the comparison show a very good agreement between the two codes

  6. Thermal solar energy in Spain. State of the art and objectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glenn, Jaouen

    2006-01-01

    According the Kyoto protocol, Spain has to reduce its CO 2 emissions at 330 millions of tons (a decrease of 18 % from the level of 2003). From the european commission policy, the energy resources will be of 12 % of renewable energies. In this context, Spain developed an energy policy in favor of the solar energy. This document provides information on: the energy market in Spain, the thermal solar energy operating, the CO 2 emissions, the state of the art in the domain in spain, the 2010 objectives, the programs and the assistance, some data on the solar market in comparison with the Europe. (A.L.B.)

  7. Fracture of thermally loaded disks of materials in elastic-brittle state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egorov, V.S.; Lanin, A.G.; Fedik, I.I.

    1981-01-01

    Fracture kinetics and limiting supporting power were studied in a solid thin disk axisymmetrically cooled from the periphery depending on the deqree of the stressed state nonuniformity and crack interaction. Basing on a strength approach of fracture linear mechanism it has become possible to obtain limit equilibrium curves and to evaluate thermoelastic stress redistribution on the boundary of the disk with one, two and four symmetrical radial cracks. Calculated data are confirmed by the results of the experiments performed with zirconium carbide water-cooled disks. It is shown that while determining the limit supporting power of a thermally loaded body, the loading history and fracture kinetics should be taken into account

  8. Electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of liquid aluminum in the two-temperature state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrov, Yu V.; Inogamov, N. A.; Mokshin, A. V.; Galimzyanov, B. N.

    2018-01-01

    The electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity of liquid aluminum in the two-temperature state is calculated by using the relaxation time approach and structural factor of ions obtained by molecular dynamics simulation. Resistivity witin the Ziman-Evans approach is also considered to be higher than in the approach with previously calculated conductivity via the relaxation time. Calculations based on the construction of the ion structural factor through the classical molecular dynamics and kinetic equation for electrons are more economical in terms of computing resources and give results close to the Kubo-Greenwood with the quantum molecular dynamics calculations.

  9. Solid state polymerization: its action on thermal and rheological properties of PET/PC reactive blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis C. Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The solid state polymerization (SSP of PET/PC reactive extrusion blends - with and without cobalt catalyst - at different polymer ratios was studied. Thermal and rheological evaluations were performed. DSC results showed changes in the PET's Tg, Tch, Tm and Xc.. The melt flow rate (MFR decreased for PET and the blends. The intrinsic viscosity increased. The variation in calorimetric and rheological properties might be attributed to the PET's chain extension reactions - esterification and transesterification. These reactions led to an increase in the PET's molar mass, consequently shifting the PET's Tg to lower temperature and PET's crystallization, besides reducing the blend miscibility and flowability.

  10. Emanation thermal analysis. Application in solid state chemistry, analytical chemistry and engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balek, V.; Tel'deshi, Yu.

    1986-01-01

    Voluminous material on application of emenation thermal analysis for investigation of solids is systematized. General concepts and historical review of development of the method are given. Methods of introduction of inert gases into solids are considered. Theoretical aspects of inert gas evolution from solids labelled by radioactive gas or its maternal isotope are stated. The methods for measuring inert gases are considered. The possibilities, limitations and perspectives of development of radiometric emanation methods for the solution of various problems of analytical chemistry and thechnology are discussed

  11. Sex-linked dominant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inheritance - sex-linked dominant; Genetics - sex-linked dominant; X-linked dominant; Y-linked dominant ... can be either an autosomal chromosome or a sex chromosome. It also depends on whether the trait ...

  12. Steady-State Thermal Properties of Rectangular Straw-Bales (RSB for Building

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonardo Conti

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Straw is an inevitable product of cereal production and is available in huge quantities in the world. In order to use straw-bales as a building material, the characteristic values of the thermal performances should be determined. To not lose the benefits of the cheapness and sustainability of the material, the characteristics must be determined with simple and inexpensive means and procedures. This research aims to implement tools and methods focused at the determination of the thermal properties of straw-bales. For this study, the guidelines dictated by ASTM and ISO were followed. A measurement system consisting of a Metering Chamber (MC was realized. The MC was placed inside a Climate Chamber (CC. During the test, a known quantity of energy is introduced inside MC. When the steady-state is reached, all the energy put into MC passes through its walls in CC, where it is absorbed by the air-conditioner. A series of thermopiles detect the temperature of the surfaces of the measurement system and of the specimen. Determining the amount of energy transmitted by the various parts of MC and by the specimen, it is possible to apply Fourier’s law to calculate the thermal conductivity of the specimen.

  13. Microscopic and probabilistic approach to thermal steady state based on a dice and coin toy model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Onorato, Pasquale; Moggio, Lorenzo; Oss, Stefano; Malgieri, Massimiliano

    2017-01-01

    In this article we present an educational approach to thermal equilibrium which was tested on a group of 13 undergraduate students at the University of Trento. The approach is based on a stochastic toy model, in which bodies in thermal contact are represented by rows of squares on a cardboard table, which exchange coins placed on the squares based on the roll of two dice. The discussion of several physical principles, such as the exponential approach to equilibrium, the determination of the equilibrium temperature, and the interpretation of the equilibrium state as the most probable macrostate, proceeds through a continual comparison between the outcomes obtained with the toy model and the results of a real experiment on the thermal contact of two masses of water at different temperatures. At the end of the sequence, a re-analysis of the experimental results in view of both the Boltzmann and Clausius definitions of entropy reveals some limits of the toy model, but also allows for a critical discussion of the concepts of temperature and entropy. In order to provide the reader with a feeling of how the sequence was received by students, and how it helped them understand the topics introduced, we discuss some excerpts from their answers to a conceptual item given at the end of the sequence. (paper)

  14. Measurement of tissue-radiation dosage using a thermal steady-state elastic shear wave.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Sheng-Yi; Hsieh, Tung-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Ru; Chen, Jin-Chung; Chou, Chien

    2017-08-01

    A biodosimeter based on thermal-induced elastic shear wave (TIESW) in silicone acellular porcine dermis (SAPD) at thermal steady state has been proposed and demonstrated. A square slab SAPD treated with ionizing radiation was tested. The SAPD becomes a continuous homogeneous and isotropic viscoelastic medium due to the generation of randomly coiled collagen fibers formed from their bundle-like structure in the dermis. A harmonic TIESW then propagates on the surface of the SAPD as measured by a nanometer-scaled strain-stress response under thermal equilibrium conditions at room temperature. TIESW oscillation frequency was noninvasively measured in real time by monitoring the transverse displacement of the TIESW on the SAPD surface. Because the elastic shear modulus is highly sensitive to absorbed doses of ionizing radiation, this proposed biodosimeter can become a highly sensitive and noninvasive method for quantitatively determining tissue-absorbed dosage in terms of TIESW’s oscillation frequency. Detection sensitivity at 1 cGy and dynamic ranges covering 1 to 40 cGy and 80 to 500 cGy were demonstrated.

  15. Thermal regime of the State 2-14 well, Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sass, J.H.; Priest, S.S.; Duda, L.E.; Carson, C.C.; Hendricks, J.D.; Robison, L.C.

    1988-01-01

    Temperature logs were made repeatedly during breaks in drilling and both during and after flow tests in the Salton Sea Scientific Drilling Project well (State 2-14). The purpose of these logs was to assist in identifying zones of fluid loss or gain and to characterize reservoir temperatures. At the conclusion of the active phase of the project, a series of logs was begun in an attempt to establish the equilibrium temperature profile. Thermal gradients decrease from about 250 mK m-1 in the upper few hundred meters to just below 200 mK m-1 near the base of the conductive cap. Using one interpretation, thermal conductivities increase with depth (mainly because of decreasing porosity), resulting in component heat flows that agree reasonably well with the mean of about 450 mW m-2. This value agrees well with heat flow data from the shallow wells within the Salton Sea geothermal field. A second interpretation, in which measured temperature coefficients of quartz- and carbonate-rich rocks are used to correct thermal conductivity, results in lower mean conductivities that are roughly constant with depth and, consequently, systematically decreasing heat flux averaging about 350 mW m-2 below 300 m. This interpretation is consistent with the inference (from fluid inclusion studies) that the rocks in this part of the field were once several tens of degrees Celsius hotter than they are now. The age of this possible disturbance is estimated at a few thousand years. -from Authors

  16. 3D numerical modelling of the thermal state of deep geological nuclear waste repositories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, Yu. N.

    2017-09-01

    One of the important aspects of the high-level radioactive waste (HLW) disposal in deep geological repositories is ensuring the integrity of the engineered barriers which is, among other phenomena, considerably influenced by the thermal loads. As the HLW produce significant amount of heat, the design of the repository should maintain the balance between the cost-effectiveness of the construction and the sufficiency of the safety margins, including those imposed on the thermal conditions of the barriers. The 3D finite-element computer code FENIA was developed as a tool for simulation of thermal processes in deep geological repositories. Further the models for mechanical phenomena and groundwater hydraulics will be added resulting in a fully coupled thermo-hydro-mechanical (THM) solution. The long-term simulations of the thermal state were performed for two possible layouts of the repository. One was based on the proposed project of Russian repository, and another features larger HLW amount within the same space. The obtained results describe the spatial and temporal evolution of the temperature filed inside the repository and in the surrounding rock for 3500 years. These results show that practically all generated heat was ultimately absorbed by the host rock without any significant temperature increase. Still in the short time span even in case of smaller amount of the HLW the temperature maximum exceeds 100 °C, and for larger amount of the HLW the local temperature remains above 100 °C for considerable time. Thus, the substantiation of the long-term stability of the repository would require an extensive study of the materials properties and behaviour in order to remove the excessive conservatism from the simulations and to reduce the uncertainty of the input data.

  17. Assessing the Thermal Environmental Impacts of an Groundwater Heat Pump in Southeastern Washington State

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freedman, Vicky L.; Waichler, Scott R.; Mackley, Rob D.; Horner, Jacob A.

    2012-04-01

    A thermal analysis of a large-scale (e.g., 1900 gpm), open-loop ground source heat pump (GSHP) installed on the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) campus in southeastern Washington State has been performed using a numerical modeling approach. Water temperature increases at the upgradient extraction wells in the system and at the downgradient Columbia River are potential concerns, especially since heat rejection to the subsurface will occur year-round. Hence, thermal impacts of the open-loop GSHP were investigated to identify operational scenarios that minimized downgradient environmental impacts at the river, and upgradient temperature drift at the production wells. Simulations examined the sensitivity of the system to variations in pumping rates and injected water temperatures, as well as to hydraulic conductivity estimates of the aquifer. Results demonstrated that both downgradient and upgradient thermal impacts were more sensitive to injection flow rates than estimates of hydraulic conductivity. Higher injection rates at lower temperatures resulted in higher temperature increases at the extraction wells but lower increases at the river. Conversely, lower pumping rates and higher injected water temperatures resulted in a smaller temperature increase at the extraction wells, but higher increases at the river. The scenario with lower pumping rates is operationally more efficient, but does increase the likelihood of a thermal plume discharging into the Columbia River. However, this impact would be mitigated by mixing within the hyporheic zone and the Columbia River. The impact under current operational conditions is negligible, but future increases in heat rejection could require a compromise between maximizing operational efficiency and minimizing temperature increases at the shoreline.

  18. Symmetric minimally entangled typical thermal states for canonical and grand-canonical ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Moritz; Barthel, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Based on the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), strongly correlated quantum many-body systems at finite temperatures can be simulated by sampling over a certain class of pure matrix product states (MPS) called minimally entangled typical thermal states (METTS). When a system features symmetries, these can be utilized to substantially reduce MPS computation costs. It is conceptually straightforward to simulate canonical ensembles using symmetric METTS. In practice, it is important to alternate between different symmetric collapse bases to decrease autocorrelations in the Markov chain of METTS. To this purpose, we introduce symmetric Fourier and Haar-random block bases that are efficiently mixing. We also show how grand-canonical ensembles can be simulated efficiently with symmetric METTS. We demonstrate these approaches for spin-1 /2 X X Z chains and discuss how the choice of the collapse bases influences autocorrelations as well as the distribution of measurement values and, hence, convergence speeds.

  19. Solid state photon upconversion utilizing thermally activated delayed fluorescence molecules as triplet sensitizer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Tony C.; Congreve, Daniel N.; Baldo, Marc A., E-mail: baldo@mit.edu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-07-20

    The ability to upconvert light is useful for a range of applications, from biological imaging to solar cells. But modern technologies have struggled to upconvert incoherent incident light at low intensities. Here, we report solid state photon upconversion employing triplet-triplet exciton annihilation in an organic semiconductor, sensitized by a thermally activated-delayed fluorescence (TADF) dye. Compared to conventional phosphorescent sensitizers, the TADF dye maximizes the wavelength shift in upconversion due to its small singlet-triplet splitting. The efficiency of energy transfer from the TADF dye is 9.1%, and the conversion yield of sensitizer exciton pairs to singlet excitons in the annihilator is 1.1%. Our results demonstrate upconversion in solid state geometries and with non-heavy metal-based sensitizer materials.

  20. Numerical investigation of steady-state thermal behavior of an infrared detector cryo chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singhal Mayank

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available An infrared (IR detector is simply a transducer of radiant energy, converting radiant energy into a measurable form. Since radiation does not rely on visible light, it offers the possibility of seeing in the dark or through obscured conditions, by detecting the IR energy emitted by objects. One of the prime applications of IR detector systems for military use is in target acquisition and tracking of projectile systems. The IR detectors also have great potential in commercial market. Typically, IR detectors perform best when cooled to cryogenic temperatures in the range of nearly 120 K. However, the necessity to operate in such cryogenic regimes makes the application of IR detectors extremely complex. Further, prior to proceeding on to a full blown transient thermal analysis it is worthwhile to perform a steady-state numerical analysis for ascertaining the effect of variation in viz., material, gas conduction coefficient, h, emissivity, ε, on the temperature profile along the cryo chamber length. This would enable understanding the interaction between the cryo chamber and its environment. Hence, the present work focuses on the development of steady-state numerical models for thermal analysis of IR cryo chamber using MATLAB. The numerical results show that gas conduction coefficient has marked influence on the temperature profile of the cryo chamber whereas the emissivity has a weak effect. The experimental validation of numerical results has also been presented.

  1. Thermal isomerization of azobenzenes: on the performance of Eyring transition state theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rietze, Clemens; Titov, Evgenii; Lindner, Steven; Saalfrank, Peter

    2017-08-01

    The thermal Z\\to E (back-)isomerization of azobenzenes is a prototypical reaction occurring in molecular switches. It has been studied for decades, yet its kinetics is not fully understood. In this paper, quantum chemical calculations are performed to model the kinetics of an experimental benchmark system, where a modified azobenzene (AzoBiPyB) is embedded in a metal-organic framework (MOF). The molecule can be switched thermally from cis to trans, under solvent-free conditions. We critically test the validity of Eyring transition state theory for this reaction. As previously found for other azobenzenes (albeit in solution), good agreement between theory and experiment emerges for activation energies and activation free energies, already at a comparatively simple level of theory, B3LYP/6-31G* including dispersion corrections. However, theoretical Arrhenius prefactors and activation entropies are in qualitiative disagreement with experiment. Several factors are discussed that may have an influence on activation entropies, among them dynamical and geometric constraints (imposed by the MOF). For a simpler model—Z\\to E isomerization in azobenzene—a systematic test of quantum chemical methods from both density functional theory and wavefunction theory is carried out in the context of Eyring theory. Also, the effect of anharmonicities on activation entropies is discussed for this model system. Our work highlights capabilities and shortcomings of Eyring transition state theory and quantum chemical methods, when applied for the Z\\to E (back-)isomerization of azobenzenes under solvent-free conditions.

  2. Experimentally Studied Thermal Piston-head State of the Internal-Combustion Engine with a Thermal Layer Formed by Micro-Arc Oxidation Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Yu. Dudareva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experimental study to show the efficiency of reducing thermal tension of internal combustion engine (ICE pistons through forming a thermal barrier coating on the piston-head. During the engine operation the piston is under the most thermal stress. High temperatures in the combustion chamber may lead to the piston-head burnout and destruction and engine failure.Micro-arc oxidation (MAO method was selected as the technology to create a thermal barrier coating. MAO technology allows us to form the ceramic coating with a thickness of 400μm on the surface of aluminum alloy, which have high heat resistance, and have good adhesion to the substrate even under thermal cycling stresses.Deliverables of MAO method used to protect pistons described in the scientific literature are insufficient, as they are either calculated or experimentally obtained at the special plants (units, which do not reproduce piston operation in a real engine. This work aims to fill this gap. The aim of the work is an experimental study of the thermal protective ability of MAO-layer formed on the piston-head with simulation of thermal processes of the real engine.The tests were performed on a specially designed and manufactured stand free of motor, which reproduces operation conditions maximum close to those of the real engine. The piston is heated by a fire source - gas burner with isobutene balloon, cooling is carried out by the water circulation system through the water-cooling jacket.Tests have been conducted to compare the thermal state of the regular engine piston without thermal protection and the piston with a heat layer formed on the piston-head by MAO method. The study findings show that the thermal protective MAO-layer with thickness of 100μm allows us to reduce thermal tension of piston on average by 8,5 %. Thus at high temperatures there is the most pronounced effect that is important for the uprated engines.The obtained findings can

  3. Double light-cone dynamics establish thermal states in integrable 1D Bose gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langen, T.; Schweigler, T.; Demler, E.; Schmiedmayer, J.

    2018-02-01

    We theoretically investigate the non-equilibrium dynamics in a quenched pair of one-dimensional Bose gases with density imbalance. We describe the system using its low-energy effective theory, the Luttinger liquid model. In this framework the system shows strictly integrable relaxation dynamics via dephasing of its approximate many-body eigenstates. In the balanced case, this leads to the well-known light-cone-like establishment of a prethermalized state, which can be described by a generalized Gibbs ensemble. In the imbalanced case the integrable dephasing leads to a state that, counter-intuitively, closely resembles a thermal equilibrium state. The approach to this state is characterized by two separate light-cone dynamics with distinct characteristic velocities. This behavior is a result of the fact that in the imbalanced case observables are not aligned with the conserved quantities of the integrable system. We discuss a concrete experimental realization to study this effect using matterwave interferometry and many-body revivals on an atom chip.

  4. Analysis of Technical State of Thermal and Mechanical Equipment of Thermal Power Stations in the Republic of Belarus under Conditions of Investment Deficit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Shichko

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains an analysis of the equipment state at a number of thermal power stations. This analysis is made on the basis of indifferent curves. Relationship of two factors is taken as a criterion for estimation of the equipment state. These factors are faultiness (parameter of failure fi"equency and operating time from the moment when the equipment was put into operation. It is noted that operation of the equipment in excess of specified life without replacement of so-called «weab> elements and estimation of metal state will lead to conditions of high risk in opieration of such equipment.

  5. EPR evidence for thermally excited triplet states in exinite, vitrinite and inertinite separated from bituminous coal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slowik, G.P.; Wojtowicz, W.; Wieckowski, A.B. [University of Zielona Gora, Zielona Gora (Poland). Inst. of Physics

    2005-07-01

    In this work we have made an electron spin resonance (EPR) study of macerals obtained from the lithotype clarain separated from Polish medium-rank coal (85.6 wt.% C). For three macerals (exinite, vitrinite, and inertinite), the temperature dependence of intensity of EPR spectra in the temperature range of 100-373 K was investigated. The experimentally obtained EPR spectra of macerals were fitted by curves of the derivatives of the Gaussian and Lorentzian functions. The best fitting was obtained, when the experimental EPR spectra were assumed to be a superposition of three lines, for exinite and vitrinite - a broad Gaussian (G), a broad Lorentzian (L1) and a narrow Lorentzian (L3) line, but for inertinite of two lines - a narrow Lorentzian (L2) and a narrow Lorentzian (L3) line. The computer-assisted fitting has shown that each individual component line has similar values of resonance field, but different linewidths and amplitudes. The temperature dependence of line intensity I of the broad Gaussian (G) and narrow Lorentzian (L2 and L3) lines fulfils the Curie law in the form I = C/T or IT = C, whereas the broad Lorentzian (L1) line does not fulfil the Curie law. In the last case the temperature dependence of the Lorentzian (L1) component was fitted by the relation I = C/T + B/(T(3 + exp(J/kT))) or IT C + B/(3 + exp(J/kT))), valid for thermally excited triplet states (S = 1). For exinite and vitrinite the curves presenting the temperature dependence of the product IT versus temperature T were resolved into two curves, one for paramagnetic centres in the doublet state (S = ), and the other for paramagnetic centres in the thermally excited triplet state (S = 1).

  6. The effects of state anxiety and thermal comfort on sleep quality and eye fatigue in shift work nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghan, Habibollah; Azmoon, Hiva; Souri, Shiva; Akbari, Jafar

    2014-01-01

    Psychological problems as state anxiety (SA) in the work environment has negative effect on the employees life especially shift work nurses, i.e. negative effect on mental and physical health (sleep quality, eye fatigue and comfort thermal). The purpose of this study was determination of effects of state anxiety and thermal comfort on sleep quality and eye fatigue in shift work nurses. This cross-sectional research conducted on 82 shift-work personnel of 18 nursing workstations of Isfahan hospitals in 2012. To measure the SA, sleep quality, visual fatigue and thermal comfort, Spielberger state-trait anxiety inventory, Pittsburg sleep quality index, eye fatigue questionnaire and thermal comfort questionnaire were used respectively. The data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, student test and correlation analysis. Correlation between SA and sleep quality was -0.664(P thermal comfort was -0.276(P = 0.016) and between SA and eye fatigue was 0.57 (P thermal conditions and reduce state anxiety level can be reduce eye fatigue and increase the sleep quality in shift work nurses.

  7. Combination is the dominant free radical process initiated in DNA by ionizing radiation: an overview based on solid-state EPR studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernhard, W.A.; Mroczka, N.; Barnes, J.

    1994-01-01

    An overview of the early processes initiated in DNA by ionizing radiation is given from the perspective of studies done by solid-state EPR with the focus on radical combination. Comparisons with free radical formation and trapping in crystalline pyrimidines (1-methylcytosine, thymine, 1-methylthymine, 1-methyluracil, and cytosine monohydrate) provide insight into the processes occurring in DNA. Between 25 and 50% of low LET ionizations in fully hydrated DNA at 4 K lead to trapped free radicals, the remaining unobserved radicals are assumed to have combined. The majority of the radicals trapped in DNA at 4 K (G ∼ 0.3 μmol/J) are believed to be in clusters. Based on the value of G, it is argued that the range of holes and bound electrons in DNA at 4 K are, in the main, limited to within the cluster diameter, ∼ 4 nm. Proton transfer across hydrogen bonds promotes radical trapping and inhibits combination but is thermally reversible. Warming to room temperature mobilizes the reversibly trapped radicals and gives additional combination (50-80% of those trapped at 4 K). The yield of free radicals, after anneal, is sufficient to account for the yield of single-strand breaks produced by direct effects. (Author)

  8. Effect of the lithospheric thermal state on the Moho interface: A case study in South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagherbandi, Mohammad; Bai, Yongliang; Sjöberg, Lars E.; Tenzer, Robert; Abrehdary, Majid; Miranda, Silvia; Alcacer Sanchez, Juan M.

    2017-07-01

    Gravimetric methods applied for Moho recovery in areas with sparse and irregular distribution of seismic data often assume only a constant crustal density. Results of latest studies, however, indicate that corrections for crustal density heterogeneities could improve the gravimetric result, especially in regions with a complex geologic/tectonic structure. Moreover, the isostatic mass balance reflects also the density structure within the lithosphere. The gravimetric methods should therefore incorporate an additional correction for the lithospheric mantle as well as deeper mantle density heterogeneities. Following this principle, we solve the Vening Meinesz-Moritz (VMM) inverse problem of isostasy constrained by seismic data to determine the Moho depth of the South American tectonic plate including surrounding oceans, while taking into consideration the crustal and mantle density heterogeneities. Our numerical result confirms that contribution of sediments significantly modifies the estimation of the Moho geometry especially along the continental margins with large sediment deposits. To account for the mantle density heterogeneities we develop and apply a method in order to correct the Moho geometry for the contribution of the lithospheric thermal state (i.e., the lithospheric thermal-pressure correction). In addition, the misfit between the isostatic and seismic Moho models, attributed mainly to deep mantle density heterogeneities and other geophysical phenomena, is corrected for by applying the non-isostatic correction. The results reveal that the application of the lithospheric thermal-pressure correction improves the RMS fit of the VMM gravimetric Moho solution to the CRUST1.0 (improves ∼ 1.9 km) and GEMMA (∼1.1 km) models and the point-wise seismic data (∼0.7 km) in South America.

  9. A warm thermal enclave in the late Pleistocene of the south-eastern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Dale A; Rich, Fredrick J; Schneider, Vincent; Lynch-Stieglitz, Jean

    2009-05-01

    Physical and biological evidence supports the probable existence of an enclave of relatively warm climate located between the Southern Appalachian Mountains and the Atlantic Ocean in the United States during the Last Glacial Maximum. The region supported a mosaic of forest and prairie habitats inhabited by a "Floridian" ice-age biota. Plant and vertebrate remains suggest an ecological gradient towards Cape Hatteras (35 degreesN) wherein forests tended to replace prairies, and browsing proboscideans tended to replace grazing proboscideans. Beyond 35 degreesN, warm waters of the Gulf Stream were deflected towards the central Atlantic, and a cold-facies biota replaced "Floridian" biota on the Atlantic coastal plain. Because of niche diversity and relatively benign climate, biodiversity may have been greater in the south-eastern thermal enclave than in other unglaciated areas of North America. However, the impact of terminal Pleistocene megafaunal extinctions may also have been shorter and more severe in the enclave than further north. A comparison with biotic changes that occurred in North America approximately 55 million years (ma) ago at the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum suggests that similar processes of change took place under both ice-house and greenhouse climates.

  10. A Synthesis of the Basal Thermal State of the Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macgregor, J. A.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Catania, G. A.; Aschwanden, A.; Clow, G. D.; Colgan, W. T.; Gogineni, S. P.; Morlighem, M.; Nowicki, S. M. J.; Paden, J. D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    Greenland's thick ice sheet insulates the bedrock below from the cold temperatures at the surface, so the bottom of the ice is often tens of degrees warmer than at the top, because the ice bottom is slowly warmed by heat coming from the Earth's depths. Knowing whether Greenland's ice lies on wet, slippery ground or is anchored to dry, frozen bedrock is essential for predicting how this ice will flow in the future. But scientists have very few direct observations of the thermal conditions beneath the ice sheet, obtained through fewer than two dozen boreholes that have reached the bottom. Our study synthesizes several independent methods to infer the Greenland Ice Sheet's basal thermal state -whether the bottom of the ice is melted or not-leading to the first map that identifies frozen and thawed areas across the whole ice sheet. This map will guide targets for future investigations of the Greenland Ice Sheet toward the most vulnerable and poorly understood regions, ultimately improving our understanding of its dynamics and contribution to future sea-level rise. It is of particular relevance to ongoing Operation IceBridge activities and future large-scale airborne missions over Greenland.

  11. Advanced materials for solid state hydrogen storage: “Thermal engineering issues”

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Srinivasa Murthy, S.; Anil Kumar, E.

    2014-01-01

    Hydrogen has been widely recognized as the “Energy Carrier” of the future. Efficient, reliable, economical and safe storage and delivery of hydrogen form important aspects in achieving success of the “Hydrogen Economy”. Gravimetric and volumetric storage capacities become important when one considers portable and mobile applications of hydrogen. In the case of solid state hydrogen storage, the gas is reversibly embedded (by physisorption and/or chemisorption) in a solid matrix. A wide variety of materials such as intermetallics, physisorbents, complex hydrides/alanates, metal organic frameworks, etc. have been investigated as possible storage media. This paper discusses the feasibility of lithium– and sodium–aluminum hydrides with emphasis on their thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties. Drawbacks such as poor heat transfer characteristics and poor kinetics demand special attention to the thermal design of solid state storage devices. - Highlights: • Advanced materials suitable for solid state hydrogen storage are discussed. • Issues related to thermodynamic and thermo-physical properties of hydriding materials are brought out. • Hydriding and dehydriding behavior including sorption kinetics of complex hydrides with emphasis on alanates are explained

  12. Burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Atta

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The burn-up dependent steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis of Pakistan research reactor-1, reference operating core, has been carried out utilizing standard computer codes WIMS/D4, CITATION, and RELAP5/MOD3.4. Reactor codes WIMS/D4 and CITATION have been used for the calculations of neutronic parameters including peaking factors and power profiles at different burn-up considering a xenon free core and also the equilibrium xenon values. RELAP5/MOD3.4 code was utilized for the determination of peak fuel centerline, clad and coolant temperatures to ensure the safety of the reactor throughout the cycle. The calculations reveal that the reactor is safe and no nucleate boiling will commence at any part of the core throughout the cycle and that the safety margin increases with burnup as peaking factors decrease.

  13. Calculation of the thermal and hydraulic states in rod cluster cores of light-water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teichel, H.

    1977-01-01

    For calculating the three-dimensional steady distribution of the thermal and hydraulic states in rod cluster cores of light-water reactors, the subchannel analysis programs COLA 1 and COLA 2 have been developed. Both programs contain a multitude of competing empirical correlations which may be used by choice. The programs COLA 1 and COLA 2 differ in the calculation method and in the treatment of the boundary condition 'equal pressure at the end of all cooling channels' governing the problem. All parts of the programs are identical. By means of recomputed experiments statements on the accuracy of the results to be expected can be made. In addition, the different suitability of both programs for different experimental conditions are shown. (orig.) [de

  14. Research Update: Utilizing magnetization dynamics in solid-state thermal energy conversion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen R. Boona

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available We review the spin-Seebeck and magnon-electron drag effects in the context of solid-state energy conversion. These phenomena are driven by advective magnon-electron interactions. Heat flow through magnetic materials generates magnetization dynamics, which can strongly affect free electrons within or adjacent to the magnetic material, thereby producing magnetization-dependent (e.g., remnant electric fields. The relative strength of spin-dependent interactions means that magnon-driven effects can generate significantly larger thermoelectric power factors as compared to classical thermoelectric phenomena. This is a surprising situation in which spin-based effects are larger than purely charge-based effects, potentially enabling new approaches to thermal energy conversion.

  15. Two-magnon bound state causes ultrafast thermally induced magnetisation switching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, J.; Atxitia, U.; Ostler, T. A.; Hovorka, O.; Chubykalo-Fesenko, O.; Chantrell, R. W.

    2013-01-01

    There has been much interest recently in the discovery of thermally induced magnetisation switching using femtosecond laser excitation, where a ferrimagnetic system can be switched deterministically without an applied magnetic field. Experimental results suggest that the reversal occurs due to intrinsic material properties, but so far the microscopic mechanism responsible for reversal has not been identified. Using computational and analytic methods we show that the switching is caused by the excitation of two-magnon bound states, the properties of which are dependent on material factors. This discovery allows us to accurately predict the onset of switching and the identification of this mechanism will allow new classes of materials to be identified or designed for memory devices in the THz regime. PMID:24253110

  16. Thermal stress state of cryogenic HP vessels under freezing and pressurization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsybenko, A.S.; Kuranov, B.A.; Chepurnoj, A.D.; Shaposhnikov, V.A.; Krishchuk, N.G.

    1986-01-01

    A mathematical model is developed for thermomechanical processes in cryogenic HP vessels under freezing either by liquid and (or) gaseous cryogen and under pressurization. Equations of nonlinear nonstationary thermal conductivity and nonisothermal thermoelastoplasticity are used for the case of the theory off low with isotropic hardening. Semiempiricaldependences of nonstationary heat exchange for gaseous medium, experimental curves of cryogenic liquid boiling, mass exchange relationships are allowed for when formulating boundary conditions. The mathematical modelis realized on the basi of the finite element method in the form of highly automated program complex TERSOD (heat resistanceof vessels), oriented for computer of the Unified System. Heat and stress-strained states for three constructions of vessels are thoroughly studied under different conditions of gaseous, liquid and combined freezing with subsequent pressurization

  17. Tunnel and thermal c-axis transport in BSCCO in the normal and pseudogap states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giura, M; Fastampa, R; Sarti, S; Pompeo, N; Silva, E

    2007-01-01

    We consider the problem of c-axis transport in double-layered cuprates, in particular with reference to Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ compounds. We exploit the effect of the two barriers on the thermal and tunnel transport. The resulting model is able to describe accurately the normal state c-axis resistivity in Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ , from the underdoped side up to the strongly overdoped. We extend the model, without introducing additional parameters, in order to allow for the decrease of the barrier when an external voltage bias is applied. The extended model is found to describe properly the c-axis resistivity for small voltage bias above the pseudogap temperature T * , the c-axis resistivity for large voltage bias even below T c , and the differential dI/dV curves taken in mesa structures

  18. Ignition phase and steady-state structures of a non-thermal air plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lu Xin Pei

    2003-01-01

    An AC-driven, non-thermal, atmospheric pressure air plasma is generated within the gap separating a disc-shaped metal electrode and a water electrode. The ignition phase and the steady-state are studied by a high-speed CCD camera. It is found that the plasma always initiates at the surface of the water electrode. The plasma exhibits different structures depending on the polarity of the water electrode: when the water electrode plays the role of cathode, a relatively wide but visibly dim plasma column is generated. At the maximum driving voltage, the gas temperature is between 800 and 900 K, and the peak current is 67 mA; when the water electrode is anode, the plasma column narrows but increases its light emission. The gas temperature in this case is measured to be in the 1400-1500 K range, and the peak current is 81 mA.

  19. Surface hopping, transition state theory, and decoherence. II. Thermal rate constants and detailed balance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Amber; Subotnik, Joseph E., E-mail: subotnik@sas.upenn.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, 231 South 34th Street, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States)

    2015-10-07

    We investigate a simple approach to compute a non-adiabatic thermal rate constant using the fewest switches surface hopping (FSSH) dynamics. We study the effects of both decoherence (using our augmented-FSSH (A-FSSH) algorithm) and forbidden hops over a large range of parameters, including high and low friction regimes, and weak and strong electronic coupling regimes. Furthermore, when possible, we benchmark our results against exact hierarchy equations of motion results, where we usually find a maximum error of roughly a factor of two (at reasonably large temperatures). In agreement with Hammes-Schiffer and Tully, we find that a merger of transition state theory and surface hopping can be both accurate and efficient when performed correctly. We further show that detailed balance is followed approximately by A-FSSH dynamics.

  20. Steady thermal stress and strain rates in a rotating circular cylinder under steady state temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Thakur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal stress and strain rates in a thick walled rotating cylinder under steady state temperature has been derived by using Seth’s transition theory. For elastic-plastic stage, it is seen that with the increase of temperature, the cylinder having smaller radii ratios requires lesser angular velocity to become fully plastic as compared to cylinder having higher radii ratios The circumferential stress becomes larger and larger with the increase in temperature. With increase in thickness ratio stresses must be decrease. For the creep stage, it is seen that circumferential stresses for incompressible materials maximum at the internal surface as compared to compressible material, which increase with the increase in temperature and measure n.

  1. Regional siting survey for thermal power plants in the state of Ohio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkins, M.L.; DiNunno, J.J.

    1975-01-01

    The selection and evaluation of sites for power plants have become increasingly difficult in recent years as pressures from various societal segments have resulted in government restraints on selection and burning of fossil fuels, on methods of heat dissipation, on acquisition of transmission line rights-of-way, and on environmental impact in general. The key elements in successful application of power plant siting technology are the development of the proper balance among the basic siting considerations and the understanding that level of detail in a study varies in an inverse relationship with the siting area under examination. As the first step in the process of selection and eventual licensing of new thermal power plant sites for a utility in the State of Ohio, the entire state was screened to determine promising candidate regions large enough to offer several possible candidate sites for thermal power plants. Because of the size of the area under consideration and the advantages of developing sites with an ultimate capacity for more than one power plant, sites with an installed capacity of 1100 to 4400 MW(e) were considered for this study. As a result of the preliminary screening conducted in four distinct steps, three candidate regions showed the best overall promise for either nuclear or fossil-fueled power plant development. Tentative identification was made of candidate sites within these candidate regions, and follow-on studies conducted in an increasing level of detail are presently in progress to determine the candidate site(s) most promising for power plant siting. (U.S.)

  2. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal State of the Spatial Layered Rod Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Stankevich

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers the features of finite element technology to determine the temperature state of layered rod structures with complex spatial design. The area of research, on the one hand, is defined by the fact that the rod structures (frames are so-called “skeletal framework” of aviation, machinery, shipbuilding products and structures for industrial construction and an issue of implementation of most research and industrial projects, strongly promising from the practical point of view, depends largely on the level of reliability, bearing capacity, and general performance of its “skeletal framework”. On the other hand, the laminates have a wide range and unique combination of valuable properties such as high strength, corrosion resistance, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity, heat resistance, abrasion resistance and many others. The use of layered metal compositions allows to increase the reliability and durability of a large range of parts and equipment and to reduce significantly the consumption of high-alloyed steels and nonferrous metals. A temperature field is one of the main factors to determine the expected performance of multilayer rod structures, operation conditions of which imply intensive thermal loading.The paper shows how within a single finite element model that approximates the spatial design of steel structures consisting of multilayer curvilinear rods, at the stage of discretization in space to take into account the thermo-physical properties of all materials, forming layer of each timber. Using the technique described in the paper has been created a complex of application programs that allows us to solve a wide class of scientific and applied problems, and explore the impact of various structural, technological and operational factors on the temperature state of multilayer rod structures. The paper presents research results of the multilayer rod design. It shows that the high conductivity layer available

  3. SEJARAH DOMINASI NEGARA DALAM PENGELOLAAN CENDANA DI NUSA TENGGARA TIMUR (History of State Domination on Cendana Management in Nusa Tenggara Timur

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Agung Sri Raharjo

    2013-03-01

    conducted in Timor Island, East Nusa Tenggara Province. Data collection done by documentary study, observation and interviews. Data were analyzed with descriptive qualitative analysis.The result shows that the past cendana management was inequity of profit sharing, state domination, no space for communication and public participation on cendana management. This condition leads to conflict and community trauma on cendana management by government.

  4. Different patterns of spontaneous brain activity between tremor-dominant and postural instability/gait difficulty subtypes of Parkinson's disease: a resting-state fMRI study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui-Min; Wang, Zhi-Jiang; Fang, Jin-Ping; Gao, Li-Yan; Ma, Ling-Yan; Wu, Tao; Hou, Ya-Nan; Zhang, Jia-Rong; Feng, Tao

    2015-10-01

    Postural instability/gait difficulty (PIGD) and tremor-dominant (TD) subtypes of Parkinson's disease (PD) show different clinical manifestations; however, their underlying neural substrates remain incompletely understood. This study aimed at investigating the subtype-specific patterns of spontaneous brain activity in PD. Thirty-one patients with PD (12 TD/19 PIGD) and 22 healthy gender- and age-matched controls were recruited. Resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected, and amplitude of low-frequency fluctuations (ALFF) was measured. Voxelwise one-way analysis of covariance and post hoc analyses of ALFF were performed among the three groups, with age and gender as covariates (levodopa daily dosage and gray matter volume as additional covariates for validation analysis). Correlations of clinical variables (e.g., disease duration and PIGD/tremor subscale score) with ALFF values were examined. Compared with controls, patients with TD exhibited higher ALFF in the right cerebellar posterior lobe and patients with PIGD exhibited lower ALFF in the bilateral putamen and cerebellar posterior lobe, and higher values primarily in several cortical areas including the inferior and superior temporal gyrus, superior frontal, and parietal gyrus. Compared with patients with PIGD, patients with TD had higher ALFF in the bilateral putamen and the cerebellar posterior lobe, as well as lower ALFF in the bilateral temporal gyrus and the left superior parietal lobule. In all patients, ALFF in the bilateral cerebellar posterior lobe positively correlated with tremor score and ALFF in the bilateral putamen negatively correlated with PIGD score. Different patterns of spontaneous neural activity in the cerebellum and putamen may underlie the neural substrate of PD motor subtypes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Constraining the composition and thermal state of the moon from an inversion of electromagnetic lunar day-side transfer functions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Amir; Connolly, J.A.D.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    We present a general method to constrain planetary composition and thermal state from an inversion of long-period electromagnetic sounding data. As an example of our approach, we reexamine the problem of inverting lunar day-side transfer functions to constrain the internal structure of the Moon. We...... to significantly influence the inversion results. In order to improve future inferences about lunar composition and thermal state, more electrical conductivity measurements are needed especially for minerals appropriate to the Moon, such as pyrope and almandine....

  6. More on the rainbow chain: entanglement, space-time geometry and thermal states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodríguez-Laguna, Javier; Dubail, Jérôme; Ramírez, Giovanni; Calabrese, Pasquale; Sierra, Germán

    2017-01-01

    The rainbow chain is an inhomogenous exactly solvable local spin model that, in its ground state, displays a half-chain entanglement entropy growing linearly with the system size. Although many exact results about the rainbow chain are known, the structure of the underlying quantum field theory has not yet been unraveled. Here we show that the universal scaling features of this model are captured by a massless Dirac fermion in a curved space-time with constant negative curvature R   =  − h "2 ( h is the amplitude of the inhomogeneity). This identification allows us to use recently developed techniques to study inhomogeneous conformal systems and to analytically characterise the entanglement entropies of more general bipartitions. These results are carefully tested against exact numerical calculations. Finally, we study the entanglement entropies of the rainbow chain in thermal states, and find that there is a non-trivial interplay between the rainbow effective temperature T_R and the physical temperature T . (paper)

  7. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis of the pellet-bed reactor for nuclear thermal propulsion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Genk, M.S.; Morley, N.J.; Yang, J.Y.

    1992-01-01

    The pellet-bed reactor (PBR) for nuclear thermal propulsion is a hydrogen-cooled, BeO-reflected, fast reactor, consisting of an annular core region filled with randomly packed, spherical fuel pellets. The fuel pellets in the PBR are self-supported, eliminating the need for internal core structure, which simplifies the core design and reduces the size and mass of the reactor. Each spherical fuel pellet is composed of hundreds of fuel microspheres embedded in a zirconium carbide (ZrC) matrix. Each fuel microsphere is composed of a UC-NbC fuel kernel surrounded by two consecutive layers of the NbC and ZrC. Gaseous hydrogen serves both as core coolant and as the propellant for the PBR rocket engine. The cold hydrogen flows axially down the inlet channel situated between the core and the external BeO reflector and radially through the orifices in the cold frit, the core, and the orifices in the hot frit. Finally, the hot hydrogen flows axially out the central channel and exits through converging-diverging nozzle. A thermal-hydraulic analysis of the PBR core was performed with an emphasis on optimizing the size and axial distribution of the orifices in the hot and cold frits to ensure that hot spots would not develop in the core during full-power operation. Also investigated was the validity of the assumptions of neglecting the axial conduction and axial cross flow in the core

  8. Endorsement of sexist ideology in Taiwan and the United States: social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, and deferential family norms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I-Ching

    2013-01-01

    Despite close relationships between men and women in daily lives, gender inequality is ubiquitous and often supported by sexist ideology. The understanding of potential bases of sexist ideology is thus important. According to Duckitt's dual-process model (2001), different worldviews may explain different types of sexist ideology. Individuals who hold a "competitive world" worldview tend to endorse group-based dominance. This lends itself to the endorsement of hostile sexism, because hostile sexism is an obvious form of male dominance. Conversely, individuals who hold a "dangerous world" worldview tend to adhere to social cohesion, collective security, and social traditions. This lends itself to the endorsement of benevolent sexism, because benevolent sexism values women who conform to gender norms. As predicted by Duckitt's model, research has shown that social dominance orientation, a general orientation towards the endorsement of group-based dominance, is closely associated with hostile sexism. Furthermore, right-wing authoritarianism, which measures adherence to social traditions, is closely associated with benevolent sexism. Due to the interdependent nature of gender relationships, the current research proposed that a relationship-based belief in hierarchy, deferential family norms, and norms depicting proper manners among family members should predict the endorsement of hostile and benevolent sexism, after controlling for social dominance orientation and right-wing authoritarianism. As predicted, according to student samples collected in Taiwan and the US, the endorsement of deferential family norms predicted the endorsement of hostile sexism and of benevolent sexism, respectively. In addition, among men and women, social dominance orientation predicted hostile sexism more strongly (as opposed to benevolent sexism), whereas right-wing authoritarianism predicted benevolent sexism more strongly (as opposed to hostile sexism). Implications regarding relationship

  9. BUT IS IT SPEECH? MAKING CRITICAL SENSE OF THE DOMINANT CONSTITUTIONAL DISCOURSE ON PORNOGRAPHY, MORALITY AND HARM UNDER THE PERVASIVE INFLUENCE OF UNITED STATES FIRST AMENDMENT JURISPRUDENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letetia van der Poll

    2012-08-01

    that “non-obscene” sexually explicit material has social value, as do esteemed works of literature and art. Secondly, the court assumes that all individuals have equal access to the means of expression and dissemination of ideas and thus fails to acknowledge substantive (and gendered structural inequalities. A closer inspection reveals that the Supreme Court’s justification of why freedom of expression is such a fundamental freedom in a constitutional democracy (and the reason that “non-obscene” sexually explicit material consequently enjoys constitutional protection is highly suspect, both intellectually and philosophically. And yet the South African Constitutional Court has explicitly recognised the same philosophical justification as the basis for free speech and expression. The Constitutional Court has, in fact, both supported and emphasised the idea that freedom of expression stands central to the concepts of democracy and political transformation through participation, and has expressly confirmed the association between freedom of expression and the political rights safeguarded under the Bill of Rights. Moreover, the Constitutional Court has also endorsed the conception of adult gender-specific sexually explicit material as a form of free expression. And yet by embracing a moralistic, libertarian model of free expression, the very ideal of a free, democratic and equal society, one in which women can live secure from the threat of harm, is put at risk. A moralistic, libertarian model is simply not capable of conceptualising sexually explicit material as a possible violation of women’s fundamental interests in equality, dignity and physical integrity.This article has a two-fold objective. The first is to critically examine the dominant discourse on adult gender-specific sexually explicit material emanating from United States jurisprudence (and its resonance in South African constitutional thought, and secondly, to assess whether this particular

  10. Evaluation of NIPER thermal EOR research, state-of-the-art and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarathi, P.S.; Olsen, D.K.; Mahmood, S.M.; Ramzel, E.B.

    1993-06-01

    The Thermal Oil Production Research Group at NIPER has conducted research on behalf of the US Department of Energy on thermal methods of oil production (steam and for 1 year, in situ combustion) since 1983. Research projects performed by this group have attempted to adapt to the needs and direction of the DOE`s oil research program and that of industry. This report summarizes the research that has been conducted, analyses the contributions of the research, describes how the technology was transferred to potential users, analyzes current trends in thermal research and thermal oil production, and makes suggestions for future research where NIPER could contribute to advances in thermal oil production.

  11. Thermal hydraulic test of advanced fuel bundle with spectral shift rod (SSR) for BWR. Effect of thermal hydraulic parameters on steady state characteristics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Takao; Kitou, Kazuaki; Chaki, Masao; Ohga, Yukiharu; Makigami, Takeshi

    2011-01-01

    Japanese national project of next generation light water reactor (LWR) development started in 2008. Under this project, spectral shift rod (SSR) is being developed. SSR, which replaces conventional water rod (WR) of boiling water reactor (BWR) fuel bundle, was invented to enhance the BWR's merit, spectral shift effect for uranium saving. In SSR, water boils by neutron and gamma-ray direct heating and water level is formed as a boundary of the upper steam region and the lower water region. This SSR water level can be controlled by core flow rate, which amplifies the change of average core void fraction, resulting in the amplified spectral shift effect. This paper presents the steady state test results of the base geometry case in SSR thermal hydraulic test, which was conducted under the national project of next generation LWR. In the test, thermal hydraulic parameters, such as flow rate, pressure, inlet subcooling and heater rod power are changed to evaluate these effects on SSR water level and other SSR characteristics. In the test results, SSR water level rose as flow rate rose, which showed controllability of SSR water level by flow rate. The sensitivities of other thermal hydraulic parameters on SSR water level were also evaluated. The obtained data of parameter's sensitivities is various enough for the further analytical evaluation. The fluctuation of SSR water level was also measured to be small enough. As a result, it was confirmed that SSR's steady state performance was as planned and that SSR design concept is feasible. (author)

  12. Apparatus for determining the thermal history of equipment using solid state track recorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruddy, F.H.; Lippincott, E.P.; Fero, A.H.; Schreiber, R.B.; Seidel, J.G.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear power plant having equipment subject to thermal aging, the rate of the thermal aging being capable of characterization by at least one equipment Arrhenius function of temperature, the equipment being subjected to a temperature environment having a predetermined range of temperatures, apparatus for determining the thermal aging which has occurred in the equipment. It comprises passive sensors, each of the sensors being formed from a selected material and subject to a thermal aging process within the range of temperatures, the extent of the thermal aging in each respective sensor being quantifiable, the rate at which the thermal aging process progresses in each of the sensors being characterized by a respective Arrhenius function of temperature; and the selected material not being the same for each of the sensors, whereby the range of activation energy values characterizing the respective Arrhenius functions encompasses the activation energy value characterizing the equipment Arrhenius function

  13. Thermal Hydraulic Fortran Program for Steady State Calculations of Plate Type Fuel Research Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khedr, H.

    2008-01-01

    The safety assessment of Research and Power Reactors is a continuous process over their life and that requires verified and validated codes. Power Reactor codes all over the world are well established and qualified against a real measuring data and qualified experimental facilities. These codes are usually sophisticated, require special skills and consume much more running time. On the other hand, most of the Research Reactor codes still requiring more data for validation and qualification. Therefore it is benefit for a regulatory body and the companies working in the area of Research Reactor assessment and design to have their own program that give them a quick judgment. The present paper introduces a simple one dimensional Fortran program called THDSN for steady state best estimate Thermal Hydraulic (TH) calculations of plate type fuel RRs. Beside calculating the fuel and coolant temperature distribution and pressure gradient in an average and hot channel the program calculates the safety limits and margins against the critical phenomena encountered in RR such as the burnout heat flux and the onset of flow instability. Well known TH correlations for calculating the safety parameters are used. THDSN program is verified by comparing its results for 2 and 10 MW benchmark reactors with that published in IAEA publications and good agreement is found. Also the program results are compared with those published for other programs such as PARET and TERMIC. An extension for this program is underway to cover the transient TH calculations

  14. Mathematical model of the crystallizing blank`s thermal state at the horizontal continuous casting machine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kryukov Igor Yu.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Present article is devoted to the development of the mathematical model, which describes thermal state and crystallization process of the rectangular cross-section blank while continious process of extraction from a horysontal continious casting machine (HCCM.The developed model took cue for the heat-transfer properties of non-iron metal teeming; its temperature on entry to the casting mold; cooling conditions of blank in the carbon molds in the presence of a copper water cooler. Besides, has been considered the asymmetry of heat interchange from blank`s head and drag at mold, coming out from fluid contraction and features of the horizontal casting mold. The developed mathematical model allows to determine alterations in crystallizing blank of the following factors with respect to time: temperature pattern of crystallizing blank under different technical working regimes of HCCM; boundaries of solid two-phase field and liquid two-phase filed; blank`s thickness variation under shrinkage of the ingot`s material

  15. Steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of LMR core using COBRA-K code

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eui Kwang; Kim, Young Gyun; Kim Young In; Kim Young Cheol

    1997-02-01

    A thermal hydraulics analysis code COBRA-K is being developed by the KAERI LMR core design technology development team. COBRA-K is a part of the integrated computation system for LMR core design and analysis, the K-CORE system. COBRA-K is supposed to predict the flow and temperature distributions in LMR core. COBRA-K is an extension of the previously published COBRA-IV-I code with several functional improvements. Specially COBRA-K has been improved to analyze single and multi-assembly, and whole-core in the transient condition. This report describes the overall features of COBRA-K and gives general input descriptions. The 19 pin assembly experimental data of ORNL were used to verify the accuracy of this code for the steady state analysis. The comparative results show good agreements between the calculated and the measured data. And COBRA-K can be used to predict flow and temperature distributions for the LMR core design. (author). 7 refs., 6 tabs., 13 figs.

  16. Topics on domination

    CERN Document Server

    Hedetniemi, ST

    1991-01-01

    The contributions in this volume are divided into three sections: theoretical, new models and algorithmic. The first section focuses on properties of the standard domination number &ggr;(G), the second section is concerned with new variations on the domination theme, and the third is primarily concerned with finding classes of graphs for which the domination number (and several other domination-related parameters) can be computed in polynomial time.

  17. A simple differential steady-state method to measure the thermal conductivity of solid bulk materials with high accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, D; Chen, G

    2014-02-01

    Accurate measurements of thermal conductivity are of great importance for materials research and development. Steady-state methods determine thermal conductivity directly from the proportionality between heat flow and an applied temperature difference (Fourier Law). Although theoretically simple, in practice, achieving high accuracies with steady-state methods is challenging and requires rather complex experimental setups due to temperature sensor uncertainties and parasitic heat loss. We developed a simple differential steady-state method in which the sample is mounted between an electric heater and a temperature-controlled heat sink. Our method calibrates for parasitic heat losses from the electric heater during the measurement by maintaining a constant heater temperature close to the environmental temperature while varying the heat sink temperature. This enables a large signal-to-noise ratio which permits accurate measurements of samples with small thermal conductance values without an additional heater calibration measurement or sophisticated heater guards to eliminate parasitic heater losses. Additionally, the differential nature of the method largely eliminates the uncertainties of the temperature sensors, permitting measurements with small temperature differences, which is advantageous for samples with high thermal conductance values and/or with strongly temperature-dependent thermal conductivities. In order to accelerate measurements of more than one sample, the proposed method allows for measuring several samples consecutively at each temperature measurement point without adding significant error. We demonstrate the method by performing thermal conductivity measurements on commercial bulk thermoelectric Bi2Te3 samples in the temperature range of 30-150 °C with an error below 3%.

  18. Dominance in domestic dogs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borg, Van Der J.A.M.; Schilder, M.B.H.; Vinke, C.M.; Vries, De Han; Petit, Odile

    2015-01-01

    A dominance hierarchy is an important feature of the social organisation of group living animals. Although formal and/or agonistic dominance has been found in captive wolves and free-ranging dogs, applicability of the dominance concept in domestic dogs is highly debated, and quantitative data are

  19. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  20. Thermal conductivity coefficients of water and heavy water in the liquid state up to 3700C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Neindre, B.; Bury, P.; Tufeu, R.; Vodar, B.

    1976-01-01

    The thermal conductivity coefficients of water and heavy water of 99.75 percent isotopic purity were measured using a coaxial cylinder apparatus, covering room temperature to their critical temperatures, and pressures from 1 to 500 bar for water, and from 1 to 1000 bar for heavy water. Following the behavior of the thermal conductivity coefficient of water, which shows a maximum close to 135 0 C, the thermal conductivity coefficient of heavy water exhibits a maximum near 95 0 C and near saturation pressures. This maximum is displaced to higher temperatures when the pressure is increased. Under the same temperature and pressure conditions the thermal conductivity coefficient of heavy water was lower than for water. The pressure effect was similar for water and heavy water. In the temperature range of our experiments, isotherms of thermal conductivity coefficients were almost linear functions of density

  1. The social dominance paradox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Jennifer Louise; den Ouden, Hanneke E M; Heyes, Cecilia M; Cools, Roshan

    2014-12-01

    Dominant individuals report high levels of self-sufficiency, self-esteem, and authoritarianism. The lay stereotype suggests that such individuals ignore information from others, preferring to make their own choices. However, the nonhuman animal literature presents a conflicting view, suggesting that dominant individuals are avid social learners, whereas subordinates focus on learning from private experience. Whether dominant humans are best characterized by the lay stereotype or the animal view is currently unknown. Here, we present a "social dominance paradox": using self-report scales and computerized tasks, we demonstrate that socially dominant people explicitly value independence, but, paradoxically, in a complex decision-making task, they show an enhanced reliance (relative to subordinate individuals) on social learning. More specifically, socially dominant people employed a strategy of copying other agents when the agents' responses had a history of being correct. However, in humans, two subtypes of dominance have been identified: aggressive and social. Aggressively dominant individuals, who are as likely to "get their own way" as socially dominant individuals but who do so through the use of aggressive or Machiavellian tactics, did not use social information, even when it was beneficial to do so. This paper presents the first study of dominance and social learning in humans and challenges the lay stereotype in which all dominant individuals ignore others' views. The more subtle perspective we offer could have important implications for decision making in both the boardroom and the classroom. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Relating 2-Rainbow Domination To Roman Domination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvarado José D.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available For a graph G, let R(G and yr2(G denote the Roman domination number of G and the 2-rainbow domination number of G, respectively. It is known that yr2(G ≤ R(G ≤ 3/2yr2(G. Fujita and Furuya [Difference between 2-rainbow domination and Roman domination in graphs, Discrete Appl. Math. 161 (2013 806-812] present some kind of characterization of the graphs G for which R(G − yr2(G = k for some integer k. Unfortunately, their result does not lead to an algorithm that allows to recognize these graphs efficiently. We show that for every fixed non-negative integer k, the recognition of the connected K4-free graphs G with yR(G − yr2(G = k is NP-hard, which implies that there is most likely no good characterization of these graphs. We characterize the graphs G such that yr2(H = yR(H for every induced subgraph H of G, and collect several properties of the graphs G with R(G = 3/2yr2(G.

  3. Two-state model of light induced activation and thermal bleaching of photochromic glasses: theory and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrari, Jose A.; Perciante, Cesar D.

    2008-01-01

    The behavior of photochromic glasses during activation and bleaching is investigated. A two-state phenomenological model describing light-induced activation (darkening) and thermal bleaching is presented. The proposed model is based on first-order kinetics. We demonstrate that the time behavior in the activation process (acting simultaneously with the thermal fading) can be characterized by two relaxation times that depend on the intensity of the activating light. These characteristic times are lower than the decay times of the pure thermal bleaching process. We study the temporal evolution of the glass optical density and its dependence on the activating intensity. We also present a series of activation and bleaching experiments that validate the proposed model. Our approach may be used to gain more insight into the transmittance behavior of photosensitive glasses, which could be potentially relevant in a broad range of applications, e.g., real-time holography and reconfigurable optical memories

  4. Thermal conductivity and expansion enhancement associated with formation of the superionic state in SrCl2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moore, J.P.; Weaver, F.J.; Graves, R.S.; McElroy, D.L.

    1983-01-01

    A second-order phase transition in SrCl 2 near 1000 K produces superionic conduction and is often called the Bredig transition. Fine-grained, 99% dense, SrCl 2 samples containing three volume percent TiO 2 to reduce radiant transport were used to measure the differential thermal expansion coefficient (α) by push-rod dilatometry and the thermal conductivity (lambda) by a radial heat flow method. Both properties show maxima near the Bredig transition. The peak α-value is over 75 x 10 -6 K -1 . The data obtained from the radial heat flow method show good agreement with earlier tests at low temperatures, and the high temperature results show a local enhancement of lambda if about 0.06 W/m.K. This enhancement cannot be attributed to electronic or radiant transport, but is due to a new mechanism of thermal diffusion of vacancy-anion interstitial pairs in the superionic state

  5. Entanglement between atomic thermal states and coherent or squeezed photons in a damping cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadollahi, F.; Safaiee, R.; Golshan, M. M.

    2018-02-01

    In the present study, the standard Jaynes-Cummings model, in a lossy cavity, is employed to characterize the entanglement between atoms and photons when the former is initially in a thermal state (mixed ensemble) while the latter is described by either coherent or squeezed distributions. The whole system is thus assumed to be in equilibrium with a heat reservoir at a finite temperature T, and the measure of negativity is used to determine the time evolution of atom-photon entanglement. To this end, the master equation for the density matrix, in the secular approximation, is solved and a partial transposition of the result is made. The degree of atom-photon entanglement is then numerically computed, through the negativity, as a function of time and temperature. To justify the behavior of atom-photon entanglement, moreover, we employ the so obtained total density matrix to compute and analyze the time evolution of the initial photonic coherent or squeezed probability distributions and the squeezing parameters. On more practical points, our results demonstrate that as the initial photon mean number increases, the atom-photon entanglement decays at a faster pace for the coherent distribution compared to the squeezed one. Moreover, it is shown that the degree of atom-photon entanglement is much higher and more stable for the squeezed distribution than that for the coherent one. Consequently, we conclude that the time intervals during which the atom-photon entanglement is distillable is longer for the squeezed distribution. It is also illustrated that as the temperature increases the rate of approaching separability is faster for the coherent initial distribution. The novel point of the present report is the calculation of dynamical density matrix (containing all physical information) for the combined system of atom-photon in a lossy cavity, as well as the corresponding negativity, at a finite temperature.

  6. The influence of the magnetic state on the thermal expansion in 1:2 rare earth intermetallic compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gratz, E.; Lindbaum, A.

    1994-01-01

    The attempt is made to demonstrate on some selected rare earth intermetallics the influence of the magnetic state on the thermal expansion. Using the X-ray powder diffraction method we investigated the thermal expansion of some selected nonmagnetic compounds (YAl 2 , YNi 2 and YCo 2 ) and some magnetic RE (rare earth) - cobalt compounds (RCo 2 ) in the temperature range from 4 up to 450 K. All these compounds crystallize in the C15-type structure (cubic Laves phase structure). By comparing the nonmagnetic Y-based compounds we could show that there is an enhanced contribution of the 3d electrons to the thermal expansion in YCo 2 . In the magnetic RCo 2 compounds the induced 3d magnetism gives rise to large volume anomalies at the magnetic ordering temperature T c . Below T c there is in addition a distortion of the cubic unit cell due to the interaction of the magnetically ordered RE ions with the anisotropic crystal field.The thermal expansion of the orthorhombic TmCu 2 , GdCu 2 and YCu 2 compounds has also been investigated for comparison. The influence of the crystal field on the thermal expansion in TmCu 2 in the paramagnetic range (TmCu 2 orders magnetically at T N =6.3 K) has been determined by comparing the thermal expansion of the nonmagnetic YCu 2 with that of TmCu 2 . The data thus obtained are compared with a theoretical model. GdCu 2 , for which the influence of the crystal field can be neglected, has been investigated in order to study the influence of the exchange interaction in the magnetically ordered state (below 42 K). ((orig.))

  7. Population of multi-quark states in exotic multiplets and thermalization in ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scherer, S.; Bleicher, M.; Haussler, S.; Stoecker, H.

    2008-01-01

    The recent discussion about experimental evidence for pentaquark states has revitalized the interest in exotic hadrons. If such states really exist, it is natural to assume that they will be formed at the late hadronization stage of ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions, given the success of quark recombination models in the description of hadronization. Here, we apply the qMD model to study the formation of color neutral exotic multi-quark clusters at hadronization. We search for color neutral clusters made up of up to six color charges, respectively. We thus obtain estimates for the numbers and phase space distributions of exotic hadronic states produced by clustering in heavy ion collisions, including the members of the pentaquark multiplets. We obtain particle abundances that are smaller than thermal model predictions. Moreover, the results obtained in recombination from ultra-relativistic heavy ion collisions can be compared to the estimates based on equal population of the corresponding multiplets, and to results from fully thermalized systems. We find that the distribution of exotic hadrons from recombination over large multiplets provides a sensitive signal for thermalization and decorrelation of the initial, non-equilibrium state of the collision. (author)

  8. Thermal energy storage for solar power generation - State of the art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, K. N.

    1981-12-01

    High temperature storage for applications in solar-thermal electric systems is considered. Noting that thermal storage is in either the form of latent, sensible or chemically stored heat, sensible heat storage is stressed as the most developed of the thermal storage technologies, spanning direct heating of a storage medium from 120-1250 C. Current methods involve solids, packed beds, fluidized beds, liquids, hot water, organic liquids, and inorganic liquids and molten salts. Latent heat storage comprises phase-change materials that move from solid to liquid with addition of heat and liquid to solid with the removal of heat. Metals or inorganic salts are candidates, and the energy balances are outlined. Finally, chemical heat storage is examined, showing possible high energy densities through catalytic, thermal dissociation reactions.

  9. A steady state thermal duct model derived by fin-theory approach and applied on an unglazed solar collector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojanovic, B.; Hallberg, D.; Akander, J. [Building Materials Technology, KTH Research School, Centre for Built Environment, University of Gaevle, SE-801 76 Gaevle (Sweden)

    2010-10-15

    This paper presents the thermal modelling of an unglazed solar collector (USC) flat panel, with the aim of producing a detailed yet swift thermal steady-state model. The model is analytical, one-dimensional (1D) and derived by a fin-theory approach. It represents the thermal performance of an arbitrary duct with applied boundary conditions equal to those of a flat panel collector. The derived model is meant to be used for efficient optimisation and design of USC flat panels (or similar applications), as well as detailed thermal analysis of temperature fields and heat transfer distributions/variations at steady-state conditions; without requiring a large amount of computational power and time. Detailed surface temperatures are necessary features for durability studies of the surface coating, hence the effect of coating degradation on USC and system performance. The model accuracy and proficiency has been benchmarked against a detailed three-dimensional Finite Difference Model (3D FDM) and two simpler 1D analytical models. Results from the benchmarking test show that the fin-theory model has excellent capabilities of calculating energy performances and fluid temperature profiles, as well as detailed material temperature fields and heat transfer distributions/variations (at steady-state conditions), while still being suitable for component analysis in junction to system simulations as the model is analytical. The accuracy of the model is high in comparison to the 3D FDM (the prime benchmark), as long as the fin-theory assumption prevails (no 'or negligible' temperature gradient in the fin perpendicularly to the fin length). Comparison with the other models also shows that when the USC duct material has a high thermal conductivity, the cross-sectional material temperature adopts an isothermal state (for the assessed USC duct geometry), which makes the 1D isothermal model valid. When the USC duct material has a low thermal conductivity, the heat transfer

  10. Mathematical model of thermal and mechanical steady state fuel element behaviour TEDEF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dinic, N.; Kostic, Z.; Josipovic, M.

    1987-01-01

    In this paper a numerical model of thermal and thermomechanical behaviour of a cylindrical metal uranium fuel element is described. Presented are numerical method and computer program for solving the stationary temperature field and thermal stresses of a fuel element. The model development is a second phase of analysis of these phenomena, and may as well be used for analysing power nuclear reactor fuel elements behaviour. (author)

  11. Early Thermal History of Rhea: The Role of Serpentinization and Liquid State Convection

    OpenAIRE

    Czechowski Leszek; Łosiak Anna

    2016-01-01

    Early thermal history of Rhea is investigated. The role of the following parameters of the model is investigated: time of beginning of accretion, tini, duration of accretion, tac, viscosity of ice close to the melting point, η0, activation energy in the formula for viscosity, E, thermal conductivity of silicate component, ksil, ammonia content, XNH3, and energy of serpentinization, cserp. We found that tini and tac are crucial for evolution. All other parameters are also important, but no dra...

  12. Thermal states of coldest and hottest neutron stars in soft X-ray transients

    OpenAIRE

    Yakovlev, D. G.; Levenfish, K. P.; Potekhin, A. Y.; Gnedin, O. Y.; Chabrier, G.

    2003-01-01

    We calculate the thermal structure and quiescent thermal luminosity of accreting neutron stars (warmed by deep crustal heating in accreted matter) in soft X-ray transients (SXTs). We consider neutron stars with nucleon and hyperon cores and with accreted envelopes. It is assumed that an envelope has an outer helium layer (of variable depth) and deeper layers of heavier elements, either with iron or with much heavier nuclei (of atomic weight A > 100) on the top (Haensel & Zdunik 1990, 2003, as...

  13. High pulse number thermal shock tests on tungsten with steady state particle background

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtz, M.; Kreter, A.; Linke, J.; Loewenhoff, Th; Pintsuk, G.; Sergienko, G.; Steudel, I.; Unterberg, B.; Wessel, E.

    2017-12-01

    Thermal fatigue of metallic materials, which will be exposed to severe environmental conditions e.g. plasma facing materials in future fusion reactors, is an important issue in order to predict the life time of complete wall components. Therefore experiments in the linear plasma device PSI-2 were performed to investigate the synergistic effects of high pulse number thermal shock events (L = 0.38 GW m-2, Δt = 0.5 ms) and stationary D/He (6%) plasma particle background on the thermal fatigue behavior of tungsten. Similar to experiments with pure thermal loads, the induced microstructural and surface modifications such as recrystallization and roughening as well as crack formation become more pronounced with increasing number of thermal shock events. However, the amount of damage significantly increases for synergistic loads showing severe surface roughening, plastic deformation and erosion resulting from the degradation of the mechanical properties caused by bombardment and diffusion of D/He to the surface and the bulk of the material. Additionally, D/He induced blistering and bubble formation were observed for all tested samples, which could change the thermal and mechanical properties of near surface regions.

  14. Constraining the composition and thermal state of the mantle beneath Europe from inversion of long-period electromagnetic sounding data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Amir; Connolly, J.A.D.; Olsen, Nils

    2006-01-01

    We reexamine the problem of inverting C responses, covering periods between 1 month and 1 year collected from 42 European observatories, to constrain the internal structure of the Earth. Earlier studies used the C responses, which connect the magnetic vertical component and the horizontal gradient...... of the horizontal components of electromagnetic variations, to obtain the conductivity profile of the Earth's mantle. Here, we go beyond this approach by inverting directly for chemical composition and thermal state of the Earth, rather than subsurface electrical conductivity structure. The primary inversion...... of geophysical data for compositional parameters, planetary composition, and thermal state is feasible. The inversion indicates most probable lower mantle geothermal gradients of similar to 0.58 K/km, core mantle boundary temperatures of similar to 2900 degrees C, bulk Earth molar Mg/Si ratios of similar to 1...

  15. The Thermal State of Permafrost in the Nordic Area during the International Polar Year 2007-2009

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, H. H.; Etzelmuller, B.; Isaksen, K.

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a snapshot of the permafrost thermal state in the Nordic area obtained during the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2009. Several intensive research campaigns were undertaken within a variety of projects in the Nordic countries to obtain this snapshot. We demonstrate...... for Scandinavia that both lowland permafrost in palsas and peat plateaus, and large areas of permafrost in the mountains are at temperatures close to 0 degrees C, which makes them sensitive to climatic changes. In Svalbard and northeast Greenland, and also in the highest parts of the mountains in the rest...... affect the permafrost thermal state in the Nordic area. Time series of active-layer thickness and permafrost temperature conditions in the Nordic area, which are generally only 10 years in length, show generally increasing active-layer depths and risings permafrost temperatures....

  16. VVER-1000 dominance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance ratio, or more precisely, its closeness to unity, is important characteristic of large reactor. It allows evaluate beforehand the number of source iterations required in deterministic calculations of power spatial distribution. Or the minimal number of histories to be modeled for achievement of statistical error level desired in large core Monte Carlo calculations. In this work relatively simple approach for dominance ratio evaluation is proposed. It essentially uses core symmetry. Dependence of dominance ratio on neutron flux spatial distribution is demonstrated. (author)

  17. WWER-1000 dominance ratio

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gorodkov, S.S.

    2009-01-01

    Dominance ratio, or more precisely, its closeness to unity, is important characteristic of large reactor. It allows evaluate beforehand the number of source iterations required in deterministic calculations of power spatial distribution. Or the minimal number of histories to be modeled for achievement of statistical error level desired in large core Monte Carlo calculations. In this work relatively simple approach for dominance ratio evaluation is proposed. It essentially uses core symmetry. Dependence of dominance ratio on neutron flux spatial distribution is demonstrated. (Authors)

  18. Elitism and Stochastic Dominance

    OpenAIRE

    Bazen, Stephen; Moyes, Patrick

    2011-01-01

    Stochastic dominance has typically been used with a special emphasis on risk and inequality reduction something captured by the concavity of the utility function in the expected utility model. We claim that the applicability of the stochastic dominance approach goes far beyond risk and inequality measurement provided suitable adpations be made. We apply in the paper the stochastic dominance approach to the measurment of elitism which may be considered the opposite of egalitarianism. While the...

  19. The OECD/NEA/NSC PBMR400 MW coupled neutronics thermal hydraulics transient benchmark - Steady-state results and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reitsma, F.; Han, J.; Ivanov, K.; Sartori, E.

    2008-01-01

    The PBMR is a High-Temperature Gas-cooled Reactor (HTGR) concept developed to be built in South Africa. The analysis tools used for core neutronic design and core safety analysis need to be verified and validated. Since only a few pebble-bed HTR experimental facilities or plant data are available the use of code-to-code comparisons are an essential part of the V and V plans. As part of this plan the PBMR 400 MW design and a representative set of transient cases is defined as an OECD benchmark. The scope of the benchmark is to establish a series of well-defined multi-dimensional computational benchmark problems with a common given set of cross-sections, to compare methods and tools in coupled neutronics and thermal hydraulics analysis with a specific focus on transient events. The OECD benchmark includes steady-state and transients cases. Although the focus of the benchmark is on the modelling of the transient behaviour of the PBMR core, it was also necessary to define some steady-state cases to ensure consistency between the different approaches before results of transient cases could be compared. This paper describes the status of the benchmark project and shows the results for the three steady state exercises defined as a standalone neutronics calculation, a standalone thermal-hydraulic core calculation, and a coupled neutronics/thermal-hydraulic simulation. (authors)

  20. Performance of tungsten-based materials and components under ITER and DEMO relevant steady-state thermal loads

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritz, Guillaume Henri

    2011-07-01

    In nuclear fusion devices the surfaces directly facing the plasma are irradiated with high energy fluxes. The most intense loads are deposited on the divertor located at the bottom of the plasma chamber, which has to withstand continuous heat loads with a power density of several MW . m{sup -2} as well as transient events. These are much shorter (in the millisecond and sub-millisecond regime) but deposit a higher power densities of a few GW . m{sup -2}. The search for materials that can survive to those severe loading conditions led to the choice of tungsten which possesses advantageous attributes such as a high melting point, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and an acceptable activation rate. These properties made it an attractive and promising candidate as armor material for divertors of future fusion devices such as ITER and DEMO. For the DEMO divertor, conceptual studies on helium-cooled tungsten plasma-facing components were performed. The concept was realized and tested under DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads. The examination of the plasma-facing components by microstructural analyses before and after thermal loading enabled to determine the mechanisms for components failure. Among others, it clearly showed the impact of the tungsten grade and the thermal stress induced crack formation on the performance of the armor material and in general of the plasma-facing component under high heat loads. A tungsten qualification program was launched to study the behaviour of various tungsten grades, in particular the crack formation, under fusion relevant steady-state thermal loads. In total, seven commercially available materials from two industrial suppliers were investigated. As the material's thermal response is strongly related to its microstructure, this program comprised different material geometries and manufacturing technologies. It also included the utilization of an actively cooled specimen holder which has been designed to perform

  1. Performance of tungsten-based materials and components under ITER and DEMO relevant steady-state thermal loads

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritz, Guillaume Henri

    2011-01-01

    In nuclear fusion devices the surfaces directly facing the plasma are irradiated with high energy fluxes. The most intense loads are deposited on the divertor located at the bottom of the plasma chamber, which has to withstand continuous heat loads with a power density of several MW . m -2 as well as transient events. These are much shorter (in the millisecond and sub-millisecond regime) but deposit a higher power densities of a few GW . m -2 . The search for materials that can survive to those severe loading conditions led to the choice of tungsten which possesses advantageous attributes such as a high melting point, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion and an acceptable activation rate. These properties made it an attractive and promising candidate as armor material for divertors of future fusion devices such as ITER and DEMO. For the DEMO divertor, conceptual studies on helium-cooled tungsten plasma-facing components were performed. The concept was realized and tested under DEMO specific cyclic thermal loads. The examination of the plasma-facing components by microstructural analyses before and after thermal loading enabled to determine the mechanisms for components failure. Among others, it clearly showed the impact of the tungsten grade and the thermal stress induced crack formation on the performance of the armor material and in general of the plasma-facing component under high heat loads. A tungsten qualification program was launched to study the behaviour of various tungsten grades, in particular the crack formation, under fusion relevant steady-state thermal loads. In total, seven commercially available materials from two industrial suppliers were investigated. As the material's thermal response is strongly related to its microstructure, this program comprised different material geometries and manufacturing technologies. It also included the utilization of an actively cooled specimen holder which has been designed to perform sophisticated

  2. The thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere during polar mesosphere winter echoes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.-J. Lübken

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In January 2005, a total of 18 rockets were launched from the Andøya Rocket Range in Northern Norway (69° N into strong VHF radar echoes called 'Polar Mesosphere Winter Echoes' (PMWE. The echoes were observed in the lower and middle mesosphere during large solar proton fluxes. In general, PMWE occur much more seldom compared to their summer counterparts PMSE (typical occurrence rates at 69° N are 1–3% vs. 80%, respectively. Our in-situ measurements by falling sphere, chaff, and instrumented payloads provide detailed information about the thermal and dynamical state of the atmosphere and therefore allow an unprecedented study of the background atmosphere during PMWE. There are a number of independent observations indicating that neutral air turbulence has caused PMWE. Ion density fluctuations show a turbulence spectrum within PMWE and no fluctuations outside. Temperature lapse rates close to the adiabatic gradient are observed in the vicinity of PMWE indicating persistent turbulent mixing. The spectral broadening of radar echoes is consistent with turbulent velocity fluctuations. Turbulence also explains the mean occurrence height of PMWE (~68–75 km: viscosity increases rapidly with altitude and destroys any small scale fluctuations in the upper mesosphere, whereas electron densities are usually too low in the lower mesosphere to cause significant backscatter. The seasonal variation of echoes in the lower mesosphere is in agreement with a turbulence climatology derived from earlier sounding rocket flights. We have performed model calculations to study the radar backscatter from plasma fluctuations caused by neutral air turbulence. We find that volume reflectivities observed during PMWE are in quantitative agreement with theory. Apart from turbulence the most crucial requirement for PMWE is a sufficiently large number of electrons, for example produced by solar proton events. We have studied the sensitivity of the radar echo strength on

  3. Symmetric minimally entangled typical thermal states, grand-canonical ensembles, and the influence of the collapse bases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Moritz; Barthel, Thomas

    Based on DMRG, strongly correlated quantum many-body systems at finite temperatures can be simulated by sampling over a certain class of pure matrix product states (MPS) called minimally entangled typical thermal states (METTS). Here, we show how symmetries of the system can be exploited to considerably reduce computation costs in the METTS algorithm. While this is straightforward for the canonical ensemble, we introduce a modification of the algorithm to efficiently simulate the grand-canonical ensemble under utilization of symmetries. In addition, we construct novel symmetry-conserving collapse bases for the transitions in the Markov chain of METTS that improve the speed of convergence of the algorithm by reducing autocorrelations.

  4. Nutritional mitigation of winter thermal stress in gilthead seabream associated metabolic pathways and potential indicators of nutritional state

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Richard, Nadege; Silva, Tomé S.; Wulff, Tune

    2016-01-01

    and phenylalanine/tyrosine catabolism, and induced higher aerobic metabolism and gluconeogenesis. Results support the notion that WF diet had a positive effect on fish nutritional state by partially counteracting the effect of thermal stress and underlined the sensitivity of proteome data for nutritional....... A total of 404 protein spots, out of 1637 detected, were differentially expressed between the two groups of fish. Mass spectrometry analysis of selected spots suggested that WF diet improved oxidative stress defense, reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress, enhanced metabolic flux through methionine cycle...... and metabolic profiling purposes. Intragroup variability and co-measured information were also used to pinpoint which proteins displayed a stronger relation with fish nutritional state....

  5. State of affairs on pollutants and syngas removal techniques stemming from thermal treatment of waste by gasification. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megret, O.; Bequet, L.

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the current study is to outline the state of affairs related to pollutants and slaughtering techniques of syngas that result both from waste thermal treatment by gasification. The study starts by a review permitting to classify the gasification techniques applied to waste thermal treatment. This review leads to distinguish between auto-thermal and allo-thermal equipments. Furthermore, are described, in this first part, the general principles and parameters of functioning and adjustment of the factors characterizing the thermal treatment in reducing atmosphere. It is also about the composition of the syngas products according to the different driving behaviours of gasifiers. Finally, we state succinctly, on one hand, the possible promotion procedures in the frame of syngas development and, on the other hand, the thresholds that we ought to reach in order to make this promotion achievable. The second part of the study deals with the characteristics of the pollutants located in the syngas. This description took the shape of a detailed index card where pollutants are classified into minority components (including those of pollutants, those of gaseous and those of particulates) according to their concentrations, to their driving behaviours and to their thermochemical conditions of formation (temperature, pressure, response-type agents, atmosphere...). In the last part, we discuss the current and the considered types of slaughtering devices in reducing atmosphere in relation with their performance in slaughtering and regarding the departure point of syngas promotion ways. Finally, are exposed the key postures and the barricades within those technologies. Hereupon, research axes are proposed. (authors)

  6. Prediction of Equilibrium States of Kinematic and Thermal Fields in Homogeneous Turbulence Submitted To the Rotation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chebbi, Besma; Bouzaiane, Mounir; Lili, Taieb

    2009-01-01

    In this work, effects of rotation on the evolution of kinematic and thermal fields in homogeneous sheared turbulence are investigated using second order closure modeling. The Launder-Reece-Ro di models, the Speziale-Sarkar-Gatski model and the Shih-Lumley models are retained for pressure-strain correlation and pressure-temperature correlation. Whereas classic models are retained for time evolution equations of kinematic and thermal dissipation rates. The fourth order Runge-Kutta method is used to resolve three non linear differential systems obtained after modeling. The numerical integration is carried out separately for several values of the dimensionless rotation number R equal to 0, 0.25 and 0.5. The obtained results are compared to the recent results of Direct Numerical Simulations of G.Brethouwer. The results have confirmed the asymptotic equilibrium behaviors of kinematic and thermal dimensionless parameters. Furthermore they have shown that rotation affects not only kinematic field but also thermal field. The coupling between the Speziale-Sarkar-Gatski model and the Launder-Reece-Rodi model is of a big contribution on the prediction of kinematic and thermal fields

  7. Genetic Dominance & Cellular Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seager, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    In learning genetics, many students misunderstand and misinterpret what "dominance" means. Understanding is easier if students realize that dominance is not a mechanism, but rather a consequence of underlying cellular processes. For example, metabolic pathways are often little affected by changes in enzyme concentration. This means that…

  8. Authoritarianism, dominance and assertiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J J

    1981-08-01

    It is shown that there are definitions of the three constructs of authoritarianism, dominance and assertiveness which read very similarly; so much so that no distinction is immediately evident. It is proposed that authoritarianism might be conceived as aggressive dominance and at least some types of assertiveness as nonaggressive dominance. A new scale of Dominance suitable for general population use was produced, and compared with the existing Ray (1976) behavior inventory of authoritarianism. Both scales showed highly significant correlations with peer rated dominance and submission (the latter being negative in sign) but only the authoritarianism scale showed significant correlations with rated aggressiveness and rigidity. It was concluded that the new definitions could be operationalized into valid scales.

  9. Design considerations for a steady state fusion reactor's thermal energy dump (TED) with emphasis on SAFFIRE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Werley, K.A.

    1980-01-01

    This work examines the use of a thermal dump to handle the severe particle and energy handling requirements of a diverted plasma. We outline a general approach for evaluating the design parameters and limitations of a thermal dump, considering such things as thermomechanical and erosion effects, compatibility, availability, machinability, coolant recirculation, vacuum pumping, economics, lifetime, etc. To demonstrate how the performance requirements are reflected in design decisions, we apply a solid-walled dump to a small-sized field reversed mirror (FRM). We also examine a liquid-lithium droplet thermal dump and point out some distinct advantages of this new concept over the solid-wall design in reducing stress, erosion, and vacuum pumping problems. The chief disadvantages of this scheme include liquid-metal safe-handling problems, vapor pressure-temperature limitations, and the need for differential pumping if T/sub Li/ > 310 0 C is desired

  10. Steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis and flow channel blockage accident analysis of JRR-3 silicide core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1997-03-01

    JRR-3 is a light water moderated and cooled, beryllium and heavy water reflected pool type research reactor using low enriched uranium (LEU) plate-type fuels. Its thermal power is 20 MW. The core conversion program from uranium-aluminum (UAl x -Al) dispersion type fuel (aluminide fuel) to uranium-silicon-aluminum (U 3 Si 2 -Al) dispersion type fuel (silicide fuel) is currently conducted at the JRR-3. This report describes about the steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis results and the flow channel blockage accident analysis result. In JRR-3, there are two operation mode. One is high power operation mode up to 20 MW, under forced convection cooling using the primary and the secondary cooling systems. The other is low power operation mode up to 200 kW, under natural circulation cooling between the reactor core and the reactor pool without the primary and the secondary cooling systems. For the analysis of the flow channel blockage accident, COOLOD code was used. On the other hand, steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis for both of the high power operation mode under forced convection cooling and low power operation under natural convection cooling, COOLOD-N2 code was used. From steady-state thermal hydraulic analysis results of both forced and natural convection cooling, fuel temperature, minimum DNBR etc. meet the design criteria and JRR-3 LEU silicide core has enough safety margin under normal operation conditions. Furthermore, flow channel blockage accident analysis results show that one channel flow blockage accident meet the safety criteria for accident conditions which have been established for JRR-3 LEU silicide core. (author)

  11. Exergy analysis of the FIGUEIRA thermal power plant operation - state of Parana, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanescu, George; Lima, Joao E. [Parana Univ., Curitiba, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia Mecanica]. E-mails: stanescu@demec.ufpr.br; joeduli@demec.ufpr.br; Andrade, Carlos de [FIGUEIRA Thermal Power Plant, Figueira, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: ccarlosaandrade@zipmail.com.br

    2000-07-01

    Exergy analysis is a powerful tool to evaluate, design and improve the thermal systems. The method of exergy analysis or availability analysis is well suited for furthering the goal of increasing the efficiency of existing power generation systems, and the capability of more effective energy resource use. Exergy analysis of the FIGUEIRA thermal power plant is presented. Exergy losses occurring in various components are considered and the exergy balance is shown in tabular form. Results clearly reveal that the steam generator is the principal site of thermodynamic losses, while the condenser is relatively unimportant. (author)

  12. Study of thermal properties and the dispersion state of nano composites epoxy/clay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paz, Juliana D.; Bertholdi, Jonas; Toledo, Tais C.; Folgueras, Marilena V.; Pezzin, Sergio H.; Coelho, Luiz A.F.

    2011-01-01

    This work investigates an exfoliation/intercalation of nano clays in an epoxy resin by means of x-rays diffraction, scanning electronic microscopy, thermal gravimetric analysis and dilatometric analysis. A comparison of two techniques for preparing nano composites is addressed: mechanical stirring and sonication. X-rays analysis showed that an exfoliation/intercalation is occurring in some samples. TG analysis indicated and increase in thermal stability of the nano composites compared to the neat resin. Finally, dilatometric analysis indicates and increase in Tg for nano composites compared to the neat resin. (author)

  13. Cast-in-place concrete walls: thermal comfort evaluation of one-storey housing in São Paulo State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. M. Sacht

    Full Text Available This paper presents a proposal of thermal performance evaluation of a one-storey housing typology (TI24A executed by CDHU - Companhia de Desenvolvimento Habitacional e Urbano do Estado de São Paulo, considering the use of cast-in-place monolithic panels of concrete, with different thicknesses panels (8, 10 and 12 cm and density between 1600 and 2400 kg/m³. In this study, the specific purpose was discussing the influence of the characteristic of concrete walls on the housing thermal performance without slab. Was defined of first parameters of study (definition of the one-storey housing typology, survey about housing users behavior and cities choose and executed computational simulation (winter and summer, for four São Paulo State cities (São Paulo, São Carlos, Santos e Presidente Prudente, with the software Arquitrop 3.0 in a one-storey housing. Was observed that in winter and summer the typologies analyzed, the panels thickness variation had more influence about results than different concrete densities. The minimum level of thermal performance (M in winter has been granted for some cities, with exception of Santos. In summer one of São Paulo city’s typology was attended the minimum level of thermal performance in agreement with standard “NBR 15575 Residential buildings up to five storied - Performance, Part 1: General requirements”.

  14. Three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled simulation of MSR in transient state condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Jianjun; Zhang, Daling; Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Wu, Yingwei

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Developed a three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled transient analysis code for MSR. • Investigated the neutron distribution and thermal-hydraulic characters of the core under transient condition. • Analyzed three different transient conditions of inlet temperature drop, reactivity jump and pump coastdown. - Abstract: MSR (molten salt reactor) use liquid molten salt as coolant and fuel solvent, which was the only one liquid reactor of six Generation IV reactor types. As a liquid reactor the physical property of reactor was significantly influenced by fuel salt flow and the conventional analysis methods applied in solid fuel reactors are not applicable for this type of reactors. The present work developed a three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled code investigated the neutronics and thermo-hydraulics characteristics of the core in transient condition based on neutron diffusion theory and numerical heat transfer. The code consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes and six group balance equations for delayed neutron precursors. The code was separately validated by neutron benchmark and flow and heat transfer benchmark. Three different transient conditions was analyzed with inlet temperature drop, reactivity jump and pump coastdown. The results provide some valuable information in design and research this kind of reactor

  15. Three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled simulation of MSR in transient state condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Jianjun [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xianning Road, 28, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); College of Mechanical and Power Engineering, China Three Gorges University, No 8, Daxue road, Yichang, Hubei 443002 (China); Zhang, Daling, E-mail: dlzhang@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xianning Road, 28, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China); Qiu, Suizheng; Su, Guanghui; Tian, Wenxi; Wu, Yingwei [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi’an Jiaotong University, Xianning Road, 28, Xi’an 710049, Shaanxi (China)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Developed a three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled transient analysis code for MSR. • Investigated the neutron distribution and thermal-hydraulic characters of the core under transient condition. • Analyzed three different transient conditions of inlet temperature drop, reactivity jump and pump coastdown. - Abstract: MSR (molten salt reactor) use liquid molten salt as coolant and fuel solvent, which was the only one liquid reactor of six Generation IV reactor types. As a liquid reactor the physical property of reactor was significantly influenced by fuel salt flow and the conventional analysis methods applied in solid fuel reactors are not applicable for this type of reactors. The present work developed a three dimensional neutronic/thermal-hydraulic coupled code investigated the neutronics and thermo-hydraulics characteristics of the core in transient condition based on neutron diffusion theory and numerical heat transfer. The code consists of two group neutron diffusion equations for fast and thermal neutron fluxes and six group balance equations for delayed neutron precursors. The code was separately validated by neutron benchmark and flow and heat transfer benchmark. Three different transient conditions was analyzed with inlet temperature drop, reactivity jump and pump coastdown. The results provide some valuable information in design and research this kind of reactor.

  16. Thermal equation of state of synthetic orthoferrosilite at lunar pressures and temperatures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, J.; Jacobs, J.M.G.; van den Berg, A.P.; Wehber, M.; Lathe, C.; McCammon, C.A.; van Westrenen, W.

    2013-01-01

    Iron-rich orthopyroxene plays an important role in models of the thermal and magmatic evolution of the Moon, but its density at high pressure and high temperature is not well-constrained. We present in situ measurements of the unit-cell volume of a synthetic polycrystalline end-member

  17. Effects of microwave heating on the thermal states of biological tissues

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mathematical analysis of microwave heating equations in one-dimensional multi-layer model has been discussed. Maxwell's equations and transient bioheat transfer equation were numerically calculated by using finite difference method to predict the effects of thermal physical properties on the transient temperature of ...

  18. Finite element code FENIA verification and application for 3D modelling of thermal state of radioactive waste deep geological repository

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butov, R. A.; Drobyshevsky, N. I.; Moiseenko, E. V.; Tokarev, U. N.

    2017-11-01

    The verification of the FENIA finite element code on some problems and an example of its application are presented in the paper. The code is being developing for 3D modelling of thermal, mechanical and hydrodynamical (THM) problems related to the functioning of deep geological repositories. Verification of the code for two analytical problems has been performed. The first one is point heat source with exponential heat decrease, the second one - linear heat source with similar behavior. Analytical solutions have been obtained by the authors. The problems have been chosen because they reflect the processes influencing the thermal state of deep geological repository of radioactive waste. Verification was performed for several meshes with different resolution. Good convergence between analytical and numerical solutions was achieved. The application of the FENIA code is illustrated by 3D modelling of thermal state of a prototypic deep geological repository of radioactive waste. The repository is designed for disposal of radioactive waste in a rock at depth of several hundred meters with no intention of later retrieval. Vitrified radioactive waste is placed in the containers, which are placed in vertical boreholes. The residual decay heat of radioactive waste leads to containers, engineered safety barriers and host rock heating. Maximum temperatures and corresponding times of their establishment have been determined.

  19. Solid state green synthesis and catalytic activity of CuO nanorods in thermal decomposition of potassium periodate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Vinay Kumar; Bhattacharya, Shantanu

    2017-09-01

    The present study reports a facile solid state green synthesis process using the leaf extracts of Hibiscus rosa-sinensis to synthesize CuO nanorods with average diameters of 15-20 nm and lengths up to 100 nm. The as-synthesized CuO nanorods were characterized by x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy and selected area electron diffraction. The formation mechanism of CuO nanorods has been explained by involving the individual role of amide I (amino groups) and carboxylate groups under excess hydroxyl ions released from NaOH. The catalytic activity of CuO nanorods in thermal decomposition of potassium periodate microparticles (µ-KIO4) microparticles was studied by thermo gravimetric analysis measurement. The original size (~100 µm) of commercially procured potassium periodate was reduced to microscale length scale to about one-tenth by PEG200 assisted emulsion process. The CuO nanorods prepared by solid state green route were found to catalyze the thermal decomposition of µ-KIO4 with a reduction of 18 °C in the final thermal decomposition temperature of potassium periodate.

  20. Generalized Power Domination

    OpenAIRE

    Omerzel, Aleš

    2014-01-01

    The power domination problem is an optimization problem that has emerged together with the development of the power networks. It is important to control the voltage and current in all the nodes and links in a power network. Measuring devices are expensive, which is why there is a tendency to place a minimum number of devices in a power network so that the network remains fully supervised. The k-power domination is a generalization of the power domination. The thesis represents the rules of th...

  1. Measurement of the Thermal Conductivity of Unfrozen and Frozen Food Materials by a Steady State Method with Coaxial Dual-cylinder Apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pongsawatmanit, R; Miyawaki, O; Yano, T

    1993-01-01

    Coaxial dual-cylinder apparatus was used to measure the effective thermal conductivity of aqueous solutions of glucose, sucrose, gelatin and egg albumin over a temperature range from -20° to 20°C by the steady state method. The accuracy of the apparatus was confirmed by testing with water and ice. The effective thermal conductivity decreased with an increase in the total solid content in both the frozen and unfrozen states. In the unfrozen state, the effective thermal conductivity was slightly dependent on temperature. In the frozen state, however, the effective thermal conductivity was strongly dependent on temperature; lower temperatures gave higher effective thermal conductivity, reflecting the increase in the ice fration. For the unfrozen samples, the intrinsic thermal conductivity of each solid component was calculated by heat transfer models. All the models tested, series, parallel and Maxwell-Eucken, were equally applicable to describe the heat conduction in the unfrozen state. In the frozen state, however, the strong temperature dependency of the effective thermal conductivity suggests that the effect of the temperature dependency of the ice fraction should be incorporated into theoretical models.

  2. Downhill Domination in Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haynes Teresa W.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A path π = (v1, v2, . . . , vk+1 in a graph G = (V,E is a downhill path if for every i, 1 ≤ i ≤ k, deg(vi ≥ deg(vi+1, where deg(vi denotes the degree of vertex vi ∈ V. The downhill domination number equals the minimum cardinality of a set S ⊆ V having the property that every vertex v ∈ V lies on a downhill path originating from some vertex in S. We investigate downhill domination numbers of graphs and give upper bounds. In particular, we show that the downhill domination number of a graph is at most half its order, and that the downhill domination number of a tree is at most one third its order. We characterize the graphs obtaining each of these bounds

  3. Thermal rate coefficients in collinear versus bent transition state reactions: the N+N{sub 2} case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagana, Antonio; Faginas Lago, Noelia; Rampino, Sergio [Dipartimento di Chimica, Universita di Perugia, 06123 Perugia (Italy); Huarte-Larranaga, FermIn [Computer Simulation and Modeling Lab (CoSMoLab), Parc CientIfic de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); GarcIa, Ernesto [Departamento de Quimica Fisica, Universidad del PaIs Vasco, 01006 Vitoria (Spain)], E-mail: lagana05@gmail.com, E-mail: fhuarte@pcb.ub.es, E-mail: e.garcia@ehu.es

    2008-10-15

    Zero total angular momentum exact quantum calculations of the probabilities of the N+N{sub 2} reaction have been performed on the L3 potential energy surface having a bent transition state. This has allowed us to work out J-shifting estimates of the thermal rate coefficient based on the calculation of either detailed (state-to-state) or cumulative (multiconfiguration) probabilities. The results obtained are used to compare the numerical outcomes and the concurrent computational machineries of both quantum and semiclassical approaches as well as to exploit the potentialities of the J-shifting model. The implications of moving the barrier to reaction from the previously proposed collinear geometry of the LEPS to the bent one of L3 are also investigated by comparing the related detailed reactive probabilities.

  4. Thermal impact assessment of multi power plant operations on estuaries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eraslan, A.H.; Kim, K.H.; Harris, J.L.

    1977-01-01

    The assessment of the thermal impact of multi power plant operations on large estuaries requires careful consideration of the problems associated with: re-entrainment, re-circulation, thermal interaction, delay in the attainment of thermal equilibrium state, and uncertainty in specifying open boundaries and open boundary conditions of the regions, which are critically important in the analysis of the thermal conditions in receiving water bodies with tidal dominated, periodically reversing flow conditions. The results of an extensive study in the Hudson River at Indian Point, 42 miles upstream of the ocean end at the Battery, concluded that the tidal-transient, multi-dimensional discrete-element (UTA) thermal transport models (ESTONE, FLOTWO, TMPTWO computer codes) and the near-field far-field zone-matching methodology can be employed with a high degree of reliability in the assessment of the thermal impact of multi power plant operations on tidal dominated estuaries

  5. Numerical Simulations of Pillar Structured Solid State Thermal Neutron Detector Efficiency and Gamma Discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, A; Wang, T; Deo, N; Cheung, C; Nikolic, R

    2008-06-24

    This work reports numerical simulations of a novel three-dimensionally integrated, {sup 10}boron ({sup 10}B) and silicon p+, intrinsic, n+ (PIN) diode micropillar array for thermal neutron detection. The inter-digitated device structure has a high probability of interaction between the Si PIN pillars and the charged particles (alpha and {sup 7}Li) created from the neutron - {sup 10}B reaction. In this work, the effect of both the 3-D geometry (including pillar diameter, separation and height) and energy loss mechanisms are investigated via simulations to predict the neutron detection efficiency and gamma discrimination of this structure. The simulation results are demonstrated to compare well with the measurement results. This indicates that upon scaling the pillar height, a high efficiency thermal neutron detector is possible.

  6. Solid-state reaction in Fe/V multilayers by ion beam mixing with thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.F.M.; Costa, M.I. da Jr.; Teixeira, S.R.; Cunha, J.B.M. da; Alves, M.C.M.

    2001-01-01

    We report a study on the structural and magnetic properties of iron-vanadium thin films, originally grown in multilayer form [Fe(20 A)/V(20 A)] 20 , and mixed by ion beam mixing (IBM) and a subsequent thermal treatment. The samples were structurally characterised by X-ray diffraction (XRD) in the θ-2θ geometry and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). The magnetic characterisation was made using conversion electron Moessbauer spectroscopy (CEMS). The XRD result for the as-deposited multilayer shows a high-degree crystallinity, while CEMS suggests abrupt interface, since no significant contribution from vanadium in iron is observed. After the IBM and thermal treatment, the results from XRD show an FeV solid solution indexed as a bcc-disordered structure (α phase). XAS structural results are consistent with the XRD observations. CEMS results show a magnetic moment reduction for mixed samples

  7. State of the art in medical applications using non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Ishikawa, Kenji; Mizuno, Masaaki; Toyokuni, Shinya; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Metelmann, Hans-Robert; Hori, Masaru

    2017-12-01

    Plasma medical science is a novel interdisciplinary field that combines studies on plasma science and medical science, with the anticipation that understanding the scientific principles governing plasma medical science will lead to innovations in the field. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma has been used for medical treatments, such as for cancer, blood coagulation, and wound healing. The interactions that occur between plasma and cells/tissues have been analyzed extensively. Direct and indirect treatment of cells with plasma has broadened the applications of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma in medicine. Examples of indirect treatment include plasma-assisted immune-therapy and plasma-activated medium. Controlling intracellular redox balance may be key in plasma cancer treatment. Animal studies are required to test the effectiveness and safety of these treatments for future clinical applications.

  8. State reduced order models for the modelling of the thermal behavior of buildings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menezo, Christophe; Bouia, Hassan; Roux, Jean-Jacques; Depecker, Patrick [Institute National de Sciences Appliquees de Lyon, Villeurbanne Cedex, (France). Centre de Thermique de Lyon (CETHIL). Equipe Thermique du Batiment]. E-mail: menezo@insa-cethil-etb.insa-lyon.fr; bouia@insa-cethil-etb.insa-lyon.fr; roux@insa-cethil-etb.insa-lyon.fr; depecker@insa-cethil-etb.insa-lyon.fr

    2000-07-01

    This work is devoted to the field of building physics and related to the reduction of heat conduction models. The aim is to enlarge the model libraries of heat and mass transfer codes through limiting the considerable dimensions reached by the numerical systems during the modelling process of a multizone building. We show that the balanced realization technique, specifically adapted to the coupling of reduced order models with the other thermal phenomena, turns out to be very efficient. (author)

  9. Hypohydration and Acute Thermal Stress Affect Mood State but not Cognition or Dynamic Postural

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-12

    of the feet and ankles . The LCD screen presented a cursor interfaced with the movement of the platform. Balance scores were given based on three...Vol- unteers were asked to rate their thermal sensation (TS) using an 8-point Likert scale with verbal anchors from 0 (unbearably cold) to 8...unbearably hot). Thirst was asses- sed using a similar 8-point Likert scale with verbal anchors from 1 (not thirst at all) to 9 (very, very thirsty) (Gagge

  10. Low temperature thermal energy storage: a state-of-the-art survey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baylin, F.

    1979-07-01

    The preliminary version of an analysis of activities in research, development, and demonstration of low temperature thermal energy storage (TES) technologies having applications in renewable energy systems is presented. Three major categories of thermal storage devices are considered: sensible heat; phase change materials (PCM); and reversible thermochemical reactions. Both short-term and annual thermal energy storage technologies based on prinicples of sensible heat are discussed. Storage media considered are water, earth, and rocks. Annual storage technologies include solar ponds, aquifers, and large tanks or beds of water, earth, or rocks. PCM storage devices considered employ salt hydrates and organic compounds. The sole application of reversible chemical reactions outlined is for the chemical heat pump. All program processes from basic research through commercialization efforts are investigated. Nongovernment-funded industrial programs and foreign efforts are outlined as well. Data describing low temperature TES activities are presented also as project descriptions. Projects for all these programs are grouped into seven categories: short-term sensible heat storage; annual sensible heat storage; PCM storage; heat transfer and exchange; industrial waste heat recovery and storage; reversible chemical reaction storage; and models, economic analyses, and support studies. Summary information about yearly funding and brief descriptions of project goals and accomplishments are included.

  11. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic design analysis of the Advanced Neutron Source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoder, G.L. Jr.; Dixon, J.R.; Elkassabgi, Y.; Felde, D.K.; Giles, G.E.; Harrington, R.M.; Morris, D.G.; Nelson, W.R.; Ruggles, A.E.; Siman-Tov, M.; Stovall, T.K.

    1994-05-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source (ANS) is a research reactor that is planned for construction at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. This reactor will be a user facility with the major objective of providing the highest continuous neutron beam intensities of any reactor in the world. Additional objectives for the facility include providing materials irradiation facilities and isotope production facilities as good as, or better than, those in the High Flux Isotope Reactor. To achieve these objectives, the reactor design uses highly subcooled heavy water as both coolant and moderator. Two separate core halves of 67.6-L total volume operate at an average power density of 4.5 MW(t)/L, and the coolant flows upward through the core at 25 m/s. Operating pressure is 3.1 MPa at the core inlet with a 1.4-MPa pressure drop through the core region. Finally, in order to make the resources available for experimentation, the fuel is designed to provide a 17-d fuel cycle with an additional 4 d planned in each cycle for the refueling process. This report examines the codes and models used to develop the thermal-hydraulic design for ANS, as well as the correlations and physical data; evaluates thermal-hydraulic uncertainties; reports on thermal-hydraulic design and safety analysis; describes experimentation in support of the ANS reactor design and safety analysis; and provides an overview of the experimental plan

  12. Nickel Oxide (NiO nanoparticles prepared by solid-state thermal decomposition of Nickel (II schiff base precursor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aliakbar Dehno Khalaji

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, plate-like NiO nanoparticles were prepared by one-pot solid-state thermal decomposition of nickel (II Schiff base complex as new precursor. First, the nickel (II Schiff base precursor was prepared by solid-state grinding using nickel (II nitrate hexahydrate, Ni(NO32∙6H2O, and the Schiff base ligand N,N′-bis-(salicylidene benzene-1,4-diamine for 30 min without using any solvent, catalyst, template or surfactant. It was characterized by Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR and elemental analysis (CHN. The resultant solid was subsequently annealed in the electrical furnace at 450 °C for 3 h in air atmosphere. Nanoparticles of NiO were produced and characterized by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD at 2θ degree 0-140°, FT-IR spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. The XRD and FT-IR results showed that the product is pure and has good crystallinity with cubic structure because no characteristic peaks of impurity were observed, while the SEM and TEM results showed that the obtained product is tiny, aggregated with plate-like shape, narrow size distribution with an average size between 10-40 nm. Results show that the solid state thermal decomposition method is simple, environmentally friendly, safe and suitable for preparation of NiO nanoparticles. This method can also be used to synthesize nanoparticles of other metal oxides.

  13. Steady state and transient thermal-hydraulic characterization of full-scale ITER divertor plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tincani, A.; Malavasi, A.; Ricapito, I.; Riccardi, B.; Di Maio, P.A.; Vella, G.

    2007-01-01

    In the frame of the activities related to ITER divertor R and D, ENEA CR Brasimone was charged by EFDA (European Fusion Design Agreement) to investigate the thermal-hydraulic behaviour of the full-scale divertor plasma facing components, i.e. Inner Vertical Target, Dome Liner and Outer Vertical Target, both in steady state and during draining and drying transient. More in detail, for each PFC, the first phase of the work is the steady state hydraulic characterization which consists of: - measurements of pressure drops at different temperatures; - determination of the velocity distribution in the internal channels; - check the possible insurgence of cavitation. The subsequent phase of the thermal-hydraulic characterization foresees a testing campaign of draining and drying procedure by means of a suitable gas flow. The objective of this experimental procedure is to eliminate in the most efficient way the residual amount of water after gravity discharge. In order to accomplish this experimental campaign a significant modification of CEF1 loop has been designed and realized. This paper presents, first of all, the experimental set-up, the agreed test matrix and the achieved results for both steady state and transient tests. Moreover, the level of the implementation of a predictive hydraulic model, based on RELAP 5 code, as well as its results are described, discussed and compared with the experimental ones. (orig.)

  14. New interpretations of the Fort Clark State Historic Site based on aerial color and thermal infrared imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, Andrew Roland

    The Fort Clark State Historic Site (32ME2) is a well known site on the upper Missouri River, North Dakota. The site was the location of two Euroamerican trading posts and a large Mandan-Arikara earthlodge village. In 2004, Dr. Kenneth L. Kvamme and Dr. Tommy Hailey surveyed the site using aerial color and thermal infrared imagery collected from a powered parachute. Individual images were stitched together into large image mosaics and registered to Wood's 1993 interpretive map of the site using Adobe Photoshop. The analysis of those image mosaics resulted in the identification of more than 1,500 archaeological features, including as many as 124 earthlodges.

  15. Thermal solar energy in Spain. State of the art and objectives; Energie solaire thermique en Espagne. Etat actuel et objectifs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glenn, Jaouen

    2006-07-01

    According the Kyoto protocol, Spain has to reduce its CO{sub 2} emissions at 330 millions of tons (a decrease of 18 % from the level of 2003). From the european commission policy, the energy resources will be of 12 % of renewable energies. In this context, Spain developed an energy policy in favor of the solar energy. This document provides information on: the energy market in Spain, the thermal solar energy operating, the CO{sub 2} emissions, the state of the art in the domain in spain, the 2010 objectives, the programs and the assistance, some data on the solar market in comparison with the Europe. (A.L.B.)

  16. Effect of thermal environment on the temporal, spatial and seasonal occurrence of measles in Ondo state, Nigeria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omonijo, Akinyemi Gabriel; Matzarakis, Andreas; Oguntoke, Olusegun; Adeofun, Clement Olabinjo

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the temporal and spatial dynamics, as well as the seasonal occurrence of measles in Ondo state, Nigeria, to better understand the role of the thermal environment in the occurrence of the childhood killer disease measles, which ranks among the top ten leading causes of child deaths worldwide. The linkages between measles and atmospheric environmental factors were examined by correlating human-biometeorological parameters in the study area with reported clinical cases of measles for the period 1998-2008. We also applied stepwise regression analysis in order to determine the human-biometeorological parameters that lead to statistical changes in reported clinical cases of measles. We found that high reported cases of measles are associated with the least populated areas, where rearing and cohabitation of livestock/domestic animals within human communities are common. There was a significant correlation ( P measles and human-biometeorological parameters except wind speed and vapour pressure. High transmission of measles occurred in the months of January to May during the dry season when human thermal comfort indices are very high. This highlights the importance of the thermal environment in disease demographics since it accounted for more than 40% variation in measles transmission within the study period.

  17. Thermal-deformation effect of welding on A 1 reactor pressure vessel weld joints properties and state of stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becka, J.; Kupka, I.

    1976-01-01

    The methods are compared of electroslag welding and of arc welding with a view to their possible application in welding the Bohunice A-1 reactor pressure vessel. Considered are the thermal deformation effects of welding on the physical properties and the stress present in welded joints. For testing, plates were used having the dimensions of 1100x2300x200 mm and rings with 4820 mm outer diameter, 1800 mm height and 170 mm thickness made of steel CSN 413O30 modified with Ni, Al+Ti. The deformation effect of welding on the residual surface and triaxial stress, the specific stored energy, the initiation temperature of brittle crack and the critical size of the initiation defect corresponding to the thermal deformation effect of welding were determined. It was found that for electroslag welding, there is a low probability of crack formation in the joints, a low level of residual stress and a low level of specific stored energy in a relatively wide joint zone. For arc welding there is a considerable probability of defect formation in the vicinity of the sharp boundary of the joint, a high level of the triaxial state of stress in the tensile region, and a high level of specific stored energy concentrated in the narrow zone of weld joints. The recommended thermal process is given for welding pressure vessels made of the CSN 413030 steel modified with Ni, Al+Ti, and 150 to 200 mm in thickness. (J.P.)

  18. Location Study of Solar Thermal Power Plant in the State of Pernambuco Using Geoprocessing Technologies and Multiple-Criteria Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Wilma B. Azevêdo

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Solar Thermal Technology for the generation of electricity in large scale has been a reality in the world since the 1980s, when the first large-sized solar plants in the United States were introduced. Brazil presents great potential for the development of large-scale projects, although it is noted that the main barriers for the insertion of this technology in Brazilian market are the lack of incentives and goals and associated costs. In a way to contribute to the insertion of solar thermal technology in Brazil, this paper presents a macro-spatial approach, based on the use of Multiple-Criteria Decision Analysis and Geoprocessing, for the location of solar thermal power plants. The applied methodology for Pernambuco, located in the Northeast Region of Brazil, considered the implantation of parabolic trough solar power plant of 80 MW, operating only in solar mode, without heat storage. Based on performed analysis, it was confirmed that Pernambuco presents great potential for the installation of solar power plants, especially in the backlands of Pernambuco. Performed validations in the model demonstrate that the methodology attended the objective once the consistence between the assigned weights to the thematic layers, individually, and the final Map of site suitability were evidenced.

  19. Enriched Boron-Doped Amorphous Selenium Based Position-Sensitive Solid-State Thermal Neutron Detector for MPACT Applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandal, Krishna [Univ. of South Carolina, Columbia, SC (United States)

    2017-09-29

    High-efficiency thermal neutron detectors with compact size, low power-rating and high spatial, temporal and energy resolution are essential to execute non-proliferation and safeguard protocols. The demands of such detector are not fully covered by the current detection system such as gas proportional counters or scintillator-photomultiplier tube combinations, which are limited by their detection efficiency, stability of response, speed of operation, and physical size. Furthermore, world-wide shortage of 3He gas, required for widely used gas detection method, has further prompted to design an alternative system. Therefore, a solid-state neutron detection system without the requirement of 3He will be very desirable. To address the above technology gap, we had proposed to develop new room temperature solidstate thermal neutron detectors based on enriched boron (10B) and enriched lithium (6Li) doped amorphous Se (As- 0.52%, Cl 5 ppm) semiconductor for MPACT applications. The proposed alloy materials have been identified for its many favorable characteristics - a wide bandgap (~2.2 eV at 300 K) for room temperature operation, high glass transition temperature (tg ~ 85°C), a high thermal neutron cross-section (for boron ~ 3840 barns, for lithium ~ 940 barns, 1 barn = 10-24 cm2), low effective atomic number of Se for small gamma ray sensitivity, and high radiation tolerance due to its amorphous structure.

  20. Enriched Boron-Doped Amorphous Selenium Based Position-Sensitive Solid-State Thermal Neutron Detector for MPACT Applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandal, Krishna

    2017-01-01

    High-efficiency thermal neutron detectors with compact size, low power-rating and high spatial, temporal and energy resolution are essential to execute non-proliferation and safeguard protocols. The demands of such detector are not fully covered by the current detection system such as gas proportional counters or scintillator-photomultiplier tube combinations, which are limited by their detection efficiency, stability of response, speed of operation, and physical size. Furthermore, world-wide shortage of 3 He gas, required for widely used gas detection method, has further prompted to design an alternative system. Therefore, a solid-state neutron detection system without the requirement of 3 He will be very desirable. To address the above technology gap, we had proposed to develop new room temperature solidstate thermal neutron detectors based on enriched boron ( 10 B) and enriched lithium ( 6 Li) doped amorphous Se (As- 0.52%, Cl 5 ppm) semiconductor for MPACT applications. The proposed alloy materials have been identified for its many favorable characteristics - a wide bandgap (~2.2 eV at 300 K) for room temperature operation, high glass transition temperature (t g ~ 85°C), a high thermal neutron cross-section (for boron ~ 3840 barns, for lithium ~ 940 barns, 1 barn = 10 -24 cm 2 ), low effective atomic number of Se for small gamma ray sensitivity, and high radiation tolerance due to its amorphous structure.

  1. On an analytical evaluation of the flux and dominant eigenvalue problem for the steady state multi-group multi-layer neutron diffusion equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceolin, Celina; Schramm, Marcelo; Bodmann, Bardo Ernst Josef; Vilhena, Marco Tullio Mena Barreto de [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre (Brazil). Programa de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia Mecanica; Bogado Leite, Sergio de Queiroz [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear, Rio de Janeiro (Brazil)

    2014-11-15

    In this work the authors solved the steady state neutron diffusion equation for a multi-layer slab assuming the multi-group energy model. The method to solve the equation system is based on an expansion in Taylor Series resulting in an analytical expression. The results obtained can be used as initial condition for neutron space kinetics problems. The neutron scalar flux was expanded in a power series, and the coefficients were found by using the ordinary differential equation and the boundary and interface conditions. The effective multiplication factor k was evaluated using the power method. We divided the domain into several slabs to guarantee the convergence with a low truncation order. We present the formalism together with some numerical simulations.

  2. Transition state theory thermal rate constants and RRKM-based branching ratios for the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction based on multi-state and multi-reference ab initio calculations of interest for the Titan's chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouk, Chanda-Malis; Zvereva-Loëte, Natalia; Scribano, Yohann; Bussery-Honvault, Béatrice

    2012-10-30

    Multireference single and double configuration interaction (MRCI) calculations including Davidson (+Q) or Pople (+P) corrections have been conducted in this work for the reactants, products, and extrema of the doublet ground state potential energy surface involved in the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction. Such highly correlated ab initio calculations are then compared with previous PMP4, CCSD(T), W1, and DFT/B3LYP studies. Large relative differences are observed in particular for the transition state in the entrance channel resolving the disagreement between previous ab initio calculations. We confirm the existence of a small but positive potential barrier (3.86 ± 0.84 kJ mol(-1) (MR-AQCC) and 3.89 kJ mol(-1) (MRCI+P)) in the entrance channel of the title reaction. The correlation is seen to change significantly the energetic position of the two minima and five saddle points of this system together with the dissociation channels but not their relative order. The influence of the electronic correlation into the energetic of the system is clearly demonstrated by the thermal rate constant evaluation and it temperature dependance by means of the transition state theory. Indeed, only MRCI values are able to reproduce the experimental rate constant of the title reaction and its behavior with temperature. Similarly, product branching ratios, evaluated by means of unimolecular RRKM theory, confirm the NH production of Umemoto et al., whereas previous works based on less accurate ab initio calculations failed. We confirm the previous findings that the N((2)D) + CH(4) reaction proceeds via an insertion-dissociation mechanism and that the dominant product channels are CH(2)NH + H and CH(3) + NH. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. KIM, Steady-State Transport for Fixed Source in 2-D Thermal Reactor by Monte-Carlo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cupini, E.; De Matteis, A.; Simonini, R.

    1980-01-01

    1 - Description of problem or function: KIM (K-infinite Monte Carlo) is a program which solves the steady-state linear transport equation for a fixed-source problem (or, by successive fixed-source runs, for the eigenvalue problem) in a two-dimensional infinite thermal reactor lattice. The main quantities computed in some broad energy groups are the following: - Fluxes and cross sections averaged over the region (i.e. a space portion that can be unconnected but contains everywhere the same homogeneous material), grouping of regions, the whole element. - Average absorption and fission rates per nuclide. - Average flux, absorption and production distributions versus energy. 2 - Method of solution: Monte Carlo simulation is used by tracing particle histories from fission birth down through the resonance region until absorption in the thermal range. The program is organised in three sections for fast, epithermal and thermal simulation, respectively; each section implements a particular model for both numerical techniques and cross section representation (energy groups in the fast section, groups or resonance parameters in the epithermal section, points in the thermal section). During slowing down (energy above 1 eV) nuclei are considered as stationary, with the exception of some resonance nuclei whose spacing between resonances is much greater than the resonance width. The Doppler broadening of s-wave resonances of these nuclides is taken into account by computing cross sections at the current neutron energy and at the temperature of the nucleus hit. During thermalization (energy below 1 eV) the thermal motion of some nuclides is also considered, by exploiting scattering kernels provided by the library for light water, heavy water and oxygen at several temperatures. KIM includes splitting and Russian roulette. A characteristic feature of the program is its approach to the lattice geometry. In fact, besides the usual continuous treatment of the geometry using the well

  4. Thermal Neutron Capture and Thermal Neutron Burn-up of K isomeric state of 177mLu: a way to the Neutron Super-Elastic Scattering cross section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roig, O.; Belier, G.; Meot, V.; Daugas, J.-M.; Romain, P.; Aupiais, J.; Jutier, Ch.; Le Petit, G.; Letourneau, A.; Marie, F.; Veyssiere, Ch.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal neutron radiative capture and burn-up measurements of the K isomeric state in 177Lu form part of an original method to indirectly obtain the neutron super-elastic scattering cross section at thermal energy. Neutron super-elastic scattering, also called neutron inelastic acceleration, occurs during the neutron collisions with an excited nuclear level. In this reaction, the nucleus could partly transfer its excitation energy to the scattered neutron

  5. Quantity, Quality, and Availability of Waste Heat from United States Thermal Power Generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingerich, Daniel B; Mauter, Meagan S

    2015-07-21

    Secondary application of unconverted heat produced during electric power generation has the potential to improve the life-cycle fuel efficiency of the electric power industry and the sectors it serves. This work quantifies the residual heat (also known as waste heat) generated by U.S. thermal power plants and assesses the intermittency and transport issues that must be considered when planning to utilize this heat. Combining Energy Information Administration plant-level data with literature-reported process efficiency data, we develop estimates of the unconverted heat flux from individual U.S. thermal power plants in 2012. Together these power plants discharged an estimated 18.9 billion GJ(th) of residual heat in 2012, 4% of which was discharged at temperatures greater than 90 °C. We also characterize the temperature, spatial distribution, and temporal availability of this residual heat at the plant level and model the implications for the technical and economic feasibility of its end use. Increased implementation of flue gas desulfurization technologies at coal-fired facilities and the higher quality heat generated in the exhaust of natural gas fuel cycles are expected to increase the availability of residual heat generated by 10.6% in 2040.

  6. Rate and State Friction Relation for Nanoscale Contacts: Thermally Activated Prandtl-Tomlinson Model with Chemical Aging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Kaiwen; Goldsby, David L.; Carpick, Robert W.

    2018-05-01

    Rate and state friction (RSF) laws are widely used empirical relationships that describe macroscale to microscale frictional behavior. They entail a linear combination of the direct effect (the increase of friction with sliding velocity due to the reduced influence of thermal excitations) and the evolution effect (the change in friction with changes in contact "state," such as the real contact area or the degree of interfacial chemical bonds). Recent atomic force microscope (AFM) experiments and simulations found that nanoscale single-asperity amorphous silica-silica contacts exhibit logarithmic aging (increasing friction with time) over several decades of contact time, due to the formation of interfacial chemical bonds. Here we establish a physically based RSF relation for such contacts by combining the thermally activated Prandtl-Tomlinson (PTT) model with an evolution effect based on the physics of chemical aging. This thermally activated Prandtl-Tomlinson model with chemical aging (PTTCA), like the PTT model, uses the loading point velocity for describing the direct effect, not the tip velocity (as in conventional RSF laws). Also, in the PTTCA model, the combination of the evolution and direct effects may be nonlinear. We present AFM data consistent with the PTTCA model whereby in aging tests, for a given hold time, static friction increases with the logarithm of the loading point velocity. Kinetic friction also increases with the logarithm of the loading point velocity at sufficiently high velocities, but at a different increasing rate. The discrepancy between the rates of increase of static and kinetic friction with velocity arises from the fact that appreciable aging during static contact changes the energy landscape. Our approach extends the PTT model, originally used for crystalline substrates, to amorphous materials. It also establishes how conventional RSF laws can be modified for nanoscale single-asperity contacts to provide a physically based friction

  7. Thermal stability and chemical bonding states of AlOxNy/Si gate stacks revealed by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He, G.; Toyoda, S.; Shimogaki, Y.; Oshima, M.

    2010-01-01

    Annealing-temperature dependence of the thermal stability and chemical bonding states of AlO x N y /SiO 2 /Si gate stacks grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) using new chemistry was investigated by synchrotron radiation photoemission spectroscopy (SRPES). Results have confirmed the formation of the AlN and AlNO compounds in the as-deposited samples. Annealing the AlO x N y samples in N 2 ambient in 600-800 deg. C promotes the formation of SiO 2 component. Meanwhile, there is no formation of Al-O-Si and Al-Si binding states, suggesting no interdiffusion of Al with the Si substrate. A thermally induced reaction between Si and AlO x N y to form volatile SiO and Al 2 O is suggested to be responsible for the full disappearance of the Al component that accompanies annealing at annealing temperature of 1000 deg. C. The released N due to the breakage of the Al-N bonding will react with the SiO 2 interfacial layer and lead to the formation of the Si 3 -N-O/Si 2 -N-O components at the top of Si substrate. These results indicate high temperature processing induced evolution of the interfacial chemistry and application range of AlO x N y /Si gate stacks in future CMOS devices.

  8. Mechanical properties of ground state structures in substitutional ordered alloys: High strength, high ductility and high thermal stability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tawancy, H.M.; Aboelfotoh, M.O.

    2014-01-01

    We have studied the effect of atom arrangements in the ground state structures of substitutional ordered alloys on their mechanical properties using nickel–molybdenum-based alloys as model systems. Three alloys with nominal compositions of Ni–19.43 at% Mo, Ni–18.53 at% Mo–15.21 at% Cr and Ni–18.72 at% Mo–6.14 at% Nb are included in the study. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the closely related Pt 2 Mo-type, DO 22 and D1 a superlattices with similar energies are identified by electron diffraction of ground state structures, which can directly be derived from the parent disordered fcc structure by minor atom rearrangements on {420} fcc planes. The three superlattices are observed to coexist during the disorder–order transformation at 700 °C with the most stable superlattice being determined by the exact chemical composition. Although most of the slip systems in the parent disordered fcc structure are suppressed, many of the twinning systems remain operative in the superlattices favoring deformation by twinning, which leads to considerable strengthening while maintaining high ductility levels. Both the Pt 2 Mo-type and DO 22 superlattices are distinguished by high strength and high ductility due to their nanoscale microstructures, which have high thermal stability. However, the D1 a superlattice is found to exhibit poor thermal stability leading to considerable loss of ductility, which has been correlated with self-induced recrystallization by migration of grain boundaries

  9. SAFE: A computer code for the steady-state and transient thermal analysis of LMR fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayes, S.L.

    1993-12-01

    SAFE is a computer code developed for both the steady-state and transient thermal analysis of single LMR fuel elements. The code employs a two-dimensional control-volume based finite difference methodology with fully implicit time marching to calculate the temperatures throughout a fuel element and its associated coolant channel for both the steady-state and transient events. The code makes no structural calculations or predictions whatsoever. It does, however, accept as input structural parameters within the fuel such as the distributions of porosity and fuel composition, as well as heat generation, to allow a thermal analysis to be performed on a user-specified fuel structure. The code was developed with ease of use in mind. An interactive input file generator and material property correlations internal to the code are available to expedite analyses using SAFE. This report serves as a complete design description of the code as well as a user's manual. A sample calculation made with SAFE is included to highlight some of the code's features. Complete input and output files for the sample problem are provided

  10. Iron dominated magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided

  11. Bestsellers dominate the market

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koenemann, Detlef

    2010-07-01

    The strong market growth of the past years has led to certain turbine types achieving very high numbers of units sold. As a result, the leading manufacturers are becoming ever more dominant, and many smaller manufacturers are beng required to seek their success in market niches. (orig.)

  12. Iron dominated magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, G.E.

    1985-07-01

    These two lectures on iron dominated magnets are meant for the student of accelerator science and contain general treatments of the subjects design and construction. The material is arranged in the categories: General Concepts and Cost Considerations, Profile Configuration and Harmonics, Magnetic Measurements, a few examples of ''special magnets'' and Materials and Practices. Extensive literature is provided.

  13. Searching for world domination

    CERN Multimedia

    Quillen, E

    2004-01-01

    "Optimists might believe Microsoft suffered a setback last week that will impede its progress toward world domination, but I suspect the company has already found a way to prevail. At issue before the European Union was Microsoft's bundling of its Windows Media Player with its operating system" (1 page)

  14. Influence of Soil Management on Water Retention from Saturation to Oven Dryness and Dominant Soil Water States in a Vertisol under Crop Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinden, Karl; Pachepsky, Yakov; Pederera, Aura; Martinez, Gonzalo; Espejo, Antonio Jesus; Giraldez, Juan Vicente

    2014-05-01

    high crop water demands, especially at the end of spring when atmospheric water demands become very high, resulting in an extension of the growing period under DD. The results provide also an explanation for the observed soil water dynamics pattern in the field, with rapid transitions between persistent wet and dry water content states. References Dexter, A.R., E.A. Czyż, G. Richard, A. Reszkowska, 2008. A user-friendly water retention function that takes account of the textural and structural pore spaces in soil. Geoderma, 143:243-253. Groenevelt, P.A., C.D. Grant, 2004. A new model for the soil-water retention curve that solves the problem of residual water contents. Eur. J. Soil Sci. 55:479-485.

  15. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia

    2017-01-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  16. Thermal hydraulic core simulation of the MYRRHA Reactor in steady state operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferandes, Gustavo H.N.; Ramos, Mário C.; Carvalho, Athos M.S.S.; Cabrera, Carlos E.V.; Costa, Antonella L.; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: ghnfernandes@gmail.com, E-mail: marc5663@gmail.com, E-mail: athos1495@yahoo.com.br, E-mail: carlosvelcab@hotmail.com, E-mail: antonella@nuclear.ufmg.br, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Instituto Nacional de Ciência e Tecnologia de Reatores Nucleares Inovadores/CNPq (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    MYRRHA (Multi-purpose Hybrid Research Reactor for High-tech Applications) is a prototype nuclear subcritical reactor driven by a particle accelerator. As a special property, the reactor maintains the nuclear fission chain reaction by means of an external neutron source provided by a particle accelerator. The main aim of this work is to study two types of coolants, LBE (Lead-Bismuth Eutectic) and Na (Sodium) that are two strong candidates to be used in ADS systems as well as in Generation IV (GEN-IV) reactors. Firstly, it was developed a thermal hydraulic model of the MYRRHA core using the RELAP5-3D, considering LBE as coolant (original project). After this, the LBE was substituted by Na coolant to investigate the reactor behavior in such case. Results have demonstrated the high heat transfer capacity of the LBE coolant in this type of system. (author)

  17. Thermal and electrodynamical formation mechanisms of overloaded AC states and charging rate influence on their stable dynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanovskii, V.; Watanabe, K.; Awaji, S.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Overloaded AC states are investigated to understand the mechanisms of there formation. •There exist characteristic time windows defining the existence of stable overloaded AC states. •Limiting values of the electric field, current and temperature are higher than the quench ones. -- Abstract: The macroscopic thermal and electrodynamical phenomena occurring in high-T c superconductors during overloaded AC states are theoretically investigated to understand the basic physical mechanisms, which are characteristic for the stable formation of the operating modes when the peak current exceeds the critical current of a superconductor during AC modes. It is shown that there exist characteristic time windows defining the existence of stable overloaded AC states. They identify the stability boundary of the overloaded AC states. Therefore, there is the maximum allowable value of a peak current of stable overloaded AC regimes at the given charging rate, cooling conditions and properties of a superconductor and a matrix. The results obtained prove that the limiting peak current is higher than the corresponding quench current defining the stability margin of DC states. It monotonically increases with the charging rate. Besides, in the stable overloaded AC states, the peak values of the electric field and temperature may be also noticeably higher than the corresponding quench values. They depend on the peak current and charging rate at the given cooling conditions. As a result, high-T c superconducting tapes can stably work under intensive AC modes without instability onset when the peak of applied currents may significantly exceed not only the critical current but also the corresponding values of DC-quench currents

  18. Surface state of GaN after rapid-thermal-annealing using AlN cap-layer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Zammar, G., E-mail: georgio.elzammar@univ-tours.fr [Université François Rabelais, Tours, GREMAN, CNRS UMR 7347, 10 rue Thalès de Milet CS 97155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Khalfaoui, W. [Université François Rabelais, Tours, GREMAN, CNRS UMR 7347, 10 rue Thalès de Milet CS 97155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Oheix, T. [Université François Rabelais, Tours, GREMAN, CNRS UMR 7347, 10 rue Thalès de Milet CS 97155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); STMicroelectronics, 10 rue Thalès de Milet CS 97155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Yvon, A.; Collard, E. [STMicroelectronics, 10 rue Thalès de Milet CS 97155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Cayrel, F.; Alquier, D. [Université François Rabelais, Tours, GREMAN, CNRS UMR 7347, 10 rue Thalès de Milet CS 97155, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France)

    2015-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Surface state of a crack-free AlN cap-layer reactive sputtered on GaN and annealed at high temperature showing a smooth, pit-free surface. - Highlights: • We deposit a crystalline AlN layer by reactive magnetron sputtering on GaN. • We show the effect of deposition parameters of AlN by reactive magnetron sputtering on the quality of the grown layer. • We demonstrate the efficiency of double cap-layer for GaN protection during high temperature thermal treatments. • We show an efficient selective etch of AlN without damaging GaN surface. - Abstract: Critical issues need to be overcome to produce high performance Schottky diodes on gallium nitride (GaN). To activate dopant, high temperature thermal treatments are required but damage GaN surface where hexagonal pits appear and prevent any device processing. In this paper, we investigated the efficiency of cap-layers on GaN during thermal treatments to avoid degradation. Aluminum nitride (AlN) and silicon oxide (SiO{sub x}) were grown on GaN by direct current reactive magnetron sputtering and plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition, respectively. AlN growth parameters were studied to understand their effect on the grown layers and their protection efficiency. Focused ion beam was used to measure AlN layer thickness. Crystalline quality and exact composition were verified using X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Two types of rapid thermal annealing at high temperatures were investigated. Surface roughness and pits density were evaluated using atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Cap-layers wet etching was processed in H{sub 3}PO{sub 4} at 120 °C for AlN and in HF (10%) for SiO{sub x}. This work reveals effective protection of GaN during thermal treatments at temperatures as high as 1150 °C. Low surface roughness was obtained. Furthermore, no hexagonal pit was observed on the surface.

  19. Differences between young adults and elderly in thermal comfort, productivity, and thermal physiology in response to a moderate temperature drift and a steady-state condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellen, L.; Marken Lichtenbelt, van W.D.; Loomans, M.G.L.C.; Toftum, J.; Wit, de M.H.

    2010-01-01

    Results from naturally ventilated buildings show that allowing the indoor temperature to drift does not necessarily result in thermal discomfort and may allow for a reduction in energy use. However, for stationary conditions, several studies indicate that the thermal neutral temperature and optimum

  20. Shielding property for thermal equilibrium states in the quantum Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Móller, N. S.; de Paula, A. L.; Drumond, R. C.

    2018-03-01

    We show that Gibbs states of nonhomogeneous transverse Ising chains satisfy a shielding property. Namely, whatever the fields on each spin and exchange couplings between neighboring spins are, if the field in one particular site is null, then the reduced states of the subchains to the right and to the left of this site are exactly the Gibbs states of each subchain alone. Therefore, even if there is a strong exchange coupling between the extremal sites of each subchain, the Gibbs states of the each subchain behave as if there is no interaction between them. In general, if a lattice can be divided into two disconnected regions separated by an interface of sites with zero applied field, then we can guarantee a similar result only if the surface contains a single site. Already for an interface with two sites we show an example where the property does not hold. When it holds, however, we show that if a perturbation of the Hamiltonian parameters is done in one side of the lattice, then the other side is completely unchanged, with regard to both its equilibrium state and dynamics.

  1. Nutritional mitigation of winter thermal stress in gilthead seabream: Associated metabolic pathways and potential indicators of nutritional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Nadège; Silva, Tomé S; Wulff, Tune; Schrama, Denise; Dias, Jorge P; Rodrigues, Pedro M L; Conceição, Luís E C

    2016-06-16

    A trial was carried out with gilthead seabream juveniles, aiming to investigate the ability of an enhanced dietary formulation (diet Winter Feed, WF, containing a higher proportion of marine-derived protein sources and supplemented in phospholipids, vitamin C, vitamin E and taurine) to assist fish in coping with winter thermal stress, compared to a low-cost commercial diet (diet CTRL). In order to identify the metabolic pathways affected by WF diet, a comparative two dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) analysis of fish liver proteome (pH 4–7) was undertaken at the end of winter. A total of 404 protein spots, out of 1637 detected, were differentially expressed between the two groups of fish. Mass spectrometry analysis of selected spots suggested that WF diet improved oxidative stress defense, reduced endoplasmic reticulum stress, enhanced metabolic flux through methionine cycle and phenylalanine/tyrosine catabolism, and induced higher aerobic metabolism and gluconeogenesis. Results support the notion that WF diet had a positive effect on fish nutritional state by partially counteracting the effect of thermal stress and underlined the sensitivity of proteome data for nutritional and metabolic profiling purposes. Intragroup variability and co-measured information were also used to pinpoint which proteins displayed a stronger relation with fish nutritional state. Winter low water temperature is a critical factor for gilthead seabream farming in the Mediterranean region, leading to a reduction of feed intake, which often results in metabolic and immunological disorders and stagnation of growth performances. In a recent trial, we investigated the ability of an enhanced dietary formulation (diet WF) to assist gilthead seabream in coping with winter thermal stress, compared to a standard commercial diet (diet CTRL). Within this context, in the present work, we identified metabolic processes that are involved in the stress-mitigating effect observed

  2. Thermal springs list for the United States; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Key to Geophysical Records Documentation No. 12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, G.W.; Grim, P.J.; Ikelman, J.A. (comps.)

    1980-06-01

    The compilation has 1702 thermal spring locations in 23 of the 50 States, arranged alphabetically by State (Postal Service abbreviation) and degrees of latitude and longitude within the State. It shows spring name, surface temperature in degrees Fahrenheit and degrees Celsius; USGS Professional Paper 492 number, USGS Circular 790 number, NOAA number, north to south on each degree of latitude and longitude of the listed. USGS 1:250,000-scale (AMS) map; and the USGS topographic map coverage, 1:63360- or 1:62500-scale (15-minute) or 1:24000-scale (7.5-minute) quadrangle also included is an alphabetized list showing only the spring name and the State in which it is located. Unnamed springs are omitted. The list includes natural surface hydrothermal features: springs, pools, mud pots, mud volcanoes, geysers, fumaroles, and steam vents at temperature of 20{sup 0}C (68[sup 0}F) or greater. It does not include wells or mines, except at sites where they supplement or replace natural vents presently or recently active, or, in some places, where orifices are not distinguishable as natural or artificial. The listed springs are located on the USGS 1:250,000 (AMS) topographic maps. (MHR)

  3. Ergodic averages via dominating processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Jesper; Mengersen, Kerrie

    2006-01-01

    We show how the mean of a monotone function (defined on a state space equipped with a partial ordering) can be estimated, using ergodic averages calculated from upper and lower dominating processes of a stationary irreducible Markov chain. In particular, we do not need to simulate the stationary...... Markov chain and we eliminate the problem of whether an appropriate burn-in is determined or not. Moreover, when a central limit theorem applies, we show how confidence intervals for the mean can be estimated by bounding the asymptotic variance of the ergodic average based on the equilibrium chain....

  4. Computer simulation of the thermal pressure in solids and the equation of state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, D.O.; Dienes, G.J.; Paskin, A.

    1976-01-01

    The equation of state of solids was investigated with molecular dynamics techniques by obtaining the pressure as a function of temperature over a wide range of compressions. Data were obtained for fcc crystals with Lennard--Jones interactions and for bcc crystals with Morse interactions. The results were analyzed in terms of the Mie--Gruneisen equation of state. The Gruneisen constant at zero temperature is found to be essentially that obtained from the volume dependence of the mean-squared lattice vibration frequency, and its temperature dependence can be approximated well with a self-consistent cell model. Calculated results are compared with experimental data for argon along the melting line

  5. Face-to-Face Packing of 2,3,9,10-Tetrasubstituted Pentacene Derivatives Revealed through a Solid State [4 + 4] Thermal Cycloaddition and Molecular Dynamic Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Bikash; Lin, Bo-Chao; Dela Cerna, Mark Vincent Carreon; Hsu, Chao-Ping; Lin, Chih-Hsiu

    2016-08-05

    2,3,9,10-Substituted pentacene tetraesters and pentacene diester-dinitriles were synthesized. These pentacene derivatives underwent an unusual solid state [4 + 4] thermal dimerization with good efficiency and complete stereoselectivity. This observation indicates this series of pentacene derivatives adopt π-π stacking geometry with large mutual overlap in solid state. This notion was confirmed by molecualr dynamic simulation.

  6. Up-Conversion Intersystem Crossing Rates in Organic Emitters for Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence: Impact of the Nature of Singlet vs Triplet Excited States

    KAUST Repository

    Samanta, Pralok Kumar; Kim, Dongwook; Coropceanu, Veaceslav; Bredas, Jean-Luc

    2017-01-01

    The rates for up-conversion intersystem crossing (UISC) from the T1 state to the S1 state are calculated for a series of organic emitters with an emphasis on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials. Both the spin-orbit coupling

  7. Detection of defect states responsible for leakage current in ultrathin tantalum pentoxide (Ta2O5) films by zero-bias thermally stimulated current spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, W.S.; Zhong, L.; Lee, A.; See, C.H.; Han, T.; Sandler, N.P.; Chong, T.C.

    1997-01-01

    Defect states responsible for leakage current in ultrathin (physical thickness 2 O 5 ) films were measured with a novel zero-bias thermally stimulated current technique. It was found that defect states A, whose activation energy was estimated to be about 0.2 eV, can be more efficiently suppressed by using N 2 O rapid thermal annealing (RTA) instead of using O 2 RTA for postdeposition annealing. The leakage current was also smaller for samples with N 2 O RTA than those with O 2 RTA for postdeposition annealing. Hence, defect states A are quite likely to be important in causing leakage current. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  8. Public owners will dominate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakken, Stein Arne

    2003-01-01

    In ten years there will still be a dominating public ownership in the energy supply sector in Norway. Statkraft will be the big actor. Norway will then be integrated in an European power market through more cables and the power price will be lower and more stable. The market will be important, but within frames set by the politicians. This article quotes the views of two central figures in the energy sector on the energy supply industry in 2014

  9. Thermal decay rate of a metastable state with two degrees of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    I I Gontchar

    2017-06-01

    Jun 1, 2017 ... expected to agree with the long time limit of the escape rate obtained using ..... distribution with zero averages and variances equal to 2. Although in the fission ... Here (t) is the probability that the metastable state has ..... the (kt)−1/2 dependence and has been adjusted to εR at some intermediate points.

  10. Thermal history and polymer electrolyte structure: implications for solid-state battery design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neat, R.; Glasse, M.; Linford, R.

    1986-01-01

    Studies on PEO/LiCF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/ polymeric electrolytes using polarising microscopy, SEM/EDX, DSC and complex plane analysis show that thin electrolyte films prepared by slow evaporation from CH/sub 3/CN solution are spherulitic in nature. More than one type of spherulite is present across the composition range and each spherulite type contains both amorphous and crystalline regions. The structural behaviour on heating and cooling is discussed with particular reference to electrolyte films of overall composition PEO/sub 20/:LiCF/sub 3/SO/sub 3/. For these high ratio triflate films, in contrast to similar PEO/LiClO/sub 4/ films, high melting salt-rich regions are unexpectedly present in conjunction with low melting, low salt spherulites. No evidence is found for the presence of pure PEO spherulites, but the low melting spherulites may have a crystalline skeleton of pure PEO. Evidence is presented for the dependence of conductivity on thermal history.

  11. Preparing Al-Mg Substrate for Thermal Spraying: Evaluation of Surface State After Different Pretreatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukauskaitė, R.; Valiulis, A. V.; Černašėjus, O.; Škamat, J.; Rębiś, J. A.

    2016-08-01

    The article deals with the pretreatment technique for preparing the surface of aluminum alloy EN AW 5754 before thermal spray. The surface after different pretreatments, including degreasing with acetone, chemical etching with acidic and alkali solutions, grit-blasting, cathodic cleaning, and some combinations of these techniques, has been studied. The investigation of pre-treated surfaces covered the topographical study (using scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and 3D profilometry), the chemical analysis by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, the evaluation of surface wettability (sessile drop method), and the assessment of surface free energy. Compared with all the techniques used in present work, the cathodic cleaning and its combination with grit-blasting provide the most preferable chemistry of the surface. Due to the absence of hydroxides at the surface and, possible, due to the diffusion of magnesium to the surface of substrate, the surface wettability and the surface free energy have been significantly improved. No direct correlation between the surface topography and the surface wettability has been established.

  12. Recovery in dc and rf performance of off-state step-stressed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors with thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Byung-Jae; Hwang, Ya-Hsi; Ahn, Shihyun; Zhu, Weidi; Dong, Chen; Lu, Liu; Ren, Fan; Holzworth, M. R.; Jones, Kevin S.; Pearton, Stephen J.; Smith, David J.; Kim, Jihyun; Zhang, Ming-Lan

    2015-01-01

    The recovery effects of thermal annealing on dc and rf performance of off-state step-stressed AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistors were investigated. After stress, reverse gate leakage current and sub-threshold swing increased and drain current on-off ratio decreased. However, these degradations were completely recovered after thermal annealing at 450 °C for 10 mins for devices stressed either once or twice. The trap densities, which were estimated by temperature-dependent drain-current sub-threshold swing measurements, increased after off-state step-stress and were reduced after subsequent thermal annealing. In addition, the small signal rf characteristics of stressed devices were completely recovered after thermal annealing

  13. Thermal-hydraulic Fortran program for steady-state calculations of plate-type fuel research reactors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khedr Ahmed

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The safety assessment of research and power reactors is a continuous process covering their lifespan and requiring verified and validated codes. Power reactor codes all over the world are well established and qualified against real measuring data and qualified experimental facilities. These codes are usually sophisticated, require special skills and consume a lot of running time. On the other hand, most research reactor codes still require much more data for validation and qualification. It is, therefore, of benefit to any regulatory body to develop its own codes for the review and assessment of research reactors. The present paper introduces a simple, one-dimensional Fortran program called THDSN for steady-state thermal-hydraulic calculations of plate-type fuel research reactors. Besides calculating the fuel and coolant temperature distributions and pressure gradients in an average and hot channel, the program calculates the safety limits and margins against the critical phenomena encountered in research reactors, such as the onset of nucleate boiling, critical heat flux and flow instability. Well known thermal-hydraulic correlations for calculating the safety parameters and several formulas for the heat transfer coefficient have been used. The THDSN program was verified by comparing its results for 2 and 10 MW benchmark reactors with those published in IAEA publications and a good agreement was found. Also, the results of the program are compared with those published for other programs, such as the PARET and TERMIC.

  14. Morphological and enzymatic response of the thermotolerant fungus Fomes sp. EUM1 in solid state fermentation under thermal stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordaz-Hernández, Armando; Ortega-Sánchez, Eric; Montesinos-Matías, Roberto; Hernández-Martínez, Ricardo; Torres-Martínez, Daniel; Loera, Octavio

    2016-08-01

    Thermotolerance of the fungus Fomes sp. EUM1 was evaluated in solid state fermentation (SSF). This thermotolerant strain improved both hyphal invasiveness (38%) and length (17%) in adverse thermal conditions exceeding 30°C and to a maximum of 40°C. In contrast, hyphal branching decreased by 46% at 45°C. The production of cellulases over corn stover increased 1.6-fold in 30°C culture conditions, xylanases increased 2.8-fold at 40°C, while laccase production improved 2.7-fold at 35°C. Maximum production of lignocellulolytic enzymes was obtained at elevated temperatures in shorter fermentation times (8-6 days), although the proteases appeared as a thermal stress response associated with a drop in lignocellulolytic activities. Novel and multiple isoenzymes of xylanase (four bands) and cellulase (six bands) were secreted in the range of 20-150 kDa during growth in adverse temperature conditions. However, only a single laccase isoenzyme (46 kDa) was detected. This is the first report describing the advantages of a thermotolerant white-rot fungus in SSF. These results have important implications for large-scale SSF, where effects of metabolic heat are detrimental to growth and enzyme production, which are severely affected by the formation of high temperature gradients. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Classical to quantum mechanical tunneling mechanism crossover in thermal transitions between magnetic states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasov, Sergei; Bessarab, Pavel F; Uzdin, Valery M; Jónsson, Hannes

    2016-12-22

    Transitions between states of a magnetic system can occur by jumps over an energy barrier or by quantum mechanical tunneling through the energy barrier. The rate of such transitions is an important consideration when the stability of magnetic states is assessed for example for nanoscale candidates for data storage devices. The shift in transition mechanism from jumps to tunneling as the temperature is lowered is analyzed and a general expression derived for the crossover temperature. The jump rate is evaluated using a harmonic approximation to transition state theory. First, the minimum energy path for the transition is found with the geodesic nudged elastic band method. The activation energy for the jumps is obtained from the maximum along the path, a saddle point on the energy surface, and the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix at that point as well as at the initial state minimum used to estimate the entropic pre-exponential factor. The crossover temperature for quantum mechanical tunneling is evaluated from the second derivatives of the energy with respect to orientation of the spin vector at the saddle point. The resulting expression is applied to test problems where analytical results have previously been derived, namely uniaxial and biaxial spin systems with two-fold anisotropy. The effect of adding four-fold anisotropy on the crossover temperature is demonstrated. Calculations of the jump rate and crossover temperature for tunneling are also made for a molecular magnet containing an Mn 4 group. The results are in excellent agreement with previously reported experimental measurements on this system.

  16. Optical methods for the evaluation of lanthanide excited state thermal ionization barrier in luminescent materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fasoli, M.; Vedda, A.; Mihóková, Eva; Nikl, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 85, č. 8 (2012), "085127-1"-"085127-8" ISSN 1098-0121 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN300100802; GA MŠk(CZ) ME10084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10100521 Keywords : Lu 2 Si 2 O 7 * Pr-doped * luminescence * scintillator * excited state ionization Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 3.767, year: 2012

  17. Magnetic Field Effects on Pure-state and Thermal Entanglement of Anisotropic Magnetic Nanodots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Istomin, Andrei Y.

    2005-05-01

    Anisotropic magnetic nanodots have recently been proposed as promising candidates for qubits for scalable quantum computing [1,2]. The main advantages of such magnetic qubits are their well-separated energy levels (which may allow operation at temperature of the order of a few K), nanometer size (which simplifies fabrication), and large spin values (which facilitates measurement of qubit states). The entanglement properties of eigenstates of a pair of Heisenberg-interacting nanodots have been analyzed in [2], where we have shown that ferromagnetic (FM) coupling produces two significantly entangled excited states. Here we investigate the magnetic field effects on the entanglement of these and other states. We show that entanglement of excited FM eigenstates of two non-identical nanodots can be tuned to its maximum value by applying a relatively weak non-uniform magnetic field. [1] J. Tejada, E.M. Chudnovsky, E. del Barco, J.M. Hernandez, and T.P. Spiller, Nanotechnology 12, 181 (2001). [2] R. Skomski, A.Y. Istomin, A.F. Starace, and D.J. Sellmyer, Phys. Rev. A 70, 062307 (2004).

  18. Thermal Performance Benchmarking: Annual Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Xuhui [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States). Transportation and Hydrogen Systems Center

    2017-10-19

    In FY16, the thermal performance of the 2014 Honda Accord Hybrid power electronics thermal management systems were benchmarked. Both experiments and numerical simulation were utilized to thoroughly study the thermal resistances and temperature distribution in the power module. Experimental results obtained from the water-ethylene glycol tests provided the junction-to-liquid thermal resistance. The finite element analysis (FEA) and computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models were found to yield a good match with experimental results. Both experimental and modeling results demonstrate that the passive stack is the dominant thermal resistance for both the motor and power electronics systems. The 2014 Accord power electronics systems yield steady-state thermal resistance values around 42- 50 mm to the 2nd power K/W, depending on the flow rates. At a typical flow rate of 10 liters per minute, the thermal resistance of the Accord system was found to be about 44 percent lower than that of the 2012 Nissan LEAF system that was benchmarked in FY15. The main reason for the difference is that the Accord power module used a metalized-ceramic substrate and eliminated the thermal interface material layers. FEA models were developed to study the transient performance of 2012 Nissan LEAF, 2014 Accord, and two other systems that feature conventional power module designs. The simulation results indicate that the 2012 LEAF power module has lowest thermal impedance at a time scale less than one second. This is probably due to moving low thermally conductive materials further away from the heat source and enhancing the heat spreading effect from the copper-molybdenum plate close to the insulated gate bipolar transistors. When approaching steady state, the Honda system shows lower thermal impedance. Measurement results of the thermal resistance of the 2015 BMW i3 power electronic system indicate that the i3 insulated gate bipolar transistor module has significantly lower junction

  19. Steady- and transient-state analyses of fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel loaded reactor core via two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Yoonhee; Cho, Nam Zin

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Fully ceramic microencapsulated fuel-loaded core is analyzed via a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model. • The model is compared to harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models. • The three thermal analysis models show ∼100 pcm differences in the k eff eigenvalue. • The three thermal analysis models show more than 70 K differences in the maximum temperature. • There occur more than 3 times differences in the maximum power for a control rod ejection accident. - Abstract: Fully ceramic microencapsulated (FCM) fuel, a type of accident-tolerant fuel (ATF), consists of TRISO particles randomly dispersed in a SiC matrix. In this study, for a thermal analysis of the FCM fuel with such a high heterogeneity, a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model was applied by the authors. This model provides separate temperatures for the fuel-kernels and the SiC matrix. It also provides more realistic temperature profiles than those of harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models, which are used for thermal analysis of a fuel element in VHTRs having a composition similar to the FCM fuel, because such models are unable to provide the fuel-kernel and graphite matrix temperatures separately. In this study, coupled with a neutron diffusion model, a FCM fuel-loaded reactor core is analyzed via a two-temperature homogenized thermal-conductivity model at steady- and transient-states. The results are compared to those from harmonic- and volumetric-average thermal conductivity models, i.e., we compare k eff eigenvalues, power distributions, and temperature profiles in the hottest single-channel at steady-state. At transient-state, we compare total powers, reactivity, and maximum temperatures in the hottest single-channel obtained by the different thermal analysis models. The different thermal analysis models and the availability of fuel-kernel temperatures in the two-temperature homogenized thermal

  20. Transport of liquid state nitrogen through long length service lines during thermal/vacuum testing. [in a Nimbus 6 satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florio, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Physical and analytical aspects associated with the transport are presented. Included is a definition of the problems and difficulties imposed by the servicing of a typical solid cryogen system, as well as a discussion of the transport requirements and of the rationale which governed their solution. A successful detailed transport configuration is defined, and the application of established mathematics to the design approach is demonstrated. The significance of head pressure, pressure drop, line friction, heat leak, Reynolds number, and the fundamental equilibrium demands of pressure and temperature were examined as they relate to the achievement of liquid state flow. Performance predictions were made for the transport system, and several analytical quantities are tabulated. These data are analyzed and compared with measured and calculated results obtained while actually servicing a solid cryogen system during thermal/vacuum testing.

  1. Effects of design variables predicted by a steady - state thermal performance analysis model of a loop heat pipe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Eui Guk; Boo, Joon Hong

    2008-01-01

    This study deals with a mathematical modeling for the steady-state temperature characteristics of an entire loop heat pipe. The lumped layer model was applied to each node for temperature analysis. The flat type evaporator and condenser in the model had planar dimensions of 40 mm (W) x 50 mm (L). The wick material was a sintered metal and the working fluid was methanol. The molecular kinetic theory was employed to model the phase change phenomena in the evaporator and the condenser. Liquid-vapor interface configuration was expressed by the thin film theories available in the literature. Effects of design factors of loop heat pipe on the thermal performance were investigated by the modeling proposed in this study

  2. Mechanical properties of ground state structures in substitutional ordered alloys: High strength, high ductility and high thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tawancy, H.M., E-mail: tawancy@kfupm.edu.sa [Center for Engineering Research, Research Institute, King Fahd University of Petroleum and Minerals, KFUPM Box 1639, Dhahran 31261 (Saudi Arabia); Aboelfotoh, M.O., E-mail: oaboelfotoh@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, NC 27606 (United States)

    2014-05-01

    We have studied the effect of atom arrangements in the ground state structures of substitutional ordered alloys on their mechanical properties using nickel–molybdenum-based alloys as model systems. Three alloys with nominal compositions of Ni–19.43 at% Mo, Ni–18.53 at% Mo–15.21 at% Cr and Ni–18.72 at% Mo–6.14 at% Nb are included in the study. In agreement with theoretical predictions, the closely related Pt{sub 2}Mo-type, DO{sub 22} and D1{sub a} superlattices with similar energies are identified by electron diffraction of ground state structures, which can directly be derived from the parent disordered fcc structure by minor atom rearrangements on {420}{sub fcc} planes. The three superlattices are observed to coexist during the disorder–order transformation at 700 °C with the most stable superlattice being determined by the exact chemical composition. Although most of the slip systems in the parent disordered fcc structure are suppressed, many of the twinning systems remain operative in the superlattices favoring deformation by twinning, which leads to considerable strengthening while maintaining high ductility levels. Both the Pt{sub 2}Mo-type and DO{sub 22} superlattices are distinguished by high strength and high ductility due to their nanoscale microstructures, which have high thermal stability. However, the D1{sub a} superlattice is found to exhibit poor thermal stability leading to considerable loss of ductility, which has been correlated with self-induced recrystallization by migration of grain boundaries.

  3. Dominating biological networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tijana Milenković

    Full Text Available Proteins are essential macromolecules of life that carry out most cellular processes. Since proteins aggregate to perform function, and since protein-protein interaction (PPI networks model these aggregations, one would expect to uncover new biology from PPI network topology. Hence, using PPI networks to predict protein function and role of protein pathways in disease has received attention. A debate remains open about whether network properties of "biologically central (BC" genes (i.e., their protein products, such as those involved in aging, cancer, infectious diseases, or signaling and drug-targeted pathways, exhibit some topological centrality compared to the rest of the proteins in the human PPI network.To help resolve this debate, we design new network-based approaches and apply them to get new insight into biological function and disease. We hypothesize that BC genes have a topologically central (TC role in the human PPI network. We propose two different concepts of topological centrality. We design a new centrality measure to capture complex wirings of proteins in the network that identifies as TC those proteins that reside in dense extended network neighborhoods. Also, we use the notion of domination and find dominating sets (DSs in the PPI network, i.e., sets of proteins such that every protein is either in the DS or is a neighbor of the DS. Clearly, a DS has a TC role, as it enables efficient communication between different network parts. We find statistically significant enrichment in BC genes of TC nodes and outperform the existing methods indicating that genes involved in key biological processes occupy topologically complex and dense regions of the network and correspond to its "spine" that connects all other network parts and can thus pass cellular signals efficiently throughout the network. To our knowledge, this is the first study that explores domination in the context of PPI networks.

  4. [Autosomal dominant polycystic kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge Adad, S; Estevão Barbosa, M; Fácio Luíz, J M; Furlan Rodrigues, M C; Iwamoto, S

    1996-01-01

    A 48-year-old male had autosomic dominant polycystic kidneys with dimensions, to the best of our knowledge, never previously reported; the right kidney weighed 15,100 g and measured 53 x 33 x 9cm and the left one 10.200 g and 46 x 21 x 7cm, with cysts measuring up to 14cm in diameter. Nephrectomy was done to control persistent hematuria and to relief disconfort caused by the large kidneys. The renal function is stable four years after transplantation.

  5. Activation measurements for thermal neutrons. Part D. 36Cl measurements in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Straume, Tore; Men, Ping; Marchetti, Alfredo A.; Egbert, Stephen D.; Roberts, James A.; Fujita, Shoichiro; Shizuma, Kiyoshi; Hoshi, Masaharu

    2005-01-01

    A large number of measurements were performed in the United States of 36 Cl in both granite and concrete samples obtained from various locations and distances in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. These measurements employed accelerator mass spectrometry (AMS) to quantify the number of atoms of 36 Cl per atom of total Cl in the sample. Results of these measurements are presented in this section and discussed in the context of the DS02 dosimetry reevaluation effort for Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic-bomb survivors. (J.P.N.)

  6. When rare is just a matter of sampling: unexpected dominance of clubtail dragonflies (Odonata, Gomphidae through different collecting methods at Parque Nacional da Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Vinícius Oliveira de Almeida

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available When rare is just a matter of sampling: Unexpected dominance of clubtail dragonflies (Odonata, Gomphidae through different collecting methods at Parque Nacional da Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais State, Brazil. Capture of dragonfly adults during two short expeditions to Parque Nacional da Serra do Cipó, Minas Gerais State, using three distinct collecting methodsaerial nets, Malaise and light sheet trapsis reported. The results are outstanding due the high number of species of Gomphidae (7 out of 26 Odonata species, including a new species of Cyanogomphus Selys, 1873, obtained by two non-traditional collecting methods. Because active collecting with aerial nets is the standard approach for dragonfly inventories, we discuss some aspects of the use of traps, comparing our results with those in the literature, suggesting they should be used as complementary methods in faunistic studies. Furthermore, Zonophora campanulata annulata Belle, 1983 is recorded for the first time from Minas Gerais State and taxonomic notes about Phyllogomphoides regularis (Selys, 1873 and Progomphus complicatus Selys, 1854 are also given.

  7. Steady-state thermal analysis of an innovative receiver for linear Fresnel reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abbas, R.; Muñoz, J.; Martínez-Val, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► An innovative multitube receiver for linear Fresnel reflectors is presented. ► Higher performance is achieved thanks to better heat transfer conditions. ► A wide range of designs that maximize efficiency for different conditions is found. ► Heat transfer fluid inlet temperature must be lower for low radiation intensities. ► Fresnel performance may be close to trough collectors, with lower costs. -- Abstract: The study of the performance of an innovative receiver for linear Fresnel reflectors is carried out in this paper, and the results are analyzed with a physics perspective of the process. The receiver consists of a bundle of tubes parallel to the mirror arrays, resulting on a smaller cross section for the same receiver width as the number of tubes increases, due to the diminution of their diameter. This implies higher heat carrier fluid speeds, and thus, a more effective heat transfer process, although it conveys higher pumping power as well. Mass flow is optimized for different tubes diameters, different impinging radiation intensities and different fluid inlet temperatures. It is found that the best receiver design, namely the tubes diameter that maximizes the exergetic efficiency for given working conditions, is similar for the cases studied. There is a range of tubes diameters that imply similar efficiencies, which can drive to capital cost reduction thanks to the flexibility of design. In addition, the length of the receiver is also optimized, and it is observed that the optimal length is similar for the working conditions considered. As a result of this study, it is found that this innovative receiver provides an optimum design for the whole day, even though impinging radiation intensity varies notably. Thermal features of this type of receiver could be the base of a new generation of concentrated solar power plants with a great potential for cost reduction, because of the simplicity of the system and the lower weigh of the

  8. Theory of the disordered ν =5/2 quantum thermal Hall state: Emergent symmetry and phase diagram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Biao; Wang, Juven

    2018-04-01

    Fractional quantum Hall (FQH) system at Landau level filling fraction ν =5 /2 has long been suggested to be non-Abelian, either Pfaffian (Pf) or antiPfaffian (APf) states by numerical studies, both with quantized Hall conductance σx y=5 e2/2 h . Thermal Hall conductances of the Pf and APf states are quantized at κx y=7 /2 and κx y=3 /2 , respectively, in a proper unit. However, a recent experiment shows the thermal Hall conductance of ν =5 /2 FQH state is κx y=5 /2 . It has been speculated that the system contains random Pf and APf domains driven by disorders, and the neutral chiral Majorana modes on the domain walls may undergo a percolation transition to a κx y=5 /2 phase. In this paper, we do perturbative and nonperturbative analyses on the domain walls between Pf and APf. We show the domain wall theory possesses an emergent SO(4) symmetry at energy scales below a threshold Λ1, which is lowered to an emergent U (1 )×U (1) symmetry at energy scales between Λ1 and a higher value Λ2, and is finally lowered to the composite fermion parity symmetry Z2F above Λ2. Based on the emergent symmetries, we propose a phase diagram of the disordered ν =5 /2 FQH system and show that a κx y=5 /2 phase arises at disorder energy scales Λ >Λ1 . Furthermore, we show the gapped double-semion sector of ND compact domain walls contributes nonlocal topological degeneracy 2ND-1, causing a low-temperature peak in the heat capacity. We implement a nonperturbative method to bootstrap generic topological 1 +1 D domain walls (two-surface defects) applicable to any 2 +1 D non-Abelian topological order. We also identify potentially relevant spin topological quantum field theories (TQFTs) for various ν =5 /2 FQH states in terms of fermionic version of U (1) ±8 Chern-Simons theory ×Z8 -class TQFTs.

  9. Complex-network description of thermal quantum states in the Ising spin chain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, Bhuvanesh; Valdez, Marc Andrew; Carr, Lincoln D.; Hazzard, Kaden R. A.

    2018-05-01

    We use network analysis to describe and characterize an archetypal quantum system—an Ising spin chain in a transverse magnetic field. We analyze weighted networks for this quantum system, with link weights given by various measures of spin-spin correlations such as the von Neumann and Rényi mutual information, concurrence, and negativity. We analytically calculate the spin-spin correlations in the system at an arbitrary temperature by mapping the Ising spin chain to fermions, as well as numerically calculate the correlations in the ground state using matrix product state methods, and then analyze the resulting networks using a variety of network measures. We demonstrate that the network measures show some traits of complex networks already in this spin chain, arguably the simplest quantum many-body system. The network measures give insight into the phase diagram not easily captured by more typical quantities, such as the order parameter or correlation length. For example, the network structure varies with transverse field and temperature, and the structure in the quantum critical fan is different from the ordered and disordered phases.

  10. Thermal monitoring as a method for estimation of technical state of digital devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavrich Yu. N.

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Requirements to the reliability level of modern element base are so high that traditional methods of assessing the technical condition of electronics become ineffective, the modern theory of reliability has almost no practical applications [1], and reliability index does not reflect the true state of an electronic device due to an insufficient amount of information received during testing of electronic devices. The majority of modern electronics are limitedly easy-to-test. They are equipped with small number of tools for direct measurement that leads to a delayed troubleshooting and the inability to take measures efficiently. Despite the fact that new generations of electronics use modern components and new design technologies, their performance is still defined by two states — serviceability or failure, and the failure still happens unexpectedly. We may note, that failure is an uncontrolled result of an irreversible degradation process, taking place in time and having appropriate time parameters, but it's not the critical act. Research of various structural and hierarchical levels of functional units of digital electronics show that temperature control can be used for automatic condition monitoring of such devices in real time. As a generalized control parameter, it is advisable to use the temperature of the case of the element, and the case itself — as a generalized point.

  11. From nature-dominated to human-dominated environmental changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messerli, Bruno; Grosjean, Martin; Hofer, Thomas; Núñez, Lautaro; Pfister, Christian

    2000-01-01

    To what extent is it realistic and useful to view human history as a sequence of changes from highly vulnerable societies of hunters and gatherers through periods with less vulnerable, well buffered and highly productive agrarian-urban societies to a world with regions of extreme overpopulation and overuse of life support systems, so that vulnerability to climatic-environmental changes and extreme events is again increasing? This question cannot be fully answered in our present state of knowledge, but at least we can try to illustrate, with three case studies from different continents, time periods and ecosystems, some fundamental changes in the relationship between natural processes and human activities that occur, as we pass from a nature-dominated to a human dominated environment. 1. Early-mid Holocene: Nature dominated environment — human adaptation, mitigation, and migration. In the central Andes, the Holocene climate changed from humid (10,800-8000 BP) to extreme arid (8000-3600 BP) conditions. Over the same period, prehistoric hunting communities adopted a more sedentary pattern of resource use by settling close to the few perennial water bodies, where they began the process of domesticating camelids around 5000 BP and irrigation from about 3100 BP. 2. Historical period: An agrarian society in transition from an "enduring" to an innovative human response. Detailed documentary evidence from Western Europe may be used to reconstruct quite precisely the impacts of climatic variations on agrarian societies. The period considered spans a major transition from an apparently passive response to the vagaries of the environment during the 16th century to an active and innovative attitude from the onset of the agrarian revolution in the late 18th century through to the present day. The associated changes in technology and in agricultural practices helped to create a society better able to survive the impact of climatic extremes. 3. The present day: A human dominated

  12. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal Shell State of the Cylindrical Cryogenic Tank During Filling and Emptying

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Zarubin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liquid hydrogen and oxygen are used as the oxidizer and fuel for liquid rocket engines. Liquefied natural gas, which is based on methane, is seen as a promising motor fuel for internal combustion engines. One of the technical problems arising from the use of said cryogenic liquid is to provide containers for storage, transport and use in the propulsion system. In the design and operation of such vessels it is necessary to have reliable information about their temperature condition, on which depend the loss of cryogenic fluids due to evaporation and the stress-strain state of the structural elements of the containers.Uneven temperature distribution along the generatrix of the cylindrical thin-walled shell of rocket cryogenic tanks, in a localized zone of cryogenic liquid level leads to a curvature of the shell and reduce the permissible axle load in a hazard shell buckling in the preparation for the start of the missile in flight with an increasing acceleration. Moving the level of the cryogenic liquid during filling or emptying the tank at a certain combination of parameters results in an increase of the local temperature distribution nonuniformity.Along with experimental study of the shell temperature state of the cryogenic container, methods of mathematical modeling allow to have information needed for designing and testing the construction of cryogenic tanks. In this study a mathematical model is built taking into account features of heat transfer in a cryogenic container, including the boiling cryogenic liquid in the inner surface of the container. This mathematical model describes the temperature state of the thin-walled shell of cylindrical cryogenic tank during filling and emptying. The work also presents a quantitative analysis of this model in case of fixed liquid level, its movement at a constant speed, and harmonic oscillations relative to a middle position. The quantitative analysis of this model has allowed to find the limit options

  13. Design of laser-driven SiO2-YAG:Ce composite thick film: Facile synthesis, robust thermal performance, and application in solid-state laser lighting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jian; Liu, Bingguo; Liu, Zhiwen; Gong, Yuxuan; Hu, Baofu; Wang, Jian; Li, Hui; Wang, Xinliang; Du, Baoli

    2018-01-01

    In recent times, there have been rapid advances in the solid-state laser lighting technology. Due to the large amounts of heat accumulated from the high flux laser radiation, color conversion materials used in solid-state laser lighting devices should possess high durability, high thermal conductivity, and low thermal quenching. The aim of this study is to develop a thermally robust SiO2-YAG:Ce composite thick film (CTF) for high-power solid-state laser lighting applications. Commercial colloidal silica which was used as the source of SiO2, played the roles of an adhesive, a filler, and a protecting agent. Compared to the YAG:Ce powder, the CTF exhibits remarkable thermal stability (11.3% intensity drop at 200 °C) and durability (4.5% intensity drop after 1000 h, at 85 °C and 85% humidity). Furthermore, the effects of the substrate material and the thickness of the CTF on the laser lighting performance were investigated in terms of their thermal quenching and luminescence saturation behaviors, respectively. The CTF with a thickness of 50 μm on a sapphire substrate does not show luminescence saturation, despite a high-power density of incident radiation i.e. 20 W/mm2. These results demonstrate the potential applicability of the CTF in solid-state laser lighting devices.

  14. Probabilistic Cloning of two Single-Atom States via Thermal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rui, Pin-Shu; Liu, Dao-Jun

    2016-12-01

    We propose a cavity QED scheme for implementing the 1 → 2 probabilistic quantum cloning (PQC) of two single-atom states. In our scheme, after the to-be-cloned atom and the assistant atom passing through the first cavity, a measurement is carried out on the assistant atom. Based on the measurement outcome we can judge whether the PQC should be continued. If the cloning fails, the other operations are omitted. This makes our scheme economical. If the PQC is continued (with the optimal probability) according to the measurement outcome, two more cavities and some unitary operations are used for achieving the PQC in a deterministic way. Our scheme is insensitive to the decays of the cavities and the atoms.

  15. Steady state thermal-hydraulic analyses of the MITICA cooling circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zaupa, M., E-mail: matteo.zaupa@igi.cnr.it [Università degli Studi di Padova, Via 8 Febbraio 2, Padova 35122 (Italy); Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy); Sartori, E.; Dalla Palma, M.; Fellin, F.; Marcuzzi, D.; Pavei, M.; Rizzolo, A. [Consorzio RFX, Corso Stati Uniti 4, Padova 35127 (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    Megavolt ITER Injector Concept Advancement is the full scale prototype of the heating and current drive neutral beam injectors for ITER, to be built at Consorzio RFX (Padova). The engineering design of its components is challenging: the total heat loads they will be subjected to (expected between 2 and 19 MW), the high heat fluxes (up to 20 MW/m{sup 2}), and the beam pulse duration up to 1 h, set demanding requirements for reliable active cooling circuits. In support of the design, the thermo-hydraulic behavior of each cooling circuit under steady state condition has been investigated by using one-dimensional models. The final results, obtained considering a number of optimizations for the cooling circuits, show that all the requirements in terms of flow rate, temperature, and pressure drop are properly fulfilled.

  16. The Preliminary GAMMA Code Thermal hydraulic Analysis for the Steady State of HTR-10 Initial Core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jun, Ji Su; Lim, Hong Sik; Lee, Won Jae

    2006-07-15

    This report describes the preliminary thermalhydraulic analysis of HTR-10 steady state full power initial core to provide a benchmark calculation of VHTGR(Very High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactors) safety analysis code of GAMMA(GAs Multicomponent Mixture Analysis). The input data of GAMMA code are produced for the models of fluid block, wall block, radiation heat transfer and each component material properties in HTR-10 reactor. The temperature and flow distributions of HTR-10 steady state 10 MW{sub th} full power initial core are calculated by GAMMA code with boundary conditions of total reactor inlet flow rate of 4.32 kg/s, inlet temperature of 250 .deg. C, inlet pressure of 3 MPa, outlet pressure of 2.992 MPa and the fixed temperature at RCCS water cooling tube of 50 .deg C. The calculation results are compared with the measured solid material temperatures at 22 fixed instrumentation positions in HTR-10. The wall temperature distribution in pebble bed core shows that the minimum temperature of 358 .deg. C is located at upper core, a higher temperature zone than 829 .deg. C is located at the inner region of 0.45 m radius at the bottom of core centre, and the maximum wall temperature is 897 .deg. C. The wall temperatures linearly decreases at radially and axially farther side from the bottom of core centre. The maximum temperature of RPV is 230 .deg. C, and the maximum values of fuel average temperature and TRISO centreline temperature are 907 .deg. C and 929 .deg. C, respectively and they are much lower than the fuel temperature limitation of 1230 .deg. C. The comparsion between the GAMMA code predictions and the measured temperature data shows that the calculation results are very close to the measured values in top and side reflector region, but a great difference is appeared in bottom reflector region. Some measured data are abnormally high in bottom reflector region, and so the confirmation of data is necessary in future. Fifteen of twenty two data have a

  17. Analysis of structural and thermal stability in the positive electrode for sulfide-based all-solid-state lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukasaki, Hirofumi; Otoyama, Misae; Mori, Yota; Mori, Shigeo; Morimoto, Hideyuki; Hayashi, Akitoshi; Tatsumisago, Masahiro

    2017-11-01

    Sulfide-based all-solid-state batteries using a non-flammable inorganic solid electrolyte are promising candidates as a next-generation power source owing to their safety and excellent charge-discharge cycle characteristics. In this study, we thus focus on the positive electrode and investigated structural stabilities of the interface between the positive electrode active material LiNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC) and the 75Li2S·25P2S5 (LPS) glass electrolyte after charge-discharge cycles via transmission electron microscopy (TEM). To evaluate the thermal stability of the fabricated all-solid-state cell, in-situ TEM observations for the positive electrode during heating are conducted. As a result, structural and morphological changes are detected in the LPS glasses. Thus, exothermal reaction present in the NMC-LPS composite positive electrode after the initial charging is attributable to the crystallization of LPS glasses. On the basis of a comparison with crystallization behavior in single LPS glasses, the origin of exothermal reaction in the NMC-LPS composites is discussed.

  18. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF ELECTRICAL AND THERMAL CONTROL OF THE LINING STATE OF INDUCTION APPARATUS OF COPPER WIRE MANUFACTURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. M. Zolotaryov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim. This article is intended to develop a technique for monitoring the lining state of induction channel furnaces for melting oxygen-free copper by monitoring changes in the distribution of thermal fields in their lining and carrying out a comparative analysis of the developed technique with the existing one that controls the electrical resistance of the melting channel of the furnaces. Technique. For carrying out the research, the theories of electromagnetic field, thermodynamics, mathematical physics, mathematical modeling based on the finite element method were used. Results. A technique for diagnosing the lining state of the induction channel furnaces for melting oxygen-free copper has been developed, which makes it possible to determine the dislocation and the size of the liquid metal leaks by analyzing the temperature distribution over the body surface both the inductor and the furnace. Scientific novelty. The connection between the temperature field distribution on the surface of the furnace body and the dislocation and dimensions of the liquid metal leaks in its lining is determined for the first time. Practical significance. Using the proposed technique will allow to conduct more accurate diagnostics of the lining conditions of the induction channel furnaces, as well as to determine the location and size of the liquid metal leaks, creating the basis for predicting the working life of the furnace.

  19. HEATHYD, Steady-State Thermal Hydraulic Analysis of Low-Enriched U Fuel Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    NABBI, R.

    1989-01-01

    1 - Description of program or function: HEATHYD is a code for the steady-state heat transfer calculation of research nuclear reactors with forced convection. It models heat transfer and coolant flow for assemblies of parallel fuel plates of MTR type with any axial power distribution. The thermodynamic model accounts for single phase cooling and sub- cooled boiling condition using the transition criterion of Bergeles-Rosenow. In addition to the calculation of the channel flow velocities and coolant pressure drops, HEATHYD calculates axial distribution of the coolant and clad-surface temperatures. Safety margins to the critical heat flux as a result of burnout condition or flow instability are determined. 2 - Method of solution: Applying the finite difference method, HEATHYD solves the equations of heat conduction and heat transfer to the coolant. For the physical properties of the coolant as a function of the coolant temperature polynomials of degree 6 are used. Depending on the coolant condition, different correlations for the heat transfer coefficient can be applied. The analysis of the critical cooling conditions resulting in burnout or flow instability, is performed according to the correlations developed by Mirshak/ Labuntsov and Forgan/Whittle

  20. New thermal neutron solid-state electronic detector based on HgI2 crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melamud, M.; Burshtein, Z.

    1983-07-01

    We describe the development of a new solid-state electronic neutron detector, based on HgI 2 single crystals. Incident neutrons are absorbed in high neutron absorbing foils, such as cadmium or gadolinium, which are placed in front of a HgI 2 detector. Gamma rays, emitted as a result of the neutron absorbtion, are then absorbed in the HgI 2 , generating free charge carriers, which are collected by the electric field. The advantage of this system lies in it's manufacturing simplicity, low weight and small physical dimensions, compared to gas-filled conventional neutron detectors. The disadvantage is that the system does not discriminate between gamma rays and neutrons. A method to minimize this disadvantage is pointed out. It is as well possible to count neutrons by direct exposure of the HgI 2 to neutrons. The neutron-to-gamma transformation in that case takes place by the material nuclei themselves. This method, however, is impractical due to the interference of delayed radioactivity whose origin are 129 I nuclei. They are generated from 128 I by absorbing a neutron, and decay with a 25 min half lifetime involving gamma emissions. (author)

  1. Thermal stress state of laminated shells of revolution made of isotropic and linearly orthotropic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, V.G.

    1995-01-01

    In this investigation, we will use a cylindrical coordinate system to study the stress state of laminated shells of revolution made of inelastically deforming isotropic materials and elastic materials with linear orthotropy. One of the principal directions of anisotropy coincides with the axis of revolution of the body. The shells will be subjected to nonaxisymmetric loading by body bar K (K Z , K r , K var-phi ) and surface bar t n (t nz , t nr , t nvar-phi ) forces and heating. The level of loading is such that the rheological properties of the materials of the layers are not a factor, although their thermomechanical characteristics depend on temperature. In addition, the loading and heating of the body occur in such a way that simple (or close to simple) deformation processes take place in its isotropic elements. These processes are accompanied by inelastic strains and the formation of unloading regions in which plastic strains having the sign opposite the initial strains develop. It is assumed that the layers of the body are secured to one another without interference and that conditions corresponding to ideal contact prevail at their interfaces

  2. Steady state model for the thermal regimes of shells of airships and hot air balloons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luchev, Oleg A.

    1992-10-01

    A steady state model of the temperature regime of airships and hot air balloons shells is developed. The model includes three governing equations: the equation of the temperature field of airships or balloons shell, the integral equation for the radiative fluxes on the internal surface of the shell, and the integral equation for the natural convective heat exchange between the shell and the internal gas. In the model the following radiative fluxes on the shell external surface are considered: the direct and the earth reflected solar radiation, the diffuse solar radiation, the infrared radiation of the earth surface and that of the atmosphere. For the calculations of the infrared external radiation the model of the plane layer of the atmosphere is used. The convective heat transfer on the external surface of the shell is considered for the cases of the forced and the natural convection. To solve the mentioned set of the equations the numerical iterative procedure is developed. The model and the numerical procedure are used for the simulation study of the temperature fields of an airship shell under the forced and the natural convective heat transfer.

  3. Stationary and transient thermal states of barometric pumping in the access pit of an underground quarry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrier, Frédéric; Le Mouël, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-15

    The transition zone between free and underground atmospheres hosts spectacular phenomena, as demonstrated by temperature measurements performed in the 4.6m diameter and 20m deep vertical access pit of an abandoned underground quarry located in Vincennes, near Paris. In summer, a stable stratification of the atmosphere is maintained, with coherent temperature variations associated with atmospheric pressure changes, with a barometric tide S2 larger than 0.1°C peak to peak. When the winter regime of turbulent cold air avalanches is initiated, stratification with pressure induced signals can be restored transiently in the upper part of the pit, while the lower part remains fully mixed and insensitive to pressure variations. The amplitude of the pressure to temperature transfer function increases with frequency below 5×10(-4)Hz, with values at 3×10(-5)Hz varying from 0.1°C·hPa(-1) at the bottom up to 2°C·hPa(-1) towards the top of the pit. These temperature variations are accounted for by cave breathing, which is pressure induced motion of air amplified by the large volume of the quarry. This understanding is supported by a numerical model including advective heat transport, heat diffusion, and heat exchange with the pit walls. Mean lifetime in the pit is of the order of 9 to 13h, and barometric pumping results in an effective ventilation rate of the quarry of the order of 10(-7)s(-1). This study illustrates the important role of barometric pumping in heat and matter transport between atmosphere and lithosphere. The resulting stationary and transient states, revealed in this pit, are probably a general feature of functioning interface systems, and therefore are an important aspect to consider in problems of contaminant transport, or the preservation of precious heritage such as rare ecosystems or painted caves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Market potential for solar thermal energy supply systems in the United States industrial and commercial sectors: 1990--2030

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1991-12-01

    This report revises and extends previous work sponsored by the US DOE on the potential industrial market in the United States for solar thermal energy systems and presents a new analysis of the commercial sector market potential. Current and future industrial process heat demand and commercial water heating, space heating and space cooling end-use demands are estimated. The PC Industrial Model (PCIM) and the commercial modules of the Building Energy End-Use Model (BEEM) used by the DOE's Energy Information Administration (EIA) to support the recent National Energy Strategy (NES) analysis are used to forecast industrial and commercial end-use energy demand respectively. Energy demand is disaggregated by US Census region to account for geographic variation in solar insolation and regional variation in cost of alternative natural gas-fired energy sources. The industrial sector analysis also disaggregates demand by heat medium and temperature range to facilitate process end-use matching with appropriate solar thermal energy supply technologies. The commercial sector analysis disaggregates energy demand by three end uses: water heating, space heating, and space cooling. Generic conceptual designs are created for both industrial and commercial applications. Levelized energy costs (LEC) are calculated for industrial sector applications employing low temperature flat plate collectors for process water preheat; parabolic troughs for intermediate temperature process steam and direct heat industrial application; and parabolic dish technologies for high temperature, direct heat industrial applications. LEC are calculated for commercial sector applications employing parabolic trough technologies for low temperature water and space heating. Cost comparisons are made with natural gas-fired sources for both the industrial market and the commercial market assuming fuel price escalation consistent with NES reference case scenarios for industrial and commercial sector gas markets

  5. Summary report of NEPTUN investigations into the steady state thermal hydraulics of the passive decay heat removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rust, K.; Weinberg, D.; Hoffmann, H.; Frey, H.H.; Baumann, W.; Hain, K.; Leiling, W.; Hayafune, H.; Ohira, H.

    1995-12-01

    During the course of steady state NEPTUN investigations, the effects of different design and operating parameters were studied; in particular: The shell design of the above core sturcture, the core power, the number of decay heat exchangers put in operation, the complete flow path blockage at the primary side of the intermediate heat exchangers, and the fluid level in the primary vessel. The findings of the NEPTUN experiments indicate that the decay heat can be safely removed by natural convection. The interwrapper flow makes an essential contribution to that behavior. The decay heat exchangers installed in the upper plenum cause a thermal stratification associated with a pronounced gradient. The vertical extent of the stratification and the quantity of the gradient are depending on the fact whether a permeable or an impermeable shell covers the above core structure. An increase of the core power or a reduction of the number of decay heat exchangers being in operation leads to a higher temperature level in the primary system but does not alter the global temperature distribution. In the case that no coolant enters the inlet windows at the primary side of the intermediate and decay heat exchangers, the core remains coolable as far as the primary vessel is filled with fluid up to a minimum level. Cold water penetrates from the upper plenum into the core and removes the decay heat. The thermal hydraulic computer code FLUTAN was applied for the three-dimensional numerical simulation of the majority of NEPTUN tests reported here. The comparison of computed against experimental data indicates a qualitatively and quantitatively satisfying agreement of the findings with respect to the field of isotherms as well as the temperature profiles in the upper plenum and within the core region of very complex geometry. (orig./HP) [de

  6. State-of-the-Art of Extreme Pressure Lubrication Realized with the High Thermal Diffusivity of Liquid Metal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Haijiang; Tian, Pengyi; Lu, Hongyu; Jia, Wenpeng; Du, Haodong; Zhang, Xiangjun; Li, Qunyang; Tian, Yu

    2017-02-15

    Sliding between two objects under very high load generally involves direct solid-solid contact at molecular/atomic level, the mechanism of which is far from clearly disclosed yet. Those microscopic solid-solid contacts could easily lead to local melting of rough surfaces. At extreme conditions, this local melting could propagate to the seizure and welding of the entire interface. Traditionally, the microscopic solid-solid contact is alleviated by various lubricants and additives based on their improved mechanical properties. In this work, we realized the state-of-the-art of extreme pressure lubrication by utilizing the high thermal diffusivity of liquid metal, 2 orders of magnitude higher than general organic lubricants. The extreme pressure lubrication property of gallium based liquid metal (GBLM) was compared with gear oil and poly-α-olefin in a four-ball test. The liquid metal lubricates very well at an extremely high load (10 kN, the maximum capability of a four-ball tester) at a rotation speed of 1800 rpm for a duration of several minutes, much better than traditional organic lubricants which typically break down within seconds at a load of a few kN. Our comparative experiments and analysis showed that this superextreme pressure lubrication capability of GBLM was attributed to the synergetic effect of the ultrafast heat dissipation of GBLM and the low friction coefficient of FeGa 3 tribo-film. The present work demonstrated a novel way of improving lubrication capability by enhancing the lubricant thermal properties, which might lead to mechanical systems with much higher reliability.

  7. The concerted impact of galaxies and QSOs on the ionization and thermal state of the intergalactic medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakiichi, Koki; Graziani, Luca; Ciardi, Benedetta; Meiksin, Avery; Compostella, Michele; Eide, Marius B.; Zaroubi, Saleem

    2017-07-01

    We present a detailed analysis of the ionization and thermal structure of the intergalactic medium (IGM) around a high-redshift (z = 10) QSO, using a large suite of cosmological, multifrequency radiative transfer simulations, exploring the contribution from galaxies as well as the QSO, and the effect of X-rays and secondary ionization. We show that in high-z QSO environments both the central QSO and the surrounding galaxies concertedly control the reionization morphology of hydrogen and helium and have a non-linear impact on the thermal structure of the IGM. A QSO imprints a distinctive morphology on H II regions if its total ionizing photon budget exceeds that of the surrounding galaxies since the onset of hydrogen reionization; otherwise, the morphology shows little difference from that of H II regions produced only by galaxies. In addition, the spectral shape of the collective radiation field from galaxies and QSOs controls the thickness of the I-fronts. While a UV-obscured QSO can broaden the I-front, the contribution from other UV sources, either galaxies or unobscured QSOs, is sufficient to maintain a sharp I-front. X-ray photons from the QSO are responsible for a prominent extended tail of partial ionization ahead of the I-front. QSOs leave a unique imprint on the morphology of He II/He III regions. We suggest that, while the physical state of the IGM is modified by QSOs, the most direct test to understand the role of galaxies and QSOs during reionization is to perform galaxy surveys in a region of sky imaged by 21 cm tomography.

  8. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and the tridosha theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-05-01

    Ayurveda, the traditional Indian System of Medicine, deals with the theory of the three tridosha states (both physical and psychological): Vata, Pitta, and Kapha. They are the three major human constitutional types that both depend on psychological and physical characteristics. The Pitta state is described as a critical, discriminative, and rational psychological state of mind, while the Kapha state is described as being dominant for emotional stimuli. The Vata state is an intermediate unstable shifting state. The Pitta types are of average height and built with well developed musculature. The Vata types are thin individuals with low body mass index. The Kapha types are short stocky individuals that tend toward obesity, and who are sedentary. The study assessed the biochemical differences between right hemispheric dominant, bihemispheric dominant, and left hemispheric dominant individuals, and then compared this with the patterns obtained in the Vata, Pitta, and Kapha states. The isoprenoid metabolites (digoxin, dolichol, and ubiquinone), glycoconjugate metabolism, free radical metabolism, and the RBC membrane composition were studied. The hemispheric chemical dominance in various systemic diseases and psychological states was also investigated. The results showed that right hemispheric chemically dominant/Kapha state had elevated digoxin levels, increased free radical production and reduced scavenging, increased tryptophan catabolites and reduced tyrosine catabolites, increased glycoconjugate levels and increased cholesterol: phospholipid ratio of RBC membranes. Left hemispheric chemically dominant/Pitta states had the opposite biochemical patterns. The patterns were normal or intermediate in the bihemispheric chemically dominant/Vata state. This pattern could be correlated with various systemic and neuropsychiatric diseases and personality traits. Right hemispheric chemical dominance/Kapha state represents a hyperdigoxinemic state with membrane sodium

  9. Thermal ionization and plasma state of high temperature vapor of UO2, Cs, and Na: Effect on the heat and radiation transport properties of the vapor phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karow, H.U.

    1979-01-01

    The paper deals with the question how far the thermophysical state and the convective and radiative heat transport properties of vaporized reactor core materials are affected by the thermal ionization existing in the actual vapor state. The materials under consideration here are: nuclear oxide fuel (UO 2 ), Na (as the LMFBR coolant material), and Cs (alkaline fission product, partly retained in the fuel of the core zone). (orig./RW) [de

  10. Foam topology. Bending versus stretching dominated architectures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deshpande, V.; Ashby, M.; Fleck, N.

    2000-01-01

    Cellular solids can deform by either the bending or stretching of the cell walls. While most cellular solids are bending-dominated, those that are stretching-dominated are much more weight-efficient for structural applications. In this study we have investigated the topological criteria that dictate the deformation mechanism of a cellular solid by analysing the rigidity (or otherwise) of pin-jointed frameworks comprising inextensional struts. We show that the minimum node connectivity for a special class of lattice structured materials to be stretching-dominated is 6 for 2D foams and 12 for 3D foams. Similarly, sandwich plates comprising of truss cores faced with planar trusses require a minimum node connectivity of 9 to undergo stretching-dominated deformation for all loading states. (author)

  11. Thermal propagation and stability in superconducting films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gray, K.E.; Kampwirth, R.T.; Zasadzinski, J.F.; Ducharme, S.P.

    1983-01-01

    Thermal propagation and stable hot spots (normal domains) are studied in various high Tsub(c) superconducting films (Nb 3 Sn, Nb, NbN and Nb 3 Ge). A new energy balance is shown to give reasonable quantitative agreement of the dependence of the propagation velocity on the length of short normal domains. The steady state (zero velocity) measurements indicate the existence of two distinct situations for films on high thermal conductivity (sapphire) substrates. For low power per unit area the film and substrate have the same temperature, and the thermal properties of the substrate dominate. However, for higher power densities in short hot spots, the coupling is relatively weak and the thermal properties of the film alone are important. Here a connection is made between the critical current stability of superconducting films and a critical hot spot size for thermal propagation. As a result efficient heat removal is shown to dominate the stabilisation of superconducting films. The strong and weak coupling situations also lead to modifications of the models for propagation velocities on sapphire substrates. Self-healing of hot spots and other phenomena in superconducting film are explained. The potential use of the thermal propagation model in applications of superconductors, especially switches is discussed. (author)

  12. The dominance of norm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward L. Rubin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective to revisit the debate about rational choice theory from the legal cultural and historical perspectives. Methods dialectic approach to the cognition of social phenomena allowing to analyze them in their historical development and functioning in the context of the integrity of subjective and objective factors this determines the choice of the research methods systemicstructural formallegal and comparative. Results The first part of this chapter will explain the way in which people in societies different from our own were subject to other motivations in situations where selfinterest would tend to dominate in our society. The reasoning is based on three examples one drawn from the history of Ancient Rome one from the High Middle Ages of the European society and one from a contemporary nonWestern culture. The second part of the chapter analyzes the reason why material selfinterest maximizing became a dominant motivation in the modern Western society. The works on historical sociology attribute this development to Calvinism but this hypothesis suffers from some serious defects. In the article we prove that the modern sensibility resulted from much longeracting trends specifically secularization urbanization and commercialization. The final section of the chapter explores the relationship between the Westrsquos prevailing norm of selfinterest maximization and the particular norms that have been discussed in microeconomic theory. It argues that some of these norms are internal to the prevailing one and are thus explicable in terms of material selfinterest but that others reflect additional norms in the general society that exist alongside and sometimes in competition with the prevailing norm of selfinterest maximization. The historicallybased view that selfinterest maximizing is a prevailing norm rather than a human universal allows these other norms to be acknowledged in a plausible and realistic manner rather than being explained away by a

  13. Thermal expansion accompanying the glass-liquid transition and crystallization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Q. Jiang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the linear thermal expansion behaviors of a Zr-based (Vitreloy 1 bulk metallic glass in its as-cast, annealed and crystallized states. Accompanying the glass-liquid transition, the as-cast Vitreloy 1 shows a continuous decrease in the thermal expansivity, whereas the annealed glass shows a sudden increase. The crystallized Vitreloy 1 exhibits an almost unchanged thermal expansivity prior to its melting. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the nucleation of crystalline phases can induce a significant thermal shrinkage of the supercooled liquid, but with the growth of these nuclei, the thermal expansion again dominates. These results are explained in the framework of the potential energy landscape, advocating that the configurational and vibrational contributions to the thermal expansion of the glass depend on both, structure and temperature.

  14. Solid-state thermal behavior and stability studies of theophylline–citric acid cocrystals prepared by neat cogrinding or thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, Po-Chun; Lin, Hong-Liang; Wang, Shun-Li; Lin, Shan-Yang

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the thermal behavior of cocrystal formed between anhydrous theophylline (TP) and anhydrous citric acid (CA) by neat manual cogrinding or thermal treatment, DSC and FTIR microspectroscopy with curve-fitting analysis were applied. The physical mixture and 60-min ground mixture were stored at 55±0.5 °C/40±2% RH condition to determine their stability behavior. Typical TP–CA cocrystals were prepared by slow solvent evaporation method. Results indicate that the cogrinding process could gradually induce the cocrystal formation between TP and CA. The IR spectral peak shift from 3495 to 3512 cm −1 and the stepwise appearance of several new IR peaks at 1731, 1712, 1676, 1651, 1557 and 1265 cm −1 with cogrinding time suggest that the mechanism of TP–CA cocrystal formation was evidenced by interacting TP with CA through the intermolecular O–H···O hydrogen bonding. The stability of 60-min ground mixture of TP–CA was confirmed at 55±0.5 °C/40±2% RH condition over a storage time of 60 days. - Garphical abstract: Cogrinding, thermal and solvent-evaporation methods might easily induce the theophylline–citric acid cocrystal formation. Highlights: ► Cogrinding process could gradually induce the cocrystal formation between TP and CA. ► The TP–CA cocrystal was formed through the intermolecular O–H···O hydrogen bonding. ► The 60-min TP–CA ground mixture was similar to the solvent-evaporated cocrystal. ► The thermal-induced TP–CA cocrystal formation was confirmed by pre-heating the physical mixture to 152 °C. ► The 60-min TP–CA ground mixture was stable at accelerated condition over a storage time of 60 days.

  15. In-situ investigation of thermal instabilities and solid state dewetting in polycrystalline platinum thin films via confocal laser microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jahangir, S.; Cheng, Xuan; Huang, H. H.; Nagarajan, V. [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052 (Australia); Ihlefeld, J. [Electronic, Optical, and Nanomaterials Department, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185 (United States)

    2014-10-28

    Solid state dewetting and the subsequent morphological changes for platinum thin films grown on zinc oxide (ZnO) buffered (001) silicon substrates (Pt/ZnO/SiO{sub 2}/(001)Si system) is investigated under vacuum conditions via a custom-designed confocal laser microscope coupled with a laser heating system. Live imaging of thin film dewetting under a range of heating and quenching vacuum ambients reveals events including hillock formation, hole formation, and hole growth that lead to formation of a network of Pt ligaments, break up of Pt ligaments to individual islands and subsequent Pt islands shape reformation, in chronological fashion. These findings are corroborated by ex-situ materials characterization and quantitative electron microscopy analysis. A secondary hole formation via blistering before film rupture is revealed to be the critical stage, after which a rapid dewetting catastrophe occurs. This process is instantaneous and cannot be captured by ex-situ methods. Finally, an intermetallic phase forms at 900 °C and alters the morphology of Pt islands, suggesting a practical limit to the thermal environments that may be used for these platinized silicon wafers in vacuum conditions.

  16. In-situ investigation of thermal instabilities and solid state dewetting in polycrystalline platinum thin films via confocal laser microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jahangir, S.; Cheng, Xuan; Huang, H. H.; Nagarajan, V.; Ihlefeld, J.

    2014-01-01

    Solid state dewetting and the subsequent morphological changes for platinum thin films grown on zinc oxide (ZnO) buffered (001) silicon substrates (Pt/ZnO/SiO 2 /(001)Si system) is investigated under vacuum conditions via a custom-designed confocal laser microscope coupled with a laser heating system. Live imaging of thin film dewetting under a range of heating and quenching vacuum ambients reveals events including hillock formation, hole formation, and hole growth that lead to formation of a network of Pt ligaments, break up of Pt ligaments to individual islands and subsequent Pt islands shape reformation, in chronological fashion. These findings are corroborated by ex-situ materials characterization and quantitative electron microscopy analysis. A secondary hole formation via blistering before film rupture is revealed to be the critical stage, after which a rapid dewetting catastrophe occurs. This process is instantaneous and cannot be captured by ex-situ methods. Finally, an intermetallic phase forms at 900 °C and alters the morphology of Pt islands, suggesting a practical limit to the thermal environments that may be used for these platinized silicon wafers in vacuum conditions.

  17. COOLOD-N2: a computer code, for the analyses of steady-state thermal-hydraulics in research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1994-03-01

    The COOLOD-N2 code provides a capability for the analyses of the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of research reactors. This code is revised version of the COOLOD-N code, and is applicable not only for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted, but also for research reactors in which rod-type fuel is adopted. In the code, subroutines to calculate temperature distribution in rod-type fuel have been newly added to the COOLOD-N code. The COOLOD-N2 code can calculate fuel temperatures under both forced convection cooling mode and natural convection cooling mode as well as COOLOD-N code. In the COOLOD-N2 code, a 'Heat Transfer package' is used for calculating heat transfer coefficient, DNB heat flux etc. The 'Heat Transfer package' is subroutine program and is especially developed for research reactors in which plate-type fuel is adopted. In case of rod-type fuel, DNB heat flux is calculated by both the 'Heat Transfer package' and Lund DNB heat flux correlation which is popular for TRIGA reactor. The COOLOD-N2 code also has a capability of calculating ONB temperature, the heat flux at onset of flow instability as well as DNB heat flux. (author)

  18. FRAPCON-2: A Computer Code for the Calculation of Steady State Thermal-Mechanical Behavior of Oxide Fuel Rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berna, G. A; Bohn, M. P.; Rausch, W. N.; Williford, R. E.; Lanning, D. D.

    1981-01-01

    FRAPCON-2 is a FORTRAN IV computer code that calculates the steady state response of light Mater reactor fuel rods during long-term burnup. The code calculates the temperature, pressure, deformation, and tai lure histories of a fuel rod as functions of time-dependent fuel rod power and coolant boundary conditions. The phenomena modeled by the code include (a) heat conduction through the fuel and cladding, (b) cladding elastic and plastic deformation, (c) fuel-cladding mechanical interaction, (d) fission gas release, (e} fuel rod internal gas pressure, (f) heat transfer between fuel and cladding, (g) cladding oxidation, and (h) heat transfer from cladding to coolant. The code contains necessary material properties, water properties, and heat transfer correlations. FRAPCON-2 is programmed for use on the CDC Cyber 175 and 176 computers. The FRAPCON-2 code Is designed to generate initial conditions for transient fuel rod analysis by either the FRAP-T6 computer code or the thermal-hydraulic code, RELAP4/MOD7 Version 2.

  19. Internal proton transfer and H2 rotations in the H5(+) cluster: a marked influence on its thermal equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Tudela, Ricardo Pérez; Barragán, Patricia; Prosmiti, Rita; Villarreal, Pablo; Delgado-Barrio, Gerardo

    2011-03-31

    Classical and path integral Monte Carlo (CMC, PIMC) "on the fly" calculations are carried out to investigate anharmonic quantum effects on the thermal equilibrium structure of the H5(+) cluster. The idea to follow in our computations is based on using a combination of the above-mentioned nuclear classical and quantum statistical methods, and first-principles density functional (DFT) electronic structure calculations. The interaction energies are computed within the DFT framework using the B3(H) hybrid functional, specially designed for hydrogen-only systems. The global minimum of the potential is predicted to be a nonplanar configuration of C(2v) symmetry, while the next three low-lying stationary points on the surface correspond to extremely low-energy barriers for the internal proton transfer and to the rotation of the H2 molecules, around the C2 axis of H5(+), connecting the symmetric C(2v) minima in the planar and nonplanar orientations. On the basis of full-dimensional converged PIMC calculations, results on the quantum vibrational zero-point energy (ZPE) and state of H5(+) are reported at a low temperature of 10 K, and the influence of the above-mentioned topological features of the surface on its probability distributions is clearly demonstrated.

  20. High thermal stability of abrupt SiO2/GaN interface with low interface state density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truyen, Nguyen Xuan; Taoka, Noriyuki; Ohta, Akio; Makihara, Katsunori; Yamada, Hisashi; Takahashi, Tokio; Ikeda, Mitsuhisa; Shimizu, Mitsuaki; Miyazaki, Seiichi

    2018-04-01

    The effects of postdeposition annealing (PDA) on the interface properties of a SiO2/GaN structure formed by remote oxygen plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (RP-CVD) were systematically investigated. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy clarified that PDA in the temperature range from 600 to 800 °C has almost no effects on the chemical bonding features at the SiO2/GaN interface, and that positive charges exist at the interface, the density of which can be reduced by PDA at 800 °C. The capacitance-voltage (C-V) and current density-SiO2 electric field characteristics of the GaN MOS capacitors also confirmed the reduction in interface state density (D it) and the improvement in the breakdown property of the SiO2 film after PDA at 800 °C. Consequently, a high thermal stability of the SiO2/GaN structure with a low fixed charge density and a low D it formed by RP-CVD was demonstrated. This is quite informative for realizing highly robust GaN power devices.

  1. Thermal equation of state of (Mg 0.9Fe 0.1) 2SiO 4 olivine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Wei; Li, Baosheng

    2006-08-01

    In situ synchrotron X-ray diffraction measurements have been carried out on San Carlos olivine (Mg 0.9Fe 0.1) 2SiO 4 up to 8 GPa and 1073 K. Data analysis using the high-temperature Birch-Murnaghan (HTBM) equation of state (EoS) yields the temperature derivative of the bulk modulus (∂ KT/∂ T) P = -0.019 ± 0.002 GPa K -1. The thermal pressure (TH) approach gives αKT = 4.08 ± 0.10 × 10 -3 GPa K -1, from which (∂ KT/∂ T) P = -0.019 ± 0.001 GPa K -1 is derived. Fitting the present data to the Mie-Grüneisen-Debye (MGD) formalism, the Grüneisen parameter at ambient conditions γ0 is constrained to be 1.14 ± 0.02 with fixed volume dependence q = 1. Combining the present data with previous results on iron-bearing olivine and fitting to MGD EoS, we obtain γ0 = 1.11 ± 0.01 and q = 0.54 ± 0.36. In this study the thermoelastic parameters obtained from various approaches are in good agreement with one another and previous results.

  2. The effects of the physical states of a simulated fission product on the linear thermal expansion of (U0.924Ce0.076)O2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dong-Joo; Kim, Yong-Soo; Yang, Jae-Ho; Kim, Si-Hyung; Lee, Young-Woo; Kim, Han-Soo

    2006-01-01

    The linear thermal expansions of an (U 0.924 Ce 0.076 )O 2 pellet, doped a simulated fission product (Nd 2 O 3 or Ru), were measured from room temperature to 1673 K in a flowing argon atmosphere using TMA. Nd 2 O 3 and Ru represent the physical states of a fission product, a dissolved oxide and a metallic precipitate, respectively. Using the measured data, the mean coefficients of a linear thermal expansion was obtained as a function of the temperature, and the effects of the physical states of a simulated fission product on the thermal expansion were investigated. In the case of the Nd 2 O 3 forming a dissolved oxide, the thermal expansion of the sample increased and the increment was proportional to the Nd contents, because the melting point of the Nd 2 O 3 was lower than that of UO 2 and although the metallic precipitate hardly affected the crystal structure, the linear thermal expansion also increased with an increasing Ru contents

  3. Thermal conductivity of Glycerol's liquid, glass, and crystal states, glass-liquid-glass transition, and crystallization at high pressures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ove; Johari, G P

    2016-02-14

    To investigate the effects of local density fluctuations on phonon propagation in a hydrogen bonded structure, we studied the thermal conductivity κ of the crystal, liquid, and glassy states of pure glycerol as a function of the temperature, T, and the pressure, p. We find that the following: (i) κcrystal is 3.6-times the κliquid value at 140 K at 0.1 MPa and 2.2-times at 290 K, and it varies with T according to 138 × T(-0.95); (ii) the ratio κliquid (p)/κliquid (0.1 MPa) is 1.45 GPa(-1) at 280 K, which, unexpectedly, is about the same as κcrystal (p)/κcrystal (0.1 MPa) of 1.42 GPa(-1) at 298 K; (iii) κglass is relatively insensitive to T but sensitive to the applied p (1.38 GPa(-1) at 150 K); (iv) κglass-T plots show an enhanced, pressure-dependent peak-like feature, which is due to the glass to liquid transition on heating; (v) continuous heating cold-crystallizes ultraviscous glycerol under pressure, at a higher T when p is high; and (vi) glycerol formed by cooling at a high p and then measured at a low p has a significantly higher κ than the glass formed by cooling at a low p. On heating at a fixed low p, its κ decreases before its glass-liquid transition range at that p is reached. We attribute this effect to thermally assisted loss of the configurational and vibrational instabilities of a glass formed at high p and recovered at low p, which is different from the usual glass-aging effect. While the heat capacity, entropy, and volume of glycerol crystal are less than those for its glass and liquid, κcrystal of glycerol, like its elastic modulus and refractive index, is higher. We discuss these findings in terms of the role of fluctuations in local density and structure, and the relations between κ and the thermodynamic quantities.

  4. Heterometallic molecular precursors for a lithium-iron oxide material: synthesis, solid state structure, solution and gas-phase behaviour, and thermal decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Haixiang; Wei, Zheng; Barry, Matthew C; Filatov, Alexander S; Dikarev, Evgeny V

    2017-05-02

    Three heterometallic single-source precursors with a Li : Fe = 1 : 1 ratio for a LiFeO 2 oxide material are reported. Heterometallic compounds LiFeL 3 (L = tbaoac (1), ptac (2), and acac(3)) have been obtained on a large scale, in nearly quantitative yields by one-step reactions that employ readily available reagents. The heterometallic precursor LiFe(acac) 3 (3) with small, symmetric substituents on the ligand (acac = pentane-2,4-dionate), maintains a 1D polymeric structure in the solid state that limits its volatility and prevents solubility in non-coordinating solvents. The application of the unsymmetrical ligands, tbaoac (tert-butyl acetoacetate) and ptac (1,1,1-trifluoro-5,5-dimethyl-2,4-hexanedionate), that exhibit different bridging properties at the two ends of the ligand, allowed us to change the connectivity pattern within the heterometallic assembly. The latter was demonstrated by structural characterization of heterometallic complexes LiFe(tbaoac) 3 (1) and LiFe(ptac) 3 (2) that consist of discrete heterocyclic tetranuclear molecules Li 2 Fe 2 L 6 . The compounds are highly volatile and exhibit a congruent sublimation character. DART mass spectrometric investigation revealed the presence of heterometallic molecules in the gas phase. The positive mode spectra are dominated by the presence of [M - L] + peaks (M = Li 2 Fe 2 L 6 ). In accord with their discrete molecular structure, complexes 1 and 2 are highly soluble in nearly all common solvents. In order to test the retention of the heterometallic structure in solution, the diamagnetic analog of 1, LiMg(tbaoac) 3 (4), has been isolated. Its tetranuclear molecular structure was found to be isomorphous to that of the iron counterpart. 1 H and 7 Li NMR spectroscopy unambiguously confirmed the presence of heterometallic molecules in solutions of non-coordinating solvents. The heterometallic precursor 1 was shown to exhibit clean thermal decomposition in air that results in phase-pure

  5. STEADY-STATE HEAT REJECTION RATES FOR A COAXIAL BOREHOLE HEAT EXCHANGER DURING PASSIVE AND ACTIVE COOLING DETERMINED WITH THE NOVEL STEP THERMAL RESPONSE TEST METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Macenić

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available At three locations in Zagreb, classical and extended thermal response test (TRT was conducted on installed coaxial heat exchangers. With classic TR test, thermogeological properties of the ground and thermal resistance of the borehole were determined at each location. It is seen that thermal conductivity of the ground varies, due to difference in geological profile of the sites. In addition, experimental research of steady-state thermal response step test (SSTRST was carried out to determine heat rejection rates for passive and active cooling in steady state regime. Results showed that heat rejection rate is only between 8-11 W/m, which indicates that coaxial system is not suitable for passive cooling demands. Furthermore, the heat pump in passive cooling mode uses additional plate heat exchanger where there is additional temperature drop of working fluid by approximately 1,5 °C. Therefore, steady-state rejection rate for passive cooling is even lower for a real case project. Coaxial heat exchanger should be always designed for an active cooling regime with an operation of a heat pump compressor in a classical vapour compression refrigeration cycle.

  6. Perfect secure domination in graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.V. Divya Rashmi

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Let $G=(V,E$ be a graph. A subset $S$ of $V$ is a dominating set of $G$ if every vertex in $Vsetminus  S$ is adjacent to a vertex in $S.$ A dominating set $S$ is called a secure dominating set if for each $vin Vsetminus S$ there exists $uin S$ such that $v$ is adjacent to $u$ and $S_1=(Ssetminus{u}cup {v}$ is a dominating set. If further the vertex $uin S$ is unique, then $S$ is called a perfect secure dominating set. The minimum cardinality of a perfect secure dominating set of $G$ is called the perfect  secure domination number of $G$ and is denoted by $gamma_{ps}(G.$ In this paper we initiate a study of this parameter and present several basic results.

  7. Dominant optic atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenaers Guy

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Definition of the disease Dominant Optic Atrophy (DOA is a neuro-ophthalmic condition characterized by a bilateral degeneration of the optic nerves, causing insidious visual loss, typically starting during the first decade of life. The disease affects primary the retinal ganglion cells (RGC and their axons forming the optic nerve, which transfer the visual information from the photoreceptors to the lateral geniculus in the brain. Epidemiology The prevalence of the disease varies from 1/10000 in Denmark due to a founder effect, to 1/30000 in the rest of the world. Clinical description DOA patients usually suffer of moderate visual loss, associated with central or paracentral visual field deficits and color vision defects. The severity of the disease is highly variable, the visual acuity ranging from normal to legal blindness. The ophthalmic examination discloses on fundoscopy isolated optic disc pallor or atrophy, related to the RGC death. About 20% of DOA patients harbour extraocular multi-systemic features, including neurosensory hearing loss, or less commonly chronic progressive external ophthalmoplegia, myopathy, peripheral neuropathy, multiple sclerosis-like illness, spastic paraplegia or cataracts. Aetiology Two genes (OPA1, OPA3 encoding inner mitochondrial membrane proteins and three loci (OPA4, OPA5, OPA8 are currently known for DOA. Additional loci and genes (OPA2, OPA6 and OPA7 are responsible for X-linked or recessive optic atrophy. All OPA genes yet identified encode mitochondrial proteins embedded in the inner membrane and ubiquitously expressed, as are the proteins mutated in the Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy. OPA1 mutations affect mitochondrial fusion, energy metabolism, control of apoptosis, calcium clearance and maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity. OPA3 mutations only affect the energy metabolism and the control of apoptosis. Diagnosis Patients are usually diagnosed during their early childhood, because of

  8. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  9. SOME CONSIDERATIONS ON ABUSE OF DOMINANT POSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Maican

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Article 82 (formerly 86 EC contains four essential elements (an undertaking, a dominant position, an abuse of that position and the abuse must affect trade between member states. The term undertakings is subject to the same broad interpretation as that applied to article 81 (formerly 85 EC and covers the same activities, both public and private.The Community interest must be also taken into account. Although it is not clear precisely what this element of article 86 requires, it will clearly curtail the scope of the exception provided under this article. Although abusive behavior of undertakings in a dominant position is prohibited, it must be recalled that merely being in a strong position is not a problem in itself. It is necessary for major players in a market to be aware of their position because practices which would not fall foul of article 82 (formerly 86 EC, where an undertaking is not dominant, will do so where dominance is established. A refusal to deal by a non-dominant undertaking would not be an abuse within article 82 (formerly 86 EC, but it will be so where the undertaking is dominant.

  10. Total Domination Versus Paired-Domination in Regular Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyman Joanna

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A subset S of vertices of a graph G is a dominating set of G if every vertex not in S has a neighbor in S, while S is a total dominating set of G if every vertex has a neighbor in S. If S is a dominating set with the additional property that the subgraph induced by S contains a perfect matching, then S is a paired-dominating set. The domination number, denoted γ(G, is the minimum cardinality of a dominating set of G, while the minimum cardinalities of a total dominating set and paired-dominating set are the total domination number, γt(G, and the paired-domination number, γpr(G, respectively. For k ≥ 2, let G be a connected k-regular graph. It is known [Schaudt, Total domination versus paired domination, Discuss. Math. Graph Theory 32 (2012 435–447] that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ (2k/(k+1. In the special case when k = 2, we observe that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ 4/3, with equality if and only if G ≅ C5. When k = 3, we show that γpr(G/γt(G ≤ 3/2, with equality if and only if G is the Petersen graph. More generally for k ≥ 2, if G has girth at least 5 and satisfies γpr(G/γt(G = (2k/(k + 1, then we show that G is a diameter-2 Moore graph. As a consequence of this result, we prove that for k ≥ 2 and k ≠ 57, if G has girth at least 5, then γpr(G/γt(G ≤ (2k/(k +1, with equality if and only if k = 2 and G ≅ C5 or k = 3 and G is the Petersen graph.

  11. Whole core pin-by-pin coupled neutronic-thermal-hydraulic steady state and transient calculations using COBAYA3 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez, J.; Herrero, J. J.; Cuervo, D.; Aragones, J. M.

    2010-10-01

    Nowadays coupled 3-dimensional neutron kinetics and thermal-hydraulic core calculations are performed by applying a radial average channel approach using a meshing of one quarter of assembly in the best case. This approach does not take into account the subchannels effects due to the averaging of the physical fields and the loose of heterogeneity in the thermal-hydraulic model. Therefore the models do not have enough resolution to predict those subchannels effects which are important for the fuel design safety margins, because it is in the local scale, where we can search the hottest pellet or the maximum heat flux. The Polytechnic University of Madrid advanced multi-scale neutron-kinetics and thermal-hydraulics methodologies being implemented in COBAYA3 include domain decomposition by alternate core dissections for the local 3-dimensional fine-mesh scale problems (pin cells/subchannels) and an analytical nodal diffusion solver for the coarse mesh scale coupled with the thermal-hydraulic using a model of one channel per assembly or per quarter of assembly. In this work, we address the domain decomposition by the alternate core dissections methodology applied to solve coupled 3-dimensional neutronic-thermal-hydraulic problems at the fine-mesh scale. The neutronic-thermal-hydraulic coupling at the cell-subchannel scale allows the treatment of the effects of the detailed thermal-hydraulic feedbacks on cross-sections, thus resulting in better estimates of the local safety margins at the pin level. (Author)

  12. Susceptibility of Iα- and Iβ-Dominated Cellulose to TEMPO-Mediated Oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Daniel O; Lindh, Jonas; Strømme, Maria; Mihranyan, Albert

    2015-05-11

    The susceptibility of Iα- and Iβ-dominated cellulose to TEMPO-mediated oxidation was studied in this work since the cellulose Iα-allomorph is generally considered to be thermodynamically less stable and therefore more reactive than the cellulose Iβ-allomorph. Highly crystalline Cladophora nanocellulose, which is dominated by the Iα-allomorph, was oxidized to various degrees with TEMPO oxidant via bulk electrolysis in the absence of co-oxidants. Further, the Cladophora nanocellulose was thermally annealed in glycerol to produce its Iβ-dominated form and then oxidized. The produced materials were subsequently studied using FTIR, CP/MAS (13)C NMR, XRD, and SEM. The solid-state analyses confirmed that the annealed Cladophora cellulose was successfully transformed from an Iα- to an Iβ-dominated form. The results of the analyses of pristine and annealed TEMPO-oxidized samples suggest that Iα- and Iβ-dominated cellulose do not differ in susceptibility to TEMPO-oxidation. This work hence suggests that cellulose from different sources are not expected to differ in susceptibility to the oxidation due to differences in allomorph composition.

  13. YALINA-Thermal Facility Experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiyavitskaya, H.; Bournos, V.; Fokov, Y.; Routkovskaya, C.; Sadovich, S.; Cintas, A.; Márquez Damián, J.I.; Lopasso, E.M.; Maiorino, J.R.; Carluccio, T.; Rossi, P.C.R.; Antunes, A.; Oliveira, F.L. de; Lee, S.M.; Xia, P.; Shi, Y.; Xia, H.; Zhu, Q.; Yu, T.; Wu, X.; Zhang, W.; Cao, J.; Luo, H.; Quan, Y.; Kulkarni, K.; Yadav, R.D.S.; Bajpai, A.; Degweker, S.B.; Modak, R.S.; Park, H.J.; Shim, H.J.; Kim, C.H.; Wojciechowski, A.; Zuta, M.; Pešić, M.; Avramović, I.; Beličev, P.; Gohar, Y.; Talamo, A.; Aliberti, G.

    2017-01-01

    This Section discussed the results obtained by the Member States participating in the IAEA coordinated research project on Analytical and Experimental Benchmark Analysis on Accelerator Driven Systems, and Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Utilization in Accelerator Driven Subcritical Assembly Systems for the YALINA Thermal facility. Member States used both Monte Carlo and deterministic computational tools to analyse the YALINA Thermal subcritical assembly, including: MCNP5, MCNPX, McCARD, PARTISN, and ERANOS computer programs. All calculations have been performed using the ENDF/B-VI (different modes) nuclear data libraries with the exception of Republic of Korea which used the ENDF/B-VII.0 nuclear data library. Generally, there is a good agreement between the results obtained by all the Member States. Deterministic codes perform space, energy, and angle discretization and materials homogenizations, which introduce approximations affecting the obtained results. In subcritical assemblies, the neutron multiplication and the detector counting rate depend strongly on the external neutron source. Cf and D-D sources provide similar results since they emit neutrons with similar average energy. D-T neutrons trigger (n,xn) reactions and have a longer mean free path, which increases the neutron leakage if the geometry dimensions of the assembly are small, as in the case of the YALINA-Thermal subcritical assembly. Close to criticality, the effect of the external neutron source diminishes since fission neutrons dominate the neutron population.

  14. A method to achieve comparable thermal states of car brakes during braking on the road and on a high-speed roll-stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolff, Andrzej

    2010-01-01

    The temperature of a brake friction surface influences significantly the braking effectiveness. The paper describes a heat transfer process in car brakes. Using a developed program of finite element method, the temperature distributions in brake rotors (disc and drum brake) of a light truck have been calculated. As a preliminary consistency criterion of the brake thermal state in road and roll-stand braking conditions, a balance of the energy cumulated in the brake rotor has been taken into account. As the most reliable consistency criterion an equality of average temperatures of the friction surface has been assumed. The presented method allows to achieve on a roll-stand the analogical thermal states of automotive brakes, which are observed during braking in road conditions. Basing on this method, it is possible to calculate the braking time and force for a high-speed roll-stand. In contrast to the previous papers of the author, new calculation results have been presented.

  15. Mathematical Modeling of the Thermal State of an Isothermal Element with Account of the Radiant Heat Transfer Between Parts of a Spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alifanov, O. M.; Paleshkin, A. V.; Terent‧ev, V. V.; Firsyuk, S. O.

    2016-01-01

    A methodological approach to determination of the thermal state at a point on the surface of an isothermal element of a small spacecraft has been developed. A mathematical model of heat transfer between surfaces of intricate geometric configuration has been described. In this model, account was taken of the external field of radiant fluxes and of the differentiated mutual influence of the surfaces. An algorithm for calculation of the distribution of the density of the radiation absorbed by surface elements of the object under study has been proposed. The temperature field on the lateral surface of the spacecraft exposed to sunlight and on its shady side has been calculated. By determining the thermal state of magnetic controls of the orientation system as an example, the authors have assessed the contribution of the radiation coming from the solar-cell panels and from the spacecraft surface.

  16. Detection of oxygen vacancy defect states in capacitors with ultrathin Ta2O5 films by zero-bias thermally stimulated current spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, W.S.; Leong, L.L.; Han, Taejoon; Sandler, Nathan P.

    2003-01-01

    Defect state D (0.8 eV) was experimentally detected in Ta 2 O 5 capacitors with ultrathin (physical thickness 2 O 5 films using zero-bias thermally stimulated current spectroscopy and correlated with leakage current. Defect state D can be more efficiently suppressed by using N 2 O rapid thermal annealing (RTA) instead of using O 2 RTA for postdeposition annealing and by using TiN instead of Al for top electrode. We believe that defect D is probably the first ionization level of the oxygen vacancy deep double donor. Other important defects are Si/O-vacancy complex single donors and C/O-vacancy complex single donors

  17. Preparation, characterization and thermal behaviour study of 4-dimethyl amino benzal pyruvate of lanthanides (III) and yttrium (III) in solid state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyano, M.H.

    1990-01-01

    Solid state compounds involving Ln and DMBP, where Ln trivalent lanthanides (except promethium) and yttrium; DMBP 4-dimethyl amino benzylidene pyruvate, were prepared by addition of ligand to the corresponding metal ions chlorides, both in aqueous solution. The precipitates were washed with distilled water and dried at 40 0 C in a forced circulation oven. Complexometry with EDTA, thermogravimetry (TG), differential thermal analysis (DTA), infra-red absorption and X-ray diffraction have been used in the study of these compounds. (author)

  18. Dominance Hierarchies in Young Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelman, Murray S.; Omark, Donald R.

    1973-01-01

    This study uses the ethological approach of seeking species characteristics and phylogenetic continuities in an investigation of human behavior. Among primates a striking consistency is the presence of some form of dominance hierarchy in many species. The present study examines peer group dominance hierarchies as they are perceived by children in…

  19. On dominator colorings in graphs

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    colors required for a dominator coloring of G is called the dominator .... Theorem 1.3 shows that the complete graph Kn is the only connected graph of order n ... Conversely, if a graph G satisfies condition (i) or (ii), it is easy to see that χd(G) =.

  20. Measurement of the rates of reaction of the ground and metastable excited states of 02+, N0+ and 0+ with atmospheric gases at thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glosik, J.; Rakshit, A.B.; Twiddy, N.D.; Adams, N.G.; Smith, D.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal-energy reaction rate coefficients and product ion distributions have been measured for reactions of both the ground state and metastable electronic states of 0 2 + , N0 + and 0 + with several neutral species, using a selected-ion flow tube. In general the excited-ion reaction rates are fast, frequently approaching the Langevin limit. Collisional quenching occurs for the reactions of N0 + sup(star) with N 2 ,0 2 and H 2 and the quenching rates have been determined. The ion source also provided a substantial yield of doubly charged 0 2 permitting some measurements of reaction rates of 0 2 2+ . (author)

  1. Thermal conductivity of electron-doped CaMnO3 perovskites: Local lattice distortions and optical phonon thermal excitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Yang; Sui Yu; Wang Xianjie; Su Wenhui; Liu Xiaoyang; Fan, Hong Jin

    2010-01-01

    The thermal transport properties of a series of electron-doped CaMnO 3 perovskites have been investigated. Throughout the temperature range 5-300 K, phonon thermal conductivity is dominant, and both electron and spin wave contributions are negligible. The short phonon mean free paths in this system result in the relatively low thermal conductivities. The strong phonon scatterings stem from the A-site mismatch and bond-length fluctuations induced by local distortions of MnO 6 octahedra. The thermal conductivity in the magnetically ordered state is enhanced as a result of the decrease in spin-phonon scattering. The results also indicate that above the magnetic ordering temperature, observable thermal excitation of optical phonons occurs. The contribution of optical phonons to thermal conductivity becomes non-negligible and is proposed to play an important role in the glass-like thermal transport behavior (i.e. positive temperature dependence of the thermal conductivity) in the paramagnetic state. These features can be understood in terms of an expression of thermal conductivity that includes both acoustic and optical phonon terms.

  2. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and eating behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-08-01

    The isoprenoid pathway produces an endogenous membrane Na+-K+ ATPase inhibitor, digoxin, which can regulate neurotransmitter and amino acid transport. Digoxin synthesis and neurotransmitter patterns were assessed in eating disorders. The patterns were compared in those with right hemispheric and left hemispheric dominance. The serum HMG CoA reductase activity, RBC membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity, serum digoxin, magnesium, tryptophan catabolites (serotonin, quinolinic acid, strychnine, and nicotine), and tyrosine catabolites (morphine, dopamine, and noradrenaline) were measured in anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, right hemispheric dominant, left hemispheric dominant, and bihemispheric dominant individuals. Digoxin synthesis was increased with upregulated tryptophan catabolism and downregulated tyrosine catabolism in those with anorexia nervosa and right hemispheric chemical dominance. Digoxin synthesis was reduced with downregulated tryptophan catabolism and upregulated tyrosine catabolism in those with bulimia nervosa and left hemispheric chemical dominance. The membrane Na+-K+ ATPase activity and serum magnesium were decreased in anorexia nervosa and right hemispheric chemical dominance while they were increased in bulimia nervosa and left hemispheric chemical dominance. Hypothalamic digoxin and hemispheric chemical dominance play a central role in the regulation of eating behavior. Anorexia nervosa represents the right hemispheric chemically dominant/hyperdigoxinemic state and bulimia nervosa the left hemispheric chemically dominant/hypodigoxinemic state.

  3. The kinetically dominated quasar 3C 418

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsly, Brian; Kharb, Preeti

    2017-06-01

    The existence of quasars that are kinetically dominated, where the jet kinetic luminosity, Q, is larger than the total (infrared to X-ray) thermal luminosity of the accretion flow, Lbol, provides a strong constraint on the fundamental physics of relativistic jet formation. Since quasars have high values of Lbol by definition, only ˜10 kinetically dominated quasars (with \\overline{Q}/L_{bol}>1) have been found, where \\overline{Q} is the long-term time-averaged jet power. We use low-frequency (151 MHz-1.66 GHz) observations of the quasar 3C 418 to determine \\overline{Q}≈ 5.5 ± 1.3 × 10^{46} {erg s^{-1}}. Analysis of the rest-frame ultraviolet spectrum indicates that this equates to 0.57 ± 0.28 times the Eddington luminosity of the central supermassive black hole and \\overline{Q}/L_{bol} ≈ 4.8 ± 3.1, making 3C 418 one of the most kinetically dominated quasars found to date. It is shown that this maximal \\overline{Q}/L_{bol} is consistent with models of magnetically arrested accretion of jet production in which the jet production reproduces the observed trend of a decrement in the extreme ultraviolet continuum as the jet power increases. This maximal condition corresponds to an almost complete saturation of the inner accretion flow with vertical large-scale magnetic flux (maximum saturation).

  4. Studies on reducing the thermal loads of solar-pumped solid state lasers; Taiyoko reiki laser no netsufuka teigen ni kansuru kenkyu

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shimizu, K; Yugami, H; Naito, H; Arashi, H [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan)

    1997-11-25

    It was intended to reduce the thermal loads of solar-pumped solid state lasers (highly densified solar light is irradiated directly onto a laser medium to cause excitation. No electric power is required for the excitation.). For this purpose, experiments were performed by using a selective permeation film. Solar light includes wavelengths not effective for excitation, which causes heat generation and thermal loads such as lens heating effect and thermal stress compounded refraction, degrading the laser beam quality. The Nd:YAG was used as a laser medium, and a multi-layered film (composed of SiO2 and TiO2) which cuts wavelength below 500 nm as a selective permeation film to cut light having wavelengths not required for excitation. A laser transmitting experiment revealed that the slope efficiency is improved by 27% as compared to not using the film. Beam fluctuation was improved to 45%. Using the selective permeation film has realized more efficient conversion of the solar light into a beam with better quality. The results for calculation of heat lens effect by using temperature distribution simulation showed good agreement with experimental values. Using the selective permeation film can suppress the maximum temperature of a laser rod to 68%, as well as the thermal stress. 9 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Domination criticality in product graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.R. Chithra

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A connected dominating set is an important notion and has many applications in routing and management of networks. Graph products have turned out to be a good model of interconnection networks. This motivated us to study the Cartesian product of graphs G with connected domination number, γc(G=2,3 and characterize such graphs. Also, we characterize the k−γ-vertex (edge critical graphs and k−γc-vertex (edge critical graphs for k=2,3 where γ denotes the domination number of G. We also discuss the vertex criticality in grids.

  6. Absorption and stimulated emission between the electronic states of C and C_2 radicals in an expanding thermal plasma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otorbaev, D.K.; Sanden, van de M.C.M.; Buuron, A.J.M.; Schram, D.C.

    1995-01-01

    Using the method of reabsorption the absolute densities of argon, atomic and molecular carbon are determined during the deposition of amorphous hydrogenated (diamond-like) carbon coatings by an expanding thermal are plasma. Depending on the gas mixture argon/methane or argon/acetylene and the manner

  7. Steady state thermal hydraulic analysis of a boiling water reactor core, for various power distributions, using computer code THABNA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkat Raj, V.; Saha, D.

    1976-01-01

    The core of a boiling water reactor may see different power distributions during its operational life. How some of the typical power distributions affect some of the thermal hydraulic parameters such as pressure drop minimum critical heat flux ratio, void distribution etc. has been studied using computer code THABNA. The effect of an increase in the leakage flow has also been analysed. (author)

  8. Dominant investors and strategic transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; von Thadden, E.-L.

    1998-01-01

    This paper studies product market competition under a strategic transparency decision. Dominant investors can influence information collection in the financial market, and thereby corporate transparency, by affecting market liquidity or the cost of information collection. More transparency on a

  9. Dominant investors and strategic transparency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perotti, E.C.; von Thadden, E.-L.

    1999-01-01

    This paper studies product market competition under a strategic transparency decision. Dominant investors can influence information collection in the financial market, and thereby corporate transparency, by affecting market liquidity or the cost of information collection. More transparency on a

  10. Multi-dimensional modeling of a thermal energy storage canister. M.S. Thesis - Cleveland State Univ., Dec. 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerslake, Thomas W.

    1991-01-01

    The Solar Dynamic Power Module being developed for Space Station Freedom uses a eutectic mixture of LiF-CaF2 phase change material (PCM) contained in toroidal canisters for thermal energy storage. Presented are the results from heat transfer analyses of a PCM containment canister. One and two dimensional finite difference computer models are developed to analyze heat transfer in the canister walls, PCM, void, and heat engine working fluid coolant. The modes of heat transfer considered include conduction in canister walls and solid PCM, conduction and pseudo-free convection in liquid PCM, conduction and radiation across PCM vapor filled void regions, and forced convection in the heat engine working fluid. Void shape, location, growth or shrinkage (due to density difference between the solid and liquid PCM phases) are prescribed based on engineering judgment. The PCM phase change process is analyzed using the enthalpy method. The discussion of the results focuses on how canister thermal performance is affected by free convection in the liquid PCM and void heat transfer. Characterizing these effects is important for interpreting the relationship between ground-based canister performance (in 1-g) and expected on-orbit performance (in micro-g). Void regions accentuate canister hot spots and temperature gradients due to their large thermal resistance. Free convection reduces the extent of PCM superheating and lowers canister temperatures during a portion of the PCM thermal charge period. Surprisingly small differences in canister thermal performance result from operation on the ground and operation on-orbit. This lack of a strong gravity dependency is attributed to the large contribution of container walls in overall canister energy redistribution by conduction.

  11. Effect of particle- and specimen-level transport on product state in compacted-powder combustion synthesis and thermal debinding of polymers from molded powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Amir Antonio Martins

    The existence of large gradients within particles and fast temporal variations in the temperature and species concentration prevents the use of asymptotic approximations for the closure of the volume-averaged, specimen-level formulations. In this case a solution of the particle-level transport problem is needed to complement the specimen-level volume-averaged equations. Here, the use of combined specimen-level and particle-level models for transport in reactive porous media is demonstrated with two examples. For the gasless compacted-powder combustion synthesis, a three-scale model is developed. The specimen-level model is based on the volume-averaged equations for species and temperature. Local thermal equilibrium is assumed and the macroscopic mass diffusion and convection fluxes are neglected. The particle-level model accounts for the interparticle diffusion (i.e., the liquid migration from liquid-rich to liquid-lean regions) and the intraparticle diffusion (i.e., the species mass diffusion within the product layer formed at the surface of the high melting temperature component). It is found that the interparticle diffusion controls the extent of conversion to the final product, the maximum temperature, and to a smaller degree the propagation velocity. The intraparticle diffusion controls the propagation velocity and to a smaller degree the maximum temperature. The initial stages of thermal degradation of EVA from molded specimens is modeled using volume-averaged equations for the species and empirical models for the kinetics of the thermal degradation, the vapor-liquid equilibrium, and the diffusion coefficient of acetic acid in the molten polymer. It is assumed that a bubble forms when the partial pressure of acetic acid exceeds the external ambient pressure. It is found that the removal of acetic acid is characterized by two regimes, a pre-charge dominated regime and a generation dominated regime. For the development of an optimum debinding schedule, the

  12. A note on isolate domination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ismail Sahul Hamid

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A set $S$ of vertices of a graph $G$ such that $\\left\\langle S\\right\\rangle$ has an isolated vertex is called an \\emph{isolate set} of $G$. The minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate set are called the \\emph{isolate number} $i_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate number} $I_0(G$ respectively. An isolate set that is also a dominating set (an irredundant set is an $\\emph{isolate dominating set} \\ (\\emph{an isolate irredundant set}$. The \\emph{isolate domination number} $\\gamma_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate domination number} $\\Gamma_0(G$ are respectively the minimum and maximum cardinality of a minimal isolate dominating set while the \\emph{isolate irredundance number} $ir_0(G$ and the \\emph{upper isolate irredundance number} $IR_0(G$ are the minimum and maximum cardinality of a maximal isolate irredundant set of $G$. The notion of isolate domination was introduced in \\cite{sb} and the remaining were introduced in \\cite{isrn}. This paper further extends a study of these parameters.   

  13. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Noriya; Yamamoto, Miyuki

    2015-01-01

    In a group setting, individuals' perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems' level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation. PMID:26136644

  14. Neural mechanisms of social dominance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriya eWatanabe

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In a group setting, individuals’ perceptions of their own level of dominance or of the dominance level of others, and the ability to adequately control their behavior based on these perceptions are crucial for living within a social environment. Recent advances in neural imaging and molecular technology have enabled researchers to investigate the neural substrates that support the perception of social dominance and the formation of a social hierarchy in humans. At the systems’ level, recent studies showed that dominance perception is represented in broad brain regions which include the amygdala, hippocampus, striatum, and various cortical networks such as the prefrontal, and parietal cortices. Additionally, neurotransmitter systems such as the dopaminergic and serotonergic systems, modulate and are modulated by the formation of the social hierarchy in a group. While these monoamine systems have a wide distribution and multiple functions, it was recently found that the Neuropeptide B/W contributes to the perception of dominance and is present in neurons that have a limited projection primarily to the amygdala. The present review discusses the specific roles of these neural regions and neurotransmitter systems in the perception of dominance and in hierarchy formation.

  15. Solar thermal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, J.

    2006-01-01

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m 3 - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become increasingly important as

  16. Solar thermal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, J.

    2006-07-15

    While wind power is widely acknowledged as the most developed of the 'new' renewables, the number two technology, in terms of installed capacity functioning worldwide, is solar heating, or solar thermal. The author has investigated recent industry reports on how these markets are developing. The authors of an International Energy Agency (IEA) survey studied 41 countries in depth at the end of 2004, revealing that 141 million m{sup 3} - corresponding to an installed capacity of 98.4 GWth - were installed in the sample countries (these nations represent 3.74 billion people, about 57% of the world's population). The installed capacity within the areas studied represents approximately 85%-90% of the solar thermal market worldwide. The use of solar heating varies greatly between countries - even close neighbours - and between economic regions. Its uptake often has more to do with policy than solar resource. There is also different uptake of technology. In China, Europe and Japan, plants with flat-plate and evacuated tube collectors are used, mainly to heat water and for space heating. Unglazed plastic collectors, used mainly for swimming pool heating, meanwhile, dominate the North American markets. Though the majority of solar heating installations today are installed on domestic rooftops, the larger-scale installations should not be overlooked. One important part of the market is the hotel sector - in particular hotels in locations that serve the seasonal summer holiday market, where solar is extremely effective. Likewise hospitals and residential homes, multi-family apartment blocks and sports centres are all good examples of places where solar thermal can deliver results. There are also a growing number of industrial applications, where solar thermal can meet the hot water needs (and possibly more) of a range of industries, such as food processing and agriculture. The ability of solar to provide a heat source for cooling is expected to become

  17. Shot-noise dominant regime of a nanoparticle in a laser beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Changchun; Robicheaux, Francis

    2017-04-01

    The technique of laser levitation of nanoparticles has become increasingly promising in the study of cooling and controlling mesoscopic quantum systems. Unlike a mechanical system, the levitated nanoparticle is less exposed to thermalization and decoherence due to the absence of direct contact with a thermal environment. In ultrahigh vacuum, the dominant source of decoherence comes from the unavoidable photon recoil from the optical trap which sets an ultimate bound for the control of levitated systems. In this paper, we study the shot noise heating and the parametric feedback cooling of an optically trapped anisotropic nanoparticle in the laser shot noise dominant regime. The rotational trapping frequency and shot noise heating rate have a dependence on the shape of the trapped particle. For an ellipsoidal particle, the ratio of the axis lengths and the overall size controls the shot noise heating rate relative to the rotational frequency. For a near spherical nanoparticle, the effective heating rate for the rotational degrees of freedom is smaller than that for translation suggesting that the librational ground state may be easier to achieve than the vibrational ground state.

  18. Global warming influence on climatic variables and thermal comfort index in Paraíba state, Brazil

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Gustavo de Assis; Instituto Agronômico de Pernambuco; Souza, Bonifácio Benicio de; Universidade Federal Campina Grande; Silva, Elisângela Maria Nunes da; UFCG

    2015-01-01

    The increase in the concentration of greenhouse gases originated from burning fossil fuels, along with breeding, been appointed as the main causes of global climate change resulting from global warming in earth's atmosphere. These changes can cause serious impacts on the lives and livestock production mainly in tropical regions. Therefore, the aim with this work was to evaluate the effect of global warming on the climatological variables, thermal comfort index and animal production in the sta...

  19. Critical Evaluation of State-of-the-Art In Situ Thermal Treatment Technologies for DNAPL Source Zone Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    valent iron (ZVI) powder in a water/ guar slurry for remediation of chlorinated DNAPL source zones. The ZVI continues the remediation after the thermal...MUST BE FOLLOWED BY PERSONNEL ON SITE 1. Smoking, eating, chewing gum or tobacco, or drinking are forbidden except in clean or designated areas...WORK PRACTICES ER-0314 69 Appendix D THE FOLLOWING PRACTICES MUST BE FOLLOWED BY PERSONNEL ON SITE 12. Smoking, eating, chewing gum or tobacco

  20. Chemical states and optical properties of thermally evaporated Ge-Te and Ge-Sb-Te amorphous thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, S.; Singh, D.; Shandhu, S. [Semiconductor Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University Amritsar (India); Thangaraj, R., E-mail: rthangaraj@rediffmail.com [Semiconductor Laboratory, Department of Physics, Guru Nanak Dev University Amritsar (India)

    2012-07-15

    Thin amorphous films of Ge{sub 22}Sb{sub 22}Te{sub 56} and Ge{sub 50}Te{sub 50} have been prepared from their respective polycrystalline bulk on glass substrates by thermal evaporation technique. The amorphous nature of the films was checked with X-ray diffraction studies. Amorphous-to-crystalline transition of the films has been induced by thermal annealing and the structural phases have been identified by X-ray diffraction. The phase transformation temperature of the films was evaluated by temperature dependent sheet resistance measurement. The chemical structure of the amorphous films has been investigated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and the role of Sb in phase change Ge{sub 22}Sb{sub 22}Te{sub 56} film is discussed. Survey and core level (Ge 3d, Te 3d, Te 4d, Sb 3p, Sb 3d, O 1s, C 1s) band spectra has been recorded and analyzed. For optical studies, the transmittance and the reflectance spectra were measured over the wavelength ranges 400-2500 nm using UV-vis-NIR spectroscopy. The optical band gap, refractive index and extinction coefficient are also presented for thermally evaporated amorphous thin films.

  1. Effect of relative humidity and temperature control on in-cabin thermal comfort state: Thermodynamic and psychometric analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alahmer, A.; Omar, M.A.; Mayyas, A.; Dongri, Shan

    2011-01-01

    This manuscript discusses the effect of manipulating the Relative Humidity RH of in-cabin environment on the thermal comfort and human occupants' thermal sensation. The study uses thermodynamic and psychometric analyses, to incorporate the effect of changing RH along with the dry bulb temperature on human comfort. Specifically, the study computes the effect of changing the relative humidity on the amount of heat rejected from the passenger compartment and the effect of relative humidity on occupants comfort zone. A practical system implementation is also discussed in terms of an evaporative cooler design. The results show that changing the RH along with dry bulb temperature inside vehicular cabins can improve the air conditioning efficiency by reducing the heat removed while improving the Human comfort sensations as measured by the Predicted Mean Value PMV and the Predicted Percentage Dissatisfied PPD indices. - Highlights: → Investigates the effect of controlling the RH and dry bulb temperature on in-cabin thermal comfort and sensation. → Conducts the thermodynamic and psychometric analyses for changing the RH and temperature for in-cabin air conditioning. → Discusses a possible system implementation through an evaporative cooler design.

  2. State-of-the-art of the utilization of thermal effluents and its future R and D plannings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iituka, Teiji; Okano, Toshiaki; Wada, Akira

    1987-01-01

    Thermal and nuclear power plants have been constructed in coastal areas in Japan, and use large quantity of seawater for cooling condensers, consequently, they discharge warm drainage which is about 7 deg C higher than seawater. The object of this paper is to study on the method of expanding the use of warm drainage by collecting the knowledge on its actual use from the papers published so far. The number of the papers collected was 153. The main fields of actually using warm drainage are marine nurseries using seawater in Japan and greenhouse heating using fresh water in foreign countries. Seven nuclear power plants and 14 thermal power plants in Japan had the facilities of marine nurseries as of June, 1986. The quantity of warm drainage used was 0.667 m 3 -s (0.05 %) in nuclear power plants and 1.182 m 3 -h in thermal power plants. In Japan, most of warm drainage is the seawater only 7 deg C higher than the original seawater, therefore the application is limited. In order to expand the application, it is important to devise the system utilizing the energy of flow in addition to its heat. It was suggested that the expansion of application would be possible in the development and improvement of fishing grounds using large quantity of warm drainage. (Kako, I.)

  3. Thermal regulation of tightly packed solid-state photodetectors in a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution clinical PET system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freese, D. L.; Vandenbroucke, A.; Innes, D.; Lau, F. W. Y.; Hsu, D. F. C.; Reynolds, P. D.; Levin, Craig S., E-mail: cslevin@stanford.edu [Departments of Electrical Engineering, Radiology, Physics, and BioEngineering, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305-5128 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: Silicon photodetectors are of significant interest for use in positron emission tomography (PET) systems due to their compact size, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and high quantum efficiency. However, one of their main disadvantages is fluctuations in temperature cause strong shifts in gain of the devices. PET system designs with high photodetector density suffer both increased thermal density and constrained options for thermally regulating the devices. This paper proposes a method of thermally regulating densely packed silicon photodetectors in the context of a 1 mm{sup 3} resolution, high-sensitivity PET camera dedicated to breast imaging. Methods: The PET camera under construction consists of 2304 units, each containing two 8 × 8 arrays of 1 mm{sup 3} LYSO crystals coupled to two position sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPD). A subsection of the proposed camera with 512 PSAPDs has been constructed. The proposed thermal regulation design uses water-cooled heat sinks, thermoelectric elements, and thermistors to measure and regulate the temperature of the PSAPDs in a novel manner. Active cooling elements, placed at the edge of the detector stack due to limited access, are controlled based on collective leakage current and temperature measurements in order to keep all the PSAPDs at a consistent temperature. This thermal regulation design is characterized for the temperature profile across the camera and for the time required for cooling changes to propagate across the camera. These properties guide the implementation of a software-based, cascaded proportional-integral-derivative control loop that controls the current through the Peltier elements by monitoring thermistor temperature and leakage current. The stability of leakage current, temperature within the system using this control loop is tested over a period of 14 h. The energy resolution is then measured over a period of 8.66 h. Finally, the consistency of PSAPD gain between independent

  4. Real or symbolic domination: New revision of La Domination masculine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tassadit Yacine

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper does a rereading of Pierre Bourdieu’s Masculine Domination (1998, from the context in which it was developed. Thus, we rely on the work carried out during the 50s in Algeria (Sociologie de l'Algérie, 1958, Esquisse d'une théorie de la pratique, 1972 and Le Sens pratique, 1980 and later in France, to show that Masculine Domination was not born spontaneously, but as a result of a long decantation enriched by field experiences and the theoretical advances of the author’s concepts. If it is true that the situation of the women described in Sociologie de l'Algérie is the result of empirical research, it is less so for Masculine Domination, whose analysis retakes the concepts forged by the social anthropologist, such as habitus and symbolic domination. In this way, this article proposes a rereading of this work through the analysis of the work that preceded it in the field.

  5. Validation of a CATHENA fuel channel model for the post blowdown analysis of the high temperature thermal-chemical experiment CS28-1, I - Steady state

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Bo Wook; Kim, Hyoung Tae; Park, Joo Hwan

    2008-01-01

    To form a licensing basis for the new methodology of the fuel channel safety analysis code system for CANDU-6, a CATHENA model for the post-blowdown fuel channel analysis for a Large Break LOCA has been developed, and tested for the steady state of a high temperature thermal-chemical experiment CS28-1. As the major concerns of the post-blowdown fuel channel analysis of the current CANDU-6 design are how much of the decay heat can be discharged to the moderator via a radiation and a convective heat transfer at the expected accident conditions, and how much zirconium sheath would be oxidized to generate H 2 at how high a fuel temperature, this study has focused on understanding these phenomena, their interrelations, and a way to maintain a good accuracy in the prediction of the fuel and the pressure tube temperatures without losing the important physics of the involved phenomena throughout the post-blowdown phase of a LBLOCA. For a better prediction, those factors that may significantly contribute to the prediction accuracy of the steady state of the test bundles were sought. The result shows that once the pressure tube temperature is predicted correctly by the CATHENA heat transfer model between the pressure tube and the calandria tube through a gap thermal resistance adjustment, all the remaining temperatures of the inner ring, middle ring and outer ring FES temperatures can be predicted quite satisfactorily, say to within an accuracy range of 20-25 deg. C, which is comparable to the reported accuracy of the temperature measurement, ±2%. Also the analysis shows the choice of the emissivity of the solid structures (typically, 0.80, 0.34, 0.34 for FES, PT, CT), and the thermal resistance across the CO 2 annulus are factors that significantly affect the steady state prediction accuracy. A question on the legitimacy of using 'transparent' assumption for the CO 2 gas annulus for the radiation heat transfer between the pressure tube and the calandria tube in CATHENA

  6. Highly dominating, highly authoritarian personalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altemeyer, Bob

    2004-08-01

    The author considered the small part of the population whose members score highly on both the Social Dominance Orientation scale and the Right-Wing Authoritarianism scale. Studies of these High SDO-High RWAs, culled from samples of nearly 4000 Canadian university students and over 2600 of their parents and reported in the present article, reveal that these dominating authoritarians are among the most prejudiced persons in society. Furthermore, they seem to combine the worst elements of each kind of personality, being power-hungry, unsupportive of equality, manipulative, and amoral, as social dominators are in general, while also being religiously ethnocentric and dogmatic, as right-wing authoritarians tend to be. The author suggested that, although they are small in number, such persons can have considerable impact on society because they are well-positioned to become the leaders of prejudiced right-wing political movements.

  7. Characteristics of rapid-thermal-annealed LiCoO2 cathode film for an all-solid-state thin film microbattery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Han-Ki; Yoon, Young Soo

    2004-01-01

    We report on the fabrication of a LiCoO 2 film for an all-solid-state thin film microbattery by using a rapid-thermal-annealing (RTA) process. The LiCoO 2 films were grown by rf magnetron sputtering using a synthesized LiCoO 2 target in a [O 2 /(Ar+O 2 )] ratio of 10%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES) analysis results showed that the surface layer on the as-deposited LiCoO 2 film was completely removed by rapid thermal annealing process in oxygen ambient for 20 min. In addition, the thin film microbattery fabricated with the annealed LiCoO 2 film shows fairly stable cyclability with a specific discharge capacity of 56.49 μAh/cm2 μm. These results show the possibility of the RTA LiCoO 2 film and rapid thermal annealing process being a promising cathode material and annealing process for thin film microbatteries, respectively

  8. Color Rendering Index Thermal Stability Improvement of Glass-Based Phosphor-Converted White Light-Emitting Diodes for Solid-State Lighting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Chin Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available High color rendering index performance has been required for phosphor-converted warm-white light-emitting diodes (PC-WWLEDs in lighting industry. The characteristics of low-temperature fabricated phosphor (yellow: Ce3+:YAG, green: Tb3+:YAG, and red: CaAlClSiN3:Eu2+ doped glass were presented for applications to high color rendering index warm-white-light-emitting diodes. Color coordinates (x, y = (0.36, 0.29, quantum yield (QY = 55.6%, color rending index (CRI = 85.3, and correlated color temperature (CCT = 3923 K were characterized. Glass-based PC-WWLEDs was found able to maintain good thermal stability for long-time high-temperature operation. QY decay, CRI remenance, and chromaticity shift were also analyzed for glass- and silicone-based high-power PC-WLEDs by thermal aging at 150°C and 250°C for industrial test standard’s aging time 1008 hours. Better than the silicone’s, thermal stability of glass-based PC-WLEDs has been improved. The resulted high color rendering index (CRI glass phosphor potentially can be used as a phosphor layer for high-performance and low-cost PC-WLEDs used in next-generation indoor solid-state lighting applications.

  9. Diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber for thermal neutron detection at the VR-1 research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomorski, Michal; Mer-Calfati, Christine [CEA-LIST, Diamond Sensors Laboratory, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Foulon, Francois [CEA, National Institute for Nuclear Science and Technology, 91191, Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Sklenka, Lubomir; Rataj, Jan; Bily, Tomas [Department of Nuclear Reactors,Faculty of Nuclear Science and Physical Engineering, Czech Technical University, V. Holesovickach 2, 180 00 PRAHA 8 (Czech Republic)

    2015-07-01

    Diamond exhibits a combination of properties which makes it attractive for neutron detection in hostile conditions. In the particular case of detection in a nuclear reactor, it is resilient to radiation, exhibits a natural low sensitivity to gamma rays, and its small size (as compared with that of gas ionisation chambers) enables fluency monitoring with a high position resolution. We report here on the use of synthetic CVD diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber with U-235 converting material for in-core thermal neutron monitoring. Two types of thin diamond detectors were developed for this application. The first type of detector is fabricated using thin diamond membrane obtained by etching low-cost commercially available single crystal CVD intrinsic diamond, so called 'optical grade' material. Starting from a few hundred of micrometre thick samples, the sample is sliced with a laser and then plasma etched down to a few tenths of micrometre. Here we report the result obtained with a 17 μm thick device. The detection surface of this detector is equal to 1 mm{sup 2}. Detectors with surfaces up to 1 cm{sup 2} can be fabricated with this technique. The second type of detector is fabricated by growing successively two thin films of diamond, by the microwave enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique, on HPHT single crystal diamond. A first, a film of boron doped (p+) single crystal diamond, a few microns thick, is deposited. Then a second film of intrinsic diamond with a thickness of a few tens of microns is deposited. This results in a P doped, Intrinsic, Metal structure (PIM) structure in which the intrinsic volume id the active part of the detector. Here we report the results obtained with a 20 μm thick intrinsic whose detection surface is equal to 0.5 mm{sup 2}, with the possibility to enlarge the surface of the detector up to 1 cm{sup 2}. These two types of detector were tested at the VR-1 research reactor at the Czech Technical University in

  10. Diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber for thermal neutron detection at the VR-1 research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pomorski, Michal; Mer-Calfati, Christine; Foulon, Francois; Sklenka, Lubomir; Rataj, Jan; Bily, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Diamond exhibits a combination of properties which makes it attractive for neutron detection in hostile conditions. In the particular case of detection in a nuclear reactor, it is resilient to radiation, exhibits a natural low sensitivity to gamma rays, and its small size (as compared with that of gas ionisation chambers) enables fluency monitoring with a high position resolution. We report here on the use of synthetic CVD diamond as a solid state micro-fission chamber with U-235 converting material for in-core thermal neutron monitoring. Two types of thin diamond detectors were developed for this application. The first type of detector is fabricated using thin diamond membrane obtained by etching low-cost commercially available single crystal CVD intrinsic diamond, so called 'optical grade' material. Starting from a few hundred of micrometre thick samples, the sample is sliced with a laser and then plasma etched down to a few tenths of micrometre. Here we report the result obtained with a 17 μm thick device. The detection surface of this detector is equal to 1 mm 2 . Detectors with surfaces up to 1 cm 2 can be fabricated with this technique. The second type of detector is fabricated by growing successively two thin films of diamond, by the microwave enhanced chemical vapour deposition technique, on HPHT single crystal diamond. A first, a film of boron doped (p+) single crystal diamond, a few microns thick, is deposited. Then a second film of intrinsic diamond with a thickness of a few tens of microns is deposited. This results in a P doped, Intrinsic, Metal structure (PIM) structure in which the intrinsic volume id the active part of the detector. Here we report the results obtained with a 20 μm thick intrinsic whose detection surface is equal to 0.5 mm 2 , with the possibility to enlarge the surface of the detector up to 1 cm 2 . These two types of detector were tested at the VR-1 research reactor at the Czech Technical University in Prague. The

  11. Novel Transparent Phosphor Conversion Matrix with High Thermal Conductivity for Next Generation Phosphor-Converted LED-based Solid State Lighting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bockstaller, Michael [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2017-02-06

    The low thermal conductivity of state-of-the-art polymer encapsulants (k ~ 0.15 Wm-1K-1) limits the efficiency and power density of current phosphor conversion light emitting diodes (pc-LEDs). The technical objective of this project was to demonstrate synthesis and processing schemes for the fabrication of polymer hybrid encapsulants with a thermal conductivity exceeding k = 0.4 Wm-1K-1 for LED applications. The ‘hybrid polymer’ approach encompasses the dispersion of high thermal conductivity particle fillers (zinc oxide, ZnO as well as the alpha-polymorph of alumina, Al2O3) within a polysiloxane matrix (poly(dimethylsiloxane), PDMS as well as poly(phenyl methyl siloxane), PPMS) to increase the thermal conductivity while maintaining optical transparency and photothermal stability at levels consistent with LED applications. To accomplish this goal, a novel synthesis method for the fabrication of nanosized ZnO particles was developed and a novel surface chemistry was established to modify the surface of zinc oxide particle fillers and thus to enable their dispersion in poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) matrix polymers. Molecular dynamics and Mie simulations were used to optimize ligand structure and to enable the concurrent mixing of particles in PDMS/PPMS embedding media while also minimizing the thermal boundary resistance as well as optical scattering of particle fillers. Using this approach the synthesis of PDMS/ZnO hybrid encapsulants exhibiting a thermal conductivity of 0.64 Wm-1K-1 and optical transparency > 0.7 mm-1 was demonstrated. A forming process based on micromolding was developed to demonstrate the forming of particle filled PDMS into film and lens shapes. Photothermal stability testing revealed stability of the materials for approximately 4000 min when exposed to blue light LED (450 nm, 30 W/cm2). One postgraduate and seven graduate students were supported by the project. The research performed within this project led to fifteen publications in peer

  12. SIMPLE-2: a computer code for calculation of steady-state thermal behavior of rod bundles with flow sweeping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, O.C. Jr.; Yao, S.; Henry, R.E.

    1976-01-01

    A computer code has been developed for use in making single-phase thermal hydraulic calculations in rod bundle arrays with flow sweeping due to spiral wraps as the predominant crossflow mixing effect. This code, called SIMPLE-2, makes the assumption that the axial pressure gradient is identical for each subchannel over a given axial increment, and is unique in that no empirical coefficients must be specified for its use. Results from this code have been favorably compared with experimental data for both uniform and highly nonuniform power distributions. Typical calculations for various bundle sizes applicable to the LMBR program are included

  13. Power, Domination and Kafka’s Castle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yücel Karadaş

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The propositions of the Enlightenment philosophy, which valued the individual and his/her freedom, began to lose effect in the middle of the 19th century, with the increasing dominance of the ‘social’ and ‘class’ brought about by the growing industrialization. This dominance, which was the result of the modern capitalist society and the beurocratic state power it gave rise to, drove the intellectuals and thinkers of the time to question the individual freedom ideals of the Enlightenment and the early stages of modernity. In the intellectual sphere this questioning gained speed with Marx but became most apparent in the propositions of the Frankfurt School, which showed a lean on Weber’s idea of beurocratic structures of the modern state. Franz Kafka’s The Castle contributes to this questioning from a literary perspective. The Castle is also important because it was written in Germany where the mechanisms of the beurocratic dominance structures were most overt. The novel strikingly represents how these mechanisms of dominance affect the individuals and the relationships between them. This study handles the individual ideal of the Enlightenment and the criticisms directed to this ideal in the modern times, and it analyzes Kafka’s The Castle in terms of how it takes its place among the criticisms to this ideal with a literary dimension. In his famous work Castle, Kafka, evaluate the modern bureaucracy and its impact on the society in a different perspective from Weber who deal with modern society with the context of rationalization. For a better understanding of the novel, it may be necessary to make a double-layer reading of it. Because, until the last pages of the novel, it is thought that modern bureaucracy as a structure is constructed in the context of “nonsense” not “rationality”. The bureucratic mechanism that woven by hundreds of details in the novel, neither its officality nor its domination built on invididuals, and

  14. Chemical and nanometer-scale structure of kerogen and its change during thermal maturation investigated by advanced solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, J.; Fang, X.; Lan, Y.; Schimmelmann, A.; Mastalerz, Maria; Xu, L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.

    2010-01-01

    We have used advanced and quantitative solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) techniques to investigate structural changes in a series of type II kerogen samples from the New Albany Shale across a range of maturity (vitrinite reflectance R0 from 0.29% to 1.27%). Specific functional groups such as CH3, CH2, alkyl CH, aromatic CH, aromatic C-O, and other nonprotonated aromatics, as well as "oil prone" and "gas prone" carbons, have been quantified by 13C NMR; atomic H/C and O/C ratios calculated from the NMR data agree with elemental analysis. Relationships between NMR structural parameters and vitrinite reflectance, a proxy for thermal maturity, were evaluated. The aromatic cluster size is probed in terms of the fraction of aromatic carbons that are protonated (???30%) and the average distance of aromatic C from the nearest protons in long-range H-C dephasing, both of which do not increase much with maturation, in spite of a great increase in aromaticity. The aromatic clusters in the most mature sample consist of ???30 carbons, and of ???20 carbons in the least mature samples. Proof of many links between alkyl chains and aromatic rings is provided by short-range and long-range 1H-13C correlation NMR. The alkyl segments provide most H in the samples; even at a carbon aromaticity of 83%, the fraction of aromatic H is only 38%. While aromaticity increases with thermal maturity, most other NMR structural parameters, including the aromatic C-O fractions, decrease. Aromaticity is confirmed as an excellent NMR structural parameter for assessing thermal maturity. In this series of samples, thermal maturation mostly increases aromaticity by reducing the length of the alkyl chains attached to the aromatic cores, not by pronounced growth of the size of the fused aromatic ring clusters. ?? 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Josephson Thermal Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guarcello, Claudio; Solinas, Paolo; Braggio, Alessandro; Di Ventra, Massimiliano; Giazotto, Francesco

    2018-01-01

    We propose a superconducting thermal memory device that exploits the thermal hysteresis in a flux-controlled temperature-biased superconducting quantum-interference device (SQUID). This system reveals a flux-controllable temperature bistability, which can be used to define two well-distinguishable thermal logic states. We discuss a suitable writing-reading procedure for these memory states. The time of the memory writing operation is expected to be on the order of approximately 0.2 ns for a Nb-based SQUID in thermal contact with a phonon bath at 4.2 K. We suggest a noninvasive readout scheme for the memory states based on the measurement of the effective resonance frequency of a tank circuit inductively coupled to the SQUID. The proposed device paves the way for a practical implementation of thermal logic and computation. The advantage of this proposal is that it represents also an example of harvesting thermal energy in superconducting circuits.

  16. Hand dominance in orthopaedic surgeons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lui, Darren F

    2012-08-01

    Handedness is perhaps the most studied human asymmetry. Laterality is the preference shown for one side and it has been studied in many aspects of medicine. Studies have shown that some orthopaedic procedures had poorer outcomes and identified laterality as a contributing factor. We developed a questionnaire to assess laterality in orthopaedic surgery and compared this to an established scoring system. Sixty-two orthopaedic surgeons surveyed with the validated Waterloo Handedness Questionnaire (WHQ) were compared with the self developed Orthopaedic Handedness Questionnaire (OHQ). Fifty-eight were found to be right hand dominant (RHD) and 4 left hand dominant (LHD). In RHD surgeons, the average WHQ score was 44.9% and OHQ 15%. For LHD surgeons the WHQ score was 30.2% and OHQ 9.4%. This represents a significant amount of time using the non dominant hand but does not necessarily determine satisfactory or successful dexterity transferable to the operating room. Training may be required for the non dominant side.

  17. Visual dominance in olfactory memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batic, N; Gabassi, P G

    1987-08-01

    The object of the present study was to verify the emergence of a 'visual dominance' effect in memory tests involving different sensory modes (sight and smell), brought about the preattentive mechanisms which select the visual sensory mode regardless of the recall task.

  18. Vector-meson dominance revisited

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terschlüsen Carla

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of mesons with electromagnetism is often well described by the concept of vector-meson dominance (VMD. However, there are also examples where VMD fails. A simple chiral Lagrangian for pions, rho and omega mesons is presented which can account for the respective agreement and disagreement between VMD and phenomenology in the sector of light mesons.

  19. Testing for Stochastic Dominance Efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.T. Post (Thierry); O. Linton; Y-J. Whang

    2005-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a new test of the stochastic dominance efficiency of a given portfolio over a class of portfolios. We establish its null and alternative asymptotic properties, and define a method for consistently estimating critical values. We present some numerical evidence that our

  20. Processes for CO2 capture. Context of thermal waste treatment units. State of the art. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, A.; Roizard, D.; Favre, E.; Dufour, A.

    2013-01-01

    For most of industrial sectors, Greenhouse Gases (GHG) such as carbon dioxide (CO 2 ) are considered as serious pollutants and have to be controlled and treated. The thermal waste treatment units are part of industrial CO 2 emitters, even if they represent a small part of emissions (2,5 % of GHG emissions in France) compared to power plants (13 % of GHG emissions in France, one third of worldwide GHG emissions) or shaper industries (20 % of GHG emissions in France). Carbon Capture and Storage (CCS) can be a solution to reduce CO 2 emissions from industries (power plants, steel and cement industries...). The issues of CCS applied to thermal waste treatment units are quite similar to those related to power plants (CO 2 flow, flue gas temperature and pressure conditions). The problem is to know if the CO 2 produced by waste treatment plants can be captured thanks to the processes already available on the market or that should be available by 2020. It seems technically possible to adapt CCS post-combustion methods to the waste treatment sector. But on the whole, CCS is complex and costly for a waste treatment unit offering small economies of scale. However, regulations concerning impurities for CO 2 transport and storage are not clearly defined at the moment. Consequently, specific studies must be achieved in order to check the technical feasibility of CCS in waste treatment context and clearly define its cost. (authors)

  1. The Thermal State Computational Research of the Low-Thrust Oxygen-Methane Gaseous-Propellant Rocket Engine in the Pulse Mode of Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. A. Vorozheeva

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently promising development direction of space propulsion engineering is to use, as spacecraft controls, low-thrust rocket engines (RDTM on clean fuels, such as oxygen-methane. Modern RDTM are characterized by a lack regenerative cooling and pulse mode of operation, during which there is accumulation of heat energy to lead to the high thermal stress of RDTM structural elements. To get an idea about the thermal state of its elements, which further will reduce the number of fire tests is therefore necessary in the development phase of a new product. Accordingly, the aim of this work is the mathematical modeling and computational study of the thermal state of gaseous oxygen-methane propellant RDMT operating in pulse mode.In this paper we consider a model RDTM working on gaseous propellants oxygen-methane in pulse mode.To calculate the temperature field of the chamber wall of model RDMT under consideration is used the mathematical model of non-stationary heat conduction in a two-dimensional axisymmetric formulation that takes into account both the axial heat leakages and the nonstationary processes occurring inside the chamber during pulse operation of RDMT.As a result of numerical study of the thermal state of model RDMT, are obtained the temperature fields during engine operation based on convective, conductive, and radiative mechanisms of heat transfer from the combustion products to the wall.It is shown that the elements of flanges of combustion chamber of model RDMT act as heat sinks structural elements. Temperatures in the wall of the combustion chamber during the engine mode of operation are considered relatively low.Raised temperatures can also occur in the mixing head in the feeding area of the oxidant into the combustion chamber.During engine operation in the area forming the critical section, there is an intensive heating of a wall, which can result in its melting, which in turn will increase the minimum nozzle throat area and hence

  2. Peukert-Equation-Based State-of-Charge Estimation for LiFePO4 Batteries Considering the Battery Thermal Evolution Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiale Xie

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To achieve accurate state-of-charge (SoC estimation for LiFePO4 (lithium iron phosphate batteries under harsh conditions, this paper resorts to the Peukert’s law to accommodate different temperatures and load excitations. By analyzing battery heat generation and dissipation, a thermal evolution model (TEM is elaborated and exploited for on-line parameter identification of the equivalent circuit model (ECM. Then, a SoC estimation framework is proposed based on the Adaptive Extended Kalman Filter (AEKF algorithm. Experimental results on a LiFePO4 pack subject to the Federal Urban Driving Schedule (FUDS profile under different temperatures and initial states suggest that the proposed SoC estimator provides good robustness and accuracy against changing temperature and highly dynamic loads.

  3. Up-Conversion Intersystem Crossing Rates in Organic Emitters for Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence: Impact of the Nature of Singlet vs Triplet Excited States

    KAUST Repository

    Samanta, Pralok Kumar

    2017-02-28

    The rates for up-conversion intersystem crossing (UISC) from the T1 state to the S1 state are calculated for a series of organic emitters with an emphasis on thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) materials. Both the spin-orbit coupling and the energy difference between the S1 and T1 states (ΔEST) are evaluated, at the density functional theory (DFT) and time-dependent DFT levels. The calculated UISC rates and ΔEST values are found to be in good agreement with available experimental data. Our results underline that small ΔEST values and sizable spin-orbit coupling matrix elements have to be simultaneously realized in order to facilitate UISC and ultimately TADF. Importantly, the spatial separation of the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied molecular orbitals of the emitter, a widely accepted strategy for the design of TADF molecules, does not necessarily lead to a sufficient reduction in ΔEST; in fact, either a significant charge-transfer (CT) contribution to the T1 state or a minimal energy difference between the local-excitation and charge-transfer triplet states is required to achieve a small ΔEST. Also, having S1 and T1 states of a different nature is found to strongly enhance spin-orbit coupling, which is consistent with the El-Sayed rule for ISC rates. Overall, our results indicate that having either similar energies for the local-excitation and charge-transfer triplet states or the right balance between a substantial CT contribution to T1 and somewhat different natures of the S1 and T1 states, paves the way toward UISC enhancement and thus TADF efficiency improvement.

  4. Steady-state thermal-hydraulic analysis of the Moroccan TRIGA MARK II reactor by using PARET/ANL and COOLOD-N2 codes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulaich, Y.; Nacir, B.; El Bardouni, T.; Zoubair, M.; El Bakkari, B.; Merroun, O.; El Younoussi, C.; Htet, A.; Boukhal, H.; Chakir, E.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → The COOLOD/N2 and PARET/ANL codes were used for a steady-state thermal-hydraulic and safety analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II reactor located at the Nuclear Studies Center of Maamora (CENM), Morocco. → The main objective of this study is to ensure the safety margins of different safety related parameters by steady-state calculations at full power level (2 MW). → The most important conclusion is that all obtained values of DNBR, fuel center and surface temperature, cladding surface temperature and coolant temperature across the hottest channel are largely far to compromise safety of the reactor. - Abstract: The COOLOD/N2 and PARET/ANL codes were used for a steady-state thermal-hydraulic and safety analysis of the 2 MW TRIGA MARK II reactor located at the Nuclear Studies Center of Maamora (CENM), Morocco. In order to validate our PARET/ANL and COOLOD-N2 models, the fuel center temperature as function of core power was calculated and compared with the corresponding experimental values. The comparison indicates that the calculated values are in satisfactory agreement with the measurement. The main objective of this study is to ensure the safety margins of different safety related parameters by steady-state calculations at full power level (2 MW). Therefore, we have calculated the departure from nucleate boiling ratio (DNBR), fuel center and surface temperature, cladding surface temperature and coolant temperature profiles across the hottest channel. The most important conclusion is that all obtained values are largely far to compromise safety of the reactor.

  5. Heat Capacity and Thermal Conductance Measurements of a Superconducting-Normal Mixed State by Detection of Single 3 eV Photons in a Magnetic Penetration Thermometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, T. R.; Balvin, M. A.; Bandler, S. R.; Denis, K. L.; Lee, S.-J.; Nagler, P. C.; Smith, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    We report on measurements of the detected signal pulses in a molybdenum-gold Magnetic Penetration Thermometer (MPT) in response to absorption of one or more 3 eV photons. We designed and used this MPT sensor for x-ray microcalorimetry. In this device, the diamagnetic response of a superconducting MoAu bilayer is used to sense temperature changes in response to absorbed photons, and responsivity is enhanced by a Meissner transition in which the magnetic flux penetrating the sensor changes rapidly to minimize free energy in a mixed superconducting normal state. We have previously reported on use of our MPT to study a thermal phonon energy loss to the substrate when absorbing x-rays. We now describe results of extracting heat capacity C and thermal conductance G values from pulse height and decay time of MPT pulses generated by 3 eV photons. The variation in C and G at temperatures near the Meissner transition temperature (set by an internal magnetic bias field) allow us to probe the behavior in superconducting normal mixed state of the condensation energy and the electron cooling power resulting from quasi-particle recombination and phonon emission. The information gained on electron cooling power is also relevant to the operation of other superconducting detectors, such as Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors.

  6. Power and Thermal Technologies for Air and Space. Delivery Order 0001: Single Ionic Conducting Solid-State Electrolyte

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Turner, Allen

    2005-01-01

    This report focuses on the development of a lithium-ion conducting channel as a solid-state electrolyte for rechargeable lithium batteries through the use of thin films of dilithium phthalocyanine (Li2Pc...

  7. LMFBR in-core thermal-hydraulics: the state of the art and US research and development needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, E.U.

    1980-04-01

    A detailed critical review is presented of the literature relevant to predicting coolant flow and temperature fields in LMFBR core assemblies for nominal and non-nominal rod bundle geometries and reactor operating conditions. The review covers existing thermal-hydraulic models, computational methods, and experimental data useful for the design of an LMFBR core. The literature search made for this review included publications listed by Nuclear Science Abstracts and Energy Data Base as well as papers presented at key nuclear conferences. Based on this extensive review, the report discusses the accuracy with which the models predict flow and temperature fields in rod assemblies, identifying areas where analytical, experimental, and model development needs exist

  8. Correlation of the oxidation state of cerium in sol-gel glasses as a function of thermal treatment via optical spectroscopy and XANES studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assefa, Zerihun; Haire, R G; Caulder, D L; Shuh, D K

    2004-07-01

    Sol-gel glass matrices containing lanthanides have numerous technological applications and their formation involves several chemical facets. In the case of cerium, its ability to exist in two different oxidation states or in mixed valence state provides additional complexities for the sol-gel process. The oxidation state of cerium present during different facets of preparation of sol-gel glasses, and also as a function of the starting oxidation state of cerium added, were studied both by optical spectroscopy and X-ray absorption near-edge structures (XANES). The findings acquired by each approach were compared. The primary focus was on the redox chemistries associated with sample preparation, gelation, and thermal treatment. When Ce3+ is introduced into the starting sols, the trivalent state normally prevails in the wet and room temperature-dried gels. Heating in air at >100 degrees C can generate a light yellow coloration with partial oxidation to the tetravalent state. Above 200 degrees C and up to approximately 1000 degrees C, cerium is oxidized to its tetravalent state. In contrast, when tetravalent cerium is introduced into the sol, both the wet and room temperature-dried gels lose the yellow-brown color of the initial ceric ammonium nitrate solution. When the sol-gel is heated to 110 degrees C it turns yellowish as the cerium tends to be re-oxidized. The yellow color is believed to represent the effect of oxidation and oligomerization of the cerium-silanol units in the matrix. The luminescence properties are also affected by these changes, the details of which are reported herein.

  9. Untangling Partnership and Domination Morality

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Loye

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Riane Eisler’s (1987 cultural transformation theory is an effective framework for understanding many of the constructs that shape society. This article uses Eisler’s theory to explain the formation of morality and the construction of conscience. It contrasts partnership morality and domination morality, and describes the factors that shape our tendency to embrace one or the other. The article helps us understand that we have a choice, and invites us to choose partnership morality.

  10. Studies of transitions between Zeeman sublevels of the potassium 4P states induced by nonresonant thermal collisions at high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boggy, R.D.

    1978-01-01

    Experiments have been performed which examine the response of selectively excited potassium atoms to thermal collisions with inert gas atoms at magnetic fields between 9 and 31 kOe. Using laser excitation of individual Zeeman sublevels of the potassium 4P states and interferometric analysis of fluorescent light, cross sections have been determined for excitation transfer between the potassium 4 2 P/sub 1/2/ and 4 2 P/sub 3/2/ fine-structure states and for depolarization of each of the fine-structure states. The experimental results for helium and neon collision partners are presented both as cross sections for transitions between individual magnetic sublevels and as irreducible cross sections for multipole depolarization, excitation transfer, and coherence transfer. Although cross sections obtained here for depolarization of 2 P/sub 1/2/ state are smaller than the high-field results of Berdowski and Krause, they agree more closely with nuclear-spin corrected low-field results and with theory. However, cross sections were found for 2 P/sub 3/2/ depolarization which are significantly larger than the theoretical predictions and the previously obtained high-field cross sections of Berdowski, Shiner, and Krause

  11. Thermal solid-state Z/E isomerization of 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines: effects of non-covalent interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZDRAVKO DŽAMBASKI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Configurational isomerization of stereo-defined 5-substituted and unsubstituted 2-alkylidene-4-oxothiazolidines (1 in the solid state, giving the Z/E mixtures in various ratios, was investigated by 1H-NMR spectroscopy, X-ray powder crystallography and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC. The Z/E composition can be rationalized in terms of non-covalent interactions, involving intermolecular and intramolecular hydrogen bonding and directional non-bonded 1,5-type S×××O interactions. X-Ray powder crystallography, using selected crystalline (Z-4-oxothiazolidine substrates, revealed transformation to the amorphous state during the irreversible Z®E process. A correlation between previous results on the Z/E isomerization in solution and now in the solid state was established.

  12. Thermal solar systems in domestic buildings. Evaluation of the Hessen state funding programme for thermal solar systems; Thermische Solaranlagen in Wohngebaeuden. Auswertung des Solarthermischen Foerderprogrammes des Landes Hessen fuer die Jahre 1992 - 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackschewitz, U.

    1998-11-01

    The report presents statistical information on all solar systems that received state funds. Problems concerning the installation of solar systems are gone into. The report focuses on service water heating systems both for single-family buildings and multiple dwellings. Further, four enquiries were carried out among operators and producers of thermal solar systems, and 29 state-funded solar systems were visited and investigated in situ. Based on the analysis of the funding programme so far, further measures are suggested. [German] Nach einer fuenfjaehrigen Laufzeit des Solarthermischen Foerderprogramms fuer Wohngebaeude beauftragte das Hessische Ministerium fuer Umwelt, Energie, Jugend, Familie und Gesundheit die Gesellschaft fuer umweltfreundliche Technologie e.V. in Kassel mit einer Auswertung des Foerderprogrammes fuer die Jahre 1992 bis 1996. Die Auswertung gibtzunaechst einen Ueberblick ueber alle gefoerderten Solaranlagen. Darueber hinaus wurden wichtige Fragestellungen, die bei der Installation thermischer Solaranlagen in Wohngebaeuden auftreten, anhand einer groesseren Zahl gefoerderter Solaranlagen untersucht. Schwerpunkte dieser Untersuchung bilden Solaranlagen zur Brauchwassererwaermung zum einen in Einfamilienhaeusern und zum anderen in groesseren Mehrfamilienhaeusern. Neben der Auswertung der Foerderantraege wurden dazu vier Umfragen bei Betreibern und Anbietern thermischer Solaranlagen durchgefuehrt und 29 gefoerderte Solaranlagen besichtigt. Aufbauend auf der Analyse des bisherigen Foerderprogrammes werden Vorschlaege fuer weitere Massnahmen des Landes zur Foerderung thermischer Solaranlagen unterbreitet. (orig.)

  13. Competition policy and regulation in hydro-dominated electricity markets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rangel, Luiz Fernando

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses the main competition issues that arise in electricity systems dominated by hydro generation, arguing that technological differences between hydro and thermal plants may allow hydropower producers to exert market power in different and subtler ways compared to thermal generators. The key for market power in hydro-based systems is the strategic allocation of a given amount of output across periods, rather than a straightforward reduction of total output. The paper examines the interaction between strategic hydro reservoir operation and transmission capacity constraints, and summarizes the implications of market power for system reliability. A review of recent relevant literature is included. Finally, possible interventions to mitigate market power are analysed

  14. Reversible bulk-phase change of anthroyl compounds for photopatterning based on photodimerization in the molten state and thermal back reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihara, Hideyuki; Yoshida, Masaru

    2013-04-10

    As new organic materials for rewritable photopatterning, 2-anthroyl and 9-anthroyl ester compounds were synthesized. Their bulk-phase changes (we use "bulk-phase change" as complete phase change in a mass of a material neither in a surface nor in a small quantity in this study) triggered by photodimerization under melting conditions (melt-photodimerization) and subsequent thermal back reactions were investigated. All the anthroyl compounds exhibited melting points lower than ca. 160 °C, and they were nearly quantitatively converted to the corresponding photodimers by UV irradiation at temperatures of ∼5 °C higher than their respective melting points. We found that there were two kinds of bulk-phase change behaviors through the photoreaction. Two of the anthroyl compounds remained isotropic and lost fluidity during the melt-photodimerization. The obtained photodimers exhibited robust solid-state amorphous phases at room temperature. In contrast, the other three anthroyl compounds showed crystallization during the melt-photodimerization. The resulting photodimers changed from isotropic to crystalline phases, even at high temperature. Various experiments revealed that the bulk phase of the photodimers was affected not by the existence of regioisomers but by their fluidity at the photoirradiation temperature. The latter three photodimers retained enough fluidity, reflecting their high molecular mobilities at the photoirradiation temperature at which the isothermal crystallization occurred. The other two products were not able to crystallize due to low fluidity, resulting in amorphous phases. We also found that all the photodimers reverted to the corresponding monomers by thermal back reaction and recovered their initial photochemical and thermal properties. Using these reversible bulk-phase changes of the anthroyl compounds, we successfully demonstrated rewritable photopatterning in not only negative images but also positive ones, based on the optical contrast

  15. Frontal brain activity and behavioral indicators of affective states are weakly affected by thermal stimuli in sheep living in different housing conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabine eVögeli

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Many stimuli evoke short-term emotional reactions. These reactions may play an important role in assessing how a subject perceives a stimulus. Additionally, long-term mood may modulate the emotional reactions but it is still unclear in what way. The question seems to be important in terms of animal welfare, as a negative mood may taint emotional reactions. In the present study with sheep, we investigated the effects of thermal stimuli on emotional reactions and the potential modulating effect of mood induced by manipulations of the housing conditions. We assume that unpredictable, stimulus-poor conditions lead to a negative and predictable, stimulus-rich conditions to a positive mood state. The thermal stimuli were applied to the upper breast during warm ambient temperatures: hot (as presumably negative, intermediate, and cold (as presumably positive. We recorded cortical activity by functional near-infrared spectroscopy, restlessness behavior (e.g. locomotor activity, aversive behaviors and ear postures as indicators of emotional reactions. The strongest hemodynamic reaction was found during a stimulus of intermediate valence independent of the animal’s housing conditions, whereas locomotor activity, ear movements and aversive behaviors were seen most in sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing conditions, independent of stimulus valence. We conclude that, sheep perceived the thermal stimuli and differentiated between some of them. An adequate interpretation of the neuronal activity pattern remains difficult, though. The effects of housing conditions were small indicating that the induction of mood was only modestly efficacious. Therefore, a modulating effect of mood on the emotional reaction was not found.

  16. The cobalt magnetic state in RCo{sub 3} intermetallics with light rare earth studied by thermal expansion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaidukova, I.Yu. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Granovsky, S.A. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Markosyan, A.S. [State Center for Condensed Matter Physics, M. Zakharova Street, 6/3, 155569 Moscow (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: marko@plms.phys.msu.ru; Petropavlovsky, A.B. [Voronezh Military Institute of Aircraft Engineering, 394064 Voronezh (Russian Federation); Rodimin, V.E. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation); Uryvaev, V.V. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University, 119992 Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-05-15

    The temperature variation of the lattice parameters of RCo{sub 3} intermetallics with light R=Pr, Nd and Sm was studied by X-ray diffraction in the temperature range 10-550 K. From the magnitude of the magnetovolume effect arising below T {sub C} it has been concluded that in NdCo{sub 3} a temperature-induced change of the Co magnetic state from a weak to a strong ferromagnetic one occurs, whereas in PrCo{sub 3} and SmCo{sub 3} the Co sublattice remains in a weak magnetic state down to at least 10 K. In SmCo{sub 3} an orthorhombic distortion of the rhombohedral crystal lattice was observed below 125 K. This is accounted for a spin reorientation of the spontaneous magnetization vector from the c-axis (high temperatures) toward the basal plane (low temperatures)

  17. Excited-state quantum phase transitions in systems with two degrees of freedom: Level density, level dynamics, thermal properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stránský, Pavel; Macek, Michal; Cejnar, Pavel

    2014-01-01

    Quantum systems with a finite number of freedom degrees f develop robust singularities in the energy spectrum of excited states as the system’s size increases to infinity. We analyze the general form of these singularities for low f, particularly f=2, clarifying the relation to classical stationary points of the corresponding potential. Signatures in the smoothed energy dependence of the quantum state density and in the flow of energy levels with an arbitrary control parameter are described along with the relevant thermodynamical consequences. The general analysis is illustrated with specific examples of excited-state singularities accompanying the first-order quantum phase transition. -- Highlights: •ESQPTs found in infinite-size limit of systems with low numbers of freedom degrees f. •ESQPTs related to non-analytical evolutions of classical phase–space properties. •ESQPT signatures analyzed for general f, particularly f=2, extending known case f=1. •ESQPT signatures identified in smoothened density and flow of energy spectrum. •ESQPTs shown to induce a new type of thermodynamic anomalies

  18. A chemically modified [alpha]-amylase with a molten-globule state has entropically driven enhanced thermal stability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siddiqui, Khawar Sohail; Poljak, Anne; De Francisci, Davide; Guerriero, Gea; Pilak, Oliver; Burg, Dominic; Raftery, Mark J.; Parkin, Don M.; Trewhella, Jill; Cavicchioli, Ricardo (Sydney); (New South)

    2010-11-15

    The thermostability properties of TAA were investigated by chemically modifying carboxyl groups on the surface of the enzyme with AMEs. The TAA{sub MOD} exhibited a 200% improvement in starch-hydrolyzing productivity at 60 C. By studying the kinetic, thermodynamic and biophysical properties, we found that TAA{sub MOD} had formed a thermostable, MG state, in which the unfolding of the tertiary structure preceded that of the secondary structure by at least 20 C. The X-ray crystal structure of TAA{sub MOD} revealed no new permanent interactions (electrostatic or other) resulting from the modification. By deriving thermodynamic activation parameters of TAA{sub MOD}, we rationalised that thermostabilisation have been caused by a decrease in the entropy of the transition state, rather than being enthalpically driven. Far-UV CD shows that the origin of decreased entropy may have arisen from a higher helical content of TAA{sub MOD}. This study provides new insight into the intriguing properties of an MG state resulting from the chemical modification of TAA.

  19. Dominant inheritance of cerebral gigantism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zonana, J; Sotos, J F; Romshe, C A; Fisher, D A; Elders, M J; Rimoin, D L

    1977-08-01

    Cerebral gigantism is a syndrome consisting of characteristic dysmorphic features, accelerated growth in early childhood, and variable degrees of mental retardation. Its etiology and pathogenesis have not been defined. Three families are presented with multiple affected members. The vertical transmission of the trait and equal expression in both sexes in these families indicates a genetic etiology with a dominant pattern of inheritance, probably autosomal. As in previously reported cases, extensive endocrine evaluation failed to define the pathogenesis of the accelerated growth present in this disorder.

  20. Hydrothermal alteration maps of the central and southern Basin and Range province of the United States compiled from Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mars, John L.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) data and Interactive Data Language (IDL) logical operator algorithms were used to map hydrothermally altered rocks in the central and southern parts of the Basin and Range province of the United States. The hydrothermally altered rocks mapped in this study include (1) hydrothermal silica-rich rocks (hydrous quartz, chalcedony, opal, and amorphous silica), (2) propylitic rocks (calcite-dolomite and epidote-chlorite mapped as separate mineral groups), (3) argillic rocks (alunite-pyrophyllite-kaolinite), and (4) phyllic rocks (sericite-muscovite). A series of hydrothermal alteration maps, which identify the potential locations of hydrothermal silica-rich, propylitic, argillic, and phyllic rocks on Landsat Thematic Mapper (TM) band 7 orthorectified images, and geographic information systems shape files of hydrothermal alteration units are provided in this study.

  1. Comparison between photon annihilation-then-creation and photon creation-then-annihilation thermal states: Non-classical and non-Gaussian properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xue-Xiang; Yuan, Hong-Chun; Wang, Yan

    2014-07-01

    We investigate the nonclassical properties of arbitrary number photon annihilation-then-creation operation (AC) and creation-then-annihilation operation (CA) to the thermal state (TS), whose normalization factors are related to the polylogarithm function. Then we compare their quantum characters, such as photon number distribution, average photon number, Mandel Q-parameter, purity and the Wigner function. Because of the noncommutativity between the annihilation operator and the creation operator, the ACTS and the CATS have different nonclassical properties. It is found that nonclassical properties are exhibited more strongly after AC than after CA. In addition we also examine their non-Gaussianity. The result shows that the ACTS can present a slightly bigger non-Gaussianity than the CATS.

  2. Comparison between photon annihilation-then-creation and photon creation-then-annihilation thermal states: Non-classical and non-Gaussian properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xue-Xiang; Wang Yan; Yuan Hong-Chun

    2014-01-01

    We investigate the nonclassical properties of arbitrary number photon annihilation-then-creation operation (AC) and creation-then-annihilation operation (CA) to the thermal state (TS), whose normalization factors are related to the polylogarithm function. Then we compare their quantum characters, such as photon number distribution, average photon number, Mandel Q-parameter, purity and the Wigner function. Because of the noncommutativity between the annihilation operator and the creation operator, the ACTS and the CATS have different nonclassical properties. It is found that nonclassical properties are exhibited more strongly after AC than after CA. In addition we also examine their non-Gaussianity. The result shows that the ACTS can present a slightly bigger non-Gaussianity than the CATS. (general)

  3. Thermal expansion, modulus of elasticity, shrinkage, creep and residual strength of concrete for PCRVs at uniaxial stress state and elevated temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aschl, H.; Stoeckl, S.

    1981-01-01

    At the Institut fuer Massivbau of the Technical University of Munich testing machines were built, which allow to test sealed and unsealed cylinders with uniaxial stress state at elevated temperatures till 523 K (250 0 C). With this equipment tests were carried out at predried, unsealed and sealed specimens to study - thermal expansion coefficient - modulus of elasticity - shrinkage and - creep of concrete at elevated temperatures of 353 K (80 0 C) and 393 K (120 0 C) and at a normal temperature of 293 K (20 0 C). In addition the residual strength of all specimens was measured. In the worst case (unsealed, i.e. drying specimens) some showed a maximum decrease in strength up to 60%. (orig.) [de

  4. COOLOD-N: a computer code, for the analyses of steady-state thermal-hydraulics in plate-type research reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaminaga, Masanori

    1990-02-01

    The COOLOD-N code provides a capability for the analysis of the steady-state thermal-hydraulics of research reactors in which plate-type fuel is employed. This code is revised version of the COOLOD code, and is applicable not only to a forced convection cooling mode, but also to a natural convection cooling mode. In the code, a function to calculate flow rate under a natural convection, and a heat transfer package which was a subroutine program to calculate heat transfer coefficient, ONB temperature and DNB heat flux, and was especially developed for the upgraded JRR-3, have been newly added to the COOLOD code. The COOLOD-N code also has a capability of calculating the heat flux at onset of flow instability as well as DNB heat flux. (author)

  5. Structural relaxation and thermal conductivity of high-pressure formed, high-density di-n-butyl phthalate glass and pressure induced departures from equilibrium state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, G P; Andersson, Ove

    2017-06-21

    We report a study of structural relaxation of high-density glasses of di-n-butyl phthalate (DBP) by measuring thermal conductivity, κ, under conditions of pressure and temperature (p,T) designed to modify both the vibrational and configurational states of a glass. Various high-density glassy states of DBP were formed by (i) cooling the liquid under a fixed high p and partially depressurizing the glass, (ii) isothermal annealing of the depressurized glass, and (iii) pressurizing the glass formed by cooling the liquid under low p. At a given low p, κ of the glass formed by cooling under high p is higher than that of the glass formed by cooling under low p, and the difference increases as glass formation p is increased. κ of the glass formed under 1 GPa is ∼20% higher at ambient p than κ of the glass formed at ambient p. On heating at low p, κ decreases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. This is the opposite of the increase in κ observed when a glass formed under a certain p is heated under the same p. At a given high p, κ of the low-density glass formed by cooling at low p is lower than that of the high-density glass formed by cooling at that high p. On heating at high p, κ increases until the glass to liquid transition range is reached. The effects observed are due to a thermally assisted approach toward equilibrium at p different from the glass formation p. In all cases, the density, enthalpy, and entropy would change until the glasses become metastable liquids at a fixed p, thus qualitatively relating κ to variation in these properties.

  6. Study of the optical properties and the carbonaceous clusters in thermally-annealed CR-39 and Makrofol-E polymer-based solid-state nuclear track detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Ghazaly, M.

    2012-01-01

    The induced modifications in the optical properties of CR-39 and Makrofol-E polymer-based solid state nuclear track detectors were investigated after thermal annealing at a temperature of 200 .deg. C for different durations. The optical properties were studied using an UV-visible spectrophotometer. From the UV-visible spectra, the direct and the indirect optical band gaps, Urbach's energies, and the number of carbon atoms in a cluster were determined. The absorbance of CR-39 plastic detector was found to decrease with increasing annealing time while the absorbance of Makrofol-E decreased with increasing annealing time. The width of the tail of localized states in the band gap ΔE was evaluated with the Urbach method. The optical energy band gaps were obtained from the direct and the indirect allowed transitions in K-space. Both of the direct and the indirect band gaps of the annealed CR-39 detector decrease with increasing annealing time while in Makrofol-E, they decreased after an annealing time of 15 minute and then showed no remarkable changes for a prolonged annealing times. Urbach's energy decreased significantly for both CR-39 and Makrofol-E with increasing annealing time. The number of carbon atoms in a cluster increased in the CR-39 detector with increasing annealing time while it decreased with increasing annealing time for Makrofol-E. We may conclude that the CR-39 detector undergoes greater modifications than the Makrofol-E detector upon thermal annealing at 200 .deg. C. In conclusion, the induced modifications in the optical properties of CR-39 and Makrofol-E are correlated with the temperature and the duration of annealing.

  7. A new phosphine oxide host based on ortho-disubstituted dibenzofuran for efficient electrophosphorescence: towards high triplet state excited levels and excellent thermal, morphological and efficiency stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Chunmiao; Xie, Guohua; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhensong; Xu, Hui; Deng, Zhaopeng; Zhao, Yi; Yan, Pengfei; Liu, Shiyong

    2011-08-01

    An efficient host for blue and green electrophosphorescence, 4,6-bis(diphenylphosphoryl)dibenzofuran (o-DBFDPO), with the structure of a short-axis-substituted dibenzofuran was designed and synthesised. It appears that the greater density of the diphenylphosphine oxide (DPPO) moieties in the short-axis substitution configuration effectively restrains the intermolecular interactions, because only very weak π-π stacking interactions could be observed, with a centroid-to-centroid distance of 3.960 Å. The improved thermal stability of o-DBFDPO was corroborated by its very high glass transition temperature (T(g)) of 191 °C, which is the result of the symmetric disubstitution structure. Photophysical investigation showed o-DBFDPO to be superior to the monosubstituted derivative, with a longer lifetime (1.95 ns) and a higher photoluminescent quantum efficiency (61 %). The lower first singlet state excited level (3.63 eV) of o-DBFDPO demonstrates the stronger polarisation effect attributable to the greater number of DPPO moieties. Simultaneously, an extremely high first triplet state excited level (T(1)) of 3.16 eV is observed, demonstrating the tiny influence of short-axis substitution on T(1). The improved carrier injection ability, which contributed to low driving voltages of blue- and green-emitting phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (PHOLEDs), was further confirmed by Gaussian calculation. Furthermore, the better thermal and morphological properties of o-DBFDPO and the matched frontier molecular orbital (FMO) levels in the devices significantly reduced efficiency roll-offs. Efficient blue and green electrophosphorescence based on the o-DBFDPO host was demonstrated. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Thermal solar energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, J.C.; Leal C, H.

    1998-01-01

    Some relative aspects to the development and current state of thermal solar energy are summarized, so much at domestic level as international. To facilitate the criteria understanding as the size of the facilities in thermal solar systems, topics as availability of the solar resource and its interactions with the matter are included. Finally, some perspectives for the development of this energetic alternative are presented

  9. Post-transition state dynamics and product energy partitioning following thermal excitation of the F⋯HCH2CN transition state: Disagreement with experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratihar, Subha; Ma, Xinyou; Xie, Jing; Scott, Rebecca; Gao, Eric; Ruscic, Branko; Aquino, Adelia J. A.; Setser, Donald W.; Hase, William L.

    2017-10-01

    Born-Oppenheimer direct dynamics simulations were performed to study atomistic details of the F + CH3CN → HF + CH2CN H-atom abstraction reaction. The simulation trajectories were calculated with a combined M06-2X/MP2 algorithm utilizing the 6-311++G** basis set. The experiments were performed at 300 K, and assuming the accuracy of transition state theory (TST), the trajectories were initiated at the F⋯HCH2CN abstraction TS with a 300 K Boltzmann distribution of energy and directed towards products. Recrossing of the TS was negligible, confirming the accuracy of TST. HF formation was rapid, occurring within 0.014 ps of the trajectory initiation. The intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) for reaction involves rotation of HF about CH2CN and then trapping in the CH2CN⋯HF post-reaction potential energy well of ˜10 kcal/mol with respect to the HF + CH2CN products. In contrast to this IRC, five different trajectory types were observed: the majority proceeded by direct H-atom transfer and only 11% approximately following the IRC. The HF vibrational and rotational quantum numbers, n and J, were calculated when HF was initially formed and they increase as potential energy is released in forming the HF + CH2CN products. The population of the HF product vibrational states is only in qualitative agreement with experiment, with the simulations showing depressed and enhanced populations of the n = 1 and 2 states as compared to experiment. Simulations with an anharmonic zero-point energy constraint gave product distributions for relative translation, HF rotation, HF vibration, CH2CN rotation, and CH2CN vibration as 5%, 11%, 60%, 7%, and 16%, respectively. In contrast, the experimental energy partitioning percentages to HF rotation and vibration are 6% and 41%. Comparisons are made between the current simulation and those for other F + H-atom abstraction reactions. The simulation product energy partitioning and HF vibrational population for F + CH3CN → HF + CH2CN

  10. Post-transition state dynamics and product energy partitioning following thermal excitation of the F⋯HCH2CN transition state: Disagreement with experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratihar, Subha; Ma, Xinyou; Xie, Jing; Scott, Rebecca; Gao, Eric; Ruscic, Branko; Aquino, Adelia J A; Setser, Donald W; Hase, William L

    2017-10-14

    Born-Oppenheimer direct dynamics simulations were performed to study atomistic details of the F + CH 3 CN → HF + CH 2 CN H-atom abstraction reaction. The simulation trajectories were calculated with a combined M06-2X/MP2 algorithm utilizing the 6-311++G** basis set. The experiments were performed at 300 K, and assuming the accuracy of transition state theory (TST), the trajectories were initiated at the F⋯HCH 2 CN abstraction TS with a 300 K Boltzmann distribution of energy and directed towards products. Recrossing of the TS was negligible, confirming the accuracy of TST. HF formation was rapid, occurring within 0.014 ps of the trajectory initiation. The intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) for reaction involves rotation of HF about CH 2 CN and then trapping in the CH 2 CN⋯HF post-reaction potential energy well of ∼10 kcal/mol with respect to the HF + CH 2 CN products. In contrast to this IRC, five different trajectory types were observed: the majority proceeded by direct H-atom transfer and only 11% approximately following the IRC. The HF vibrational and rotational quantum numbers, n and J, were calculated when HF was initially formed and they increase as potential energy is released in forming the HF + CH 2 CN products. The population of the HF product vibrational states is only in qualitative agreement with experiment, with the simulations showing depressed and enhanced populations of the n = 1 and 2 states as compared to experiment. Simulations with an anharmonic zero-point energy constraint gave product distributions for relative translation, HF rotation, HF vibration, CH 2 CN rotation, and CH 2 CN vibration as 5%, 11%, 60%, 7%, and 16%, respectively. In contrast, the experimental energy partitioning percentages to HF rotation and vibration are 6% and 41%. Comparisons are made between the current simulation and those for other F + H-atom abstraction reactions. The simulation product energy partitioning and HF vibrational population for F + CH 3 CN

  11. RELAP5 capabilities in thermal-hydraulic prediction of SBWR containment behaviour: PANDA steady state and transient tests evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faluomi, V.; Aksan, S.N.

    2000-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of the qualification activity of RELAP5/Mod3.2 code performed using PANDA steady state and integral test experimental data. The steady state tests evaluate the PCC performances in removing decay heat power in presence and in absence of non-condensable gases, while the considered integral test (M3) simulates the transient following a break in the main steam line of the SBWR, using, as nominal initial conditions, those calculated for the SBWR under SSAR assumptions at one hour into the LOCA. The results obtained simulating both types of tests show a rather good and robust overall code behavior both in the simulation of steady state test and in the representation of the integral test considered: most of the main experimental results (WW/DW pressures, PCC heat exchange) were well represented by the code. The different studies performed indicated that: Different models of PCC pool lead a different trend of system pressure, and sometimes to an opening of vacuum breaker valves, that does not occur in the transient; The code underestimate the heat exchanged between PCC pool and tubes: n the considered test the system pressure is slightly overestimated (maximum 2% more than the experimental value). This fact is also proved by the differences in the temperature of the condensing mixture in the PCC, quite large in all the performed studies; The treatment of the non condensable gases, as implemented in the code, lead some errors in the calculation of the heat transfer coefficient in the PCC components and generally slow down the overall calculation. In general terms, the RELAP5/Mod3.2 was found to be suitable to represent the SBWR containment behavior under the conditions specified in the experimental side. (author)

  12. INVESTIGATION OF NONAXISYMMETRIC STRESS STATE FOR QUASI-STATIC THERMAL POWER LOADING UNDER CONDITIONS OF HIGHEST-ENERGY PARTICLE IRRADIATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Chigarev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper contains a virtual modeling 2D(r, θ for deformation of singly-connected cylindrical solid under conditions of thermo-irradiation impact. Influence of a circumferential distortion on nonaxisymmetric strain-stress state for various values of temperature amplitudes has been investigated in the paper. A solid cylinder  with internal heat sources has been considered as a model body. Properties of the model body correspond to cermet fuel (40 % UO2 + 60 % Cr. 

  13. RAP-3A Computer code for thermal and hydraulic calculations in steady state conditions for fuel element clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popescu, C.; Biro, L.; Iftode, I.; Turcu, I.

    1975-10-01

    The RAP-3A computer code is designed for calculating the main steady state thermo-hydraulic parameters of multirod fuel clusters with liquid metal cooling. The programme provides a double accuracy computation of temperatures and axial enthalpy distributions of pressure losses and axial heat flux distributions in fuel clusters before boiling conditions occur. Physical and mathematical models as well as a sample problem are presented. The code is written in FORTRAN-4 language and is running on a IBM-370/135 computer

  14. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Dental Composites Cured with CAD/CAM Assisted Solid-State Laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto De Santis

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Over the last three decades, it has been frequently reported that the properties of dental restorative composites cured with argon laser are similar or superior to those achieved with conventional halogen and light emitting diode (LED curing units. Whereas laser curing is not dependent on the distance between the curing unit and the material, such distance represents a drawback for conventional curing units. However, a widespread clinical application of this kind of laser remains difficult due to cost, heavy weight, and bulky size. Recently, with regard to the radiation in the blue region of the spectrum, powerful solid-state lasers have been commercialized. In the current research, CAD (computer-aided design/CAM (computer-aided manufacturing assisted solid-state lasers were employed for curing of different dental restorative composites consisting of micro- and nanoparticle-reinforced materials based on acrylic resins. Commercial LED curing units were used as a control. Temperature rise during the photopolymerisation process and bending properties were measured. By providing similar light energy dose, no significant difference in temperature rise was observed when the two light sources provided similar intensity. In addition, after 7 days since curing, bending properties of composites cured with laser and LED were similar. The results suggested that this kind of laser would be suitable for curing dental composites, and the curing process does not suffer from the tip-to-tooth distance.

  15. The thermal expansion and Co magnetic state in light RCo3 intermetallics (R=Pr, Nd, Sm)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaidukova, I.Yu.; Granovsky, S.A.; Markosyan, A.S.; Rodimin, V.E.

    2006-01-01

    The temperature variation of the lattice parameters of three light RCo 3 intermetallic compounds with R=Pr, Nd, Sm and the Nd 1- x Y x Co 3 system was studied by X-ray diffraction in a wide temperature range 10-550 K. From the magnetovolume effect arising considerably below the Curie temperature it has been concluded that in the Nd 1- x Y x Co 3 system a temperature-induced change of the Co magnetic state from a low to a high magnetic moment one occurs, whereas in the case of R=Pr and Sm the internal magnetic field acting on the Co sublattice is not high enough and the Co sublattice remains in the low magnetic moment state down to at least 10 K. The results are compared with those of heavy RCo 3 compounds. In SmCo 3 an orthorhombic distortion of the rhombohedral crystal lattice was observed below 125 K. This is accounted for a spin reorientation of the magnetization vector from the c-axis (high temperatures) to the basal plane (low temperatures)

  16. The thermal expansion and Co magnetic state in light RCo{sub 3} intermetallics (R=Pr, Nd, Sm)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaidukova, I.Yu. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University 119992 Moscow, GSP-2 (Russian Federation); Granovsky, S.A. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University 119992 Moscow, GSP-2 (Russian Federation); Markosyan, A.S. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University 119992 Moscow, GSP-2 (Russian Federation)]. E-mail: ashot_markosyan@yahoo.com; Rodimin, V.E. [Faculty of Physics, M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State University 119992 Moscow, GSP-2 (Russian Federation)

    2006-06-15

    The temperature variation of the lattice parameters of three light RCo{sub 3} intermetallic compounds with R=Pr, Nd, Sm and the Nd{sub 1-} {sub x} Y {sub x} Co{sub 3} system was studied by X-ray diffraction in a wide temperature range 10-550 K. From the magnetovolume effect arising considerably below the Curie temperature it has been concluded that in the Nd{sub 1-} {sub x} Y {sub x} Co{sub 3} system a temperature-induced change of the Co magnetic state from a low to a high magnetic moment one occurs, whereas in the case of R=Pr and Sm the internal magnetic field acting on the Co sublattice is not high enough and the Co sublattice remains in the low magnetic moment state down to at least 10 K. The results are compared with those of heavy RCo{sub 3} compounds. In SmCo{sub 3} an orthorhombic distortion of the rhombohedral crystal lattice was observed below 125 K. This is accounted for a spin reorientation of the magnetization vector from the c-axis (high temperatures) to the basal plane (low temperatures)

  17. Mechanical and Thermal Properties of Dental Composites Cured with CAD/CAM Assisted Solid-State Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Santis, Roberto; Gloria, Antonio; Maietta, Saverio; Martorelli, Massimo; De Luca, Alessandro; Spagnuolo, Gianrico; Riccitiello, Francesco; Rengo, Sandro

    2018-01-01

    Over the last three decades, it has been frequently reported that the properties of dental restorative composites cured with argon laser are similar or superior to those achieved with conventional halogen and light emitting diode (LED) curing units. Whereas laser curing is not dependent on the distance between the curing unit and the material, such distance represents a drawback for conventional curing units. However, a widespread clinical application of this kind of laser remains difficult due to cost, heavy weight, and bulky size. Recently, with regard to the radiation in the blue region of the spectrum, powerful solid-state lasers have been commercialized. In the current research, CAD (computer-aided design)/CAM (computer-aided manufacturing) assisted solid-state lasers were employed for curing of different dental restorative composites consisting of micro- and nanoparticle-reinforced materials based on acrylic resins. Commercial LED curing units were used as a control. Temperature rise during the photopolymerisation process and bending properties were measured. By providing similar light energy dose, no significant difference in temperature rise was observed when the two light sources provided similar intensity. In addition, after 7 days since curing, bending properties of composites cured with laser and LED were similar. The results suggested that this kind of laser would be suitable for curing dental composites, and the curing process does not suffer from the tip-to-tooth distance. PMID:29584683

  18. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Kalcheva, S [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Sikik, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium); Koonen, E [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium)

    2016-09-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water. The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident. A feasibility study for the conversion of the BR2 reactor from highly-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel was previously performed to verify it can operate safely at the same maximum nominal steady-state heat flux. An assessment was also performed to quantify the heat fluxes at which the onset of flow instability and critical heat flux occur for each fuel type. This document updates and expands these results for the current representative core configuration (assuming a fresh beryllium matrix) by evaluating the onset of nucleate boiling (ONB), onset of fully developed nucleate boiling (FDNB), onset of flow instability (OFI) and critical heat flux (CHF).

  19. Post-transition state dynamics and product energy partitioning following thermal excitation of the F∙∙∙HCH2 CN transition state: Disagreement with experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pratihar, Subha [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061, USA; Ma, Xinyou [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061, USA; Xie, Jing [Department of Chemistry, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55455, USA; Scott, Rebecca [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061, USA; Gao, Eric [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061, USA; Ruscic, Branko [Chemical Sciences and Engineering Division, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439, USA and Computation Institute, University of Chicago, Chicago, Illinois 60637, USA; Aquino, Adelia J. A. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061, USA; School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin 300072, People’s Republic of China; Institute for Soil Research University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria; Setser, Donald W. [Institute for Soil Research University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences Vienna, Peter-Jordan-Strasse 82, A-1190 Vienna, Austria; Hase, William L. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409-1061, USA

    2017-10-14

    Born-Oppenheimer direct dynamics simulations were performed to study atomistic details of the F + CH3CN → HF + CH2CN H-atom abstraction reaction. The simulation trajectories were calculated with a combined M06-2X/MP2 algorithm utilizing the 6-311++G** basis set. In accord with experiment and assuming the accuracy of transition state theory (TST), the trajectories were initiated at the F-HCH2CN abstraction TS with a 300 K Boltzmann distribution of energy and directed towards products. Recrossing of the TS was negligible, confirming the accuracy of TST for the simulation. HF formation was rapid, occurring within 0.014 ps of the trajectory initiation. The intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) for reaction involves rotation of HF about CH2CN and then trapping in the CH2CN-HF post-reaction potential energy well of ~10 kcal/mol with respect to the HF + CH2CN products. In contrast to this IRC, five different trajectory types were observed, with the majority involving direct dissociation and only 11% approximately following the IRC. The HF vibrational and rotational quantum numbers, n and J, were calculated when HF was initially formed and they increase as potential energy is released in forming the HF + CH2CN products. The population of the HF product vibrational states is only in qualitative agreement with experiment, with the simulations showing depressed and enhanced populations of the n = 1 and 2 states as compared to experiment. From the simulations and with an anharmonic zero-point energy constraint, the percentage partitioning of the product energy to relative translation, HF rotation, HF vibration, CH2CN rotation and CH2CN vibration is 5, 11, 60, 7, and 16%, respectively. In contrast the experimental energy partitioning percentages to HF rotation and vibration are 6 and 41%. Comparisons are made between the current simulation and those for other F + H

  20. Replacement of unsteady heat transfer coefficient by equivalent steady-state one when calculating temperature oscillations in a thermal layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supel'nyak, M. I.

    2017-11-01

    Features of calculation of temperature oscillations which are damped in a surface layer of a solid and which are having a small range in comparison with range of temperature of the fluid medium surrounding the solid at heat transfer coefficient changing in time under the periodic law are considered. For the specified case the equations for approximate definition of constant and oscillating components of temperature field of a solid are received. The possibility of use of appropriately chosen steady-state coefficient when calculating the temperature oscillations instead of unsteady heat-transfer coefficient is investigated. Dependence for definition of such equivalent constant heat-transfer coefficient is determined. With its help the research of temperature oscillations of solids with canonical form for some specific conditions of heat transfer is undertaken. Comparison of the obtained data with results of exact solutions of a problem of heat conductivity by which the limits to applicability of the offered approach are defined is carried out.

  1. Electronic states at Si-SiO2 interface introduced by implantation of Si in thermal SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalnitsky, A.; Poindexter, E.H.; Caplan, P.J.

    1990-01-01

    Interface traps due to excess Si introduced into the Si-SiO 2 system by ion implantation are investigated. Implanted oxides are shown to have interface traps at or slightly above the Si conduction band edge with densities proportional to the density of off-stoichiometric Si at the Si-SiO 2 interface. Diluted oxygen annealing is shown to result in physical separation of interface traps and equilibrium substrate electrons, demonstrating that ''interface'' states are located within a 0.5 nm thick layer of SiO 2 . Possible charge trapping mechanisms are discussed and the effect of these traps on MOS transistor characteristics is described using a sheet charge model. (author)

  2. Steady-State Thermal-Hydraulics Analyses for the Conversion of the BR2 Reactor to LEU

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Licht, J. R. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Van den Branden, G. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Kalcheva, S. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Sikik, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium); Koonen, E. [SCK CEN (Belgium)

    2015-12-01

    BR2 is a research reactor used for radioisotope production and materials testing. It’s a tank-in-pool type reactor cooled by light water and moderated by beryllium and light water (Figure 1). The reactor core consists of a beryllium moderator forming a matrix of 79 hexagonal prisms in a hyperboloid configuration; each having a central bore that can contain a variety of different components such as a fuel assembly, a control or regulating rod, an experimental device, or a beryllium or aluminum plug. Based on a series of tests, the BR2 operation is currently limited to a maximum allowable heat flux of 470 W/cm2 to ensure fuel plate integrity during steady-state operation and after a loss-of-flow/loss-of-pressure accident.

  3. Mars Thermal Inertia

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    This image shows the global thermal inertia of the Martian surface as measured by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument on the Mars Global Surveyor. The data were acquired during the first 5000 orbits of the MGS mapping mission. The pattern of inertia variations observed by TES agrees well with the thermal inertia maps made by the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper experiment, but the TES data shown here are at significantly higher spatial resolution (15 km versus 60 km).The TES instrument was built by Santa Barbara Remote Sensing and is operated by Philip R. Christensen, of Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ.

  4. On domination multisubdivision number of unicyclic graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna Raczek

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper continues the interesting study of the domination subdivision number and the domination multisubdivision number. On the basis of the constructive characterization of the trees with the domination subdivision number equal to 3 given in [H. Aram, S.M. Sheikholeslami, O. Favaron, Domination subdivision number of trees, Discrete Math. 309 (2009, 622-628], we constructively characterize all connected unicyclic graphs with the domination multisubdivision number equal to 3. We end with further questions and open problems.

  5. Sellers to dominate price talks?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McLean, A.

    2000-01-01

    The last decade has been a sad one for coal exporters with only two price increases going the sellers' way, one in 1995 and the other in 1996. True, the financial hardships imposed upon the miners have resulted in improvements in all aspects of the coal chain. Mine productivity as measured in tonnes of output per employee is up, while rail and port charges and even, albeit at more modest levels, government charges, are down. However there is a widespread viewpoint that this will be the year of the price rise and, potentially, a big one. The difference in the forthcoming coal negotiations with the Japanese buyers is that, this time, the tightness of the market, both in coking and thermal coal, is demand driven

  6. Superparamagnetism and spin-glass like state for the MnFe2O4 nano-particles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao Ruorui; Zhang Yue; Yu Wei; Xiong Rui; Shi Jing

    2012-01-01

    MnFe 2 O 4 nano-particles with an average size of about 7 nm were synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. Based on the magnetic hysteresis loops measured at different temperatures the temperature-dependent saturation magnetization (M S ) and coercivity (H C ) are determined. It is shown that above 20 K the temperature-dependence of the M S and H C indicates the magnetic behaviors in the single-domain nano-particles, while below 20 K, the change of the M S and H C indicates the freezing of the spin-glass like state on the surfaces. By measuring the magnetization–temperature (M–T) curves under the zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling procedures at different applied fields, superparamagnetism behavior is also studied. Even though in the ZFC M–T curves peaks can be observed below 160 K, superparamagnetism does not appear until the temperature goes above 300 K, which is related with the strong inter-particle interaction. - Highlights: ► MnFe 2 O 4 nano-particles with size of 7 nm were prepared. ► The surface spin-glass like state is frozen below 20 K. ► The peaks in ZFC magnetization–temperature curves are observed below 160 K. ► The inter-particle interaction inhibits the superparamagnetism at room temperature.

  7. Incorporation of low energy activated nitrogen onto HOPG surface: Chemical states and thermal stability studies by in-situ XPS and Raman spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Maneesh; Shasha, Michal; Michaelson, Shaul; Hoffman, Alon

    2016-09-01

    In this paper we report the chemical states analysis of activated nitrogen incorporated highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) surface under well-controlled conditions. Nitrogen incorporation is carried out by two different processes: an indirect RF nitrogen plasma and low energy (1 keV) N2+ implantation. Bonding configuration, concentration and thermal stability of the incorporated nitrogen species by aforesaid processes are systematically compared by in-situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Relatively large concentration of nitrogen is incorporated onto RF nitride HOPG surface (16.2 at.%), compared to N2+ implanted HOPG surface (7.7 at.%). The evolution of N 1s components (N1, N2, N3) with annealing temperature is comprehensively discussed, which indicates that the formation and reorganization of local chemical bonding states are determined by the process of nitridation and not by the prior chemical conditioning (i.e., amorphization or hydrogenation) of the HOPG surface. A combined XPS and Raman spectroscopy studies revealed that N2+ implantation process resulted in a high level of defects to the HOPG surface, which cannot be annealed-out by heat treatment up to 1000 °C. On the other hand, the RF nitrogen plasma process did not produce a high level of surface defects, while incorporating nearly the same amount of stable nitrogen species.

  8. Electron-mediated relaxation following ultrafast pumping of strongly correlated materials: model evidence of a correlation-tuned crossover between thermal and nonthermal states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moritz, B; Kemper, A F; Sentef, M; Devereaux, T P; Freericks, J K

    2013-08-16

    We examine electron-electron mediated relaxation following ultrafast electric field pump excitation of the fermionic degrees of freedom in the Falicov-Kimball model for correlated electrons. The results reveal a dichotomy in the temporal evolution of the system as one tunes through the Mott metal-to-insulator transition: in the metallic regime relaxation can be characterized by evolution toward a steady state well described by Fermi-Dirac statistics with an increased effective temperature; however, in the insulating regime this quasithermal paradigm breaks down with relaxation toward a nonthermal state with a complicated electronic distribution as a function of momentum. We characterize the behavior by studying changes in the energy, photoemission response, and electronic distribution as functions of time. This relaxation may be observable qualitatively on short enough time scales that the electrons behave like an isolated system not in contact with additional degrees of freedom which would act as a thermal bath, especially when using strong driving fields and studying materials whose physics may manifest the effects of correlations.

  9. Equivalent circuit model parameters of a high-power Li-ion battery: Thermal and state of charge effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jamie; Nelson, Ruben; Kalu, Egwu E.; Weatherspoon, Mark H.; Zheng, Jim P.

    2011-05-01

    Equivalent circuit model (EMC) of a high-power Li-ion battery that accounts for both temperature and state of charge (SOC) effects known to influence battery performance is presented. Electrochemical impedance measurements of a commercial high power Li-ion battery obtained in the temperature range 20 to 50 °C at various SOC values was used to develop a simple EMC which was used in combination with a non-linear least squares fitting procedure that used thirteen parameters for the analysis of the Li-ion cell. The experimental results show that the solution and charge transfer resistances decreased with increase in cell operating temperature and decreasing SOC. On the other hand, the Warburg admittance increased with increasing temperature and decreasing SOC. The developed model correlations that are capable of being used in process control algorithms are presented for the observed impedance behavior with respect to temperature and SOC effects. The predicted model parameters for the impedance elements Rs, Rct and Y013 show low variance of 5% when compared to the experimental data and therefore indicates a good statistical agreement of correlation model to the actual experimental values.

  10. Combined effect of bottom reflectivity and water turbidity on steady state thermal efficiency of salt gradient solar pond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Husain, M.; Patil, P.S.; Patil, S.R.; Samdarshi, S.K.

    2004-01-01

    In salt gradient solar ponds, the clarity of water and absorptivity of the bottom are important concerns. However, both are practically difficult to maintain beyond a certain limit. The reflectivity of the bottom causes the loss of a fraction of the incident radiation flux, resulting in lower absorption of flux in the pond. Turbidity hinders the propagation of radiation. Thereby it decreases the flux reaching the storage zone. Both these factors lower the efficiency of the pond significantly. However, the same turbidity also prevents the loss of radiation reflected from the bottom. Hence, the combined effect is compensatory to some extent. The present work is an analysis of the combined effect of the bottom's reflectivity and water turbidity on the steady state efficiency of solar ponds. It is found that in the case of a reflective bottom, turbidity, within certain limits, improves the efficiency of pond. This is apparently contradictory to the conventional beliefs about the pond. Nevertheless, this conclusion is of practical importance for design and maintenance of solar ponds

  11. Transportation over long distance and thermal energy storage, coupling with energetic valuation processes from waste. State of art. Extended abstract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Megret, O.; Bequet, L.; Manificat, A.; Weber, C.

    2011-12-01

    This study aims, on one hand, to realize a state of art about over long distance transport and heat energy storage and, on the other hand, to examine their coupling with waste valuation systems. After reminding the adequate context of development with those solutions and too showing the importance of the stake linked to the current work, we first expose the introductive elements in terms of storage and heat energy transport. The second chapter deals with the description of some materials, equipment and systems concerning heat storage energy. Afterward, the over long distance heat transport systems are detailed in the third chapter. In the fourth chapter, it is about waste valuation techniques and heat energy potentials users. The fifth chapter sums up the different techniques of storage and heat transport that are applicable to waste field according to the appropriate sector. Finally, the sixth chapter goes about 3 case-works in 3 fields: housing/commercial, industrial laundry and high temperature industry (steel industry). The purpose is to determine the implementation feasibility of the different techniques of storage and waste heat transport. (authors)

  12. Amplified spontaneous emission and thermal management on a high average-power diode-pumped solid-state laser - the Lucia laser system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albach, D.

    2010-01-01

    The development of the laser triggered the birth of numerous fields in both scientific and industrial domains. High intensity laser pulses are a unique tool for light/matter interaction studies and applications. However, current flash-pumped glass-based systems are inherently limited in repetition-rate and efficiency. Development within recent years in the field of semiconductor lasers and gain media drew special attention to a new class of lasers, the so-called Diode Pumped Solid State Laser (DPSSL). DPSSLs are highly efficient lasers and are candidates of choice for compact, high average-power systems required for industrial applications but also as high-power pump sources for ultra-high intense lasers. The work described in this thesis takes place in the context of the 1 kilowatt average-power DPSSL program Lucia, currently under construction at the 'Laboratoire d'Utilisation des Laser Intenses' (LULI) at the Ecole Polytechnique, France. Generation of sub-10 nanosecond long pulses with energies of up to 100 joules at repetition rates of 10 hertz are mainly limited by Amplified Spontaneous Emission (ASE) and thermal effects. These limitations are the central themes of this work. Their impact is discussed within the context of a first Lucia milestone, set around 10 joules. The developed laser system is shown in detail from the oscillator level to the end of the amplification line. A comprehensive discussion of the impact of ASE and thermal effects is completed by related experimental benchmarks. The validated models are used to predict the performances of the laser system, finally resulting in a first activation of the laser system at an energy level of 7 joules in a single-shot regime and 6.6 joules at repetition rates up to 2 hertz. Limitations and further scaling approaches are discussed, followed by an outlook for the further development. (author) [fr

  13. Changing the Dominant Paradigm in Economics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Lourdes Mollo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This article addresses the discussion proposed by the World Academy of Art & Science (WAAS about the need to build a new paradigm to confront the challenges of the global society and to move across to a New Society discussing specific problems related to economic globalization and proposing changes. The ways in which economic orthodoxy and heterodoxy analyze the role of the State and the question of sustainability of development and the problems of environmental sustainability depend on their different views or theoretical arguments about the role of the market. The article contrasts the mainstream economics arguments to support the free market context of globalization with Post-Keynesian and Marxist’s skeptical or critical views. Finally, it proposes some strategies to face the critical aspects analyzed making suggestions to move to another dominant economic paradigm.

  14. ["Animal hypnosis" and defensive dominant, behavioral aspect].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlygina, R A; Galashina, A G; Bogdanov, A V

    2002-01-01

    A stationary excitation focus produced in the sensorimotor cortex of a rabbit by rhythmic electrodermal paw stimulation was manifested in the reaction to a testing sound stimulus earlier indifferent for the animal. Regardless of the stimulated paw (left or right), reactions to the testing stimuli appeared approximately in the equal percent of cases (70.7% and 71.5%, respectively). After a single-trial induction of the "animal hypnosis" state, it was difficult to produce the dominant focus by simulation of the left paw, whereas the results of the right-paw stimulation did not differ from those obtained during control stimulation. Consequently, the influence of hypnosis on defensive stationary excitation foci in different hemispheres was not the same.

  15. Prolate dominant but oblate stable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Girija, K.K.; Joseph, Antony

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses the yrast states of even-even nuclei in the isotopic chains 150-160 Dy, 150-160 Er and 150-160 Yb and thereby to study the shape and deformation dependence of ground state energy, exploring cranked Nilsson Strutinsky shell correction method and potential energy surface (PES) diagrams. The total energy calculations have been performed for the even-even nuclei of the isotopic chains 150-160 Dy, 150-160 Er and 150-160 Yb in the ground state. The range of triaxiality parameter used is 0-60 ° and a frequency range of 0-1.5 MeV is employed. The quadrupole deformation parameter ε 2 is varied from 0 to 1

  16. THERMAL PHASES OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS: ESTIMATING THERMAL INERTIA FROM ECCENTRICITY, OBLIQUITY, AND DIURNAL FORCING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, Nicolas B. [Center for Interdisciplinary Exploration and Research in Astrophysics and Department of Physics and Astronomy, Northwestern University, 2131 Tech Drive, Evanston, IL 60208 (United States); Voigt, Aiko [Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Bundesstr. 53, D-20146 Hamburg (Germany); Abbot, Dorian S., E-mail: n-cowan@nortwestern.edu [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, 5734 South Ellis Avenue, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2012-09-20

    In order to understand the climate on terrestrial planets orbiting nearby Sun-like stars, one would like to know their thermal inertia. We use a global climate model to simulate the thermal phase variations of Earth analogs and test whether these data could distinguish between planets with different heat storage and heat transport characteristics. In particular, we consider a temperate climate with polar ice caps (like the modern Earth) and a snowball state where the oceans are globally covered in ice. We first quantitatively study the periodic radiative forcing from, and climatic response to, rotation, obliquity, and eccentricity. Orbital eccentricity and seasonal changes in albedo cause variations in the global-mean absorbed flux. The responses of the two climates to these global seasons indicate that the temperate planet has 3 Multiplication-Sign the bulk heat capacity of the snowball planet due to the presence of liquid water oceans. The obliquity seasons in the temperate simulation are weaker than one would expect based on thermal inertia alone; this is due to cross-equatorial oceanic and atmospheric energy transport. Thermal inertia and cross-equatorial heat transport have qualitatively different effects on obliquity seasons, insofar as heat transport tends to reduce seasonal amplitude without inducing a phase lag. For an Earth-like planet, however, this effect is masked by the mixing of signals from low thermal inertia regions (sea ice and land) with that from high thermal inertia regions (oceans), which also produces a damped response with small phase lag. We then simulate thermal light curves as they would appear to a high-contrast imaging mission (TPF-I/Darwin). In order of importance to the present simulations, which use modern-Earth orbital parameters, the three drivers of thermal phase variations are (1) obliquity seasons, (2) diurnal cycle, and (3) global seasons. Obliquity seasons are the dominant source of phase variations for most viewing angles. A

  17. THERMAL PHASES OF EARTH-LIKE PLANETS: ESTIMATING THERMAL INERTIA FROM ECCENTRICITY, OBLIQUITY, AND DIURNAL FORCING

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cowan, Nicolas B.; Voigt, Aiko; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2012-01-01

    In order to understand the climate on terrestrial planets orbiting nearby Sun-like stars, one would like to know their thermal inertia. We use a global climate model to simulate the thermal phase variations of Earth analogs and test whether these data could distinguish between planets with different heat storage and heat transport characteristics. In particular, we consider a temperate climate with polar ice caps (like the modern Earth) and a snowball state where the oceans are globally covered in ice. We first quantitatively study the periodic radiative forcing from, and climatic response to, rotation, obliquity, and eccentricity. Orbital eccentricity and seasonal changes in albedo cause variations in the global-mean absorbed flux. The responses of the two climates to these global seasons indicate that the temperate planet has 3× the bulk heat capacity of the snowball planet due to the presence of liquid water oceans. The obliquity seasons in the temperate simulation are weaker than one would expect based on thermal inertia alone; this is due to cross-equatorial oceanic and atmospheric energy transport. Thermal inertia and cross-equatorial heat transport have qualitatively different effects on obliquity seasons, insofar as heat transport tends to reduce seasonal amplitude without inducing a phase lag. For an Earth-like planet, however, this effect is masked by the mixing of signals from low thermal inertia regions (sea ice and land) with that from high thermal inertia regions (oceans), which also produces a damped response with small phase lag. We then simulate thermal light curves as they would appear to a high-contrast imaging mission (TPF-I/Darwin). In order of importance to the present simulations, which use modern-Earth orbital parameters, the three drivers of thermal phase variations are (1) obliquity seasons, (2) diurnal cycle, and (3) global seasons. Obliquity seasons are the dominant source of phase variations for most viewing angles. A pole-on observer

  18. Thermal comfort: research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoof, van J.; Mazej, M.; Hensen, J.L.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal comfort -the state of mind, which expresses satisfaction with the thermal environment- is an important aspect of the building design process as modern man spends most of the day indoors. This paper reviews the developments in indoor thermal comfort research and practice since the second half

  19. Evaluation of dominant thyroid masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, C.G. Jr.; Buckwalter, J.A.; Staab, E.V.; Kerr, C.Y.

    1976-01-01

    Controversy exists concerning the management of solitary thyroid nodules because of conflicting information concerning the high clinical incidence of thyroid nodules, the varying incidence of cancer reported in those surgically excised and the infrequency of death from thyroid cancer. During the past several years, a plan for evaluating patients with dominant thyroid masses has evolved. The objective is to avoid unnecessary operations by identifying patients with a high risk of cancer. The criteria which are used are the age and sex of the patient, the duration of the mass, 125 I or /sup 99m/Tc scans, 75 Selenomethionine scans, B-mode ultrasonography and the response of the mass to suppressive therapy. This is a report of the findings in 222 patients who have been studied employing this approach. Thirty percent of the patients were operated upon. Forty percent had neoplasms (well differentiated cancer--28.8 percent, adenoma--12.1 percent), 47.0 percent--nodular goiter, 6.1 percent cysts, and 6.1 percent chronic thyroiditis. The incidence of cancer in the 222 patients was 8.6 percent and adenoma 3.6 percent. Patients at greatest risk of having cancer are those with solid nonfunctioning nodules which fail to regress with suppressive therapy. This study indicates that the approach described above is effective in selecting for surgical excision those individuals at greatest risk of having thyroid cancer

  20. Economic Dominance with Political Incompetence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tienken, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    The fraudulent claims by policymakers and pundits that the United States is losing its economic competitiveness due to a failing education system continue unabated. However, the latest data on competitiveness suggest that it is poor economic policy, not education, that is holding back the economy.

  1. The dominance behavioral system and manic temperament: Motivation for dominance, self-perceptions of power, and socially dominant behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Sheri L.; Carver, Charles S.

    2012-01-01

    The dominance behavioral system has been conceptualized as a biologically based system comprising motivation to achieve social power and self-perceptions of power. Biological, behavioral, and social correlates of dominance motivation and self-perceived power have been related to a range of psychopathological tendencies. Preliminary evidence suggests that mania and risk for mania (manic temperament) relate to the dominance system.

  2. Phase transition and thermal equations of state of (Fe,Al)-bridgmanite and post-perovskite: Implication for the chemical heterogeneity at the lowermost mantle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ningyu; Wei, Wei; Han, Shunjie; Song, Junhao; Li, Xinyang; Duan, Yunfei; Prakapenka, Vitali B.; Mao, Zhu

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we have determined the phase boundary between Mg0.735Fe0.21Al0.07Si0.965O3-Bm and PPv and the thermal equations of state of both phases up to 202 GPa and 2600 K using synchrotron X-ray diffraction in laser heated diamond anvil cells. Our experimental results have shown that the combined effect of Fe and Al produces a wide two-phase coexistence region with a thickness of 26 GPa (410 km) at 2200 K, and addition of Fe lowers the onset transition pressure to 98 GPa at 2000 K, consistent with previous experimental results. Furthermore, addition of Fe was noted to reduce the density (ρ) and bulk sound velocity (VΦ) contrasts across the Bm-PPv phase transition, which is in contrast to the effect of Al. Using the obtained phase diagram and thermal equations of state of Bm and PPv, we have also examined the effect of composition variations on the ρ and VΦ profiles of the lowermost mantle. Our modeling results have shown that the pyrolitic lowermost mantle should be highly heterogeneous in composition and temperature laterally to match the observed variations in the depth and seismic signatures of the D″ discontinuity. Normal mantle in a pyrolitic composition with ∼10% Fe and Al in Bm and PPv will lack clear seismic signature of the D″ discontinuity because the broad phase boundary could smooth the velocity contrast between Bm and PPv. On the other hand, Fe-enriched regions close to the cold slabs may show a seismic signature with a change in the velocity slope of the D″ discontinuity, consistent with recent seismic observations beneath the eastern Alaska. Only regions depleted in Fe and Al near the cold slabs would show a sharp change in velocity. Fe in such regions could be removed to the outer core by strong core-mantle interactions or partitions together with Al to the high-pressure phases in the subduction mid ocean ridge basalts. Our results thus have profound implication for the composition of the lowermost mantle.

  3. On The Roman Domination Stable Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hajian Majid

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A Roman dominating function (or just RDF on a graph G = (V,E is a function f : V → {0, 1, 2} satisfying the condition that every vertex u for which f(u = 0 is adjacent to at least one vertex v for which f(v = 2. The weight of an RDF f is the value f(V (G = Pu2V (G f(u. The Roman domination number of a graph G, denoted by R(G, is the minimum weight of a Roman dominating function on G. A graph G is Roman domination stable if the Roman domination number of G remains unchanged under removal of any vertex. In this paper we present upper bounds for the Roman domination number in the class of Roman domination stable graphs, improving bounds posed in [V. Samodivkin, Roman domination in graphs: the class RUV R, Discrete Math. Algorithms Appl. 8 (2016 1650049].

  4. Dominant drivers of business students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radu Cătălina

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Taibi Kahler wrote in 1974 a theory about five main drivers that could explain people’s motivation and a series of positive and negative behavior patterns: Be Strong, Be Perfect, Hurry Up, Try Hard and Please People. Of course, we consider there is no absolute positive or negative behavior, since (1 everything needs to be analyzed by taking into account the context and (2 any behavior pattern can mean a series of advantages as long as people understand their own values, beliefs, attitudes and behaviors. It would be interesting to link Kahler’s drivers to the educational process, in order to be able to adapt our courses and our teaching styles to students’ requirements and also to the requirements in the labor market. Our paper is built on literature review and a questionnaire applied to a sample of 607 students in Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania. Information was processed with Microsoft Excel 2013, in order to look at the main working styles our students have, at the main explanations for the differences between them and in order to test a series of hypotheses. We were interested to look at the main traits of the current generation of students in our university: dominant drivers, roles of managers and specialists, the attractiveness of the entrepreneurial career path, etc. and at a series of patterns (i.e. gender-related differences. We consider results of this study are useful both for teaching and research purposes. In terms of teaching, we plan to adapt our educational methods in order to improve the educational process.

  5. Thermal energy storage devices, systems, and thermal energy storage device monitoring methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tugurlan, Maria; Tuffner, Francis K; Chassin, David P.

    2016-09-13

    Thermal energy storage devices, systems, and thermal energy storage device monitoring methods are described. According to one aspect, a thermal energy storage device includes a reservoir configured to hold a thermal energy storage medium, a temperature control system configured to adjust a temperature of the thermal energy storage medium, and a state observation system configured to provide information regarding an energy state of the thermal energy storage device at a plurality of different moments in time.

  6. Thermal management for LED applications

    CERN Document Server

    Poppe, András

    2014-01-01

    Thermal Management for LED Applications provides state-of-the-art information on recent developments in thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems and their applications. Coverage begins with an overview of the basics of thermal management including thermal design for LEDs, thermal characterization and testing of LEDs, and issues related to failure mechanisms and reliability and performance in harsh environments. Advances and recent developments in thermal management round out the book with discussions on advances in TIMs (thermal interface materials) for LED applications, advances in forced convection cooling of LEDs, and advances in heat sinks for LED assemblies. This book also: Presents a comprehensive overview of the basics of thermal management as it relates to LEDs and LED-based systems Discusses both design and thermal management considerations when manufacturing LEDs and LED-based systems Covers reliability and performance of LEDs in harsh environments Has a hands-on applications a...

  7. A Boundary Property for Upper Domination

    KAUST Repository

    AbouEisha, Hassan M.; Hussain, Shahid; Lozin, Vadim; Monnot, Jé rô me; Ries, Bernard; Zamaraev, Viktor

    2016-01-01

    An upper dominating set in a graph is a minimal (with respect to set inclusion) dominating set of maximum cardinality.The problem of finding an upper dominating set is generally NP-hard, but can be solved in polynomial time in some restricted graph

  8. Hypothalamic digoxin, hemispheric chemical dominance, and peptic ulcer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurup, Ravi Kumar; Kurup, Parameswara Achutha

    2003-10-01

    The isoprenoid pathway produces three key metabolites--endogenous digoxin-like factor (EDLF) (membrane sodium-potassium ATPase inhibitor and regulator of neurotransmitter transport), ubiquinone (free radical scavenger), and dolichol (regulator of glycoconjugate metabolism). The pathway was assessed in peptic ulcer and acid peptic disease and its relation to hemispheric dominance studied. The activity of HMG CoA reductase, serum levels of EDLF, magnesium, tryptophan catabolites, and tyrosine catabolites were measured in acid peptic disease, right hemispheric dominant, left hemispheric dominant, and bihemispheric dominant individuals. All the patients with peptic ulcer disease were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listening test. The pathway was upregulated with increased EDLF synthesis in peptic ulcer disease (PUD). There was increase in tryptophan catabolites and reduction in tyrosine catabolites in these patients. The ubiquinone levels were low and free radical production increased. Dolichol and glycoconjugate levels were increased and lysosomal stability reduced in patients with acid peptic disease (APD). There was increase in cholesterol:phospholipid ratio with decreased glyco conjugate levels in membranes of patients with PUD. Acid peptic disease represents an elevated EDLF state which can modulate gastric acid secretion and the structure of the gastric mucous barrier. It can also lead to persistence of Helicobacter pylori infection. The biochemical pattern obtained in peptic ulcer disease is similar to those obtained in left-handed/right hemispheric chemically dominant individuals. But all the patients with peptic ulcer disease were right-handed/left hemispheric dominant by the dichotic listen ing test. Hemispheric chemical dominance has no correlation with handedness or the dichotic listening test. Peptic ulcer disease occurs in right hemispheric chemically dominant individuals and is a reflection of altered brain function.

  9. Effect of nanofiller’s size and shape on the solid state microstructure and thermal properties of poly(butylene succinate) nanocomposites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papageorgiou, Dimitrios G.; Chrissafis, Konstantinos; Pavlidou, Eleni; Deliyanni, Eleni A.; Papageorgiou, George Z.; Terzopoulou, Zoi; Bikiaris, Dimitrios N.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • The microstructure and thermal properties of PBSu-based nanocomposites were studied. • Ag and SiO 2 were dispersed more uniformly, compared to GO and MWCNTs. • PBSu/Ag nanocomposites exhibited higher nucleation activity and faster rates. • The order of nucleation efficiency of the fillers was GO < MWCNTs < SiO 2 < Ag. • The activation energy of nanocomposite samples was lower than that of PBSu. - Abstract: We report a study of the solid state microstructure and crystallization kinetics of poly(butylene succinate) (PBSu) reinforced with nanofillers of different shapes, sizes and geometries such as silver, silica (SiO 2 ), multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and graphene oxide (GO). The solid state structure of neat polymer and nanocomposites were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), polarized optical microscopy (POM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The results indicated that the nanocomposite samples exhibited enhanced crystallinity and nucleation density, along with smaller spherulite size. Additionally, the spherical nanofillers were dispersed more uniformly in the polymeric matrix, than the other two filler types. The crystallization kinetics under both isothermal and dynamic conditions were also studied and as was expected, the nanocomposite samples, crystallize at higher rates due to the increased number of nucleation sites, as was calculated with Avrami, Dobreva and Friedman’s methods. From the crystallization study it was found that the nanocomposite filled with Ag nanoparticles exhibited the highest rates from all other fillers followed from SiO 2 and MWCNTs while GO showed the lowest rates

  10. Manipulating the Electronic Excited State Energies of Pyrimidine-Based Thermally Activated Delayed Fluorescence Emitters To Realize Efficient Deep-Blue Emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, Ryutaro; Ohsawa, Tatsuya; Sasabe, Hisahiro; Nakao, Kohei; Hayasaka, Yuya; Kido, Junji

    2017-02-08

    The development of efficient and robust deep-blue emitters is one of the key issues in organic light-emitting devices (OLEDs) for environmentally friendly, large-area displays or general lighting. As a promising technology that realizes 100% conversion from electrons to photons, thermally activated delayed fluorescence (TADF) emitters have attracted considerable attention. However, only a handful of examples of deep-blue TADF emitters have been reported to date, and the emitters generally show large efficiency roll-off at practical luminance over several hundreds to thousands of cd m -2 , most likely because of the long delayed fluorescent lifetime (τ d ). To overcome this problem, we molecularly manipulated the electronic excited state energies of pyrimidine-based TADF emitters to realize deep-blue emission and reduced τ d . We then systematically investigated the relationships among the chemical structure, properties, and device performances. The resultant novel pyrimidine emitters, called Ac-XMHPMs (X = 1, 2, and 3), contain different numbers of bulky methyl substituents at acceptor moieties, increasing the excited singlet (E S ) and triplet state (E T ) energies. Among them, Ac-3MHPM, with a high E T of 2.95 eV, exhibited a high external quantum efficiency (η ext,max ) of 18% and an η ext of 10% at 100 cd m -2 with Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage chromaticity coordinates of (0.16, 0.15). These efficiencies are among the highest values to date for deep-blue TADF OLEDs. Our molecular design strategy provides fundamental guidance to design novel deep-blue TADF emitters.

  11. Superparamagnetism and spin-glass like state for the MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nano-particles synthesized by the thermal decomposition method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao Ruorui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Zhang Yue, E-mail: yue-zhang@mail.hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Department of Electric Science and Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yu Wei [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Xiong Rui [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); Shi Jing [Key Laboratory of Artificial Micro- and Nano-structures of Ministry of Education, School of Physics and Technology, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Key Laboratory for the Green Preparation and Application of Functional Materials of Ministry of Education, Hubei University, Wuhan 430062 (China); International Center for Material Physics, Shen Yang 110015 (China)

    2012-08-15

    MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nano-particles with an average size of about 7 nm were synthesized by the thermal decomposition method. Based on the magnetic hysteresis loops measured at different temperatures the temperature-dependent saturation magnetization (M{sub S}) and coercivity (H{sub C}) are determined. It is shown that above 20 K the temperature-dependence of the M{sub S} and H{sub C} indicates the magnetic behaviors in the single-domain nano-particles, while below 20 K, the change of the M{sub S} and H{sub C} indicates the freezing of the spin-glass like state on the surfaces. By measuring the magnetization-temperature (M-T) curves under the zero-field-cooling (ZFC) and field-cooling procedures at different applied fields, superparamagnetism behavior is also studied. Even though in the ZFC M-T curves peaks can be observed below 160 K, superparamagnetism does not appear until the temperature goes above 300 K, which is related with the strong inter-particle interaction. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer MnFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} nano-particles with size of 7 nm were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The surface spin-glass like state is frozen below 20 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The peaks in ZFC magnetization-temperature curves are observed below 160 K. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The inter-particle interaction inhibits the superparamagnetism at room temperature.

  12. Synthesis of Cubic Phase-Co Microspheres by Mechanical Solid-State Reaction-Thermal Decomposition and Research on Its Growth Kinetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Deng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cubic phase cobalt (Co, which can be used as a key component for composite materials given its excellent ductility and internal structure, is not easy to obtain at room temperature. In this study, oxalic acid and cobalt nitrate are used as raw materials to synthesize the cobalt oxalate precursor, which has a stable structure with a five-membered chelate ring. Cobalt oxalate microspheres, having a high internal energy content, were prepared by using mechanical solid-state reaction in the presence of a surfactant, which can produce spherical micelles. The thermal decomposition of the precursor was carried out by maintaining it in a nitrogen atmosphere at 450°C for 3 h. At the end of the procedure, 100 nm cubic phase-Co microspheres, stable at room temperature, were obtained. Isothermal and nonisothermal kinetic mechanisms of cobalt grain growth were investigated. The cubic-Co grain growth activation energy, Q, was calculated in this study to be 71.47 kJ/mol. The required reaction temperature was low, making the production process simple and suitable for industrial applications.

  13. Comparative Studies on Thermal, Mechanical, and Flame Retardant Properties of PBT Nanocomposites via Different Oxidation State Phosphorus-Containing Agents Modified Amino-CNTs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, San-E; Wang, Li-Li; Chen, Hao; Yang, Wei; Yuen, Anthony Chun-Yin; Chen, Timothy Bo-Yuan; Luo, Cheng; Bi, Wen-Mei; Hu, En-Zhu; Zhang, Jian; Si, Jing-Yu; Lu, Hong-Dian; Hu, Kun-Hong; Chan, Qing Nian; Yeoh, Guan Heng

    2018-01-26

    High-performance poly(1,4-butylene terephthalate) (PBT) nanocomposites have been developed via the consideration of phosphorus-containing agents and amino-carbon nanotube (A-CNT). One-pot functionalization method has been adopted to prepare functionalized CNTs via the reaction between A-CNT and different oxidation state phosphorus-containing agents, including chlorodiphenylphosphine (DPP-Cl), diphenylphosphinic chloride (DPP(O)-Cl), and diphenyl phosphoryl chloride (DPP(O₃)-Cl). These functionalized CNTs, DPP(O x )-A-CNTs ( x = 0, 1, 3), were, respectively, mixed with PBT to obtain the CNT-based polymer nanocomposites through a melt blending method. Scanning electron microscope observations demonstrated that DPP(O x )-A-CNT nanoadditives were homogeneously distributed within PBT matrix compared to A-CNT. The incorporation of DPP(O x )-A-CNT improved the thermal stability of PBT. Moreover, PBT/DPP(O₃)-A-CNT showed the highest crystallization temperature and tensile strength, due to the superior dispersion and interfacial interactions between DPP(O₃)-A-CNT and PBT. PBT/DPP(O)-A-CNT exhibited the best flame retardancy resulting from the excellent carbonization effect. The radicals generated from decomposed polymer were effectively trapped by DPP(O)-A-CNT, leading to the reduction of heat release rate, smoke production rate, carbon dioxide and carbon monoxide release during cone calorimeter tests.

  14. The STAT7 Code for Statistical Propagation of Uncertainties In Steady-State Thermal Hydraulics Analysis of Plate-Fueled Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dunn, Floyd E. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Hu, Lin-wen [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States). Nuclear Reactor Lab.; Wilson, Erik [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2016-12-01

    The STAT code was written to automate many of the steady-state thermal hydraulic safety calculations for the MIT research reactor, both for conversion of the reactor from high enrichment uranium fuel to low enrichment uranium fuel and for future fuel re-loads after the conversion. A Monte-Carlo statistical propagation approach is used to treat uncertainties in important parameters in the analysis. These safety calculations are ultimately intended to protect against high fuel plate temperatures due to critical heat flux or departure from nucleate boiling or onset of flow instability; but additional margin is obtained by basing the limiting safety settings on avoiding onset of nucleate boiling. STAT7 can simultaneously analyze all of the axial nodes of all of the fuel plates and all of the coolant channels for one stripe of a fuel element. The stripes run the length of the fuel, from the bottom to the top. Power splits are calculated for each axial node of each plate to determine how much of the power goes out each face of the plate. By running STAT7 multiple times, full core analysis has been performed by analyzing the margin to ONB for each axial node of each stripe of each plate of each element in the core.

  15. Studies of ruthenium complexes, 8. Kinetic studies of the thermal substitution reaction of hexaammine and cis--dihalogenotetraammineruthenium(III) complexes in the solid state

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohyoshi, A; Hiraki, S; Odate, T; Kohata, S; Oda, J [Kumamoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1975-01-01

    The kinetics of the thermal substitution reaction of hexaamineruthenium (III) halides and cis-dihalogenotetraamineruthenium (III) halides have been studied in the solid state. The reaction rates and kinetic parameters were determined for these two reactions; (Ru(NH/sub 3/)/sub 6/)X/sub 3/..-->..(RuX(NH/sub 3/)/sub 5/)X/sub 2/+NH/sub 3/, (X=Br, I) and cis - (RuX/sub 2/(NH/sub 3/)/sub 4/)X..-->..(RuX/sub 3/(NH/sub 3/)/sub 3/)+NH/sub 3/, (X=Cl, Br). The values of the rate constant, the activation energy, and the activation entropy were 2.10x10/sup -5/ s/sup -1/ (at 161/sup 0/C), 23.2 kcal mol/sup -1/, and -29.3 e.u. for the hexaamine bromide, and 2.92x10/sup -5/ s/sup -1/ (at 162/sup 0/C), 31.3 kcal mol/sup -1/, and -10.1 e.u. for the cis-dibromotetraamine bromide. The Ssub(N)2 mechanism is more probable for the former reaction, while the Ssub(N)1 mechanism is more probable for the latter reaction.

  16. Influence of plasma-induced energy deposition effects, the equation of state, thermal ionization, pulse shaping, and radiation on ion-beam-driven expansions of plane metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, K.A.; Tahir, N.A.

    1986-01-01

    In a previous paper by Long and Tahir [Phys. Fluids 29, 275 (1986)], the motion of plane targets irradiated by ion beams whose energy deposition was assumed to be independent of the ion energy, and the temperature and density of the plasma, was analyzed. In this paper, the analytic solution is extended in order to include the effects of a temperature-and density-dependent energy deposition as a result of electron excitation, an improved equation of state, thermal ionization, a pulse shape, and radiation losses. The change in the energy deposition with temperature and density leads to range shortening and an increased power deposition in the target. It is shown how the analytic theory can be used to analyze experiments to measure the enhanced energy deposition. In order to further analyze experiments, numerical simulations are presented which include the plasma-induced effects on the energy deposition. It is shown that since the change in the range is due to both decrease in density and the increase in temperature, it is not possible to separate these two effects in present experiments. Therefore, the experiments which measure the time-dependent energy of the ions emerging from the back side of a plane target do not as yet measure the energy loss as a function of the density and temperature of the plasma or of the energy of the ion, but only an averaged loss over certain ranges of these physical quantities

  17. Epigenetic dominance of prion conformers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Saijo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Although they share certain biological properties with nucleic acid based infectious agents, prions, the causative agents of invariably fatal, transmissible neurodegenerative disorders such as bovine spongiform encephalopathy, sheep scrapie, and human Creutzfeldt Jakob disease, propagate by conformational templating of host encoded proteins. Once thought to be unique to these diseases, this mechanism is now recognized as a ubiquitous means of information transfer in biological systems, including other protein misfolding disorders such as those causing Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. To address the poorly understood mechanism by which host prion protein (PrP primary structures interact with distinct prion conformations to influence pathogenesis, we produced transgenic (Tg mice expressing different sheep scrapie susceptibility alleles, varying only at a single amino acid at PrP residue 136. Tg mice expressing ovine PrP with alanine (A at (OvPrP-A136 infected with SSBP/1 scrapie prions propagated a relatively stable (S prion conformation, which accumulated as punctate aggregates in the brain, and produced prolonged incubation times. In contrast, Tg mice expressing OvPrP with valine (V at 136 (OvPrP-V136 infected with the same prions developed disease rapidly, and the converted prion was comprised of an unstable (U, diffusely distributed conformer. Infected Tg mice co-expressing both alleles manifested properties consistent with the U conformer, suggesting a dominant effect resulting from exclusive conversion of OvPrP-V136 but not OvPrP-A136. Surprisingly, however, studies with monoclonal antibody (mAb PRC5, which discriminates OvPrP-A136 from OvPrP-V136, revealed substantial conversion of OvPrP-A136. Moreover, the resulting OvPrP-A136 prion acquired the characteristics of the U conformer. These results, substantiated by in vitro analyses, indicated that co-expression of OvPrP-V136 altered the conversion potential of OvPrP-A136 from the S to

  18. Active Radiative Thermal Switching with Graphene Plasmon Resonators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilic, Ognjen; Thomas, Nathan H; Christensen, Thomas; Sherrott, Michelle C; Soljačić, Marin; Minnich, Austin J; Miller, Owen D; Atwater, Harry A

    2018-03-27

    We theoretically demonstrate a near-field radiative thermal switch based on thermally excited surface plasmons in graphene resonators. The high tunability of graphene enables substantial modulation of near-field radiative heat transfer, which, when combined with the use of resonant structures, overcomes the intrinsically broadband nature of thermal radiation. In canonical geometries, we use nonlinear optimization to show that stacked graphene sheets offer improved heat conductance contrast between "ON" and "OFF" switching states and that a >10× higher modulation is achieved between isolated graphene resonators than for parallel graphene sheets. In all cases, we find that carrier mobility is a crucial parameter for the performance of a radiative thermal switch. Furthermore, we derive shape-agnostic analytical approximations for the resonant heat transfer that provide general scaling laws and allow for direct comparison between different resonator geometries dominated by a single mode. The presented scheme is relevant for active thermal management and energy harvesting as well as probing excited-state dynamics at the nanoscale.

  19. Analytical model of unsteady-state convective heat transfer between the heat carrier and the finite sizes plate adjusted for the thermal relaxation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makarushkin Danila

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A hyperbolic boundary value problem of the thermal conduction of a two-dimensional plate with the third kind boundary conditions is formulated. The transient thermal process in the plate is due to the temperature changes of the external medium over time and along the plate length, and also by a multiple step change of the plate surface heat transfer coefficient throughout the transient process. An analytical solution with improved convergence adjusted for thermal relaxation and thermal damping is obtained for the temperature field in the plate.

  20. Thermal comfort

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Osburn, L

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal comfort is influenced by environmental parameters as well as other influences including asymmetric heating and cooling conditions. Additionally, some aspects of thermal comfort may be exploited so as to enable a building to operate within a...