WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal cycle limits

  1. Importance of thermal diffusion in the gravo-magnetic limit cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Owen, James E.; Armitage, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    We consider the role of thermal diffusion due to turbulence and radiation on accretion bursts that occur in protoplanetary discs which contain dead zones. Using 1D viscous disc models we show that diffusive radial transport of heat is important during the gravo-magnetic limit cycle, and can strongly modify the duration and frequency of accretion outbursts. When the Prandtl number is large - such that turbulent diffusion of heat is unimportant - radial radiative diffusion reduces the burst dur...

  2. Limit cycles in quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Patrick

    2015-04-27

    In this thesis we investigate Limit Cycles in Quantum Systems. Limit cycles are a renormalization group (RG) topology. When degrees of freedom are integrated out, the coupling constants flow periodically in a closed curve. The presence of limit cycles is restricted by the necessary condition of discrete scale invariance. A signature of discrete scale invariance and limit cycles is log-periodic behavior. The first part of this thesis is concerned with the study of limit cycles with the similarity renormalization group (SRG). Limit cycles are mainly investigated within conventional renormalization group frameworks, where degrees of freedom, which are larger than a given cutoff, are integrated out. In contrast, in the SRG potentials are unitarily transformed and thereby obtain a band-diagonal structure. The width of the band structure can be regarded as an effective cutoff. We investigate the appearance of limit cycles in the SRG evolution. Our aim is to extract signatures as well as the scaling factor of the limit cycle. We consider the 1/R{sup 2}-potential in a two-body system and a three-body system with large scattering lengths. Both systems display a limit cycle. Besides the frequently used kinetic energy generator we apply the exponential and the inverse generator. In the second part of this thesis, Limit Cycles at Finite Density, we examine the pole structure of the scattering amplitude for distinguishable fermions at zero temperature in the medium. Unequal masses and a filled Fermi sphere for each fermion species are considered. We focus on negative scattering lengths and the unitary limit. The properties of the three-body spectrum in the medium and implications for the phase structure of ultracold Fermi gases are discussed.

  3. Limit Cycles and Conformal Invariance

    CERN Document Server

    Fortin, Jean-Francois; Stergiou, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    There is a widely held belief that conformal field theories (CFTs) require zero beta functions. Nevertheless, the work of Jack and Osborn implies that the beta functions are not actually the quantites that decide conformality, but until recently no such behavior had been exhibited. Our recent work has led to the discovery of CFTs with nonzero beta functions, more precisely CFTs that live on recurrent trajectories, e.g., limit cycles, of the beta-function vector field. To demonstrate this we study the S function of Jack and Osborn. We use Weyl consistency conditions to show that it vanishes at fixed points and agrees with the generator Q of limit cycles on them. Moreover, we compute S to third order in perturbation theory, and explicitly verify that it agrees with our previous determinations of Q. A byproduct of our analysis is that, in perturbation theory, unitarity and scale invariance imply conformal invariance in four-dimensional quantum field theories. Finally, we study some properties of these new, "cycl...

  4. Thermal cycling in multifilamentary superconducting composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragao, E.E.A. de.

    1984-01-01

    NbTi-Cu multifilamentary superconducting composites were embedded, polished, characterized by microscopic techniques, and analyzed in a qualitative and semiquantitative way by energy dispersion technique. The superconductors were submitted to thermal cycling between the ambient temperature and the boiling point of helium (4.2K), for different number of cycles. The aims were to study the correlation between the possible microstructural damages due to thermal stresses arising in the composite during cycling and the variation of properties of the material with the number of cycles as well as to verify the validity of an elastic model for thermal stresses for low temperature cycles. (author)

  5. Thermal stress relaxation in magnesium composites during thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trojanova, Z.; Lukac, P. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)); Kiehn, J.; Kainer, K.U.; Mordike, B.L. (Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany))

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that the internal friction of Mg - Saffil metal matrix composites can be influenced by thermal stresses, if MMCc are submitted to thermal cycling between room temperature and an upper temperature of cycling. These stresses can be accommodated by generation and motion of dislocations giving the formation of the microplastic zones. The thermal stress relaxation depends on the upper temperature of cycling, the volume fraction of reinforcement and the matrix composition and can result in plastic deformation and strain hardening of the matrix without applied stress. The internal friction measurements can be used for non destructive investigation of processes which influence the mechanical properties. (orig.)

  6. Ultrafast Thermal Cycling of Solar Panels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wall, T

    1998-01-01

    Two new cyclers that utilize a novel hybrid approach to perform fast thermal cycling of solar panels have been built and are now operational in the Mechanics and Materials Technology Center at The Aerospace Corporation...

  7. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  8. Research on nanosatellite thermal cycling test applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiyuan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to verify the spacecraft performance in extreme temperature and vacuum, and to screen spacecraft early defect, generally spacecraft TV (Thermal Vacuum test should be carried out before launch. Designed in small size and with low cost, nanosatellite is made from a large number of COTS (Commercial off the shelf components; therefore, the test should be low-cost, simple and quick. With the intention of screen out early defects of the product in lower cost, nanosatellite developers usually use TC (Thermal Cycling test to partially replace the TV test because TV test is more expensive. However, due to the air convection, TC test is different from TV test in heat transfer characteristics, which may be over-test or short-test in TC test. This paper aims to explore the applicability of different nanosatellites in TC/TV test. Using rule number analysis method, Heat Transfer model in vacuum and ambient environment has been built to analyse the characteristics of heat transfer under different temperature and characteristic length, and to deliver the recommended limits on using TC test instead of the TV test. The CFD and test methods are applied to verify the rule number analysis above.

  9. Methods and compositions for rapid thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Benett, William J.; Frank, James M.; Deotte, Joshua R.; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2018-04-10

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A microfluidic heat exchanger with an internal porous medium is coupled to tanks containing cold fluid and hot fluid. Fluid flows alternately from the cold tank and the hot tank into the porous medium, cooling and heating samples contained in the microfluidic heat exchanger's sample wells. A valve may be coupled to the tanks and a pump, and switching the position of the valve may switch the source and direction of fluid flowing through the porous medium. A controller may control the switching of valve positions based on the temperature of the samples and determined temperature thresholds. A sample tray for containing samples to be thermally cycled may be used in conjunction with the thermal cycling system. A surface or internal electrical heater may aid in heating the samples, or may replace the necessity for the hot tank.

  10. Methods and compositions for rapid thermal cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Benett, William J.; Frank, James M.; Deotte, Joshua R.; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2015-10-27

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A microfluidic heat exchanger with an internal porous medium is coupled to tanks containing cold fluid and hot fluid. Fluid flows alternately from the cold tank and the hot tank into the porous medium, cooling and heating samples contained in the microfluidic heat exchanger's sample wells. A valve may be coupled to the tanks and a pump, and switching the position of the valve may switch the source and direction of fluid flowing through the porous medium. A controller may control the switching of valve positions based on the temperature of the samples and determined temperature thresholds. A sample tray for containing samples to be thermally cycled may be used in conjunction with the thermal cycling system. A surface or internal electrical heater may aid in heating the samples, or may replace the necessity for the hot tank.

  11. Reconstruction of the limit cycles by the delays method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo D, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Calleros M, G.

    2003-01-01

    The boiling water reactors (BWRs) are designed for usually to operate in a stable-lineal regime. In a limit cycle the behavior of the one system is no lineal-stable. In a BWR, instabilities of nuclear- thermohydraulics nature can take the reactor to a limit cycle. The limit cycles should to be avoided since the oscillations of power can cause thermal fatigue to the fuel and/or shroud. In this work the employment of the delays method is analyzed for its application in the detection of limit cycles in a nuclear power plant. The foundations of the method and it application to power signals to different operation conditions are presented. The analyzed signals are: to steady state, nuclear-thermohydraulic instability, a non linear transitory and, finally, failure of a controller plant . Among the main results it was found that the delays method can be applied to detect limit cycles in the power monitors of the BWR reactors. It was also found that the first zero of the autocorrelation function is an appropriate approach to select the delay in the detection of limit cycles, for the analyzed cases. (Author)

  12. Improvements in steam cycle thermal power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The invention provides improvements in steam cycle thermal power stations. The power station adapted to supply a network with variable requirements, is according provided with a heat accumulator. A feed water re-heater using steam taken in the steam generator, is mounted downstream of the water-station. This arrangement permits to substantially increase the temperature of the water admitted into the steam generator and allows the accumulator to restore the heat accumulated at a higher-rate, at peak periods. This can be applied to power stations, the basic thermal source of which is adapted only to moderate working conditions [fr

  13. Thermal stresses and their possible limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Montfort, C.

    1974-01-01

    The method proposed is not restricted to heat exchangers. It concerns the means of determining the behaviour of materials subjected to thermal and mechanical stresses. The paper has two parts: I. Method for the rapid determination of thermal stresses. II. Possible limits of stresses. Field of elasticity and plasticity [fr

  14. The limits to solar thermal electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainer, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The potential and limits of solar thermal power systems depend primarily on their capacity to meet electricity demand in mid-winter, and the associated cost, storage and other implications. Evidence on output and costs is analysed. Most attention is given to central receivers. Problems of low radiation levels, embodied energy costs, variability and storage are discussed and are found to set significant difficulties for large scale solar thermal supply in less than ideal latitudes and seasons. It is concluded that for solar thermal systems to meet a large fraction of anticipated global electricity demand in winter would involve prohibitive capital costs. - Highlights: • Output and capital cost data for various solar thermal technologies is examined. • Special attention is given to performance in winter. • Attention is also given to the effect of solar intermittency. • Implications for storage are considered. • It is concluded that there are significant limits to solar thermal power

  15. Prolonging thermal barrier coated specimen life by thermal cycle management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.; Poolos, N. P.

    1981-01-01

    Thermal barrier coatings applied to the heated side of engine components such as seals, combustor, and blades of a gas turbine offer a potential increase in efficiency through the use of higher gas temperatures or less cooling air or benefits arising from extended component life by reducing component metal temperatures. The considered investigation has the objective to show that while a thermal barrier coated (TBC) specimen can be brought to a fixed temperature using various fuel-air ratio (F/A) values, lower calculated stresses are associated with lower (F/A) values. This implies that control of (F/A) values (i.e., rates of heat input) during the starting transient and to a lesser extent during shutdown and operation, offers a potential method of improving TBC lifetime through thermal cycle management.

  16. On Limit Cycles in Supersymmetric Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Fortin, Jean-Francois; Murphy, Christopher W.; Stergiou, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Contrary to popular belief conformality does not require zero beta functions. This follows from the work of Jack and Osborn, and examples in non-supersymmetric theories were recently found by some of us. In this note we show that such examples are absent in unitary N=1 supersymmetric four-dimensional field theories. More specifically, we show to all orders in perturbation theory that the beta-function vector field of such theories does not admit limit cycles. A corollary of our result is that unitary N=1 supersymmetric four-dimensional theories cannot be superscale-invariant without being superconformal.

  17. Improvements in steam cycle thermal power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1973-01-01

    The invention relates to improvements in steam-cycle thermal power stations. In a heat storage and recovery installation, two exchangers provide a heat transfert between the working fluid and a thermofluid, in a direction or the other according as heat must be stored or recovered. In the case of heat storage, the exchanger makes use of live steam as heating fluid. In the case of heat recovery, the steam generator feed-water is heated in the exchangers at the expanse of the thermo-fluid, then in a water reheater using live steam as heating fluid. This can be applied to power stations feeding variable consumption networks [fr

  18. Effects of Black Hole Spin on the Limit-Cycle Behaviour of Accretion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a spatially 1.5-dimensional, time-dependent numerical study of accretion disks around Kerr black holes. Our study focuses on the limit-cycle behavior of thermally unstable accretion disks. We find that maximal luminosity may be a more appropriate probe of black hole spin than the cycle duration and influence ...

  19. Thermal Cycling of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet Fuel Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

    1969-12-08

    In phase I tungsten clad cermet fuel specimens were thermal cycled, to study the effects of fuel loading, fuel particle size, stablized fuel, duplex coatings, and fabrication techniques on dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In phase II the best combination of the factors studies in phase I were combined in one specimen for evaluation.

  20. Serrated magnetic properties in metallic glass by thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ri Myong-Chol; Sohrabi, Sajad; Ding Da-Wei; Wang Wei-Hua; Dong Bang-Shao; Zhou Shao-Xiong

    2017-01-01

    Fe-based metallic glasses (MGs) with excellent soft magnetic properties are applicable in a wide range of electronic industry. We show that the cryogenic thermal cycle has a sensitive effect on soft magnetic properties of Fe 78 Si 9 B 13 glassy ribbon. The values of magnetic induction (or magnetic flux density) B and coercivity H c show fluctuation with increasing number of thermal cycles. This phenomenon is explained as thermal-cycle-induced stochastically structural aging or rejuvenation which randomly fluctuates magnetic anisotropy and, consequently, the magnetic induction and coercivity. Overall, increasing the number of thermal cycles improves the soft magnetic properties of the ribbon. The results could help understand the relationship between relaxation and magnetic property, and the thermal cycle could provide an effective approach to improving performances of metallic glasses in industry. (paper)

  1. Oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jutfelt, Fredrik; Norin, Tommy; Ern, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    The Commentary by Pörtner, Bock and Mark (Pörtner et al., 2017) elaborates on the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Biology Commentaries allow for personal and controversial views, yet the journal also mandates that ‘opinion and fact must...... be clearly distinguishable’ (http://jeb.biologists.org/content/articletypes# comms). We contend that Pörtner et al. (2017) do not meet this requirement, and that they present a biased account of the OCLTT hypothesis. We raise two main points: (1) Pörtner et al. (2017) do not do justice to the growing number...

  2. Changing credit limits, changing business cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Ravn, Søren Hove; Santoro, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    In the last half-century, capital markets across the industrialized world have undergone massive deregulation, involving large increases in the loan-to-value (LTV) ratios of house- holds and firms. We study the business-cycle implications of this phenomenon in an es- timated dynamic general...... economies, due to credit constraints becoming non-binding more often. The non-monotonic relationship be- tween credit market conditions and macroeconomic fluctuations carries important lessons for regulatory and macroprudential policymakers. While reducing the average LTV ratio may unintentionally increase...... macroeconomic volatility, a countercyclical LTV ratio proves to be successful in dampening business cycle fluctuations and, most importantly, avoiding dramatic output drops....

  3. Changing Credit Limits, Changing Business Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Ravn, Søren Hove; Santoro, Emiliano

    In the last decades, capital markets across the industrialized world have undergone massive deregulation, involving increases in the loan-to-value (LTV) ratios of households and firms. We study the business-cycle implications of this phenomenon in a dynamic general equilibrium model with multiple...

  4. Investigation of boiling water reactor stability and limit-cycle amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Euler, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Galerkin's method has been applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR) dynamics model consisting of the point kinetics equations, which describe the neutronics, and a feedback transfer function, which describes the thermal hydraulics. The result is a low-order approximate solution describing BWR behavior during small-amplitude limit-cycle oscillations. The approximate solution has been used to obtain a stability condition, show that the average reactor power must increase during limit-cycle oscillations, and qualitatively determine how changes in transfer function values affect the limit-cycle amplitude. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  5. The Limits of Schumpeter's Business Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2006-01-01

    Schumpeter designed Business Cycles as his major work, but it has never received much attention. The problem is partly related to its complex treatment of the theory of waveform economic evolution and the related study of the statistics and history of 150 years of capitalist evolution, but the book...... also makes a deliberate analytical delimitation: the emphasis on economic evolution and the placement of institutional change as an external factor. This definition of the task did not allow Schumpeter to make a full-blown study of the history of capitalist evolution. To some extent, he overcame...

  6. Bifurcation of limit cycles for cubic reversible systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the bifurcation of limit cycles of a class of cubic reversible system having a center at the origin. We prove that this system has at least four limit cycles produced by the period annulus around the center under cubic perturbations

  7. Mechanical Motion Induced by Spatially Distributed Limit-Cycle Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Hidetsugu; Mukae, Yuuki

    2017-03-01

    Spatially distributed limited-cycle oscillators are seen in various physical and biological systems. In internal organs, mechanical motions are induced by the stimuli of spatially distributed limit-cycle oscillators. We study several mechanical motions by limit-cycle oscillators using simple model equations. One problem is deformation waves of radius oscillation induced by desynchronized limit-cycle oscillators, which is motivated by peristaltic motion of the small intestine. A resonance-like phenomenon is found in the deformation waves, and particles can be transported by the deformation waves. Another is the beating motion of the heart. The expansion and contraction motion is realized by a spatially synchronized limit-cycle oscillation; however, the strong beating disappears by spiral chaos, which is closely related to serious arrhythmia in the heart.

  8. Reconstruction of the limit cycles by the delays method; Reconstruccion de ciclos limite por el metodo de los retardos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo D, R.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Calleros M, G. [CFE, CNLV, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: rcd@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The boiling water reactors (BWRs) are designed for usually to operate in a stable-lineal regime. In a limit cycle the behavior of the one system is no lineal-stable. In a BWR, instabilities of nuclear- thermohydraulics nature can take the reactor to a limit cycle. The limit cycles should to be avoided since the oscillations of power can cause thermal fatigue to the fuel and/or shroud. In this work the employment of the delays method is analyzed for its application in the detection of limit cycles in a nuclear power plant. The foundations of the method and it application to power signals to different operation conditions are presented. The analyzed signals are: to steady state, nuclear-thermohydraulic instability, a non linear transitory and, finally, failure of a controller plant . Among the main results it was found that the delays method can be applied to detect limit cycles in the power monitors of the BWR reactors. It was also found that the first zero of the autocorrelation function is an appropriate approach to select the delay in the detection of limit cycles, for the analyzed cases. (Author)

  9. Fast thermal cycling-enhanced electromigration in power metallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Van Hieu; Salm, Cora; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Bisschop, J.; Mouthaan, A.J.; Kuper, F.G.

    Fast thermal nterconnects used in power ICs are susceptible to short circuit failure due to a combination of fast thermal cycling and electromigration stresses. In this paper, we present a study of electromigration-induced extrusion short-circuit failure in a standard two level metallization

  10. Effects of thermal cycling on aluminum metallization of power diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Mads; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; Kristensen, Peter Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of aluminum metallization on top of power electronic chips is a well-known wear out phenomenon under power cycling conditions. However, the origins of reconstruction are still under discussion. In the current study, a method for carrying out passive thermal cycling of power diodes...

  11. Eutectic mixtures of some fatty acids for latent heat storage: Thermal properties and thermal reliability with respect to thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sari, Ahmet [Department of Chemistry, Gaziosmanpasa University, 60240 Tokat (Turkey)]. E-mail: asari@gop.edu.tr

    2006-06-15

    Accelerated thermal cycle tests have been conducted to study the change in melting temperatures and latent heats of fusion of the eutectic mixtures of lauric acid (LA)-myristic acid (MA), lauric acid (LA)-palmitic acid (PA) and myristic acid (MA)-stearic acid (SA) as latent heat storage materials. The thermal properties of these materials were determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis method. The thermal reliability of the eutectic mixtures after melt/freeze cycles of 720, 1080 and 1460 was also evaluated using the DSC curves. The accelerated thermal cycle tests indicate that the melting temperatures usually tend to decrease, and the variations in the latent heats of fusion are irregular with increasing number of thermal cycles. Moreover, the probable reasons for the change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures after repeated thermal cycles were investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic analysis indicates that the accelerated melt/freeze processes do not cause any degradation in the chemical structure of the mixtures. The change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures with increasing number of thermal cycles is only because of the presence of certain amounts of impurities in the fatty acids used in their preparation. It is concluded that the tested eutectic mixtures have reasonable thermal properties and thermal reliability as phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat storage in any solar heating applications that include a four year utilization period.

  12. Eutectic mixtures of some fatty acids for latent heat storage: Thermal properties and thermal reliability with respect to thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Accelerated thermal cycle tests have been conducted to study the change in melting temperatures and latent heats of fusion of the eutectic mixtures of lauric acid (LA)-myristic acid (MA), lauric acid (LA)-palmitic acid (PA) and myristic acid (MA)-stearic acid (SA) as latent heat storage materials. The thermal properties of these materials were determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis method. The thermal reliability of the eutectic mixtures after melt/freeze cycles of 720, 1080 and 1460 was also evaluated using the DSC curves. The accelerated thermal cycle tests indicate that the melting temperatures usually tend to decrease, and the variations in the latent heats of fusion are irregular with increasing number of thermal cycles. Moreover, the probable reasons for the change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures after repeated thermal cycles were investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic analysis indicates that the accelerated melt/freeze processes do not cause any degradation in the chemical structure of the mixtures. The change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures with increasing number of thermal cycles is only because of the presence of certain amounts of impurities in the fatty acids used in their preparation. It is concluded that the tested eutectic mixtures have reasonable thermal properties and thermal reliability as phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat storage in any solar heating applications that include a four year utilization period

  13. Engine cycle design considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaccio, D.G.; Scheil, C.M.; Collins, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    A top-level study was performed which addresses nuclear thermal propulsion system engine cycle options and their applicability to support future Space Exploration Initiative manned lunar and Mars missions. Technical and development issues associated with expander, gas generator, and bleed cycle near-term, solid core nuclear thermal propulsion engines are identified and examined. In addition to performance and weight the influence of the engine cycle type on key design selection parameters such as design complexity, reliability, development time, and cost are discussed. Representative engine designs are presented and compared. Their applicability and performance impact on typical near-term lunar and Mars missions are shown

  14. Thermodynamic limits of energy harvesting from outgoing thermal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhiraju, Siddharth; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2018-04-17

    We derive the thermodynamic limits of harvesting power from the outgoing thermal radiation from the ambient to the cold outer space. The derivations are based on a duality relation between thermal engines that harvest solar radiation and those that harvest outgoing thermal radiation. In particular, we derive the ultimate limit for harvesting outgoing thermal radiation, which is analogous to the Landsberg limit for solar energy harvesting, and show that the ultimate limit far exceeds what was previously thought to be possible. As an extension of our work, we also derive the ultimate limit of efficiency of thermophotovoltaic systems.

  15. Study on durability for thermal cycle of planar SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Motoo; Nakata, Kei-ichi; Wakayama, Sin-ichi [Tonen Corp., Saitama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    TONEN CORPORATION has developed planar type SOFC since 1986. We demonstrated the output of 1.3 kW in 1991 and 5.1 kW in 1995. Simultaneously we have studied how to raise electric efficiency and reliability utilizing hydrogen and propane as fuel. Durability for thermal cycle is one of the most important problems of planar SOFC to make it more practical. The planar type SOFC is made up of separator, zirconia electrolyte and glass sealant. The thermal expansion of these components are expected to be the same value, however, they still possess small differences. In this situation, a thermal cycle causes a thermal stress due to the difference of the cell components and is often followed by a rupture in cell components, therefore, the analysis of the thermal stress should give us much useful information. The thermal cycle process consists of a heating up and cooling down procedure. Zirconia electrolyte is not bonded to the separator under the condition of the initial heating up procedure, and glass sealant becomes soft or melts and glass seals spaces between the zirconia and separator. The glass sealant becomes harder with the cooling down procedure. Moreover, zirconia is tightly bonded with separator below a temperature which is defined as a constraint temperature and thermal stress also occurs. This indicates that the heating up process relaxes the thermal stress and the cooling down increases it. In this paper, we simulated dependence of the stress on the sealing configuration, thermal expansion of sealant and constraint temperature of sealant glass. Furthermore, we presented SOFC electrical properties after a thermal cycle.

  16. Limit cycles bifurcating from a perturbed quartic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coll, Bartomeu, E-mail: dmitcv0@ps.uib.ca [Dept. de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Facultat de ciencies, 07071 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Llibre, Jaume, E-mail: jllibre@mat.uab.ca [Dept. de Matematiques, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cc 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Prohens, Rafel, E-mail: dmirps3@ps.uib.ca [Dept. de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Facultat de ciencies, 07071 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: We study polynomial perturbations of a quartic center. We get simultaneous upper and lower bounds for the bifurcating limit cycles. A higher lower bound for the maximum number of limit cycles is obtained. We obtain more limit cycles than the number obtained in the cubic case. - Abstract: We consider the quartic center x{sup .}=-yf(x,y),y{sup .}=xf(x,y), with f(x, y) = (x + a) (y + b) (x + c) and abc {ne} 0. Here we study the maximum number {sigma} of limit cycles which can bifurcate from the periodic orbits of this quartic center when we perturb it inside the class of polynomial vector fields of degree n, using the averaging theory of first order. We prove that 4[(n - 1)/2] + 4 {<=} {sigma} {<=} 5[(n - 1)/2] + 14, where [{eta}] denotes the integer part function of {eta}.

  17. Canard Limit Cycle of the Holling-Tanner Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongwu Zheng

    2014-01-01

    growth rate of the predator small enough. The obtained result shows that there may be at most one canard limit cycle, and the range of small parameters is estimated. The phenomenon of outbreak is explained.

  18. Limit Cycle Prediction Based on Evolutionary Multiobjective Formulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Katebi

    2009-01-01

    In the second part, SIDF is extended to the class of nonlinear multiinput multioutput (MIMO systems containing separable nonlinear elements of any general form. In both cases linearized harmonic balance equations are derived and the search for a limit cycle is formulated as a multiobjective problem. Multiobjective genetic algorithm (MOGA is utilized to search the space of parameters of theoretically possible limit cycle operations. Case studies are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  19. The effects of thermal cycling on the thermal deformation of graphite-polyimide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyer, M. W.; Hagaman, J. A.

    1979-01-01

    The effects of repetitive thermal cycling on the thermal deformation of graphite-fiber-reinforced polyimide laminates are investigated. Unsymmetric and unidirectional laminate specimens were cycled in an oven between room temperature and 180 or 315 C five times, and temperature and deformation were recorded as a function of time in order to measure thermal deformation. The results of the lower temperature cycling reveal a hysteresis-like effect in the temperature-thermal deformation relation for a single cycle, while no differences are detected from one cycle to the next. The response of an eight-layer curved specimen is found to agree well with predictions based on a piecewise-linear lamination theory, however, four-layer laminate response could not be explained. The results of the high-temperature tests also indicate a dependence of the strain on whether the specimen was being heated or cooled, however quantitative results are considered unreliable, due to strain gage difficulties.

  20. U.S. births and limit cycle models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachter, K W; Lee, R D

    1989-02-01

    Lee's (1974) formal demographic feedback models summarize the implications for births and age-structure of neo-Malthusian theories of baby booms such as those of Easterlin. For some parameter values, such models imply sustained cycles, so-called "limit cycles", in births. Frauenthal and Swick recently reestimated a continuous-age version of Lee's basic cohort model with U.S. series and, contrary to Lee's original findings, concluded that "limit cycles oscillations have been occurring in U.S. births." This article disputes their conclusion, ascribing it to an inconsistency in detrending procedures. Furthermore, it corrects Lee's original conclusion by showing that his alternative period labor-force feedback model, estimated from U.S. series, leads to cycles of implausibly long period. This article thus reopens the question of whether any feedback model could account for the observed cycles in U.S. births.

  1. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Using Double-Stage Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Ikegami

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC using non-azeotropic mixtures such as ammonia/water as working fluid and the multistage cycle has been investigated in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the cycle because of small ocean temperature differences. The performance and effectiveness of the multistage cycle are barely understood. In addition, previous evaluation methods of heat exchange process cannot clearly indicate the influence of the thermophysical characteristics of the working fluid on the power output. Consequently, this study investigated the influence of reduction of the irreversible losses in the heat exchange process on the system performance in double-stage Rankine cycle using pure working fluid. Single Rankine, double-stage Rankine and Kalina cycles were analyzed to ascertain the system characteristics. The simple evaluation method of the temperature difference between the working fluid and the seawater is applied to this analysis. From the results of the parametric performance analysis it can be considered that double-stage Rankine cycle using pure working fluid can reduce the irreversible losses in the heat exchange process as with the Kalina cycle using an ammonia/water mixture. Considering the maximum power efficiency obtained in the study, double-stage Rankine and Kalina cycles can improve the power output by reducing the irreversible losses in the cycle.

  2. Effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on microhardness of acrylic resin denture base.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; Dos Santos, Daniela Micheline; Baptista, Gabriella Trunckle; Moreno, Amália; Andreotti, Agda Marobo; Dekon, Stéfan Fiuza de Carvalho

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on the microhardness of acrylic resins denture base. Four different brands of acrylic resins were evaluated: Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico and Lucitone. Each brand of acrylic resin was divided into four groups (n = 7) according to the disinfection method (microwave, Efferdent, 4% chlorhexidine and 1% hypochlorite). Samples were disinfected during 60 days. Before and after disinfection, samples were thermal cycled between 5-55 °C with 30-s dwell times for 1000 cycles. The microhardness was measured using a microhardener, at baseline (B), after first thermal cycling (T1), after disinfection (D) and after second thermal cycling (T2). The microhardness values of all groups reduced over time. QC-20 acrylic resin exhibited the lowest microhardness values. At B and T1 periods, the acrylic resins exhibited statistically greater microhardness values when compared to D and T2 periods. It can be concluded that the microhardness values of the acrylic resins denture base were affected by the thermal cycling and disinfection procedures. However, all microhardness values obtained herein are within acceptable clinical limits for the acrylic resins.

  3. Thermal energy dissipation and xanthophyll cycles beyond the Arabidopsis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Plazaola, José Ignacio; Esteban, Raquel; Fernández-Marín, Beatriz; Kranner, Ilse; Porcar-Castell, Albert

    2012-09-01

    Thermal dissipation of excitation energy is a fundamental photoprotection mechanism in plants. Thermal energy dissipation is frequently estimated using the quenching of the chlorophyll fluorescence signal, termed non-photochemical quenching. Over the last two decades, great progress has been made in the understanding of the mechanism of thermal energy dissipation through the use of a few model plants, mainly Arabidopsis. Nonetheless, an emerging number of studies suggest that this model represents only one strategy among several different solutions for the environmental adjustment of thermal energy dissipation that have evolved among photosynthetic organisms in the course of evolution. In this review, a detailed analysis of three examples highlights the need to use models other than Arabidopsis: first, overwintering evergreens that develop a sustained form of thermal energy dissipation; second, desiccation tolerant plants that induce rapid thermal energy dissipation; and third, understorey plants in which a complementary lutein epoxide cycle modulates thermal energy dissipation. The three examples have in common a shift from a photosynthetically efficient state to a dissipative conformation, a strategy widely distributed among stress-tolerant evergreen perennials. Likewise, they show a distinct operation of the xanthophyll cycle. Expanding the list of model species beyond Arabidopsis will enhance our knowledge of these mechanisms and increase the synergy of the current studies now dispersed over a wide number of species.

  4. Effects of thermal cycling on composite materials for space structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tompkins, Stephen S.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the thermal and mechanical properties of composite materials that are candidates for space structures are briefly described. The results from a thermal analysis of the orbiting Space Station Freedom is used to define a typical thermal environment and the parameters that cause changes in the thermal history. The interactions of this environment with composite materials are shown and described. The effects of this interaction on the integrity as well as the properties of GR/thermoset, Gr/thermoplastic, Gr/metal and Gr/glass composite materials are discussed. Emphasis is placed on the effects of the interaction that are critical to precision spacecraft. Finally, ground test methodology are briefly discussed.

  5. Weldability investigation steel P 91 by weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates results of hardness and impact energy of thermal cycle simulated specimens of high-alloy steel P 91 and their dependence on cooling time from 800 to 500 °C. Results were obtained by measuring hardness HV 1 and by experimental testing of Charpy notched specimens. Metallographic analysis of samples was performed on scanning electronic microscope.

  6. Limit cycles in nonlinear excitation of clusters of classical oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lauro, E.; De Martino, S.; Falanga, M.; Ixaru, L. Gr.

    2009-10-01

    In this paper we develop a numerical procedure for detecting the existence of limit cycles in nonlinear excitation of clusters of classical harmonic oscillators. Our technique is able to compute also the main parameters of a limit cycle, that is the amplitudes and the period. The numerical method, based on the propagation matrix formalism, is transparent and easy to apply. It may find application in various areas where nonlinear excitations are involved, e.g., sound and mechanic vibrations in musical instruments, ground vibrations in volcanic areas, and sea tides.

  7. Method for limiting movement of a thermal shield for a nuclear reactor, and thermal shield displacement limiter therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Boyd, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method of limiting the movement of a thermal shield of a nuclear reactor. It comprises: machining at least four (4) pockets in upper portions of a thermal shield circumferentially about a core barrel of a nuclear reactor to receive key-wave inserts; tapping bolt holes in the pockets of the thermal shield to receive bolts; positioning key-wave inserts into the pockets of the thermal shield to be bolted in place with the bolt holes; machining dowel holes at least partially through the positioned key-way inserts and the thermal shield to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the key-way insert and thermal shield to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; sliding limiter keys into the key-way inserts and bolting the limiter keys to the core barrel to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative and the core barrel while allowing radial and axial movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; machining dowel holes through the limiter key and at least partially through the core barrel to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the limiter key and core barrel to restrain tangential movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel of the nuclear reactor

  8. Thermal Cycling on Fatigue Failure of the Plutonium Vitrification Melter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jordan, Jeffrey; Gorczyca, Jennifer

    2009-02-11

    One method for disposition of excess plutonium is vitrification into cylindrical wasteforms. Due to the hazards of working with plutonium, the vitrification process must be carried out remotely in a shielded environment. Thus, the equipment must be easily maintained. With their simple design, induction melters satisfy this criterion, making them ideal candidates for plutonium vitrification. However, due to repeated heating and cooling cycles and differences in coefficients of thermal expansion of contacting materials fatigue failure of the induction melter is of concern. Due to the cost of the melter, the number of cycles to failure is critical. This paper presents a method for determining the cycles to failure for an induction melter by using the results from thermal and structural analyses as input to a fatigue failure model.

  9. Effect of thermal cycling on change of titanium alloy properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anufriev, V.P.; Bogachev, I.N.; Veksler, Yu.G.

    1980-01-01

    Investigated are the change of mechanical and physical properties of VT1-0, VT3-1 and VT-16 alloys, as well as resistances of their thermal fatigue under thermocycling (TC). It is shown that mechanical properties of the investigated alloys increase in the result of thermocycling. Maximum of the strength characteristics is obtained at 10 cycles on fine-grained alloys after TC. Maximum of strength and hardness on the samples with coarse grain is described and is shifted towards the lower number of cycles. VT1-0, VT3-1 and VT-16 alloys have high resistant ability against thermal fatigue in themocycling with maximal cycle temperature below recrystallization threshold

  10. Limit cycles and stiffness control with variable stiffness actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carloni, Raffaella; Marconi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Variable stiffness actuators realize highly dynamic systems, whose inherent mechanical compliance can be properly exploited to obtain a robust and energy-efficient behavior. The paper presents a control strategy for variable stiffness actuators with the primarily goal of tracking a limit cycle

  11. Rainfall limit of the N cycle on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Stephanie A.; Michalski, Greg; Thiemens, Mark; Quinn, Richard C.; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Kohl, Steven; Wankel, Scott D.; Kendall, Carol; McKay, Christopher P.; Amundson, Ronald

    2007-09-01

    In most climates on Earth, biological processes control soil N. In the Atacama Desert of Chile, aridity severely limits biology, and soils accumulate atmospheric NO3-. We examined this apparent transformation of the soil N cycle using a series of ancient Atacama Desert soils (>2 My) that vary in rainfall (21 to Mars.

  12. Centres and limit cycles for an extended Kukles system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Pearson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We present conditions for the origin to be a centre for a class of cubic systems. Some of the centre conditions are determined by finding complicated invariant functions. We also investigate the coexistence of fine foci and the simultaneous bifurcation of limit cycles from them.

  13. Thermo-optical "canard orbits" and excitable limit cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Francesco; Catalán, Gustau; Sánchez, Pedro; Balle, Salvador; Piro, Oreste

    2004-02-20

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the existence of canard orbits and excitable quasiharmonic limit cycles in the thermo-optical dynamics of semiconductor optical amplifiers. We also observe the phase locking of the noise-induced spikes to the small-amplitude Hopf quasiharmonic oscillations, recently predicted by Makarov, Nekorkin, and Velarde [Phys. Rev. Lett. 86, 3431 (2001)

  14. Thermal cycling behaviour of lanthanum zirconate as EB-PVD thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Bagcivan, N.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal cycling tests with two different EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were performed in a furnace cycle test. The results of these tests showed an increase of endurable cycle number when pyrochloric La 2 Zr 2 O 7 was used as TBC. 1865 cycles were reached with La 2 Zr 2 O 7 and 1380 cycles with 7 weigth-% yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) EB-PVD TBC. Additional investigation was made with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to investigate morphology and to determine chemical composition by electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. X-Ray diffraction was performed to analyze structural constitution of deposited coatings. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  15. Effect of thermal cycling on ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, G.; Hendricks, R. C.

    1980-01-01

    The paper studies the comparative life of plasma-sprayed ZrO2-Y2O3 thermal barrier coatings on NiCrAlY bond coats on Rene 41 in short (4 min) and long (57 min) thermal cycles at 1040 C in a 0.3-Mach flame. Attention is given to determining the effect of short- and long-duration cycles on ZrO2-Y2O3 coatings, the cause of any cycle frequency effects, and methods to improve tolerance to thermal stress. Short cycles greatly reduced the life of the ceramic coating in terms of time at temperatures as compared to longer cycles, the failed coating indicating compressive failure. The experiments and stress calculations show that repeatedly subjecting a ceramic coating to high rates of initial heating has a more destructive influence on the coating than sustained operation at temperature. The effect of such thermal compressive stresses might be minimized through coating deposition and thickness control and by turbine cycle measurement to keep starting heating rates below critical values.

  16. The role of heater thermal response in reactor thermal limits during oscillartory two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles, A.E.; Brown, N.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Vasil`ev, A.D. [Nuclear Safety Institute, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Wendel, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analytical and numerical investigations of critical heat flux (CHF) and reactor thermal limits are conducted for oscillatory two-phase flows often associated with natural circulation conditions. It is shown that the CHF and associated thermal limits depend on the amplitude of the flow oscillations, the period of the flow oscillations, and the thermal properties and dimensions of the heater. The value of the thermal limit can be much lower in unsteady flow situations than would be expected using time average flow conditions. It is also shown that the properties of the heater strongly influence the thermal limit value in unsteady flow situations, which is very important to the design of experiments to evaluate thermal limits for reactor fuel systems.

  17. Thermally induced error : Density limit for magnetic data storage

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Richard; Chantrell, Roy; Nowak, Ulrich; Lyberatos, Andreas; Richter, H.-J.

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic data storage is pervasive in the preservation of digital information and the rapid pace of computer development requires ever more capacity. Increasing the storage density for magnetic hard disk drives requires a reduced bit size, previously thought to be limited by the thermal stability of the constituent magnetic grains. The limiting storage density in magnetic recording is investigated treating the writing of bits as a thermodynamic process. A 'thermal writability' factor is intro...

  18. Parametric Studies Of Failure Mechanisms In Thermal Barrier Coatings During Thermal Cycling Using FEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivathsa, B.; Das, D. K.

    2015-12-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) are widely used on different hot components of gas turbine engines such as blades and vanes. Although, several mechanisms for the failure of the TBCs have been suggested, it is largely accepted that the durability of these coatings is primarily determined by the residual stresses that are developed during the thermal cycling. In the present study, the residual stress build-up in an electron beam physical vapour deposition (EB-PVD) based TBCs on a coupon during thermal cycling has been studied by varying three parameters such as the cooling rate, TBC thickness and substrate thickness. A two-dimensional thermomechanical generalized plane strain finite element simulations have been performed for thousand cycles. It was observed that these variations change the stress profile significantly and the stress severity factor increases non-linearly. Overall, the predictions of the model agree with reported experimental results and help in predicting the failure mechanisms.

  19. Assessment of variations in thermal cycle life data of thermal barrier coated rods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, R. C.; Mcdonald, G.

    1981-01-01

    The reported study had the purpose to examine variations in cyclic life and in adhesive/cohesive coating strength. Possible effects of heating rate, stress reversal, temperature level, and ceramic deposition methods on coating life were also investigated. Life cycle data for 22 thermal barrier coated rods were examined and found to be statistically modeled by normal or log-normal distributions. The sample mean was 1330 cycles with a standard deviation of 520 cycles. Adhesive/cohesive pulloff strength data for 20 thermal barrier coated flat head piston specimens were taken. The average pulloff stress was 9 MPa with a standard deviation of 4.2 MPa. It was found that variations in heating rate can produce significant variations in the life cycle data.

  20. Testing of High Thermal Cycling Stability of Low Strength Concrete as a Thermal Energy Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete has the potential to become a solution for thermal energy storage (TES integrated in concentrating solar power (CSP systems due to its good thermal and mechanical properties and low cost of material. In this study, a low strength concrete (C20 is tested at high temperatures up to 600 °C. Specimens are thermally cycled at temperatures in the range of 400–300 °C, 500–300 °C, and 600–300 °C, which TES can reach in operation. For comparison, specimens also cycled at temperature in the range of 400–25 °C (room temperature, 500–25 °C, and 600–25 °C. It is found from the test results that cracks are not observed on the surfaces of concrete specimens until the temperature is elevated up to 500 °C. There is mechanical deterioration of concrete after exposure to high temperature, especially to high thermal cycles. The residual compressive strength of concrete after 10 thermal cycles between 600 °C and 300 °C is about 58.3%, but the specimens remain stable without spalling, indicating possible use of low strength concrete as a TES material.

  1. Macro-fiber composites under thermal cycles for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Krystal L.; Hobeck, Jared D.; Owen, Robert B.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2017-04-01

    Macro-Fiber Composites (MFCs) are a piezoelectric material typically employed in applications ranging from vibration damping to actuation to structural health monitoring. These composites have flown in space but only with thermal protection and for a short duration. They have not been significantly tested under thermally cyclic conditions similar to those they would experience in Low-Earth Orbit (LEO) without shielding. Research has shown that the performance of MFCs varies when the MFC undergoes a thermal cycle. This paper outlines an autonomous experiment that will be able to run impedance measurements and actuate MFCs, further testing their performance in a space environment where thermal cycles are common. This will be installed on a CubeSat and flown to LEO where it will collect data and downlink it back for study. Details of the layout of the experiments and electronic systems being used on the CubeSat for the payload are presented alongside future steps that need to be taken to ensure a successful flight.

  2. Simulation and parametric optimisation of thermal power plant cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravindra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to analyse parametric studies and optimum steam extraction pressures of three different (subcritical, supercritical and ultra-supercritical coal fired power plant cycles at a particular main steam temperature of 600 °C by keeping the reheat temperature at 537 °C and condenser pressure at 0.09 bar as constant. In order to maximize the heat rate gain possible with supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions, eight stages of feed water heater arrangement with single reheater is considered. The system is optimized in such a way that the percentage exergetic losses are reduced for the increase of the exergetic efficiency and higher fuel utilization. The plant cycles are simulated and optimized by using Cycle Tempo 5.0 simulation software tool. From the simulation study, it is observed that the thermal efficiency of the three different power plant cycles obtained as 41.40, 42.48 and 43.03%, respectively. The specific coal consumption for three different power plant cycles are 0.56, 0.55 and 0.54 Tonnes/MWh. The improvement in feed water temperatures at the inlet of steam generator of respective cycles are 291, 305 and 316 °C.

  3. Generalized fourier series for the study of limit cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Margallo, J.; Bejarano, J. Diaz; Yuste, S. Bravo

    1988-08-01

    The approximate solution, to first order, of non-linear differential equations is studied using the method of harmonic balance with generalized Fourier series and Jacobian elliptic functions. As an interesting use of the series, very good analytic approximations to the limit cycles of Liénard's ordinary differential equation (ODE), Ẍ + g(X) = f(X) Ẋ, are presented. Specifically, it is shown that, contrary to an opinion given in a well-known textbook on non-linear oscillations, g( X) not only modifies the period but influences the topology. In the generalized van der Pol equation with f( X) = ɛ(1- X2) and g( X) = AX + 2 BX3 for ɛ < 0·1, the presence of zero, one, or three limit cycles is found to depend on the value of {A}/{B}.

  4. Limit Cycle Analysis in a Class of Hybrid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Favela-Contreras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid systems are those that inherently combine discrete and continuous dynamics. This paper considers the hybrid system model to be an extension of the discrete automata associating a continuous evolution with each discrete state. This model is called the hybrid automaton. In this work, we achieve a mathematical formulation of the steady state and we show a way to obtain the initial conditions region to reach a specific limit cycle for a class of uncoupled and coupled continuous-linear hybrid systems. The continuous-linear term is used in the sense of the system theory and, in this sense, continuous-linear hybrid automata will be defined. Thus, some properties and theorems that govern the hybrid automata dynamic behavior to evaluate a limit cycle existence have been established; this content is explained under a theoretical framework.

  5. Limit cycles at the outer edge of the habitable zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haqq-Misra, J. D.; Kopparapu, R.; Batalha, N. E.; Harman, C.; Kasting, J. F.

    2016-12-01

    The liquid water habitable zone (HZ) describes the orbital distance at which a terrestrial planet can maintain above-freezing conditions through regulation by the carbonate-silicate cycle. Calculations with one-dimensional climate models predict that the inner edge of the HZ is limited by water loss through a runaway greenhouse, while the outer edge of the HZ is bounded by the maximum greenhouse effect of carbon dioxide. This classic picture of the HZ continues to guide interpretation of exoplanet discoveries; however, recent calculations have shown that terrestrial planets near the outer edge of the HZ may exhibit other behaviors that affect their habitability. Here I discuss results from a hierarchy of climate models to understand the stellar environments most likely to support a habitable planet. I present energy balance climate model calculations showing the conditions under which planets in the outer regions of the habitable zone should oscillate between long, globally glaciated states and shorter periods of climatic warmth, known as `limit cycles.' Such conditions would be inimical to the development of complex land life, including intelligent life. Limit cycles may also provide an explanation for fluvial features on early Mars, although this requires additional greenhouse warming by hydrogen. These calculations show that the net volcanic outgassing rate and the propensity for plant life to sequester carbon dioxide are critical factors that determine the susceptibility of a planet to limit cycling. I argue that planets orbiting mid G- to mid K-type stars offer more opportunity for supporting advanced life than do planets around F-type stars or M-type stars.

  6. Wall paintings in churches with a limited Christological cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koukiaris Silas, Archimandrite

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with twelve small Cretan and Peloponnesian churches, painted in the 13tn, 14tn and 15th centuries. The iconographical program in these churches includes very limited Christological cycles. On the contrary, the lives the patron saints of the churches are illustrated extensively. This phenomenon is related to the growing importance of hagiology from the end of the 13th century onwards.

  7. Thermo-Optical ``Canard Orbits'' and Excitable Limit Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Francesco; Catalán, Gustau; Sánchez, Pedro; Balle, Salvador; Piro, Oreste

    2004-02-01

    We demonstrate experimentally and theoretically the existence of canard orbits and excitable quasiharmonic limit cycles in the thermo-optical dynamics of semiconductor optical amplifiers. We also observe the phase locking of the noise-induced spikes to the small-amplitude Hopf quasiharmonic oscillations, recently predicted by Makarov, Nekorkin, and Velarde [Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-9007 86, 3431 (2001)10.1103/PhysRevLett.86.3431].

  8. A feasible thermal-cycle screening system for cryogenic semiconductor components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ligang; Liu, Dafu; Huang, Yimin; Zhu, Sangen; Gong, Haimei

    2005-01-01

    For the limit of its lifetime, the Stirling cooler is operated on the intermittent mode in satellite in some cases. Thus such cryogenic semiconductor components as HgCdTe mid or long wavelength infrared (IR) detectors are subjected to thousands of repeated thermal cycles from below -173°C to room temperature. Therefore, a series of experiments focused on quality, performance and reliability are essential in order to satisfy the reasonable requirements. Accordingly, a feasible thermal cycle screening system is put forward. And a vast experimental data show that thermal cycle tests play the most effective role in the environment stress screen (ESS). In this paper, we introduce the system to help to study the main failure mechanisms and improve the performance of the semiconductor components. Such main failure mechanisms as solder-ball invalidation encountered commonly in the detector modules, which is due to the large thermal expansion coefficient mismatch among different materials. The thermal cycle system is based on the principle of heat exchange. We expect HgCdTe IR detectors be cooled to lower than -173°C and heated to room temperature in a few minutes. Above all, we simulate the heating and cooling system through finite element method (FEM). As a result, the computations reveal that the IR detectors can be heated and cooled at a higher rate than expected. A consequent design of the entire system is founded on the simulation. At last, we adjust the mechanical structure of heat exchange system to the adaptive state to accomplish the ESS. The thermal cycle screening system includes an autocontrol part and a test part. The autocontrol part is adopted to realize the heat exchange between IR detectors and the environment, and the test one to inspect the temperature and electrical parameters of these detectors. And at least four IR detector samples can be screened at one time.

  9. Factors which could limit the nuclear fuel cycle development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecqueur, M.; Barre, B.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle is a most important industry for the energy future of the world. It has also a leading part as regards the physical continuity of energy supply of the countries engaged in the nuclear field. The development of this industry is subject to the economic or political constraints involved by the availability of raw materials, technologies or production means. The various limiting factors which could affect the different stages of the fuel cycle are linked with the technical, economic and financial aspects, with the impact on the environment, nuclear safety, risks of non-pacific uses and proliferation of arms. Interesting to note is also the correlation between the fuel cycle development and the problems of energy independence and security of nuclear programs. As a conclusion, the nuclear fuel cycle industry is confronted to difficulties due to its extremely rapid growth (doubling time 5 years) which only few heavy industries have encountered for long periods. It is more over submitted to the political and safety constraints always linked with nuclear matters. The task is therefore a difficult one. But the objective is worth-while since it is a condition to the development of nuclear industry [fr

  10. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Robert; Preble, Joseph P; Reece, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maint...

  11. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert Rimmer; Jay Benesch; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece

    2005-01-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running

  12. Fuel Cycle Performance of Thermal Spectrum Small Modular Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worrall, Andrew [ORNL; Todosow, Michael [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL)

    2016-01-01

    Small modular reactors may offer potential benefits, such as enhanced operational flexibility. However, it is vital to understand the holistic impact of small modular reactors on the nuclear fuel cycle and fuel cycle performance. The focus of this paper is on the fuel cycle impacts of light water small modular reactors in a once-through fuel cycle with low-enriched uranium fuel. A key objective of this paper is to describe preliminary reactor core physics and fuel cycle analyses conducted in support of the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy Fuel Cycle Options Campaign. Challenges with small modular reactors include: increased neutron leakage, fewer assemblies in the core (and therefore fewer degrees of freedom in the core design), complex enrichment and burnable absorber loadings, full power operation with inserted control rods, the potential for frequent load-following operation, and shortened core height. Each of these will impact the achievable discharge burn-up in the reactor and the fuel cycle performance. This paper summarizes the results of an expert elicitation focused on developing a list of the factors relevant to small modular reactor fuel, core, and operation that will impact fuel cycle performance. Preliminary scoping analyses were performed using a regulatory-grade reactor core simulator. The hypothetical light water small modular reactor considered in these preliminary scoping studies is a cartridge type one-batch core with 4.9% enrichment. Some core parameters, such as the size of the reactor and general assembly layout, are similar to an example small modular reactor concept from industry. The high-level issues identified and preliminary scoping calculations in this paper are intended to inform on potential fuel cycle impacts of one-batch thermal spectrum SMRs. In particular, this paper highlights the impact of increased neutron leakage and reduced number of batches on the achievable burn-up of the reactor. Fuel cycle performance

  13. Thermal power generation during heat cycle near room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Takayuki; Fukuzumi, Yuya; Kobayashi, Wataru; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate that a sodium-ion secondary battery (SIB)-type thermocell consisting of two types of Prussian blue analogue (PBA) with different electrochemical thermoelectric coefficients (S EC ≡ ∂V/∂T V and T are the redox potential and temperature, respectively) produces electrical energy during heat cycles. The device produces an electrical energy of 2.3 meV/PBA per heat cycle between 295 K (= T L) and 323 K (= T H). The ideal thermal efficiency (η = 1.0%), which is evaluated using the heat capacity (C = 4.16 meV/K) of ideal Na2Co[Fe(CN)6], reaches 11% of the Carnot efficiency (ηth = 8.7%). Our SIB-type thermocell is a promising thermoelectric device that harvests waste heat near room temperature.

  14. Reversing the irreversible: From limit cycles to emergent time symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortês, Marina; Smolin, Lee

    2018-01-01

    In 1979 Penrose hypothesized that the arrows of time are explained by the hypothesis that the fundamental laws are time irreversible [R. Penrose, in General Relativity: An Einstein Centenary Survey (1979)]. That is, our reversible laws, such as the standard model and general relativity are effective, and emerge from an underlying fundamental theory which is time irreversible. In [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.084007; 90, 044035 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.044035; 93, 084039 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.084039] we put forward a research program aiming at realizing just this. The aim is to find a fundamental description of physics above the Planck scale, based on irreversible laws, from which will emerge the apparently reversible dynamics we observe on intermediate scales. Here we continue that program and note that a class of discrete dynamical systems are known to exhibit this very property: they have an underlying discrete irreversible evolution, but in the long term exhibit the properties of a time reversible system, in the form of limit cycles. We connect this to our original model proposal in [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.084007], and show that the behaviors obtained there can be explained in terms of the same phenomenon: the attraction of the system to a basin of limit cycles, where the dynamics appears to be time reversible. Further than that, we show that our original models exhibit the very same feature: the emergence of quasiparticle excitations obtained in the earlier work in the space-time description is an expression of the system's convergence to limit cycles when seen in the causal set description.

  15. Stability of limit cycles in autonomous nonlinear systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náprstek, Jiří; Fischer, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 8 (2014), s. 1929-1943 ISSN 0025-6455 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200710902; GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/0094; GA ČR(CZ) GC13-34405J Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : limit cycle * nonlinear oscillator * stability Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 1.949, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11012-014-9899-8

  16. A Fuzzy Heater Control System Stimulating Thermal Cycling of Flight Hardware for a Thermal Environmental Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Li; Chen, Yow-Hwa; Pan, Hsu-Pin; Cheng, Robert; Hsiao, Chiuder

    2004-08-01

    The flight hardware suffers thermal cycling in space environment. The temperature range of the hardware is controlled between -45 C and 85 C for the space-flight test environment in a thermal vacuum chamber on ground. A Heater Control System (HCS) provides thirty heating points to simulate the thermal status of flight hardware. The control is configured in traditional PD algorithm and implemented in a workstation of a control room. Since the thermal mass is different for the different articles, the pre-determined parameters of PD control cannot fit all articles. The fuzzy logics are then proposed to be adaptive to the different articles. The fuzzy control is implemented with LabVIEW in a PXI industrial computer. The remote GPIB instruments of hibay are interfaced to PXI computer via Ethernet communication. In summary, the overall system takes advantages of GPIB standardized component, increasing capabilities, adaptive control with a fuzzy algorithm, and distributed control architecture.

  17. General Linearized Theory of Quantum Fluctuations around Arbitrary Limit Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Weiss, Talitha; Walter, Stefan; de Valcárcel, Germán J

    2017-09-29

    The theory of Gaussian quantum fluctuations around classical steady states in nonlinear quantum-optical systems (also known as standard linearization) is a cornerstone for the analysis of such systems. Its simplicity, together with its accuracy far from critical points or situations where the nonlinearity reaches the strong coupling regime, has turned it into a widespread technique, being the first method of choice in most works on the subject. However, such a technique finds strong practical and conceptual complications when one tries to apply it to situations in which the classical long-time solution is time dependent, a most prominent example being spontaneous limit-cycle formation. Here, we introduce a linearization scheme adapted to such situations, using the driven Van der Pol oscillator as a test bed for the method, which allows us to compare it with full numerical simulations. On a conceptual level, the scheme relies on the connection between the emergence of limit cycles and the spontaneous breaking of the symmetry under temporal translations. On the practical side, the method keeps the simplicity and linear scaling with the size of the problem (number of modes) characteristic of standard linearization, making it applicable to large (many-body) systems.

  18. Thermal modeling of cylindrical lithium ion battery during discharge cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Baek, Seung Man

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. → This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. → A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. → The contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate. → The contribution of heat source due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. - Abstract: Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. The simplified model by adopting a cylindrical coordinate was employed. This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. The mathematical model solves conservation of energy considering heat generations due to both joule heating and entropy change. A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. The temperature profile from simulation had similar tendency with experiment. The temperature profile was decomposed with contributions of each heat sources and was presented at several discharge rates. It was found that the contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate, whereas that due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. Also the effect of cooling condition and the LiNiCoMnO 2 /C battery were analyzed for the purpose of temperature reduction.

  19. Cycle Trades for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C.; Guidos, M.; Greene, W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been used as a reliable source for utility power in the United States for decades. Even in the 1940's, long before the United States had a viable space program, the theoretical benefits of nuclear power as applied to space travel were being explored. These benefits include long-life operation and high performance, particularly in the form of vehicle power density, enabling longer-lasting space missions. The configurations for nuclear rocket systems and chemical rocket systems are similar except that a nuclear rocket utilizes a fission reactor as its heat source. This thermal energy can be utilized directly to heat propellants that are then accelerated through a nozzle to generate thrust or it can be used as part of an electricity generation system. The former approach is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) and the latter is Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), which is then used to power thruster technologies such as ion thrusters. This paper will explore a number of indirect-NTP engine cycle configurations using assumed performance constraints and requirements, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each cycle configuration, and present preliminary performance and size results. This paper is intended to lay the groundwork for future efforts in the development of a practical NTP system or a combined NTP/NEP hybrid system.

  20. Thermally Induced Ultra High Cycle Fatigue of Copper Alloys of the High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    In order to keep the overall length of the compact linear collider (CLIC), currently being studied at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), within reasonable limits, i.e. less than 50 km, an accelerating gradient above 100 MV/m is required. This imposes considerable demands on the materials of the accelerating structures. The internal surfaces of these core components of a linear accelerator are exposed to pulsed radio frequency (RF) currents resulting in cyclic thermal stresses expected to cause surface damage by fatigue. The designed lifetime of CLIC is 20 years, which results in a number of thermal stress cycles of the order of 2.33•1010. Since no fatigue data existed in the literature for CLIC parameter space, a set of three complementary experiments were initiated: ultra high cycle mechanical fatigue by ultrasound, low cycle fatigue by pulsed laser irradiation and low cycle thermal fatigue by high power microwaves, each test representing a subset of the original problem. High conductiv...

  1. The effect of spheroidizing by thermal cycling in low concentration Cr-Mo alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, H.S.; Kang, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    An intensive study was carried out on spheroidizing of pearlite (Sph) and number of spherical carbide in proeutectoid ferrite (No/100) of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling. Physical and mechanical properties of steel containing 0.33 % C with thermal cycling were compared with those of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling. The effect of normal heat treatment and cooling rate on spheroidizing of pearlite and precipitation of fine spherical carbide in the steels were investigated. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Thermal cycling of low concentration Cr-Mo steel promoted the spheroidizing of pearlite compared with that of steel without Cr and Mo to steel had significant effect on spheroidizing of pearlite. 2) Number of fine spherical carbides of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling was over 5 times to that of fine spherical carbides of hypoeutectoid steel with thermal cycling. 3) Spheroidizing of pearlite and number of fine spherical carbide in proeutectoid ferrite of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with increasing thermal cycle and cooling rate. 4) Hardness of steel with thermal cycling was decreased. However, low concentration Cr-Mo steel had little decreasing rate in hardness with increasing thermal cycle on the basis of 100 times in thermal cycle. Therefore, toughness was considered to be increased with increasing spheroidizing of pearlite without changing mechanical properties. (author)

  2. Crack propagation under thermal cycling loading inducing a thermal gradient in the specimen thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.N.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to figure out the crack growth phenomenon by thermal fatigue induced by thermal gradient through thickness of specimen. Firstly, an experimental facility has been developed: a rectangular parallelepiped specimen is subjected to thermal cycling between 350 C and 100 C; the specimen is freed to expand and contract. Two semi-circular notches (0,1 mm depth and 4 mm length) have been machined on the surface of the specimen. A series of interrupted tests has been carried out to characterize and quantify the crack growth in depth and surface of the pre-existing crack. Next, a three-dimensional crack growth simulation has been implemented in ABAQUS. Automation using Python was used to simulate the propagation of a crack under thermal cycling, with re-meshing at crack front after each calculation step. No assumption has been taken on the crack front during the crack propagation. A comparison with test results showed very good agreement on the evolution of crack front shape and on the kinetics of propagation on the edge and the heart of pre-existing crack. An analytical approach was also developed based on the calculation of stress intensity factors (SIC). A two-dimensional approach was first introduced enabling us to better understand the influence of various thermal and geometric parameters. Finally, a three dimensional approach, with an elliptical assumption crack shape during the propagation, leading to a prediction of crack growth on the surface and in depth which is very similar to that obtained numerically, but with computational time much lower. (author)

  3. Continuous flow thermal cycler microchip for DNA cycle sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hong; Chen, Jifeng; Zhu, Li; Shadpour, Hamed; Hupert, Mateusz L; Soper, Steven A

    2006-09-01

    We report here on the use of a polymer-based continuous flow thermal cycler (CFTC) microchip for Sanger cycle sequencing using dye terminator chemistry. The CFTC chip consisted of a 20-loop spiral microfluidic channel hot-embossed into polycarbonate (PC) that had three well-defined temperature zones poised at 95, 55, and 60 degrees C for denaturation, renaturation, and DNA extension, respectively. The sequencing cocktail was hydrodynamically pumped through the microreactor channel at different linear velocities ranging from 1 to 12 mm/s. At a linear velocity of 4 mm/s resulting in a 36-s extension time, a read length of >600 bp could be obtained in a total reaction time of 14.6 min. Further increases in the flow rate resulted in a reduction in the total reaction time but also produced a decrease in the sequencing read length. The CFTC chip could be reused for subsequent sequencing runs (>30) with negligible amounts of carryover contamination or degradation in the sequencing read length. The CFTC microchip was subsequently coupled to a solid-phase reversible immobilization (SPRI) microchip made from PC for purification of the DNA sequencing ladders (i.e., removal of excess dye-labeled dideoxynucleotides, DNA template, and salts) prior to gel electrophoresis. Coupling of the CFTC chip to the SPRI microchip showed read lengths similar to that obtained from benchtop instruments but did not require manual manipulation of the cycle sequencing reactions following amplification.

  4. Thermal Cycle Reliability and Failure Mechanisms of CCGA and PBGA Assemblies with and without Corner Staking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2008-01-01

    Area array packages (AAPs) with 1.27 mm pitch have been the packages of choice for commercial applications; they are now starting to be implemented for use in military and aerospace applications. Thermal cycling characteristics of plastic ball grid array (PBGA) and chip scale package assemblies, because of their wide usage for commercial applications, have been extensively reported on in literature. Thermal cycling represents the on-off environmental condition for most electronic products and therefore is a key factor that defines reliability.However, very limited data is available for thermal cycling behavior of ceramic packages commonly used for the aerospace applications. For high reliability applications, numerous AAPs are available with an identical design pattern both in ceramic and plastic packages. This paper compares assembly reliability of ceramic and plastic packages with the identical inputs/outputs(I/Os) and pattern. The ceramic package was in the form of ceramic column grid array (CCGA) with 560 I/Os peripheral array with the identical pad design as its plastic counterpart.

  5. Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi: Simulations vs. Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell; Benafan, Othmane; Noebe, Ronald; Vaidyanathan, Raj; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A recent microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal-based plasticity, the B2 MB190 phase transformation and anisotropic elasticity at the grain scale is calibrated to recent data for polycrystalline NiTi (49.9 at.% Ni). Inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, texture and differential scanning calorimetry data, as well as a subset of recent isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. The model is assessed against additional experimental data. Several experimental trends are captured - in particular, the transformation strain during thermal cycling monotonically increases and reaches a peak with increasing bias stress. This is achieved, in part, by modifying the martensite hardening matrix proposed by Patoor et al. [Patoor E, Eberhardt A, Berveiller M. J Phys IV 1996;6:277]. Some experimental trends are underestimated - in particular, the ratcheting of macrostrain during thermal cycling. This may reflect a model limitation that transformation-plasticity coupling is captured on a coarse (grain) scale but not on a fine (martensitic plate) scale.

  6. Thermal Cooling Limits of Sbotaged Spent Fuel Pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Thomas G. Hughes; Dr. Thomas F. Lin

    2010-09-10

    To develop the understanding and predictive measures of the post “loss of water inventory” hazardous conditions as a result of the natural and/or terrorist acts to the spent fuel pool of a nuclear plant. This includes the thermal cooling limits to the spent fuel assembly (before the onset of the zircaloy ignition and combustion), and the ignition, combustion, and the subsequent propagation of zircaloy fire from one fuel assembly to others

  7. Thermal fracture and pump limit of Nd: glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingzhe; Ma Wen; Tan Jichun; Zhang Yongliang; Li Mingzhong; Jing Feng

    2011-01-01

    Based on published fracture experiments and 3D transient finite-element analyses, and taking the first principal stress as the criterion and the Griffith crack theory to determine the critical fracture stress, a Weibull statistical model is established to predict the fracture possibility of Nd: glass with certain pump parameters. Other issues which limit the pump power are also presented. The results show that the fracture limit of laser medium depends on the optical polishing technology. For a short pulse and high energy Nd: glass laser, taking America's polishing technology in the 1990s as reference,the pump saturation limits the pump power to 18 kW/cm 2 when the repetition rate is lower than 1 Hz, while the thermal fracture limits the pump power when the repetition rate is higher than 10 Hz. (authors)

  8. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  9. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  10. How Thermal Fatigue Cycles Change the Rheological Behavior of Polymer Modified Bitumen?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaoui, B.; Merbouh, M.; Van de Ven, M.F.C.; Chailleux, E.; Youcefi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of thermal fatigue cycles phenomenon, which affects the performance of flexible pavement. The purpose of the paper is to extent the knowledge on the rheology of polymer modified bitumen which was affected by cycles of thermal fatigue. The aim of this research is to

  11. Effect of polymerization methods and thermal cycling on color stability of acrylic resin denture teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Pita, Murillo Sucena; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho

    2009-12-01

    Acrylic resin denture teeth are widely used due to the chemical bond to the acrylic resin of the denture base. However, discoloration of acrylic resin denture teeth can be a problem. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of polymerization methods and thermal cycling on the color change of acrylic resin denture teeth. Ten different brands of acrylic resin denture teeth were evaluated: Art Plus (AP), Biolux (BX), Biotone IPN (BI), Magister (MG), Mondial 6 (MD), Premium 6 (PR), SR Vivodent PE (SR), Trilux (TR), Trubyte Biotone (TB), and Vipi Dent Plus (VP). Each brand was divided into 2 groups (n=12); each group was subjected to 1 of 2 polymerization methods (microwave, 500 W for 3 minutes, or water bath, 74 degrees C for 9 hours). After polymerization, all of the specimens were thermal cycled between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C with 30-second dwell times for 5000 cycles. The specimen colors were measured with a spectrophotometer, using the CIE L*a*b* system, at baseline (B), after polymerization (P), and after thermal cycling (T). Color differences (DeltaE) were calculated for periods between P and B (PB), T and B (TB), and T and P (TP). A DeltaE of < or =3.3 was considered clinically acceptable. The data were evaluated by 3-way repeated-measures ANOVA and the Tukey HSD test (alpha=.05). The highest DeltaE values were obtained for BI and SR teeth; these were significantly higher than the values obtained for the other brands (P<.05). There was no significant difference between the 2 polymerization methods. There was no significant difference between TB and PB for either polymerization method. The DeltaE values are within acceptable clinical limits for all brands, for both polymerization methods and different measurement periods.

  12. Theoretical thermodynamic analysis of Rankine power cycle with thermal driven pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakew, Amlaku Abie; Bolland, Olav; Ladam, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The work is focused on theoretical aspects of thermal driven pump (TDP) Rankine cycle. → The mechanical pump is replaced by thermal driven pump. → Important parameters of thermal driven pump Rankine cycle are investigated. → TDP Rankine cycle produce more power but it requires additional low grade heat. - Abstract: A new approach to improve the performance of supercritical carbon dioxide Rankine cycle which uses low temperature heat source is presented. The mechanical pump in conventional supercritical carbon dioxide Rankine cycle is replaced by thermal driven pump. The concept of thermal driven pump is to increase the pressure of a fluid in a closed container by supplying heat. A low grade heat source is used to increase the pressure of the fluid instead of a mechanical pump, this increase the net power output and avoid the need for mechanical pump which requires regular maintenance and operational cost. The thermal driven pump considered is a shell and tube heat exchanger where the working fluid is contained in the tube, a tube diameter of 5 mm is chosen to reduce the heating time. The net power output of the Rankine cycle with thermal driven pump is compared to that of Rankine cycle with mechanical pump and it is observed that the net power output is higher when low grade thermal energy is used to pressurize the working fluid. The thermal driven pump consumes additional heat at low temperature (60 o C) to pressurize the working fluid.

  13. Useful work and the thermal efficiency in the ideal Lenolr cycle with regenerative preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Demos P.

    2000-11-01

    In the existing thermal engine concepts negative work transfer (usually needed to drive a compression process) is supplied by the work produced by the engine itself. The remaining difference (i.e., the net work transfer) becomes the useful work, since it is available for external consumption. The thermal efficiency is the parameter that compares this against the heat input into the system. It forms the main optimization parameter in any engine design. The objective of the present study is to show that for the case of the Lenoir cycle with regenerative preheating the entire positive work is available for external consumption, since the negative (i.e., the compression) work is supplied by the atmospheric air. Not only this, but, during the compression process and due to the pressure difference across the two sides of the moving piston, an additional (useful) work transfer may be generated. Thus, the proposed power plant may be considered as a combination of a thermal engine and a wind turbine. In the ideal cycle limit (at least), the total amount of useful work exceeds the heat entering the system. This leads to the definition of a new parameter for the efficiency (called the technical efficiency), which compares the combined positive work transfer (i.e., the useful one) against the heat entering the system and which may exceed the 100% level.

  14. [Effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Da; Liu, Kai-Lei; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Wei-Sheng; Liao, Chu-Hong; Jiang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins. A nanofilled composite (Z350) and 4 microhybrid composites (P60, Z250, Spectrum, and AP-X) were fabricated from lateral to center to form cubic specimens. The lateral surfaces were abrased and polished before water storage and 40 000 thermal cycles (5/55 degrees celsius;). The mean surface roughness (Ra) were measured and compared before and after thermal cycling, and the changes of microstructure were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Significant decreases of Ra were observed in the composites, especially in Spectrum (from 0.164±0.024 µm to 0.140±0.017 µm, Presins, and fissures occurred on Z350 following the thermal cycling. Water storage and thermal cycling may produce polishing effect on composite resins and cause fissures on nanofilled composite resins.

  15. Modelling and Improvement of Thermal Cycling in Power Electronics for Motor Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernica, Ionut; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the dynamical change of the thermal stress in the power devices is one of the major factors that have influences on the overall efficiency and reliability of power electronics. The main objective of this paper consists of identifying the main parameters that affect the thermal...... cycling of power devices in a motor drive application and modelling their impact on the thermal stress. The motor drive system together with the thermal cycling in the power semiconductors have been modelled, and after investigating the dynamic behavior of the system, adverse temperature swings...... are identified during the acceleration and deceleration periods of the motor. The main causes for these adverse thermal cycles have been presented and, consequently, the influence of the deceleration slope, modulation technique and reactive current on the thermal cycles has been analyzed. Finally, the improved...

  16. Thermal stress and creep fatigue limitations in first wall design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Harkness, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic performance of a lithium cooled cylindrical first wall module has been analyzed as a function of the incident neutron wall loading. Three criteria were established for the purpose of defining the maximum wall loading allowable for modules constructed of Type 316 stainless steel and a vanadium alloy. Of the three, the maximum structural temperature criterion of 750 0 C for vanadium resulted in the limiting wall loading value of 7 MW/m 2 . The second criterion limited thermal stress levels to the yield strength of the alloy. This led to the lowest wall loading value for the Type 316 stainless steel wall (1.7 MW/m 2 ). The third criterion required that the creep-fatigue characteristics of the module allow a lifetime of 10 MW-yr/m 2 . At wall temperatures of 600 0 C, this lifetime could be achieved in a stainless steel module for wall loadings less than 3.2 MW/m 2 , while the same lifetime could be achieved for much higher wall loadings in a vanadium module

  17. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Peter H [Glendale, CA; Brandt, Randolph J [Palmdale, CA

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  18. Thermal hydraulic and power cycle analysis of liquid lithium blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic and power cycle analyses were performed for the first-wall and blanket systems of tokamak-type fusion reactors under a typical set of design and operating conditions. The analytical results for lithium-cooled blanket cells show that with stainless steel as construction material and with no divertor present, the maximum allowable neutron wall loading is approximately 2 MW/m 2 and is limited by thermal stress criteria. With vanadium alloy as construction material and no divertor present, the maximum allowable neutron wall loading is approximately 8 MW/m 2 and is limited by an interplay of constraints imposed on the maximum allowable structural temperature and the minimum allowable coolant inlet temperature. With a divertor these wall loadings can be increased by from 40 to 90 percent. The cost of the vanadium system is found to be competitive with the stainless steel system because of the higher allowable structural temperatures and concomitant higher thermal efficiencies afforded by the vanadium alloys

  19. Laser Soldering and Thermal Cycling Tests of Monolithic Silicon Pixel Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Strand, Frode Sneve

    2015-01-01

    An ALPIDE-1 monolithic silicon pixel sensor prototype has been laser soldered to a flex printed circuit using a novel interconnection technique using lasers. This technique is to be optimised to ensure stable, good quality connections between the sensor chips and the FPCs. To test the long-term stability of the connections, as well as study the effects on hit thresholds and noise in the sensor, it was thermally cycled in a climate chamber 1200 times. The soldered connections showed good qualities like even melting and good adhesion on pad/flex surfaces, and the chip remained in working condition for 1080 cycles. After this, a few connections failed, having cracks in the soldering tin, rendering the chip unusable. Threshold and noise characteristics seemed stable, except for the noise levels of sector 2 in the chip, for 1000 cycles in a temperature interval of "10^{\\circ}" and "50^{\\circ}" C. Still, further testing with wider temperature ranges and more cycles is needed to test the limitations of the chi...

  20. The effect of a thermal renal denervation cycle on the mechanical properties of the arterial wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkins, Alan A; Sheridan, William S; Sharif, Faisal; Murphy, Bruce P

    2014-11-28

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect that a thermal renal denervation cycle has on the mechanical properties of the arterial wall. Porcine arterial tissue specimens were tested in three groups: native tissue, decellularized tissue, decellularized with collagen digestion (e.g. elastin only). One arterial specimen was used as an unheated control specimen while another paired specimen was subjected to a thermal cycle of 70°C for 120s (n=10). The specimens were subjected to tensile loading and a shrinkage analysis. We observed two key results: The mechanical properties associated with the elastin extracellular matrix (ECM) were not affected by the thermal cycle. The effect of the thermal cycle on the collagen (ECM) was significant, in both the native and decellularized groups the thermal cycle caused a statistically significant decrease in stiffness, and failure strength, moreover the native tissue demonstrated a 27% reduction in lumen area post exposure to the thermal cycle. We have demonstrated that a renal denervation thermal cycle can significantly affect the mechanical properties of an arterial wall, and these changes in stiffness and failure strength were associated with alterations to the collagen rather than the elastin extracellular matrix component. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cubic and quartic planar differential systems with exact algebraic limit cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bendjeddou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct cubic and quartic polynomial planar differential systems with exact limit cycles that are ovals of algebraic real curves of degree four. The result obtained for the cubic case generalizes a proposition of [9]. For the quartic case, we deduce for the first time a class of systems with four algebraic limit cycles and another for which nested configurations of limit cycles occur.

  2. Historical thermal regimes define limits to coral acclimatization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howells, Emily J; Berkelmans, Ray; van Oppen, Madeleine J H; Willis, Bette L; Bay, Line K

    2013-05-01

    native site. All parameters investigated (bleaching, mortality, Symbiodinium type fidelity, reproductive timing) demonstrated strong interactions between genotype and environment, indicating that the acclimatization potential of A. millepora populations may be limited by adaptation of the holobiont to native thermal regimes.

  3. Equilibrium limit of thermal conduction and boundary scattering in nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B; Kınacı, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Çağın, Tahir

    2014-06-28

    Determining the lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of nanostructures is especially challenging in that, aside from the phonon-phonon scattering present in large systems, the scattering of phonons from the system boundary greatly influences heat transport, particularly when system length (L) is less than the average phonon mean free path (MFP). One possible route to modeling κ in these systems is through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, inherently including both phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering effects in the classical limit. Here, we compare current MD methods for computing κ in nanostructures with both L ⩽ MFP and L ≫ MFP, referred to as mean free path constrained (cMFP) and unconstrained (uMFP), respectively. Using a (10,0) CNT (carbon nanotube) as a benchmark case, we find that while the uMFP limit of κ is well-defined through the use of equilibrium MD and the time-correlation formalism, the standard equilibrium procedure for κ is not appropriate for the treatment of the cMFP limit because of the large influence of boundary scattering. To address this issue, we define an appropriate equilibrium procedure for cMFP systems that, through comparison to high-fidelity non-equilibrium methods, is shown to be the low thermal gradient limit to non-equilibrium results. Further, as a means of predicting κ in systems having L ≫ MFP from cMFP results, we employ an extrapolation procedure based on the phenomenological, boundary scattering inclusive expression of Callaway [Phys. Rev. 113, 1046 (1959)]. Using κ from systems with L ⩽ 3 μm in the extrapolation, we find that the equilibrium uMFP κ of a (10,0) CNT can be predicted within 5%. The equilibrium procedure is then applied to a variety of carbon-based nanostructures, such as graphene flakes (GF), graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), CNTs, and icosahedral fullerenes, to determine the influence of size and environment (suspended versus supported) on κ. Concerning the GF and GNR systems, we find that

  4. Elasto-plastic damage analysis of functionally graded material disks subjected to thermal shock and thermal cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Myung; Toi, Yutaka [Tokyo Univ. (Japan). Inst. of Industrial Science

    2001-03-01

    The elasto-plastic damage behaviors of functionally graded materials (FGM) subjected to thermal loading are analyzed by the finite element method using continuum damage mechanics. The Lemaitre's damage model is employed to analyze the damage behavior of a FGM disk subjected to thermal shock and a FGM coating subjected to thermal cycle. The effect of FGM on the thermal damage is discussed through some numerical examples for industrial materials. Numerical results show the validity of the present method for the evaluation and the development of new FGM. (author)

  5. Thermal Losses Effect on the Performance of an Intermittent Solar Refrigeration Cycle for Generation Phase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boukhchana, Yasmina; Fellah, Ali; Ben Brahim, Ammar

    2009-01-01

    In this contribution, a study of the thermal losses effect undergone by the different parts of an intermittent absorption solar refrigeration cycle using the Ammonia/Water mixture is presented. After having shown the interest of the intermittent cycles through the discussion of the problem of the adaptation of these cycles to solar energy, mass and thermal assessments for each compartment of the installation were established for the two cases without and with thermal losses. The resulting differential equations system is solved numerically. The theoretical results obtained concern the temperature variations, the vapor flow as well as the compositions of the rich and the poor solutions

  6. Quantitative consideration for the tempering effect during multi-pass thermal cycle in HAZ of low-alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Lina; Nakabayashi, Yuma; Saida, Kazuyoshi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Kameyama, Masashi; Hirano, Shinro; Chigusa, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    A new Thermal Cycle Tempering Parameter (TCTP) to deal with the tempering effect during multi-pass thermal cycles has been proposed by extending Larson-Miller parameter (LMP). Experimental result revealed that the hardness in synthetic HAZ of the low alloy steel subjected to multi tempering thermal cycles has a good linear relationship with TCTP. By using this relationship, the hardness of the low-alloy steel reheated with tempering thermal cycles can be predicted when the original hardness is known. (author)

  7. Effective reaction rates for diffusion-limited reaction cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nałęcz-Jawecki, Paweł; Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miękisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-12-07

    Biological signals in cells are transmitted with the use of reaction cycles, such as the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle, in which substrate is modified by antagonistic enzymes. An appreciable share of such reactions takes place in crowded environments of two-dimensional structures, such as plasma membrane or intracellular membranes, and is expected to be diffusion-controlled. In this work, starting from the microscopic bimolecular reaction rate constants and using estimates of the mean first-passage time for an enzyme-substrate encounter, we derive diffusion-dependent effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients (EMRRC) for a generic reaction cycle. Each EMRRC was found to be half of the harmonic average of the microscopic rate constant (phosphorylation c or dephosphorylation d), and the effective (crowding-dependent) motility divided by a slowly decreasing logarithmic function of the sum of the enzyme concentrations. This implies that when c and d differ, the two EMRRCs scale differently with the motility, rendering the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules diffusion-dependent. Analytical predictions are verified using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the two-dimensional triangular lattice at the single-molecule resolution. It is demonstrated that the proposed formulas estimate the steady-state concentrations and effective reaction rates for different sets of microscopic reaction rates and concentrations of reactants, including a non-trivial example where with increasing diffusivity the fraction of phosphorylated substrate molecules changes from 10% to 90%.

  8. Energetic and exergetic analysis of Rankine cycles for solar power plants with parabolic trough and thermal storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cenuşă Victor-Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the “secondary” circuit (for thermodynamic conversion of a Concentrated Solar Power (CSP plant with thermodynamic cycle, whose mirrors field supplies a thermal power, averaged over a sunny day, of about 100 MW heat. We study the case of parabolic trough solar collector using silicone oil in the “primary” circuit, which limits the peak temperature below 400 °C. The “primary” circuit uses thermal storage, allowing a delay between the power generation in rapport with the solar energy capture. We choose a water-steam cycle, type Hirn. For increasing its efficiency, it has regenerative feed water preheating and steam reheating. We compared, energetic and exergetic, two types of cycles, using a numerical model with iterative structure, developed by the authors. The results showed that the simplified design achieves practically the same thermodynamic performances with the advanced one.

  9. Evaluation of the of thermal shock resistance of a castable containing andalusite aggregates by thermal shock cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.C.R.; Santos, E.M.B.; Ribeiro, S.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of refractory materials is one of the most important characteristics that determine their performance in many applications, since abrupt and drastic differences in temperature can damage them. Resistance to thermal shock damage can be evaluated based on thermal cycles, i.e., successive heating and cooling cycles followed by an analysis of the drop in Young's modulus occurring in each cycle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance to thermal shock damage in a commercial refractory concrete with andalusite aggregate. Concrete samples that were sintered at 1000 deg C and 1450 deg C for 5 hours to predict and were subjected to 30 thermal shock cycles, soaking in the furnace for 20 minutes at a temperature of 1000 deg C, and subsequent cooling in circulating water at 25 deg C. The results showed a decrease in Young's modulus and rupture around 72% for samples sintered at 1000 ° C, and 82% in sintered at 1450 ° C. The refractory sintered at 1450 deg C would show lower thermal shock resistance than the refractory sintered at 1000 deg C. (author)

  10. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  11. Macro-fiber composites performance under thermal cycling for impedance-based SHM applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Cassio T.; Owen, Robert B.; Inman, Daniel J.

    2014-03-01

    This work focuses on investigating the effects of thermal cycles in the impedance-based damage detection performance of Macro-Fiber Composites (MFC). A host structure with an MFC bonded to its surface is submitted to a 90 minutes temperature cycle that varies from -20°C to 65° C. After each cycle the electrical impedance of the test sample is measured with and without the presence of a representative damage (an added mass). The results indicate that the thermal cycling affects the smart device by changing its impedance profile, a phenomenon that should be taken into account in damage detection algorithms.

  12. To What Degree Thermal Cycles Affect Chalk Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livada, Tijana; Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar Inger

    and water saturated chalk. Sixty disks of dry Kansas chalk exposed to different number of temperature cycles were tested for tensile strength using a Brazilian test. Changes in elastic properties as function of number of temperature cycles of the same chalk, but now saturated in water, were studied using...... triaxial cell experiments. For dry rock, no significant effects of temperature cycling was found on average tensile strength, however the range of the tensile failure stress is doubled for the samples exposed to 50 temperature cycles, as opposed to those to none. For water saturated cores, the temperature...... cycling had a significant effect and a significant accumulative irreversible deformation was seen for the core exposed to cyclical temperature variations, so that the elastic bulk modulus consequently increased more than for a core that had been tested at constant temperature. The inconsistency...

  13. Maximum power and thermal efficiency of an irreversible power cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ait-Ali, Mohand A.

    1995-10-01

    A simple Carnot-like irreversible power cycle is modeled with two isothermal and two adiabatic, irreversible processes. The generic source of internal irreversibility, deduced from the Clausius inequality, produces entropy at a rate proportional to the external heat conductance and the engine temperature ratio. This cycle is optimized for maximum power and maximum efficiency, and its performances compared to those of the endoreversible cycle, based on typical heat source and heat sink temperatures. Both cycles produce maximum power at the same engine temperature ratio, but the irreversible cycle prediction of maximum efficiency and heat conductance allocation between steam boiler and condenser, appear to be not only more realistic, but also more relevant to actual design considerations of power plants.

  14. Influence of micro-structural parameters and thermal cycling on the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Ultra high performance fibre reinforced cement-based composite; CARDIFRC; micro-structure; mechanical and fracture properties; thermal cycling. ... Author Affiliations. B L Karihaloo1. School of Engineering, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK ...

  15. Effect of thermal-mechanical cycling on thermal expansion behavior of boron fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qin, Y.C.; He, S.Y.; Yang, D.Z.

    2004-01-01

    The thermal expansion behavior of boron fiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composite subjected to thermal-mechanical cycling (TMC) was studied. Experimental results showed that TMC affected greatly the thermal expansion behavior of the composite. Using a simple analysis model of internal stress in the fibers, the stress change during the thermal expansion coefficient measurements of the composite subjected to TMC was calculated. The results indicated that TMC could induce the interfacial degradation of the composite, and the more the numbers of TMC cycles, or the higher the applied stress level of TMC, the more serious the interfacial degradation of the composite became. The proposed one-dimensional analysis model was proved to be a simple and qualitative approach to probing the interfacial degradation of unidirectional fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites during TMC

  16. The Effects of Thermal Cycling on Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Devices for Aerospace Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These Include radiation, extreme temperatures, thermal cycling, to name a few. Preliminary data obtained on new Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide power devices under exposure to radiation followed by long term thermal cycling are presented. This work was done in collaboration with GSFC and JPL in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  17. Joint Removal Implications : Thermal Analysis and Life-Cycle Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Deck joints are causing significant bridge deterioration and maintenance problems for Departments of Transportation (DOTs). Colorado State University researchers partnered with the Colorado DOT to analyze the effects of temperature change and thermal...

  18. Probabilistic Material Strength Degradation Model for Inconel 718 Components Subjected to High Temperature, High-Cycle and Low-Cycle Mechanical Fatigue, Creep and Thermal Fatigue Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bast, Callie C.; Boyce, Lola

    1995-01-01

    The development of methodology for a probabilistic material strength degradation is described. The probabilistic model, in the form of a postulated randomized multifactor equation, provides for quantification of uncertainty in the lifetime material strength of aerospace propulsion system components subjected to a number of diverse random effects. This model is embodied in the computer program entitled PROMISS, which can include up to eighteen different effects. Presently, the model includes five effects that typically reduce lifetime strength: high temperature, high-cycle mechanical fatigue, low-cycle mechanical fatigue, creep and thermal fatigue. Results, in the form of cumulative distribution functions, illustrated the sensitivity of lifetime strength to any current value of an effect. In addition, verification studies comparing predictions of high-cycle mechanical fatigue and high temperature effects with experiments are presented. Results from this limited verification study strongly supported that material degradation can be represented by randomized multifactor interaction models.

  19. Swing-Leg Retraction for Limit Cycle Walkers Improves Disturbance Rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbelen, D.G.E.; Wisse, M.

    2008-01-01

    Limit cycle walkers are bipeds that exhibit a stable cyclic gaitwithout requiring local controllability at all times during gait. A well-known example of limit cycle walking is McGeer’s “passive dynamic walking,” but the concept expands to actuated bipeds as involved in this study. One of the

  20. Simulating Thermal Cycling and Isothermal Deformation Response of Polycrystalline NiTi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manchiraju, Sivom; Gaydosh, Darrell J.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Anderson, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    A microstructure-based FEM model that couples crystal plasticity, crystallographic descriptions of the B2-B19' martensitic phase transformation, and anisotropic elasticity is used to simulate thermal cycling and isothermal deformation in polycrystalline NiTi (49.9at% Ni). The model inputs include anisotropic elastic properties, polycrystalline texture, DSC data, and a subset of isothermal deformation and load-biased thermal cycling data. A key experimental trend is captured.namely, the transformation strain during thermal cycling is predicted to reach a peak with increasing bias stress, due to the onset of plasticity at larger bias stress. Plasticity induces internal stress that affects both thermal cycling and isothermal deformation responses. Affected thermal cycling features include hysteretic width, two-way shape memory effect, and evolution of texture with increasing bias stress. Affected isothermal deformation features include increased hardening during loading and retained martensite after unloading. These trends are not captured by microstructural models that lack plasticity, nor are they all captured in a robust manner by phenomenological approaches. Despite this advance in microstructural modeling, quantitative differences exist, such as underprediction of open loop strain during thermal cycling.

  1. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Dombrowski, D.E. [Brush Wellman, Inc., Cleveland, OH (United States); Guiniatouline, R.N. [Efremov Institute, (Russia); Kupriynov, I.B. [Russian Institute of Inorganic Materials (Russia)

    1996-02-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ``spike`` of 750{degree}C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m{sup 2}. Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP`d spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe{sub 12}. Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis.

  2. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ''spike'' of 750 degree C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m 2 . Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP'd spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe 12 . Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis

  3. Thermal performance analysis of Brayton cycle with waste heat recovery boiler for diesel engines of offshore oil production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xianglong; Gong, Guangcai; Wu, Yi; Li, Hangxin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparison of Brayton cycle with WHRB adopted in diesel engines with and without fans by thermal performance. • Waste heat recovery technology for FPSO. • The thermoeconomic analysis for the heat recovery for FPSO. - Abstract: This paper presents the theoretical analysis and on-site testing on the thermal performance of the waste heat recovery system for offshore oil production facilities, including the components of diesel engines, thermal boilers and waste heat boilers. We use the ideal air standard Brayton cycle to analyse the thermal performance. In comparison with the traditional design, the fans at the engine outlet of the waste heat recovery boiler is removed due to the limited space of the offshore platform. The cases with fan and without fan are compared in terms of thermal dynamics performance, energy efficiency and thermo-economic index of the system. The results show that the application of the WHRB increases the energy efficiency of the whole system, but increases the flow resistance in the duct. It is proved that as the waste heat recovery boiler takes the place of the thermal boiler, the energy efficiency of whole system without fan is slightly reduced but heat recovery efficiency is improved. This research provides an important guidance to improve the waste heat recovery for offshore oil production facilities.

  4. Generalized Fourier series and limit cycles of generalized van der Pol oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Margallo, J.; Bejarano, J. D.

    1990-02-01

    A very simple generalization, using Jacobian elliptic functions, of the usual Fourier series, appropriate for non-linear systems, is used to study the first order approximate solution of the generalized van der Pol oscillators Ẍ+AX+2BX 3+ɛ(z 3+z 2X 2+z 1X 4) dotX=0 . A generalized harmonic balance method is used to determine the limit cycles. The cases A > 0, B > 0 and A 0 are considered in some detail. For given values of the parameters zi, the values of A and B for which limit cycles exist are found as functions of m. Numerical values for the radius, frequency, and energy of the limit cycles are given. The presence of zero, one, two, three or four limit cycles depends on the value of the parameters of the equation. Stability, bifurcations of fixed points, and the limit cycle stability are studied qualitatively.

  5. Degradation of thermal barrier coatings with NiCoCrA1Y and NiAI bond coats by thermal cycling at high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Gil Moo; Koo, Seong Mo [Chungnam National Univ., Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Meier, G. H.; Pettit, F. S. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2004-10-01

    The effect of thermal cycling on the degradation of thermal barrier coatings has been studied. A Ni-based superalloy substrate was coated with an A1-rich NiA1 or NiCoCrA1Y bond coat and Yttria stabilized zirconia. These specimens were exposed to two types of thermal cyclings, namely, 10 minute thermal cycling and 1hour thermal cycling, at 1100 .deg. C in the air. The TBC system with NiCoCrA1Y bond coat showed a longer life time in 10 minute thermal cycling compared to that with NiA1, while the TBC system with NiA1 showed a longer life time in 1 hour thermal cycling compared to that with NiCoCrA1Y. These degradation behaviors will be discussed in detail.

  6. Experimental investigation of high cycle thermal fatigue in a T-junction piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick; Kulenovic, Rudi; Laurien, Eckart [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE)

    2015-10-15

    High cycle thermal fatigue damage of structure in the vicinity of T-junction piping systems in nuclear power plants is of importance. Mixing of coolant streams at significant temperature differences causes thermal fluctuations near piping wall leading to gradual thermal degradation. Flow mixing in a T-junction is performed. The determined factors result in bending stresses being imposed on the piping system ('Banana effect').

  7. Thermal mixing in T-junction piping system concerned with high-cycle thermal fatigue in structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Monji, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), a numerical simulation code 'MUGTHES' has been developed to investigate thermal striping phenomena caused by turbulence mixing of fluids in different temperature and to provide transient data for an evaluation method of high-cycle thermal fatigue. MUGTHES adopts Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach to predict unsteady phenomena in thermal mixing and employs boundary fitted coordinate system to be applied to complex geometry in a power reactor. Numerical simulation of thermal striping phenomena in a T-junction piping system (T-pipe) is conducted. Boundary condition for the simulation is chosen from an existing water experiment in JAEA, named as WATLON experiment. In the numerical simulation, standard Smagorinsky model is employed as eddy viscosity model with the model coefficient of 0.14 (=Cs). Numerical results of MUGTHES are verified by the comparisons with experimental results of velocity and temperature. Through the numerical simulation in the T-pipe, applicability of MUGTHES to the thermal striping phenomena is confirmed and the characteristic large-scale eddy structure which dominates thermal mixing and may cause high-cycle thermal fatigue is revealed. (author)

  8. Efficient cycles for carbon capture CLC power plants based on thermally balanced redox reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The rotary reactor differs from most alternative chemical looping combustion (CLC) reactor designs because it maintains near-thermal equilibrium between the two stages of the redox process by thermally coupling channels undergoing oxidation and reduction. An earlier study showed that this thermal coupling between the oxidation and reduction reactors increases the efficiency by up to 2% points when implemented in a regenerative Brayton cycle. The present study extends this analysis to alternative CLC cycles with the objective of identifying optimal configurations and design tradeoffs. Results show that the increased efficiency from reactor thermal coupling applies only to cycles that are capable of exploiting the increased availability in the reduction reactor exhaust. Thus, in addition to the regenerative cycle, the combined CLC cycle and the combined-regenerative CLC cycle are suitable for integration with the rotary reactor. Parametric studies are used to compare the sensitivity of the different cycle efficiencies to parameters like pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, carrier-gas fraction and purge steam generation. One of the key conclusions from this analysis is that while the optimal efficiency for regenerative CLC cycle was the highest of the three (56% at 3. bars, 1200. °C), the combined-regenerative cycle offers a trade-off that combines a reasonably high efficiency (about 54% at 12. bars, 1200. °C) with much lower gas volumetric flow rate and consequently, smaller reactor size. Unlike the other two cycles, the optimal compressor pressure ratio for the regenerative cycle is weakly dependent on the design turbine inlet temperature. For the regenerative and combined regenerative cycles, steam production in the regenerator below 2× fuel flow rate improves exhaust recovery and consequently, the overall system efficiency. Also, given that the fuel side regenerator flow is unbalanced, it is more efficient to generate steam from the

  9. A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle for advanced gas cooled fast and thermal reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yasuyoshi, Kato; Takeshi, NItawaki; Yoshio, Yoshizawa

    2001-01-01

    A carbon dioxide partial condensation direct cycle concept has been proposed for gas cooled fast and thermal reactors. The fast reactor with the concept are evaluated to be a potential alternative option to liquid metal cooled fast reactors, providing comparable cycle efficiency at the same core outlet temperature, eliminating the safety problems, simplifying the heat transport system and making easier plant maintenance. The thermal reactor with the concept is expected to be an alternative solution to current high temperature gas cooled reactors (HTGRs) with helium gas turbines, allowing comparable cycle efficiency at the moderate temperature of 650 C instead of 800 C in HTGRs. (author)

  10. A Peltier thermal cycling unit for radiopharmaceutical synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.J.; Nader, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the use of Peltier devices to rapidly cycle the temperature of reaction vessels in a radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. Peltier devices have the advantage that they can be actively cooled as well as heated, allowing precise and rapid control of vessel temperatures. Reaction vessel temperatures of between -6 deg. C and 110 deg. C have been obtained with commercially available devices with reasonable cycle times. Two devices have been used as the basis for a general purpose, two-pot synthesis system for production of [ 11 C] compounds such as raclopride

  11. Assessment of the influence of design limits to the economics of WWER fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dementiev, V.G.; Shishkov, L.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the influence of the reactor parameters limits for normal operation on the economical performance of WWER fuel cycles. It is shown for the typical WWER fuel cycles that decreasing the limits for the main power distribution parameters to 10% leads to decreasing the fuel components of the electricity cost price up to 4-5%. As the nowadays limitations are reached the dependence becomes weaker. (Authors)

  12. Life cycle analysis of underground thermal energy storage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomasetta, Camilla; van Ree, Derk; Griffioen, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Underground Thermal Energy Storage (UTES) systems are used to buffer the seasonal difference between heat and cold supply and demand and, therefore, represent an interesting option to conserve energy. Even though UTES are considered environmental friendly solutions they are not completely free of

  13. Effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on colour stability of denture base acrylic resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiato, Marcelo C; Dos Santos, Daniela M; Baptista, Gabriella T; Moreno, Amália; Andreotti, Agda M; Bannwart, Lisiane C; Dekon, Stefan F C

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling and disinfection on the colour change of denture base acrylic resin. Four different brands of acrylic resins were evaluated (Onda Cryl, QC 20, Classico and Lucitone). All brands were divided into four groups (n = 7) determined according to the disinfection procedure (microwave, Efferdent, 4% chlorhexidine or 1% hypochlorite). The treatments were conducted three times a week for 60 days. All specimens were thermal cycled between 5 and 55°C with 30-s dwell times for 1000 cycles before and after disinfection. The specimens' colour was measured with a spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b* system. The evaluations were conducted at baseline (B), after first thermal cycling (T1 ), after disinfection (D) and after second thermal cycling (T2 ). Colour differences (ΔE) were calculated between T1 and B (T1 B), D and B (DB), and T2 and B (T2 B) time-points.   The samples submitted to disinfection by microwave and Efferdent exhibited the highest values of colour change. There were significant differences on colour change between the time-points, except for the Lucitone acrylic resin. The thermal cycling and disinfection procedures significantly affected the colour stability of the samples. However, all values obtained for the acrylic resins are within acceptable clinical parameters. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S and The Gerodontology Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Study of deformation mechanisms of zinc bicrystals by thermal cycling (1963)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mondon, J.

    1963-06-01

    The thermal cycling of zinc bicrystals has been studied in order to precise the thermal cycling growth mechanism, proposed by Burke and TURKALO, specially the dependence of 'equi-cohesive' temperature of grains on their mutual orientation and the parameters of the thermal cycle. Dilatometric studies showed that a bicrystal had no equi-cohesive temperature and that the grain-boundary develops stress at all temperatures. The creep of single and bicrystal have been studied on a dilatometer with stress below the Yield-stress. At constant temperature secondary creep appears after a transient period, at cycled temperature creep stays transient for strains of about 10 -4 to 10 -3 when the crystal is plastically hard. Micrographic investigations show that grain-boundary migration accompanies the grain boundary shearing and that cycles produce a strong polygonisation, corroborating the fact that the grain boundary remains a stress-generator and that creep occurs in the volume of grains. The discussion of results shows that the transient creep of hard grain in a bicrystal makes the thermal cycling irreversible and allows on elongation at each cycle if that have the lower expansion coefficient. (author) [fr

  15. Limit cycles from a cubic reversible system via the third-order averaging method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linping Peng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the bifurcation of limit cycles from a cubic integrable and non-Hamiltonian system. By using the averaging theory of the first and second orders, we show that under any small cubic homogeneous perturbation, at most two limit cycles bifurcate from the period annulus of the unperturbed system, and this upper bound is sharp. By using the averaging theory of the third order, we show that two is also the maximal number of limit cycles emerging from the period annulus of the unperturbed system.

  16. Accelerated Thermal Cycling Test of Microencapsulated Paraffin Wax/Polyaniline Made by Simple Preparation Method for Solar Thermal Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silakhori, Mahyar; Naghavi, Mohammad Sajad; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mahlia, Teuku Meurah Indra; Fauzi, Hadi; Mehrali, Mohammad

    2013-04-29

    Microencapsulated paraffin wax/polyaniline was prepared using a simple in situ polymerization technique, and its performance characteristics were investigated. Weight losses of samples were determined by Thermal Gravimetry Analysis (TGA). The microencapsulated samples with 23% and 49% paraffin showed less decomposition after 330 °C than with higher percentage of paraffin. These samples were then subjected to a thermal cycling test. Thermal properties of microencapsulated paraffin wax were evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). Structure stability and compatibility of core and coating materials were also tested by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), and the surface morphology of the samples are shown by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). It has been found that the microencapsulated paraffin waxes show little change in the latent heat of fusion and melting temperature after one thousand thermal recycles. Besides, the chemical characteristics and structural profile remained constant after one thousand thermal cycling tests. Therefore, microencapsulated paraffin wax/polyaniline is a stable material that can be used for thermal energy storage systems.

  17. Analysis of thermal cycles and working fluids for power generation in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarlecki, Jason; Lior, Noam; Zhang Na

    2007-01-01

    Production of power in space for terrestrial use is of great interest in view of the rapidly rising power demand and its environmental impacts. Space also offers a very low temperature, making it a perfect heat sink for power plants, thus offering much higher efficiencies. This paper focuses on the evaluation and analysis of thermal Brayton, Ericsson and Rankine power cycles operating at space conditions on several appropriate working fluids. Under the examined conditions, the thermal efficiency of Brayton cycles reaches 63%, Ericsson 74%, and Rankine 85%. These efficiencies are significantly higher than those for the computed or real terrestrial cycles: by up to 45% for the Brayton, and 17% for the Ericsson; remarkably 44% for the Rankine cycle even when compared with the best terrestrial combined cycles. From the considered working fluids, the diatomic gases (N 2 and H 2 ) produce somewhat better efficiencies than the monatomic ones in the Brayton and Rankine cycles. The Rankine cycles require radiator areas that are larger by up to two orders of magnitude than those required for the Brayton and Ericsson cycles. The results of the analysis of the sensitivity of the cycle performance parameters to major parameters such as turbine inlet temperature and pressure ratio are presented, equations or examining the effects of fluid properties on the radiator area and pressure drop were developed, and the effects of the working fluid properties on cycle efficiency and on the power production per unit radiator area were explored to allow decisions on the optimal choice of working fluids

  18. Residual Tensile Property of Plain Woven Jute Fiber/Poly(Lactic Acid) Green Composites during Thermal Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katogi, Hideaki; Takemura, Kenichi; Akiyama, Motoki

    2016-07-14

    This study investigated the residual tensile properties of plain woven jute fiber reinforced poly(lactic acid) (PLA) during thermal cycling. Temperature ranges of thermal cycling tests were 35-45 °C and 35-55 °C. The maximum number of cycles was 10³ cycles. The quasi-static tensile tests of jute fiber, PLA, and composite were conducted after thermal cycling tests. Thermal mechanical analyses of jute fiber and PLA were conducted after thermal cycling tests. Results led to the following conclusions. For temperatures of 35-45 °C, tensile strength of composite at 10³ cycles decreased 10% compared to that of composite at 0 cycles. For temperatures of 35-55 °C, tensile strength and Young's modulus of composite at 10³ cycles decreased 15% and 10%, respectively, compared to that of composite at 0 cycles. Tensile properties and the coefficient of linear expansion of PLA and jute fiber remained almost unchanged after thermal cycling tests. From observation of a fracture surface, the length of fiber pull out in the fracture surface of composite at 10³ cycles was longer than that of composite at 0 cycles. Therefore, tensile properties of the composite during thermal cycling were decreased, probably because of the decrease of interfacial adhesion between the fiber and resin.

  19. Residual Tensile Property of Plain Woven Jute Fiber/Poly(Lactic Acid Green Composites during Thermal Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Katogi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the residual tensile properties of plain woven jute fiber reinforced poly(lactic acid (PLA during thermal cycling. Temperature ranges of thermal cycling tests were 35–45 °C and 35–55 °C. The maximum number of cycles was 103 cycles. The quasi-static tensile tests of jute fiber, PLA, and composite were conducted after thermal cycling tests. Thermal mechanical analyses of jute fiber and PLA were conducted after thermal cycling tests. Results led to the following conclusions. For temperatures of 35–45 °C, tensile strength of composite at 103 cycles decreased 10% compared to that of composite at 0 cycles. For temperatures of 35–55 °C, tensile strength and Young’s modulus of composite at 103 cycles decreased 15% and 10%, respectively, compared to that of composite at 0 cycles. Tensile properties and the coefficient of linear expansion of PLA and jute fiber remained almost unchanged after thermal cycling tests. From observation of a fracture surface, the length of fiber pull out in the fracture surface of composite at 103 cycles was longer than that of composite at 0 cycles. Therefore, tensile properties of the composite during thermal cycling were decreased, probably because of the decrease of interfacial adhesion between the fiber and resin.

  20. Performance Limits and Opportunities for Low Temperature Thermal Desalination

    OpenAIRE

    Nayar, Kishor Govind; Swaminathan, Jaichander; Warsinger, David Elan Martin; Lienhard, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional low temperature thermal desalination (LTTD) uses ocean thermal temperature gradients to drive a single stage flash distillation process to produce pure water from seawater. While the temperature difference in the ocean drives distillation and provides cooling in LTTD, external electrical energy is required to pump the water streams from the ocean and to maintain a near vacuum in the flash chamber. In this work, an LTTD process from the literature is compared against, the thermody...

  1. A graphic approach to include dissipative-like effects in reversible thermal cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, Luis Antonio; Angulo-Brown, Fernando

    2017-05-01

    Since the decade of 1980's, a connection between a family of maximum-work reversible thermal cycles and maximum-power finite-time endoreversible cycles has been established. The endoreversible cycles produce entropy at their couplings with the external heat baths. Thus, this kind of cycles can be optimized under criteria of merit that involve entropy production terms. Meanwhile the relation between the concept of work and power is quite direct, apparently, the finite-time objective functions involving entropy production have not reversible counterparts. In the present paper we show that it is also possible to establish a connection between irreversible cycle models and reversible ones by means of the concept of "geometric dissipation", which has to do with the equivalent role of a deficit of areas between some reversible cycles and the Carnot cycle and actual dissipative terms in a Curzon-Ahlborn engine.

  2. Thermal energy storage for integrated gasification combined-cycle power plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, M.K.; Antoniak, Z.I.; Brown, D.R.; Somasundaram, S.

    1990-07-01

    There are increasingly strong indications that the United States will face widespread electrical power generating capacity constraints in the 1990s; most regions of the country could experience capacity shortages by the year 2000. The demand for new generating capacity occurs at a time when there is increasing emphasis on environmental concerns. The integrated gasification combined-cycle (IGCC) power plant is an example of an advanced coal-fired technology that will soon be commercially available. The IGCC concept has proved to be efficient and cost-effective while meeting all current environmental regulations on emissions; however, the operating characteristics of the IGCC system have limited it to base load applications. The integration of thermal energy storage (TES) into an IGCC plant would allow it to meet cyclic loads while avoiding undesirable operating characteristics such as poor turn-down capability, impaired part-load performance, and long startup times. In an IGCC plant with TES, a continuously operated gasifier supplies medium-Btu fuel gas to a continuously operated gas turbine. The thermal energy from the fuel gas coolers and the gas turbine exhaust is stored as sensible heat in molten nitrate salt; heat is extracted during peak demand periods to produce electric power in a Rankine steam power cycle. The study documented in this report was conducted by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and consists of a review of the technical and economic feasibility of using TES in an IGCC power plant to produce intermediate and peak load power. The study was done for the US Department of Energy's (DOE) Office of Energy Storage and Distribution. 11 refs., 5 figs., 18 tabs.

  3. Thermal shock cycling effect on the mechanical behavior of epoxy matrix-woven flax fabric composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papanicolaou, G. C.; Chalkias, D. A.; Koutsomitopoulou, A. F.

    2018-02-01

    Thermal fatigue occurs in many engineering constructions, made of polymeric composites, during several applications. Due to the structural heterogeneity of composite materials the fatigue damage after large cyclic temperature variation is complex. It is important to examine thermal fatigue, studying the parameters affecting the process and if possible, describe their effect through mathematical equations in order to predict the properties degradation of the fatigued composites. In the present investigation epoxy matrix-woven flax fabric composites were fabricated and subsequently submitted to thermal shock cycling. Next, their mechanical behavior was studied through quasi-static 3-point bending tests. Thermal shock cycling experiments, of a maximum number of 200 thermal cycles, were performed, each cycle consisted of a 10 minutes exposure of composite specimens in an oven at 50 °C, followed by an abrupt exposure of the same specimens in a freezer for another 10 minutes at -20 °C. From the entire study, it was found that there is a certain number of cycles above which damage increases rapidly, reaching a plateau where saturation of micro-damage is attained. Finally, it is worth to mentioning that all experimental results were accurately predicted by applying the RPM model (Residual Property Model), a semi-analytical predictive model developed by the corresponding author.

  4. Existence of 121 limit cycles in a perturbed planar polynomial Hamiltonian vector field of degree 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Yu, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a systematic procedure has been explored to studying general Z q -equivariant planar polynomial Hamiltonian vector fields for the maximal number of closed orbits and the maximal number of limit cycles after perturbation. Following the procedure by taking special consideration of Z 12 -equivariant vector fields of degree 11, the maximal of 99 closed orbits are obtained under a well-defined coefficient group. Consequently, perturbation parameter control in limit cycle computation leads to the existence of 121 limit cycles in the perturbed Hamiltonian vector field, which gives rise to the lower bound of Hilbert number of 11th-order systems as H(11) ≥ 11 2 . Two conjectures are proposed regarding the maximal number of closed orbits for equivariant polynomial Hamiltonian vector fields and the maximal number of limit cycles bifurcated from the well defined Hamiltonian vector fields after perturbation

  5. The Greatest Number of Limit Cycles of the Generalized RAYLEIGH-LIÉNARD Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bejarano, J. D.; Garcia-Margallo, J.

    1999-03-01

    The limit cycles of the generalized Rayleigh-Liénard oscillatorX+AX+2BX3+ɛ(z3+z2X2+z1X4+z4X2)X=0, forA>0,B>0, andA0 are studied by using the Jacobian elliptic functions with the generalized harmonic balance method. For given values of the parameterszi≠0,i=1, 2, 3, 4, the values ofAandBfor which limit cycles exist are found as functions of a single parameter. There is one limit cycle in the region where the Hamiltonian,Esay, is positive, i.e., a solution of type cn, and six limit cycles, three double values, in the region whereEis negative, solution type dn.

  6. Thermoacoustic analysis of the dynamic pressure inside a model combustor during limit cycle oscillations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alemela, P.R.; Roman Casado, J.C.; Tarband Veeraraghavan, S.K.; Kok, Jacobus B.W.

    2013-01-01

    In this work comprehensive experimental and numerical studies incorporating the most relevant physical mechanisms causing limit cycle pressure and combustion rate oscillations (LCO) in a laboratory scale combustor will be discussed. The strong interaction between the aerodynamics-combustion-acoustic

  7. Estimating the boundaries of a limit cycle in a 2D dynamical system using renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ayan; Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2018-04-01

    While the plausibility of formation of limit cycle has been a well studied topic in context of the Poincare-Bendixson theorem, studies on estimates in regard to the possible size and shape of the limit cycle seem to be scanty in the literature. In this paper we present a pedagogical study of some aspects of the size of this limit cycle using perturbative renormalization group by doing detailed and explicit calculations upto second order for the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. This famous model is well known to lead to a limit cycle for certain ranges of values of the parameters involved in the problem. Within the tenets of the approximations made, reasonable agreement with the numerical plots can be achieved.

  8. The Effect of New Collision-Induced Absorption Coefficients on the Early Mars Limit Cycle Hypothesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayworth, B. P.; Payne, R. C.; Kasting, J. F.

    2017-11-01

    Updating the Limit Cycling (LC) Model for early Mars with new absorption coefficients to test for changes to LC behavior and to potentially lower needed concentrations of greenhouse gases. Thought will be given to the effect of LC on habitability.

  9. High-frequency thermal-electrical cycles for pyroelectric energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Bikram; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Cho, Hanna; Martin, Lane W.; King, William P.

    2014-01-01

    We report thermal to electrical energy conversion from a 150 nm thick BaTiO 3 film using pyroelectric cycles at 1 kHz. A microfabricated platform enables temperature and electric field control with temporal resolution near 1 μs. The rapid electric field changes as high as 11 × 10 5  kV/cm-s, and temperature change rates as high as 6 × 10 5  K/s allow exploration of pyroelectric cycles in a previously unexplored operating regime. We investigated the effect of phase difference between electric field and temperature cycles, and electric field and temperature change rates on the electrical energy generated from thermal-electrical cycles based on the pyroelectric Ericsson cycle. Complete thermodynamic cycles are possible up to the highest cycle rates tested here, and the energy density varies significantly with phase shifts between temperature and electric field waveforms. This work could facilitate the design and operation of pyroelectric cycles at high cycle rates, and aid in the design of new pyroelectric systems

  10. Limit cycles bifurcated from a center in a three dimensional system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Sang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Based on the pseudo-division algorithm, we introduce a method for computing focal values of a class of 3-dimensional autonomous systems. Using the $\\epsilon^1$-order focal values computation, we determine the number of limit cycles bifurcating from each component of the center variety (obtained by Mahdi et al. It is shown that at most four limit cycles can be bifurcated from the center with identical quadratic perturbations and that the bound is sharp.

  11. Deep greedy learning under thermal variability in full diurnal cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauss, Patrick; Rosario, Dalton

    2017-08-01

    We study the generalization and scalability behavior of a deep belief network (DBN) applied to a challenging long-wave infrared hyperspectral dataset, consisting of radiance from several manmade and natural materials within a fixed site located 500 m from an observation tower. The collections cover multiple full diurnal cycles and include different atmospheric conditions. Using complementary priors, a DBN uses a greedy algorithm that can learn deep, directed belief networks one layer at a time and has two layers form to provide undirected associative memory. The greedy algorithm initializes a slower learning procedure, which fine-tunes the weights, using a contrastive version of the wake-sleep algorithm. After fine-tuning, a network with three hidden layers forms a very good generative model of the joint distribution of spectral data and their labels, despite significant data variability between and within classes due to environmental and temperature variation occurring within and between full diurnal cycles. We argue, however, that more questions than answers are raised regarding the generalization capacity of these deep nets through experiments aimed at investigating their training and augmented learning behavior.

  12. Numerical investigation into the existence of limit cycles in two-dimensional predator�prey systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quay van der Hoff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been a surge of interest in developing and analysing models of interacting species in ecosystems, with specific interest in investigating the existence of limit cycles in systems describing the dynamics of these species. The original Lotka–Volterra model does not possess any limit cycles. In recent years this model has been modified to take disturbances into consideration and allow populations to return to their original numbers. By introducing logistic growth and a Holling Type II functional response to the traditional Lotka–Volterra-type models, it has been proven analytically that a unique, stable limit cycle exists. These proofs make use of Dulac functions, Liénard equations and invariant regions, relying on theory developed by Poincaré, Poincaré-Bendixson, Dulac and Liénard, and are generally perceived as difficult. Computer algebra systems are ideally suited to apply numerical methods to confirm or refute the analytical findings with respect to the existence of limit cycles in non-linear systems. In this paper a class of predator–prey models of a Gause type is used as the vehicle to illustrate the use of a simple, yet novel numerical algorithm. This algorithm confirms graphically the existence of at least one limit cycle that has analytically been proven to exist. Furthermore, adapted versions of the proposed algorithm may be applied to dynamic systems where it is difficult, if not impossible, to prove analytically the existence of limit cycles.

  13. Test bench for thermal cycling of 10 kV silicon carbide power modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderskov, Simon Dyhr; Jørgensen, Asger Bjørn; Maarbjerg, Anders Eggert

    2016-01-01

    measurement of on-state voltages and direct real-time measurement of die surface temperatures, enabled by fiber optical sensors, which are built into the power modules. A thermal model of the module prototypes, based on the temperature measurements, is established. Independent verification steps have been......This paper presents a test bench for lifetime investigation of 10 kV silicon carbide power modules. The test bench subjects high voltage switching operation to the modules while power cycling. Thus both a thermal and electrical operating point is emulated. The power cycling setup features offline...... made to validate the performance of the on-state voltage measurement and the thermal model. Issues are revealed in the form of common mode currents in gate drive supply, which should be remedied. Finally a new operating point for power cycling is suggested to better stress the power modules....

  14. A thermal model for the seasonal nitrogen cycle on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Paige, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The seasonal N2-cycle model presently used to characterize such observed phenomena on Triton as atmospheric pressure and surface albedo features at the time of the Voyager encounter incorporates diurnal and seasonal subsurface heat conduction, and can account for the heat capacity of N2 frost deposits. The results obtained by this model differ from those of previous studies in that they do not predict the seasonal freezing-out of the Triton atmosphere; even for a wide range of input parameters, the bright southern polar cap is seen as rather unlikely to be N2. The results support the microphysical arguments for the presence of either dark or smooth translucent N2 frosts on the Triton surface.

  15. Widespread range expansions shape latitudinal variation in insect thermal limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Lesley T.

    2016-06-01

    Current anthropogenic impacts, including habitat modification and climate change, may contribute to a sixth mass extinction. To mitigate these impacts and slow further losses of biodiversity, we need to understand which species are most at risk and identify the factors contributing to current and future declines. Such information is often obtained through large-scale, comparative and biogeographic analysis of lineages or traits that are potentially sensitive to ongoing anthropogenic change--for instance to predict which regions are most susceptible to climate change-induced biodiversity loss. However, for this approach to be generally successful, the underlying causes of identified geographical trends need to be carefully considered. Here, I augment and reanalyse a global data set of insect thermal tolerances, evaluating the contribution of recent and contemporary range expansions to latitudinal variation in thermal niche breadth. Previous indications that high-latitude ectotherms exhibit broad thermal niches and high warming tolerances held only for species undergoing range expansions or invasions. In contrast, species with stable or declining geographic ranges exhibit latitudinally decreasing absolute thermal tolerances and no latitudinal variation in tolerance breadths. Thus, non-range-expanding species, particularly insular or endemic species, which are often of highest conservation priority, are unlikely to tolerate future climatic warming at high latitudes.

  16. Limiting factors to advancing thermal battery technology for naval applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Patrick B.; Winchester, Clinton S.

    1991-10-01

    Thermal batteries are primary reserve electrochemical power sources using molten salt electrolyte which experience little effective aging while in storage or dormant deployment. Thermal batteries are primarily used in military applications, and are currently used in a wide variety of Navy devices such as missiles, torpedoes, decays, and training targets, usually as power supplies in guidance, propulsion, and Safe/Arm applications. Technology developments have increased the available energy and power density ratings by an order of magnitude in the last ten years. Present thermal batteries, using lithium anodes and metal sulfide cathodes, are capable of performing applications where only less rugged and more expensive silver oxide/zinc or silver/magnesium chloride seawater batteries could serve previously. Additionally, these batteries are capable of supplanting lithium/thionyl chloride reserve batteries in a variety of specifically optimized designs. Increases in thermal battery energy and power density capabilities are not projected to continue with the current available technology. Several battery designs are now at the edge of feasibility and safety. Since future naval systems are likely to require continued growth of battery energy and power densities, there must be significant advances in battery technology. Specifically, anode alloy composition and new cathode materials must be investigated to allow for safe development and deployment of these high power, higher energy density batteries.

  17. Economic optimization of a Kalina cycle for a parabolic trough solar thermal power plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modi, Anish; Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Andreasen, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    The Kalina cycle has recently seen increased interest as a replacement for the more traditional steam Rankine cycle for geothermal, solar, ocean thermal energy conversion and waste heat recovery applications. The Kalina cycle uses a mixture of ammonia and water as the working fluid. The ammonia...... cost of the Kalina cycle power plant (the solar field plus the power cycle), an optimization was performed by varying the turbine outlet pressure, the separator inlet temperature and the separator inlet ammonia mass fraction. All the heat exchangers were modelled as shell and tube type using suitable...... heat transfer correlations, and appropriate cost functions were used to estimate the costs for the various plant components. The optimal capital investment costs were determined for several values of the turbine inlet ammonia mass fraction and among the compared cases, the Kalina cycle has the minimum...

  18. Effect of storage in artificial saliva and thermal cycling on Knoop hardness of resin denture teeth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assunção, Wirley Gonçalves; Gomes, Erica Alves; Barão, Valentim Adelino Ricardo; Barbosa, Débora Barros; Delben, Juliana Aparecida; Tabata, Lucas Fernando

    2010-07-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effect of different storage periods in artificial saliva and thermal cycling on Knoop hardness of 8 commercial brands of resin denture teeth. Eigth different brands of resin denture teeth were evaluated (Artplus group, Biolux group, Biotone IPN group, Myerson group, SR Orthosit group, Trilux group, Trubyte Biotone group, and Vipi Dent Plus group). Twenty-four teeth of each brand had their occlusal surfaces ground flat and were embedded in autopolymerized acrylic resin. After polishing, the teeth were submitted to different conditions: (1) immersion in distilled water at 37+/-2 degrees C for 48+/-2h (control); (2) storage in artificial saliva at 37+/-2 degrees C for 15, 30 and 60 days, and (3) thermal cycling between 5 and 55 degrees C with 30-s dwell times for 5000 cycles. Knoop hardness test was performed after each condition. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=.05). In general, SR Orthosit group presented the highest statistically significant Knoop hardness value while Myerson group exhibited the smallest statistically significant mean (Pthermal cycling, and after all storage periods. The Knoop hardness means obtained before thermal cycling procedure (20.34+/-4.45 KHN) were statistically higher than those reached after thermal cycling (19.77+/-4.13 KHN). All brands of resin denture teeth were significantly softened after storage period in artificial saliva. Storage in saliva and thermal cycling significantly reduced the Knoop hardness of the resin denture teeth. SR Orthosit denture teeth showed the highest Knoop hardness values regardless the condition tested. Copyright 2010 Japan Prosthodontic Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mineralogical control on thermal damage and the presence of a thermal Kaiser effect during temperature-cycling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J.; Daoud, A.; Meredith, P. G.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems are in part controlled by the mechanical and thermal stresses acting on them and so it is important to understand the response of volcanic rocks to thermo-mechanical loading. One such response is the well-known `Kaiser stress-memory' effect observed under cyclic mechanical loading. By contrast, the presence of an analogous `Kaiser temperature-memory effect' during cyclic thermal loading has received little attention. We have therefore explored the possibility of a Kaiser temperature-memory effect using three igneous rocks of different composition, grain size and origin; Slaufrudalur Granophyre (SGP), Nea Kameni Andesite (NKA) and Seljadalur Basalt (SB). We present results from a series of thermal stressing experiments in which acoustic emissions (AE) were recorded contemporaneously with changing temperature. Samples of each rock were subjected to both a single heating and cooling cycle to a maximum temperature of 900 °C and multiple heating/cooling cycles to peak temperatures of 350°C, 500°C, 700°C and 900 °C (all at a constant rate of 1°C/min on heating and a natural cooling rate of memory effect in SGP, but not in either NKA and SB. We further find that the vast majority of thermal crack damage is generated upon cooling in the finer grained materials (NKA and SB), but that substantial thermal crack damage is generated during heating in the coarser grained SGP. The total amount of crack damage generated due to heating or cooling is dependent on the mineral composition and, most importantly, the grain size and arrangement, as well as the maximum temperature to which the rock is exposed. Knowledge of thermal stress history and the presence of a Kaiser temperature-memory effect is potentially important in understanding magma chamber dynamics, where the cyclic nature of mechanical and thermal inflation and deflation can lead to sequential accumulation of damage, potentially leading to critical rupture.

  20. Thermal energy storage for an integrated coal gasification combined-cycle power plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drost, K.; Antoniak, Z.; Brown, D.; Somasundaram, S.

    1991-10-01

    This study investigates the use of molten nitrate salt thermal energy storage in an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant allowing the facility to economically provide peak- and intermediate-load electric power. The results of the study show that an integrated gasification combined-cycle power plant with thermal energy storage can reduce the cost of coal-fired peak- or intermediate-load electric power by between 5% and 20% depending on the plants operating schedule. The use of direct-contact salt heating can further improve the economic attractiveness of the concept. 12 refs., 1 fig., 5 tabs.

  1. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  2. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Control and Irradiated EPC 2nd Generation GaN FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Results of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  3. Effects of Radiation and Long-Term Thermal Cycling on EPC 1001 Gallium Nitride Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Data obtained on long-term thermal cycling of new un-irradiated and irradiated samples of EPC1001 gallium nitride enhancement-mode transistors are presented. This work was done by a collaborative effort including GRC, GSFC, and support the NASA www.nasa.gov 1 JPL in of Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  4. Residual thermal effects in macro fiber composite actuators exposed to persistent temperature cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobeck, J. D.; Owen, R. B.; Inman, D. J.

    2016-03-01

    In this letter, the authors present results of an experimental investigation demonstrating how extreme persistent thermal cycling influences the performance of piezoelectric macro fiber composite (MFC) actuators. More specifically, this research shows how repeated temperature cycling ranging from -60 °C to 90 °C and from -50 °C to 150 °C affects an MFCs ability to actuate while being driven at frequencies of 60 Hz to 90 Hz with a voltage of 20 Vpp. Experimental results show that thermal cycling causes MFC actuation characteristics to drift and eventually stabilize after approximately 20 cycles. In two cases presented here, thermal cycling alone caused a residual increase in actuation amplitude that exceeded the initial amplitude by 70%. This apparent thermal memory effect of MFCs may significantly impact the design and analysis of active structures where MFCs are used for vibration or displacement control in transient extreme temperature environments such as those encountered by aerospace structures, industrial equipment, automobiles, and civil infrastructure.

  5. Exploring the Thermal Limits of IR-Based Automatic Whale Detection (ETAW)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Exploring the thermal limits of IR -based automatic whale...mammal detection, consisting of an actively stabilized, spinning IR camera and an algorithm that detects whale blows on the basis of their thermal...2 OBJECTIVES This project aims at a cost-efficient test of the thermal limits of the abovementioned IR based automatic whale detection

  6. Estimating the power efficiency of the thermal power plant modernization by using combined-cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovhannisyan, L.S.; Harutyunyan, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    The power efficiency of the thermal power plant (TPP) modernization by using combined-cycle technologies is introduced. It is shown that it is possible to achieve the greatest decrease in the specific fuel consumption at modernizing the TPP at the expense of introducing progressive 'know-how' of the electric power generation: for TPP on gas, it is combined-cycle, gas-turbine superstructures of steam-power plants and gas-turbines with heat utilization

  7. A limit cycle oscillator model for cycling mood variations of bipolar disorder patients derived from cellular biochemical reaction equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, T. D.

    2013-08-01

    We derive a nonlinear limit cycle model for oscillatory mood variations as observed in patients with cycling bipolar disorder. To this end, we consider two signaling pathways leading to the activation of two enzymes that play a key role for cellular and neural processes. We model pathway cross-talk in terms of an inhibitory impact of the first pathway on the second and an excitatory impact of the second on the first. The model also involves a negative feedback loop (inhibitory self-regulation) for the first pathway and a positive feedback loop (excitatory self-regulation) for the second pathway. We demonstrate that due to the cross-talk the biochemical dynamics is described by an oscillator equation. Under disease-free conditions the oscillatory system exhibits a stable fixed point. The breakdown of the self-inhibition of the first pathway at higher concentration levels is studied by means of a scalar control parameter ξ, where ξ equal to zero refers to intact self-inhibition at all concentration levels. Under certain conditions, stable limit cycle solutions emerge at critical parameter values of ξ larger than zero. These oscillations mimic pathological cycling mood variations that emerge due to a disease-induced bifurcation. Consequently, our modeling analysis supports the notion of bipolar disorder as a dynamical disease. In addition, our study establishes a connection between mechanistic biochemical modeling of bipolar disorder and phenomenological nonlinear oscillator approaches to bipolar disorder suggested in the literature.

  8. A novel solar thermal cycle with chemical looping combustion. Paper no. IGEC-1-020

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, H.; Jin, H.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a thermal cycle with the integration of chemical-looping combustion and solar thermal energy with the temperature of about 500-600 o C. Chemical-looping combustion may be carried out in two successive reactions between a reduction of hydrocarbon fuel with metal oxides and a reduced metal with oxygen in air. This loop of chemical reaction is substituted for conventional combustion of fuel. Methane as a fuel and nickel oxides as oxygen carrier were employed in this cycle. Collected high-temperature solar thermal energy is provided for the endothermic reduction reaction. The feature of the proposed cycle is investigated through Energy-Utilization Diagram methodology. As a result, at the turbine inlet temperature of 1200 o C, the exergy efficiency of the proposed cycle would expected to be about 4 percentage points higher than that of conventional gas turbine combined cycle. Compared to the previous study of chemical-looping combustion energy system, the proposed cycle with the integration of green energy and traditional hydrocarbon fuels will offer the possibility of both greenhouse gas mitigation with green energy and a new approach of efficient use of solar energy. (author)

  9. Aeroelastic Limit-Cycle Oscillations resulting from Aerodynamic Non-Linearities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, A.C.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamic non-linearities, such as shock waves, boundary layer separation or boundary layer transition, may cause an amplitude limitation of the oscillations induced by the fluid flow around a structure. These aeroelastic limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs) resulting from aerodynamic non-linearities

  10. Influence of thermal cycling on flexural properties of composites reinforced with unidirectional silica-glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriç, Gökçe; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2008-08-01

    The purpose was to investigate the effect of water storage and thermal cycling on the flexural properties of differently sized unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) containing different quantities of fibers. The effect of fiber orientation on the thermal expansion of FRCs as well as how the stresses in the composites can be affected was considered. An experimental polymeric base material was reinforced with silica-glass fibers. The cleaned and silanized fibers were sized with either linear PBMA-size or crosslinked PMMA-size. For the determination of flexural properties and water uptake, specimens were processed with various quantities of differently sized unidirectional fibers. Water uptake of FRC was measured. Water immersed specimens were thermally cycled for 500 and 12,000 cycles (5 degrees C/55 degrees C). Flexural properties of "dry" and wet specimens with and without thermal cycling were determined by a three-point bending test. The linear coefficients of thermal expansion (LCTE) for FRC samples with different fiber orientations were determined using a thermomechanical analyzer. Water uptake of the FRC specimens increased with a decrease in fiber content of the FRC. Flexural properties of FRCs improved with increasing fiber content, whereas the flexural properties were not influenced significantly by water and thermal cycling. Fiber orientation had different effects on LCTE of FRCs. Unidirectional FRCs had two different LCTE in longitudinal and transverse directions whereas bidirectional FRCs had similar LCTE in two directions and a higher one in the third direction. The results of the study suggest that the surface-treated unidirectional silica-glass FRC can be used for long-term clinical applications in the oral cavity.

  11. Quantum correlations and limit cycles in the driven-dissipative Heisenberg lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, E. T.; Jin, J.; Rossini, D.; Fazio, R.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2018-04-01

    Driven-dissipative quantum many-body systems have attracted increasing interest in recent years as they lead to novel classes of quantum many-body phenomena. In particular, mean-field calculations predict limit cycle phases, slow oscillations instead of stationary states, in the long-time limit for a number of driven-dissipative quantum many-body systems. Using a cluster mean-field and a self-consistent Mori projector approach, we explore the persistence of such limit cycles as short range quantum correlations are taken into account in a driven-dissipative Heisenberg model.

  12. Imposed Thermal Fatigue and Post-Thermal-Cycle Wear Resistance of Biomimetic Gray Cast Iron by Laser Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Qi; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Deping; Chen, Zhikai; Zhang, Peng

    2017-08-01

    The present study aims to create coupling biomimetic units on gray cast iron substrate by laser surface treatment (LST). LSTs for single-step (LST1) and two-step (LST2) processes, were carried out on gray cast iron in different media (air and water). Their effects on microstructure, thermal fatigue, and post-thermal-cycle wear (PTW) resistance on the specimens were studied. The tests were carried out to examine the influence of crack-resistance behavior as well as the biomimetic surface on its post-thermal-cycle wear behavior and different units, with different laser treatments for comparison. Results showed that LST2 enhanced the PTW behaviors of gray cast iron, which then led to an increase in its crack resistance. Among the treated cast irons, the one treated by LST2 in air showed the lowest residual stress, due to the positive effect of the lower steepness of the thermal gradient. Moreover, the same specimen showed the best PTW performance, due to its superior crack resistance and higher hardness as a result of it.

  13. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, J. Michael

    1980-01-01

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating

  15. Thermal Cycle Reliability of PBGA/CCGA 717 I/Os

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2006-01-01

    Status of thermal cycle test results for a nonfunctional daisy-chained peripheral ceramic column grid array (CCGA) and its plastic ball grid array (PBGA) version. both having 560 I/Os. were presented in last year's conference. Test results included environmental data for three different thermal cycle regimes (-55 C/125 C, -55 C/100 C, and -50 C /75 C). Update information on these - especially failure type for assemblies with high and low solder volumes-were presented. The thermal cycle test procedure followed those recommended IPC-9701 for tin-lead solder joint assemblies. Revision A of this specification covers guideline thermal cycle requirements for Pb-free solder joints. Some background information discussed during release of this specification with its current guideline recommendations were also presented. In a recent reliability investigation a fully populated CCGA with 717 I/Os was also considered for assembly reliability. evaluation. The functional package is a field-programmable gate array that has much higher processing power than its previous version. This new package is smaller in dimension, has no interposer, and has a thinner column wrapped with copper for reliability improvement. This paper will also present thermal cycle test results for this package assembly and its plastic version with 728 I/Os. both of which were exposed to three different cycle regimes. Two cycle profiles were those specified by IPC- 9701A for tin-lead, i.e. -55 to 100 C and -55 to 125 C and one was a cycle profile specified by Mil-Std-883, i.e.. -65 C/150 C which is generally used for ceramic hybrid packages. Per IPC-9701 A, test vehicles were built using daisy chain packages and were continuously monitored. The effects of many process and assembly variables-including corner staking commonly used for improving resistance to mechanical loading such as drop and vibration loads--were also considered as part of the test matrix. Optical photomicrographs were taken at various thermal

  16. The Effect of Drive Signal Limiting on High Cycle Fatigue Life Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kihm, Frederic; Rizzi, Stephen A.

    2014-01-01

    It is common practice to assume a Gaussian distribution of both the input acceleration and the response when modeling random vibration tests. In the laboratory, however, shaker controllers often limit the drive signal to prevent high amplitude peaks. The high amplitudes may either be truncated at a given level (socalled brick wall limiting or abrupt clipping), or compressed (soft limiting), resulting in drive signals which are no longer Gaussian. The paper first introduces several methods for limiting a drive signal, including brick wall limiting and compression. The limited signal is then passed through a linear time-invariant system representing a device under test. High cycle fatigue life predictions are subsequently made using spectral fatigue and rainflow cycle counting schemes. The life predictions are compared with those obtained from unclipped input signals. Some guidelines are provided to help the test engineer decide how clipping should be applied under different test scenarios.

  17. Thermal activation by power-limited coloured noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Peter; Neiman, Alexander; Afghan, Muhammad K N; Nadkarni, Suhita; Ullah, Ghanim [Department of Physics and Astronomy and Quantitative Biology Institute, Ohio University, Athens, OH 45701 (United States)

    2005-01-01

    We consider thermal activation in a bistable potential in the presence of correlated (Ornstein-Uhlenbeck) noise. Escape rates are discussed as a function of the correlation time of the noise at a constant variance of the noise. In contrast to a large body of previous work, where the variance of the noise decreases with increasing correlation time of the noise, we find a bell-shaped curve for the escape rate with a vanishing rate at zero and infinite correlation times. We further calculate threshold crossing rates driven by energy-constrained coloured noise.

  18. The limit cycles of the generalized Rayleigh-Liénard oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Margallo, J.; Bejarano, J. D.

    1992-07-01

    The limit cycles of the generalized Rayleigh and mixed (Rayleigh-Liénard) oscillator Ẍ + AX + 2BX 3 + ɛ(z 3 + z 2X 2 + z 1X 4 + z 4dotX2) dotX = 0 , for A and B > 0, are studied by using the Jacobian elliptic functions with the generalized harmonic balance method. The transitory motion, and consequently the limit cycles and their stability, are also studied quantitatively with a generalized approximation of the Krylov-Bogoliubov slowly varying amplitude and phase type, giving the radius, frequency, and energy of the limit cycles. Whether there are zero, one or two limit cycles, and their stability, depends on the values of the parameters zi, i = 1, 2, 3, 4. These solutions are interesting because they do not depend on the value of ɛ. For the simple cases of only two non-zero zi parameters, plots of the universal functions are given as well as the limit cycle radii. Approximate solutions in the general case are found to coincide with certain exact solutions of the mixed-type oscillators.

  19. Effect of Thermal Cycling on Zinc Antimonide Thin Film Thermoelectric Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hosseini, Seyed Mojtaba Mir; Rezaniakolaei, Alireza; Rosendahl, Lasse Aistrup

    2017-01-01

    is fixed between a heater block and heat sink cooled by the ambient. The thermoelectric element is studied under open circuit and also optimal constant loads corresponding to maximum power output. The thermal cycles are provided for five different hot junction temperatures, 160, 200, 250, 300 and 350 ᵒC...

  20. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  1. Effects of Wearing a Helmet on Thermal Balance While Cycling in the Heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gisolfi, C. V.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    To determine the effects of wearing a helmet on thermal balance and rating of perceived exertion while cycling in the heat, six male competitive cyclists aged 19 to 32 years rode a stationary bicycle in an environmentally controlled chamber for two hours. Results are presented. (Author/MT)

  2. Mechanical and thermal cycling effects on the flexural strength of glass ceramics fused to titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasquez, Vanessa; Ozcan, Mutlu; Nishioka, Renato; Souza, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Alfredo; Pavanelli, Carlos

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical and thermal cycling on the flexural strength (ISO 9693) of three brands of ceramics fused to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Metallic frameworks of 25 x 3 x 0.5 mm dimensions (N = 84) were cast in cpTi, followed by 150-mu m aluminum oxide airborne

  3. Development of Thermal Performance Analysis Computer Program on Turbine Cycle of Yoggwang 3,4 Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S.Y.; Choi, K.H.; Jee, M.H.; Chung, S.I. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the study ''Development of Thermal Performance Analysis Computer Program on Turbine Cycle of Yonggwang 3,4 Units'' is to utilize computerized program to the performance test of the turbine cycle or the analysis of the operational status of the thermal plants. In addition, the result can be applicable to the analysis of the thermal output at the abnormal status and be a powerful tool to find out the main problems for such cases. As a results, the output of this study can supply the way to confirm the technical capability to operate the plants efficiently and to obtain the economic gains remarkably. (author). 27 refs., 73 figs., 6 tabs.

  4. Thermal-CFD Analysis of Combined Solar-Nuclear Cycle Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathi, Nima [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); McDaniel, Patrick [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vorobieff, Peter [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); de Oliveira, Cassiano [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aleyasin, Seyed Sobhan [Univ. of Manitoba (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this paper is evaluating the efficiency of a novel combined solar-nuclear cycle. CFD-Thermal analysis is performed to apply the available surplus heat from the nuclear cycle and measure the available kinetic energy of air for the turbine of a solar chimney power plant system (SCPPS). The presented idea helps to decrease the thermal pollution and handle the water shortage supply for water plant by replacing the cooling tower by solar chimney power plant to get the surplus heat from the available warm air in the secondary loop of the reactor. By applying this idea to a typical 1000 MW nuclear power plant with a 0.33 thermal efficiency, we can increase it to 0.39.

  5. Finite Element Modeling of Thermal Cycling Induced Microcracking in Carbon/Epoxy Triaxial Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Morscher, Gregory; Martin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The microcrack distribution and mass change in PR520/T700s and 3502/T700s carbon/epoxy braided composites exposed to thermal cycling was evaluated experimentally. Acoustic emission was utilized to record the crack initiation and propagation under cyclic thermal loading between -55 C and 120 C. Transverse microcrack morphology was investigated using X-ray Computed Tomography. Different performance of two kinds of composites was discovered and analyzed. Based on the observations of microcrack formation, a meso-mechanical finite element model was developed to obtain the resultant mechanical properties. The simulation results exhibited a decrease in strength and stiffness with increasing crack density. Strength and stiffness reduction versus crack densities in different orientations were compared. The changes of global mechanical behavior in both axial and transverse loading conditions were studied. Keywords: Thermal cycles; Microcrack; Finite Element Model; Braided Composite

  6. Evaluation of thermal striping risks: Limitation of cracks initiation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drubay, B.; Acker, D.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal striping is the effect of a rapid random oscillation of surface temperature inducing a corresponding fluctuation of surface strains. It occurs on components situated in the mixing zone of coolant streams of different temperatures and is characterised by large numbers of strain cycles having the potential to add to the fatigue damage produced by strain cycles associated with all other plant operating events. The purpose of this paper is to describe the R and D works performed in the frame of the European Fast Reactor project between 1985 and 1992 on the thermal striping: experimental works and validation of assessment methodology. (author)

  7. Mathematical interpretation of Brownian motor model: Limit cycles and directed transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianqiang; Ma, Hong; Zhong, Suchuang

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we first suggest that the attractor of Brownian motor model is one of the reasons for the directed transport phenomenon of Brownian particle. We take the classical Smoluchowski-Feynman (SF) ratchet model as an example to investigate the relationship between limit cycles and directed transport phenomenon of the Brownian particle. We study the existence and variation rule of limit cycles of SF ratchet model at changing parameters through mathematical methods. The influences of these parameters on the directed transport phenomenon of a Brownian particle are then analyzed through numerical simulations. Reasonable mathematical explanations for the directed transport phenomenon of Brownian particle in SF ratchet model are also formulated on the basis of the existence and variation rule of the limit cycles and numerical simulations. These mathematical explanations provide a theoretical basis for applying these theories in physics, biology, chemistry, and engineering.

  8. A general family of morphed nonlinear phase oscillators with arbitrary limit cycle shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajallooeian, Mostafa; van den Kieboom, Jesse; Mukovskiy, Albert; Giese, Martin A.; Ijspeert, Auke J.

    2013-11-01

    We present a general family of nonlinear phase oscillators which can exhibit arbitrary limit cycle shapes and infinitely large basins of attraction. This general family is the superset of familiar control methods like PD-control over a periodic reference, and rhythmic Dynamical Movement Primitives. The general methodology is based on morphing the limit cycle of an existing phase oscillator with phase-based scaling functions to obtain a desired limit cycle behavior. The introduced methodology can be represented as first, second, or n-th order dynamical systems. The elegance of the formulation provides the possibility to define explicit arbitrary convergence behavior for simple cases. We analyze the stability properties of the methodology with the Poincaré-Bendixson theorem and the Contraction Theory, and use numerical simulations to show the properties of some oscillators that are a subset of this general family.

  9. Approximating the amplitude and form of limit cycles in the weakly nonlinear regime of Lienard systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.L.; Lopez-Ruiz, R.

    2007-01-01

    Lienard equations, x+εf(x)x+x=0, with f(x) an even continuous function are considered. In the weak nonlinear regime (ε->0), the number and O(ε 0 ) approximation of the amplitude of limit cycles present in this type of systems, can be obtained by applying a methodology recently proposed by the authors [Lopez-Ruiz R, Lopez JL. Bifurcation curves of limit cycles in some Lienard systems. Int J Bifurcat Chaos 2000;10:971-80]. In the present work, that method is carried forward to higher orders in ε and is embedded in a general recursive algorithm capable to approximate the form of the limit cycles and to correct their amplitudes as an expansion in powers of ε. Several examples showing the application of this scheme are given

  10. Chaos control of chaotic limit cycles of real and complex van der Pol oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mahmoud, Gamal M. E-mail: gmahmoud@uaeu.ac.ae; Farghaly, Ahmed A.M. E-mail: ahmed_1_66@yahoo.com

    2004-08-01

    Chaos control and nonlinear dynamics of both real and complex nonlinear oscillators constitutes some of the most fascinating developments in applied sciences. The chaos control of chaotic unstable limit cycles of real and complex (or coupled) nonlinear van der Pol oscillators is investigated in this paper. These oscillators appear in many important applications in engineering, for example, vacuum tube circuits. The presence of chaotic limit cycles is verified by calculating largest Lyapunov exponent and the power spectrum. The problem of chaos control of these limit cycles is studied using a feedback control method, which is based on the construction of a special form of a time-continuous perturbation. Our investigation of both real and complex (or coupled) van der Pol oscillators enriches the nonlinear dynamical systems.

  11. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  12. Limited capacity for developmental thermal acclimation in three tropical wrasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motson, K.; Donelson, J. M.

    2017-06-01

    For effective conservation and management of marine systems, it is essential that we understand the biological impacts of and capacity for acclimation to increased ocean temperatures. This study investigated for the first time the effects of developing in projected warmer ocean conditions in the tropical wrasse species: Halichoeres melanurus, Halichoeres miniatus and Thalassoma amblycephalum. New recruits were reared for 11 weeks in control (29 °C) and +2 °C (31 °C) temperature treatments, consistent with predicted increases in sea surface temperature by 2100. A broad range of key attributes and performance parameters was tested, including aerobic metabolism, swimming ability, burst escape performance and physical condition. Response latency of burst performance was the only performance parameter in which evidence of beneficial thermal developmental acclimation was found, observed only in H. melanurus. Generally, development in the +2 °C treatment came at a significant cost to all species, resulting in reduced growth and physical condition, as well as metabolic and swimming performance relative to controls. Development in +2 °C conditions exacerbated the effects of warming on aerobic metabolism and swimming ability, compared to short-term warming effects. Burst escape performance parameters were only mildly affected by development at +2 °C, with non-locomotor performance (response latency) showing greater thermal sensitivity than locomotor performance parameters. These results indicate that the effects of future climate change on tropical wrasses would be underestimated with short-term testing. This study highlights the importance of holistic, longer-term developmental experimental approaches, with warming found to yield significant, species-specific responses in all parameters tested.

  13. GEM, Fuel Cycle Cost and Economics for Thermal Reactor, Present Worth Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.A.; Hang, D.F.

    1974-01-01

    1- Description of problem or function: GEM is used to predict fuel cycle costs for any type nuclear system (i.e., BWR, HTGR, PWR, LMFBR, GCFR,... ). The current version is limited to thermal reactors. GEM is designed for production use by large utilities which have several reactor types on their system. GEM has been written so as to accommodate all major fuel management activities undertaken by a utility - (1) fuel bid analysis, (2) evaluation of actual day to day operation, and (3) system simulation and optimization studies. 2 - Method of solution: Costs are calculated using present-worth techniques and continuous compounding. The equations are based on an investor-owned utility capitalization structure which easily covers the range of industrial, private, and public (government) owned utilities. Three distinct types of analysis (cash flow, allocated costs, yearly cash flow) are performed, each yielding identical results. Using these as a basis many other analyses are undertaken. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Dimensions of all arrays are carried as variables throughout the analysis. The maximum size of each array is set by the user in program MAIN. Current values are set so that maxima are: 50 batches per case study, 20 year batch life, 30 year case study, 120 batch burn time-steps, 20 individual payments (sales) associated with each cost component

  14. Life cycle assessment of thermal waste-to-energy technologies: review and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Tonini, Davide; Turconi, Roberto; Boldrin, Alessio

    2015-03-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case-studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste composition, technology, gas cleaning, energy recovery, residue management, and inventory data), and (iii) modeling principles (e.g. energy/mass calculation principles, energy substitution, inclusion of capital goods and uncertainty evaluation). Very few of the published studies provided full and transparent descriptions of all these aspects, in many cases preventing an evaluation of the validity of results, and limiting applicability of data and results in other contexts. The review clearly suggests that the quality of LCA studies of WtE technologies and systems including energy recovery can be significantly improved. Based on the review, a detailed overview of assumptions and modeling choices in existing literature is provided in conjunction with practical recommendations for state-of-the-art LCA of Waste-to-Energy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of Neochloris oleoabundans under nitrogen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, Lenneke; Schepers, Lutz W; Cuaresma, Maria; Barbosa, Maria J; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H

    2014-10-10

    The circadian clock schedules processes in microalgae cells at suitable times in the day/night cycle. To gain knowledge about these biological time schedules, Neochloris oleoabundans was grown under constant light conditions and nitrogen limitation. Under these constant conditions, the only variable was the circadian clock. The results were compared to previous work done under nitrogen-replete conditions, in order to determine the effect of N-limitation on circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of N. oleoabundans. The circadian clock was not affected by nitrogen-limitation, and cell division was timed in the natural night, despite of constant light conditions. However, because of nitrogen-limitation, not the entire population was able to divide every day. Two subpopulations were observed, which divided alternately every other day. This caused oscillations in biomass yield and composition. Starch and total fatty acids (TFA) were accumulated during the day. Also, fatty acid composition changed during the cell cycle. Neutral lipids were built up during the day, especially in cells that were arrested in their cell cycle (G2 and G3). These findings give insight in the influence of circadian rhythms on the cell cycle and biomass composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformation and mechanical strengthening of stainless steels – A phase-field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Shaw, Brian A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D elastoplastic phase-field model is used to study the effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformationas well as on mechanical strengthening of both austenite and martensite in stainless steel. The results show that with an increasing number of thermal cycles, martensite becomes more...... stable. Increase in strain, plastic strainand strain hardening lead to strengthening of austenite....

  17. Calculation of BWR [Boiling Water Reactor] limit cycle amplitude using Galerkin's method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.; Euler, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes the application of Galerkin's method to estimate the amplitude of boiling water reactor (BWR) limit cycle oscillations. It will be shown that Galerkin's method can be applied to a model of BWR dynamics consisting of the point kinetics equations and the LAPUR generated feedback transfer function to calculate the time history of small amplitude limit cycles. This allows results from the linear frequency domain code LAPUR to be used to calculate nonlinear time domain information. 2 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab

  18. Critical thermal limits affected differently by developmental and adult thermal fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salachan, Paul Vinu; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2017-01-01

    Means and variances of the environmental thermal regime play an important role in determining the fitness of terrestrial ectotherms. Adaptive phenotypic responses induced by heterogeneous temperatures have been shown to be mediated by molecular pathways independent of the classic heat shock...... responses, however, an in-depth understanding of plasticity induced by fluctuating temperatures is still lacking. We investigated high and low temperature acclimation induced by fluctuating thermal regimes at two different mean temperatures, at two different amplitudes of fluctuation and across...... the developmental and adult life stages. For developmental acclimation, we found mildly detrimental effects of high amplitude fluctuations for critical thermal minima, while the critical thermal maxima showed a beneficial response to higher amplitude fluctuations. For adult acclimation involving shifts between...

  19. Thermal enhancement of charge and discharge cycles for adsorbed natural gas storage

    KAUST Repository

    Rahman, Kazi Afzalur

    2011-07-01

    The usage of adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage is hindered by the thermal management during the adsorption and desorption processes. An effective thermal enhancement is thus essential for the development of the ANG technology and the motivation for this study is the investigation of a gas storage system with internal thermal control. We employed a fin-tube type heat exchanger that is placed in a pressurized cylinder. A distributed-parameter model is used for the theoretical modeling and simulations are conducted at assorted charging and discharging conditions. These studies included the transient thermal behaviours of the elements within the ANG-charged cylinder and parameters such as pressure and temperature profiles of adsorbent have been obtained during charge and discharge cycles, and results are compared with a conventional compressed methane vessel. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimizing the Environmental Performance of In Situ Thermal Remediation Technologies Using Life Cycle Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Gitte; Nielsen, Steffen G.; Weber, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    the pressure on coal-based electricity and thereby reduces the environmental impacts due to electricity production by up to 10%. Furthermore, reducing the amount of concrete in the vapor cap by using a concrete sandwich construction can potentially reduce the environmental impacts due to the vapor cap by up......In situ thermal remediation technologies provide efficient and reliable cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater, but at a high cost of environmental impacts and resource depletion due to the large amounts of energy and materials consumed. This study provides a detailed investigation of four...... in situ thermal remediation technologies (steam enhanced extraction, thermal conduction heating, electrical resistance heating, and radio frequency heating) in order to (1) compare the life-cycle environmental impacts and resource consumption associated with each thermal technology, and (2) identify...

  1. Thermal Stability of Hexamethyldisiloxane (MM for High-Temperature Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Preißinger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of efficient Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC units for the usage of industrial waste heat at high temperatures requires direct contact evaporators without intermediate thermal oil circuits. Therefore, the thermal stability of high-temperature working fluids gains importance. In this study, the thermal degradation of hexamethyldisiloxane (MM is investigated in an electrically heated tube. Qualitative results concerning remarks on degradation products as well as quantitative results like the annual degradation rate are presented. It is shown that MM is stable up to a temperature of 300 °C with annual degradation rates of less than 3.5%. Furthermore, the break of a silicon–carbon bond can be a main chemical reaction that influences the thermal degradation. Finally, it is discussed how the results may impact the future design of ORC units.

  2. Re-austenitisation of chromium-bearing pressure vessel steels during the weld thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, Druce; Li, Huijun; Jones, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Steels with chromium contents between 0.5 and 12 wt% are commonly used for fabrication of creep resistant pressure vessels (PV) for the power generation industry. Most of these steels are susceptible to Type IV creep failure in the intercritical and/ or grain refined regions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the parent metal. The re-austenitisation process plays a central role in establishing the transformed microstructures and the creep resistance of the various sub-zones of the HAZ. The high alloy content and the presence of alloy-rich carbides in the as-supplied parent plate can significantly retard the kinetics of transformation to austenite, resulting in both incomplete austenitisation and inhomogeneous austenite. Overlapping weld thermal cycles in multi-pass welds add further complexity to the progressive development of microstructure over the course of the welding process. In order to clarify structural evolution, thermal simulation has been used to study the effects of successive thermal cycles on the structures and properties of the HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The results showed that, before post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), the HAZ microstructures and properties, particularly in doubly reheated sub-zones, were highly heterogeneous and differed markedly from those of the base steel. It is concluded that close control of the thermal cycle by pre-heat, weld heat input and post-heat is necessary to obtain a heat affected zone with microstructures and properties compatible with those of the base plate.

  3. Exploring the limits of identifying sub-pixel thermal features using ASTER TIR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, R.G.; Keszthelyi, L.P.; Davies, A.G.; Schneider, D.J.; Jaworowski, C.; Heasler, H.

    2010-01-01

    Understanding the characteristics of volcanic thermal emissions and how they change with time is important for forecasting and monitoring volcanic activity and potential hazards. Satellite instruments view volcanic thermal features across the globe at various temporal and spatial resolutions. Thermal features that may be a precursor to a major eruption, or indicative of important changes in an on-going eruption can be subtle, making them challenging to reliably identify with satellite instruments. The goal of this study was to explore the limits of the types and magnitudes of thermal anomalies that could be detected using satellite thermal infrared (TIR) data. Specifically, the characterization of sub-pixel thermal features with a wide range of temperatures is considered using ASTER multispectral TIR data. First, theoretical calculations were made to define a "thermal mixing detection threshold" for ASTER, which quantifies the limits of ASTER's ability to resolve sub-pixel thermal mixing over a range of hot target temperatures and % pixel areas. Then, ASTER TIR data were used to model sub-pixel thermal features at the Yellowstone National Park geothermal area (hot spring pools with temperatures from 40 to 90 ??C) and at Mount Erebus Volcano, Antarctica (an active lava lake with temperatures from 200 to 800 ??C). Finally, various sources of uncertainty in sub-pixel thermal calculations were quantified for these empirical measurements, including pixel resampling, atmospheric correction, and background temperature and emissivity assumptions.

  4. Thermal cycling effect in U-10Mo/Zry-4 monolithic nuclear fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopes, Denise A., E-mail: deniseadorno@hotmail.com [Escola Politécnica, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463, 05508-030 São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zimmermann, Angelo J.O.; Silva, Selma L. [Centro Tecnológico da Marinha de São Paulo – CTMSP – CEA, Estrada Sorocaba Iperó, Km 12,5, 18560-000 Iperó, SP (Brazil); Piqueira, J.R.C. [Escola Politécnica, Universidade de São Paulo, Av. Prof. Mello Moraes, 2463, 05508-030 São Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2016-05-15

    Uranium alloys in a monolithic form have been considered attractive candidates for high density nuclear fuel. However, this high-density fissile material configuration keeps the volume permitted for the retention of fission products at a minimum. Additionally, the monolithic nuclear fuel has a peculiar configuration, whereby the fuel is in direct contact with the cladding. How this fuel configuration will retain fission products and how this will affect its integrity under various physical conditions - such as thermal cycling - are some of the technological problems for this new fuel. In this paper, the effect of out-of-pile thermal cycling is studied for a monolithic fuel plate produced by a hot co-rolling method using U-10Mo (wt %) as the fuel alloy and Zircaloy-4 as the cladding material. After performing 10 thermal cycles from 25 to 400 °C at a rate of 1 °C/min (∼125 h), the fuel alloy presented several fractures that were observed to occur in the last three cycles. These cracks nucleated approximately in the center of the fuel alloy and crossed the interdiffusion zone initiating an internal crack in the cladding. The results suggest that the origin of these fractures is the thermal fatigue of the U-10Mo alloy caused due to the combination of two factors: (i) the high difference in the thermal expansion coefficient of the fuel and of the cladding material, and (ii) the bound condition of fuel/cladding materials in this fuel element configuration.

  5. A polycycle and limit cycles in a non-differentiable predator-prey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (Math. Sci.) Vol. 117, No. 2, May 2007, pp. 219–231. © Printed in India. A polycycle and limit cycles in a non-differentiable predator-prey model. E S ´AEZ and I SZ ´ANT ´O. Departamento de Matemática ... System (1.1) is a kind of model that justifies the enrichment paradox, i.e 'increasing the supply of limiting nutrients or ...

  6. Effect of thermal cycling on flexural properties of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segerström, Susanna; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2009-07-01

    To determine flexural strength and modulus after water storage and thermal cycling of carbon-graphite fiber-reinforced (CGFR) polymers based on poly(methyl methacrylate) and a copolymer matrix, and to examine adhesion between fiber and matrix by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Solvent cleaned carbon-graphite (CG) braided tubes of fibers were treated with a sizing resin. The resin mixture of the matrix was reinforced with 24, 36, 47 and 58wt% (20, 29, 38 and 47vol.%) CG-fibers. After heat polymerization the specimens were kept for 90 days in water and thereafter hydrothermally cycled (12,000 cycles, 5/55 degrees C). Mechanical properties were evaluated by three-point bend testing. After thermal cycling, the adhesion between fibers and matrix was evaluated by SEM. Hydrothermal cycling did not decrease flexural strength of the CGFR polymers with 24 and 36wt% fiber loadings; flexural strength values after thermocycling were 244.8 (+/-32.33)MPa for 24wt% and 441.3 (+/-68.96)MPa for 36wt%. Flexural strength values after thermal cycling were not further increased after increasing the fiber load to 47 (459.2 (+/-45.32)MPa) and 58wt% (310.4 (+/-52.79)MPa). SEM revealed good adhesion between fibers and matrix for all fiber loadings examined. The combination of the fiber treatment and resin matrix described resulted in good adhesion between CG-fibers and matrix. The flexural values for fiber loadings up to 36wt% appear promising for prosthodontic applications such as implant-retained prostheses.

  7. Martensitic transformation in an intergranular corrosion area of austenitic stainless steel during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Yen, Hung-Wei; Trimby, Patrick; Moody, Steven; Miller, Sarah; Chensee, Martin; Ringer, Simon; Cairney, Julie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidation-assisted martensitic phase transformation was observed in an austenitic stainless steel after thermal cycling up to 970 °C in air in a solar thermal steam reformer. The intergranular corrosion areas were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural-and-chemical maps revealed that within intergranular corrosion areas this martensitic transformation primarily occurs in oxidation-induced chromium-depleted zones, rather than due to only sensitization. This displacive transformation may also play a significant role in the rate at which intergranular corrosion takes place

  8. Arbitrary number of limit cycles for planar discontinuous piecewise linear differential systems with two zones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis de Carvalho Braga

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For any given positive integer $n$ we show the existence of a class of discontinuous piecewise linear differential systems with two zones in the plane having exactly $n$ hyperbolic limit cycles. Moreover, all the points on the separation boundary between the two zones are of sewing type, except the origin which is the only equilibrium point.

  9. On the Stable Limit Cycle of a Weight-Driven Pendulum Clock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llibre, J; Teixeira, M. A.

    2010-01-01

    In a recent paper (Denny 2002 Eur. J. Phys. 23 449-58), entitled "The pendulum clock: a venerable dynamical system", Denny showed that in a first approximation the steady-state motion of a weight-driven pendulum clock is shown to be a stable limit cycle. He placed the problem in a historical context and obtained an approximate solution using the…

  10. Limit cycles bifurcating from the periodic annulus of cubic homogeneous polynomial centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Llibre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We obtain an explicit polynomial whose simple positive real roots provide the limit cycles which bifurcate from the periodic orbits of any cubic homogeneous polynomial center when it is perturbed inside the class of all polynomial differential systems of degree n.

  11. Circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of Neochloris oleoabundans under nitrogen limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, de L.; Schepers, L.W.; Cuaresma Franco, M.; Barbosa, M.J.; Martens, D.E.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock schedules processes in microalgae cells at suitable times in the day/night cycle. To gain knowledge about these biological time schedules, Neochloris oleoabundans was grown under constant light conditions and nitrogen limitation. Under these constant conditions, the only variable

  12. Explosion of limit cycles and chaotic waves in a simple nonlinear chemical system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten; Sturis, Jeppe

    2001-01-01

    A model of an autocatalytic chemical reaction was employed to study the explosion of limit cycles and chaotic waves in a nonlinear chemical system. The bifurcation point was determined using asymptotic analysis and perturbations. Scaling laws for amplitude and period were derived. A strong...

  13. A polycycle and limit cycles in a non-differentiable predator-prey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J. Math. Biol. 33 (1995) 816–828. [2] Blows T R and Lloyd N G, The number of limit cycles of certain polynomial differential equations. Proc. Royal Soc. Edinburgh A98 (1984) 215–239. [3] Clark C W, Mathematical Bioeconomics: The Optimal Management of Renewable. Resources, 2nd ed. (John Wiley and Sons) (1990) pp.

  14. A Polycycle and Limit Cycles in a Non-Differentiable Predator-Prey ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    For a non-differentiable predator-prey model, we establish conditions for the existence of a heteroclinic orbit which is part of one contractive polycycle and for some values of the parameters, we prove that the heteroclinic orbit is broken and generates a stable limit cycle. In addition, in the parameter space, we prove that ...

  15. Can oxygen set thermal limits in an insect and drive gigantism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilco C E P Verberk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thermal limits may arise through a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand in a range of animal taxa. Whilst this oxygen limitation hypothesis is supported by data from a range of marine fish and invertebrates, its generality remains contentious. In particular, it is unclear whether oxygen limitation determines thermal extremes in tracheated arthropods, where oxygen limitation may be unlikely due to the efficiency and plasticity of tracheal systems in supplying oxygen directly to metabolically active tissues. Although terrestrial taxa with open tracheal systems may not be prone to oxygen limitation, species may be affected during other life-history stages, particularly if these rely on diffusion into closed tracheal systems. Furthermore, a central role for oxygen limitation in insects is envisaged within a parallel line of research focussing on insect gigantism in the late Palaeozoic. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we examine thermal maxima in the aquatic life stages of an insect at normoxia, hypoxia (14 kPa and hyperoxia (36 kPa. We demonstrate that upper thermal limits do indeed respond to external oxygen supply in the aquatic life stages of the stonefly Dinocras cephalotes, suggesting that the critical thermal limits of such aquatic larvae are set by oxygen limitation. This could result from impeded oxygen delivery, or limited oxygen regulatory capacity, both of which have implications for our understanding of the limits to insect body size and how these are influenced by atmospheric oxygen levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings extend the generality of the hypothesis of oxygen limitation of thermal tolerance, suggest that oxygen constraints on body size may be stronger in aquatic environments, and that oxygen toxicity may have actively selected for gigantism in the aquatic stages of Carboniferous arthropods.

  16. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fic Adam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle, which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle. The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  17. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fic, Adam; Składzień, Jan; Gabriel, Michał

    2015-03-01

    Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle), which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle). The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  18. Radiation and Thermal Cycling Effects on EPC1001 Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Lauenstein, Jean M.; Casey, Megan C.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Information pertaining to performance of electronic parts and systems under hostile environments is very scarce, especially for new devices. Such data is very critical so that proper design is implemented in order to ensure mission success and to mitigate risks associated with exposure of on-board systems to the operational environment. In this work, newly-developed enhancement-mode field effect transistors (FET) based on gallium nitride (GaN) technology were exposed to various particles of ionizing radiation and to long-term thermal cycling over a wide temperature range. Data obtained on control (un-irradiated) and irradiated samples of these power transistors are presented and the results are discussed.

  19. Thermal-Electromagnetic Analysis for Driving Cycles of Embedded Flux-Switching Permanent Magnet Motors

    OpenAIRE

    Li , Guangjin; Ojeda , Javier; Hoang , Emmanuel; Gabsi , Mohamed; Lécrivain , Michel

    2012-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents a fast and precise electromagnetic-thermal model of a redundant dual star Flux-Switching Permanent Magnet (FSPM) motor for the embedded applications with driving cycles, e.g. Hybrid Electrical Vehicle (HEV), aerospace, etc. This model is based on a prior steady characterization by Finite Element Method (FEM) 2D of the FSPM motor via calculating the instantaneous torque, the normal and tangential components of magnetic flux density (Br and ) of each ...

  20. Thermal cycling of stress-induced martensite for high-performance shape memory effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casati, Riccardo; Vedani, Maurizio; Tuissi, Ausonio

    2014-01-01

    A novel approach to achieve an extraordinary high stress recovery shape memory effect based on thermal cycling of stress-induced martensite is proposed. An alternative thermodynamic path is considered in order to achieve outstanding functional properties of Ni-rich NiTi alloys, which are commonly used at room or body temperature as superelastic materials. Fatigue tests revealed excellent stability of the material subjected to the novel thermomechanical path, confirming its suitability for employment in high-performance shape memory actuators

  1. An integrated solar thermal power system using intercooled gas turbine and Kalina cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Shuo; Hong, Hui; Jin, Hongguang; Wang, Zhifeng

    2012-01-01

    A new solar tower thermal power system integrating the intercooled gas turbine top cycle and the Kalina bottoming cycle is proposed in the present paper. The thermodynamic performance of the proposed system is investigated, and the irreversibility of energy conversion is disclosed using the energy–utilization diagram method. On the top cycle of the proposed system, the compressed air after being intercooled is heated at 1000 °C or higher at the solar tower receiver and is used to drive the gas turbine to generate power. The ammonia–water mixture as the working substance of the bottom cycle recovers the waste heat from the gas turbine to generate power. A concise analytical formula of solar-to-electric efficiency of the proposed system is developed. As a result, the peak solar-to-electric efficiency of the proposed system is 27.5% at a gas turbine inlet temperature of 1000 °C under the designed solar direct normal irradiance of 800 W/m 2 . Compared with a conventional solar power tower plant, the proposed integrated system conserves approximately 69% of consumed water. The results obtained in the current study provide an approach to improve solar-to-electric efficiency and offer a potential to conserve water for solar thermal power plants in arid area. -- Highlights: ► An Integrated Solar Thermal Power System is modeled. ► A formula forecasting the thermodynamic performance is proposed. ► The irreversibility of energy conversion is disclosed using an energy utilization method. ► The effect of key operational parameters on thermal performance is examined.

  2. Uranium-plutonium partitioning by pulsed column in the first cycle of the three cycle thermal oxide reprocessing plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phillips, C.

    1992-01-01

    The Thermal Oxide Reprocessing Plant (THORP) is currently being commissioned at the Sellafield, England site of British Nuclear Fuels Plc, and will use the Purex process to reprocess irradiated oxide fuel from British, European and Japanese reactors. Careful initial design of the chemical flowsheet, combined with extensive small and full scale, fully active and inactive development work resulted in an efficient three cycle flowsheet with the minimum number of liquid waste streams. The use of salt-free reagents allows these wastes to be evaporated and vitrified for long term storage. The effect of technetium on the uranium-plutonium partitioning process and of neptunium on the purification of the uranium product received particular attention during the development work. (author)

  3. Thermal Cycling Behavior of Zinc Antimonide Thin Films for High Temperature Thermoelectric Power Generation Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Hyung Cheoul; Woo, Chang-Su; Han, Seungwoo

    2015-08-19

    The zinc antimonide compound ZnxSby is one of the most efficient thermoelectric materials known at high temperatures due to its exceptional low thermal conductivity. For this reason, it continues to be the focus of active research, especially regarding its glass-like atomic structure. However, before practical use in actual surroundings, such as near a vehicle manifold, it is imperative to analyze the thermal reliability of these materials. Herein, we present the thermal cycling behavior of ZnxSby thin films in nitrogen (N2) purged or ambient atmosphere. ZnxSby thin films were prepared by cosputtering and reached a power factor of 1.39 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 321 °C. We found maximum power factor values gradually decreased in N2 atmosphere due to increasing resistivity with repeated cycling, whereas the specimen in air kept its performance. X-ray diffraction and electron microscopy observations revealed that fluidity of Zn atoms leads to nanoprecipitates, porous morphologies, and even growth of a coating layer or fiber structures on the surface of ZnxSby after repetitive heating and cooling cycles. With this in mind, our results indicate that proper encapsulation of the ZnxSby surface would reduce these unwanted side reactions and the resulting degradation of thermoelectric performance.

  4. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  5. Sensitivity of LWR fuel cycle costs to uncertainties in detailed thermal cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Becker, M.; Harris, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Cross sections averaged over the thermal energy (< 1 or 2 eV) group have been shown to have an important economic role for light-water reactors. Cost implications of thermal cross section uncertainties at the few-group level were reported earlier. When it has been determined that costs are sensitive to a specific thermal-group cross section, it becomes desirable to determine how specific energy-dependent cross sections influence fuel cycle costs. Multigroup cross-section sensitivity coefficients vary with fuel exposure. By changing the shape of a cross section displayed on a view-tube through an interactive graphics system, one can compute the change in few-group cross section using the exposure dependent sensitivity coefficients. With the changed exposure dependent few-group cross section, a new fuel cycle cost is computed by a sequence of batch depletion, core analysis, and fuel batch cost code modules. Fuel cycle costs are generally most sensitive to cross section uncertainties near the peak of the hardened Maxwellian flux

  6. Effects of cure temperature, electron radiation, and thermal cycling on P75/930 composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funk, Joan G.

    1990-01-01

    Graphite/epoxy composites are candidates for future space structures due to high stiffness and dimensional stability requirements of these structures. Typical graphite/epoxy composites are brittle and have high residual stresses which often result in microcracking during the thermal cycling typical of the space environment. Composite materials used in geosynchronous orbit applications will also be exposed to high levels of radiation. The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of cure temperature and radiation exposure on the shear strength and thermal cycling-induced microcrack density of a high modulus, 275 F cure epoxy, P75/930. The results from the P75/930 are compared to previously reported data on P75/934 and T300/934 where 934 is a standard 350 F cure epoxy. The results of this study reveal that P75/930 is significantly degraded by total doses of electron radiation greater than 10(exp 8) rads and by thermally cycling between -250 F and 150 F. The P75/930 did not have improved microcrack resistance over the P75/934, and the 930 resin system appears to be more sensitive to electron radiation-induced degradation than the 934 resin system.

  7. Advance reactor and fuel-cycle systems--potentials and limitations for United States utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.; Williams, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential benefits and limitations of advance reactor and fuel-cycle systems for United States utilities. The results of the review of advanced technologies show that for the near and midterm, the only advance reactor and fuel-cycle system with significant potential for United States utilities is the current LWR, and evolutionary, not revolutionary, enhancements. For the long term, the liquid-metal breeder reactor continues to be the most promising advance nuclear option. The major factors leading to this conclusion are summarized

  8. Simulation of the synergistic low Earth orbit effects of vacuum thermal cycling, vacuum UV radiation, and atomic oxygen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dever, Joyce A.; Degroh, Kim K.; Stidham, Curtis R.; Stueber, Thomas J.; Dever, Therese M.; Rodriguez, Elvin; Terlep, Judith A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to assess the low Earth orbit (LEO) durability of candidate space materials, it is necessary to use ground laboratory facilities which provide LEO environmental effects. A facility combining vacuum thermal cycling and vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation has been designed and constructed at NASA Lewis Research Center for this purpose. This facility can also be operated without the VUV lamps. An additional facility can be used to provide VUV exposure only. By utilizing these facilities, followed by atomic oxygen exposure in an RF plasma asher, the effects of the individual vacuum thermal cycling and VUV environments can be compared to the effect of the combined vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environment on the atomic oxygen durability of materials. The synergistic effects of simulated LEO environmental conditions on materials were evaluated by first exposing materials to vacuum thermal cycling, VUV, and vacuum thermal cycling/VUV environments followed by exposure to atomic oxygen in an RP plasma asher. Candidate space power materials such as atomic oxygen protected polyimides and solar concentrator mirrors were evaluated using these facilities. Characteristics of the Vacuum Thermal Cycling/VUV Exposure Facility which simulates the temperature sequences and solar ultraviolet radiation exposure that would be experienced by a spacecraft surface in LEO are discussed. Results of durability evaluations of some candidate space power materials to the simulated LEO environmental conditions will also be discussed. Such results have indicated that for some materials, atomic oxygen durability is affected by previous exposure to thermal cycling and/or VUV exposure.

  9. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  10. Reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of multi-MW wind power inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of power devices in grid-connected inverter for 10 MW wind turbines is investigated. Restrained by the grid codes, the allowable reactive power ranges in relation to amplitude and phase angle of the load current for a single...... converter system are first presented at different wind speeds. Furthermore, the interaction between paralleled converter systems in a wind park is also considered and analyzed. By controlling the reactive power circulated among paralleled converters, a new concept is then proposed to stabilize the thermal...... fluctuation of the power devices during wind gusts. It is concluded that the reactive power may change the thermal distribution of power devices. By properly controlling the reactive power, it is possible to achieve a more stable junction temperature in the power devices during the fluctuation of wind speed...

  11. Reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of multi-MW wind power inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of power devices in grid-connected inverter for 10 MW wind turbines is investigated. Restrained by the grid codes, the allowable reactive power ranges in relation to amplitude and phase angle of the load current for a single...... converter system are first presented at different wind speeds. Furthermore, the interaction between paralleled converter systems in a wind park is also considered and analyzed. By controlling the reactive power circulated among paralleled converters, a new concept is then proposed to stabilize the thermal...... fluctuation of the power devices during wind gusts. It is concluded that the reactive power may change the thermal distribution of power devices. By properly controlling the reactive power, it is possible to achieve a more stable junction temperature in the power devices during the fluctuation of wind speed...

  12. Improvement of chemical control in the water-steam cycle of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajakovic-Ognjanovic, Vladana N.; Zivojinovic, Dragana Z.; Grgur, Branimir N.; Rajakovic, Ljubinka V.

    2011-01-01

    A more effective chemical control in the water-steam cycle (WSC) of thermal power plants (TPP) is proposed in this paper. Minimization of corrosion effects by the production of ultra pure water and its strict control is the basis of all the investigated processes. The research involved the analysis of water samples in the WSC through key water quality parameters and by the most convenient analytical tools. The necessity for the stricter chemical control is demonstrated through a concrete example of the TPP Nikola Tesla, Serbia. After a thorough analysis of the chemical control system of the WSC, diagnostic and control parameters were chosen for continuous systematic measurements. Sodium and chloride ions were recognized as the ions which indicate the corrosion potential of the water and give insight into the proper production and maintenance of water within the WSC. Chemical transformations of crucial corrosion elements, iron and silica, were considered and related to their quantitative values. - Research highlights: → The more effective chemical control in the water-steam cycle of thermal power plant Nikola Tesla, Serbia. → In chemical control the diagnostic and control parameters were optimized and introduced for the systematic measurements in the water-steam cycle. → Sodium and chloride ions were recognized as ions which indicate corrosion potential of water and give insight to proper function of production and maintenance of water within water-team cycle. → Chemical transformations of crucial corrosion elements, iron and silica are considered and related with their quantitative values.

  13. Determining passive cooling limits in CPV using an analytical thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, Federico; Arenas, Osvaldo; Vossier, Alexis; Dollet, Alain; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard

    2013-09-01

    We propose an original thermal analytical model aiming to predict the practical limits of passive cooling systems for high concentration photovoltaic modules. The analytical model is described and validated by comparison with a commercial 3D finite element model. The limiting performances of flat plate cooling systems in natural convection are then derived and discussed.

  14. Nitrogen cycling in Yellowstone National Park thermal features: using gene expression to reveal ecological function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lafree, S. T.; Burton, M. S.; Meyer-Dombard, D. R.

    2010-12-01

    Studies of biodiversity, metabolic strategies, and functional ecology in modern hydrothermal systems have the potential to provide insight into the metabolism and evolution of life. The geochemical and microbial diversity present at Yellowstone National Park (YNP), Wyoming, USA, makes it an ideal place for studying the functional ecology and metabolic processes of prokaryotic organisms. While much work in terrestrial hydrothermal features is focused on phylogenetic and geochemical analyses, a few recent investigations in YNP and other hydrothermal areas have focused on “gene hunting”: screening thermal sediment and biofilm samples for the presence of genes utilized in specific metabolic processes [2, 3, 6, 7, 8]. Although research has evaluated and confirmed the presence of many of these genes in various thermophilic microbial communities, the existence of a gene in the DNA of an organism does not verify its use, and few researchers have done work to confirm the utilization (expression) of the genes discovered in thermal samples [1, 6, 7, 8]. Disequilibrium between reduced hydrothermal fluid of YNP thermal features and the atmosphere provides a copious source of potential energy to be harnessed through microbial metabolic processes, with NO3- and NO2- serving as the preferred electron acceptors and top energy sources after O2 [4, 5]. Consequentially, nitrogen cycling likely plays a vital role in microbial metabolic processes, as well as nutrient availability. This study explores the presence and utilization of functional genes that are key in steps of the nitrogen cycle, such as nitrogen fixation (NifH), denitrification (nirKS), and ammonia oxidation (amoA). Both DNA and RNA were extracted from thermal sediment and streamer biofilm communities collected in the chemosynthetic zone of various thermal features of the Sentinel Meadows Group in Lower Geyser Basin, YNP. Extracted DNA and reverse transcribed RNA (cDNA) were amplified using the polymerase chain

  15. Thermal cycling fatigue behavior of hardfacing heat-resistant stainless steel for continuous caster rolls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Jae Young; Sung, Hwan Jin; Ahn, Sang Ho

    1998-01-01

    The variation of tensile properties and hardness as a function of tempering temperature and time has been investigated using a hardfacing 12%Cr stainless steel. The mechanical properties of the hardfacing 12%Cr stainless steel could be generalized by the Larson-Miller parameter, which concurrently considers the effects of tempering temperature and time. Thermal cycling fatigue behavior of a hardfacing 12%Cr stainless steel has been investigated using a special thermal fatigue testing apparatus. The resistance of thermal fatigue was deteriorated mainly by the low ductility and true fracture strength of material. The temperature distribution in the specimen was calculated using finite element program and compared to experimental results. The strain and stress distributions were evaluated taking into account the temperature distribution and the temperature dependence of the material properties. The results showed that maximum values of strain and stress were produced within the induction-heating region. The strain amplitude obtained in this study was much smaller than that of fully constrained case, which corresponds to thermal expansion due to temperature difference. This result arises from the reduction of the temperature gradient due to thermal conduction to the neighboring region. The magnitude of strain raised with the increase in the temperature gradient, which is due to the rapid cooling and heating rates in the induction-heating region

  16. How important is thermal history? Evidence for lasting effects of developmental temperature on upper thermal limits inDrosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellermann, Vanessa; van Heerwaarden, Belinda; Sgrò, Carla M

    2017-05-31

    A common practice in thermal biology is to take individuals directly from the field and estimate a range of thermal traits. These estimates are then used in studies aiming to understand broad scale distributional patterns, understanding and predicting the evolution of phenotypic plasticity, and generating predictions for climate change risk. However, the use of field-caught individuals in such studies ignores the fact that many traits are phenotypically plastic and will be influenced by the thermal history of the focal individuals. The current study aims to determine the extent to which estimates of upper thermal limits (CTmax), a frequently used measure for climate change risk, are sensitive to developmental and adult acclimation temperatures and whether these two forms of plasticity are reversible. Examining a temperate and tropical population of Drosophila melanogaster we show that developmental acclimation has a larger and more lasting effect on CTmax than adult acclimation. We also find evidence for an interaction between developmental and adult acclimation, particularly when flies are acclimated for a longer period, and that these effects can be population specific. These results suggest that thermal history can have lasting effects on estimates of CTmax. In addition, we provide evidence that developmental and/or adult acclimation are unlikely to contribute to substantial shifts in CTmax and that acclimation capacity may be constrained at higher temperatures. © 2017 The Author(s).

  17. Global stability, limit cycles and chaotic behaviors of second order interpolative sigma delta modulators

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Yuk-Fan; Ling, Wing-Kuen; Reiss, Joshua; Yu, Xinghuo

    2011-01-01

    It is well known that second order lowpass interpolative sigma delta modulators (SDMs) may suffer from instability and limit cycle problems when the magnitudes of the input signals are at large and at intermediate levels, respectively. In order to solve these problems, we propose to replace the second order lowpass interpolative SDMs to a specific class of second order bandpass interpolative SDMs with the natural frequencies of the loop filters very close to zero. The global stability propert...

  18. Coronal rain in magnetic arcades: Rebound shocks, Limit cycles, and Shear flows

    OpenAIRE

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-01-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer ($>6$ hour) timespan. We quantify how in-situ forming blob-like condensations grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the...

  19. POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITS OF THE CYCLE OF CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT -PDCA AS AN ELEMENT OF LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Machado Junior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the possibilities and limits of the use of continuous improvement cycle, PDCA, as a tool that contributes to the development of individual learning in the organization. It is a qualitative, descriptive end uses the case study as a method. It was observed that the practice proposed by PDCA, can be used in the process of knowledge creation in line with the authors in the field, constituting a form of knowledge management within the organization, enabling the creation of tacit knowledge and its explicit transformation were not observed limits for their use.

  20. Influence of accelerated thermal charging and discharging cycles on thermo-physical properties of organic phase change materials for solar thermal energy storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raam Dheep, G.; Sreekumar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Identification of organic phase change materials namely benzamide and sebacic acid. • Thermal reliability studies on identified phase change materials. • Measurement of phase transition temperature and latent heat of fusion. • Analysis of relative percentage difference (RPD%) in heat of fusion and melting temperature of benzamide and sebacic acid. - Abstract: Integration of appropriate thermal energy storage system plays a predominant role in upgrading the efficiency of solar thermal energy devices by reducing the incongruity between energy supply and demand. Latent heat thermal energy storage based on phase change materials (PCM) is found to be the most efficient and prospective method for storage of solar thermal energy. Ensuring the thermal reliability of PCM through large number of charging (melting) and discharging (solidification) cycles is a primary prerequisite to determine the suitability of PCM for a specific thermal energy storage applications. The present study explains the experimental analysis carried out on two PCM’s namely benzamide and sebacic acid to check the compatibility of the material in solar thermal energy storage applications. The selected materials were subjected to one thousand accelerated melting and solidification cycles in order to investigate the percentage of variation at different stages on latent heat of fusion, phase transition temperature, onset and peak melting temperature. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) was used to determine the phase transition temperature and heat of fusion upon completion of every 100 thermal cycles and continued up to 1000 cycles. Relative Percentage Difference (RPD%) is calculated to find out the absolute deviation of melting temperature and latent heat of fusion with respect to zeroth cycle. The experimental study recorded a melting temperatures of benzamide and sebacic acid as 125.09 °C and 135.92 °C with latent heat of fusion of 285.1 (J/g) and 374.4 (J/g). The

  1. A Hot-Stage Atomic Force Microscope for the Measurement of Plastic Deformation in Metallic Thin Films During Thermal Cycling

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shultz, Thomas

    2001-01-01

    .... The system will allow future in-situ thermal cycling experiments on microelectronic devices in a protected environment to provide insight into the role of plastic deformation in metallic thin films...

  2. Texture development and strain hysteresis in a NiTi shape-memory alloy during thermal cycling under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, B.; Majumdar, B.S.; Dutta, I.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cycling experiments were conducted on a NiTi shape-memory alloy at different constant applied stresses below the yield strength of the martensite. The mechanical strain response manifested as strain hysteresis loops, whose range was proportional to the applied stress. In situ neutron diffraction experiments show that the strain hysteresis occurs as a result of the establishment of a stress-dependent crystallographic texture of the martensite during the first cool-down from austenite, and thereafter repeated during thermal cycling under the same load. This texture is found to depend on the stress during the thermal cycling experiments. A strain-pole map is derived and shown to explain the observed texture during thermal cycling. The strain-pole methodology is shown to work with similar martensitic transformations in other material systems.

  3. A novel hybrid oxy-fuel power cycle utilizing solar thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gou Chenhua; Cai Ruixian; Hong Hui

    2007-01-01

    An advanced oxy-fuel hybrid power system (AHPS) is proposed in this paper. Solar thermal energy is used in the AHPS to produce saturated steam as the working fluid, and natural gas is internally combusted with pure oxygen. It is in configuration close to the zero emission Graz cycle. The thermodynamic characteristics at design conditions of the AHPS are analyzed using the advanced process simulator Aspen Plus. The corresponding exergy loss analyses are also carried out to gain understanding of the loss distribution. The results are given in detail. The solar thermal hybrid H 2 O turbine power generation system (STHS) is evaluated in this study as the reference. The comparison results demonstrate that the proposed cycle has notable advantages in thermodynamic performances. For example, the net fuel-to-electricity efficiency of the AHPS is 95.90%, which is 21.61 percentage points higher than that of the STHS. The exergy efficiency (based on the exergy input of fuel and solar thermal energy without radiation) of the AHPS is 55.88%, which is 2.13 percentage points higher than that of the STHS

  4. Indirect genetic effects underlie oxygen-limited thermal tolerance within a coastal population of chinook salmon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz, Nicolas J; Anttila, Katja; Chen, Zhongqi; Heath, John W; Farrell, Anthony P; Neff, Bryan D

    2014-08-22

    With global temperatures projected to surpass the limits of thermal tolerance for many species, evaluating the heritable variation underlying thermal tolerance is critical for understanding the potential for adaptation to climate change. We examined the evolutionary potential of thermal tolerance within a population of chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) by conducting a full-factorial breeding design and measuring the thermal performance of cardiac function and the critical thermal maximum (CTmax) of offspring from each family. Additive genetic variation in offspring phenotype was mostly negligible, although these direct genetic effects explained 53% of the variation in resting heart rate (fH). Conversely, maternal effects had a significant influence on resting fH, scope for fH, cardiac arrhythmia temperature and CTmax. These maternal effects were associated with egg size, as indicated by strong relationships between the mean egg diameter of mothers and offspring thermal tolerance. Because egg size can be highly heritable in chinook salmon, our finding indicates that the maternal effects of egg size constitute an indirect genetic effect contributing to thermal tolerance. Such indirect genetic effects could accelerate evolutionary responses to the selection imposed by rising temperatures and could contribute to the population-specific thermal tolerance that has recently been uncovered among Pacific salmon populations. © 2014 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  5. WESF cesium capsule behavior at high temperature or during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Gray, W.J.; Shippell, R.J.; Katayama, Y.B.

    1985-06-01

    Double-walled stainless steel (SS) capsules prepared for storage of radioactive 137 Cs from defense waste are now being considered for use as sources for commercial irradiation. Cesium was recovered at B-plant from the high-level radioactive waste generated during processing of defense nuclear fuel. It was then purified, converted to the chloride form, and encapsulated at the Hanford Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The molten cesium chloride salt was encapsulated by pouring it into the inner of two concentric SS cylinders. Each cylinder was fitted with a SS end cap that was welded in place by inert gas-tungsten arc welding. The capsule configuration and dimensions are shown in Figure 1. In a recent review of the safety of these capsules, Tingey, Wheelwright, and Lytle (1984) indicated that experimental studies were continuing to produce long-term corrosion data, to reaffirm capsule integrity during a 90-min fire where capsule temperatures reached 800 0 C, to monitor mechanical properties as a function of time, and to assess the effects of thermal cycling due to periodic transfer of the capsules from a water storage pool to the air environment of an irradiator facility. This report covers results from tests that simulated the effects of the 90-min fire and from thermal cycling actual WESF cesium capsules for 3845 cycles over a period of six months. 11 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs

  6. Simulated Solar Flare X-Ray and Thermal Cycling Durability Evaluation of Hubble Space Telescope Thermal Control Candidate Replacement Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    deGroh, Kim K.; Banks, Bruce A.; Sechkar, Edward A.; Scheiman, David A.

    1998-01-01

    During the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) second servicing mission (SM2), astronauts noticed that the multilayer insulation (MLI) covering the telescope was damaged. Large pieces of the outer layer of MLI (aluminized Teflon fluorinated ethylene propylene (Al-FEP)) were torn in several locations around the telescope. A piece of curled up Al-FEP was retrieved by the astronauts and was found to be severely embrittled, as witnessed by ground testing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) organized a HST MLI Failure Review Board (FRB) to determine the damage mechanism of FEP in the HST environment, and to recommend replacement insulation material to be installed on HST during the third servicing mission (SM3) in 1999. Candidate thermal control replacement materials were chosen by the FRB and tested for environmental durability under various exposures and durations. This paper describes durability testing of candidate materials which were exposed to charged particle radiation, simulated solar flare x-ray radiation and thermal cycling under load. Samples were evaluated for changes in solar absorptance and tear resistance. Descriptions of environmental exposures and durability evaluations of these materials are presented.

  7. The defect level and ideal thermal conductivity of graphene uncovered by residual thermal reffusivity at the 0 K limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yangsu; Xu, Zaoli; Xu, Shen; Cheng, Zhe; Hashemi, Nastaran; Deng, Cheng; Wang, Xinwei

    2015-06-14

    Due to its intriguing thermal and electrical properties, graphene has been widely studied for potential applications in sensor and energy devices. However, the reported value for its thermal conductivity spans from dozens to thousands of W m(-1) K(-1) due to different levels of alternations and defects in graphene samples. In this work, the thermal diffusivity of suspended four-layered graphene foam (GF) is characterized from room temperature (RT) down to 17 K. For the first time, we identify the defect level in graphene by evaluating the inverse of thermal diffusivity (termed "thermal reffusivity": Θ) at the 0 K limit. By using the Debye model of Θ = Θ0 + C× e(-θ/2T) and fitting the Θ-T curve to the point of T = 0 K, we identify the defect level (Θ0) and determine the Debye temperature of graphene. Θ0 is found to be 1878 s m(-2) for the studied GF and 43-112 s m(-2) for three highly crystalline graphite materials. This uncovers a 16-43-fold higher defect level in GF than that in pyrolytic graphite. In GF, the phonon mean free path solely induced by defects and boundary scattering is determined as 166 nm. The Debye temperature of graphene is determined to be 1813 K, which is very close to the average theoretical Debye temperature (1911 K) of the three acoustic phonon modes in graphene. By subtracting the defect effect, we report the ideal thermal diffusivity and conductivity (κideal) of graphene presented in the 3D foam structure in the range of 33-299 K. Detailed physics based on chemical composition and structure analysis are given to explain the κideal-T profile by comparing with those reported for suspended graphene.

  8. Femto-Newton light force measurement at the thermal noise limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, F; Heugel, S; Wang, L J

    2008-03-15

    The measurement of very small light forces has wide applications in many fields of physics. A common measurement method for small force detection is the determination of changes in the dynamic behavior of mechanical oscillators, either in amplitude or in frequency. The detection of slowly varying forces mostly requires long period oscillators, such as a torsion pendulum. We demonstrate the application of a macroscopic, low-noise, torsion balance oscillator for the detection of radiation pressure forces at the femto-Newton level. The system is "precooled" (removing excess seimic noise) to be only thermal noise limited. The demonstrated force sensitivity reaches the thermal limit.

  9. Fatigue limit investigation of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy in giga-cycle regime

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Yoshimasa, E-mail: yoshim-t@kansai-u.ac.jp [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita-shi, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Yoshitake, Hiroaki; Nakamichi, Ryota; Wada, Takuya; Takuma, Masanori [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kansai University, 3-3-35 Yamate-cho, Suita-shi, Osaka 564-8680 (Japan); Shikama, Takahiro [Kobe Steel Ltd., Aluminum and Copper Business (Chofu Works), 14-1 Chofu Minato-machi, Shimonoseki, Yamaguchi 752-0953 (Japan); Noguchi, Hiroshi [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Kyushu University, 744 Motooka, Nishi-ku, Fukuoka 819-0395 (Japan)

    2014-09-22

    In order to investigate the fatigue limit micro-mechanism of a precipitation-hardened Al–Mg–Si alloy (6061-T6), the alloy was subjected to very-high-cycle fatigue (VHCF) of over 10{sup 9} cycles by an ultrasonic fatigue method. Two kinds of specimens, one with smooth surface and the other with a small artificial hole on the surface, were compared. The smooth specimens showed no distinct fatigue limit. Conversely, the holed specimens showed clear fatigue limit which had been generally deemed to be absent in non-ferrous alloys. In addition to the conventional fatigue crack growth (FCG) observation by replica technique, metallographically critical analyses by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and cross-sectional focused ion beam (FIB) were conducted to reveal the micro-plasticity associated with FCG. It was found that the fatigue life of smooth specimens at low stress amplitude was controlled by an unstoppable FCG mechanism mediated by persistent slip bands (PSBs). On the other hand, the emergence of distinct fatigue limit in holed specimens was attributed to a non-propagating crack having mode I characteristics in essence. No coaxing effect was, however, confirmed for such non-propagating cracks. The above results, which were somewhat different from previous ones obtained by rotating bending under normal frequency, were discussed in terms of both metallurgical and mechanical points of view.

  10. Fatigue limit investigation of 6061-T6 aluminum alloy in giga-cycle regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Yoshitake, Hiroaki; Nakamichi, Ryota; Wada, Takuya; Takuma, Masanori; Shikama, Takahiro; Noguchi, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    In order to investigate the fatigue limit micro-mechanism of a precipitation-hardened Al–Mg–Si alloy (6061-T6), the alloy was subjected to very-high-cycle fatigue (VHCF) of over 10 9 cycles by an ultrasonic fatigue method. Two kinds of specimens, one with smooth surface and the other with a small artificial hole on the surface, were compared. The smooth specimens showed no distinct fatigue limit. Conversely, the holed specimens showed clear fatigue limit which had been generally deemed to be absent in non-ferrous alloys. In addition to the conventional fatigue crack growth (FCG) observation by replica technique, metallographically critical analyses by electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and cross-sectional focused ion beam (FIB) were conducted to reveal the micro-plasticity associated with FCG. It was found that the fatigue life of smooth specimens at low stress amplitude was controlled by an unstoppable FCG mechanism mediated by persistent slip bands (PSBs). On the other hand, the emergence of distinct fatigue limit in holed specimens was attributed to a non-propagating crack having mode I characteristics in essence. No coaxing effect was, however, confirmed for such non-propagating cracks. The above results, which were somewhat different from previous ones obtained by rotating bending under normal frequency, were discussed in terms of both metallurgical and mechanical points of view

  11. The effect of laser treatment of WC-Co coatings on their failure under thermal cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasterov, Artur; Shugurov, Artur; Kazachenok, Marina; Panin, Alexey; Cheng, Chin-Hsiang; Chang, I.-Ling

    2016-11-01

    The given paper studies the effect of surface laser treatment of WC-Co coatings on their surface morphology, phase composition and thermal cycling behavior. The coatings were sprayed on stainless steel substrates with the use of a high velocity oxy fuel spraying process. Application of the scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction showed that re-melting of the coating surface layer during laser treatment induced changes in its phase composition as well as the formation of regular rows of globular asperities on the coating surface. The latter resulted in a sharp increase in thermal shock resistance of the laser treated WC-Co coatings under water quench tests; its underlying mechanism are proposed and discussed in the paper.

  12. Research on transient thermal process of a friction brake during repetitive cycles of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavchev, Yanko; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Dimitrov, Yavor

    2017-12-01

    Simplified models are used in the classical engineering analyses of the friction brake heating temperature during repetitive cycles of operation to determine basically the maximum and minimum brake temperatures. The objective of the present work is to broaden and complement the possibilities for research through a model that is based on the classical scheme of the Newton's law of cooling and improves the studies by adding a disturbance function for a corresponding braking process. A general case of braking in non-periodic repetitive mode is considered, for which a piecewise function is defined to apply pulse thermal loads to the system. Cases with rectangular and triangular waveforms are presented. Periodic repetitive braking process is also studied using a periodic rectangular waveform until a steady thermal state is achieved. Different numerical methods such as the Euler's method, the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK4) and the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg 4-5 (RKF45) are used to solve the non-linear differential equation of the model. The constructed model allows during pre-engineering calculations to be determined effectively the time for reaching the steady thermal state of the brake, to be simulated actual braking modes in vehicles and material handling machines, and to be accounted for the thermal impact when performing fatigue calculations.

  13. Thermal-mechanical analyses of fuel rods in extended burnup cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajan, S.R.; Sheppard, K.D.

    1984-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to investigate analytically the impact of low-leakage extended burnup cycling schemes on fuel performance in pressurized water reactors (PWRs). The thermal-mechanical analysis was done with the COMETHE code. Power histories from various fuel cycling schemes were imposed on a single fuel design, and the behaviour of rod internal pressure, fuel centerline temperature, and susceptibility to PCI-induced failure assessed as a function of burnup. These estimates were made both for base load operating histories as well as power histories that included load-follow operations. The high burnup schemes were found to have potential, though not severe, increases in internal pin pressure and cladding hoop stresses. Load follow operations are not expected to degrade fuel performance at conventional burnups, but tend to aggravate the situation of tensile cladding hoop stress at higher burnups. (author)

  14. Effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Daneshkazemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Certain studies have been conducted on the effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS of composites to dentin, but the results were different. The authors therefore decided to evaluate these effects on the bonding of Clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface of 42 molar teeth were bonded to Filtek-Z250 resin composite by Clearfil SE bond. The teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups and exposed to different mechanical and thermal load cycling. Thermocycling was at 5-55°C and mechanical load cycling was created with a force of 125 N and 0.5 Hz. Then, the teeth were sectioned and shaped to hour glass form and subjected to microTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by computer with three-way analysis of variance and T-test at P < 0.05 significant. To evaluate the location and mode of failure, the specimens were observed under the stereomicroscope. Then, one of the specimens in each group was evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM for mode of failure. Results: All of the study groups had a significantly lower microTBS as compared to the control group ( P < 0.001. There was no statistically significant difference between mechanical cycling with 50K (kilo = 1000 cycles, and 50K mechanical cycles plus 1K thermal cycles. Most of the fractures in the control group were of adhesive type and this type of fracture increased after exposure to mechanical and thermal load cycling. Conclusion: Thermal and mechanical load cycling had significant negative effects on microTBS and the significant effects of mechanical load cycling started to be significant at 100K cycles.

  15. Separation and prediction of irrecoverable strain components of concrete during the first thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Strains of three AGR type concretes were measured during the first heat cycle and their relative thermal stability determined. It was possible to isolate for the first time the shrinkage and creep components for the period during heating-up. Predictions of the residual strains for the loaded specimens can be made by simple superposition of creep and shrinkage components up to a certain critical temperature, which for basalt concrete is about 500 deg. C and limestone concrete is about 200-300 deg. C. Above the critical temperature, it is necessary to add a 'cracking component'. (author)

  16. A Literature Review of Shock Sensitivity Changes of TATB Due to Thermal Cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Boyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-07-15

    Insensitive high explosives (IHEs) based on 1,3,5-triamino 2,4,6-trinitro-benzene (TATB) are the IHEs of choice for use in nuclear warheads over conventional high explosives when safety is the only consideration, because they are very insensitive to thermal or mechanical initiation stimuli. It is this inherent insensitivity to high temperatures, shock, and impact, which provides detonation design challenges when designing TATB explosive systems while at the same time providing a significant level of protection against accidental initiation. Although classified as IHE, over the past few years the focus on explosive safety has demonstrated that the shock sensitivity of TATB is influenced with respect to temperature. A number of studies have been performed on TATB and TATB formulations, plastic bonded explosives (PBX) 9502, and LX-17-01 (LX-17), which demonstrates the increase in shock sensitivity of the explosive after it has been preheated or thermally cycled over various temperature ranges. Many studies suggest the change in sensitivity is partly due to the decomposition rates of the temperature elevated TATB. Others point to the coefficient of thermal expansion, the crystalline structures of TATB and/or the combination of all factors, which create voids which can become active hot spots. During thermal cycling, TATB is known to undergo an irreversible increase in specific volume called ratchet growth. This increase in specific volume correlates to a decrease in density. This decrease in density and increase in volume, demonstrate the creations of additional void spaces which could serve as potential new initiation hot spots thus, increasing the overall sensitivity of the HE. This literature review evaluates the published works to understand why the shock sensitivity of TATB-based plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) changes with temperature.

  17. Thermochemical cycles for energy storage: Thermal decomposition of ZnCO sub 4 systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wentworth, W.E. (Houston Univ., TX (United States))

    1992-04-01

    The overall objective of our research has been to develop thermochemical cycles that can be used for energy storage. A specific cycle involving ammonium hydrogen sulfate (NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4}) has been proposed. Each reaction in the proposed cycle has been examined experimentally. Emphasis has been placed on the basic chemistry of these reactions. In the concluding phase of this research, reported herein, we have shown that when NH{sub 4}HSO{sub 4} is mixed with ZnO and decomposed, the resulting products can be released stepwise (H{sub 2}A{sub (g)} at {approximately}163{degrees}C, NH{sub 3(g)} at 365--418{degrees}C, and a mixture of SO{sub 2(g)} and SO{sub 3(g)} at {approximately}900{degrees}C) and separated by controlling the reaction temperature. Side reactions do not appear to be significant and the respective yields are high as would be required for the successful use of this energy storage reaction in the proposed cycle. Thermodynamic, kinetic, and other reaction parameters have been measured for the various steps of the reaction. Finally we have completed a detailed investigation of one particular reaction: the thermal decomposition of zinc sulfate (ZnSO{sub 4}). We have demonstrated that this reaction can be accelerated and the temperature required reduced by the addition of excess ZnO, V{sub 2}A{sub 5} and possibly other metal oxides.

  18. Technical Feasibility Study of Thermal Energy Storage Integration into the Conventional Power Plant Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek D. Wojcik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current load balance in the grid is managed mainly through peaking fossil-fuelled power plants that respond passively to the load changes. Intermittency, which comes from renewable energy sources, imposes additional requirements for even more flexible and faster responses from conventional power plants. A major challenge is to keep conventional generation running closest to the design condition with higher load factors and to avoid switching off periods if possible. Thermal energy storage (TES integration into the power plant process cycle is considered as a possible solution for this issue. In this article, a technical feasibility study of TES integration into a 375-MW subcritical oil-fired conventional power plant is presented. Retrofitting is considered in order to avoid major changes in the power plant process cycle. The concept is tested based on the complete power plant model implemented in the ProTRAX software environment. Steam and water parameters are assessed for different TES integration scenarios as a function of the plant load level. The best candidate points for heat extraction in the TES charging and discharging processes are evaluated. The results demonstrate that the integration of TES with power plant cycle is feasible and provide a provisional guidance for the design of the TES system that will result in the minimal influence on the power plant cycle.

  19. Fast thermal cycling of acetanilide and magnesium chloride hexahydrate for indoor solar cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Amir, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.M.; Faidah, Adel S.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Heniti, S.

    2009-01-01

    Solar cookers are broadly divided into a direct or focusing type, indirect or box-type and advanced solar cookers. The focusing and box-type solar cookers are for outdoor applications. The advanced solar cookers have the advantage of being usable indoors and thus solve one of the problems, which impede the social acceptance of solar cookers. The advanced type solar cookers are employing additional solar units that increase the cost. Therefore, the solar cooker must contain a heat storage medium to store thermal energy for use during off-sunshine hours. The main aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the melting/solidification fast cycling of the commercial grade acetanilide C 8 H 9 NO (T m = 116 deg. C) and magnesium chloride hexahydrate MgCl 2 .6H 2 O (T m = 116.7 deg. C) on their thermo-physical properties; such as melting point and latent heat of fusion, to be used as storage media inside solar cookers. Five hundred cycles have been performed. The thermo-physical properties are measured using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. The compatibility of the selected phase change materials (PCMs) with the containing material is also studied via the surface investigation, using the SIM technique, of aluminum and stainless steel samples embedded in the PCM during cycling. It is inferred that acetanilide is a promising PCM for cooking indoors and during law intensity solar radiation periods with good compatibility with aluminum as a containing material. However, MgCl 2 .6H 2 O is not stable during its thermal cycling (even with the extra water principle) due to the phase segregation problem; therefore, it is not recommended as a storage material inside solar cookers for cooking indoors. It is also indicated that MgCl 2 .6H 2 O is not compatible with either aluminum or stainless steel.

  20. Does oxygen limit thermal tolerance in arthropods? A critical review of current evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberk, Wilco C.E.P.; Overgaard, Johannes; Ern, Rasmus; Bayley, Mark; Wang, Tobias; Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last decade, numerous studies have investigated the role of oxygen in setting thermal tolerance in aquatic animals, and there has been particular focus on arthropods. Arthropods comprise one of the most species-rich taxonomic groups on Earth, and display great diversity in the modes of ventilation, circulation, blood oxygen transport, with representatives living both in water (mainly crustaceans) and on land (mainly insects). The oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis proposes that the temperature dependent performance curve of animals is shaped by the capacity for oxygen delivery in relation to oxygen demand. If correct, oxygen limitation could provide a mechanistic framework to understand and predict both current and future impacts of rapidly changing climate. In arthropods, most studies testing the OCLTT hypothesis have considered tolerance to thermal extremes. These studies likely operate from the philosophical viewpoint that if the model can predict these critical thermal limits, then it is more likely to also explain loss of performance at less extreme, non-lethal temperatures, for which much less data is available. Nevertheless, the extent to which lethal temperatures are influenced by limitations in oxygen supply remains unresolved. Here we critically evaluate the support and universal applicability for oxygen limitation being involved in lethal temperatures in crustaceans and insects. The relatively few studies investigating the OCLTT hypothesis at low temperature do not support a universal role for oxygen in setting the lower thermal limits in arthropods. With respect to upper thermal limits, the evidence supporting OCLTT is stronger for species relying on underwater gas exchange, while the support for OCLTT in air-breathers is weak. Overall, strongest support was found for increased anaerobic metabolism close to thermal maxima. In contrast, there was only mixed support for the prediction that aerobic scope

  1. Does oxygen limit thermal tolerance in arthropods? A critical review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberk, Wilco C E P; Overgaard, Johannes; Ern, Rasmus; Bayley, Mark; Wang, Tobias; Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, numerous studies have investigated the role of oxygen in setting thermal tolerance in aquatic animals, and there has been particular focus on arthropods. Arthropods comprise one of the most species-rich taxonomic groups on Earth, and display great diversity in the modes of ventilation, circulation, blood oxygen transport, with representatives living both in water (mainly crustaceans) and on land (mainly insects). The oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis proposes that the temperature dependent performance curve of animals is shaped by the capacity for oxygen delivery in relation to oxygen demand. If correct, oxygen limitation could provide a mechanistic framework to understand and predict both current and future impacts of rapidly changing climate. In arthropods, most studies testing the OCLTT hypothesis have considered tolerance to thermal extremes. These studies likely operate from the philosophical viewpoint that if the model can predict these critical thermal limits, then it is more likely to also explain loss of performance at less extreme, non-lethal temperatures, for which much less data is available. Nevertheless, the extent to which lethal temperatures are influenced by limitations in oxygen supply remains unresolved. Here we critically evaluate the support and universal applicability for oxygen limitation being involved in lethal temperatures in crustaceans and insects. The relatively few studies investigating the OCLTT hypothesis at low temperature do not support a universal role for oxygen in setting the lower thermal limits in arthropods. With respect to upper thermal limits, the evidence supporting OCLTT is stronger for species relying on underwater gas exchange, while the support for OCLTT in air-breathers is weak. Overall, strongest support was found for increased anaerobic metabolism close to thermal maxima. In contrast, there was only mixed support for the prediction that aerobic scope

  2. Thermal and structural limitations for impurity-control components in FED/INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Cha, Y.; Mattas, R.; Abdou, M.; Cramer, B.; Haines, J.

    1983-02-01

    The successful operation of the impurity-control system of the FED/INTOR will depend to a large extent on the ability of its various components to withstand the imposed thermal and mechanical loads. The present paper explores the thermal and stress analyses aspects of the limiter and divertor operation of the FED/INTOR in its reference configuration. Three basic limitations governing the design of the limiter and the divertor are the maximum allowable metal temperature, the maximum allowable stress intensity and the allowable fatigue life of the structural material. Other important design limitations stemming from sputtering, evaporation, melting during disruptions, etc. are not considered in the present paper. The materials considered in the present analysis are a copper and a vanadium alloy for the structural material and graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide, tungsten and silicon carbide for the coating or tile material

  3. Thermal Stability Limits of Imidazolium Ionic Liquids Immobilized on Metal-Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babucci, Melike; Akçay, Aslı; Balci, Volkan; Uzun, Alper

    2015-08-25

    Thermal stability limits of 33 imidazolium ionic liquids (ILs) immobilized on three of the most commonly used high surface area metal-oxides, SiO2, γ-Al2O3, and MgO, were investigated. ILs were chosen from a family of 13 cations and 18 anions. Results show that the acidity of C2H of an imidazolium ring is one of the key factors controlling the thermal stability. An increase in C2H bonding strength of ILs leads to an increase in their stability limits accompanied by a decrease in interionic energy. Systematic changes in IL structure, such as changes in electronic structure and size of anion/cation, methylation on C2 site, and substitution of alkyl groups on the imidazolium ring with functional groups have significant effects on thermal stability limits. Furthermore, thermal stability limits of ILs are influenced strongly by acidic character of the metal-oxide surface. Generally, as the point of zero charge (PZC) of the metal-oxide increases from SiO2 to MgO, the interactions of IL and metal-oxide dominate over interionic interactions, and metal-oxide becomes the significant factor controlling the stability limits. However, thermal stability limits of some ILs show the opposite trend, as the chemical activities of the cation functional group or the electron donating properties of the anion alter IL/metal-oxide interactions. Results presented here can help in choosing the most suitable ILs for materials involving ILs supported on metal-oxides, such as for supported ionic liquid membranes (SILM) in separation applications or for solid catalyst with ionic liquid layer (SCILL) and supported ionic liquid phase (SILP) catalysts in catalysis.

  4. Optimisation of a Kalina cycle for a central receiver solar thermal power plant with direct steam generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modi, Anish; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Central receiver solar thermal power plants are regarded as one of the promising ways to generate electricity in near future. They offer the possibility of using high temperatures and pressures to achieve high efficiencies with standard power cycles. A direct steam generation approach can be used...... for a central receiver solar thermal power plant with direct steam generation. The variation in the cycle performance with respect to the turbine inlet ammonia mass fraction and pressure and a comparison of the initial investment with that of the basic Rankine cycle are also presented. Only high live steam...

  5. Limit cycle behaviour of the bump-on-tail and ion-acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.A.E.M.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of the bump-on-tail and current-driven ion-acoustic instability is considered. The eigenmodes have discrete k because of finite periodic boundary conditions. Increasing a critical parameter (the number density and the electron drift velocity respectively) above its neutral stable value by a small fractional amount Δ 2 , one mode becomes unstable. The nonlinear dynamics of the unstable mode is determined by means of the multiple time scale method. Usually, limit cycle behaviour is found. A short comparison with quasi-linear theory is given, and the results are compared with experiment. (Auth.)

  6. Finding Limit Cycles in self-excited oscillators with infinite-series damping functions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2015-03-01

    In this paper we present a simple method for finding the location of limit cycles of self excited oscillators whose damping functions can be represented by some infinite convergent series. We have used standard results of first-order perturbation theory to arrive at amplitude equations. The approach has been kept pedagogic by first working out the cases of finite polynomials using elementary algebra. Then the method has been extended to various infinite polynomials, where the fixed points of the corresponding amplitude equations cannot be found out. Hopf bifurcations for systems with nonlinear powers in velocities have also been discussed.

  7. Entrainment of noise-induced and limit cycle oscillators under weak noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitarai, Namiko; Alon, Uri; Jensen, Mogens H

    2013-01-01

    , and addition of noise gives oscillations around the fixed point with fluctuating amplitude. We investigate how each class of models behaves under the external periodic forcing, taking the well-studied van der Pol equation as an example. We find that when the forcing is additive, the noise-induced oscillator...... can show only one-to-one entrainment to the external frequency, in contrast to the limit cycle oscillator which is known to entrain to any ratio. When the external forcing is multiplicative, on the other hand, the noise-induced oscillator can show entrainment to a few ratios other than one...

  8. Limit cycles of a flexible shaft with hydrodynamic journal bearings in unstable regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, R. D.; Black, H. F.

    1980-01-01

    A symmetric 3 mass rotor supported on hydrodynamic bearings is described. An approximate method of representing finite bearings is used to calculate bearing forces. As the method sums forces from a number of independent circular lobes lemon 3 and 4 lobe bearings are taken into account. The calculations are based on an axial groove bearing. Linear analysis precedes nonlinear simulation of some unstable conditions. The demonstration of small limit cycles suggests that necessarily flexible rotors e.g., helicopter tail rotors, may be practical without either tilt pad bearings or external dampers.

  9. Thermal Parameters of Ultra-High-Temperature Reactors for Closed-Cycle Nuclear MHD Power Plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilli, P.V.

    1968-01-01

    Thermal parameters of ultra-high temperature reactors for closed-cycle MHD power plants are investigated. The 'pressure dilemma' (core and heat exchangers requiring highworking pressures for high performance; the MHD duct requiring low working pressures for strong non-equilibrium ionization and high power density) turns out to be less serious than is often assumed because: the core power density of present-day high temperature reactors is determined by nuclear considerations rather than thermal ones; higher plant efficiency reduces thermal power; larger temperature rise and higher efficiency lead to reduced mass flow rate; for the same ratio of pumping power to net output, core pressure loss ratio may be higher than in a conventional HTR; the cost of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel is considerably reduced at lower gas pressure. Dimensional and dimensionless equations are deduced that show the dependence of core dimensions and coolant flow data on thermodynamic parameters, and on thermal properties and state of the coolant. Helium, neon, and argon are compared, as are mixtures of them, showing advantages. Film and fuel temperature differences are small in comparison with gas temperature rise, particularly for the combined MHD/steam cycle. Maximum fuel element temperature - the crucial parameter - therefore occurs at the hot end of the channel. A worked example demonstrates that power densities only slightly lower than in conventional HTR's should be achievable with helium at a pressure of 5 to 10 bar and moderate pressure losses, even if the difference between maximum fuel temperature and mixed mean gas outlet temperature is only 150 to 250°C. There may be some penalty for fuel manufacturing and fuel inventory cost. Fuel cycle cost will, however, benefit from increased plant efficiency. Radial power and temperature flattening is of paramount importance; it requires a low age factor and thus a fuel management scheme with fuel reprocessing, relatively low

  10. Laser High-Cycle Thermal Fatigue of Pulse Detonation Engine Combustor Materials Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Dong-Ming; Fox, Dennis S.; Miller, Robert A.

    2001-01-01

    Pulse detonation engines (PDE's) have received increasing attention for future aerospace propulsion applications. Because the PDE is designed for a high-frequency, intermittent detonation combustion process, extremely high gas temperatures and pressures can be realized under the nearly constant-volume combustion environment. The PDE's can potentially achieve higher thermodynamic cycle efficiency and thrust density in comparison to traditional constant-pressure combustion gas turbine engines (ref. 1). However, the development of these engines requires robust design of the engine components that must endure harsh detonation environments. In particular, the detonation combustor chamber, which is designed to sustain and confine the detonation combustion process, will experience high pressure and temperature pulses with very short durations (refs. 2 and 3). Therefore, it is of great importance to evaluate PDE combustor materials and components under simulated engine temperatures and stress conditions in the laboratory. In this study, a high-cycle thermal fatigue test rig was established at the NASA Glenn Research Center using a 1.5-kW CO2 laser. The high-power laser, operating in the pulsed mode, can be controlled at various pulse energy levels and waveform distributions. The enhanced laser pulses can be used to mimic the time-dependent temperature and pressure waves encountered in a pulsed detonation engine. Under the enhanced laser pulse condition, a maximum 7.5-kW peak power with a duration of approximately 0.1 to 0.2 msec (a spike) can be achieved, followed by a plateau region that has about one-fifth of the maximum power level with several milliseconds duration. The laser thermal fatigue rig has also been developed to adopt flat and rotating tubular specimen configurations for the simulated engine tests. More sophisticated laser optic systems can be used to simulate the spatial distributions of the temperature and shock waves in the engine. Pulse laser high-cycle

  11. Mathematical model of the competition life cycle under limited resources conditions: Problem statement for business community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelomentsev, A. G.; Medvedev, M. A.; Berg, D. B.; Lapshina, S. N.; Taubayev, A. A.; Davletbaev, R. H.; Savina, D. V.

    2017-12-01

    Present study is devoted to the development of competition life cycle mathematical model in the closed business community with limited resources. Growth of each agent is determined by the balance of input and output resource flows: input (cash) flow W is covering the variable V and constant C costs and growth dA/dt of the agent's assets A. Value of V is proportional to assets A that allows us to write down a first order non-stationary differential equation of the agent growth. Model includes the number of such equations due to the number of agents. The amount of resources that is available for agents vary in time. The balances of their input and output flows are changing correspondingly to the different stages of the competition life cycle. According to the theory of systems, the most complete description of any object or process is the model of its life cycle. Such a model describes all stages of its development: from the appearance ("birth") through development ("growth") to extinction ("death"). The model of the evolution of an individual firm, not contradicting the economic meaning of events actually observed in the market, is the desired result from modern AVMs for applied use. With a correct description of the market, rules for participants' actions, restrictions, forecasts can be obtained, which modern mathematics and the economy can not give.

  12. A Krebs Cycle Component Limits Caspase Activation Rate through Mitochondrial Surface Restriction of CRL Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aram, Lior; Braun, Tslil; Braverman, Carmel; Kaplan, Yosef; Ravid, Liat; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Arama, Eli

    2016-04-04

    How cells avoid excessive caspase activity and unwanted cell death during apoptotic caspase-mediated removal of large cellular structures is poorly understood. We investigate caspase-mediated extrusion of spermatid cytoplasmic contents in Drosophila during spermatid individualization. We show that a Krebs cycle component, the ATP-specific form of the succinyl-CoA synthetase β subunit (A-Sβ), binds to and activates the Cullin-3-based ubiquitin ligase (CRL3) complex required for caspase activation in spermatids. In vitro and in vivo evidence suggests that this interaction occurs on the mitochondrial surface, thereby limiting the source of CRL3 complex activation to the vicinity of this organelle and reducing the potential rate of caspase activation by at least 60%. Domain swapping between A-Sβ and the GTP-specific SCSβ (G-Sβ), which functions redundantly in the Krebs cycle, show that the metabolic and structural roles of A-Sβ in spermatids can be uncoupled, highlighting a moonlighting function of this Krebs cycle component in CRL activation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Passive residual energy utilization system in thermal cycles on water-cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placco, Guilherme M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Santos, Rubens S. dos

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a concept of a residual energy utilization in nuclear plants thermal cycles. After taking notice of the causes of the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, an idea arose to adapt a passive thermal circuit as part of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). One of the research topics of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), as part of the heat conversion of a space nuclear power system is a passive multi fluid turbine. One of the main characteristics of this device is its passive capability of staying inert and be brought to power at moments notice. During the first experiments and testing of this passive device, it became clear that any small amount of gas flow would generate power. Given that in the first stages of the Fukushima accident and even during the whole event there was plenty availability of steam flow that would be the proper condition to make the proposed system to work. This system starts in case of failure of the ECCS, including loss of site power, loss of diesel generators and loss of the battery power. This system does not requires electricity to run and will work with bleed steam. It will generate enough power to supply the plant safety system avoiding overheating of the reactor core produced by the decay heat. This passive system uses a modified Tesla type turbine. With the tests conducted until now, it is possible to ensure that the operation of this new turbine in a thermal cycle is very satisfactory and it performs as expected. (author)

  14. Passive residual energy utilization system in thermal cycles on water-cooled power reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Placco, Guilherme M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F., E-mail: placco@ieav.cta.br, E-mail: guimarae@ieav.cta.br [Instituto de Estudos Avancados (IEAV/DCTA) Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Santos, Rubens S. dos, E-mail: rsantos@ien.gov.br [Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear (IEN/CNEN -RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    This work presents a concept of a residual energy utilization in nuclear plants thermal cycles. After taking notice of the causes of the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, an idea arose to adapt a passive thermal circuit as part of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). One of the research topics of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), as part of the heat conversion of a space nuclear power system is a passive multi fluid turbine. One of the main characteristics of this device is its passive capability of staying inert and be brought to power at moments notice. During the first experiments and testing of this passive device, it became clear that any small amount of gas flow would generate power. Given that in the first stages of the Fukushima accident and even during the whole event there was plenty availability of steam flow that would be the proper condition to make the proposed system to work. This system starts in case of failure of the ECCS, including loss of site power, loss of diesel generators and loss of the battery power. This system does not requires electricity to run and will work with bleed steam. It will generate enough power to supply the plant safety system avoiding overheating of the reactor core produced by the decay heat. This passive system uses a modified Tesla type turbine. With the tests conducted until now, it is possible to ensure that the operation of this new turbine in a thermal cycle is very satisfactory and it performs as expected. (author)

  15. Thermal analysis of a Phase Change Material for a Solar Organic Rankine Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasiello, M.; Braimakis, K.; Andreozzi, A.; Karellas, S.

    2017-11-01

    Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a promising technology for low temperature power generation, for example for the utilization of medium temperature solar energy. Since heat generated from solar source is variable throughout the day, the implementation of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems to guarantee the continuous operation of solar ORCs is a critical task, and Phase Change Materials (PCM) rely on latent heat to store large amounts of energy. In the present study, a thermal analysis of a PCM for a solar ORC is carried out. Three different types of PCMs are analyzed. The energy equation for the PCM is modeled by using the heat capacity method, and it is solved by employing a 1Dexplicit finite difference scheme. The solar source is modeled with a time-variable temperature boundary condition, with experimental data taken from the literature for two different solar collectors. Results are presented in terms of temperature profiles and stored energy. It has been shown that the stored energy depends on the heat source temperature, on the employed PCM and on the boundary conditions. It has been demonstrated that the use of a metal foam can drastically enhance the stored energy due to the higher overall thermal conductivity.

  16. Effect of long-term storage of LWR spent fuel on Pu-thermal fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Masayoshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya; Itahara, Kuniyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo; Hamada, Koji

    1998-01-01

    According to the Long-term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy (June, 1994) in Japan, the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant will be operated shortly after the year 2000, and the planning of the construction of the second commercial plant will be decided around 2010. Also, it is described that spent fuel storage has a positive meaning as an energy resource for the future utilization of Pu. Considering the balance between the increase of spent fuels and the domestic reprocessing capacity in Japan, it can be expected that the long-term storage of UO 2 spent fuels will be required. Then, we studied the effect of long-term storage of spent fuels on Pu-thermal fuel cycle. The burnup calculation were performed on the typical Japanese PWR fuel, and the burnup and criticality calculations were carried out on the Pu-thermal cores with MOX fuel. Based on the results, we evaluate the influence of extending the spent fuel storage term on the criticality safety, shielding design of the reprocessing plant and the core life time of the MOX core, etc. As the result of this work on long-term storage of LWR spent fuels, it becomes clear that there are few demerits regarding the lifetime of a MOX reactor core, and that there are many merits regarding the safety aspects of the fuel cycle facilities. Furthermore, long-term storage is meaningful as energy storage for effective utilization of Pu to be improved by technological innovation in future, and it will allow for sufficient time for the important policymaking of nuclear fuel cycle establishment in Japan. (author)

  17. Robust prevention of limit cycle for nonlinear control systems with parametric uncertainties both in the linear plant and nonlinearity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Jay

    2007-10-01

    A new method is proposed to compute all feasible robust stabilizing controllers for preventing the generation of limit cycle of nonlinear control systems with parametric uncertainties both in the linear plant and nonlinearity. The describing function analysis method is employed to approximate the behaviors of the nonlinearity. The Kharitonov theorem is utilized to characterize parametric uncertainties in the linear plant and nonlinearity. Necessary conditions for limit cycles are established. Boundaries for the generation of limit cycle and boundaries for asymptotic stability are portrayed exploiting the stability equation method. The region for prescribed limit cycle behavior and the region for asymptotic stability are located. An admissible specification-oriented Kharitonov region is found directly on the controller parameter plane. The region is non-conservative and constitutes all of the feasible controller gain sets to achieve robust prevention of limit cycle for the considered uncertain nonlinear control systems. The way to tune the controller gains is suggested. Finally, for comparison purpose, two illustrative examples proposed in the literature are given to show how the proposed algorithm can be effectively applied to tune a robust controller to achieve a prescribed limit cycle behavior and accomplish robust limit cycle amplitude suppression and prevention.

  18. Warming tolerance across insect ontogeny: influence of joint shifts in microclimates and thermal limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pincebourde, Sylvain; Casas, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    The impact of warming on the persistence and distribution of ectotherms is often forecasted from their warming tolerance, inferred as the difference between their upper thermal limit and macroclimate temperature. Ectotherms, however, are thermally adapted to their microclimates, which can deviate substantially from macroscale conditions. Ignoring microclimates can therefore bias estimates of warming tolerance. We compared warming tolerance of an insect across its ontogeny when calculated from macro- and microclimate temperatures. We used a heat balance model to predict experienced microclimate temperatures from macroclimate, and we measured thermal limits for several life stages. The model shows a concomitant increase in microclimate temperatures and thermal limits across insect ontogeny, despite the fact that they all share the same macroclimate. Consequently, warming tolerance; as estimated from microclimate temperature, remained constant across ontogeny. When calculated from macroclimate temperature, however, warming tolerance was overestimated by 7-10 degrees C, depending on the life stage. Therefore, errors are expected when predicting persistence and distribution shifts of ectotherms in changing climates using macroclimate rather than microclimate.

  19. Application of a statistical thermal design procedure to evaluate the PWR DNBR safety analysis limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robeyns, J.; Parmentier, F.; Peeters, G.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of safety analysis for the Belgian nuclear power plants and for the reload compatibility studies, Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE) has developed, to define a 95/95 DNBR criterion, a statistical thermal design method based on the analytical full statistical approach: the Statistical Thermal Design Procedure (STDP). In that methodology, each DNBR value in the core assemblies is calculated with an adapted CHF (Critical Heat Flux) correlation implemented in the sub-channel code Cobra for core thermal hydraulic analysis. The uncertainties of the correlation are represented by the statistical parameters calculated from an experimental database. The main objective of a sub-channel analysis is to prove that in all class 1 and class 2 situations, the minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) remains higher than the Safety Analysis Limit (SAL). The SAL value is calculated from the Statistical Design Limit (SDL) value adjusted with some penalties and deterministic factors. The search of a realistic value for the SDL is the objective of the statistical thermal design methods. In this report, we apply a full statistical approach to define the DNBR criterion or SDL (Statistical Design Limit) with the strict observance of the design criteria defined in the Standard Review Plan. The same statistical approach is used to define the expected number of rods experiencing DNB. (author)

  20. Theoretical analysis of saturation and limit cycles in short pulse FEL oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piovella, N.; Chaix, P.; Jaroszynski, D. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We derive a model for the non linear evolution of a short pulse oscillator from low signal up to saturation in the small gain regime. This system is controlled by only two independent parameters: cavity detuning and losses. Using a closure relation, this model reduces to a closed set of 5 non linear partial differential equations for the EM field and moments of the electron distribution. An analysis of the linearised system allows to define and calculate the eigenmodes characterising the small signal regime. An arbitrary solution of the complete nonlinear system can then be expanded in terms of these eigenmodes. This allows interpreting various observed nonlinear behaviours, including steady state saturation, limit cycles, and transition to chaos. The single mode approximation reduces to a Landau-Ginzburg equation. It allows to obtain gain, nonlinear frequency shift, and efficiency as functions of cavity detuning and cavity losses. A generalisation to two modes allows to obtain a simple description of the limit cycle behaviour, as a competition between these two modes. An analysis of the transitions to more complex dynamics is also given. Finally, the analytical results are compared to the experimental data from the FELIX experiment.

  1. A Study on Stability of Limit Cycle Walking Model with Feet: Parameter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggwon Jeon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two kinds of feet, namely, curved and flat feet, are added to limit cycle walking model to investigate its stability properties. Although both models are already proposed and are investigated, most previous works are focused on efficiency and gait behaviors. Only the stability properties of the simplest walking model conceived Garcia et al. are well defined. Therefore, there is still a need for a precise research on the effect of feet, especially in the view of local stability, bifurcation route to chaos, global stability, falling boundary and energy balance line. Therefore, this article revisits the stability analysis of limit cycle walking model with various foot shape. To analyze the effects of feet, we re-derive the equation of motion of modified models by adding one more parameter of foot shape than the simplest walking model. Also, the falling boundary and energy balance line of modified models are derived to get proper initial conditions for stable walking and to explain global stability. Simulation results show us that the curved feet can enlarge both stable walking range and area of basin of attraction while the case of flat feet depends on foot shape parameter.

  2. Output power analyses for the thermodynamic cycles of thermal power plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Chen; Cheng, Xue-Tao; Liang, Xin-Gang

    2014-05-01

    Thermal power plant is one of the important thermodynamic devices, which is very common in all kinds of power generation systems. In this paper, we use a new concept, entransy loss, as well as exergy destruction, to analyze the single reheating Rankine cycle unit and the single stage steam extraction regenerative Rankine cycle unit in power plants. This is the first time that the concept of entransy loss is applied to the analysis of the power plant Rankine cycles with reheating and steam extraction regeneration. In order to obtain the maximum output power, the operating conditions under variant vapor mass flow rates are optimized numerically, as well as the combustion temperatures and the off-design flow rates of the flue gas. The relationship between the output power and the exergy destruction rate and that between the output power and the entransy loss rate are discussed. It is found that both the minimum exergy destruction rate and the maximum entransy loss rate lead to the maximum output power when the combustion temperature and heat capacity flow rate of the flue gas are prescribed. Unlike the minimum exergy destruction rate, the maximum entransy loss rate is related to the maximum output power when the highest temperature and heat capacity flow rate of the flue gas are not prescribed.

  3. FIBWR2 evaluation of fuel thermal limits during density wave oscillaions in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nik, N.; Rajan, S.R.; Karasulu, M. [New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analyses were performed to evaluate hydraulic and thermal margin responses of three different BWR fuel designs subjected to the same periodic power/flow oscillations, such as those that might be exhibited during an instability event. The power/flow versus time information from the oscillations was used as a forcing function to calculate the hydraulic response and the MCPR performance of the limiting fuel bundles during the regional oscillations using the analytical code FIBWR2. The results of the calculations were used to determine the thermal margin variation as a function of oscillation magnitude.

  4. Effect of thermal cycling on the strength and superconducting properties of laser floating zone textured Bi-2212 rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salazar, A.; Pastor, J.Y.; Llorca, J.; Natividad, E.; Gimeno, F.J.; Angurel, L.A.

    2003-01-01

    The influence of the thermal cycling on the flexure strength and superconducting properties of textured Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O 8+δ rods processed by the laser-heated floating zone method was studied. Two different temperature ranges (77-300 and 77-393 K) were used to separate the contributions of chemical reactions with liquid water from those due to the thermo-elastic stresses. The rods showed excellent resistance to thermal cycling in both cases and neither the superconducting nor the mechanical properties were significantly affected. In particular, the variation of the critical current at 77 K was below ±4% after 50 thermal cycles. The flexure strength of rods increased or decreased by ∼10% after a few tens of thermal cycles, and crack deflection along the rod axis was observed in the specimens which showed a reduction in strength. This decrease was transitory, and the flexure strength after 50 thermal cycles was similar to that measured on the as-received rods

  5. Limits to solar power conversion efficiency with applications to quantum and thermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Smith, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical framework is presented that permits examination of the limit to the efficiency of various solar power conversion devices. Thermodynamic limits to solar power efficiency are determined for both quantum and thermal systems, and the results are applied to a variety of devices currently considered for use in space systems. The power conversion efficiency for single-threshold energy quantum systems receiving unconcentrated air mass zero solar radiation is limited to 31 percent. This limit applies to photovoltaic cells directly converting solar radiation, or indirectly, as in the case of a thermophotovoltaic system. Photoelectrochemical cells rely on an additional chemical reaction at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface, which introduces additional second-law demands and a reduction of the solar conversion efficiency. Photochemical systems exhibit even lower possible efficiencies because of their relatively narrow absorption bands. Solar-powered thermal engines in contact with an ambient reservoir at 300 K and operating at maximum power have a peak conversion efficiency of 64 percent, and this occurs for a thermal reservoir at a temperature of 2900 K. The power conversion efficiency of a solar-powered liquid metal magnetohydrodydnamic generator, a solar-powered steam turbine electric generator, and an alkali metal thermoelectric converter is discussed.

  6. Energy efficiency potentials: Contrasting thermodynamic, technical and economic limits for organic Rankine cycles within UK industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q.; Hammond, G.P.; Norman, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Energy savings have a thermodynamic, technical and economic limit. • The potential for organic Rankine cycles in UK industry was assessed. • 3.5 PJ/yr of electricity was generated by economically attractive opportunities. • The steel, chemical and cement subsectors comprised the majority of potential. • Drivers and barriers to realising the potentials were discussed. - Abstract: The laws of thermodynamics set a theoretical limit on the energy savings that can be realised in a given application. This thermodynamic potential cannot be reached in practice, and a technical potential for energy savings is defined by the performance of available technology. Only applications of the technology that are considered economic will usually be considered for installation. This economic potential will itself not be fully realised, with the actual savings that are achieved limited by further barriers. A database on surplus heat availability within UK industry was used to estimate the thermodynamic, technical, and economic potentials when converting this surplus heat to electricity using organic Rankine cycles (ORCs). Technical and economic information was based on that reported from existing installations and manufacturers. Installations economic over the target payback period totalled approximately 3.5 PJ/yr of electricity generation, primarily in the steel, chemicals and cement subsectors. However, this result is sensitive to the input parameters, particularly the future price of electricity and required payback period, which are uncertain. Therefore a range of possible scenarios were investigated. The results form a basis for discussion on how to close this “gap” between the identified potentials and the savings realised in practice.

  7. One thousand thermal cycles of magnesium chloride hexahydrate as a promising PCM for indoor solar cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Heniti, S.; Al-Agel, F.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Marzouki, F.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Solar cookers must contain a PCM for cooking indoors. → MgCl 2 .6H 2 O when it cycled in a sealed container. → MgCl 2 .6H 2 O shows maximum of 0.1-3.5 o C of supercooling. → MgCl 2 .6H 2 O is a promising PCM for thermal energy storage. -- Abstract: Cooking is the major necessity for people all over the world. It accounts for a major share of energy consumption in developing countries. There is a critical need for the development of alternative, appropriate, affordable methods of cooking for use in developing countries. There is a history for solar cooking since 1650 where they are broadly divided into direct or focusing type, box-type and indirect or advanced solar cookers. The advanced solar cookers have the advantage of being usable indoors and thus solve one of the problems, which impede the social acceptance of solar cookers. The advanced type solar cookers are employing additional solar units that increase the cost. Therefore, the solar cooker must contain a heat storage medium to store thermal energy for use during off-sunshine hours. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the melting/solidification fast thermal cycling of commercial grade magnesium chloride hexahydrate (MgCl 2 .6H 2 O) on its thermo-physical properties; such as melting point and latent heat of fusion, to be used as a storage medium inside solar cookers. One thousand cycles have been performed in a sealed container under the extra water principle. The thermo-physical properties are measured using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. It is indicated that MgCl 2 .6H 2 O with the extra water principle and hermetically sealing of the container is a promising phase change material (PCM) for cooking indoors and during law intensity solar radiation periods. It is also found from the melting/solidification behavior of MgCl 2 .6H 2 O that it is solidify almost without supercooling; except in few cases where it showed maximum of 0

  8. Effects of thermal cycling on surface roughness, hardness and flexural strength of polymethylmethacrylate and polyamide denture base resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayaz, Elif Aydoğan; Bağış, Bora; Turgut, Sedanur

    2015-10-16

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of thermal cycling on the surface roughness, hardness and flexural strength of denture resins. Polyamide (PA; Deflex and Valplast) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA; QC-20 and Acron MC) denture materials were selected. A total of 180 specimens were fabricated and then divided into 3 groups. The first group (group 1) acted as a control and was not thermocycled. The second group (group 2) was subjected to thermocycling for 10,000 cycles in artificial saliva and 5,000 cycles in distilled water. The last group (group 3) was thermocycled for 20,000 cycles in artificial saliva and 10,000 cycles in distilled water. The surface roughness were measured with a profilometer. The hardness of the resins were measured with a Vickers Hardness Tester using a 100-gf load. The flexural strength test was performed using the universal test machine with a crosshead speed of 5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using statistical software. The results of the measurements in the 3 different tests were analyzed by Kruskal-Wallis test with Bonferroni correction. Multiple comparisons were made by Conover and Wilcoxon tests. There was a significant difference between the PMMA and PA groups in terms of surface roughness, hardness and transverse strength before and after thermal cycling (p<0.001). Thermal cycling did not change the surface roughness, hardness and flexural strength values of either the PMMA or PA group (p>0.001).

  9. Evaluation of error bands and confidence limits for thermal measurements in the CFTL bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, K.W.; Sanders, J.P.; Conklin, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Surface cladding temperatures for the fuel rod simulators in the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) must be inferred from a measurement at a thermocouple junction within the rod. This step requires the evaluation of the thermal field within the rod based on known parameters such as heat generation rate, dimensional tolerances, thermal properties, and contact coefficients. Uncertainties in the surface temperature can be evaluated by assigning error bands to each of the parameters used in the calculation. A statistical method has been employed to establish the confidence limits for the surface temperature from a combination of the standard deviations of the important parameters. This method indicates that for a CFTL fuel rod simulator with a total power of 38 kW and a ratio of maximum to average axial power of 1.21, the 95% confidence limit for the calculated surface temperature is +- 45 0 C at the midpoint of the rod

  10. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miękisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  11. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  12. Oxidation behavior of Hf-modified platinum aluminide coatings during thermal cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Ye

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Platinum aluminide coatings with different Hf contents were fabricated by using HfCl4. The oxidation kinetics and the rumpling behavior of oxide scale were investigated. After thermal cycling, the coating with 0.46 wt% Hf showed least weight gain. With the increase of Hf content, rumpling extent of the scale decreased. Meanwhile, HfO2 preferentially formed in the scale resulting in the increase of scale thickness. The oxidation of excessive Hf even caused the spallation of the scale. The results in the present study indicate that although Hf plays an important role in decreasing rumpling extent of TGO, the oxidation of Hf decreases the adhesion of the scale. Keywords: Pt-Al coating, Hf, Oxidation, Rumpling

  13. Modeling of Thermal Cycle CI Engine with Multi-Stage Fuel Injection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arkadiusz Jamrozik

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This work presents a complete thermal cycle modeling of a four-stroke diesel engine with a three-dimensional simulation program CFD - AVL Fire. The object of the simulation was the S320 Andoria engine. The purpose of the study was to determine the effect of fuel dose distribution on selected parameters of the combustion process. As a result of the modeling, time spatial pressure distributions, rate of pressure increase, heat release rate and NO and soot emission were obtained for 3 injection strategies: no division, one pilot dose and one main dose and two pilot doses and one main dose. It has been found that the use of pilot doses on the one hand reduces engine hardness and lowers NO emissions and on the other hand, increases soot emissions.

  14. Life cycle assessment of thermal Waste-to-Energy technologies: Review and recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard; Tonini, Davide; Turconi, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    -studies published in 136 peer-reviewed journal articles within 1995 and 2013. The studies were evaluated with respect to critical aspects such as: (i) goal and scope definitions (e.g. functional units, system boundaries, temporal and geographic scopes), (ii) detailed technology parameters (e.g. related to waste......Life cycle assessment (LCA) has been used extensively within the recent decade to evaluate the environmental performance of thermal Waste-to-Energy (WtE) technologies: incineration, co-combustion, pyrolysis and gasification. A critical review was carried out involving 250 individual case...... composition, technology, gas cleaning, energy recovery, residue management, and inventory data), and (iii) modeling principles (e.g. energy/mass calculation principles, energy substitution, inclusion of capital goods and uncertainty evaluation). Very few of the published studies provided full and transparent...

  15. The Effect of Thermal Cycling on Crystal-Liquid Separation During Lunar Magma Ocean Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of magma oceans likely involves a mixture of fractional and equilibrium crystallization [1]. The existence of: 1) large volumes of anorthosite in the lunar highlands and 2) the incompatible- rich (KREEP) reservoir suggests that fractional crystallization may have dominated during differentiation of the Moon. For this to have occurred, crystal fractionation must have been remarkably efficient. Several authors [e.g. 2, 3] have hypothesized that equilibrium crystallization would have dominated early in differentiation of magma oceans because of crystal entrainment during turbulent convection. However, recent numerical modeling [4] suggests that crystal settling could have occurred throughout the entire solidification history of the lunar magma ocean if crystals were large and crystal fraction was low. These results indicate that the crystal size distribution could have played an important role in differentiation of the lunar magma ocean. Here, I suggest that thermal cycling from tidal heating during lunar magma ocean crystallization caused crystals to coarsen, leading to efficient crystal-liquid separation.

  16. Numerical analysis of energy piles under different boundary conditions and thermal loading cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khosravi Ali

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The thermo- mechanical behavior of energy piles has been studied extensively in recent years. In the present study, a numerical model was adapted to study the effect of various parameters (e.g. heating/cooling temperature, head loading condition and soil stiffness on the thermo-mechanical behavior of an energy pile installed in unsaturated sandstone. The results from the simulations were compared with measurements from a thermal response test on a prototype energy pile installed beneath a 1-story building at the US Air Force Academy (USAFA in Colorado Springs, CO. A good agreement was achieved between the results obtained from the prototype and the numerical models. A parametric evaluation were also carried out which indicated the significance of the stiffness of the unsaturated sandstone and pile’s head loading condition on stress-strain response of the energy pile during heating/cooling cycles.

  17. Effect of the combined stress on the life of components under thermal cycling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuchowski, R.; Zietkowski, L.

    1987-01-01

    The life of structural components subjected to temperature changes is affected, among other factors, by the nature of the stress field. If life prediction for axially stressed components can be accomplished with a number of well established techniques, the behaviour under a complex state of stress and varying temperature conditions still is the object of intensive research. The present study was aimed at assessing the influence of the stress field upon the life of specimens made of chromium-nickel H23N18 steel under thermal cycling conditions. The designation of steel is in accordance with Polish Standards. The experiments were made on thin-walled tubular specimens loaded with various combinations of a static axial force and a static torque. (orig./GL)

  18. Study of cyclic thermal aging of tube type receivers as a function of the duration of the cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setien, Eneko; Fernández-Reche, Jesús; Ariza, María Jesús; Álvarez-de-Lara, Mónica

    2017-06-01

    The tube type receivers are exposed to variable duration cyclic operating conditions, which can jeopardize its reliability, and make it hard to estimate its long term performance. The designers have to deal with this problem and estimate the receiver long term performance based on the poor available litterature and the data sheets of the material. In order to help the designer better estimate the performance of the receivers, in this paper the cyclic thermal aging is analyzed as a function of the cycle duration. For this purpose, coated and uncoated Inconel alloy 625 tubular samples, similar to those used in the commercial receivers, are cyclically aged with different thermal cycle duration. The aging of these samples has been analyzed by means of oxidation kinetics, microstructure examination and mechanical and optical properties. The effect of the thermal cycle duration is studied and discussed by comparison of the results.

  19. Resolution of the Poincare problem and nonexistence of algebraic limit cycles in family (I) of Chinese classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavarriga, Javier; Garcia, Isaac A.; Sorolla, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    Any quadratic system with limit cycles can be written in one of the three families stated by the Chinese classification. In this paper we consider family (I), i.e., x-bar =δx-y+-bar x2+mxy+ny2,y-bar =x. We show that the degree of its real irreducible invariant algebraic curves is bounded by 3. By the way, we prove that there is not any algebraic limit cycle for this family

  20. Control of Limit Cycle Oscillations of a Two-Dimensional Aeroelastic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghommem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear and nonlinear static feedback controls are implemented on a nonlinear aeroelastic system that consists of a rigid airfoil supported by nonlinear springs in the pitch and plunge directions and subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The normal form is used to investigate the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the freestream velocity is increased and to analytically predict the amplitude and frequency of the ensuing limit cycle oscillations (LCO. It is shown that linear control can be used to delay the flutter onset and reduce the LCO amplitude. Yet, its required gains remain a function of the speed. On the other hand, nonlinear control can be effciently implemented to convert any subcritical Hopf bifurcation into a supercritical one and to significantly reduce the LCO amplitude.

  1. Robust Nonlinear Regulation of Limit Cycle Oscillations in UAVs Using Synthetic Jet Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Ramos Pedroza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a synthetic jet actuators (SJA-based nonlinear robust controller is developed, which is capable of completely suppressing limit cycle oscillations (LCO in UAV systems with parametric uncertainty in the SJA dynamics and unmodeled external disturbances. Specifically, the control law compensates for uncertainty in an input gain matrix, which results from the unknown airflow dynamics generated by the SJA. Challenges in the control design include compensation for input-multiplicative parametric uncertainty in the actuator dynamic model. The result was achieved via innovative algebraic manipulation in the error system development, along with a Lyapunov-based robust control law. A rigorous Lyapunov-based stability analysis is utilized to prove asymptotic LCO suppression, considering a detailed dynamic model of the pitching and plunging dynamics. Numerical simulation results are provided to demonstrate the robustness and practical performance of the proposed control law.

  2. Canard explosion of limit cycles in templator models of self-replication mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten

    2011-01-01

    Templators are differential equation models for self-replicating chemical systems. Beutel and Peacock-López [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 125104 (2007)]10.1063/1.2716396 have numerically analyzed a model for a cross-catalytic self-replicating system and found two cases of canard explosion, that is......, a substantial change of amplitude of a limit cycle over a very short parameter interval. We show how the model can be reduced to a two-dimensional system and how canard theory for slow-fast equations can be applied to yield analytic information about the canard explosion. In particular, simple expressions...... for the parameter value where the canard explosion occurs are obtained. The connection to mixed-mode oscillations also observed in the model is briefly discussed. © 2011 American Institute of Physics....

  3. Canard explosion of limit cycles in templator models of self-replication mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brøns, Morten

    2011-04-01

    Templators are differential equation models for self-replicating chemical systems. Beutel and Peacock-López [J. Chem. Phys. 126, 125104 (2007)], 10.1063/1.2716396 have numerically analyzed a model for a cross-catalytic self-replicating system and found two cases of canard explosion, that is, a substantial change of amplitude of a limit cycle over a very short parameter interval. We show how the model can be reduced to a two-dimensional system and how canard theory for slow-fast equations can be applied to yield analytic information about the canard explosion. In particular, simple expressions for the parameter value where the canard explosion occurs are obtained. The connection to mixed-mode oscillations also observed in the model is briefly discussed.

  4. Controlling the Limit-Cycle of the Ziegler Column via a Tuned Piezoelectric Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco D’Annibale

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is about the nonlinear analysis of a piezoelectric controlled Ziegler column. The piezoelectric controller, here referred to as Tuned Piezoelectric Damper (TPD, possesses evanescent characteristics and, moreover, it is tuned to the first natural frequency of the mechanical system, thus resembling the well-known Tuned Mass Damper. This means that the flow of energy between mechanical and electrical subsystems is driven by the resonance (Den Hartog principle and magnified by the singularity of the evanescent electrical characteristics. Numerical simulations, showing how the proposed control strategy is effective in increasing the linear stability domain and decreasing the amplitude of the limit-cycles in the postcritical range, are presented.

  5. Fundamental-frequency and load-varying thermal cycles effects on lifetime estimation of DFIG power converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, G.; Zhou, D.; Yang, J.

    2017-01-01

    In respect to a Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) system, its corresponding time scale varies from microsecond level of power semiconductor switching to second level of the mechanical response. In order to map annual thermal profile of the power semiconductors, different approaches have been ...... adopted to handle the fundamental-frequency thermal cycles and load-varying thermal cycles. Their effects on lifetime estimation of the power device in the Back-to-Back (BTB) power converter are evaluated.......In respect to a Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) system, its corresponding time scale varies from microsecond level of power semiconductor switching to second level of the mechanical response. In order to map annual thermal profile of the power semiconductors, different approaches have been...

  6. Nutrient limitation reduces land carbon uptake in simulations with a model of combined carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Goll

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon (C cycle models applied for climate projections simulate a strong increase in net primary productivity (NPP due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. These models usually neglect the limited availability of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, nutrients that commonly limit plant growth and soil carbon turnover. To investigate how the projected C sequestration is altered when stoichiometric constraints on C cycling are considered, we incorporated a P cycle into the land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg, which already includes representations of coupled C and N cycles.

    The model reveals a distinct geographic pattern of P and N limitation. Under the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario, the accumulated land C uptake between 1860 and 2100 is 13% (particularly at high latitudes and 16% (particularly at low latitudes lower in simulations with N and P cycling, respectively, than in simulations without nutrient cycles. The combined effect of both nutrients reduces land C uptake by 25% compared to simulations without N or P cycling. Nutrient limitation in general may be biased by the model simplicity, but the ranking of limitations is robust against the parameterization and the inflexibility of stoichiometry. After 2100, increased temperature and high CO2 concentration cause a shift from N to P limitation at high latitudes, while nutrient limitation in the tropics declines. The increase in P limitation at high-latitudes is induced by a strong increase in NPP and the low P sorption capacity of soils, while a decline in tropical NPP due to high autotrophic respiration rates alleviates N and P limitations. The quantification of P limitation remains challenging. The poorly constrained processes of soil P sorption and biochemical mineralization are identified as the main uncertainties in the strength of P limitation

  7. Performance analysis of a Kalina cycle for a central receiver solar thermal power plant with direct steam generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modi, Anish; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Solar thermal power plants have attracted increasing interest in the past few years - with respect to both the design of the various plant components, and extending the operation hours by employing different types of storage systems. One approach to improve the overall plant efficiency is to use...... that the simple Rankine cycle exhibits better performance than the Kalina cycle when the heat input is only from the solar receiver. However, when using a two-tank molten-salt storage system as the primary source of heat input, the Kalina cycle showed an advantage over the simple Rankine cycle because of about 33...... % reduction in the storage requirement. The solar receiver showed the highest rate of exergy destruction for both the cycles. The rates of exergy destruction in other components of the cycles were found to be highly dependent on the amount of recuperation, and the ammonia mass fraction and pressure...

  8. Changes in phosphorus magnetic resonance spectra during the cell cycle of phosphorus limited phased culture of Candida utilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.S.S.; MacDonald, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Cell extracts, serially obtained from Candida utilis grown in continuous (synchrony) culture under phosphate limitation during an 8-h cycle and examined by NMR spectroscopy, revealed changes in polyphosphate content during the cycle period: other phosphorus containing components showed relatively little change. Initially zero, the polyphosphate content increased rapidly to a maximum after 30 min that coincided with exhaustion of phosphate from the culture, and then decreased slowly back to zero at the end of the cycle. The results suggest that polyphosphate, usually considered to function as a reserve material, actively participates during the cell cycle. 12 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table

  9. Heat transfer characteristics and limitations analysis of heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guangming, Xiao; Yanxia, Du; Yewei, Gui; Lei, Liu; Xiaofeng, Yang; Dong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The theories of heat transfer, thermodynamics and fluid dynamics are employed to develop the coupled heat transfer analytical methods for the heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structure (HPC TPS), and a three-dimensional numerical method considering the sonic limit of heat pipe is proposed. To verify the calculation correctness, computations are carried out for a typical heat pipe and the results agree well with experimental data. Then, the heat transfer characteristics and limitations of HPC TPS are mainly studied. The studies indicate that the use of heat pipe can reduce the temperature at high heat flux region of structure efficiently. However, there is a frozen startup period before the heat pipe reaching a steady operating state, and the sonic limit will be a restriction on the heat transfer capability. Thus, the effects of frozen startup must be considered for the design of HPC TPS. The simulation model and numerical method proposed in this paper can predict the heat transfer characteristics of HPC TPS quickly and exactly, and the results will provide important references for the design or performance evaluation of HPC TPS. - Highlights: • Numerical methods for the heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structure are studied. • Three-dimensional simulation model considering sonic limit of heat pipe is proposed. • The frozen startup process of the embedded heat pipe can be predicted exactly. • Heat transfer characteristics of TPS and limitations of heat pipe are discussed

  10. Effect of thermal mass on life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodoo, Ambrose; Gustavsson, Leif; Sathre, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effect of thermal mass on life cycle primary energy balance of concrete and wood building is analyzed. ► A concrete building has slightly lower space heating demand than a wood alternative. ► Still, a wood building has a lower life cycle primary energy use than a concrete alternative. ► The influence of thermal mass on space heating energy use for buildings in Nordic climate is small. -- Abstract: In this study we analyze the effect of thermal mass on space heating energy use and life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building. The analysis includes primary energy use during the production, operation, and end-of-life phases. Based on hour-by-hour dynamic modeling of heat flows in building mass configurations we calculate the energy saving benefits of thermal mass during the operation phase of the buildings. Our results indicate that the energy savings due to thermal mass is small and varies with the climatic location and energy efficiency levels of the buildings. A concrete-frame building has slightly lower space heating demand than a wood-frame alternative, due to the higher thermal mass of concrete-based materials. Still, a wood-frame building has a lower life cycle primary energy balance than a concrete-frame alternative. This is due primarily to the lower production primary energy use and greater bioenergy recovery benefits of the wood-frame buildings. These advantages outweigh the energy saving benefits of thermal mass. We conclude that the influence of thermal mass on space heating energy use for buildings located in Nordic climate is small and that wood-frame buildings with cogeneration based district heating would be an effective means of reducing primary energy use in the built environment.

  11. Evaluation of Electroless-Nickel Plated Polypropylene under Thermal Cycling and Mechanical Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Ajibola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electroless-nickel composite (ENC consisting of bright metallic electroless-nickel (EN and dull electroless-nickel-phosphorus (EN-P were deposited on the polypropylene (PP substrate from the sodium hypophosphite baths. The ENC plated specimens were subjected to abrasive wear-adhesion test of 1750, 3500, 7000 and 14000 cycles; thermal cycle-adhesion tests, and tensile strength and creep tests. The deposition of ENC influenced the strength and creep strain properties of the PP. The maximum stress σ of 118 (MPa was obtained from EN-PP specimen at strain  of 0.1 mm/mm as compared with the PP having stress σ of 36 (MPa at strain  of 0.07 mm/mm before failure The surface appearances and microstructures of ENC film on PP substrates were examined under the higher resolution metallurgical microscope with digital camera and microscopic camera. The composition of ENC film was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray analyses (Jeol JSM-7600F Field Emission SEM/EDX, The micrographs and spectra lines data generated were used to interpret the results.

  12. Far-Field Superresolution of Thermal Electromagnetic Sources at the Quantum Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ranjith; Tsang, Mankei

    2016-11-04

    We obtain the ultimate quantum limit for estimating the transverse separation of two thermal point sources using a given imaging system with limited spatial bandwidth. We show via the quantum Cramér-Rao bound that, contrary to the Rayleigh limit in conventional direct imaging, quantum mechanics does not mandate any loss of precision in estimating even deep sub-Rayleigh separations. We propose two coherent measurement techniques, easily implementable using current linear-optics technology, that approach the quantum limit over an arbitrarily large range of separations. Our bound is valid for arbitrary source strengths, all regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and for any imaging system with an inversion-symmetric point-spread function. The measurement schemes can be applied to microscopy, optical sensing, and astrometry at all wavelengths.

  13. Pushing desalination recovery to the maximum limit: Membrane and thermal processes integration

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil

    2017-05-05

    The economics of seawater desalination processes has been continuously improving as a result of desalination market expansion. Presently, reverse osmosis (RO) processes are leading in global desalination with 53% share followed by thermally driven technologies 33%, but in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries their shares are 42% and 56% respectively due to severe feed water quality. In RO processes, intake, pretreatment and brine disposal cost 25% of total desalination cost at 30–35% recovery. We proposed a tri-hybrid system to enhance overall recovery up to 81%. The conditioned brine leaving from RO processes supplied to proposed multi-evaporator adsorption cycle driven by low temperature industrial waste heat sources or solar energy. RO membrane simulation has been performed using WinFlow and IMSDesign commercial softwares developed by GE and Nitto. Detailed mathematical model of overall system is developed and simulation has been conducted in FORTRAN. The final brine reject concentration from tri-hybrid cycle can vary from 166,000ppm to 222,000ppm if RO retentate concentration varies from 45,000ppm to 60,000ppm. We also conducted economic analysis and showed that the proposed tri-hybrid cycle can achieve highest recovery, 81%, and lowest energy consumption, 1.76kWhelec/m3, for desalination reported in the literature up till now.

  14. The Effect of Thermal Cycling Treatments on the Thermal Stability and Mechanical Properties of a Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal cycling treatments on the thermal stability and mechanical properties of a Ti48Zr20Nb12Cu5Be15 bulk metallic glass composite (BMGC has been investigated. Results show that moderate thermal cycles in a temperature range of −196 °C (cryogenic temperature, CT to 25 °C (room temperature, RT or annealing time at CT has not induced obvious changes of thermal stability and then it decreases slightly over critical thermal parameters. In addition, the dendritic second phases with a bcc structure are homogeneously embedded in the amorphous matrix; no visible changes are detected, which shows structural stability. Excellent mechanical properties as high as 1599 MPa yield strength and 34% plastic strain are obtained, and the yield strength and elastic modulus also increase gradually. The effect on the stability is analyzed quantitatively by crystallization kinetics and plastic-flow models, and indicates that the reduction of structural relaxation enthalpy, which is related to the degradation of spatial heterogeneity, reduces thermal stability but does not imperatively deteriorate the plasticity.

  15. Topological Classification of Limit Cycles of Piecewise Smooth Dynamical Systems and Its Associated Non-Standard Bifurcations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Taborda

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for the synthesis and the classification of nonsmooth limit cycles and its bifurcations (named Non-Standard Bifurcations or Discontinuity Induced Bifurcations or DIBs in n-dimensional piecewise-smooth dynamical systems, particularly Continuous PWS and Discontinuous PWS (or Filippov-type PWS systems. The proposed qualitative approach explicitly includes two main aspects: multiple discontinuity boundaries (DBs in the phase space and multiple intersections between DBs (or corner manifolds—CMs. Previous classifications of DIBs of limit cycles have been restricted to generic cases with a single DB or a single CM. We use the definition of piecewise topological equivalence in order to synthesize all possibilities of nonsmooth limit cycles. Families, groups and subgroups of cycles are defined depending on smoothness zones and discontinuity boundaries (DB involved. The synthesized cycles are used to define bifurcation patterns when the system is perturbed with parametric changes. Four families of DIBs of limit cycles are defined depending on the properties of the cycles involved. Well-known and novel bifurcations can be classified using this approach.

  16. Mechanisms Controlling Species Responses to Climate Change: Thermal Tolerances and Shifting Range Limits. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, R. F.; Bykova, O.; Coiner, H.

    2010-12-01

    One of the main effects of anthropogenic climate change will be widespread shifts in species distribution, with the common assumption that they will migrate to higher elevation and latitude. While this assumption is supported by migration patterns following climate warming in the past 20,000 years, it has not been rigorously evaluated in terms of physiological mechanism, despite the implication that migration in response to climate warming is controlled by some form of thermal adaptation. We have been evaluating the degree to which species range limits are controlled by physiological patterns of thermal tolerance in bioinvaders of North America. Bioinvaders presumably have few biotic controls over their distribution and thus are more likely to fully exploit their thermal niche. In cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), the minimum lethal temperature in winter is -32C, which corresponds to the mean winter minimum temperature at its northern range limit. In red brome (Bromus rubens), the minimum lethal temperature is also near -32C, which is well below the minimum winter temperature near -20C that corresponds to its northern distribution limit. In kudzu (Pueraria lobata), the minimum lethal temperature is near -20C, which corresponds to the midwinter minimum at its northern distribution limit; however, overwintering kudzu tissues are insulated by soil and snow cover, and thus do not experience lethal temperatures at kudzu's northern range limit. These results demonstrate that some invasive species can exploit the potential range defined by their low temperature tolerance and thus can be predicted by mechanistic models to migrate to higher latitudes with moderation of winter cold. The distribution of other invaders such as kudzu and red brome are not controlled by tolerance of midwinter cold. Developing mechanistic models of their distributions, and how these might change with climate warming, will require extensive physiological study.

  17. Thermal noise limit for ultra-high vacuum noncontact atomic force microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jannis Lübbe

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The noise of the frequency-shift signal Δf in noncontact atomic force microscopy (NC-AFM consists of cantilever thermal noise, tip–surface-interaction noise and instrumental noise from the detection and signal processing systems. We investigate how the displacement-noise spectral density dz at the input of the frequency demodulator propagates to the frequency-shift-noise spectral density dΔf at the demodulator output in dependence of cantilever properties and settings of the signal processing electronics in the limit of a negligible tip–surface interaction and a measurement under ultrahigh-vacuum conditions. For a quantification of the noise figures, we calibrate the cantilever displacement signal and determine the transfer function of the signal-processing electronics. From the transfer function and the measured dz, we predict dΔf for specific filter settings, a given level of detection-system noise spectral density dzds and the cantilever-thermal-noise spectral density dzth. We find an excellent agreement between the calculated and measured values for dΔf. Furthermore, we demonstrate that thermal noise in dΔf, defining the ultimate limit in NC-AFM signal detection, can be kept low by a proper choice of the cantilever whereby its Q-factor should be given most attention. A system with a low-noise signal detection and a suitable cantilever, operated with appropriate filter and feedback-loop settings allows room temperature NC-AFM measurements at a low thermal-noise limit with a significant bandwidth.

  18. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) fabricated part behavior under tensile stress, thermal cycling, and fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shojib

    using visual feedback method led to an increase in UTS of 16% in XYZ, 7% in XZY, and 22% in ZXY. The FDM fabricated parts using PC were tested under thermal cycling of -30° C to 85° C. A series of experiments were performed (e.g., tensile test, deformation of fabricated part, glass transition measurement) to evaluate the possibility of FDM fabricated parts in the harsh environment (embedded electronics, wiring in automotive industry, etc.). The UTS results showed that the results were not significantly different using statistical analysis after 150 thermal cycles while average Young's modulus increased from 1389 MPa to 1469 MPa after 150 thermal cycles. The highest warping of the specimen was found to be 78 microm which was the result of continuous thermal expansion and contraction. A sealing algorithm was developed using LabVIEW and MATLAB programming. The LabVIEW program was developed to obtain the edge information of each layer of a 3D model part. The MATLAB programming was used to gather the output information from LabVIEW and calculate the suggested RW providing least amount of gap in between rasters and contours. As a result, each layer became sealed and was able to withstand air pressure within a pressure vessel. A test specimen was fabricated according to the developed sealing algorithm parameters and used to show entirely sealed walls capable of withstanding up to 138 kPa air pressure.

  19. Thermodynamic and design considerations of organic Rankine cycles in combined application with a solar thermal gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, R.; Kusterer, K.; Sugimoto, T.; Tanimura, K.; Bohn, D.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies are considered to provide a significant contribution for the electric power production in the future. Different kinds of technologies are presently in operation or under development, e.g. parabolic troughs, central receivers, solar dish systems and Fresnel reflectors. This paper takes the focus on central receiver technologies, where the solar radiation is concentrated by a field of heliostats in a receiver on the top of a tall tower. To get this CSP technology ready for the future, the system costs have to reduce significantly. The main cost driver in such kind of CSP technologies are the huge amount of heliostats. To reduce the amount of heliostats, and so the investment costs, the efficiency of the energy conversion cycle becomes an important issue. An increase in the cycle efficiency results in a decrease of the solar heliostat field and thus, in a significant cost reduction. The paper presents the results of a thermodynamic model of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for combined cycle application together with a solar thermal gas turbine. The gas turbine cycle is modeled with an additional intercooler and recuperator and is based on a typical industrial gas turbine in the 2 MW class. The gas turbine has a two stage radial compressor and a three stage axial turbine. The compressed air is preheated within a solar receiver to 950°C before entering the combustor. A hybrid operation of the gas turbine is considered. In order to achieve a further increase of the overall efficiency, the combined operation of the gas turbine and an Organic Rankine Cycle is considered. Therefore an ORC has been set up, which is thermally connected to the gas turbine cycle at two positions. The ORC can be coupled to the solar-thermal gas turbine cycle at the intercooler and after the recuperator. Thus, waste heat from different cycle positions can be transferred to the ORC for additional production of electricity. Within this investigation

  20. Plasticity in thermal tolerance has limited potential to buffer ectotherms from global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Alex R.; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming is increasing the overheating risk for many organisms, though the potential for plasticity in thermal tolerance to mitigate this risk is largely unknown. In part, this shortcoming stems from a lack of knowledge about global and taxonomic patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity. To address this critical issue, we test leading hypotheses for broad-scale variation in ectotherm tolerance plasticity using a dataset that includes vertebrate and invertebrate taxa from terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats. Contrary to expectation, plasticity in heat tolerance was unrelated to latitude or thermal seasonality. However, plasticity in cold tolerance is associated with thermal seasonality in some habitat types. In addition, aquatic taxa have approximately twice the plasticity of terrestrial taxa. Based on the observed patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity, we propose that limited potential for behavioural plasticity (i.e. behavioural thermoregulation) favours the evolution of greater plasticity in physiological traits, consistent with the ‘Bogert effect’. Finally, we find that all ectotherms have relatively low acclimation in thermal tolerance and demonstrate that overheating risk will be minimally reduced by acclimation in even the most plastic groups. Our analysis indicates that behavioural and evolutionary mechanisms will be critical in allowing ectotherms to buffer themselves from extreme temperatures. PMID:25994676

  1. Plasticity in thermal tolerance has limited potential to buffer ectotherms from global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Alex R; Stillman, Jonathon H

    2015-06-07

    Global warming is increasing the overheating risk for many organisms, though the potential for plasticity in thermal tolerance to mitigate this risk is largely unknown. In part, this shortcoming stems from a lack of knowledge about global and taxonomic patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity. To address this critical issue, we test leading hypotheses for broad-scale variation in ectotherm tolerance plasticity using a dataset that includes vertebrate and invertebrate taxa from terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats. Contrary to expectation, plasticity in heat tolerance was unrelated to latitude or thermal seasonality. However, plasticity in cold tolerance is associated with thermal seasonality in some habitat types. In addition, aquatic taxa have approximately twice the plasticity of terrestrial taxa. Based on the observed patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity, we propose that limited potential for behavioural plasticity (i.e. behavioural thermoregulation) favours the evolution of greater plasticity in physiological traits, consistent with the 'Bogert effect'. Finally, we find that all ectotherms have relatively low acclimation in thermal tolerance and demonstrate that overheating risk will be minimally reduced by acclimation in even the most plastic groups. Our analysis indicates that behavioural and evolutionary mechanisms will be critical in allowing ectotherms to buffer themselves from extreme temperatures. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Laura [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Smith, Paul [John Halkyard and Associates: Glosten Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Rizea, Steven [Makai Ocean Engineering, Waimanalo, HI (United States); Van Ryzin, Joe [Makai Ocean Engineering, Waimanalo, HI (United States); Morgan, Charles [Planning Solutions, Inc., Vancouver, WA (United States); Noland, Gary [G. Noland and Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Pavlosky, Rick [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Thomas, Michael [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Halkyard, John [John Halkyard and Associates: Glosten Associates, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawaii and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the

  3. Thermal limits for growth and reproduction in the desert pupfish, Cyprinodon n. nevadensis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerking, S.D.; Lee, R.M.

    1979-01-01

    The thermal limits for growth of the desert pupfish (Cyprinodon n. nevadensis) were determined in seven-week laboratory feeding experiments at three rations (1.5, 3.0 and 4.5% body weight day) of Tetra-min prepared food and seven temperatures (12, 16, 20, 24, 28, 32, and 36 C). Curves of specific growth rates (% dry weight gain/day) as related to temperature were skewed to the left at the three rations. Growth was inhibited at 12, 16 and 36 C. Fish at the lower two temperatures were torpid and lacked appetite; the higher temperature fish did not eat sufficient food to match the high metabolic cost. The thermal scope for growth was narrowed as ration decreased and as age/size increased. Taking these factors into account, the thermal limits for growth of immature pupfish feeding at moderate to high rates were 17.5 to 31.0 C with optimum growth achieved at 22.0 C. Successful reproduction depends on egg production and egg viability.

  4. Performance analysis of a Kalina cycle for a central receiver solar thermal power plant with direct steam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modi, Anish; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Solar thermal power plants have attracted increasing interest in the past few years – with respect to both the design of the various plant components, and extending the operation hours by employing different types of storage systems. One approach to improve the overall plant efficiency is to use direct steam generation with water/steam as both the heat transfer fluid in the solar receivers and the cycle working fluid. This enables operating the plant with higher turbine inlet temperatures. Available literature suggests that it is feasible to use ammonia-water mixtures at high temperatures without corroding the equipment by using suitable additives with the mixture. The purpose of the study reported here was to investigate if there is any benefit of using a Kalina cycle for a direct steam generation, central receiver solar thermal power plant with high live steam temperature (450 °C) and pressure (over 100 bar). Thermodynamic performance of the Kalina cycle in terms of the plant exergy efficiency was evaluated and compared with a simple Rankine cycle. The rates of exergy destruction for the different components in the two cycles were also calculated and compared. The results suggest that the simple Rankine cycle exhibits better performance than the Kalina cycle when the heat input is only from the solar receiver. However, when using a two-tank molten-salt storage system as the primary source of heat input, the Kalina cycle showed an advantage over the simple Rankine cycle because of about 33 % reduction in the storage requirement. The solar receiver showed the highest rate of exergy destruction for both the cycles. The rates of exergy destruction in other components of the cycles were found to be highly dependent on the amount of recuperation, and the ammonia mass fraction and pressure at the turbine inlet. - Highlights: •Kalina cycle for a central receiver solar thermal power plant with direct steam generation. •Rankine cycle shows better plant exergy

  5. Estimate of the upper limit of amplitude of Solar Cycle No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbergleit, V. M; Larocca, P. A [Departamento de Fisica, UBA (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    AA* indices of values greater than 60 10{sup -9} Tesla are considered in order to characterize geomagnetic storms since the available series of these indices comprise the years from 1868 to 1998 (The longest existing interval of geomagnetic activity). By applying the precursor technique we have performed an analysis of the storm periods and the solar activity, obtaining a good correlation between the number of storms ({alpha})(characterized by the AA* indices) and the amplitudes of each solar cycle ({zeta}) and those of the next ({mu}). Using the multiple regression method applied to {alpha}=A+B{zeta} +C{mu}, the constants are calculated and the values found are: A=-33 {+-}18, B= 0.74{+-}0.13 y C= 0.56{+-}0.13. The present statistical method indicates that the current solar cycle (number 23) would have an upper limit of 202{+-}57 monthy mean sunspots. This value indicates that the solar activity would be high causing important effects on the Earth's environment. [Spanish] Se consideran los valores de los indices AA* de valor mayor que 60 10{sup -9} Tesla para caracterizar tormentas geomagneticas ya que las series disponibles de estos indices van desde 1868 hasta 1998 (el mas largo intervalo de la actividad geomagnetica existente). Aplicando la tecnica del precursor hemos realizado un analisis de los periodos de tormentas y la actividad solar obteniendo una buena correlacion entre el numero de tormentas ({alpha}) (caracterizado por los indices AA*) y las amplitudes de los ciclos solares corriente ({zeta}) y el proximo ({mu}). Usando el metodo de regresion multiple aplicado a {alpha}=A+B{zeta} +C{mu}, las consonantes resultaron: A=-33 {+-}18, B= 0.74{+-}0.13 y C= 0.56{+-}0.13. El metodo estadistico presentado indica que el ciclo actual (numero 23) tendria un pico de 202{+-} 57 manchas mensuales promedio. Este valor indica que la actividad solar seria alta produciendo importantes efectos en el medio ambiente terrestre.

  6. Experimental investigation of thermal limits in parallel plate configuration for the future material testing reactor (JHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigitte Noel

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The design of the future material testing reactor, named Jules Horowitz Reactor and dedicated to technological irradiations, will allow very high performances. The JHR will be cooled and moderated by light water. The preliminary core of JHR consists of 46 assemblies, arranged in a triangular lattice inside a rectangular aluminium matrix. It is boarded on two sides by a beryllium reflector. The other two sides are left free in order to introduce mobile irradiation devices. The JHR assembly would be composed of 3 x 6 cylindrical fuel plates maintained by 3 stiffeners. The external diameter of the assembly is close to 8 cm with a 600 mm heated length, coolant channels having a 1.8 mm gap width. The JHR core must be designed to accommodate high power densities using a high coolant mass flux and sub-cooling level at moderate pressure. The JHR core configuration with multi-channels is subject to a potential excursive instability, called flow redistribution, and is distinguished from a true critical heat flux which would occur at a fixed channel flow rate. At thermal-hydraulic conditions applicable to the JHR, the availability of experimental data for both flow redistribution and CHF is very limited. Consequently, a thermal-hydraulic test facility (SULTAN-RJH) was designed and built in CEA-Grenoble to simulate a full-length coolant sub-channel representative of the JHR core, allowing determination of both thermal limits under relevant thermal hydraulics conditions. The SULTAN-RJH test section simulates a single sub-channel in the JHR core with a cross section corresponding to a mean span (∼50 mm) that has a full reactor length (600 mm), the same flow channel gap (1.5 mm) and Inconel plates of 1 mm thickness. The tests with light water flowing vertically upward will investigate a heat flux range of 0-7 MW/m 2 , velocity range of 0.6-18 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.2-1.0 MPa and inlet temperature range of 25-180 deg. C. The test section

  7. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys under Load-Biased Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garg, Anita; Gaydosh, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    While NiTiPd alloys have been extensively studied for proposed use in high-temperature shape-memory applications, little is known about the shape-memory response of these materials under stress. Consequently, the isobaric thermal cyclic responses of five (Ni,Pd)49.5Ti50.5 alloys with constant stoichiometry and Pd contents ranging from 15 to 46 at. pct were investigated. From these tests, transformation temperatures, transformation strain (which is proportional to work output), and unrecovered strain per cycle (a measure of dimensional instability) were determined as a function of stress for each alloy. It was found that increasing the Pd content over this range resulted in a linear increase in transformation temperature, as expected. At a given stress level, work output decreased while the amount of unrecovered strain produced during each load-biased thermal cycle increased with increasing Pd content, during the initial thermal cycles. However, continued thermal cycling at constant stress resulted in a saturation of the work output and nearly eliminated further unrecovered strain under certain conditions, resulting in stable behavior amenable to many actuator applications.

  8. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 158B/159A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walker, Billy Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 158B/159A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  9. The effect of aging by thermal cycling and mechanical brushing on resilient denture liner hardness and roughness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Caio; Mesquita, Marcelo Ferraz; Consani, Rafael Leonardo Xediek; Henriques, Guilherme Elias Pesanha

    2008-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of aging on resilient denture liners. The aging effects were produced by using thermal cycling and mechanical brushing and were quantified as changes to surface hardness and roughness of resilient denture liners. A plasticized acrylic resin (Dentuflex) and two silicone-based (Molloplast-B, Sofreliner MS) resilient denture liners were examined. Pre- and post-test roughness and hardness measurements were recorded using a Surfcorder SE 1700 and Shore A durometer Teclock GS-709, respectively. Sixty specimens were manufactured; half were subjected to 3000 cycles in the thermal cycler (5 and 55 degrees C). The remaining specimens received 30,000 strokes applied by a mechanical brushing machine followed by 3000 thermal cycles. Representative specimens from each group were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Data were examined by multiple ANOVA, split-plot analysis, and Tukey test (alpha= 0.05). Shore A hardness values for Dentuflex, Molloplast-B, and Sofreliner MS soft liners were different from each other (p 0.05) after tooth brushing (1.7 +/- 0.3; 1.7 +/- 0.4; 1.9 +/- 0.8) or thermocycling (1.6 +/- 0.5; 1.6 +/- 0.6; 1.5 +/- 0.5). Thermal cycling promoted increased hardness for Sofreliner MS and Dentuflex. Mechanical brushing promoted wear abrasion in Sofreliner MS and Dentuflex materials. Molloplast-B experienced no deleterious effects from either of the tests.

  10. Influence of thermal and mechanical cycling on the flexural strength of ceramics with titanium or gold alloy frameworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oyafuso, Denise Kanashiro; Ozcan, Mutlu; Bottino, Marco Antonio; Itinoche, Marcos Koiti

    Objectives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of thermal and mechanical cycling alone or in combination, on the flexural strength of ceramic and metallic frameworks cast in gold alloy or titanium. Methods. Metallic frameworks (25 mm x 3 mm x 0.5 mm) (N = 96) cast in gold alloy or

  11. Microstructural changes in HSLA-100 steel thermally cycled to simulate the heat-affected zone during welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanos, G.; Fonda, R. W.; Vandermeer, R. A.; Matuszeski, A.

    1995-12-01

    The microstructural changes that occur in a commercial HSLA-100 steel thermally cycled to simulate weld heat affected zone (HAZ) behavior were systematically investigated primarily by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Eight different weld thermal cycles, with peak temperatures representative of four HAZ regions (the tempered region, the intercritical region, the fine-grained austenitized region, and the coarse-grained austenitized region) and cooling rates characteristic of high heat input (cooling rate (CR) = 5 °C/s) and low heat input (CR = 60 °C/s) welding were simulated in a heating/quenching dilatometer. The as-received base plate consisted of heavily tempered lath martensite, acicular ferrite, and retained austenite matrix phases with precipitates of copper, niobiumcarbonitride, and cementite. The microstructural changes in both the matrix and precipitate phases due to thermal cycling were examined by TEM and correlated with the results of (1) conventional optical microscopy, (2) prior austenite grain size measurements, (3) microhardness testing, and (4) dilatometric analysis. Many of the thermal cycles resulted in dramatic changes in both the microstructures and the properties due to the synergistic interaction between the simulated position in the HAZ and the heat input. Some of these microstructures deviate substantially from those predicted from published continuous cooling transformation (CCT) curves. The final microstructure was predominantly dependent upon peak temperature (i.e., position within the HAZ), although the cooling rate (i.e., heat input) strongly affected the microstructures of the simulated intercritical and finegrained austenitized regions.

  12. Thermally moderated hollow fiber sorbent modules in rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption mode for hydrogen purification

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2012-10-01

    We describe thermally moderated multi-layered pseudo-monolithic hollow fiber sorbents entities, which can be packed into compact modules to provide small-footprint, efficient H2 purification/CO2 removal systems for use in on-site steam methane reformer product gas separations. Dual-layer hollow fibers are created via dry-jet, wet-quench spinning with an inner "active" core of cellulose acetate (porous binder) and zeolite NaY (69 wt% zeolite NaY) and an external sheath layer of pure cellulose acetate. The co-spun sheath layer reduces the surface porosity of the fiber and was used as a smooth coating surface for a poly(vinyl-alcohol) post-treatment, which reduced the gas permeance through the fiber sorbent by at least 7 orders of magnitude, essentially creating an impermeable sheath layer. The interstitial volume between the individual fibers was filled with a thermally-moderating paraffin wax. CO2 breakthrough experiments on the hollow fiber sorbent modules with and without paraffin wax revealed that the "passively" cooled paraffin wax module had 12.5% longer breakthrough times than the "non-isothermal" module. The latent heat of fusion/melting of the wax offsets the released latent heat of sorption/desorption of the zeolites. One-hundred rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption cycles were performed on the "passively" cooled hollow fiber sorbents using 25 vol% CO2/75 vol% He (H2 surrogate) at 60 °C and 113 psia, resulting in a product purity of 99.2% and a product recovery of 88.1% thus achieving process conditions and product quality comparable to conventional pellet processes. Isothermal and non-isothermal dynamic modeling of the hollow fiber sorbent module and a traditional packed bed using gPROMS® indicated that the fiber sorbents have sharper fronts (232% sharper) and longer adsorbate breakthrough times (66% longer), further confirming the applicability of the new fiber sorbent approach for H2 purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  13. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-01-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm−2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling. PMID:26928921

  14. Energy performance and economic evaluation of heat pump/organic rankine cycle system with sensible thermal storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, Carolina; Dumont, Olivier; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2016-01-01

    that consists of a ground-source heat pump with possibility of reversing operation as an ORC power cycle combined with solar heating in a single-family building is introduced. The ORC mode enables the use of solar energy in periods of no heat energy demand and reverses the heat pump cycle to supply electrical......The interaction between electrical and thermal energy demands represent a potential area for balancing supply and demand that could contribute to the integration of intermittent renewables in energy systems. To enable the interaction between thermal and electric energy, an innovative concept......-life conditions knowledge, the paper considers two different sensible energy storage (TES) configurations for the reversible heat pump/organic Rankine cycle (HP/ORC) system: a buffer tank for both space heating and domestic hot water and a hot water storage tank used exclusively for domestic hot water...

  15. Performance Evaluation of HP/ORC (Heat Pump/Organic Rankine Cycle) System with Optimal Control of Sensible Thermal Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Carmo, Carolina Madeira Ramos; Dumont, Olivier; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2016-01-01

    come to contribute to the integration of intermittent renewables.This paper describes an innovative concept that consists of the addition of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) to a combined solar system coupled to a ground-source heat pump (HP) in a single-family building. The ORC enables the use of solar...... energy in periods of no thermal energy demand and reverses the heat pump cycle to supply electrical power. A dynamic model based on empirical data of this system is used to determine the annual performance. Furthermore, this work assesses the benefits of different control strategies that address...... of the users. Results show that real load control logic can lessen the adverse effects of cycling in the compressor of the system as well as increase the thermal demand (up to 33%) and the electrical demand (max. 8.4%) covered by renewable energy (solar). However, the extension of these improvements is highly...

  16. Geographic divergence in upper thermal limits across insect life stages: does behavior matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Heidi J; Higgins, Jessica K; Buckley, Lauren B; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2016-05-01

    Insects with complex life cycles vary in size, mobility, and thermal ecology across life stages. We examine how differences in the capacity for thermoregulatory behavior influence geographic differences in physiological heat tolerance among egg and adult Colias butterflies. Colias adults exhibit differences in morphology (wing melanin and thoracic setal length) along spatial gradients, whereas eggs are morphologically indistinguishable. Here we compare Colias eriphyle eggs and adults from two elevations and Colias meadii from a high elevation. Hatching success and egg development time of C. eriphyle eggs did not differ significantly with the elevation of origin. Egg survival declined in response to heat-shock temperatures above 38-40 °C and egg development time was shortest at intermediate heat-shock temperatures of 33-38 °C. Laboratory experiments with adults showed survival in response to heat shock was significantly greater for Colias from higher than from lower elevation sites. Common-garden experiments at the low-elevation field site showed that C. meadii adults initiated heat-avoidance and over-heating behaviors significantly earlier in the day than C. eriphyle. Our study demonstrates the importance of examining thermal tolerances across life stages. Our findings are inconsistent with the hypothesis that thermoregulatory behavior inhibits the geographic divergence of physiological traits in mobile stages, and suggest that sessile stages may evolve similar heat tolerances in different environments due to microclimatic variability or evolutionary constraints.

  17. Coronal Rain in Magnetic Arcades: Rebound Shocks, Limit Cycles, and Shear Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, X.; Xia, C.; Keppens, R.; Van Doorsselaere, T.

    2015-07-01

    We extend our earlier multidimensional, magnetohydrodynamic simulations of coronal rain occurring in magnetic arcades with higher resolution, grid-adaptive computations covering a much longer (>6 hr) time span. We quantify how blob-like condensations forming in situ grow along and across field lines and show that rain showers can occur in limit cycles, here demonstrated for the first time in 2.5D setups. We discuss dynamical, multi-dimensional aspects of the rebound shocks generated by the siphon inflows and quantify the thermodynamics of a prominence-corona transition-region-like structure surrounding the blobs. We point out the correlation between condensation rates and the cross-sectional size of loop systems where catastrophic cooling takes place. We also study the variations of the typical number density, kinetic energy, and temperature while blobs descend, impact, and sink into the transition region. In addition, we explain the mechanisms leading to concurrent upflows while the blobs descend. As a result, there are plenty of shear flows generated with relative velocity difference around 80 km s-1 in our simulations. These shear flows are siphon flows set up by multiple blob dynamics and they in turn affect the deformation of the falling blobs. In particular, we show how shear flows can break apart blobs into smaller fragments, within minutes.

  18. Vortex-induced vibration of a tension leg platform tendon: Multi-mode limit cycle oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Nabanita

    2017-12-01

    This paper studies the application of mathematical models to analyze the vortex-induced vibrations of the tendons of a given TLP along the Indian coastline, by using an analytical approach, analyzed using MATLAB. The tendon is subjected to a steady current load, which causes vortex-shedding downstream, leading to cross-flow vibrations. The magnitude of the excitation (lift and drag coefficients) depends on the vortex-shedding frequency. The resulting vibration is studied for possible resonant behavior. The excitation force is quantified empirically, the added mass by potential flow hydrodynamics, and the vibration by normal mode summation method. Non-linear viscous damping of the water is considered. The non-linear oscillations are studied by the phase-plane method, investigating the limit-cycle oscillations. The stable/unstable regions of the dynamic behavior are demarcated. The modal contribution to the total deflection is studied to establish the possibility of resonance of one of the wet modes with the vortex-shedding frequency.

  19. Power harvesting by electromagnetic coupling from wind-induced limit cycle oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalero, G.; Olivieri, S.; Mazzino, A.; Boragno, C.

    2017-09-01

    Recent developments of low-power microprocessors open to new applications such as wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the consequent problem of autonomous powering. For this purpose, a possible strategy is represented by energy harvesting from wind or other flows exploiting fluid-structure interactions. In this work, we present an updated picture of a flutter-based device characterized by fully passive dynamics and a simple constructive layout, where limit cycle oscillations are undergone by an elastically bounded wing. In this case, the conversion from mechanical to electrical energy is performed by means of an electromagnetic coupling between a pair of coils and magnets. A centimetric-size prototype is shown to harvest energy from low wind velocities (between 2 and 4 m s-1), reaching a power peak of 14 mW, representing a valuable amount for applications related to WSN. A mathematical description of the nonlinear dynamics is then provided by a quasi-steady phenomenological model, revealing satisfactory agreement with the experimental framework within a certain parametric range and representing a useful tool for future optimizations.

  20. Transient thermal model of passenger car's cabin and implementation to saturation cycle with alternative working fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hoseong; Hwang, Yunho; Song, Ilguk; Jang, Kilsang

    2015-01-01

    A transient thermal model of a passenger car's cabin is developed to investigate the dynamic behavior of cabin thermal conditions. The model is developed based on a lumped-parameter model and solved using integral methods. Solar radiation, engine heat through the firewall, and engine heat to the air ducts are all considered. Using the thermal model, transient temperature profiles of the interior mass and cabin air are obtained. This model is used to investigate the transient behavior of the cabin under various operating conditions: the recirculation mode in the idling state, the fresh air mode in the idling state, the recirculation mode in the driving state, and fresh air mode in the driving state. The developed model is validated by comparing with experimental data and is within 5% of deviation. The validated model is then applied for evaluating the mobile air conditioning system's design. The study found that a saturation cycle concept (four-stage cycle with two-phase refrigerant injection) could improve the system efficiency by 23.9% and reduce the power consumption by 19.3%. Lastly, several alternative refrigerants are applied and their performance is discussed. When the saturation cycle concept is applied, R1234yf MAC (mobile air conditioning) shows the largest COP (coefficient of performance) improvement and power consumption reduction. - Highlights: • The transient thermal model of the passenger car cabin is developed. • The developed model is validated with experimental data and showed 5% deviation. • Saturation cycle concept is applied to the developed cabin model. • There is 24% COP improvement by applying the saturation cycle concept. • R1234yf showed the highest potential when it is applied to the saturation cycle.

  1. Multi-parameter fibre Bragg grating sensor-array for thermal vacuum cycling test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L.; Ahlers, B.; Toet, P.; Casarosa, G.; Appolloni, M.

    2017-11-01

    strain transducer to generate strain via a dedicated feed through in the chamber. Thermocouples are used to log the temperature for comparison to the temperature FBG sensor. Extreme temperature ranges from -150°C and +70°C at a pressure down to 10-4 Pa (10-6 mbar) are covered as well as testing under ambient conditions. In total five thermal cycles during a week test are performed. The FBG temperature sensor test results performed in the ESA/ESTEC TV chamber reveal high reproducibility (within 1 °C) within the test temperature range without any evidence of hysteresis. Differences are detected to the previous calibration curve. Investigation is performed to find the cause of the discrepancy. Differences between the test set-ups are identified. Equipment of the TNO test is checked and excluded to be the cause. Additional experiments are performed. The discrepancy is most likely caused by a 'thermal shock' due to rapid cooling down to LN2 temperature, which results in a wavelength shift. Test data of the FBG strain sensor is analysed. The read-out of the FBG strain sensor varies with the temperature during the test. This can be caused by temperature induced changes in the mechanical setup (fastening of the mechanical parts) or impact of temperature to the mechanical strain transfer to the FBG. Improvements are identified and recommendations given for future activities.

  2. Resistance to radiation and concretes thermal cycles for conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez N, M.; Monroy G, F.; Gonzalez D, R. C.; Corona P, I. J.; Ortiz A, G.

    2014-10-01

    In order to know the concrete type most suitable for use as a matrix of conditioning of spent radioactive sources, concrete test tubes using 4 different types of cement were prepared: CPC 30-Rs Extra, CPC 30-R Impercem, CPC 30-R Rs and CPC 30-R with two gravel sizes >30 mm and <10 mm. The concrete test tubes were subjected to testing compressive strength after 28 days of hardening and after being irradiated and subjected to thermal cycles. Subsequently they were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, in order to evaluate whether these concretes accredited the tests set by the NOM-019-Nucl-1995. The results show that the compressive strength of the hardened concretes to 28 days presents values between 36 and 25 MPa; applying irradiation the resistance may decrease to 30% of its original strength; and if subjected to high and low temperatures the ettringite formation also causes a decrease in resistance. The results show that concretes made from cement Impercem, Cruz Azul with gravel <10 mm comply with the provisions of standard and they can be used for conditioning of spent radioactive sources. (Author)

  3. Fiber-reinforced composite analysis using optical coherence tomography after mechanical and thermal cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyotoku, B. B. C.; Braz, A. K. S.; Braz, R.; Gomes, A. S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are new materials which have been used for a variety of dental applications, including tooth splinting, replacement of missing teeth, treatment of dental emergencies, reinforcement of resin provisional fixed prosthodontic restorations, orthodontic retention, and other clinical applications. Different fiber types are available, but little clinical information has been disseminated. The traditional microscopy investigation, most commonly used to study this material, is a destructive technique, which requires specimen sectioning and are essentially surface measurements. On the basis of these considerations, the aim of this research is to analyze the interior of a dental sample reinforced with fiber after a mechanical and thermal cycling to emulate oral conditions using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The device we are using is a home built Fourier domain OCT working at 800 nm with 6 μm resolution. The results are compared with microscopy images to validate OCT as a working method. In long term, fractures allow bacterial invasion provoking plaque and calculus formation that can cause caries and periodontal disease. Therefore, non invasive imaging of the bridge fiber enables the possibility of periodic clinical evaluation to ensure the patient health. Furthermore, OCT images can provide a powerful method for quantitative analysis of crack propagation, and can potentially be used for in vivo assessment.

  4. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  5. Investigation of relation between singular points and number of limit cycles for a rotor-AMBs system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Tian, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between singular points and the number of limit cycles is investigated for a rotor-active magnetic bearings system with time-varying stiffness and single-degree-of-freedom. The averaged equation of the system is a perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. The dynamic characteristics of the unperturbed system are first analyzed for a certain parameter group. The number of limit cycles and their configurations of the perturbed system under eight different parametric groups are obtained and the influence of eight control conditions on the number of limit cycles is studied. The results obtained here will play an important leading role in the study of the properties of nonlinear dynamics and control of the rotor-active magnetic bearings system with time-varying stiffness.

  6. Limitations of toxicity characterization in life cycle assessment: Can adverse outcome pathways provide a new foundation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gust, Kurt A; Collier, Zachary A; Mayo, Michael L; Stanley, Jacob K; Gong, Ping; Chappell, Mark A

    2016-07-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) has considerable merit for holistic evaluation of product planning, development, production, and disposal, with the inherent benefit of providing a forecast of potential health and environmental impacts. However, a technical review of current life cycle impact assessment (LCIA) methods revealed limitations within the biological effects assessment protocols, including: simplistic assessment approaches and models; an inability to integrate emerging types of toxicity data; a reliance on linear impact assessment models; a lack of methods to mitigate uncertainty; and no explicit consideration of effects in species of concern. The purpose of the current study is to demonstrate that a new concept in toxicological and regulatory assessment, the adverse outcome pathway (AOP), has many useful attributes of potential use to ameliorate many of these problems, to expand data utility and model robustness, and to enable more accurate and defensible biological effects assessments within LCIA. Background, context, and examples have been provided to demonstrate these potential benefits. We additionally propose that these benefits can be most effectively realized through development of quantitative AOPs (qAOPs) crafted to meet the needs of the LCIA framework. As a means to stimulate qAOP research and development in support of LCIA, we propose 3 conceptual classes of qAOP, each with unique inherent attributes for supporting LCIA: 1) mechanistic, including computational toxicology models; 2) probabilistic, including Bayesian networks and supervised machine learning models; and 3) weight of evidence, including models built using decision-analytic methods. Overall, we have highlighted a number of potential applications of qAOPs that can refine and add value to LCIA. As the AOP concept and support framework matures, we see the potential for qAOPs to serve a foundational role for next-generation effects characterization within LCIA. Integr Environ Assess Manag

  7. Thermal diffusivity and adiabatic limit temperature characterization of consolidate granular expanded perlite using the flash method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raefat, Saad; Garoum, Mohammed; Laaroussi, Najma; Thiam, Macodou; Amarray, Khaoula

    2017-07-01

    In this work experimental investigation of apparent thermal diffusivity and adiabatic limit temperature of expanded granular perlite mixes has been made using the flash technic. Perlite granulates were sieved to produce essentially three characteristic grain sizes. The consolidated samples were manufactured by mixing controlled proportions of the plaster and water. The effect of the particle size on the diffusivity was examined. The inverse estimation of the diffusivity and the adiabatic limit temperature at the rear face as well as the heat losses coefficients were performed using several numerical global minimization procedures. The function to be minimized is the quadratic distance between the experimental temperature rise at the rear face and the analytical model derived from the one dimension heat conduction. It is shown that, for all granulometry tested, the estimated parameters lead to a good agreement between the mathematical model and experimental data.

  8. Phenotypic variance, plasticity and heritability estimates of critical thermal limits depend on methodological context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chown, Steven L.; Jumbam, Keafon R.; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2009-01-01

    used during assessments of critical thermal limits to activity. To date, the focus of work has almost exclusively been on the effects of rate variation on mean values of the critical limits. 2.  If the rate of temperature change used in an experimental trial affects not only the trait mean but also its...... variance, estimates of heritable variation would also be profoundly affected. Moreover, if the outcomes of acclimation are likewise affected by methodological approach, assessment of beneficial acclimation and other hypotheses might also be compromised. 3.  In this article, we determined whether...... of temperature change resulted in different phenotypic variances and different estimates of heritability, presuming that genetic variance remains constant. We also found that different rates resulted in different conclusions regarding the responses of the species to acclimation, especially in the case of L...

  9. Near-thermal limit gating in heavily doped III-V semiconductor nanowires using polymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, A. R.; Carrad, D. J.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygârd, J.; Micolich, A. P.

    2018-02-01

    Doping is a common route to reducing nanowire transistor on-resistance but it has limits. A high doping level gives significant loss in gate performance and ultimately complete gate failure. We show that electrolyte gating remains effective even when the Be doping in our GaAs nanowires is so high that traditional metal-oxide gates fail. In this regime we obtain a combination of subthreshold swing and contact resistance that surpasses the best existing p -type nanowire metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Our subthreshold swing of 75 mV/dec is within 25 % of the room-temperature thermal limit and comparable with n -InP and n -GaAs nanowire MOSFETs. Our results open a new path to extending the performance and application of nanowire transistors, and motivate further work on improved solid electrolytes for nanoscale device applications.

  10. Physiological performance of warm-adapted marine ectotherms: Thermal limits of mitochondrial energy transduction efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Eloy; Hendricks, Eric; Menze, Michael A; Torres, Joseph J

    2016-01-01

    Thermal regimes in aquatic systems have profound implications for the physiology of ectotherms. In particular, the effect of elevated temperatures on mitochondrial energy transduction in tropical and subtropical teleosts may have profound consequences on organismal performance and population viability. Upper and lower whole-organism critical temperatures for teleosts suggest that subtropical and tropical species are not susceptible to the warming trends associated with climate change, but sub-lethal effects on energy transduction efficiency and population dynamics remain unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the thermal sensitivity of processes associated with mitochondrial energy transduction in liver mitochondria from the striped mojarra (Eugerres plumieri), the whitemouth croaker (Micropogonias furnieri) and the palometa (Trachinotus goodei), to those of the subtropical pinfish (Lagodon rhomboides) and the blue runner (Caranx crysos). Mitochondrial function was assayed at temperatures ranging from 10 to 40°C and results obtained for both tropical and subtropical species showed a reduction in the energy transduction efficiency of the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) system in most species studied at temperatures below whole-organism critical temperature thresholds. Our results show a loss of coupling between O2 consumption and ATP production before the onset of the critical thermal maxima, indicating that elevated temperature may severely impact the yield of ATP production per carbon unit oxidized. As warming trends are projected for tropical regions, increasing water temperatures in tropical estuaries and coral reefs could impact long-term growth and reproductive performance in tropical organisms, which are already close to their upper thermal limit. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Assessment of Accrued Damage and Remaining Useful Life in Leadfree Electronics Subjected to Multiple Thermal Environments of Thermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method has been developed for prognostication of accrued prior damage in electronics subjected to overlapping sequential environments of thermal aging and thermal...

  12. Thermal cycling in LWR components in OECD-NEA member countries - CSNI integrity and ageing working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faidy, Claude; Chapuliot, Stephane; Mathet, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Thermal cycling is a widespread and recurring problem in nuclear power plants worldwide. Several incidents with leakage of primary water inside the containment challenged the integrity of NPPs although no release outside of containment occurred. Thermal cycling was not taken into account at the design stage. Regulatory bodies, utilities and researchers have to address it for their operating plants. It is a complex phenomenon that involves and links thermal hydraulic, fracture mechanic, materials and plant operation. Thermal cycling is connected either to operating transients (low cycle fatigue) or to complex phenomenon like stratification, vortex and mixing (low and high cycle fatigue). The former is covered by existing rules and codes. The latter is partially addressed by national rules and constitutes the subject of this report. In 2002, the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) requested the working group on the integrity of reactor components and structures (IAGE WG) to prepare a program of work on thermal cycling to provide information to NEA member countries on operational experience, regulatory policies, countermeasures in place, current status of research and development, and to identify areas where research is needed both at national and international levels. The working group proposed a 3 fold program that covered: - Review of operating experience, regulatory framework, countermeasures and current research; - Benchmark to assess calculation capabilities in NEA member countries for crack initiation and propagation under a cyclic thermal loading, and ultimately to develop screening criteria to identify susceptible components; results of the benchmark were published in 2005; - Organisation of an international conference in cooperation with the EPRI and the USNRC on fatigue of reactor components. This conference reviews progress in the areas and provides a forum for discussion and exchange of information between high level experts. The

  13. Effect of thermal cycling of SiC{sub f}/SiC composites on their mechanical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Udayakumar, A., E-mail: audayk@yahoo.com [Materials Science Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research – National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore-560 017 (India); Stalin, M.; Abhayalakshmi, M.B.; Hariharan, Ramya [Materials Science Division, Council of Scientific and Industrial Research – National Aerospace Laboratories, Bangalore-560 017 (India); Balasubramanian, M., E-mail: mbala@iitm.ac.in [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Madras, Chennai-600 036 (India)

    2013-11-15

    SiC{sub f}/SiC composites are class of high temperature structural materials being developed for use in nuclear fusion and fission reactor systems because of their superior high temperature mechanical properties, low radiation damage and low induced radioactivity. Two types of 2D SiC{sub f}/SiC composites were made through isothermal and isobaric chemical vapor infiltration process using eight harness satin-woven ceramic-grades Nicalon™ fibers with boron nitride (BN) interface, namely: one with lower interface thickness and a second type with higher interface thickness. The BN interface was applied to the fiber prior to SiC matrix addition to modify the interfacial bond strength leading to better toughness and improved oxidation resistance. The density achieved was around 2.6 g/cc. The composite specimens were subjected to thermal cycling treatment using an in-house furnace. The mechanical properties such as tensile strength, fracture toughness and interfacial bond strength were also studied for all the composites before and after thermal cycling. It is seen from the results that both composites withstood thermal shocks and thermal cycling treatment. It was also concluded from the present work that good balance between load transfer and crack arresting was established.

  14. Effect of Regenerative Organic Rankine Cycle (RORC on the Performance of Solar Thermal Power in Yogyakarta, Indonesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghalya Pikra

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents effect of Regenerative Organic Rankine Cycle (RORC on the performance of solar thermal power in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. Solar thermal power is a plant that uses solar energy as heat source. Indonesia has high humidity level, so that parabolic trough is the most suitable type of solar thermal power technology to be developed, where the design is made with small focal distance. Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC is a Rankine cycle that use organic fluid as working fluid to utilize low temperature heat sources. RORC is used to increase ORC performance. The analysis was done by comparing ORC system with and without regenerator addition. Refrigerant that be used in the analysis is R123. Preliminary data was taken from the solar collector system that has been installed in Yogyakarta. The analysis shows that with 36 m total parabolic length, the resulting solar collector capacity is 63 kW, heat input/evaporator capacity is determined 26.78 kW and turbine power is 3.11 kW for ORC, and 3.38 kW for RORC. ORC thermal efficiency is 11.28% and RORC is 12.26%. Overall electricity efficiency is 4.93% for ORC, and 5.36% for RORC. With 40°C condensing temperature and evaporation at 10 bar saturated condition, efficiency of RORC is higher than ORC. Greater evaporation temperature at the same pressure (10 bar provide greater turbine power and efficiency.

  15. Internal cycling, not external loading, decides the nutrient limitation in eutrophic lake: A dynamic model with temporal Bayesian hierarchical inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen; Liu, Yong; Liang, Zhongyao; Wu, Sifeng; Guo, Huaicheng

    2017-06-01

    Lake eutrophication is associated with excessive anthropogenic nutrients (mainly nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) and unobserved internal nutrient cycling. Despite the advances in understanding the role of external loadings, the contribution of internal nutrient cycling is still an open question. A dynamic mass-balance model was developed to simulate and measure the contributions of internal cycling and external loading. It was based on the temporal Bayesian Hierarchical Framework (BHM), where we explored the seasonal patterns in the dynamics of nutrient cycling processes and the limitation of N and P on phytoplankton growth in hyper-eutrophic Lake Dianchi, China. The dynamic patterns of the five state variables (Chla, TP, ammonia, nitrate and organic N) were simulated based on the model. Five parameters (algae growth rate, sediment exchange rate of N and P, nitrification rate and denitrification rate) were estimated based on BHM. The model provided a good fit to observations. Our model results highlighted the role of internal cycling of N and P in Lake Dianchi. The internal cycling processes contributed more than external loading to the N and P changes in the water column. Further insights into the nutrient limitation analysis indicated that the sediment exchange of P determined the P limitation. Allowing for the contribution of denitrification to N removal, N was the more limiting nutrient in most of the time, however, P was the more important nutrient for eutrophication management. For Lake Dianchi, it would not be possible to recover solely by reducing the external watershed nutrient load; the mechanisms of internal cycling should also be considered as an approach to inhibit the release of sediments and to enhance denitrification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Use of polyethylene glycol for the improvement of the cycling stability of bischofite as thermal energy storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Andrea; Ushak, Svetlana; Galleguillos, Hector; Fernandez, Angel; Cabeza, Luisa F.; Grágeda, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Bischofite as phase change material for TES is studied. • Thermophysical properties of bischofite mixtures with PEG were determined. • The aim was to improve the cycling stability of bischofite. • The heating and cooling during 30 cycles were measured. • The most stable sample was bischofite + 5% PEG 2 000. - Abstract: Bischofite is a by-product of the non-metallic mining industry. It has been evaluated as phase change material in thermal energy storage, but it shows little cycling stability, therefore in this paper the mixture of bischofite with an additive was studied. Since polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a PCM itself, in this paper PEG (with different molecular weights) is used as additive in a PCM (bischofite) to improve its thermal behaviour. Results show that adding 5% PEG 2 000 to bischofite gives a more cycling stable PCM without affecting its melting temperature neither decreasing significantly its heat of fusion. This research shows that mixing an inorganic PCM with an organic additive can be a good option to improve the thermal performance of the PCM

  17. The interrelationship between the lower oxygen limit, chlorophyll fluorescence and the xanthophyll cycle in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A Harrison; DeLong, John M; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N; Prange, Robert K

    2011-03-01

    The lower oxygen limit (LOL) in plants may be identified through the measure of respiratory gases [i.e. the anaerobic compensation point (ACP) or the respiratory quotient breakpoint (RQB)], but recent work shows it may also be identified by a sudden rise in dark minimum fluorescence (F(o)). The interrelationship between aerobic respiration and fermentative metabolism, which occur in the mitochondria and cytosol, respectively, and fluorescence, which emanates from the chloroplasts, is not well documented in the literature. Using spinach (Spinacia oleracea), this study showed that F(o) and photochemical quenching (q(P)) remained relatively unchanged until O(2) levels dropped below the LOL. An over-reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool is believed to increase F(o) under dark + anoxic conditions. It is proposed that excess cytosolic reductant due to inhibition of the mitochondria's cytochrome oxidase under low-O(2), may be the primary reductant source. The maximum fluorescence (F(m)) is largely unaffected by low-O(2) in the dark, but was severely quenched, mirroring changes to the xanthophyll de-epoxidation state (DEPS), under even low-intensity light (≈4 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). In low light, the low-O(2)-induced increase in F(o) was also quenched, likely by non-photochemical and photochemical means. The degree of quenching in the light was negatively correlated with the level of ethanol fermentation in the dark. A discussion detailing the possible roles of cyclic electron flow, the xanthophyll cycle, chlororespiration and a pathway we termed 'chlorofermentation' were used to interpret fluorescence phenomena of both spinach and apple (Malus domestica) over a range of atmospheric conditions under both dark and low-light.

  18. The hype cycle in 3D displays: inherent limits of autostereoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2013-06-01

    Since a couple of years, a renaissance of 3dimensional cinema can be observed. Even though the stereoscopy was quite popular within the last 150 years, the 3d cinema has disappeared and re-established itself several times. The first boom in the late 19th century stagnated and vanished after a few years of success, the same happened again in 50's and 80's of the 20th century. With the commercial success of the 3d blockbuster "Avatar" in 2009, at the latest, it is obvious that the 3d cinema is having a comeback. How long will it last this time? There are already some signs of a declining interest in 3d movies, as the discrepancy between expectations and the results delivered becomes more evident. From the former hypes it is known: After an initial phase of curiosity (high expectations and excessive fault tolerance), a phase of frustration and saturation (critical analysis and subsequent disappointment) will follow. This phenomenon is known as "Hype Cycle" The everyday experienced evolution of technology has conditioned the consumers. The expectation "any technical improvement will preserve all previous properties" cannot be fulfilled with present 3d technologies. This is an inherent problem of stereoscopy and autostereoscopy: The presentation of an additional dimension caused concessions in relevant characteristics (i.e. resolution, brightness, frequency, viewing area) or leads to undesirable physical side effects (i.e. subjective discomfort, eye strain, spatial disorientation, feeling of nausea). It will be verified that the 3d apparatus (3d glasses or 3d display) is also the source for these restrictions and a reason for decreasing fascination. The limitations of present autostereoscopic technologies will be explained.

  19. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Fatigue life under cyclic thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The number of cycles to failure of specimens in fatigue tests can be estimated by predicting crack growth. Under a cyclic thermal stress caused by fluctuation of fluid temperature, due to the stress gradient in the thickness direction, the estimated fatigue life differs from that estimated for mechanical fatigue tests. In this paper, the influence of crack growth under cyclic thermal loading on the fatigue life was investigated. First, the thermal stress was derived by superposing analytical solutions, and then, the stress intensity factor was obtained by the weight function method. It was shown that the thermal stress depended not on the rate of the fluid temperature change but on the rise time, and the magnitude of the stress was increased as the rise time was decreased. The stress intensity factor under the cyclic thermal stress was smaller than that under the uniform stress distribution. The change in the stress intensity factor with the crack depth was almost the same regardless of the rise time. The estimated fatigue life under the cyclic thermal loading could be 1.6 times longer than that under the uniform stress distribution. The critical size for the fatigue life determination was assumed to be 3 mm for fatigue test specimens of 10 mm diameter. By evaluating the critical size by structural integrity analyses, the fatigue life was increased and the effect of the critical size on the fatigue life was more pronounced for the cyclic thermal stress. (author)

  20. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Fatigue life under cyclic thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The number of cycles to failure of specimens in fatigue tests can be estimated by predicting crack growth. Under a cyclic thermal stress caused by fluctuation of fluid temperature, due to the stress gradient in the thickness direction, the estimated fatigue life differs from that estimated for mechanical fatigue tests. In this paper, the influence of crack growth under cyclic thermal loading on the fatigue life was investigated. First, the thermal stress was derived by superposing analytical solutions, and then, the stress intensity factor was obtained by the weight function method. It was shown that the thermal stress depended not on the rate of the fluid temperature change but on the rise time, and the magnitude of the stress was increased as the rise time was decreased. The stress intensity factor under the cyclic thermal stress was smaller than that under the uniform stress distribution. The change in the stress intensity factor with the crack depth did not depend on the heat transfer coefficient and only slightly depended on the rise time. The estimated fatigue life under the cyclic thermal loading could be 1.6 times longer than that under the uniform stress distribution. The critical size for the fatigue life determination was assumed to be 3 mm for fatigue test specimens of 10 mm diameter. By evaluating the critical size by structural integrity analyses, the fatigue life was increased and the effect of the critical size on the fatigue life was more pronounced for the cyclic thermal stress. (author)

  1. Global Carbon Cycle Perturbations and Implications for Arctic Hydrology during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Kump, L.; Diefendorf, A. F.; Freeman, K. H.

    2011-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM; ca. 55.9 Ma) was an interval of geologically abrupt global warming lasting ~200 ka. It has been proposed as an ancient analogue for future climate response to CO2 emission from fossil fuel burning. The onset of this event is fueled by a large release of 13C-depleted carbon into the ocean-atmosphere system. However, there is a large discrepancy in the magnitude of the carbon isotope excursion (CIE) between marine and terrestrial records. Here we present new organic geochemical data and stable carbon isotope records from n-alkanes and pristane extracted from core materials representing the most expanded PETM section yet recovered from a nearshore marine early Cenozoic succession from Spitsbergen. The low hydrogen index and oxygen index indicate that organic matter has been thermally altered, consistent with n-alkanes that do not show a clear odd-over-even predominance as reflected by the low and constant carbon preference index. The δ13C records of long chain n-alkanes from core BH9-05 track the δ13C recorded in total organic carbon, but are ~3% more negative prior to the CIE, ~4.5% more negative during the CIE, and ~4% more negative after the CIE. An orbital age model derived from the same core suggests the CIE from n-alkanes appears more abruptly onset than the bulk organic carbon, indicating possibly climate-induced modification to the observed feature in n-alkanes. In addition, the carbon isotope values of individual long-chain (n-C27 to n-C31) n-alkanes tend to become less negative with increasing chain length resulting in the smallest magnitude CIEs in longer chain lengths (i.e. n-C31) and the largest magnitude CIEs in shorter chain lengths (i.e. n-C27). We are currently considering the effect of plant community and paleoclimate on the observed pattern of CIE in n-alkanes to evaluate carbon cycle perturbations and Arctic hydrology changes during the PETM. One interpretation of these patterns is that there was an

  2. The Menstrual Cycle Influences Emotion but Has Limited Effect on Cognitive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2018-01-01

    From a psychological perspective, the menstrual cycle has been a research topic for more than 50 years. The most recent menstrual cycle research has been driven by an increased interest in sex differences in neuroscience, and the urge to understand sex disparities in prevalence, clinical presentation, and treatment response in psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Indeed, the menstrual cycle is an excellent model of ovarian steroid influence on emotion, behavior, and cognition. This review summarizes the emotion-related and cognitive findings of methodologically sound menstrual cycle studies. In particular, the review is devoted to the sex hormone-induced emotional disturbances in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder, a subgroup of women responding with enhanced sensitivity to the normal fluctuations in endogenous hormone levels during the menstrual cycle. In addition, emotion processing and cognitive findings across the menstrual cycle in healthy women are also discussed. The overall conclusion is that that menstrual cycle differences in sexually dimorphic cognitive tasks are small and difficult to replicate. Emotion-related changes are more consistently found and are better associated with progesterone and the luteal phase, than with estradiol. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Seasonality in swimming and cycling: Exploring a limitation of accelerometer based studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flo Harrison

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accelerometer-based studies of children's physical activity have reported seasonal patterns in activity levels. However, the inability of many accelerometers to detect activity while the wearer is swimming or cycling may introduce a bias to the estimation of seasonality if participation in these activities are themselves seasonally patterned. We explore seasonal patterns in children's swimming and cycling among a sample of 7–8 year olds (N = 591 participating in the Millennium Cohort Study, UK. Participating children wore an accelerometer for one week on up to five occasions over the year and their parents completed a diary recording daily minutes spent swimming and cycling. Both swimming and cycling participation showed seasonal patterns, with 2.7 (SE 0.8 more minutes swimming and 5.7 (0.7 more minutes cycling performed in summer compared to winter. Adding swimming and cycling time to accelerometer-determined MVPA increased the summer-winter difference in MVPA from 16.6 (1.6 to 24.9 min. The seasonal trend in swimming and cycling appears to follow the same pattern as accelerometer-measured MVPA. Studies relying solely on accelerometers may therefore underestimate seasonal differences in children's activity.

  4. Life cycle assessment as a method of limitation of a negative environment impact of castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Casting production constitutes environmental problems going far beyond the foundry plant area. Applying a notion of the life cycle the input (suppliers side and output factors (clients side can be identified. The foundry plant activities for the environment hazard mitigation can be situated on various stages of the casting life cycle. The environment impact of motorisation castings made of different materials – during the whole life cycle of castings – are discussed in the paper. It starts from the charge material production, then follows via the casting process, car assembly, car exploitation and ends at the car breaking up for scrap.

  5. The Influence of Thermal Cycles on the Microstructure of Grade 92 Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, X.; West, G. D.; Siefert, J. A.; Parker, J. D.; Thomson, R. C.

    2017-11-01

    The microstructure in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of welds made from the 9 wt pct chromium martensitic Grade 92 steel is complex and has not yet been completely understood. There is a lack of systematic microstructural investigations to define the different regions of the microstructure across the HAZ of Grade 92 steel welds as a function of the welding process. In this study, the microstructure in the HAZ of an as-fabricated single-pass bead-on-plate weld on a parent metal of Grade 92 steel was systematically investigated by using an extensive range of electron and ion-microscopy-based techniques. A dilatometer was used to apply controlled thermal cycles to simulate the microstructures in the different regions of the HAZ. A wide range of microstructural properties in the simulated materials were then characterized and compared with the experimental observations from the weld HAZ. It was found that the microstructure in the HAZ of a single-pass Grade 92 steel weld can be categorized as a function of a decreasing peak temperature reached as (1) the completely transformed (CT) region, in which the original matrix is completely reaustenitized with complete dissolution of the pre-existing secondary precipitate particles; (2) the partially transformed (PT) region, where the original matrix is partially reaustenitized along with a partial dissolution of the secondary precipitate particles from the original matrix; and (3) the overtempered (OT) region, where the pre-existing precipitate particles coarsen. The PT region is considered to be the susceptible area for damage in the commonly reported HAZ failures in weldments constructed from these types of steels.

  6. Modeling the small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Willem G.; Meyer, Josua P.

    2016-05-01

    The small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle (STBC) makes use of a sun-tracking dish reflector, solar receiver, recuperator and micro-turbine to generate power in the range of 1-20 kW. The modeling of such a system, using a turbocharger as micro-turbine, is required so that optimisation and further development of an experimental setup can be done. As a validation, an analytical model of the small-scale STBC in Matlab, where the net power output is determined from an exergy analysis, is compared with Flownex, an integrated systems CFD code. A 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish with open-cavity tubular receiver and plate-type counterflow recuperator is considered, based on previous work. A dish optical error of 10 mrad, a tracking error of 1° and a receiver aperture area of 0.25 m × 0.25 m are considered. Since the recuperator operates at a very high average temperature, the recuperator is modeled using an updated ɛ-NTU method which takes heat loss to the environment into consideration. Compressor and turbine maps from standard off-the-shelf Garrett turbochargers are used. The results show that for the calculation of the steady-state temperatures and pressures, there is good comparison between the Matlab and Flownex results (within 8%) except for the recuperator outlet temperature, which is due to the use of different ɛ-NTU methods. With the use of Matlab and Flownex, it is shown that the small-scale open STBC with an existing off-the-shelf turbocharger could generate a positive net power output with solar-to-mechanical efficiency of up to 12%, with much room for improvement.

  7. Elastic modulus and thermal stress in coating during heat cycling with different substrate shapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaona, Daniel; Valarezo, Alfredo

    2015-09-01

    The elastic modulus of a deposit ( E d) can be obtained by monitoring the temperature (Δ T) and curvature (Δ k) of a one-side coated long plate, namely, a onedimensional (1D) deformation model. The aim of this research is to design an experimental setup that proves whether a 1D deformation model can be scaled for complex geometries. The setup includes a laser displacement sensor mounted on a robotic arm capable of scanning a specimen surface and measuring its deformation. The reproducibility of the results is verified by comparing the present results with Stony Brook University Laboratory's results. The Δ k-Δ T slope error is less than 8%, and the E d estimation error is close to 2%. These values reveal the repeatability of the experiments. Several samples fabricated with aluminum as the substrate and 100MXC nanowire (Fe and Cr alloy) as the deposit are analyzed and compared with those in finite element (FE) simulations. The linear elastic behavior of 1D (flat long plate) and 2D (squared plate) specimens during heating/cooling cycles is demonstrated by the high linearity of all Δ k-Δ T curves (over 97%). The E d values are approximately equal for 1D and 2D analyses, with a median of 96 GPa and standard deviation of 2 GPa. The correspondence between the experimental and simulated results for the 1D and 2D specimens reveals that deformation and thermal stress in coated specimens can be predicted regardless of specimen geometry through FE modeling and by using the experimental value of E d. An example of a turbine-bladeshaped substrate is presented to validate the approach.

  8. Effects of vacuum thermal cycling on mechanical and physical properties of high performance carbon/bismaleimide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qi; Chen Ping; Gao Yu; Mu Jujie; Chen Yongwu; Lu Chun; Liu Dong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The level of cross-links was improved to a certain extent. → The thermal stability was firstly improved and then decreased. → The transverse and longitudinal CTE were both determined by the degree of interfacial debonding. → The mass loss ratio increases firstly and then reaches a plateau value. → The surface morphology was altered and the surface roughness increased firstly and then decreased. → The transverse tensile strength was reduced. → The flexural strength increased firstly and then decreased to a plateau value. → The ILSS increased firstly and then decreased to a plateau value. - Abstract: The aim of this article was to investigate the effects of vacuum thermal cycling on mechanical and physical properties of high performance carbon/bismaleimide (BMI) composites used in aerospace. The changes in dynamic mechanical properties and thermal stability were characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The changes in linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) were measured in directions perpendicular and parallel to the fiber direction, respectively. The outgassing behavior of the composites were examined. The evolution of surface morphology and surface roughness were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Changes in mechanical properties including transverse tensile strength, flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) were measured. The results indicated that the vacuum thermal cycling could improve the crosslinking degree and the thermal stability of resin matrix to a certain extent, and induce matrix outgassing and thermal stress, thereby leading to the mass loss and the interfacial debonding of the composite. The degradation in transverse tensile strength was caused by joint effects of the matrix outgassing and the interfacial debonding, while the changes in flexural strength and ILSS were affected by a competing effect between the crosslinking degree

  9. An application of the Caputo-Fabrizio operator to replicator-mutator dynamics: Bifurcation, chaotic limit cycles and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doungmo Goufo, Emile Franc

    2018-02-01

    The physical behaviors of replicator-mutator processes found in theoretical biophysics, physical chemistry, biochemistry and population biology remain complex with unlimited expressibility. People languages, for instance, have impressively and unpredictably changed over the time in human history. This is mainly due to the collection of small changes and collaboration with other languages. In this paper, the Caputo-Fabrizio operator is applied to a replicator-mutator dynamic taking place in midsts with movement. The model is fully analyzed and solved numerically via the Crank-Nicolson scheme. Stability and convergence results are provided. A concrete application to replicator-mutator dynamics for a population with three strategies is performed with numerical simulations provided for some fixed values of the physical position of the population symbolized by r and the grid points. Physically, it happens that limit cycles appear, not only in function of the mutation parameter μ but also in function of the values given to r . The amplitudes of limit cycles also appear to be proportional to r but the stability of the system remains unaffected. However, those limit cycles instead of disappearing as expected, are immediately followed by chaotic and unpredictable behaviors certainly due to the non-singular kernel used in the model and suitable to non-linear dynamics. Hence, the appearance and disappearance of limit cycles might be controlled by the position variable r which can also apprehend chaos.

  10. Formation of multiple subpulses in a free-electron laser operating in the limit-cycle mode

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knippels, G.M.H.; van der Meer, A. F. G.; R F X A M Mols,; Oepts, D.; van Amersfoort, P. W.

    1996-01-01

    The evolution of the longitudinal pulse shape and the spectrum of the short-pulse, far-infrared free-electron laser FELIX are investigated. Depending on the amount of cavity desynchronization applied, the laser is found to operate in the stable-focus mode or in the limit-cycle mode. In the latter

  11. Seasonality in swimming and cycling: Exploring a limitation of accelerometer based studies

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Flo; atkin, Andrew James; van sluijs, Esther Maria; Jones, A

    2017-01-01

    Accelerometer-based studies of children's physical activity have reported seasonal patterns in activity levels. However, the inability of many accelerometers to detect activity while the wearer is swimming or cycling may introduce a bias to the estimation of seasonality if participation in these activities are themselves seasonally patterned. We explore seasonal patterns in children's swimming and cycling among a sample of 7–8 year olds ($N$ = 591) participating in the Millennium Cohort Study...

  12. Detailed analysis of the effect of the turbine and compressor isentropic efficiency on the thermal and exergy efficiency of a Brayton cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živić Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy and exergy analysis of a Brayton cycle with an ideal gas is given. The irreversibility of the adiabatic processes in turbine and compressor is taken into account through their isentropic efficiencies. The net work per cycle, the thermal efficiency and the two exergy efficiencies are expressed as functions of the four dimensionless variables: the isentropic efficiencies of turbine and compressor, the pressure ratio, and the temperature ratio. It is shown that the maximal values of the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiency are achieved when the isentropic efficiencies and temperature ratio are as high as possible, while the different values of pressure ratio that maximize the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiencies exist. These pressure ratios increase with the increase of the temperature ratio and the isentropic efficiency of compressor and turbine. The increase of the turbine isentropic efficiency has a greater impact on the increase of the net work per cycle and the thermal efficiency of a Brayton cycle than the same increase of compressor isentropic efficiency. Finally, two goal functions are proposed for thermodynamic optimization of a Brayton cycle for given values of the temperature ratio and the compressor and turbine isentropic efficiencies. The first maximizes the sum of the net work per cycle and thermal efficiency while the second the net work per cycle and exergy efficiency. In both cases the optimal pressure ratio is closer to the pressure ratio that maximizes the net work per cycle.

  13. Energy Performance and Economic Evaluation of Heat Pump/Organic Rankine Cycle System with Sensible Thermal Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carmo, C.; Dumont, O.; Nielsen, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction between electrical and thermal energy demands represent a potential area for balancing supply and demand that could contribute to the integration of intermittent renewables in energy systems. To enable the interaction between thermal and electric energy, an innovative concept...... that consists of a ground-source heat pump with possibility of reversing operation as an ORC power cycle combined with solar heating in a single-family building is introduced. The ORC mode enables the use of solar energy in periods of no heat energy demand and reverses the heat pump cycle to supply electrical....... The results with the two different configurations are simulated in the Modelica language and compared in terms of energy shift potential in order to optimize RES integration, as well as the economic feasibility of the system in a cold climate....

  14. Effect of thermal cycling on the microstructure of a directionally solidified Fe, Cr, Al-TaC eutectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.; Tewari, S. N.

    1977-01-01

    Cylindrical bars (1.2 cm diameter) of Fe-13.6Cr-3.7Al-9TaC (wt %) eutectic alloy were directionally solidified in a modified Bridgman type furnace at 1 cm/h. The alloy microstructure consisted of aligned TaC fibers imbedded in a bcc Fe-Cr-Al matrix. Specimens of the alloy were thermally cycled from 1100 to 425 C in a burner rig. The effects of 1800 thermal cycles on the microstructure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, revealing a zig-zag shape of TaC fibers aligned parallel to the growth direction. The mechanism of carbide solution and reprecipitation on the (111) easy growth planes, suggested previously to account for the development of irregular serrations in Co-Cr-Ni matrix alloys, is believed to be responsible for these zig-zag surfaces.

  15. Limitations to the use of two-dimensional thermal modeling of a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, B.W.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal modeling of a nuclear waste repository is basic to most waste management predictive models. It is important that the modeling techniques accurately determine the time-dependent temperature distribution of the waste emplacement media. Recent modeling studies show that the time-dependent temperature distribution can be accurately modeled in the far-field using a 2-dimensional (2-D) planar numerical model; however, the near-field cannot be modeled accurately enough by either 2-D axisymmetric or 2-D planar numerical models for repositories in salt. The accuracy limits of 2-D modeling were defined by comparing results from 3-dimensional (3-D) TRUMP modeling with results from both 2-D axisymmetric and 2-D planar. Both TRUMP and ADINAT were employed as modeling tools. Two-dimensional results from the finite element code, ADINAT were compared with 2-D results from the finite difference code, TRUMP; they showed almost perfect correspondence in the far-field. This result adds substantially to confidence in future use of ADINAT and its companion stress code ADINA for thermal stress analysis. ADINAT was found to be somewhat sensitive to time step and mesh aspect ratio. 13 figures, 4 tables

  16. Recent developments in thermally-driven seawater desalination: Energy efficiency improvement by hybridization of the MED and AD cycles

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2015-01-01

    The energy, water and environment nexus is a crucial factor when considering the future development of desalination plants or industry in the water-stressed economies. New generation of desalination processes or plants has to meet the stringent environment discharge requirements and yet the industry remains highly energy efficient and sustainable when producing good potable water. Water sources, either brackish or seawater, have become more contaminated as feed while the demand for desalination capacities increase around the world. One immediate solution for energy efficiency improvement comes from the hybridization of the proven desalination processes to the newer processes of desalination: For example, the integration of the available thermally-driven to adsorption desalination (AD) cycles where significant thermodynamic synergy can be attained when cycles are combined. For these hybrid cycles, a quantum improvement in energy efficiency as well as in increase in water production can be expected. The advent of MED with AD cycles, or simply called the MEDAD cycles, is one such example where seawater desalination can be pursued and operated in cogeneration with the electricity production plants: The hybrid desalination cycles utilize only the low exergy bled-steam at low temperatures, complemented with waste exhaust or renewable solar thermal heat at temperatures between 60 and 80. °C. In this paper, the authors have reported their pioneered research on aspects of AD and related hybrid MEDAD cycles, both at theoretical models and experimental pilots. Using the cogeneration of electricity and desalination concept, the authors examined the cost apportionment of fuel cost by the quality or exergy of working steam for such cogeneration configurations.

  17. Thermal hydraulic feasibility of supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle power conversion for the KALIMER-150 sodium-cooled fast reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sienicki, J.J.; Moisseytsev, A.; Cho, D.H.; Kim, Seong-O; Hahn, Dohee

    2004-01-01

    One possible approach to achieving a significant reduction in the overnight and operating costs of a sodium-cooled fast reactor is to replace the traditional Rankine steam cycle with an advanced power converter that consists of a gas turbine Brayton cycle that utilizes supercritical carbon dioxide (S-CO 2 ) as the working fluid. A joint project between Argonne National Laboratory and the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute has been initiated to investigate the thermal-hydraulic feasibility of coupling the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle to the KALIMAR-150 sodium-cooled fast reactor conceptual design. As an initial step in investigating the system aspects of coupling the reactor to the S-CO 2 Brayton cycle, the case is investigated in which the intermediate heat transfer loop is eliminated in order to achieve additional cost reductions. The main objectives are to determine the potential gain in plant efficiency and to estimate the size of the key Brayton cycle components. A S-CO 2 Brayton cycle efficiency of 43.2% is calculated. Accounting for primary pump power and other in-house loads, a net plant efficiency of 40.8% is obtained, compared to 38.2% for the current (Rankine cycle) plant. If higher Na temperatures could be accommodated, then a 1% gain in plant efficiency could be obtained for each 20degC incremental increase in sodium core outlet temperature. Further investigation of the thermal sizing of the Na/S-Co 2 heat exchanger is also carried out; parametric sensitivity studies are performed for the case in which the intermediate heat transport system is retained as well as the case in which it is eliminated. (author)

  18. Lyapunov-based control of limit cycle oscillations in uncertain aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, Brendan

    Store-induced limit cycle oscillations (LCO) affect several fighter aircraft and is expected to remain an issue for next generation fighters. LCO arises from the interaction of aerodynamic and structural forces, however the primary contributor to the phenomenon is still unclear. The practical concerns regarding this phenomenon include whether or not ordnance can be safely released and the ability of the aircrew to perform mission-related tasks while in an LCO condition. The focus of this dissertation is the development of control strategies to suppress LCO in aircraft systems. The first contribution of this work (Chapter 2) is the development of a controller consisting of a continuous Robust Integral of the Sign of the Error (RISE) feedback term with a neural network (NN) feedforward term to suppress LCO behavior in an uncertain airfoil system. The second contribution of this work (Chapter 3) is the extension of the development in Chapter 2 to include actuator saturation. Suppression of LCO behavior is achieved through the implementation of an auxiliary error system that features hyperbolic functions and a saturated RISE feedback control structure. Due to the lack of clarity regarding the driving mechanism behind LCO, common practice in literature and in Chapters 2 and 3 is to replicate the symptoms of LCO by including nonlinearities in the wing structure, typically a nonlinear torsional stiffness. To improve the accuracy of the system model a partial differential equation (PDE) model of a flexible wing is derived (see Appendix F) using Hamilton's principle. Chapters 4 and 5 are focused on developing boundary control strategies for regulating the bending and twisting deformations of the derived model. The contribution of Chapter 4 is the construction of a backstepping-based boundary control strategy for a linear PDE model of an aircraft wing. The backstepping-based strategy transforms the original system to a exponentially stable system. A Lyapunov-based stability

  19. Electrical and thermal transport in the quasiatomic limit of coupled Luttinger liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Aaron; Ilan, Roni; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a new model for quasi-one-dimensional materials, motivated by intriguing but not yet well-understood experiments that have shown two-dimensional polymer films to be promising materials for thermoelectric devices. We consider a two-dimensional material consisting of many one-dimensional systems, each treated as a Luttinger liquid, with weak (incoherent) coupling between them. This approximation of strong interactions within each one-dimensional chain and weak coupling between them is the "quasiatomic limit." We find integral expressions for the (interchain) transport coefficients, including the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermopower, and we extract their power law dependencies on temperature. Luttinger liquid physics is manifested in a violation of the Wiedemann-Franz law; the Lorenz number is larger than the Fermi liquid value by a factor between γ2 and γ4, where γ ≥1 is a measure of the electron-electron interaction strength in the system.

  20. Effects of metal primers on the bonding of an adhesive resin cement to noble metal ceramic alloys after thermal cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minami, Hiroyuki; Murahara, Sadaaki; Suzuki, Shiro; Tanaka, Takuo

    2011-12-01

    Although the effectiveness of primers for resin bonding to noble alloys has been demonstrated, no effective clinical technique for bonding to noble metal ceramic alloys has been established. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of metal primers on the shear bond strength of an adhesive resin to noble metal ceramic alloys after thermal cycling. Sixty-three disk-shaped specimens (10 × 2.5 mm) were cast from high-gold-content alloys (Super Metal W-85: W85 or IFK88 GR: IFK88), a high-palladium-content alloy (Super Metal N-40: N40), and an Ag-Pd-Cu-Au alloy (Castwell M.C.12: MC12). Smaller-sized disk-shaped specimens (8 × 2.5 mm) were fabricated with MC12. Bonding surfaces were finished with 600-grit SiC-paper and airborne-particle abraded with 50-μm alumina. Pairs of disks were primed (V-Primer: VP; ML Primer: ML; or Metaltite: MT) and bonded with an adhesive resin (Super-Bond C&B). The bond strengths were determined before and after 20,000 and 50,000 thermal cycles (n=7). Data were analyzed by using a 3-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni test (α=.05). Failure modes were determined by optical microscope and SEM observation. Bond strengths to high-gold-content alloys with VP and MT significantly decreased after the thermal cycling (Palloys were not degraded up to 50,000 thermal cycles when primed with ML. None of the primers evaluated was effective for high-palladium-content alloy. Copyright © 2011 The Editorial Council of the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas LLC, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmingtonm, North Carolina (United States); Avila N, A., E-mail: Gabriel.Cuevas-Vivas@ge.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  2. Bond Coat Engineering Influence on the Evolution of the Microstructure, Bond Strength, and Failure of TBCs Subjected to Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R. S.; Nagy, D.; Marple, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Different types of thermal spray systems, including HVOF (JP5000 and DJ2600-hybrid), APS (F4-MB and Axial III), and LPPS (Oerlikon Metco system) were employed to spray CoNiCrAlY bond coats (BCs) onto Inconel 625 substrates. The chemical composition of the BC powder was the same in all cases; however, the particle size distribution of the powder employed with each torch was that specifically recommended for the torch. For optimization purposes, these BCs were screened based on initial evaluations of roughness, porosity, residual stress, relative oxidation, and isothermal TGO growth. A single type of standard YSZ top coat was deposited via APS (F4MB) on all the optimized BCs. The TBCs were thermally cycled by employing a furnace cycle test (FCT) (1080 °C-1 h—followed by forced air cooling). Samples were submitted to 10, 100, 400, and 1400 cycles as well as being cycled to failure. The behavior of the microstructures, bond strength values (ASTM 633), and the TGO evolution of these TBCs, were investigated for the as-sprayed and thermally cycled samples. During FCT, the TBCs found to be both the best and poorest performing and had their BCs deposited via HVOF. The results showed that engineering low-oxidized BCs does not necessarily lead to an optimal TBC performance. Moreover, the bond strength values decrease significantly only when the TBC is about to fail (top coat spall off) and the as-sprayed bond strength values cannot be used as an indicator of TBC performance.

  3. Advances in the estimation of dynamic thermal limits of electric grids; Avances en la estimacion de limites termicos dinamicos de las lineas electricas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cabetas, J.; Lumbreras, J.; Ibarra, J.I. [Iberdrola (Spain); Marin, L.; Sancha, J.L.; Soto, F.; Crespo, R. [Red Electrica Espanola, Madrid (Spain)

    1997-09-01

    This article presents the preliminary results of the project developed by Iberdrola and REE in order to analyze in detail the thermal dynamic limit in the grids and to improve the effective use of power distribution. It presents methods to evaluate in real time the aerial grid. (Author) 13 refs.

  4. Thermal cycling tests of 1st wall mock-ups with beryllium/CuCrZr bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, M.; Iwadachi, T.; Uchida, M.; Yamada, H.; Nakamichi, M.; Kawamura, H.

    2004-01-01

    The innovative bonding technology between beryllium and CuCrZr with Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) has been proposed for the manufacturing of the ITER first wall. In the next step, thermal cycling test of first wall mock-ups manufactured with the bonding technology, were carried out under the ITER heat load condition. The test condition is 1000 cycles of On and Off under 5 MW/m 2 , and two types of the mock-up were manufactured for evaluation of the effects on HIP temperature (520 degree C and 610 degree C). The tensile properties of the bonding were also evaluated in room temperature and 200 degree C. As for the results of the thermal cycling tests, the temperature near the bonding interface were scarcely any change up to 1000 cycles, and obvious damage of the mock-up was not detected under the tests. As for the results of the tensile tests in 200 degree C, the test pieces of the HIP bonding at 610 degree C were broken in parent CuCrZr material, not broken in the bonding interface. (author)

  5. Changes in reactivity and in the margins to thermal limits by the inclusion of control rods of advanced type in the Laguna Verde Power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Ramirez, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The obtained results are presented when simulating with CM-PRESTO code the cycle 10 of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Central, using two advanced types of control bars, besides the originally loaded ones. The two advanced types, to those that are denominated 1AV and 2AV in this work, are of different design, however both have in some place of the bar, a section with hafnium like neutron absorber material. They thought about three different scenarios, in the first one, used as reference, is simulated the cycle 10 using the original control bars, while in the other two cases the advanced types are used. The values of the reactivity were compared and of some margins to the thermal limits obtained when using the bars of advanced type, with those obtained in the case in that alone they are considered those original bars. It was found that in condition of power both advanced types present bigger absorber power of neutrons that the original bars, being quantified in average this bigger power in 0.22 pcm/notch for the type 1AV and in 0.51 pcm/notch for the type 2AV. The affectation of the margins to the observed thermal limits is minimum. (Author)

  6. Thermal limits of wild and laboratory strains of two African malaria vector species, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Candice L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria affects large parts of the developing world and is responsible for almost 800,000 deaths annually. As climates change, concerns have arisen as to how this vector-borne disease will be impacted by changing rainfall patterns and warming temperatures. Despite the importance and controversy surrounding the impact of climate change on the potential spread of this disease, little information exists on the tolerances of several of the vector species themselves. Methods Using a ramping protocol (to assess critical thermal limits - CT and plunge protocol (to assess lethal temperature limits - LT information on the thermal tolerance of two of Africa’s important malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus was collected. The effects of age, thermal acclimation treatment, sex and strain (laboratory versus wild adults were investigated for CT determinations for each species. The effects of age and sex for adults and life stage (larvae, pupae, adults were investigated for LT determinations. Results In both species, females are more tolerant to low and high temperatures than males; larvae and pupae have higher upper lethal limits than do adults. Thermal acclimation of adults has large effects in some instances but small effects in others. Younger adults tend to be more tolerant of low or high temperatures than older age groups. Long-standing laboratory colonies are sufficiently similar in thermal tolerance to field-collected animals to provide reasonable surrogates when making inferences about wild population responses. Differences between these two vectors in their thermal tolerances, especially in larvae and pupae, are plausibly a consequence of different habitat utilization. Conclusions Limited plasticity is characteristic of the adults of these vector species relative to others examined to date, suggesting limited scope for within-generation change in thermal tolerance. These findings and the greater tolerance

  7. Increasing the structural strength of iron-carbon materials by thermal cycling treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedyukin, V.K.; Platonov, V.N.

    1977-01-01

    Outlined are the principles of a method for thermal cyclic treatment of cast irons, carbon and low-alloy structural steels. It has been found that the thermal cyclic treatment makes it possible either to enhance the strength characteristics of materials parallel with improvements in palsticity and resilience or to substantially raise the plasticity and the resilience (by two, three and more times) while retaining the strength properties. It is shown that the thermal cyclic treatment has a beneficial effect upon the overall service capabilities of the thermally treated materials

  8. Change of needle temperature during one cycle of sewing operation in thermal equilibrium

    OpenAIRE

    川西, 定子; 宮脇, 知子; Sadako, Kawanishi; Tomoko, Miyawaki

    2003-01-01

    The rise and fall during one cycle of sewing operation, in the equilibrium needle temperature was discussed. At a constant sewing velocity, the higher the needle temperature was, the bigger the amount of rise and fall during one cycle in an equilibrium needle temperature was. As the sewing velocity rose, the needle temperature increased, but the amount of rise and fall during one cycle of sewing operation in the equilibrium needle temperature decreased. The reason was that the fall time decre...

  9. Variants of Regenerated Fissile Materials Usage in Thermal Reactors as the First Stage of Fuel Cycle Closing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, E. A.; Tsibul'skiy, V. F.

    2017-12-01

    At present, 240 000 t of spent nuclear fuel (SF) has been accumulated in the world. Its long-term storage should meet safety conditions and requires noticeable finances, which grow every year. Obviously, this situation cannot exist for a long time; in the end, it will require a final decision. At present, several variants of solution of the problem of SF management are considered. Since most of the operating reactors and those under construction are thermal reactors, it is reasonable to assume that the structure of the nuclear power industry in the near and medium-term future will be unchanged, and it will be necessary to utilize plutonium in thermal reactors. In this study, different strategies of SF management are compared: open fuel cycle with long-term SF storage, closed fuel cycle with MOX fuel usage in thermal reactors and subsequent long-term storage of SF from MOX fuel, and closed fuel cycle in thermal reactors with heterogeneous fuel arrangement. The concept of heterogeneous fuel arrangement is considered in detail. While in the case of traditional fuel it is necessary to reprocess the whole amount of spent fuel, in the case of heterogeneous arrangement, it is possible to separate plutonium and 238U in different fuel rods. In this case, it is possible to achieve nearly complete burning of fissile isotopes of plutonium in fuel rods loaded with plutonium. These fuel rods with burned plutonium can be buried after cooling without reprocessing. They would contain just several percent of initially loaded plutonium, mainly even isotopes. Fuel rods with 238U alone should be reprocessed in the usual way.

  10. Development of a thermal scheme for a cogeneration combined-cycle unit with an SVBR-100 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasilov, V. F.; Dudolin, A. A.; Krasheninnikov, S. M.

    2017-02-01

    At present, the prospects for development of district heating that can increase the effectiveness of nuclear power stations (NPS), cut down their payback period, and improve protection of the environment against harmful emissions are being examined in the nuclear power industry of Russia. It is noted that the efficiency of nuclear cogeneration power stations (NCPS) is drastically affected by the expenses for heat networks and heat losses during transportation of a heat carrier through them, since NPSs are usually located far away from urban area boundaries as required for radiation safety of the population. The prospects for using cogeneration power units with small or medium power reactors at NPSs, including combined-cycle units and their performance indices, are described. The developed thermal scheme of a cogeneration combined-cycle unit (CCU) with an SBVR-100 nuclear reactor (NCCU) is presented. This NCCU should use a GE 6FA gasturbine unit (GTU) and a steam-turbine unit (STU) with a two-stage district heating plant. Saturated steam from the nuclear reactor is superheated in a heat-recovery steam generator (HRSG) to 560-580°C so that a separator-superheater can be excluded from the thermal cycle of the turbine unit. In addition, supplemental fuel firing in HRSG is examined. NCCU effectiveness indices are given as a function of the ambient air temperature. Results of calculations of the thermal cycle performance under condensing operating conditions indicate that the gross electric efficiency η el NCCU gr of = 48% and N el NCCU gr = 345 MW can be achieved. This efficiency is at maximum for NCCU with an SVBR-100 reactor. The conclusion is made that the cost of NCCU installed kW should be estimated, and the issue associated with NCCUs siting with reference to urban area boundaries must be solved.

  11. Assessing the potential of hybrid fossil–solar thermal plants for energy policy making: Brayton cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardos, Eva; López, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Javier; Abánades, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a first study in-depth of solar–fossil hybridization from a general perspective. It develops a set of useful parameters for analyzing and comparing hybrid plants, it studies the case of hybridizing Brayton cycles with current solar technologies and shows a tentative extrapolation of the results to integrated combined cycle systems (ISCSS). In particular, three points have been analyzed: the technical requirements for solar technologies to be hybridized with Brayton cycles, the temperatures and pressures at which hybridization would produce maximum power per unit of fossil fuel, and their mapping to current solar technologies and Brayton cycles. Major conclusions are that a hybrid plant works in optimum conditions which are not equal to those of the solar or power blocks considered independently, and that hybridizing at the Brayton cycle of a combined cycle could be energetically advantageous. -- Highlights: •We model a generic solar–fossil hybrid Brayton cycle. •We calculate the operating conditions for maximum ratio power/fuel consumption. •Best hybrid plant conditions are not the same as solar or power blocks separately. •We study potential for hybridization with current solar technologies. •Hybridization at the Brayton in a combined cycle may achieve high power/fuel ratio

  12. Effects of bonding bakeout thermal cycles on pre- and post irradiation microstructures, physical, and mechanical properties of copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    At present, dispersion strengthened (DS) copper is being considered as the primary candidate material for the ITER first wall and divertor components. Recently, it was agreed among the ITER parties that a backup alloy should be selected from the two well known precipitation hardened copper alloys, CuCrZr and CuNiBe. It was therefore decided to carry out screening experiments to simulate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. On the basis of the results of these experiments, one of the two alloys will be selected as a backup material. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime ageing, and bonding thermal cycle followed by reageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 623K for 100 hours. Tensile specimens of the DS copper were also given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of these heat treated specimens of CuCrZr, CuNiBe, and DS copper were neutron irradiated at 523K to a dose level of {approx}0.3 dpa (NRT) in the DR-3 reactor at Riso. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with the various heat treatments were tensile tested at 532K. The dislocation, precipitate and void microstructures and electrical resistivity of these specimens were also determined. Results of these investigations will be reported and discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and irradiation-induced precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. Results show that the bonding and bakeout thermal cycles are not likely to have any serious deleterious effects on the performance of these alloys. The CuNiBe alloys were found to be susceptible to radiation-induced embrittlement, however, the exact mechanism is not yet known. It is thought that radiation-induced precipitation and segregation of the beryllium may be responsible.

  13. A novel temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Minqiang; R. Perch-Nielsen, Ivan; Sørensen, Karen Skotte

    We present a new temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with external heater and temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting...

  14. Life cycle-based water assessment of a hand dishwashing product: opportunities and limitations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Hoof, Gert; Buyle, Bea; Kounina, Anna; Humbert, Sebastien

    2013-10-01

    It is only recently that life cycle-based indicators have been used to evaluate products from a water use impact perspective. The applicability of some of these methods has been primarily demonstrated on agricultural materials or products, because irrigation requirements in food production can be water-intensive. In view of an increasing interest on life cycle-based water indicators from different products, we ran a study on a hand dishwashing product. A number of water assessment methods were applied with the purpose of identifying both product improvement opportunities, as well as understanding the potential for underlying database and methodological improvements. The study covered the entire life cycle of the product and focused on environmental issues related to water use, looking in-depth at inventory, midpoint, and endpoint methods. "Traditional" water emission driven methods, such as freshwater eutrophication, were excluded from the analysis. The use of a single formula with the same global supply chain, manufactured in 1 location was evaluated in 2 countries with different water scarcity conditions. The study shows differences ranging up to 4 orders in magnitude for indicators with similar units associated with different water use types (inventory methods) and different cause-effect chain models (midpoint and endpoint impact categories). No uncertainty information was available on the impact assessment methods, whereas uncertainty from stochastic variability was not available at the time of study. For the majority of the indicators studied, the contribution from the consumer use stage is the most important (>90%), driven by both direct water use (dishwashing process) as well as indirect water use (electricity generation to heat the water). Creating consumer awareness on how the product is used, particularly in water-scarce areas, is the largest improvement opportunity for a hand dishwashing product. However, spatial differentiation in the inventory and

  15. Limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, S.A.; Hosea, J.C.; Timberlake, J.R.

    1984-10-19

    A limiter with a specially contoured front face is provided. The front face of the limiter (the plasma-side face) is flat with a central indentation. In addition, the limiter shape is cylindrically symmetric so that the limiter can be rotated for greater heat distribution. This limiter shape accommodates the various power scrape-off distances lambda p, which depend on the parallel velocity, V/sub parallel/, of the impacting particles.

  16. On the formation of limit cycle of the friction-induced stick-slip vibration in oilwell drillstring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the stick-slip vibration in oilwell drillstring is studied. The drilling system is modelled as a lumped-parameter torsional pendulum and the interaction between the drill bit and the rock is treated as Coulomb friction. Equation of motion of the drill bit is established and the dynamic responses of the drill bit are obtained. A drilling system with the drillstring length 3000 m is analysed, in which the system parameters are selected by reference to the actual drilling situation. After the slip vibrations in the initial stage, final state of the drill bit is a stable stick-slip vibration of which the limit cycle is a closed loop. In order to find the stability of the limit cycle corresponds to the periodically stick-slip vibration, different initial conditions for the drill bit are studied. Results show that the drill bit will lead to a periodic motion and the phase trajectories ultimately converge to the same limit cycle corresponds to stable stick-slip vibration.

  17. Effect of the self-pumped limiter concept on the tritium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Sze, D.K.; Hassanein, A.

    1988-01-01

    The self-pumped limiter concept for impurity control of the plasma of a fusion reactor has a major impact on the design of the tritium systems. To achieve a sustained burn, conventional limiters and divertors remove large quantities of unburnt tritium and deuterium from the plasma which must be then recycled using a plasma processing system. The self-pumped limiter which does not remove the hydrogen species, does not require any plasma processing equipment. The blanket system and the coolant processing systems acquire greater importance with the use of this unconventional impurity control system. 3 refs., 2 figs

  18. Generalization of the Rabi population inversion dynamics in the sub-one-cycle pulse limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doslic, N.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the population inversion in a two-level system generated by a sub-one-cycle pulse excitation. Specifically, we explore the effect that the time derivative of the pulse envelope has on the Rabi dynamics. Our analysis is based on a combination of analytical, perturbative, and nonperturbative treatments and is complemented by numerical simulations. We find a shortening of the Rabi inversion period and show that complete inversion is unobtainable under resonant, ultrashort pulse conditions. The impact of nonresonant and carrier-envelope phase-dependent effects on the dynamics of two-level and multilevel systems is studied numerically, and conditions for complete population inversion are derived

  19. Underwater Cycle Ergometry: Power Requirements With and Without Diver Thermal Dress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shykoff, B

    2009-01-01

    .... An ongoing problem has been that, although the power requirement of cycling in the water is known to be greater than that in air for the same ergometer setting, the magnitude of the difference...

  20. Characterization of the Ni–Mo–Cr superalloy subjected to simulated heat-affected zone thermal cycle treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yanming, E-mail: heyanming@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Yang, Jianguo, E-mail: yangjg@zjut.edu.cn [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Qin, Chunjie [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China); Chen, Shuangjian [Shanghai Institute of Applied Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 201800 (China); Gao, Zengliang [Institute of Process Equipment and Control Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou 310014 (China)

    2015-09-15

    Highlights: • The constitution of Ni–17Mo–7Cr alloy was convincingly ascertained by TEM analysis. • The Ni–17Mo–7Cr alloy was thermally cycled with a peak temperature up to 1350 °C. • The lamellar-like phases in the alloy were firstly determined by TEM and HRTEM. • The formation mechanism for the lamellar-like phases was unveiled rigorously. • Effect of lamellar-like phases on the alloy’s performances was evaluated in depth. - Abstract: A representative Ni–Mo–Cr superalloy with basic composition of Ni–17Mo–7Cr (wt.%) was fabricated in the work and the relationship between the microstructure and mechanical properties while it went through simulated heat-affected zone (HAZ) thermal cycle treatment was investigated. The results reveal that the Ni–Mo–Cr alloy mainly consisted of Ni matrix and MoC carbides. The critical peak temperature that a lamellar-like structure occurred in the alloy was found to be 1300 °C. These products were firstly characterized by transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscope (HRTEM) analysis, and they were essentially Ni matrix and carbides (MoC and chromium carbides) generated through local melting. The equivalent mechanical properties of the alloy relative to that of un-treated alloy were received owing to its unique architecture even the peak temperature during thermal cycle was up to 1350 °C. The results obtained suggests these lamellar-like products dispersed near the fusion line in a Ni–Mo–Cr welded joint will not influence the joint’s mechanical strength and stability while the peak temperature in the HAZ was adjusted below 1350 °C, providing valuable guideline in designing and applying the Ni–Mo–Cr system superalloys.

  1. Thermal and pseudoelastic cycling in Cu-14.1Al-4.2Ni (wt%) single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastien, R.; Corbellani, C.E.; Sade, M.; Lovey, F.C.

    2005-01-01

    Thermally and stress induced martensitic transformations between β and a mixture of martensitic structures, β' and γ', were studied in Cu-14.1Al-4.2Ni (wt%) single crystals. In this way information on the relative stability between β' and γ' martensites, compared to the β phase, was obtained. The measurement of electrical resistance as a function of temperature was used to follow the evolution of thermally induced transitions. The stress induced transformations were analyzed in the small temperature range at which the pseudoelastic behavior between β and a mixture of both martensites plays the main role. A clear inhibition of the γ' martensite is detected as the number of cycles increases, no matter which thermodynamic coordinate is varied to induce the phase transition, i.e., temperature or stress. An evaluation of the magnitude of the relative stabilization of the β' martensite compared with γ' was obtained by a suitably designed experiment

  2. Nanodomain Engineered (K, Na)NbO3 Lead-Free Piezoceramics: Enhanced Thermal and Cycling Reliabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Fang-Zhou; Wang, Ke; Cheng, Li-Qian

    2015-01-01

    The growing environmental concerns have been pushing the development of viable green alternatives for lead-based piezoceramics to be one of the priorities in functional ceramic materials. A polymorphic phase transition has been utilized to enhance piezoelectric properties of lead-free (K, Na)NbO3......- based materials, accepting the drawbacks of high temperature and cycling instabilities. Here, we present that CaZrO3-modified (K, Na)NbO3 piezoceramics not only possess excellent performance at ambient conditions benefiting from nanodomain engineering, but also exhibit superior stability against...... temperature fluctuation and electrical fatigue cycling. It was found that the piezoelectric coefficient d33 is temperature independent under 4 kV/mm, which can be attributed to enhanced thermal stability of electric field engineered domain configuration; whereas the electric field induced strain exhibits...

  3. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  4. Effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on the properties of copper alloys irradiated at 350 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Edwards, D.J.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    2001-01-01

    Screening experiments were carried out to determine the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of the oxide dispersion strengthened (GlidCop, CuAl-25) and the precipitation hardened (CuCrZr, CuNiBe) copper alloys. Tensile...... results are described and their salient features discussed. The most significant effect of neutron irradiation is a severe loss of ductility in the case of CuNiBe alloys. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  5. Effect of the self-pumped limiter concept on the tritium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Sze, D.K.; Hassanein, A.

    1988-01-01

    The self-pumped limiter concept was the impurity control system for the reactor in the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS). The use of a self-pumped limiter had a major impact on the design of the tritium systems of the TPSS fusion reactor. The self-pumped limiter functions by depositing the helium ash under a layer of metal (vanadium). The majority of the hydrogen species are recycled at the plasma edge; a small fraction permeates to the blanket/coolant which was lithium in TPSS. Use of the self-pumped limiter results in the elimination of the plasma processing system. Thus, the blanket tritium processing system becomes the major tritium system. The main advantages achieved for the tritium systems with a self-pumped limiter are a reduction in the capital cost of tritium processing equipment as well as a reduction in building space, a reduced tritium inventory for processing and for reserve storage, an increase in the inherent safety of the fusion plant and an improvement in economics for a fusion world economy

  6. Limitation of future radiation exposures from the present operation of nuclear fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the bases and the formulation for limiting the doses in the future from the combined contribution of present and future practices causing radiation exposures. Local, regional and global contributions to the exposure of given population groups are discussed, and the use of the collective dose commitments for predicting future exposures from continuing practice is presented. The paper discusses the limitation of the dose commitment and of the collective dose commitment per unit practice as procedures for controlling future exposures. It also presents the bases used to assign upperbounds of exposure, which are fractions of the relevant dose limits, to exposures caused by a given source or practice. These considerations have been introduced in the regulatory requirements used in Argentina, and the paper examines the bases of the relevant provisions. (author)

  7. Integration of photovoltaic and concentrated solar thermal technologies for H2 production by the hybrid sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Raffaele; Ferrara, Mariarosaria; Lanchi, Michela; Turchetti, Luca

    2017-06-01

    It is widely agreed that hydrogen used as energy carrier and/or storage media may significantly contribute in the reduction of emissions, especially if produced by renewable energy sources. The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycle is considered as one of the most promising processes to produce hydrogen through the water-splitting process. The FP7 project SOL2HY2 (Solar to Hydrogen Hybrid Cycles) investigates innovative material and process solutions for the use of solar heat and power in the HyS process. A significant part of the SOL2HY2 project is devoted to the analysis and optimization of the integration of the solar and chemical (hydrogen production) plants. In this context, this work investigates the possibility to integrate different solar technologies, namely photovoltaic, solar central receiver and solar troughs, to optimize their use in the HyS cycle for a green hydrogen production, both in the open and closed process configurations. The analysis carried out accounts for different combinations of geographical location and plant sizing criteria. The use of a sulfur burner, which can serve both as thermal backup and SO2 source for the open cycle, is also considered.

  8. A Life-cycle Approach to Improve the Sustainability of Rural Water Systems in Resource-Limited Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Stacey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A WHO and UNICEF joint report states that in 2008, 884 million people lacked access to potable drinking water. A life-cycle approach to develop potable water systems may improve the sustainability for such systems, however, a review of the literature shows that such an approach has primarily been used for urban systems located in resourced countries. Although urbanization is increasing globally, over 40 percent of the world’s population is currently rural with many considered poor. In this paper, we present a first step towards using life-cycle assessment to develop sustainable rural water systems in resource-limited countries while pointing out the needs. For example, while there are few differences in costs and environmental impacts for many improved rural water system options, a system that uses groundwater with community standpipes is substantially lower in cost that other alternatives with a somewhat lower environmental inventory. However, a LCA approach shows that from institutional as well as community and managerial perspectives, sustainability includes many other factors besides cost and environment that are a function of the interdependent decision process used across the life cycle of a water system by aid organizations, water user committees, and household users. These factors often present the biggest challenge to designing sustainable rural water systems for resource-limited countries.

  9. Life cycle assessment (LCA) of electricity generation technologies: Overview, comparability and limitations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turconi, Roberto; Boldrin, Alessio; Astrup, Thomas Fruergaard

    2013-01-01

    Electricity generation is a key contributor to global emissions of greenhouse gases (GHG), NOx and SO2 and their related environmental impact. A critical review of 167 case studies involving the life cycle assessment (LCA) of electricity generation based on hard coal, lignite, natural gas, oil...... contribution for biomass technologies (71% for GHG, 54% for NOx and 61% for SO2) and nuclear power (60% for GHG, 82% for NOx and 92% for SO2); infrastructures provided the highest impact for renewables. These data indicated that all three phases should be included for completeness and to avoid problem shifting....... The most critical methodological aspects in relation to LCA studies were identified as follows: definition of the functional unit, the LCA method employed (e.g., IOA, PCA and hybrid), the emission allocation principle and/or system boundary expansion. The most important technological aspects were...

  10. Analysis on the thermal and electrical characteristics of impregnating materials for the bifilar winding-type superconducting fault current limiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Seong Eun; Bae, Duck Kweon; Yoon, Kyung Yong; Yoon, Yong Soo; Ko, Tae Kuk; Kim, Sang-Hyun

    2006-05-01

    The resistive type high temperature superconducting fault current limiter (HTSFCL) limits the fault current with the resistance that generated by fault current. The generated resistance by fault current makes large pulse power which makes the operation of HTSFCL unstable. So, the cryogenic cooling system of the resistive type HTSFCL must diffuse and eliminate the pulse energy very quickly. Although the best way is to make wide direct contact area between HTS winding and coolant as much as possible, HTS winding also need the impregnation layer which fixes and protects it from electromagnetic force. This paper deals with thermal conductivity and dielectric strength of some epoxy compounds for the impregnation of high temperature superconducting (HTS) winding at 77 K. The measured data can be used in the optimal design of impregnation for HTS winding. Aluminar filling increased the thermal conductivity of epoxy compounds. Hardener also affected the thermal conductivity and the dielectric strength of epoxy compounds.

  11. Electrical resistivity and strain recovery studies on the effect of thermal cycling under constant stress on R-phase in NiTi shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchil, J.; Mahesh, K.K.; Kumara, K. Ganesh

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, the results of electrical resistivity and strain recovery measurements involved in the study of the stability of R-phase in NiTi shape memory alloy upon thermal cycling under a constant tensile stress of 100 and 200 MPa are presented. Two wire samples are chosen such that the one heat-treated at 560 deg. C exhibits a pure martensitic phase and the other heat-treated at 380 deg. C consists of a mixture of R-phase and martensitic phase with residual austenites at ambient temperature. In both cases, the applied stress has been found to promote the R→A transformation during the heating part of the thermal cycling unlike the case of stress free condition in which R-phase is found to exist only in the cooling part of thermal cycling. R-phase is found to become more prominent with increasing applied stress. It is also found that the applied tensile stress enables the development of R-phase in the cooling part of the first thermal cycle itself in the sample heat-treated at 560 deg. C whereas under stress-free condition it requires about 15 thermal cycles to develop R-phase. The NiTi wire heat-treated at 560 deg. C exhibits more recoverable strain in the initial cycles than the wire heat-treated at 380 deg. C, but after a large number of thermal cycles of the order of 1000 the recoverable strain in both samples is found to be almost the same. Under tensile stress, the sample heat-treated at 380 deg. C is found to be more stable against plastic deformation with thermal cycling and hence can be preferred over the sample heat-treated at 560 deg. C for two-way applications of SMA

  12. Equilibrium Limit of Boundary Scattering in Carbon Nanostructures: Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin; Kinaci, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Cagin, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    It is widely known that graphene and many of its derivative nanostructures have exceedingly high reported thermal conductivities (up to 4000 W/mK at 300 K). Such attractive thermal properties beg the use of these structures in practical devices; however, to implement these materials while preserving transport quality, the influence of structure on thermal conductivity should be thoroughly understood. For graphene nanostructures, having average phonon mean free paths on the order of one micron, a primary concern is how size influences the potential for heat conduction. To investigate this, we employ a novel technique to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity from the Green-Kubo relations and equilibrium molecular dynamics in systems where phonon-boundary scattering dominates heat flow. Specifically, the thermal conductivities of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes are calculated in sizes up to 3 microns, and the relative influence of boundary scattering on thermal transport is determined to be dominant at sizes less than 1 micron, after which the thermal transport largely depends on the quality of the nanostructure interface. The method is also extended to carbon nanostructures (fullerenes) where phonon confinement, as opposed to boundary scattering, dominates, and general trends related to the influence of curvature on thermal transport in these materials are discussed.

  13. Multiple steady states, limit cycles and chaotic attractors in evolutionary games with Logit Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.H.; Ochea, M.I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates, by means of simple, three and four strategy games, the occurrence of periodic and chaotic behaviour in a smooth version of the Best Response Dynamics, the Logit Dynamics. The main finding is that, unlike Replicator Dynamics, generic Hopf bifurcation and thus, stable limit

  14. Effect of Gaseous Impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and Aging Properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Dhanesh [Primary Contact; Lamb, Joshua; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; and Pal, Narendra

    2011-03-28

    This program was dedicated to understanding the effect of impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and aging properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage. At the start of the program we found reversibility between Li2NH+LiH LiH+LiNH2 (yielding ~5.8 wt.%H capacity). Then we tested the effect of impurity in H2 gas by pressure cycling at 255°C; first with industrial gas containing ppm levels of O2 and H2O as major impurities. Both these impurities had a significant impact on the reversibility and decreased the capacity by 2.65 wt.%H. Further increase in number of cycles from 500 to 1100 showed only a 0.2 wt%H more weight loss, showing some capacity is still maintained after a significant number of cycles. The loss of capacity is attributed to the formation of ~55 wt% LiH and ~30% Li2O, as major contaminant phases, along with the hydride Li2NH phase; suggesting loss of nitrogen during cycling. The effect of 100 ppm H2O in H2 also showed a decrease of ~2.5 wt.%H (after 560 cycles), and 100ppm O2 in H2; a loss of ~4.1 wt.%. Methane impurity (100 ppm, 100cycles), showed a very small capacity loss of 0.9 wt.%H under similar conditions. However, when Li3N was pressure cycled with 100ppmN2-H2 there were beneficial effects were observed (255oC); the reversible capacity increased to 8.4wt.%H after 853 cycles. Furthermore, with 20 mol.%N2-H2 capacity increased to ~10 wt.%H after 516 cycles. We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (Go = -98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (Go = -50.3 kJ/mol). We propose that the mitigation of hydrogen capacity losses is due to the destabilization of the LiH phase that tends to accumulate during cycling. Also more Li2NH phase was found in the cycled product. Mixed Alanates (3LiNH2:Li3AlH6) showed that 7 wt% hydrogen desorbed under dynamic vacuum. Equilibrium experiments (maximum 12 bar H2) showed up to 4wt% hydrogen reversibly

  15. Multiple regression models for the prediction of the maximum obtainable thermal efficiency of organic Rankine cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Pierobon, Leonardo; Wronski, Jorrit

    2014-01-01

    to power. In this study we propose four linear regression models to predict the maximum obtainable thermal efficiency for simple and recuperated ORCs. A previously derived methodology is able to determine the maximum thermal efficiency among many combinations of fluids and processes, given the boundary...... conditions of the process. Hundreds of optimised cases with varied design parameters are used as observations in four multiple regression analyses. We analyse the model assumptions, prediction abilities and extrapolations, and compare the results with recent studies in the literature. The models...

  16. Life cycle cost optimization of buildings with regard to energy use, thermal indoor environment and daylight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Svendsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    Buildings represent a large economical investment and have long service lives through which expenses for heating, cooling, maintenance and replacement depends on the chosen building design. Therefore, the building cost should not only be evaluated by the initial investment cost but rather...... and by the customer. The influence of different design variables on life cycle cost and building performance is very complicated and the design variables can be combined in an almost unlimited number of ways. Optimization can be applied to achieve a building design with low life cycle cost and good performance....... This paper discusses performance optimization and outlines an optimization method based on minimization of the life cycle cost constrained by performance requirements. Many different performance requirements can be included in the optimization. The performance requirements discussed in this paper are heating...

  17. Thermophysical characterization and thermal cycling stability of two TCM: CaCl2 and zeolite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barreneche, C.; Fernández, A.I.; Cabeza, L.F.; Cuypers, R.

    2015-01-01

    At this moment, the global energy consumption in buildings is around 40% of the total energy consumption in developed countries. Thermal energy storage (TES) is presented as one way to address this energy-related problem proposing an alternative to reduce the gap between energy supply and energy

  18. Changes in the hydrological cycle in tropical East Africa during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Handley, L.; O'Halloran, A.; Pearson, P.N.; Hawkins, E.; Nicholas, C.J.; Schouten, S.; McMillan, I.K.; Pancost, R.D.

    2012-01-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM), at ca. 55.8 Ma, is one of the most studied instances of past greenhouse gas-induced global warming. As such, it provides a rich opportunity to examine the impact of such global change on local climates. The effects of increased continental and sea surface

  19. Optimizing phonon scattering by tuning surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing to break the random-alloy limit of thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Li, Wu

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the cross-plane thermal conductivity κ of superlattices (SLs) as interfaces change from perfectly abrupt to totally intermixed, by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the spectral heat current calculations. We highlight the role of surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing by calculating the κ of SLs with changing interface roughness, whose tuning allows for κ values much lower than the "alloy limit" and the abrupt interface limit in same cases. The interplay between alloy and interface scattering in different frequency ranges provides a physical basis to predict a minimum of thermal conductivity. More specifically, we also explore how the interface roughness affects the thermal conductivities for SL materials with a broad span of atomic mass and bond strength. In particular, we find that (i) only when the "spacer" thickness of SLs increases up to a critical value, κ of rough SLs can break the corresponding "alloy limit," since SLs with different "spacer" thickness have different characteristic length of phonon transport, which is influenced by surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing to different extend. (ii) Whether κ changes monotonically with interface roughness strongly depends on the period length and intrinsic behavior of phonon transport for SL materials. Especially, for the SL with large period length, there exists an optimal interface roughness that can minimize the thermal conductivity. (iii) Surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing is more effective in achieving a low κ below the alloy limit for SL materials with large mass mismatch than with small one. (iv) It is possible for SL materials with large lattice mismatch (i.e., bond strength) to design an ideally abrupt interface structure with κ much below the alloy limit. These results have clear implications for optimization of thermal transport for heat management and for the development of thermoelectric materials.

  20. The correct lens mount lightweighting design of thermal cycle stress in Cassegrain telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, M. Y.; Chang, S. T.; Huang, T. M.; Hsu, Ming-Ying

    2011-10-01

    The Cassegrain telescope system was design for space environment. The correct lens mount assembly is included as correct lens, lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The system mass budget allocated to correct lens assembly was 5 Kg. Meanwhile, according to optical design the correct lens is made from fused silica, the lens diameter is 130 mm, and the mass is 2.3 Kg. Therefore, remain mass budget is 2.7 Kg; including the lens mount, spacer, mount barrel and retainer. The telescope system deformation is mainly caused by thermal deformation on space orbit. The correct lens mount was made from invar material in initial design. The CTE (Coefficient of Thermal Expansion) of invar is only 1* 10-6/°C, low CTE would be resistant to thermal deformation, but invar density is 8* 10-6 kg/mm3. If all components were made from invar, the total mass was over 2.7 kg. Thus, the components material would consider titanium alloy (CTE is 8.6* 10-6/°C, density is 4.43* 10-6 kg/mm3) or aluminum alloy (CTE is 23.6* 10-6/°C, density is 2.81* 10-6 kg/mm3). The titanium alloy density is 1.83 times lighter than invar, but CTE is 8.6 times higher. The aluminum alloy density is 2.84 times lighter then invar, but CTE is 23.6 times higher. The lens mount thermal deformation would effect correct lens surface wavefront error and introduce optical aberration. This article analyzes the correct lens assembly thermal deformation and optical performance in different lens mount material. From above conditions, using FEM (Finite Element Method) and optical software, simulation and optimization on the lens mount design have been performed to achieve system mass requirement.

  1. Long-term effects of storage and thermal cycling on the marginal adaptation of provisional resin crowns: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrenberg, David; Weiner, Gabriel I; Weiner, Saul

    2006-03-01

    Provisional resin crowns may be used for an extended period while complex treatments are completed. The crowns function intraorally; therefore, moisture absorption and thermal cycling may affect the physical properties of acrylic resin, causing a change in marginal gap size. The purpose of this pilot study was to examine the effect of long-term water absorption and thermal cycling on marginal gap size of polymethyl methacrylate copolymer and bis-acrylic composite resin crowns. Specimens (n = 10) were fabricated from 2 acrylic resins: a polymethyl methacrylate (Alike) and a bis-acrylic composite resin (Provitec). Specimens were first fabricated on a metal master die. Custom die stems were fabricated for each specimen from a low-fusing alloy (Cerroblend) to eliminate the factor of polymerization shrinkage. Specimens were then fitted to assure a standardized, pre-experimental marginal gap range of Provisional crowns made from either a bis-acrylic resin composite or a polymethyl methacrylate copolymer demonstrated loss of marginal adaptation during a simulated long-term period of service.

  2. Assessment of drug-induced arrhythmic risk using limit cycle and autocorrelation analysis of human iPSC-cardiomyocyte contractility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, R. Jason; Qi, Feng; Phatak, Sharangdhar; Smith, Layton H.; Malany, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac safety assays incorporating label-free detection of human stem-cell derived cardiomyocyte contractility provide human relevance and medium throughput screening to assess compound-induced cardiotoxicity. In an effort to provide quantitative analysis of the large kinetic datasets resulting from these real-time studies, we applied bioinformatic approaches based on nonlinear dynamical system analysis, including limit cycle analysis and autocorrelation function, to systematically assess beat irregularity. The algorithms were integrated into a software program to seamlessly generate results for 96-well impedance-based data. Our approach was validated by analyzing dose- and time-dependent changes in beat patterns induced by known proarrhythmic compounds and screening a cardiotoxicity library to rank order compounds based on their proarrhythmic potential. We demonstrate a strong correlation for dose-dependent beat irregularity monitored by electrical impedance and quantified by autocorrelation analysis to traditional manual patch clamp potency values for hERG blockers. In addition, our platform identifies non-hERG blockers known to cause clinical arrhythmia. Our method provides a novel suite of medium-throughput quantitative tools for assessing compound effects on cardiac contractility and predicting compounds with potential proarrhythmia and may be applied to in vitro paradigms for pre-clinical cardiac safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Impedance-based monitoring of human iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte contractility • Limit cycle analysis of impedance data identifies aberrant oscillation patterns. • Nonlinear autocorrelation function quantifies beat irregularity. • Identification of hERG and non-hERG inhibitors with known risk of arrhythmia • Automated software processes limit cycle and autocorrelation analyses of 96w data

  3. COMBINED CYCLE GAS TURBINE FOR THERMAL POWER STATIONS: EXPERIENCE IN DESIGNING AND OPERATION, PROSPECTS IN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Karnitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has reviewed main world tendencies in power consumption and power system structure. Main schemes of combined cycle gas turbines have been considered in the paper. The paper contains an operational analysis of CCGT blocks that are operating within the Belarusian energy system. The analysis results have been given in tables showing main operational indices of power blocks

  4. The efficiency of an open-cavity tubular solar receiver for a small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, W.G.; Bello-Ochende, T.; Meyer, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Results show efficiencies of a low-cost stainless steel tubular cavity receiver. • Optimum ratio of 0.0035 is found for receiver aperture area to concentrator area. • Smaller receiver tube and higher mass flow rate increase receiver efficiency. • Larger tube and smaller mass flow rate increase second law efficiency. • Large-tube receiver performs better in the small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle. - Abstract: The first law and second law efficiencies are determined for a stainless steel closed-tube open rectangular cavity solar receiver. It is to be used in a small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle using a micro-turbine with low compressor pressure ratios. There are many different variables at play to model the air temperature increase of the air running through such a receiver. These variables include concentrator shape, concentrator diameter, concentrator rim angle, concentrator reflectivity, concentrator optical error, solar tracking error, receiver aperture area, receiver material, effect of wind, receiver tube diameter, inlet temperature and mass flow rate through the receiver. All these variables are considered in this paper. The Brayton cycle requires very high receiver surface temperatures in order to be successful. These high temperatures, however, have many disadvantages in terms of heat loss from the receiver, especially radiation heat loss. With the help of ray-tracing software, SolTrace, and receiver modelling techniques, an optimum receiver-to-concentrator-area ratio of A′ ≈ 0.0035 was found for a concentrator with 45° rim angle, 10 mrad optical error and 1° tracking error. A method to determine the temperature profile and net heat transfer rate along the length of the receiver tube is presented. Receiver efficiencies are shown in terms of mass flow rate, receiver tube diameter, pressure drop, maximum receiver surface temperature and inlet temperature of the working fluid. For a 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish, the

  5. Dimensions of biodiversity of oceanic nitrogen cycling: nutrient co-limitation, nitrogen substrate preferences and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehr, J.; Mills, M. M.; Shilova, I. N.; Turk-Kubo, K.; Robidart, J.; van Dijken, G.; Bjorkman, K. M.; Whitt, D. B.; Wai, B.; Pampin Baro, J.; Hogan, M.; Rapp, I.; Zakem, E.; Fredrickson, A.; Leahy, B.; Linney, M.; Santiago, A.; Follows, M. J.; Achterberg, E. P.; Kolber, Z.; Church, M. J.; Arrigo, K. R.

    2016-02-01

    We conducted the research cruise: Nutrient Effects on Marine microOrganisms (NEMO) onboard the R/V New Horizon (NH1417: August 18 to September 16, 2014) between the ports of San Diego, CA and Honolulu, HI. The three major objectives of the cruise were to: 1) evaluate genetic, physiological and phylogenetic responses of marine phytoplankton communities in the North Pacific Subtropical Gyre to different nitrogen (N) substrates and to determine how other nutrients (iron, phosphorus) impact N utilization; 2) characterize the physical processes and dynamics in support of the biological processes; and 3) characterize the diversity and activities of microbial communities in the upper water column in relation to the nutrient availability. Several incubation experiments were conducted along the cruise transect to assess the effect of nutrients on microbial communities. The results showed that N addition resulted in increased chlorophyll a (chl a) and rates of CO2 fixation at most sites, but Prochlorococcus, Synechococcus and picoekaryotic phytoplankton had different responses to urea, ammonium and nitrate. In contrast, chl a and CO2 fixation did not respond to additions of single nutrient (e.g. N, P or Fe alone) at the westernmost experiment (151°W), where the simultaneous addition of N and P was required for stimulation. The physical dynamics were studied through high-resolution surveys of eddy dipole features as well as diel sampling at two locations. Additionally, we characterized an extensive bloom that occurred near the critical latitude (29°N, 140°W) from mid July to the end of September; a typical but still enigmatic event. Here, we present a summary of the initial observations and findings from the NEMO cruise with data including physics, nutrient concentrations, chl a, primary productivity and microbial community composition. The results of this research cruise will help in assessing how ocean N cycling and ecosystem functions will respond to global climate

  6. Assessment of Thermal Maturity Trends in Devonian–Mississippian Source Rocks Using Raman Spectroscopy: Limitations of Peak-Fitting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S. Lupoi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal maturity of shale is often measured by vitrinite reflectance (VRo. VRo measurements for the Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks evaluated herein predicted thermal immaturity in areas where associated reservoir rocks are oil-producing. This limitation of the VRo method led to the current evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a suitable alternative for developing correlations between thermal maturity and Raman spectra. In this study, Raman spectra of Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks were regressed against measured VRo or sample-depth. Attempts were made to develop quantitative correlations of thermal maturity. Using sample-depth as a proxy for thermal maturity is not without limitations as thermal maturity as a function of depth depends on thermal gradient, which can vary through time, subsidence rate, uplift, lack of uplift, and faulting. Correlations between Raman data and vitrinite reflectance or sample-depth were quantified by peak-fitting the spectra. Various peak-fitting procedures were evaluated to determine the effects of the number of peaks and maximum peak widths on correlations between spectral metrics and thermal maturity. Correlations between D-frequency, G-band full width at half maximum (FWHM, and band separation between the G- and D-peaks and thermal maturity provided some degree of linearity throughout most peak-fitting assessments; however, these correlations and those calculated from the G-frequency, D/G FWHM ratio, and D/G peak area ratio also revealed a strong dependence on peak-fitting processes. This dependency on spectral analysis techniques raises questions about the validity of peak-fitting, particularly given the amount of subjective analyst involvement necessary to reconstruct spectra. This research shows how user interpretation and extrapolation affected the comparability of different samples, the accuracy of generated trends, and therefore, the potential of the Raman spectral

  7. Assessment of Thermal Maturity Trends in Devonian–Mississippian Source Rocks Using Raman Spectroscopy: Limitations of Peak-Fitting Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupoi, Jason S., E-mail: jlupoi@rjlg.com; Fritz, Luke P. [RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States); Parris, Thomas M. [Kentucky Geological Survey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Hackley, Paul C. [UniversityS. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Solotky, Logan [RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States); Eble, Cortland F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Schlaegle, Steve [RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    The thermal maturity of shale is often measured by vitrinite reflectance (VRo). VRo measurements for the Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks evaluated herein predicted thermal immaturity in areas where associated reservoir rocks are oil-producing. This limitation of the VRo method led to the current evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a suitable alternative for developing correlations between thermal maturity and Raman spectra. In this study, Raman spectra of Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks were regressed against measured VRo or sample-depth. Attempts were made to develop quantitative correlations of thermal maturity. Using sample-depth as a proxy for thermal maturity is not without limitations as thermal maturity as a function of depth depends on thermal gradient, which can vary through time, subsidence rate, uplift, lack of uplift, and faulting. Correlations between Raman data and vitrinite reflectance or sample-depth were quantified by peak-fitting the spectra. Various peak-fitting procedures were evaluated to determine the effects of the number of peaks and maximum peak widths on correlations between spectral metrics and thermal maturity. Correlations between D-frequency, G-band full width at half maximum (FWHM), and band separation between the G- and D-peaks and thermal maturity provided some degree of linearity throughout most peak-fitting assessments; however, these correlations and those calculated from the G-frequency, D/G FWHM ratio, and D/G peak area ratio also revealed a strong dependence on peak-fitting processes. This dependency on spectral analysis techniques raises questions about the validity of peak-fitting, particularly given the amount of subjective analyst involvement necessary to reconstruct spectra. This research shows how user interpretation and extrapolation affected the comparability of different samples, the accuracy of generated trends, and therefore, the potential of the Raman spectral method to become an

  8. Performance analysis of a potassium-steam two stage vapour cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitachi, Kohshi; Saito, Takeshi

    1983-01-01

    It is an important subject to raise the thermal efficiency in thermal power plants. In present thermal power plants which use steam cycle, the plant thermal efficiency has already reached 41 to 42 %, steam temperature being 839 K, and steam pressure being 24.2 MPa. That is, the thermal efficiency in a steam cycle is facing a limit. In this study, analysis was made on the performance of metal vapour/steam two-stage Rankine cycle obtained by combining a metal vapour cycle with a present steam cycle. Three different combinations using high temperature potassium regenerative cycle and low temperature steam regenerative cycle, potassium regenerative cycle and steam reheat and regenerative cycle, and potassium bleed cycle and steam reheat and regenerative cycle were systematically analyzed for the overall thermal efficiency, the output ratio and the flow rate ratio, when the inlet temperature of a potassium turbine, the temperature of a potassium condenser, and others were varied. Though the overall thermal efficiency was improved by lowering the condensing temperature of potassium vapour, it is limited by the construction because the specific volume of potassium in low pressure section increases greatly. In the combinatipn of potassium vapour regenerative cycle with steam regenerative cycle, the overall thermal efficiency can be 58.5 %, and also 60.2 % if steam reheat and regenerative cycle is employed. If a cycle to heat steam with the bled vapor out of a potassium vapour cycle is adopted, the overall thermal efficiency of 63.3 % is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Maximum thermal limits of coral reef damselfishes are size dependent and resilient to near-future ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Timothy D; Roche, Dominique G; Binning, Sandra A; Speers-Roesch, Ben; Sundin, Josefin

    2017-10-01

    Theoretical models predict that ocean acidification, caused by increased dissolved CO 2 , will reduce the maximum thermal limits of fishes, thereby increasing their vulnerability to rising ocean temperatures and transient heatwaves. Here, we tested this prediction in three species of damselfishes on the Great Barrier Reef, Australia. Maximum thermal limits were quantified using critical thermal maxima (CT max ) tests following acclimation to either present-day or end-of-century levels of CO 2 for coral reef environments (∼500 or ∼1000 µatm, respectively). While species differed significantly in their thermal limits, whereby Dischistodus perspicillatus exhibited greater CT max (37.88±0.03°C; N =47) than Dascyllus aruanus (37.68±0.02°C; N =85) and Acanthochromis polyacanthus (36.58±0.02°C; N =63), end-of-century CO 2 had no effect ( D. aruanus ) or a slightly positive effect (increase in CT max of 0.16°C in D. perspicillatus and 0.21°C in A. polyacanthus ) on CT max Contrary to expectations, early-stage juveniles were equally as resilient to CO 2 as larger conspecifics, and CT max was higher at smaller body sizes in two species. These findings suggest that ocean acidification will not impair the maximum thermal limits of reef fishes, and they highlight the critical role of experimental biology in testing predictions of theoretical models forecasting the consequences of environmental change. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  10. Variational calculation of the limit cycle and its frequency in a two-neuron model with delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Sebastian F.; Wessel, Ralf; Pelster, Axel

    2006-01-01

    We consider a model system of two coupled Hopfield neurons, which is described by delay differential equations taking into account the finite signal propagation and processing times. When the delay exceeds a critical value, a limit cycle emerges via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. First, we calculate its frequency and trajectory perturbatively by applying the Poincare-Lindstedt method. Then, the perturbation series are resummed by means of the Shohat expansion in good agreement with numerical values. However, with increasing delay, the accuracy of the results from the Shohat expansion worsens. We thus apply variational perturbation theory (VPT) to the perturbation expansions to obtain more accurate results, which moreover hold even in the limit of large delays

  11. Analyze and Improve Lifetime in 3L-NPC Inverter from Power Cycle and Thermal Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Quan; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Qunjing

    2014-01-01

    Three-level Neutral-point-clamped (3L-NPC) topology is becoming a realistic alternative to the conventional one in high-voltage and high-power application. Studies show that the power cycling mean time to failure (MTTF) of the semiconductor bond wire in 3L-NPC inverter system may be very short...... under some common conditions. Firstly, this paper shows the impact of some key parameters on power electronic system lifetime according the analysis of semiconductor failure mechanism. Secondly, a switching frequency reduction method based on the position relationship between the flowing current...... and load voltage is applied to reduce power cycle and switching losses. And then, three-level active neutral point-clamped topology is taken into account to wake the most thermo stressed device. In order to validate the improve lifetime method in this paper, a 2MW 3L-NPC converter used in wind energy has...

  12. Effect of mouth-motion fatigue and thermal cycling on the marginal accuracy of partial coverage restorations made of various dental materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stappert, Christian F J; Chitmongkolsuk, Somsak; Silva, Nelson R F A; Att, Wael; Strub, Joerg R

    2008-09-01

    To investigate the influence of mouth-motion fatigue on marginal-accuracy of partial-coverage-restorations-(PCRs) of various dental materials. Eighty molars were prepared equally and divided into five groups (n=16). PCRs were fabricated of following dental materials: Group-GO=Gold-Pontor-MPF(double dagger), Group-TA=Targis*, Group-EX=IPS-e.max-Press*, Group-EM=IPS-Empress*, Group-PC=ProCAD*/Cerec 3(dagger) ((double dagger)Metalor/*Ivoclar-Vivadent/(dagger)Sirona-Dental-System). Gold-PCRs were cemented conventionally. Residual 64 PCRs were adhesively luted and subjected to masticatory loading (1.2million-cycles, 1.6Hz, 49N) and thermal cycling (5 degrees C/55 degrees C, 60s, dwell-time, 5500cycles). Discrepancies in marginal-accuracy were examined on epoxy replicas (200 x magnification). Statistical analysis was performed by unpaired and paired t-tests (alpha=0.05). After cementing, marginal-accuracy (geometrical mean)[95% confidence limits] was recorded: GO-47[43-51]microm, TA-42[38-45]microm, EX-60[52-67]microm, EM-52[45-60]microm and PC-75[59-94]microm. No significant differences were found between groups GO, TA and EM. Values of Group-EX were significantly higher compared to Group-TA (p=0.04). Group-PC demonstrated significantly decreased marginal-accuracy towards groups GO (p=0.03) and TA (p=0.02). Except for Group-GO (p=0.01), no significant changes in marginal-accuracy were observed after mouth-motion fatigue and thermal cycling (GO-42[38-45]microm, TA-42[38-47]microm, EX-56[49-65]microm, EM-54[46-64]microm and PC-71[59-84]microm). However, Group-GO and Group-EM showed significant deviations in marginal-accuracy after aging (p=0.04). Marginal discrepancies of groups EX and EM were similar (p=1.0). Values of Group-PC were significantly higher when compared to groups GO (p=0.01) and TA (p=0.02). Buccal-lingual marginal discrepancies were significantly higher than mesial-distal in all groups and stages. Cast-gold-PCRs demonstrated superior marginal

  13. Relieving thermal discomfort: Effects of sprayed L-menthol on perception, performance, and time trial cycling in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barwood, M J; Corbett, J; Thomas, K; Twentyman, P

    2015-06-01

    L-menthol stimulates cutaneous thermoreceptors and induces cool sensations improving thermal comfort, but has been linked to heat storage responses; this could increase risk of heat illness during self-paced exercise in the heat. Therefore, L-menthol application could lead to a discrepancy between behavioral and autonomic thermoregulatory drivers. Eight male participants volunteered. They were familiarized and then completed two trials in hot conditions (33.5 °C, 33% relative humidity) where their t-shirt was sprayed with CONTROL-SPRAY or MENTHOL-SPRAY after 10 km (i.e., when they were hot and uncomfortable) of a 16.1-km cycling time trial (TT). Thermal perception [thermal sensation (TS) and comfort (TC)], thermal responses [rectal temperature (Trec ), skin temperature (Tskin )], perceived exertion (RPE), heart rate, pacing (power output), and TT completion time were measured. MENTHOL-SPRAY made participants feel cooler and more comfortable and resulted in lower RPE (i.e., less exertion) yet performance was unchanged [TT completion: CONTROL-SPRAY 32.4 (2.9) and MENTHOL-SPRAY 32.7 (3.0) min]. Trec rate of increase was 1.40 (0.60) and 1.45 (0.40) °C/h after CONTROL-SPRAY and MENTHOL-SPRAY application, which were not different. Spraying L-menthol toward the end of self-paced exercise in the heat improved perception, but did not alter performance and did not increase heat illness risk. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Observational limitations of Bose-Einstein photon statistics and radiation noise in thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y.-J.; Talghader, J. J.

    2018-01-01

    For many decades, theory has predicted that Bose-Einstein statistics are a fundamental feature of thermal emission into one or a few optical modes; however, the resulting Bose-Einstein-like photon noise has never been experimentally observed. There are at least two reasons for this: (1) Relationships to describe the thermal radiation noise for an arbitrary mode structure have yet to be set forth, and (2) the mode and detector constraints necessary for the detection of such light is extremely hard to fulfill. Herein, photon statistics and radiation noise relationships are developed for systems with any number of modes and couplings to an observing space. The results are shown to reproduce existing special cases of thermal emission and are then applied to resonator systems to discuss physically realizable conditions under which Bose-Einstein-like thermal statistics might be observed. Examples include a single isolated cavity and an emitter cavity coupled to a small detector space. Low-mode-number noise theory shows major deviations from solely Bose-Einstein or Poisson treatments and has particular significance because of recent advances in perfect absorption and subwavelength structures both in the long-wave infrared and terahertz regimes. These microresonator devices tend to utilize a small volume with few modes, a regime where the current theory of thermal emission fluctuations and background noise, which was developed decades ago for free-space or single-mode cavities, has no derived solutions.

  15. The effects of stacking sequence and thermal cycling on the flexural properties of laminate composites of aluminium-epoxy/basalt-glass fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi Azghan, Mehdi; Eslami-Farsani, Reza

    2018-02-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the effects of different stacking sequences and thermal cycling on the flexural properties of fibre metal laminates (FMLs). FMLs were composed of two aluminium alloy 2024-T3 sheets and epoxy polymer-matrix composites that have four layers of basalt and/or glass fibres with five different stacking sequences. For FML samples the thermal cycle time was about 6 min for temperature cycles from 25 °C to 115 °C. Flexural properties of samples evaluated after 55 thermal cycles and compared to non-exposed samples. Surface modification of aluminium performed by electrochemical treatment (anodizing) method and aluminium surfaces have been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Also, the flexural failure mechanisms investigated by the optical microscope study of fractured surfaces. SEM images indicated that the porosity of the aluminium surface increased after anodizing process. The findings of the present study showed that flexural modulus were maximum for basalt fibres based FML, minimum for glass fibres based FML while basalt/glass fibres based FML lies between them. Due to change in the failure mechanism of basalt/glass fibres based FMLs that have glass fibres at outer layer of the polymer composite, the flexural strength of this FML is lower than glass and basalt fibres based FML. After thermal cycling, due to the good thermal properties of basalt fibres, flexural properties of basalt fibres based FML structures decreased less than other composites.

  16. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NOx control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO x control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO x removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNO x operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics

  17. Evaluation of the of thermal shock resistance of a castable containing andalusite aggregates by thermal shock cycles; Avaliacao da resistencia ao dano por choque termico por ciclagem de um concreto refratario contendo agregados de andaluzita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G.C.R.; Santos, E.M.B.; Ribeiro, S., E-mail: girribeiro@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (DEMAR/EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia de. Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais; Resende, W.S. [Industrias Brasileiras de Artigos Refratarios (IBAR), Lorena, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, J.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The thermal shock resistance of refractory materials is one of the most important characteristics that determine their performance in many applications, since abrupt and drastic differences in temperature can damage them. Resistance to thermal shock damage can be evaluated based on thermal cycles, i.e., successive heating and cooling cycles followed by an analysis of the drop in Young's modulus occurring in each cycle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance to thermal shock damage in a commercial refractory concrete with andalusite aggregate. Concrete samples that were sintered at 1000 deg C and 1450 deg C for 5 hours to predict and were subjected to 30 thermal shock cycles, soaking in the furnace for 20 minutes at a temperature of 1000 deg C, and subsequent cooling in circulating water at 25 deg C. The results showed a decrease in Young's modulus and rupture around 72% for samples sintered at 1000 ° C, and 82% in sintered at 1450 ° C. The refractory sintered at 1450 deg C would show lower thermal shock resistance than the refractory sintered at 1000 deg C. (author)

  18. The effects of thermal acclimation on lethal temperatures and critical thermal limits in the green vegetable bug, Nezara viridula (L. (Hemiptera: Pentatomidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pol eChanthy

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available According to geographical distribution, Nezara viridula (Heteroptera: Pentatomidae can be found across tropical, subtropical and temperate regions and this pattern is assumed to reflect differences in thermal adaptation, particularly in cold tolerance. Here the lethal temperature and critical thermal limits (thermal tolerance are examined for N. viridula. The upper lethal temperature for N. viridula at two contrasting climate locations (Breeza and Grafton, New South Wales, Australia was 40.3ºC with 20% survival under the stress of high temperature. The lower lethal temperature did not differ between these two populations and was -8.0ºC with 20% survival under low temperature stress. Survival of N. viridula increased after acclimation at high temperature for seven days. In contrast, when acclimated at lower temperatures (10 and 15ºC, survival of Breeza and Grafton N. viridula was lower than 20% at -8.0ºC.Control-reared N. viridula adults (25ºC had a mean CTMinOnset (cold stupor of 1.3 ± 2.1ºC and a mean CTMax (heat coma of 45.9 ± 0.9ºC. After 7 days of acclimation at 10, 20, 30, or 35ºC, N. viridula adults exhibited a 1ºC change in CTMax and a ~ 1.5ºC change in CTMinOnset. CTMax and CTMinOnset of Breeza and Grafton N. viridula populations did not differ across acclimation temperatures. These results suggest that short-term temperature acclimation is more important than provenance for determining lethal temperatures and critical thermal limits in N. viridula.

  19. Climate, carbon cycling and marine ecology during the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum

    OpenAIRE

    Frieling, J.

    2016-01-01

    The Paleocene and Eocene are characterized by strong greenhouse climates. Atmospheric CO2 concentrations and global temperatures were much higher than today. The period from 60 to 50 million years ago (Ma) is marked by a gradual warming trend of ~8 ºC in the deep ocean. The interval from 56 to 50 Ma is further characterized by several transient perturbations of the carbon cycle. Essentially, these perturbations, or “hyperthermal” events mark phases of rapid (103 – 104 years) warming, associat...

  20. A Novel Organic Rankine Cycle System with Improved Thermal Stability and Low Global Warming Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panesar Angad S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC system for long haul truck application. Rather than typical tail pipe heat recovery configurations, the proposed setup exploits the gaseous streams that are already a load on the engine cooling module. The system uses dual loops connected only by the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR stream. A water blend study is conducted to identify suitable mixtures for the High Temperature (HT loop, while the Low Temperature (LT loop utilises a Low Global Warming (GWP Hydrofluoroether.

  1. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  2. Emissions from cycling of thermal power plants in electricity systems with high penetration of wind power: Life cycle assessment for Ireland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Turconi, Roberto; O'Dwyer, C.; Flynn, D.

    2014-01-01

    , as part of LCA of electricity generation, the efficiency reduction would result in large underestimation of emissions, e.g. up to 65% for an oil power plant. Overall, cycling emissions accounted for less than 7% of lifecycle CO2, NOx and SO2 emissions in the five scenarios considered: while......-load electricity production shifts to a cleaner source than coal. Finally, the present study indicates that, in terms of emission reductions, the priority for Ireland is to phase out coal-based power plants. While investing in new storage capacity reduces system operating costs at high wind penetrations and limits......The increase of renewable sources in the power sector is an important step towards more sustainable electricity production. However, introducing high shares of variable renewables, such as wind and solar, cause dispatchable power plants to vary their output to fulfill the remaining electrical...

  3. Limited Energy Study. Thermal Storage at Central Chilled Water Plant, Fort Leonard Wood, Missouri

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1996-01-01

    The Scope of Work (See Appendix A) called for the study of the economic feasibility of providing a cold thermal storage system at the central chiller plant serving the Fort Leonard Wood 600 Area in order to reduce electrical demand charges...

  4. Investigation of ferroelectric materials by the thermal noise method: advantages and limitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednyakov, Petr; Shnaidshtein, I. V.; Strukov, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 500, č. 1 (2016), 203-217 ISSN 0015-0193 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15110S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thermal noise * ferroelectricity * thin films * dielectric permittivity * equivalent circuit Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.551, year: 2016

  5. The thermal conductivity of steam in the zero density limit as a function of temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengers, J. V.; Basu, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    An equation for the thermal conductivity of steam at pressures of 1 atmosphere and below is presented. Sources of the experimental data and the actual data used in the analysis are presented. Also included is low density data below 100 C.

  6. Thermal-Economic Modularization of Small, Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plants for Mid-Enthalpy Geothermal Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yodha Y. Nusiaputra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The costs of the surface infrastructure in mid-enthalpy geothermal power systems, especially in remote areas, could be reduced by using small, modular Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC power plants. Thermal-economic criteria have been devised to standardize ORC plant dimensions for such applications. We designed a modular ORC to utilize various wellhead temperatures (120–170 °C, mass flow rates and ambient temperatures (−10–40 °C. A control strategy was developed using steady-state optimization, in order to maximize net power production at off-design conditions. Optimum component sizes were determined using specific investment cost (SIC minimization and mean cashflow (MCF maximization for three different climate scenarios. Minimizing SIC did not yield significant benefits, but MCF proved to be a much better optimization function.

  7. Deposition Time and Thermal Cycles of Fabricating Thin-wall Steel Parts by Double Electrode GMAW Based Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Dongqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition time for fabricating the thin-wall part as well as the peak temperature of the substrate during the process was analyzed in the double electrode gas metal arc welding (DE-GMAW based additive manufacturing (AM. The total deposition time and the interlayer idle time of the manufacturing process decreased with the increasing of the bypass current under the same interlayer temperature and the same deposition rate. The thermal cycling curves illustrated that the peak temperature of the substrate was lower in the DE-GMAW base AM under the same conditions. When depositing the thin-wall parts, the DE-GMAW based AM can reduce the heat input to the substrate and improve the fabrication efficiency, compared with the GMAW based AM.

  8. Monitoring the Degradation Process of Inconel 600 and its Aluminide Coatings under Molten Sulfate Film with Thermal Cycles by Electrochemical Measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Take, S.; Yoshinaga, S.; Yanagita, M.; Itoi, Y.

    2016-01-01

    With a specially designed electrochemical cell, the changes in impedance behavior for Inconel 600 and aluminide diffusion coatings under molten sulfate film with thermal cycles (from 800 ℃ to 350 ℃) were monitored with electrochemical impedance measurements. It was found that corrosion resistance for both materials increased with lower temperatures. At the same time, the state of molten salt was also monitored successfully by measuring the changes in impedance at high frequency, which generally represents the resistance of molten salt itself. After two thermal cycles, both Inconel 600 and aluminide diffusion coatings showed excellent corrosion resistance. The results from SEM observation and EDS analysis correlated well with the results obtained by electrochemical impedance measurements. It is concluded that electrochemical impedance is very useful for monitoring the corrosion resistance of materials under molten salt film conditions even with thermal cycles.

  9. Thermal analysis of W VII-AS limiter system and presentation of a graphite-block concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Grigull, P.

    1989-01-01

    A 2D-finite element thermal analysis of the initial W VII-AS limiter system has been performed and is discussed. Furhter to this analysis a graphite block concept is presented. This concept has been numerically analyzed for applications as a limiter in plasma and nuclear fusion experimental devices. The results are described in this paper. This block concept seems to be also applicable to first wall and divertor designs; the graphite elements could be replaced by ceramic ones. (author). 10 refs.; 13 figs

  10. Low Temperature Creep of Hot-Extruded Near-Stoichiometric NiTi Shape Memory Alloy. Part 2; Effect of Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S. V.; Noebe, R. D.

    2013-01-01

    This paper is the first report on the effect prior low temperature creep on the thermal cycling behavior of NiTi. The isothermal low temperature creep behavior of near-stoichiometric NiTi between 300 and 473 K was discussed in Part I. The effect of temperature cycling on its creep behavior is reported in the present paper (Part II). Temperature cycling tests were conducted between either 300 or 373 K and 473 K under a constant applied stress of either 250 or 350 MPa with hold times lasting at each temperature varying between 300 and 700 h. Each specimen was pre-crept either at 300 or at 473 K for several months under an identical applied stress as that used in the subsequent thermal cycling tests. Irrespective of the initial pre-crept microstructures, the specimens exhibited a considerable increase in strain with each thermal cycle so that the total strain continued to build-up to 15 to 20 percent after only 5 cycles. Creep strains were immeasurably small during the hold periods. It is demonstrated that the strains in the austenite and martensite are linearly correlated. Interestingly, the differential irrecoverable strain, in the material measured in either phase decreases with increasing number of cycles, similar to the well-known Manson-Coffin relation in low cycle fatigue. Both phases are shown to undergo strain hardening due to the development of residual stresses. Plots of true creep rate against absolute temperature showed distinct peaks and valleys during the cool-down and heat-up portions of the thermal cycles, respectively. Transformation temperatures determined from the creep data revealed that the austenitic start and finish temperatures were more sensitive to the pre-crept martensitic phase than to the pre-crept austenitic phase. The results are discussed in terms of a phenomenological model, where it is suggested that thermal cycling between the austenitic and martensitic phase temperatures or vice versa results in the deformation of the austenite and

  11. Energy losses in thermally cycled optical fibers constrained in small bend radii

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guild, Eric; Morelli, Gregg

    2012-09-23

    High energy laser pulses were fired into a 365μm diameter fiber optic cable constrained in small radii of curvature bends, resulting in a catastrophic failure. Q-switched laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, Nd:YAG laser were injected into the cables, and the spatial intensity profile at the exit face of the fiber was observed using an infrared camera. The transmission of the radiation through the tight radii resulted in an asymmetric intensity profile with one half of the fiber core having a higher peak-to-average energy distribution. Prior to testing, the cables were thermally conditioned while constrained in the small radii of curvature bends. Single-bend, double-bend, and U-shaped eometries were tested to characterize various cable routing scenarios.

  12. Summary of the Effects of Two Years of Hygro-Thermal Cycling on a Carbon/Epoxy Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael; Bail, Justin L.

    2011-01-01

    Composite materials are beginning to be used for structures in the fan section of commercial gas turbine engines. This paper explores the type of damage that could occur within one type of composite material after exposure to hygrothermal cycles (temperature/humidity cycles) that are representative of the environment in the fan section of an engine. The effect of this damage on composite material properties is measured. Chemical changes in the matrix material were limited to the exposed surface. Microcrack formation was identified in the composite material. This damage did not cause a significant reduction in tensile strength or impact penetration resistance of the composite material. Additional data is needed to assess the effect of damage on compressive strength.

  13. Computer code system for the R and D of nuclear fuel cycle with fast reactor. 2. Development and application of analytical evaluation system for thermal striping phenomena

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muramatsu, Toshiharu

    2001-01-01

    Fluid-structure thermal interaction phenomena characterized by stationary random temperature fluctuations, namely thermal striping are observed in the downstream region such as a T-junction piping system of liquid metal fast reactors (LMFRs). Therefore, the piping wall located in the downstream region must be protected against the stationary random thermal process, which might induce high-cycle fatigue. This paper describes the evaluation system based on numerical simulation methods consisting of three thermohydraulics computer programs AQUA, DINUS-3 and THEMIS and of three thermomechanical computer programs BEMSET, FINAS and CANIS, for the thermal striping developed at Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Institute (JNC). Verification results for each computer code and the system are also introduced based on out-of-pile experimental data using water and sodium as working fluids. (author)

  14. Effects of Hygrothermal Cycling on the Chemical, Thermal, and Mechanical Properties of 862/W Epoxy Resin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Sandi G.; Roberts, Gary D.; Copa, Christine C.; Bail, Justin L.; Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.

    2011-01-01

    The hygrothermal aging characteristics of an epoxy resin were characterized over 1 year, which included 908 temperature and humidity cycles. The epoxy resin quickly showed evidence of aging through color change and increased brittleness. The influence of aging on the material s glass transition temperature (Tg) was evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) and Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA). The Tg remained relatively constant throughout the year long cyclic aging profile. The chemical composition was monitored by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) where evidence of chemical aging and advancement of cure was noted. The tensile strength of the resin was tested as it aged. This property was severely affected by the aging process in the form of reduced ductility and embrittlement. Detailed chemical evaluation suggests many aging mechanisms are taking place during exposure to hygrothermal conditions. This paper details the influence of processes such as: advancement of cure, chemical degradation, and physical aging on the chemical and physical properties of the epoxy resin.

  15. Tracheal sound parameters of respiratory cycle phases show differences between flow-limited and normal breathing during sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkas, A; Huupponen, E; Virkkala, J; Saastamoinen, A; Rauhala, E; Tenhunen, M; Himanen, S-L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop new computational parameters to examine the characteristics of respiratory cycle phases from the tracheal breathing sound signal during sleep. Tracheal sound data from 14 patients (10 males and 4 females) were examined. From each patient, a 10 min long section of normal and a 10 min section of flow-limited breathing during sleep were analysed. The computationally determined proportional durations of the respiratory phases were first investigated. Moreover, the phase durations and breathing sound amplitude levels were used to calculate the area under the breathing sound envelope signal during inspiration and expiration phases. An inspiratory sound index was then developed to provide the percentage of this type of area during the inspiratory phase with respect to the combined area of inspiratory and expiratory phases. The proportional duration of the inspiratory phase showed statistically significantly higher values during flow-limited breathing than during normal breathing and inspiratory pause displayed an opposite difference. The inspiratory sound index showed statistically significantly higher values during flow-limited breathing than during normal breathing. The presented novel computational parameters could contribute to the examination of sleep-disordered breathing or as a screening tool

  16. Life cycle assessment of hemp cultivation and use of hemp-based thermal insulator materials in buildings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zampori, Luca; Dotelli, Giovanni; Vernelli, Valeria

    2013-07-02

    The aim of this research is to assess the sustainability of a natural fiber, such as hemp (Cannabis sativa), and its use as thermal insulator for building applications. The sustainability of hemp was quantified by life cycle assessment (LCA) and particular attention was given to the amount of CO2eq of the whole process, and the indicator greenhouse gas protocol (GGP) was selected to quantify CO2eq emissions. In this study also CO2 uptake of hemp was considered. Two different allocation procedures (i.e., mass and economic) were adopted. Other indicators, such as Cumulative Energy Demand (CED) and EcoIndicator99 H were calculated. The production of 1 ha yielded 15 ton of hemp, whose global warming potential (GWP100) was equal to about -26.01 ton CO2eq: the amount allocated to the technical fiber (20% of the total amount of hemp biomass) was -5.52 ton CO2eq when mass allocation was used, and -5.54 ton CO2eq when economic allocation was applied. The sustainability for building applications was quantified by considering an insulation panel made by hemp fiber (85%) and polyester fiber (15%) in 1 m(2) of wall having a thermal transmittance (U) equal to 0.2 W/m(2)_K. The environmental performances of the hemp-based panel were compared to those of a rockwool-based one.

  17. The effect of thermal cycling to 1100 degree C on the alpha (Mo) phase in directionally solidified gamma/gamma prime-alpha alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.

    1981-01-01

    In gamma/gamma prime - alpha eutectic alloys (Ni-Mo-Al), the resistance of the alpha phase to morphological changes during thermal cycling was found to be dependent on the structure formed during directional solidification. Fine, smooth alpha fibers survived up to 1000 five minute cycles to 1100 C with minor microstructural contour changes, while coarser and irregularly shaped alpha fibers tended to spheroidize. A mechanism to explain this phenomenon is proposed. It is suggested that on heating to 1100 C, the alpha phase is likely to undergo morphological changes, until differential thermal expansion creates a stress free interface between the alpha phase and the gamma/gamma prime matrix.

  18. Impact of Total Ionizing Dose Radiation Testing and Long-Term Thermal Cycling on the Operation of CMF20120D Silicon Carbide Power MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheidegger, Robert J.; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Scheick, Leif; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    Power systems designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and extreme temperature exposures. Silicon carbide devices show great promise for use in future power electronics systems, but information pertaining to performance of the devices in the space environment is very scarce. A silicon carbide N-channel enhancement-mode power MOSFET called the CMF20120 is of interest for use in space environments. Samples of the device were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling to address their reliability for use in space applications. The results of the experimental work are presentd and discussed.

  19. Cosmic ray heating in cool core clusters - II. Self-regulation cycle and non-thermal emission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Svenja; Pfrommer, Christoph

    2017-05-01

    Self-regulated feedback by active galactic nuclei (AGNs) appears to be critical in balancing radiative cooling of the low-entropy gas at the centres of galaxy clusters and in regulating star formation in central galaxies. In a companion paper, we found steady-state solutions of the hydrodynamic equations that are coupled to the cosmic ray (CR) energy equation for a large cluster sample. In those solutions, radiative cooling in the central region is balanced by streaming CRs through the generation and dissipation of resonantly generated Alfvén waves and by thermal conduction at large radii. Here, we demonstrate that the predicted non-thermal emission resulting from hadronic CR interactions in the intracluster medium exceeds observational radio (and gamma-ray) data in a subsample of clusters that host radio mini haloes (RMHs). In contrast, the predicted non-thermal emission is well below observational data in cooling galaxy clusters without RMHs. These are characterized by exceptionally large AGN radio fluxes, indicating high CR yields and associated CR heating rates. We suggest a self-regulation cycle of AGN feedback in which non-RMH clusters are heated by streaming CRs homogeneously throughout the central cooling region. We predict radio micro haloes surrounding the AGNs of these CR-heated clusters in which the primary emission may predominate the hadronically generated emission. Once the CR population has streamed sufficiently far and lost enough energy, the cooling rate increases, which explains the increased star formation rates in clusters hosting RMHs. Those could be powered hadronically by CRs that have previously heated the cluster core.

  20. Does thermal variability experienced at the egg stage influence life history traits across life cycle stages in a small invertebrate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kun Xing

    Full Text Available Although effects of thermal stability on eggs have often been considered in vertebrates, there is little data thermal stability in insect eggs even though these eggs are often exposed in nature to widely fluctuating ambient conditions. The modularity of development in invertebrates might lead to compensation across life cycle stages but this remains to be tested particularly within the context of realistic temperature fluctuations encountered in nature. We simulated natural temperate fluctuations on eggs of the worldwide cruciferous insect pest, the diamondback moth (DBM, Plutella xylostella (L., while maintaining the same mean temperature (25°C±0°C, 25±4°C, 25±6°C, 25±8°C, 25±10°C, 25±12°C and assessed egg development, survival and life history traits across developmental stages. Moderate fluctuations (25±4°C, 25±6°C did not influence performance compared to the constant temperature treatment, and none of the treatments influenced egg survival. However the wide fluctuating temperatures (25±10°C, 25±12°C slowed development time and led to an increase in pre-pupal mass, although these changes did not translate into any effects on longevity or fecundity at the adult stage. These findings indicate that environmental effects can extend across developmental stages despite the modularity of moth development but also highlight that there are few fitness consequences of the most variable thermal conditions likely to be experienced by Plutella xylostella.

  1. Thermal tests of a multi-tubular reactor for hydrogen production by using mixed ferrites thermochemical cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Pardo, Aurelio; Denk, Thorsten; Vidal, Alfonso

    2017-06-01

    The SolH2 project is an INNPACTO initiative of the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness, with the main goal to demonstrate the technological feasibility of solar thermochemical water splitting cycles as one of the most promising options to produce H2 from renewable sources in an emission-free way. A multi-tubular solar reactor was designed and build to evaluate a ferrite thermochemical cycle. At the end of this project, the ownership of this plant was transferred to CIEMAT. This paper reviews some additional tests with this pilot plant performed in the Plataforma Solar de Almería with the main goal to assess the thermal behavior of the reactor, evaluating the evolution of the temperatures inside the cavity and the relation between supplied power and reached temperatures. Previous experience with alumina tubes showed that they are very sensitive to temperature and flux gradients, what leads to elaborate an aiming strategy for the heliostat field to achieve a uniform distribution of the radiation inside the cavity. Additionally, the passing of clouds is a phenomenon that importantly affects all the CSP facilities by reducing their efficiency. The behavior of the reactor under these conditions has been studied.

  2. Thermal Capacitive Electrochemical Cycle on Carbon-Based Supercapacitor for Converting Low-grade Heat to Electricity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Wang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available It is a great challenge to efficiently convert low-grade heat (<100°C to electricity. Currently available heat-to-current converters, such as thermoelectric generators, operating in a low-grade heat regime reach efficiencies no higher than a few percent (<3%. Herein, we illustrated a thermal capacitive electrochemical cycle (TCEC using electrochemical cell, where the connection to the hot or cold reservoirs alternates in a cyclic charging–heating–discharging–cooling mode to convert heat into electricity, which performs as an electrochemical heat engine. TCEC technology is a cost-effective method for exploiting the temperature-dependent electrostatic potential in an electric double layer (EDL at carbon electrode/electrolyte interfaces; it produces net electricity by altering the EDL thickness via heating and cooling. In this paper, TCEC on supercapacitor was confirmed on commercial supercapacitor, which showed a poor conversion efficiency. To improve the performance, we redesigned the cell by employing the pouch cell setup with activated carbon as electrode materials and homemade temperature controlling system, which boosted the efficiency from 0.5% of commercial supercapacitor to 3.05% when cycling between 10 and 65°C. A higher efficiency of 3.95% could be reached by using microwaved exfoliated graphene nanosheets (MEG and nitric acid-treated MEG, which could help in decreasing the energy loss caused by charge leakage.

  3. Effects of the plastic deformation and thermal cycles on the mechanical properties of fully recrystallized Zircaloy-4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Litvack, Nicolas

    2005-01-01

    The development of crystallographic texture in a product depends, for a given material, of its fabrication history. In our case, the evolution of that texture results from a combination of cold working and thermal cycles applied together or separately. In the present work, cold working levels ranging from 50 % to approximately 90 % and different heat treatment cycles has been applied to Zircaloy-4 sheets and tubes. Using X-ray diffraction techniques and the direct pole figure method, the evolution of crystallographic texture has been analyzed for each fabrication route. We observed that cold working levels up to 90 % without intermediate annealing heat treatment do not change significantly the classic angle between basal pole and the normal/radial direction of the product (φ ≅ ± 25 degrees). Furthermore, the application of intermediate cold working levels (50 % - 60 %) and more than two intermediate annealing heat treatments exhibits a marked modification of the basal pole orientation. The basal poles appear now parallel to the normal direction (φ ≅ 0 degrees) of the product. Additionally, the crystallographic texture change observed with X-ray procedures was evaluated by the measure of anisotropic parameters R and P. The results here obtained will be use in the future as a basis for the design of a fabrication route capable to obtain in a HPTR process, seamless calandria tubes strengthened by crystallographic texture. (author) [es

  4. Contribution to the study of can deformations in the fuel elements of gas-graphite reactors during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gauthron, M.; Boudouresques, B.; Delpeyroux, P.

    1964-01-01

    The cans of fuel cartridges used in reactors of the gas-graphite type have either longitudinal fins of variable thickness, short herring-bone fins, or else a mixture of the two. An important test of the strength of these cartridges is their behaviour during thermal cycling carried out in cells reproducing in-pile conditions. It has been observed during with rapid cooling that there occurs a shortening at the base of the fins which can be accompanied in particular by a compression effect at the fin type, which has a tendency to curl, and by a tractive force acting on the body of the can at the ends of the longitudinal fins; this last phenomenon can result in a fracturing of the welds at the extremities or of the ends of the cartridge. This report presents first of all the way in which the stress diagram can be drawn for a can touching the fuel, and then the effect of the ratchet along a fin fixed to a bar with or without grooves. Finally the importance is shown of the test cycling variables (temperature, heating and cooling rates). (authors) [fr

  5. Assessment of cumulative damage by using ultrasonic C-scan on carbon fiber/epoxy composites under thermal cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Yutaka Shiino

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, structural composites manufactured by carbon fiber/epoxy laminates have been employed in large scale in aircraft industries. These structures require high strength under severe temperature changes of -56° until 80 °C. Regarding this scenario, the aim of this research was to reproduce thermal stress in the laminate plate developed by temperature changes and tracking possible cumulative damages on the laminate using ultrasonic C-scan inspection. The evaluation was based on attenuation signals and the C-scan map of the composite plate. The carbon fiber/epoxy plain weave laminate underwent temperatures of -60° to 80 °C, kept during 10 minutes and repeated for 1000, 2000, 3000 and 4000 times. After 1000 cycles, the specimens were inspected by C-scanning. A few changes in the laminate were observed using the inspection methodology only in specimens cycled 3000 times, or so. According to the found results, the used temperature range did not present enough conditions to cumulative damage in this type of laminate, which is in agreement with the macro - and micromechanical theory.

  6. Effect of tooth brushing and thermal cycling on a surface change of ceromers finished with different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, L-R; Yi, Y-J; Heo, S-J

    2002-09-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of tooth brushing and thermal cycling on the surface lustre and surface roughness of three ceromer systems treated with different surface finishing methods. The ceromers studied were: (1). Artglass, (2). Targis, (3). Sculpture and (4). the control group, Z 100. Half of the Targis and Sculpture groups were polished and the rest were coated with staining and glazing solution, respectively. All specimens were subjected to thermocycling 10000 times. Tooth brushing abrasion tests were performed in a customized tooth-brushing machine with 500 g weight applied on a back-and-forth cycle for 20000 repetitions. The lustre determined by measuring the light reflection area and the average roughness was compared between groups and between pre- and post-test values. All materials showed a lower lustre and rougher surface after thermocycling and tooth brushing (P ceromer specimens, except glazed Sculpture, showed a higher lustre and similar roughness to the control group. The post-brushing results revealed that glazed Sculpture presented discretely fallen out glaze coatings and had maximum change. However, stained Targis showed minimum change (P < 0.05) and polished Targis presented more changes than that of the staining treatment. It is therefore concluded that the glaze coatings for Sculpture don't exhibit long-term durability, while stain coatings for Targis acted like a protective layer.

  7. The Choice of thermal reactor systems. A report by the National Nuclear Corporation Limited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report to the Secretary of State in Great Britain by the National Nuclear Corporation following their assessment of the three thermal reactor systems, the AGR, PWR and SGHWR type reactors, which was performed in order to assist in the decision on the choice of thermal reactors for the U.K., is in three parts. Part I is an assessment of the three systems. It comprises: a description of the general method of assessment; a commentary in which are summarised discussions on the most important issues influencing reactor choice, i.e. safety, component failure, operational characteristics, development programme, construction programme; implications for the U.K. industry; costs; and reference design of each system. Part II consists of related questions and answers accompanied by commentaries on public acceptability and views from industry. Part III contains some conclusions including an analysis on the implications of the choices open and a summary of the main features of the assessment. (U.K.)

  8. Limit Cycles and Chaos via Quasi-periodicity in Two Coupled Ensembles of Ultra-cold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Aniket; Yuzbashyan, Emil; Altshuler, Boris

    We study the dynamics of two mesoscopic ensembles of ultra-cold two level atoms, which are collectively coupled to an optical cavity and are being pumped incoherently to the excited state. Whereas the time independent steady states are well understood, little is known about the time dependent ones. We explore and categorize various time dependent steady states, e.g. limit cycles and chaotic behavior. We draw a non-equilibrium phase diagram indicating different steady-state behaviors in different parts of the parameter space. We discuss the synchronization of the two ensembles in the time dependent steady states. We also show the onset of chaos via quasi-periodicity. The rich time dependent steady-state behavior, especially the existence of chaos, opens up possibilities for several engineering applications. Supported in part by the University and Louis Bevier Graduate Fellowship.

  9. Cell death induced by ozone and various non-thermal plasmas: therapeutic perspectives and limitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lunov, Oleg; Zablotskyy, Vitaliy A.; Churpita, Olexandr; Chánová, Eliška; Syková, Eva; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kubinová, Šárka

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 4, NOV (2014), "7129-1"-"7129-11" ISSN 2045-2322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1309 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M100101219 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 ; RVO:61389013 ; RVO:68378041 Keywords : cell death * non-thermal plasma * therapeutic perspectives Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics; FH - Neurology (UEM-P); CD - Macromolecular Chemistry (UMCH-V) Impact factor: 5.578, year: 2014

  10. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T

    2015-12-02

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  11. Thermal niche of Atlantic cod Gadus morhua: limits, tolerance and optima

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Righton, David A.; Andersen, Ken Haste; Neat, Francis

    2010-01-01

    in those cod with a mean thermal history of between 8 and 10°C. Our direct observations of habitat occupation suggest that adult cod will be able to tolerate warming seas, but that climate change will affect cod populations at earlier life-history stages as well as exerting effects on cod prey species........ The data demonstrate that cod is an adaptable and tolerant species capable of surviving and growing in a wide range of temperate marine climates. The total thermal niche ranged from –1.5 to 19°C; this range was narrower (1 to 8°C) during the spawning season. Cod in each of the stocks studied had a thermal...... niche of approximately 12°C, but latitudinal differences in water temperature meant that cod in the warmer, southern regions experienced 3 times the degree days (DD; ~4000 DD yr–1) than individuals from northern regions (~1200 DD yr–1). Growth rates increased with temperature, reaching a maximum...

  12. Reducing thermal conductivity of binary alloys below the alloy limit via chemical ordering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duda, John C; English, Timothy S; Jordan, Donald A; Norris, Pamela M; Soffa, William A

    2011-01-01

    Substitutional solid solutions that exist in both ordered and disordered states will exhibit markedly different physical properties depending on their exact crystallographic configuration. Many random substitutional solid solutions (alloys) will display a tendency to order given the appropriate kinetic and thermodynamic conditions. Such order-disorder transitions will result in major crystallographic reconfigurations, where the atomic basis, symmetry, and periodicity of the alloy change dramatically. Consequently, the dominant scattering mechanism in ordered alloys will be different than that in disordered alloys. In this study, we present a hypothesis that ordered alloys can exhibit lower thermal conductivities than their disordered counterparts at elevated temperatures. To validate this hypothesis, we investigate the phononic transport properties of disordered and ordered AB Lennard-Jones alloys via non-equilibrium molecular dynamics and harmonic lattice dynamics calculations. It is shown that the thermal conductivity of an ordered alloy is the same as the thermal conductivity of the disordered alloy at ∼0.6T melt and lower than that of the disordered alloy above 0.8T melt .

  13. Period doubling cascades of limit cycles in cardiac action potential models as precursors to chaotic early Afterdepolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Philipp; Bulelzai, M A K; Erhardt, André H

    2017-04-04

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs) are pathological voltage oscillations during the repolarization phase of cardiac action potentials (APs). EADs are caused by drugs, oxidative stress or ion channel disease, and they are considered as potential precursors to cardiac arrhythmias in recent attempts to redefine the cardiac drug safety paradigm. The irregular behaviour of EADs observed in experiments has been previously attributed to chaotic EAD dynamics under periodic pacing, made possible by a homoclinic bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the deterministic AP system of differential equations. In this article we demonstrate that a homoclinic bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the action potential model is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for the genesis of chaotic EADs. We rather argue that a cascade of period doubling (PD) bifurcations of limit cycles in the full AP system paves the way to chaotic EAD dynamics across a variety of models including a) periodically paced and spontaneously active cardiomyocytes, b) periodically paced and non-active cardiomyocytes as well as c) unpaced and spontaneously active cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, our bifurcation analysis reveals that chaotic EAD dynamics may coexist in a stable manner with fully regular AP dynamics, where only the initial conditions decide which type of dynamics is displayed. EADs are a potential source of cardiac arrhythmias and hence are of relevance both from the viewpoint of drug cardiotoxicity testing and the treatment of cardiomyopathies. The model-independent association of chaotic EADs with period doubling cascades of limit cycles introduced in this article opens novel opportunities to study chaotic EADs by means of bifurcation control theory and inverse bifurcation analysis. Furthermore, our results may shed new light on the synchronization and propagation of chaotic EADs in homogeneous and heterogeneous multicellular and cardiac tissue preparations.

  14. Large scale motions of multiple limit-cycle high Reynolds number annular and toroidal rotor/stator cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridel-Bertomeu, Thibault; Gicquel, L. Y. M.; Staffelbach, G.

    2017-06-01

    Rotating cavity flows are essential components of industrial applications but their dynamics are still not fully understood when it comes to the relation between the fluid organization and monitored pressure fluctuations. From computer hard-drives to turbo-pumps of space launchers, designed devices often produce flow oscillations that can either destroy the component prematurely or produce too much noise. In such a context, large scale dynamics of high Reynolds number rotor/stator cavities need better understanding especially at the flow limit-cycle or associated statistically stationary state. In particular, the influence of curvature as well as cavity aspect ratio on the large scale organization and flow stability at a fixed rotating disc Reynolds number is fundamental. To probe such flows, wall-resolved large eddy simulation is applied to two different rotor/stator cylindrical cavities and one annular cavity. Validation of the predictions proves the method to be suited and to capture the disc boundary layer patterns reported in the literature. It is then shown that in complement to these disc boundary layer analyses, at the limit-cycle the rotating flows exhibit characteristic patterns at mid-height in the homogeneous core pointing the importance of large scale features. Indeed, dynamic modal decomposition reveals that the entire flow dynamics are driven by only a handful of atomic modes whose combination links the oscillatory patterns observed in the boundary layers as well as in the core of the cavity. These fluctuations form macro-structures, born in the unstable stator boundary layer and extending through the homogeneous inviscid core to the rotating disc boundary layer, causing its instability under some conditions. More importantly, the macro-structures significantly differ depending on the configuration pointing the need for deeper understanding of the influence of geometrical parameters as well as operating conditions.

  15. Modeling of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde with the PEPSE code to conditions of thermal power licensed at present (2027 MWt)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda G, M. A.; Maya G, F.; Medel C, J. E.; Cardenas J, J. B.; Cruz B, H. J.; Mercado V, J. J.

    2011-11-01

    By means of the use of the performance evaluation of power system efficiencies (PEPSE) code was modeled the vapor cycle of the nuclear power station of Laguna Verde to reproduce the nuclear plant behavior to conditions of thermal power, licensed at present (2027 MWt); with the purpose of having a base line before the implementation of the project of extended power increase. The model of the gauged vapor cycle to reproduce the nuclear plant conditions makes use of the PEPSE model, design case of the vapor cycle of nuclear power station of Laguna Verde, which has as main components of the model the great equipment of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde. The design case model makes use of information about the design requirements of each equipment for theoretically calculating the electric power of exit, besides thermodynamic conditions of the vapor cycle in different points. Starting from the design model and making use of data of the vapor cycle measured in the nuclear plant; the adjustment factors were calculated for the different equipment s of the vapor cycle, to reproduce with the PEPSE model the real vapor cycle of Laguna Verde. Once characterized the model of the vapor cycle of Laguna Verde, we can realize different sensibility studies to determine the effects macros to the vapor cycle by the variation of certain key parameters. (Author)

  16. An analysis of the proposed MITR-III core to establish thermal-hydraulic limits at 10 MW. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harling, O.K.; Lanning, D.D.; Bernard, J.A.; Meyer, J.E.; Henry, A.F.

    1997-01-01

    The 5 MW Massachusetts Institute of Technology Research Reactor (MITR-II) is expected to operate under a new license beginning in 1999. Among the options being considered is an upgrade in the heat removal system to allow operation at 10 MW. The purpose of this study is to predict the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits for the upgraded reactor (MITR-III). The MITR Multi-Channel Analysis Code was written to analyze the response of the MITR system to a series of anticipated transients in order to determine the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits under various operating conditions. The MIT Multi-Channel Analysis Code models the primary and secondary systems, with special emphasis placed on analyzing the thermal-hydraulic conditions in the core. The code models each MITR fuel element explicitly in order to predict the behavior of the system during flow instabilities. The results of the code are compared to experimental data from MITR-II and other sources. New definitions are suggested for the Limiting Safety System Settings and Safety Limits. MITR Limit Diagrams are included for three different heat removal system configurations. It is concluded that safe, year-round operating at 10 MW is possible, given that the primary and secondary flow rates are both increased by approximately 40%

  17. Apparent limitations of head-up-displays and thermal imaging systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brickner, Michael S.

    1989-01-01

    A simulated helicopter flight through a slalom course was presented on a Silicon Graphics IRIS 3130. The display represented the major visual characteristics of thermal images. Subjects were asked to maintain a designated altitude, while flying a slalom course between regularly spaced pylons. The presence of some of the high frequency details in the image improved subjects' ability to reach and maintain the correct altitude. A head-up-display helped in maintaining altitude, but impaired maneuvering around the poles. The results are interpreted in terms of the competition for visual resources between the HUD and the world view.

  18. Upper limit for stratospheric HBr using far-infrared thermal emission spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traub, W. A.; Johnson, D. G.; Jucks, K. W.; Chance, K. V.

    1992-01-01

    An upper limit is measured for stratospheric HBr from three balloon flights. The observations were made with the FIRS-2 far-infrared Fourier transform spectrometer. The 1sigma upper limits from the 1988, 1989, and 1990 balloon flights are 13 pptv at 35 km, 7 pptv at 32 km, and 3 pptv at 31 km, respectively. Combining all 3 flights, the weighted average 1sigma upper limit for HBr is 4 pptv at 32 km. This value is significantly smaller than the only other previously published spectroscopic value of 20 +/- 7 pptv (2sigma), but is consistent with a theoretical estimate which predicts roughly 0.4 pptv at this altitude.

  19. Loss Prediction and Thermal Analysis of Surface-Mounted Brushless AC PM Machines for Electric Vehicle Application Considering Driving Duty Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxun Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a computationally efficient loss prediction procedure and thermal analysis of surface-mounted brushless AC permanent magnet (PM machine considering the UDDS driving duty cycle by using a lumped parameters’ thermal model. The accurate prediction of loss and its variation with load are essential for thermal analysis. Employing finite element analysis (FEA to determine loss at every load point would be computationally intensive. Here, the finite element analysis and/or experiment based computationally efficient winding copper and iron loss and permanent magnet (PM power loss models are employed to calculate the electromagnetic loss at every operation point, respectively. Then, the lumped parameter thermal method is used to analyse the thermal behaviour of the driving PM machine. Experiments have been carried out to measure the temperature distribution in a motor prototype. The calculation and experiment results are compared and discussed.

  20. Direct thermal effects of the Hadean bombardment did not limit early subsurface habitability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, R. E.; Marchi, S.

    2018-03-01

    Intense bombardment is considered characteristic of the Hadean and early Archean eons, yet some detrital zircons indicate that near-surface water was present and thus at least intervals of clement conditions may have existed. We investigate the habitability of the top few kilometers of the subsurface by updating a prior approach to thermal evolution of the crust due to impact heating, using a revised bombardment history, a more accurate thermal model, and treatment of melt sheets from large projectiles (>100 km diameter). We find that subsurface habitable volume grows nearly continuously throughout the Hadean and early Archean (4.5-3.5 Ga) because impact heat is dissipated rapidly compared to the total duration and waning strength of the bombardment. Global sterilization was only achieved using an order of magnitude more projectiles in 1/10 the time. Melt sheets from large projectiles can completely resurface the Earth several times prior to ∼4.2 Ga but at most once since then. Even in the Hadean, melt sheets have little effect on habitability because cooling times are short compared to resurfacing intervals, allowing subsurface biospheres to be locally re-established by groundwater infiltration between major impacts. Therefore the subsurface is always habitable somewhere, and production of global steam or silicate-vapor atmospheres are the only remaining avenues to early surface sterilization by bombardment.

  1. Technical feasibility of the electrode ionization process for the makeup water treatment system of the thermal cycle of the CAREM-25 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramilo, Lucia B.; Chocron, Mauricio

    2003-01-01

    In thermal cycles of PWRs nuclear power plants with once-through steam generators as the CAREM-25, makeup water of very high purity is required to minimizing the induction of corrosion phenomena, fundamentally in the steam generators and other thermal cycle components. The makeup water treatment systems include several stages, of which the demineralization is the purification stage. The required makeup water purity is obtained in this stage. Historically, ultrapure water systems were based completely on ion exchange technology. Now, the electrode ionization process (EDI) has replaced the ion exchange technology used traditionally in the demineralization stage. Continuous demineralization in an EDI stack consists of three coupled processes: ion exchange, continuous ion removal by transport through the ion exchange resin and membranes into the concentrate stream, continuous regeneration by hydrogen and hydroxyl ions derived from the water splitting reaction and driven by the applied direct current. EDI process allows to obtain ultrapure water, with practically no use of chemical reagents and with technologies of continuous process. The objective of this work is the analysis of the electrode ionization process (EDI) for its implementation in the makeup water treatment system of the thermal cycle of the CAREM-25 nuclear power plant. The obtained results allow to assure the technical feasibility of implementation of the electrode ionization process, EDI, in the makeup water treatment system of the thermal cycle of this Argentinean nuclear power plant. (author)

  2. A temperature control method for shortening thermal cycling time to achieve rapid polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bu, Minqiang; Perch-Nielsen, Ivan R.; Sørensen, Karen Skotte

    2013-01-01

    We present a temperature control method capable of effectively shortening the thermal cycling time of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) in a disposable polymer microfluidic device with an external heater and a temperature sensor. The method employs optimized temperature overshooting and undershooting...

  3. Acute Upper Thermal Limits of Three Aquatic Invasive Invertebrates: Hot Water Treatment to Prevent Upstream Transport of Invasive Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Jessica; Moy, Philip; de Stasio, Bart

    2011-01-01

    Transport of aquatic invasive species (AIS) by boats traveling up rivers and streams is an important mechanism of secondary spread of AIS into watersheds. Because physical barriers to AIS movement also prevent navigation, alternate methods for preventing spread are necessary while allowing upstream navigation. One promising approach is to lift boats over physical barriers and then use hot water immersion to kill AIS attached to the hull, motor, or fishing gear. However, few data have been published on the acute upper thermal tolerance limits of potential invaders treated in this manner. To test the potential effectiveness of this approach for a planned boat lift on the Fox River of northeastern WI, USA, acute upper thermal limits were determined for three AIS, adult zebra mussels ( Dreissena polymorpha), quagga mussels ( Dreissena rostriformis bugensis), and spiny water fleas ( Bythotrephes longimanus) from the local area employing temperatures from 32 to 54°C and immersion times from 1 to 20 min. Mortality was determined after immersion followed by a 20-min recovery period. Immersion at 43°C for at least 5 min was required to ensure 100% mortality for all three species, but due to variability in the response by Bythotrephes a 10 min immersion would be more reliable. Overall there were no significant differences between the three species in acute upper thermal limits. Heated water can be an efficient, environmentally sound, and cost effective method of controlling AIS potentially transferred by boats, and our results should have both specific and wide-ranging applications in the prevention of the spread of aquatic invasive species.

  4. Does inhalation injury limit exercise endurance in children convalescing from thermal injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, M H; Mlcak, R P; Robinson, E; McCauley, R L; Carp, S S; Robson, M C; Herndon, D N

    1993-01-01

    The cardiopulmonary performance levels in children who are convalescing from thermal injury are unknown. This investigation was designed to evaluate cardiopulmonary function in children with and without inhalation injury. Forty children with a mean time since burn injury of 2.6 +/- 1.9 years and a mean burn size of 44% +/- 22% total body surface area were selected for the study and divided into two groups: inhalation injury (group 1) and non-inhalation injury (group 2). Pulmonary function studies and cardiopulmonary stress testing were completed on all patients. Both groups reached the same endurance level on the treadmill; however, patients in group 1 did so with an increased expired volume, respiratory rate, and ratio of dead space ventilation to total ventilation which indicated that there were greater demands on the respiratory system. Spirometry and lung volumes at rest showed that 64% of patients in group 1 had abnormal lung function compared with only 27% of patients in group 2.

  5. Limited role for thermal erosion by turbulent lava in proximal Athabasca Valles, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataldo, Vincenzo; Williams, David A.; Dundas, Colin M.; Kestay, Laszlo P.

    2015-01-01

    The Athabasca Valles flood lava is among the most recent (Mars and was probably emplaced turbulently. The Williams et al. (2005) model of thermal erosion by lava has been applied to what we term “proximal Athabasca,” the 75 km long upstream portion of Athabasca Valles. For emplacement volumes of 5000 and 7500 km3and average flow thicknesses of 20 and 30 m, the duration of the eruption varies between ~11 and ~37 days. The erosion of the lava flow substrate is investigated for three eruption temperatures (1270°C, 1260°C, and 1250°C), and volatile contents equivalent to 0–65 vol % bubbles. The largest erosion depths of ~3.8–7.5 m are at the lava source, for 20 m thick and bubble-free flows that erupted at their liquidus temperature (1270°C). A substrate containing 25 vol % ice leads to maximum erosion. A lava temperature 20°C below liquidus reduces erosion depths by a factor of ~2.2. If flow viscosity increases with increasing bubble content in the lava, the presence of 30–50 vol % bubbles leads to erosion depths lower than those relative to bubble-free lava by a factor of ~2.4. The presence of 25 vol % ice in the substrate increases erosion depths by a factor of 1.3. Nevertheless, modeled erosion depths, consistent with the emplacement volume and flow duration constraints, are far less than the depth of the channel (~35–100 m). We conclude that thermal erosion does not appear to have had a major role in excavating Athabasca Valles.

  6. Energetic and financial investigation of a stand-alone solar-thermal Organic Rankine Cycle power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tzivanidis, Christos; Bellos, Evangelos; Antonopoulos, Kimon A.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A stand-alone solar driven Organic Rankine Cycle is optimized parametrically. • The system is optimized energetically and financially. • Nine working fluids are tested with cyclohexane to be the most suitable. • A collecting area of 25,000 m 2 parabolic trough collectors is the optimum solution. • The maximum IRR is 13.46% and the payback period is about 9 years. - Abstract: The use of solar thermal energy for electricity production is a clean and sustainable way to cover the increasing energy needs of our society. The most mature technology for capturing solar energy in high temperature levels is the parabolic trough collectors (PTC). In this study, an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) coupled with PTC is analyzed parametrically in order to be optimized financially and energetically. The first step is the thermodynamic investigation of the ORC by using various working fluids. The second step is the energetic and financial investigation of the total system which includes the solar field, the storage tank and the ORC module. By testing many combinations of collecting areas and storage tank volumes, finally cyclohexane proved to be the most suitable working fluid for producing 1 MW el with PTC. Specifically, in the optimum situation a solar field of 25,000 m 2 with storage tank of about 300 m 3 leads to a payback period of 9 years and to an internal rate of return (IRR) equal to 13.46%. Moreover, an economic comparison for different commercial collectors is presented, with Eurotrough ET-150 being the financially optimum solution for this case study.

  7. Thermal cycling and electrochemical characteristics of solid oxide fuel cell supported on stainless steel with a new 3-phase composite anode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayaghi, Amir Masoud; Kim, Kun Joong; Kim, Sun Jae; Kim, Sunwoong; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2017-06-01

    We report design, fabrication method, and fast thermal-cycling ability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) that use stainless steel (STS) as a support, and a new 3-phase anode. La and Ni co-doped SrTiO3 (La0.2Sr0.8Ti0.9Ni0.1O3-d, LSTN), replaces some of the Ni in conventional Ni-yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) anode; the resultant LSTN-YSZ-Ni 3-phase-composite anode is tested as a new reduction (or decomposition)-resistant anode of STS-supported SOFCs that can be co-fired with STS. A multi-layered cell with YSZ electrolyte (thickness ∼5 μm), composite anode, STS-cermet contact-layer, and STS support is designed, then fabricated by tape casting, lamination, and co-firing at 1250 °C in reducing atmosphere. The maximum power density (MPD) is 325 mW cm-2 at 650 °C; this is one of the highest among STS-supported cells fabricated by co-firing. The cell also shows stable open-circuit voltage and Ohmic resistance during 100 rapid thermal cycles between 170 and 600 °C. STS support minimizes stress and avoids cracking of electrolyte during rapid thermal cycling. The excellent MPD and stability during thermal cycles, and promising characteristics of SOFC as a power source for vehicle or mobile devices that requires rapid thermal cycles, are attributed to the new design of the cell with new anode structure.

  8. Effects of High Temperature and Thermal Cycling on the Performance of Perovskite Solar Cells: Acceleration of Charge Recombination and Deterioration of Charge Extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikh, Arif D; Munir, Rahim; Haque, Md Azimul; Bera, Ashok; Hu, Weijin; Shaikh, Parvez; Amassian, Aram; Wu, Tom

    2017-10-11

    In this work, we investigated the effects of high operating temperature and thermal cycling on the photovoltaic (PV) performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with a typical mesostructured (m)-TiO 2 -CH 3 NH 3 PbI 3-x Cl x -spiro-OMeTAD architecture. After temperature-dependent grazing-incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering, in situ X-ray diffraction, and optical absorption experiments were carried out, the thermal durability of PSCs was tested by subjecting the devices to repetitive heating to 70 °C and cooling to room temperature (20 °C). An unexpected regenerative effect was observed after the first thermal cycle; the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) increased by approximately 10% in reference to the as-prepared device. This increase of PCE was attributed to the heating-induced improvement of the crystallinity and p doping in the hole transporter, spiro-OMeTAD, which promotes the efficient extraction of photogenerated carriers. However, further thermal cycles produced a detrimental effect on the PV performance of PSCs, with the short-circuit current and fill factor degrading faster than the open-circuit voltage. Similarly, the PV performance of PSCs degraded at high operation temperatures; both the short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage decreased with increasing temperature, but the temperature-dependent trend of the fill factor was the opposite. Our impedance spectroscopy analysis revealed a monotonous increase of the charge-transfer resistance and a concurrent decrease of the charge-recombination resistance with increasing temperature, indicating a high recombination of charge carriers. Our results revealed that both thermal cycling and high temperatures produce irreversible detrimental effects on the PSC performance because of the deteriorated interfacial photocarrier extraction. The present findings suggest that the development of robust charge transporters and proper interface engineering are critical for the deployment of perovskite

  9. Effects of High Temperature and Thermal Cycling on the Performance of Perovskite Solar Cells: Acceleration of Charge Recombination and Deterioration of Charge Extraction

    KAUST Repository

    Sheikh, Arif D.

    2017-09-18

    In this work, we investigated the effects of high operating temperature and thermal cycling on the photovoltaic performance of perovskite solar cells (PSCs) with a typical mesostructured (m)-TiO2-CH3NH3PbI3-xClx-spiro-OMeTAD architecture. After carrying out temperature-dependent grazing incidence wide-angle X-ray scattering (GIWAXS), in-situ X-ray diffraction (XRD) and optical absorption experiments, thermal durability of PSCs was tested by subjecting the devices to repetitive heating to 70 °C and cooling to room temperature (20 °C). An unexpected regenerative effect was observed after the first thermal cycle; the average power conversion efficiency (PCE) increased by approximately 10 % in reference to the as-prepared device. This increase of PCE was attributed to the heating-induced improvement of crystallinity and p-doping in the hole-transporter, Spiro-OMeTAD, which promotes the efficient extraction of photo-generated carriers. However, further thermal cycles produced a detrimental effect on the photovoltaic performance of PSCs with short-circuit current and fill factor degrading faster than the open-circuit voltage. Similarly, the photovoltaic performance of PSCs degraded at high operation temperatures; both short-circuit current and open-circuit voltage decreased with increasing temperature, but the temperature-dependent trend of fill factor was opposite. Our impedance spectroscopy analysis revealed a monotonous increase of charge transfer resistance and a concurrent decrease of charge recombination resistance with increasing temperature, indicating high recombination of charge carriers. Our results revealed that both thermal cycling and high temperatures produce irreversible detrimental effects on the PSC performance due to the deteriorated interfacial photo-carrier extraction. The present findings suggest that development of robust charge transporters and proper interface engineering are critical for the deployment of perovskite photovoltaics in harsh

  10. A minimal limit-cycle model to profile movement patterns of individuals during agility drill performance: Effects of skill level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Identification of control strategies during agility performance is significant in understanding movement behavior. This study aimed at providing a fundamental mathematical model for describing the motion of participants during an agility drill and to determine whether skill level constrained model components. Motion patterns of two groups of skilled and unskilled participants (n=8 in each) during performance of a forward/backward agility drill modeled as limit-cycles. Participant movements were recorded by motion capture of a reflective marker attached to the sacrum of each individual. Graphical and regression analyses of movement kinematics in Hooke's plane, phase plane and velocity profile were performed to determine components of the models. Results showed that the models of both skilled and unskilled groups had terms from Duffing stiffness as well as Van der Pol damping oscillators. Data also indicated that the proposed models captured on average 97% of the variance for both skilled and unskilled groups. Findings from this study revealed the movement patterning associated with skilled and unskilled performance in a typical forward/backward agility drill which might be helpful for trainers and physiotherapists in enhancing agility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Reduced-order aeroelastic model for limit-cycle oscillations in vortex-dominated unsteady airfoil flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Babu, Arun Vishnu; Ramesh, Kiran; Gopalarathnam, Ashok

    2017-11-01

    In previous research, Ramesh et al. (JFM,2014) developed a low-order discrete vortex method for modeling unsteady airfoil flows with intermittent leading edge vortex (LEV) shedding using a leading edge suction parameter (LESP). LEV shedding is initiated using discrete vortices (DVs) whenever the Leading Edge Suction Parameter (LESP) exceeds a critical value. In subsequent research, the method was successfully employed by Ramesh et al. (JFS, 2015) to predict aeroelastic limit-cycle oscillations in airfoil flows dominated by intermittent LEV shedding. When applied to flows that require large number of time steps, the computational cost increases due to the increasing vortex count. In this research, we apply an amalgamation strategy to actively control the DV count, and thereby reduce simulation time. A pair each of LEVs and TEVs are amalgamated at every time step. The ideal pairs for amalgamation are identified based on the requirement that the flowfield in the vicinity of the airfoil is least affected (Spalart, 1988). Instead of placing the amalgamated vortex at the centroid, we place it at an optimal location to ensure that the leading-edge suction and the airfoil bound circulation are conserved. Results of the initial study are promising.

  12. Analysis of Limit Cycle Oscillation Data from the Aeroelastic Test of the SUGAR Truss-Braced Wing Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Robert E.; Funk, Christie; Scott, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Research focus in recent years has been given to the design of aircraft that provide significant reductions in emissions, noise and fuel usage. Increases in fuel efficiency have also generally been attended by overall increased wing flexibility. The truss-braced wing (TBW) configuration has been forwarded as one that increases fuel efficiency. The Boeing company recently tested the Subsonic Ultra Green Aircraft Research (SUGAR) Truss-Braced Wing (TBW) wind-tunnel model in the NASA Langley Research Center Transonic Dynamics Tunnel (TDT). This test resulted in a wealth of accelerometer data. Other publications have presented details of the construction of that model, the test itself, and a few of the results of the test. This paper aims to provide a much more detailed look at what the accelerometer data says about the onset of aeroelastic instability, usually known as flutter onset. Every flight vehicle has a location in the flight envelope of flutter onset, and the TBW vehicle is not different. For the TBW model test, the flutter onset generally occurred at the conditions that the Boeing company analysis said it should. What was not known until the test is that, over a large area of the Mach number dynamic pressure map, the model displayed wing/engine nacelle aeroelastic limit cycle oscillation (LCO). This paper dissects that LCO data in order to provide additional insights into the aeroelastic behavior of the model.

  13. A Technique for Mitigating Thermal Stress and Extending Life Cycle of Power Electronic Converters Used for Wind Turbines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canras Batunlu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Over the last two decades, various models have been developed to assess and improve the reliability of power electronic conversion systems (PECs with a focus on those used for wind turbines. However, only few studies have dealt with mitigating the PECs thermo-mechanical effects on their reliability taking into account variations in wind characteristics. This work critically investigates this issue and attempts to offer a mitigating technique by, first, developing realistic full scale (FS and partial scale (PS induction generator models combined with two level back-to-back PECs. Subsequently, deriving a driving algorithm, which reduces PEC’s operating temperature by controlling its switching patterns. The developed switching procedure ensures minimum temperature fluctuations by adapting the variable DC link and system’s frequency of operation. It was found for both FS and PS topologies, that the generator side converters have higher mean junction temperatures where the grid side ones have more fluctuations on their thermal profile. The FS and PS cycling temperatures were reduced by 12 °C and 5 °C, respectively. Moreover, this led to a significant improvement in stress; approximately 27 MPa stress reduction for the FS induction generator PEC.

  14. Results of scoping tests for open-cycle OTEC (ocean thermal energy conversion) components operating with seawater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zangrando, F; Bharathan, D; Green, H J; Link, H F; Parsons, B K; Parsons, J M; Pesaran, A A [Solar Energy Research Inst., Golden, CO (USA); Panchal, C B [Argonne National Lab., IL (USA)

    1990-09-01

    This report presents comprehensive documentation of the experimental research conducted on open-cycle ocean thermal energy conversion (OC-OTEC) components operating with seawater as a working fluid. The results of this research are presented in the context of previous analysis and fresh-water testing; they provide a basis for understanding and predicting with confidence the performance of all components of an OC-OTEC system except the turbine. Seawater tests have confirmed the results that were obtained in fresh-water tests and predicted by the analytical models of the components. A sound technical basis has been established for the design of larger systems in which net power will be produced for the first time from OC-OTEC technology. Design and operation of a complete OC-OTEC system that produces power will provide sufficient confidence to warrant complete transfer of OC-OTEC technology to the private sector. Each components performance is described in a separate chapter written by the principal investigator responsible for technical aspects of the specific tests. Chapters have been indexed separately for inclusion on the data base.

  15. Surface phenomena associated with thermal cycling of copper and their impact on the service life of particle accelerator structures

    CERN Document Server

    Aicheler, Markus; Theisen, Werner; Sgobba, Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The performance of accelerating structures (AS) in the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) is sensitive to a variety of parameters, including the surface quality of key elements of the AS. Processes which affect the surface quality are therefore of particular concern. The present work addresses surface modifications associated with thermal cycling during operation. This type of operating condition represents a specific type of fatigue loading. Four fatigue test procedures were used in the present study in order to investigate the fatigue behaviour of oxygen{free{electronic (OFE) copper, the candidate material of the CLIC-AS: conventional fatigue (CVF), ultrasonic swinger (USS), laser fatigue (LAF) and radio{frequency fatigue (RFF). During operation of the accelerator the material of the AS will be subjected to cyclic temperature changes of approx. Delta T = 56 K, from about 40° C to about 100° C. These temperature changes will result in cyclic biaxial strains in the surface of the order of epsilon(biax) = 9.2 x ...

  16. Influence of Thermal Cycling on Flexural Properties and Simulated Wear of Computer-aided Design/Computer-aided Manufacturing Resin Composites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujimoto, A; Barkmeier, W W; Takamizawa, T; Latta, M A; Miyazaki, M

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the influence of thermal cycling on the flexural properties and simulated wear of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) resin composites. The six CAD/CAM resin composites used in this study were 1) Lava Ultimate CAD/CAM Restorative (LU); 2) Paradigm MZ100 (PM); 3) CERASMART (CS); 4) Shofu Block HC (SB); 5) KATANA AVENCIA Block (KA); and 6) VITA ENAMIC (VE). Specimens were divided randomly into two groups, one of which was stored in distilled water for 24 hours, and the other of which was subjected to 10,000 thermal cycles. For each material, 15 specimens from each group were used to determine the flexural strength and modulus according to ISO 6872, and 20 specimens from each group were used to examine wear using a localized wear simulation model. The test materials were subjected to a wear challenge of 400,000 cycles in a Leinfelder-Suzuki device (Alabama machine). The materials were placed in custom-cylinder stainless steel fixtures, and simulated localized wear was generated using a stainless steel ball bearing (r=2.387 mm) antagonist in a water slurry of polymethyl methacrylate beads. Simulated wear was determined using a noncontact profilometer (Proscan 2100) with Proscan and AnSur 3D software. The two-way analysis of variance of flexural properties and simulated wear of CAD/CAM resin composites revealed that material type and thermal cycling had a significant influence (p0.05) between the two factors. The flexural properties and maximum depth of wear facets of CAD/CAM resin composite were different (p0.05) by thermal cycling, except in the case of VE. The volume losses in wear facets on LU, PM, and SB after 10,000 thermal cycles were significantly higher (pproperties and simulated wear of CAD/CAM resin composites are different depending on the material. In addition, the flexural properties and simulated wear of CAD/CAM resin composites are influenced by thermal cycling.

  17. Flooding-limited thermal mixing: The case of high-froude number injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iyer, K.; Theofanous, T.G.

    1985-01-01

    The stratification in the cold leg due to high pressure injection in a stagnated loop of a PWR is considered. The working hypothesis is that at high injection Froude numbers the extent of mixing approaches a limit controlled only by the flooding condition at the cold leg exit. The available experimental data support this hypothesis. Predictions for reactor conditions indicate a stratification of about --40 0 C. As a consequence, the downcomer plume would be rather weak (low Froude Number) and is expected to decay quickly

  18. High Cycle Thermal Fatigue Analysis for a Mixing Tee in Safety Injection and Shutdown Cooling System of SKN Unit 3 and 4 Power Plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Kyeong Jin; Lee, Dong Jae; Kim, Dae Soo; Huh, Man Gil

    2011-01-01

    Safety Injection and Shutdown Cooling system (SISC) in a nuclear power plant has an important role of core cooling during plant shutdown and on emergency conditions. A heat exchanger on the SISC removes the heat energy generated in the reactor core during shutdown cooling event. Mixing tee placed on downstream of the heat exchanger designates a Tshaped branch connection where the hot flow passed through the by-pass line mixes with the flow passed through the heat exchanger, and due to the characteristics of fluid with bad heat conductivity, the flow develops a mixing zone in a distance from the mixing tee. The pipe wall in the mixing zone experiences the thermal oscillation of high cycle, and therefore is in a state of the high cycle thermal fatigue loadings. In this work, performed is the high cycle thermal fatigue analysis for a mixing tee under the prescribed thermal loadings in a mixing zone. Using the evaluation guide established by JSME, JSME S017- 2003 which has evaluation procedure composing of the four steps, we evaluate the fatigue integrity of the mixing tee of which the results show that the mixing tee satisfies the fatigue integrity in the last step (fourth) of four steps of evaluation procedure where the fatigue usage factor, U was calculated and then compared with the well known criterion, U<1. Representative results of the fatigue analysis are also discussed

  19. A new frequency-domain criterion for elimination of limit cycles in fixed-point state-space digital filters using saturation arithmetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vimal

    2007-01-01

    In [Singh V. Elimination of overflow oscillations in fixed-point state-space digital filters using saturation arithmetic. IEEE Trans Circ Syst 1990;37(6):814-8], a frequency-domain criterion for the suppression of limit cycles in fixed-point state-space digital filters using saturation overflow arithmetic was presented. The passivity property owing to the presence of multiple saturation nonlinearities was exploited therein. In the present paper, a new notion of passivity, namely, that involving the state variables is considered, thereby arriving at an entirely new frequency-domain criterion for the suppression of limit cycles in such filters

  20. Effect of thermal barrier coatings on the performance of steam and water-cooled gas turbine/steam turbine combined cycle system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nainiger, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the performance of air, steam, and water-cooled gas-turbine/steam turbine combined-cycle systems with and without thermal-barrier coatings. For steam cooling, thermal barrier coatings permit an increase in the turbine inlet temperature from 1205 C (2200 F), resulting in an efficiency improvement of 1.9 percentage points. The maximum specific power improvement with thermal barriers is 32.4 percent, when the turbine inlet temperature is increased from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1675 C (3050 F) and the airfoil temperature is kept the same. For water cooling, the maximum efficiency improvement is 2.2 percentage points at a turbine inlet temperature of 1683 C (3062 F) and the maximum specific power improvement is 36.6 percent by increasing the turbine inlet temperature from 1425 C (2600 F) to 1730 C (3150 F) and keeping the airfoil temperatures the same. These improvements are greater than that obtained with combined cycles using air cooling at a turbine inlet temperature of 1205 C (2200 F). The large temperature differences across the thermal barriers at these high temperatures, however, indicate that thermal stresses may present obstacles to the use of coatings at high turbine inlet temperatures.