WorldWideScience

Sample records for thermal cycle limits

  1. Theory of limit cycles

    CERN Document Server

    Ye, Yan-Qian; Lo, Chi Y

    1986-01-01

    Over the past two decades the theory of limit cycles, especially for quadratic differential systems, has progressed dramatically in China as well as in other countries. This monograph, updating the 1964 first edition, includes these recent developments, as revised by eight of the author's colleagues in their own areas of expertise. The first part of the book deals with limit cycles of general plane stationary systems, including their existence, nonexistence, stability, and uniqueness. The second section discusses the global topological structure of limit cycles and phase-portraits of quadratic systems. Finally, the last section collects important results that could not be included under the subject matter of the previous two sections or that have appeared in the literature very recently. The book as a whole serves as a reference for college seniors, graduate students, and researchers in mathematics and physics.

  2. Thermal background noise limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulkis, S.

    1982-01-01

    Modern detection systems are increasingly limited in sensitivity by the background thermal photons which enter the receiving system. Expressions for the fluctuations of detected thermal radiation are derived. Incoherent and heterodyne detection processes are considered. References to the subject of photon detection statistics are given.

  3. Limit cycles in quantum systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemann, Patrick

    2015-04-27

    In this thesis we investigate Limit Cycles in Quantum Systems. Limit cycles are a renormalization group (RG) topology. When degrees of freedom are integrated out, the coupling constants flow periodically in a closed curve. The presence of limit cycles is restricted by the necessary condition of discrete scale invariance. A signature of discrete scale invariance and limit cycles is log-periodic behavior. The first part of this thesis is concerned with the study of limit cycles with the similarity renormalization group (SRG). Limit cycles are mainly investigated within conventional renormalization group frameworks, where degrees of freedom, which are larger than a given cutoff, are integrated out. In contrast, in the SRG potentials are unitarily transformed and thereby obtain a band-diagonal structure. The width of the band structure can be regarded as an effective cutoff. We investigate the appearance of limit cycles in the SRG evolution. Our aim is to extract signatures as well as the scaling factor of the limit cycle. We consider the 1/R{sup 2}-potential in a two-body system and a three-body system with large scattering lengths. Both systems display a limit cycle. Besides the frequently used kinetic energy generator we apply the exponential and the inverse generator. In the second part of this thesis, Limit Cycles at Finite Density, we examine the pole structure of the scattering amplitude for distinguishable fermions at zero temperature in the medium. Unequal masses and a filled Fermi sphere for each fermion species are considered. We focus on negative scattering lengths and the unitary limit. The properties of the three-body spectrum in the medium and implications for the phase structure of ultracold Fermi gases are discussed.

  4. The thermal limits to life on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Andrew

    2014-04-01

    Living organisms on Earth are characterized by three necessary features: a set of internal instructions encoded in DNA (software), a suite of proteins and associated macromolecules providing a boundary and internal structure (hardware), and a flux of energy. In addition, they replicate themselves through reproduction, a process that renders evolutionary change inevitable in a resource-limited world. Temperature has a profound effect on all of these features, and yet life is sufficiently adaptable to be found almost everywhere water is liquid. The thermal limits to survival are well documented for many types of organisms, but the thermal limits to completion of the life cycle are much more difficult to establish, especially for organisms that inhabit thermally variable environments. Current data suggest that the thermal limits to completion of the life cycle differ between the three major domains of life, bacteria, archaea and eukaryotes. At the very highest temperatures only archaea are found with the current high-temperature limit for growth being 122 °C. Bacteria can grow up to 100 °C, but no eukaryote appears to be able to complete its life cycle above ~60 °C and most not above 40 °C. The lower thermal limit for growth in bacteria, archaea, unicellular eukaryotes where ice is present appears to be set by vitrification of the cell interior, and lies at ~-20 °C. Lichens appear to be able to grow down to ~-10 °C. Higher plants and invertebrates living at high latitudes can survive down to ~-70 °C, but the lower limit for completion of the life cycle in multicellular organisms appears to be ~-2 °C.

  5. The determination of resistance of marble to thermal and moisture cycles: relevance and limits of the recent European natural stone standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellopede, Rossana; Castelletto, Eleonora; Marini, Paola; Zichella, Lorena

    2015-04-01

    The recent European standard EN 16306:2013 specifies laboratory methodology on the determination of the resistance to thermal and moisture cycling of marble for cladding of building façades. In particular measurements of bowing and flexural strength should be performed before and at the end of the ageing cycles. Bowing is measured on specimens of dimension 30*100*400mm exposed to moisture from beneath and heating (gradually till 80°C) on the upper face. The flexural strength should be measured both on reference and on exposed specimens in order to assess the variation of mechanical properties. Additional non-destructive tests are foreseen but are not compulsory for the standard. Moreover, the Annex A of the EN 16306, contains a guidance of the limit values that could be useful for the building planner for façade panels dimensioning. Different varieties of marble (two from Italy, one from Greece and three from Portugal) have been tested by means of this laboratory ageing test. Non-destructive tests such as the measurements of Ultrasonic Pulse Velocity (UPV), porosity, and water absorption have been executed together with the conventional flexural strength test. Image analysis on thin sections soaked with methylene blue have been analysed to further investigate the correlation between porosity and tendency to bowing. Base on the results obtained, some consideration on the decrease of mechanical resistance and the bowing in relation to the variety of marble tested and the limit values indicated the Annex A of EN 16306 can be drawn. Besides, from the data analysed a deepened discussion has been made. It is known that bowing and rapid strength loss occur in some varieties of marble when used as exterior cladding but further considerations can be made: bowing and flexural strength are correlate and in which way? Often the bowing is related to the decrease of flexural strength but it happens that there is a decrease in the mechanical resistance of the stone also

  6. DETECTING ALIEN LIMIT CYCLES NEAR A HAMILTONIAN 2-SADDLE CYCLE

    OpenAIRE

    LUCA, Stijn; DUMORTIER, Freddy; Caubergh, M.; Roussarie, R.

    2009-01-01

    This paper aims at providing and example of a cubic Hamiltonian 2-saddle cycle that after bifurcation can give rise to an alien limit cycle; this is a limit cycle that is not controlled by a zero of the related Abelian integral. To guarantee the existence of an alien limit cycle one can verify generic conditions on the Abelian integral and on the transition map associated to the connections of the 2-saddle cycle. In this paper, a general method is developed to compute the first and second der...

  7. Thermal cycling in multifilamentary superconducting composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aragao, E.E.A. de.

    1984-01-01

    NbTi-Cu multifilamentary superconducting composites were embedded, polished, characterized by microscopic techniques, and analyzed in a qualitative and semiquantitative way by energy dispersion technique. The superconductors were submitted to thermal cycling between the ambient temperature and the boiling point of helium (4.2K), for different number of cycles. The aims were to study the correlation between the possible microstructural damages due to thermal stresses arising in the composite during cycling and the variation of properties of the material with the number of cycles as well as to verify the validity of an elastic model for thermal stresses for low temperature cycles. (author)

  8. Thermal stress relaxation in magnesium composites during thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trojanova, Z.; Lukac, P. (Karlova Univ., Prague (Czech Republic)); Kiehn, J.; Kainer, K.U.; Mordike, B.L. (Technische Univ. Clausthal, Clausthal-Zellerfeld (Germany))

    1998-01-01

    It has been shown that the internal friction of Mg - Saffil metal matrix composites can be influenced by thermal stresses, if MMCc are submitted to thermal cycling between room temperature and an upper temperature of cycling. These stresses can be accommodated by generation and motion of dislocations giving the formation of the microplastic zones. The thermal stress relaxation depends on the upper temperature of cycling, the volume fraction of reinforcement and the matrix composition and can result in plastic deformation and strain hardening of the matrix without applied stress. The internal friction measurements can be used for non destructive investigation of processes which influence the mechanical properties. (orig.)

  9. Ultrafast Thermal Cycling of Solar Panels

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wall, T

    1998-01-01

    Two new cyclers that utilize a novel hybrid approach to perform fast thermal cycling of solar panels have been built and are now operational in the Mechanics and Materials Technology Center at The Aerospace Corporation...

  10. Thermally regenerative hydrogen/oxygen fuel cell power cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morehouse, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    Two innovative thermodynamic power cycles are analytically examined for future engineering feasibility. The power cycles use a hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell for electrical energy production and use the thermal dissociation of water for regeneration of the hydrogen and oxygen. The TDS (thermal dissociation system) uses a thermal energy input at over 2000 K to thermally dissociate the water. The other cycle, the HTE (high temperature electrolyzer) system, dissociates the water using an electrolyzer operating at high temperature (1300 K) which receives its electrical energy from the fuel cell. The primary advantages of these cycles is that they are basically a no moving parts system, thus having the potential for long life and high reliability, and they have the potential for high thermal efficiency. Both cycles are shown to be classical heat engines with ideal efficiency close to Carnot cycle efficiency. The feasibility of constructing actual cycles is investigated by examining process irreversibilities and device efficiencies for the two types of cycles. The results show that while the processes and devices of the 2000 K TDS exceed current technology limits, the high temperature electrolyzer system appears to be a state-of-the-art technology development. The requirements for very high electrolyzer and fuel cell efficiencies are seen as determining the feasbility of the HTE system, and these high efficiency devices are currently being developed. It is concluded that a proof-of-concept HTE system experiment can and should be conducted.

  11. Universality, marginal operators, and limit cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glazek, Stanislaw D.; Wilson, Kenneth G.

    2004-01-01

    The universality of renormalization-group limit-cycle behavior is illustrated with a simple discrete Hamiltonian model. A nonperturbative renormalization-group equation for the model is soluble analytically at criticality and exhibits one marginal operator (made necessary by the limit cycle) and an infinite set of irrelevant operators. Relevant operators are absent. The model exhibits an infinite series of bound-state energy eigenvalues. This infinite series approaches an exact geometric series as the eigenvalues approach zero--also a consequence of the limit cycle. Wegner's eigenvalues for irrelevant operators are calculated generically for all choices of parameters in the model. We show that Wegner's eigenvalues are independent of location on the limit cycle, in contrast with Wegner's operators themselves, which vary depending on their location on the limit cycle. An example is then used to illustrate numerically how one can tune the initial Hamiltonian to eliminate the first two irrelevant operators. After tuning, the Hamiltonian's bound-state eigenvalues converge much more quickly than otherwise to an exact geometric series

  12. Reconstruction of the limit cycles by the delays method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo D, R.; Ortiz V, J.; Calleros M, G.

    2003-01-01

    The boiling water reactors (BWRs) are designed for usually to operate in a stable-lineal regime. In a limit cycle the behavior of the one system is no lineal-stable. In a BWR, instabilities of nuclear- thermohydraulics nature can take the reactor to a limit cycle. The limit cycles should to be avoided since the oscillations of power can cause thermal fatigue to the fuel and/or shroud. In this work the employment of the delays method is analyzed for its application in the detection of limit cycles in a nuclear power plant. The foundations of the method and it application to power signals to different operation conditions are presented. The analyzed signals are: to steady state, nuclear-thermohydraulic instability, a non linear transitory and, finally, failure of a controller plant . Among the main results it was found that the delays method can be applied to detect limit cycles in the power monitors of the BWR reactors. It was also found that the first zero of the autocorrelation function is an appropriate approach to select the delay in the detection of limit cycles, for the analyzed cases. (Author)

  13. Methods and compositions for rapid thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beer, Neil Reginald; Benett, William J.; Frank, James M.; Deotte, Joshua R.; Spadaccini, Christopher

    2018-04-10

    The rapid thermal cycling of a material is targeted. A microfluidic heat exchanger with an internal porous medium is coupled to tanks containing cold fluid and hot fluid. Fluid flows alternately from the cold tank and the hot tank into the porous medium, cooling and heating samples contained in the microfluidic heat exchanger's sample wells. A valve may be coupled to the tanks and a pump, and switching the position of the valve may switch the source and direction of fluid flowing through the porous medium. A controller may control the switching of valve positions based on the temperature of the samples and determined temperature thresholds. A sample tray for containing samples to be thermally cycled may be used in conjunction with the thermal cycling system. A surface or internal electrical heater may aid in heating the samples, or may replace the necessity for the hot tank.

  14. Coding of Information in Limit Cycle Oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleimer, Jan-Hendrik; Stemmler, Martin

    2009-12-01

    Starting from a general description of noisy limit cycle oscillators, we derive from the Fokker-Planck equations the linear response of the instantaneous oscillator frequency to a time-varying external force. We consider the time series of zero crossings of the oscillator’s phase and compute the mutual information between it and the driving force. A direct link is established between the phase response curve summarizing the oscillator dynamics and the ability of a limit cycle oscillator, such as a heart cell or neuron, to encode information in the timing of peaks in the oscillation.

  15. Influence of Thermal Cycling on Cryogenic Thermometers

    CERN Document Server

    Balle, C; Rieubland, Jean Michel; Suraci, A; Togny, F; Vauthier, N

    1999-01-01

    The stringent requirements on temperature control of the superconducting magnets for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), impose that the cryogenic temperature sensors meet compelling demands such as long-term stability, radiation hardness, readout accuracy better than 5 mK at 1.8 K and compatibility with industrial control equipment. This paper presents the results concerning long-term stability of resistance temperature sensors submitted to cryogenic thermal cycles. For this task a simple test facility has been designed, constructed and put into operation for cycling simultaneously 115 cryogenic thermometers between 300 K and 4.2 K. A thermal cycle is set to last 71/4 hours: 3 hours for either cooling down or warming up the sensors and 1 respectively 1/4 hour at steady temperature conditions at each end of the temperature cycle. A Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) drives automatically this operation by reading 2 thermometers and actuating on 3 valves and 1 heater. The first thermal cycle was accomplished in a...

  16. The limits to solar thermal electricity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trainer, Ted

    2014-01-01

    The potential and limits of solar thermal power systems depend primarily on their capacity to meet electricity demand in mid-winter, and the associated cost, storage and other implications. Evidence on output and costs is analysed. Most attention is given to central receivers. Problems of low radiation levels, embodied energy costs, variability and storage are discussed and are found to set significant difficulties for large scale solar thermal supply in less than ideal latitudes and seasons. It is concluded that for solar thermal systems to meet a large fraction of anticipated global electricity demand in winter would involve prohibitive capital costs. - Highlights: • Output and capital cost data for various solar thermal technologies is examined. • Special attention is given to performance in winter. • Attention is also given to the effect of solar intermittency. • Implications for storage are considered. • It is concluded that there are significant limits to solar thermal power

  17. GNPS 18-months fuel cycles core thermal hydraulic design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Changwen; Zhou Zhou

    2002-01-01

    GNPS begins to implement the 18-month fuel cycles from the initial annual reload at cycle 9, thus the initial core thermal hydraulic design is not valid any more. The new critical heat flux (CHF) correlation, FC, which is developed by Framatome, is used in the design, and the generalized statistical methodology (GSM) instead of the initial deterministic methodology is used to determine the DNBR design limit. As the AFA 2G and AFA 3G are mixed loaded in the transition cycle, it will result that the minimum DNBR in the mixed core is less than that of AFA 3G homogenous core, the envelop mixed core DNBR penalty is given. Consequently the core physical limit for mixed core and equilibrium cycles, and the new over temperature ΔT overpower ΔT are determined

  18. Limit Cycles in Predator-Prey Models

    OpenAIRE

    Puchuri Medina, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    The classic Lotka-Volterra model belongs to a family of differential equations known as “Generalized Lotka-Volterra”, which is part of a classification of four models of quadratic fields with center. These models have been studied to address the Hilbert infinitesimal problem, which consists in determine the number of limit cycles of a perturbed hamiltonian system with center. In this work, we first present an alternative proof of the existence of centers in Lotka-Volterra predator-prey models...

  19. Thermal-hydraulic limitations on water-cooled limiters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Y.S.; Misra, B.

    1984-08-01

    An assessment of the cooling requirements for fusion reactor components, such as the first wall and limiter/divertor, was carried out using pressurized water as the coolant. In order to establish the coolant operating conditions, a survey of the literature on departure from nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, asymmetrical heating and heat transfer augmentation techniques was carried out. The experimental data and the empirical correlations indicate that thermal protection for the fusion reactor components based on current design concepts can be provided with an adequate margin of safety without resorting to either high coolant velocities, excessive coolant pressures, or heat transfer augmentation techniques. If, however, the future designs require heat transfer enhancement techniques, experimental verification would be necessary since no data on heat transfer augmentation techniques exist for complex geometries, especially under asymmetrically heated conditions. Since the data presented herein concern primarily thermal protection, the final design should consider other factors such as thermal stresses, temperature limits, and fatigue

  20. Oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jutfelt, Fredrik; Norin, Tommy; Ern, Rasmus

    2018-01-01

    The Commentary by Pörtner, Bock and Mark (Pörtner et al., 2017) elaborates on the oxygen- and capacity-limited thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis. Journal of Experimental Biology Commentaries allow for personal and controversial views, yet the journal also mandates that ‘opinion and fact must b...

  1. Non-existence of limit cycles for planar vector fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Gine

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This article presents sufficient conditions for the non-existence of limit cycles for planar vector fields. Classical methods for the nonexistence of limit cycles are connected with the theory developed here.

  2. Thermal limiting effects in optical plasmonic waveguides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ershov, A.E.; Gerasimov, V.S.; Gavrilyuk, A.P.; Karpov, S.V.; Zakomirnyi, V.I.; Rasskazov, I.L.; Polyutov, S.P.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied thermal effects occurring during excitation of optical plasmonic waveguide (OPW) in the form of linear chain of spherical Ag nanoparticles by pulsed laser radiation. It was shown that heating and subsequent melting of the first irradiated particle in a chain can significantly deteriorate the transmission efficiency of OPW that is the crucial and limiting factor and continuous operation of OPW requires cooling devices. This effect is caused by suppression of particle's surface plasmon resonance due to reaching the melting point temperature. We have determined optimal excitation parameters which do not significantly affect the transmission efficiency of OPW. - Highlights: • The thermodynamic model was developed to study thermal effects at nanoscale. • Developed model considers temperature-dependent permittivity of the nanoparticles. • Thermal effects significantly suppress transmission efficiency of plasmonic chains. • Optimal parameters for stable operation of plasmonic chains were defined.

  3. Materials performance in prototype Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) columns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    Two prototype Thermal Cycling Absorption Process (TCAP) columns have been metallurgically examined after retirement, to determine the causes of failure and to evaluate the performance of the column container materials in this application. Leaking of the fluid heating and cooling subsystems caused retirement of both TCAP columns, not leaking of the main hydrogen-containing column. The aluminum block design TCAP column (AHL block TCAP) used in the Advanced Hydride Laboratory, Building 773-A, failed in one nitrogen inlet tube that was crimped during fabrication, which lead to fatigue crack growth in the tube and subsequent leaking of nitrogen from this tube. The Third Generation stainless steel design TCAP column (Third generation TCAP), operated in 773-A room C-061, failed in a braze joint between the freon heating and cooling tubes (made of copper) and the main stainless steel column. In both cases, stresses from thermal cycling and local constraint likely caused the nucleation and growth of fatigue cracks. No materials compatibility problems between palladium coated kieselguhr (the material contained in the TCAP column) and either aluminum or stainless steel column materials were observed. The aluminum-stainless steel transition junction appeared to be unaffected by service in the AHL block TCAP. Also, no evidence of cracking was observed in the AHL block TCAP in a location expected to experience the highest thermal shock fatigue in this design. It is important to limit thermal stresses caused by constraint in hydride systems designed to work by temperature variation, such as hydride storage beds and TCAP columns

  4. Effects of Black Hole Spin on the Limit-Cycle Behaviour of Accretion ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present a spatially 1.5-dimensional, time-dependent numerical study of accretion disks around Kerr black holes. Our study focuses on the limit-cycle behavior of thermally unstable accretion disks. We find that maximal luminosity may be a more appropriate probe of black hole spin than the cycle duration and influence ...

  5. Changing credit limits, changing business cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Ravn, Søren Hove; Santoro, Emiliano

    2017-01-01

    In the last half-century, capital markets across the industrialized world have undergone massive deregulation, involving large increases in the loan-to-value (LTV) ratios of house- holds and firms. We study the business-cycle implications of this phenomenon in an es- timated dynamic general...... macroeconomic volatility, a countercyclical LTV ratio proves to be successful in dampening business cycle fluctuations and, most importantly, avoiding dramatic output drops....

  6. Thermal Cycling of Uranium Dioxide - Tungsten Cermet Fuel Specimens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gripshover, P.J.; Peterson, J.H.

    1969-12-08

    In phase I tungsten clad cermet fuel specimens were thermal cycled, to study the effects of fuel loading, fuel particle size, stablized fuel, duplex coatings, and fabrication techniques on dimensional stability during thermal cycling. In phase II the best combination of the factors studies in phase I were combined in one specimen for evaluation.

  7. Changing Credit Limits, Changing Business Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Henrik; Ravn, Søren Hove; Santoro, Emiliano

    In the last decades, capital markets across the industrialized world have undergone massive deregulation, involving increases in the loan-to-value (LTV) ratios of households and firms. We study the business-cycle implications of this phenomenon in a dynamic general equilibrium model with multiple...

  8. The Limits of Schumpeter's Business Cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Esben Sloth

    2006-01-01

    Schumpeter designed Business Cycles as his major work, but it has never received much attention. The problem is partly related to its complex treatment of the theory of waveform economic evolution and the related study of the statistics and history of 150 years of capitalist evolution, but the book...

  9. Algebraic limit cycles in polynomial systems of differential equations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llibre, Jaume; Zhao Yulin

    2007-01-01

    Using elementary tools we construct cubic polynomial systems of differential equations with algebraic limit cycles of degrees 4, 5 and 6. We also construct a cubic polynomial system of differential equations having an algebraic homoclinic loop of degree 3. Moreover, we show that there are polynomial systems of differential equations of arbitrary degree that have algebraic limit cycles of degree 3, as well as give an example of a cubic polynomial system of differential equations with two algebraic limit cycles of degree 4

  10. On the approximation of the limit cycles function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Cherkas

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available We consider planar vector fields depending on a real parameter. It is assumed that this vector field has a family of limit cycles which can be described by means of the limit cycles function $l$. We prove a relationship between the multiplicity of a limit cycle of this family and the order of a zero of the limit cycles function. Moreover, we present a procedure to approximate $l(x$, which is based on the Newton scheme applied to the Poincaré function and represents a continuation method. Finally, we demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed procedure by means of a Liénard system.

  11. Investigation of boiling water reactor stability and limit-cycle amplitude

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damiano, B.; March-Leuba, J.A.; Euler, J.A.

    1991-01-01

    Galerkin's method has been applied to a boiling water reactor (BWR) dynamics model consisting of the point kinetics equations, which describe the neutronics, and a feedback transfer function, which describes the thermal hydraulics. The result is a low-order approximate solution describing BWR behavior during small-amplitude limit-cycle oscillations. The approximate solution has been used to obtain a stability condition, show that the average reactor power must increase during limit-cycle oscillations, and qualitatively determine how changes in transfer function values affect the limit-cycle amplitude. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  12. Thermal Limits and Thresholds of Red Sea Biota

    KAUST Repository

    Chaidez, Veronica

    2018-01-01

    tropical systems. This has major consequences for organisms that may already find themselves at their thermal limits. The aim of this project was to define the thermal limits and thresholds of certain Red Sea species. Firstly, to better understand

  13. Thermal cycling and vibration response for PREPP concrete waste forms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielson, R.M.; Welch, J.M.

    1983-06-01

    The Process Experimental Pilot Plant (PREPP) will process those transuranic wastes which do not satisfy the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) Waste Acceptance Criteria. Since these wastes will contain considerable quantities of combustible materials, incineration will be an integral part of the treatment process. Four basic types of PREPP ash wastes have been identified. The four types are designated high metal box waste, combustible waste, average waste, and inorganic sludge. In this process, the output of the incinerator is a mixture of ash and shredded noncombustible material (principally metals) which is separated into two sizes, -1/4 inch (under-size waste) and reverse arrow 1/4 inch (oversize waste). These wastes are solidified with hydraulic cement in 55-gallon drums. Simulated PREPP waste forms prepared by Colorado School of Mines Research Institute were subjected to thermal cycling and vibration testing to demonstrate compliance with the WIPP immobilization criterion. Although actual storage and transport conditions are expected to vary somewhat from those utilized in the testing protocol, the generation of only very small amounts of particulate suggests that the immobilization criterion should be routinely met for similar waste form formulations and production procedures. However, the behavior of waste forms containing significant quantities of off-gas scrubber sludge or considerably higher waste loadings may differ. Limited thermal cycling and vibration testing of prototype waste forms should be conducted if the final formulations or production methods used for actual waste forms differ appreciably from those tested in this study. If such testing is conducted, consideration should be given to designing the experiment to accommodate a larger number of thermal cycles more representative of the duration of storage expected

  14. Bifurcation of limit cycles for cubic reversible systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Shao

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This article is concerned with the bifurcation of limit cycles of a class of cubic reversible system having a center at the origin. We prove that this system has at least four limit cycles produced by the period annulus around the center under cubic perturbations

  15. Self-organizing maps based on limit cycle attractors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Di-Wei; Gentili, Rodolphe J; Reggia, James A

    2015-03-01

    Recent efforts to develop large-scale brain and neurocognitive architectures have paid relatively little attention to the use of self-organizing maps (SOMs). Part of the reason for this is that most conventional SOMs use a static encoding representation: each input pattern or sequence is effectively represented as a fixed point activation pattern in the map layer, something that is inconsistent with the rhythmic oscillatory activity observed in the brain. Here we develop and study an alternative encoding scheme that instead uses sparsely-coded limit cycles to represent external input patterns/sequences. We establish conditions under which learned limit cycle representations arise reliably and dominate the dynamics in a SOM. These limit cycles tend to be relatively unique for different inputs, robust to perturbations, and fairly insensitive to timing. In spite of the continually changing activity in the map layer when a limit cycle representation is used, map formation continues to occur reliably. In a two-SOM architecture where each SOM represents a different sensory modality, we also show that after learning, limit cycles in one SOM can correctly evoke corresponding limit cycles in the other, and thus there is the potential for multi-SOM systems using limit cycles to work effectively as hetero-associative memories. While the results presented here are only first steps, they establish the viability of SOM models based on limit cycle activity patterns, and suggest that such models merit further study. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Thermal cycling fatigue of organic thermal interface materials using a thermal-displacement measurement technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steill, Jason Scott

    The long term reliability of polymer-based thermal interface materials (TIM) is essential for modern electronic packages which require robust thermal management. The challenge for today's materials scientists and engineers is to maximize the heat flow from integrated circuits through a TIM and out the heat sink. Thermal cycling of the electronic package and non-uniformity in the heat flux with respect to the plan area can lead to void formation and delamination which re-introduces inefficient heat transfer. Measurement and understanding at the nano-scale is essential for TIM development. Finding and documenting the evolution of the defects is dependent upon a full understanding of the thermal probes response to changing environmental conditions and the effects of probe usage. The response of the thermal-displacement measurement technique was dominated by changes to the environment. Accurate measurement of the thermal performance was hindered by the inability to create a model system and control the operating conditions. This research highlights the need for continued study into the probe's thermal and mechanical response using tightly controlled test conditions.

  17. Reconstruction of the limit cycles by the delays method; Reconstruccion de ciclos limite por el metodo de los retardos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo D, R.; Ortiz V, J. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Calleros M, G. [CFE, CNLV, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)]. e-mail: rcd@nuclear.inin.mx

    2003-07-01

    The boiling water reactors (BWRs) are designed for usually to operate in a stable-lineal regime. In a limit cycle the behavior of the one system is no lineal-stable. In a BWR, instabilities of nuclear- thermohydraulics nature can take the reactor to a limit cycle. The limit cycles should to be avoided since the oscillations of power can cause thermal fatigue to the fuel and/or shroud. In this work the employment of the delays method is analyzed for its application in the detection of limit cycles in a nuclear power plant. The foundations of the method and it application to power signals to different operation conditions are presented. The analyzed signals are: to steady state, nuclear-thermohydraulic instability, a non linear transitory and, finally, failure of a controller plant . Among the main results it was found that the delays method can be applied to detect limit cycles in the power monitors of the BWR reactors. It was also found that the first zero of the autocorrelation function is an appropriate approach to select the delay in the detection of limit cycles, for the analyzed cases. (Author)

  18. Effect of thermal state and thermal comfort on cycling performance in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Emiel; Daanen, Hein A M; Levels, Koen; Casadio, Julia R; Plews, Daniel J; Kilding, Andrew E; Siegel, Rodney; Laursen, Paul B

    2015-07-01

    To determine the effect of thermal state and thermal comfort on cycling performance in the heat. Seven well-trained male triathletes completed 3 performance trials consisting of 60 min cycling at a fixed rating of perceived exertion (14) followed immediately by a 20-km time trial in hot (30°C) and humid (80% relative humidity) conditions. In a randomized order, cyclists either drank ambient-temperature (30°C) fluid ad libitum during exercise (CON), drank ice slurry (-1°C) ad libitum during exercise (ICE), or precooled with iced towels and ice slurry ingestion (15 g/kg) before drinking ice slurry ad libitum during exercise (PC+ICE). Power output, rectal temperature, and ratings of thermal comfort were measured. Overall mean power output was possibly higher in ICE (+1.4%±1.8% [90% confidence limit]; 0.4> smallest worthwhile change [SWC]) and likely higher PC+ICE (+2.5%±1.9%; 1.5>SWC) than in CON; however, no substantial differences were shown between PC+ICE and ICE (unclear). Time-trial performance was likely enhanced in ICE compared with CON (+2.4%±2.7%; 1.4>SWC) and PC+ICE (+2.9%±3.2%; 1.9>SWC). Differences in mean rectal temperature during exercise were unclear between trials. Ratings of thermal comfort were likely and very likely lower during exercise in ICE and PC+ICE, respectively, than in CON. While PC+ICE had a stronger effect on mean power output compared with CON than ICE did, the ICE strategy enhanced late-stage time-trial performance the most. Findings suggest that thermal comfort may be as important as thermal state for maximizing performance in the heat.

  19. Physiological responses to short-term thermal stress in mayfly (Neocloeon triangulifer) larvae in relation to upper thermal limits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyoung Sun; Chou, Hsuan; Funk, David H; Jackson, John K; Sweeney, Bernard W; Buchwalter, David B

    2017-07-15

    Understanding species' thermal limits and their physiological determinants is critical in light of climate change and other human activities that warm freshwater ecosystems. Here, we ask whether oxygen limitation determines the chronic upper thermal limits in larvae of the mayfly Neocloeon triangulifer , an emerging model for ecological and physiological studies. Our experiments are based on a robust understanding of the upper acute (∼40°C) and chronic thermal limits of this species (>28°C, ≤30°C) derived from full life cycle rearing experiments across temperatures. We tested two related predictions derived from the hypothesis that oxygen limitation sets the chronic upper thermal limits: (1) aerobic scope declines in mayfly larvae as they approach and exceed temperatures that are chronically lethal to larvae; and (2) genes indicative of hypoxia challenge are also responsive in larvae exposed to ecologically relevant thermal limits. Neither prediction held true. We estimated aerobic scope by subtracting measurements of standard oxygen consumption rates from measurements of maximum oxygen consumption rates, the latter of which was obtained by treating with the metabolic uncoupling agent carbonyl cyanide-4-(trifluoromethoxy) pheylhydrazone (FCCP). Aerobic scope was similar in larvae held below and above chronic thermal limits. Genes indicative of oxygen limitation (LDH, EGL-9) were only upregulated under hypoxia or during exposure to temperatures beyond the chronic (and more ecologically relevant) thermal limits of this species (LDH). Our results suggest that the chronic thermal limits of this species are likely not driven by oxygen limitation, but rather are determined by other factors, e.g. bioenergetics costs. We caution against the use of short-term thermal ramping approaches to estimate critical thermal limits (CT max ) in aquatic insects because those temperatures are typically higher than those that occur in nature. © 2017. Published by The Company of

  20. Solar thermal organic rankine cycle for micro-generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkahli, N. A.; Abdullah, H.; Darus, A. N.; Jalaludin, A. F.

    2012-06-01

    The conceptual design of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) driven by solar thermal energy is developed for the decentralized production of electricity of up to 50 kW. Conventional Rankine Cycle uses water as the working fluid whereas ORC uses organic compound as the working fluid and it is particularly suitable for low temperature applications. The ORC and the solar collector will be sized according to the solar flux distribution in the Republic of Yemen for the required power output of 50 kW. This will be a micro power generation system that consists of two cycles, the solar thermal cycle that harness solar energy and the power cycle, which is the ORC that generates electricity. As for the solar thermal cycle, heat transfer fluid (HTF) circulates the cycle while absorbing thermal energy from the sun through a parabolic trough collector and then storing it in a thermal storage to increase system efficiency and maintains system operation during low radiation. The heat is then transferred to the organic fluid in the ORC via a heat exchanger. The organic fluids to be used and analyzed in the ORC are hydrocarbons R600a and R290.

  1. Fast thermal cycling-enhanced electromigration in power metallization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Van Hieu; Salm, Cora; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Bisschop, J.; Mouthaan, A.J.; Kuper, F.G.

    Fast thermal nterconnects used in power ICs are susceptible to short circuit failure due to a combination of fast thermal cycling and electromigration stresses. In this paper, we present a study of electromigration-induced extrusion short-circuit failure in a standard two level metallization

  2. Effects of thermal cycling on aluminum metallization of power diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Mads; Pedersen, Kristian Bonderup; Kristensen, Peter Kjær

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of aluminum metallization on top of power electronic chips is a well-known wear out phenomenon under power cycling conditions. However, the origins of reconstruction are still under discussion. In the current study, a method for carrying out passive thermal cycling of power diodes...

  3. State variable participation in the limit cycle of induction motor

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    State variable participation in the limit cycle of induction ... 2National Institute of Technical Teachers' Training and Research, Kolkata 700 106, India ..... the phase plot shown in figure 10 would be very useful as it shows infinite loops, meaning.

  4. Limit cycles bifurcating from a perturbed quartic center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coll, Bartomeu, E-mail: dmitcv0@ps.uib.ca [Dept. de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Facultat de ciencies, 07071 Palma de Mallorca (Spain); Llibre, Jaume, E-mail: jllibre@mat.uab.ca [Dept. de Matematiques, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cc 08193 Bellaterra, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Prohens, Rafel, E-mail: dmirps3@ps.uib.ca [Dept. de Matematiques i Informatica, Universitat de les Illes Balears, Facultat de ciencies, 07071 Palma de Mallorca (Spain)

    2011-04-15

    Highlights: We study polynomial perturbations of a quartic center. We get simultaneous upper and lower bounds for the bifurcating limit cycles. A higher lower bound for the maximum number of limit cycles is obtained. We obtain more limit cycles than the number obtained in the cubic case. - Abstract: We consider the quartic center x{sup .}=-yf(x,y),y{sup .}=xf(x,y), with f(x, y) = (x + a) (y + b) (x + c) and abc {ne} 0. Here we study the maximum number {sigma} of limit cycles which can bifurcate from the periodic orbits of this quartic center when we perturb it inside the class of polynomial vector fields of degree n, using the averaging theory of first order. We prove that 4[(n - 1)/2] + 4 {<=} {sigma} {<=} 5[(n - 1)/2] + 14, where [{eta}] denotes the integer part function of {eta}.

  5. Engine cycle design considerations for nuclear thermal propulsion systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelaccio, D.G.; Scheil, C.M.; Collins, J.T.

    1993-01-01

    A top-level study was performed which addresses nuclear thermal propulsion system engine cycle options and their applicability to support future Space Exploration Initiative manned lunar and Mars missions. Technical and development issues associated with expander, gas generator, and bleed cycle near-term, solid core nuclear thermal propulsion engines are identified and examined. In addition to performance and weight the influence of the engine cycle type on key design selection parameters such as design complexity, reliability, development time, and cost are discussed. Representative engine designs are presented and compared. Their applicability and performance impact on typical near-term lunar and Mars missions are shown

  6. Thermodynamic limits of energy harvesting from outgoing thermal radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buddhiraju, Siddharth; Santhanam, Parthiban; Fan, Shanhui

    2018-04-17

    We derive the thermodynamic limits of harvesting power from the outgoing thermal radiation from the ambient to the cold outer space. The derivations are based on a duality relation between thermal engines that harvest solar radiation and those that harvest outgoing thermal radiation. In particular, we derive the ultimate limit for harvesting outgoing thermal radiation, which is analogous to the Landsberg limit for solar energy harvesting, and show that the ultimate limit far exceeds what was previously thought to be possible. As an extension of our work, we also derive the ultimate limit of efficiency of thermophotovoltaic systems.

  7. Eutectic mixtures of some fatty acids for latent heat storage: Thermal properties and thermal reliability with respect to thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sari, Ahmet

    2006-01-01

    Accelerated thermal cycle tests have been conducted to study the change in melting temperatures and latent heats of fusion of the eutectic mixtures of lauric acid (LA)-myristic acid (MA), lauric acid (LA)-palmitic acid (PA) and myristic acid (MA)-stearic acid (SA) as latent heat storage materials. The thermal properties of these materials were determined by the differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) analysis method. The thermal reliability of the eutectic mixtures after melt/freeze cycles of 720, 1080 and 1460 was also evaluated using the DSC curves. The accelerated thermal cycle tests indicate that the melting temperatures usually tend to decrease, and the variations in the latent heats of fusion are irregular with increasing number of thermal cycles. Moreover, the probable reasons for the change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures after repeated thermal cycles were investigated. Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopic analysis indicates that the accelerated melt/freeze processes do not cause any degradation in the chemical structure of the mixtures. The change in thermal properties of the eutectic mixtures with increasing number of thermal cycles is only because of the presence of certain amounts of impurities in the fatty acids used in their preparation. It is concluded that the tested eutectic mixtures have reasonable thermal properties and thermal reliability as phase change materials (PCMs) for latent heat storage in any solar heating applications that include a four year utilization period

  8. Cycling of conventional power plants: Technical limits and actual costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Bergh, Kenneth; Delarue, Erik

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Literature reports a wide range of cycling parameters (technical and cost-related). • The impact of different cycling parameters is assessed. • The German 2013 system is studied as a case study. • Even for stringent parameters, the dynamic limit of the portfolio is not reached. • Cycling costs can be reduced with 40% when taken into account in the scheduling. - Abstract: Cycling of conventional generation units is an important source of operational flexibility in the electricity generation system. Cycling is changing the power output of conventional units by means of ramping and switching (starting up and shutting down). In the literature, a wide range of technical and cost-related cycling parameters can be found. Different studies allocate different cycling parameters to similar generation units. This paper assesses the impact of different cycling parameters allocated to a conventional generation portfolio. Both the technical limitations of power plants and all costs related to cycling are considered. The results presented in this paper follow from a unit commitment model, used for a case study based on the German 2013 system. The conventional generation portfolio has to deliver different residual load time series, corresponding to different levels of renewables penetration. The study shows, under the assumptions made, that although the dynamic limits of some units are reached, the limits of the conventional generation portfolio as a whole are not reached, even if stringent dynamic parameters are assigned to the generation portfolio and a highly variable residual load is imposed to the system. The study shows also the importance of including full cycling costs in the unit commitment scheduling. The cycling cost can be reduced by up to 40% when fully taken into account

  9. Rapid thermal cycling of new technology solar array blanket coupons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiman, David A.; Smith, Bryan K.; Kurland, Richard M.; Mesch, Hans G.

    1990-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center is conducting thermal cycle testing of a new solar array blanket technologies. These technologies include test coupons for Space Station Freedom (SSF) and the advanced photovoltaic solar array (APSA). The objective of this testing is to demonstrate the durability or operational lifetime of the solar array interconnect design and blanket technology within a low earth orbit (LEO) or geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO) thermal cycling environment. Both the SSF and the APSA array survived all rapid thermal cycling with little or no degradation in peak performance. This testing includes an equivalent of 15 years in LEO for SSF test coupons and 30 years of GEO plus ten years of LEO for the APSA test coupon. It is concluded that both the parallel gap welding of the SSF interconnects and the soldering of the APSA interconnects are adequately designed to handle the thermal stresses of space environment temperature extremes.

  10. Influence of safety limitations on the fuel cycle management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mancini, G

    1972-05-03

    The choice of an optimum fuel cycle has been up to now governed from the safety point of view, by the setting of very general limitations on few parameters, as for instance on the fuel temperature and on the surface temperature. As a better understanding of the design and materials limitations become available, the philosophy of the fuel cycle optimisation can be improved. The aim of this contribution is to shortly revise the safety aspects involved in the choice of a fuel cycle management and thereafter try to draw some general conclusions.

  11. Study on durability for thermal cycle of planar SOFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ando, Motoo; Nakata, Kei-ichi; Wakayama, Sin-ichi [Tonen Corp., Saitama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    TONEN CORPORATION has developed planar type SOFC since 1986. We demonstrated the output of 1.3 kW in 1991 and 5.1 kW in 1995. Simultaneously we have studied how to raise electric efficiency and reliability utilizing hydrogen and propane as fuel. Durability for thermal cycle is one of the most important problems of planar SOFC to make it more practical. The planar type SOFC is made up of separator, zirconia electrolyte and glass sealant. The thermal expansion of these components are expected to be the same value, however, they still possess small differences. In this situation, a thermal cycle causes a thermal stress due to the difference of the cell components and is often followed by a rupture in cell components, therefore, the analysis of the thermal stress should give us much useful information. The thermal cycle process consists of a heating up and cooling down procedure. Zirconia electrolyte is not bonded to the separator under the condition of the initial heating up procedure, and glass sealant becomes soft or melts and glass seals spaces between the zirconia and separator. The glass sealant becomes harder with the cooling down procedure. Moreover, zirconia is tightly bonded with separator below a temperature which is defined as a constraint temperature and thermal stress also occurs. This indicates that the heating up process relaxes the thermal stress and the cooling down increases it. In this paper, we simulated dependence of the stress on the sealing configuration, thermal expansion of sealant and constraint temperature of sealant glass. Furthermore, we presented SOFC electrical properties after a thermal cycle.

  12. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Using Double-Stage Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Ikegami

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC using non-azeotropic mixtures such as ammonia/water as working fluid and the multistage cycle has been investigated in order to improve the thermal efficiency of the cycle because of small ocean temperature differences. The performance and effectiveness of the multistage cycle are barely understood. In addition, previous evaluation methods of heat exchange process cannot clearly indicate the influence of the thermophysical characteristics of the working fluid on the power output. Consequently, this study investigated the influence of reduction of the irreversible losses in the heat exchange process on the system performance in double-stage Rankine cycle using pure working fluid. Single Rankine, double-stage Rankine and Kalina cycles were analyzed to ascertain the system characteristics. The simple evaluation method of the temperature difference between the working fluid and the seawater is applied to this analysis. From the results of the parametric performance analysis it can be considered that double-stage Rankine cycle using pure working fluid can reduce the irreversible losses in the heat exchange process as with the Kalina cycle using an ammonia/water mixture. Considering the maximum power efficiency obtained in the study, double-stage Rankine and Kalina cycles can improve the power output by reducing the irreversible losses in the cycle.

  13. A treatment of thermal efficiency improvement in the Brayton cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujii, Terushige; Akagawa, Koji; Nakanishi, Shigeyasu; Inoue, Kiyoshi; Ishigai, Seikan.

    1982-01-01

    So far, as the working fluid for power-generating plants, mainly water and air (combustion gas) have been used. In this study, in regeneration and isothermal compression processes being considered as the means for the efficiency improvement in Brayton cycle, the investigation of equivalent graphical presentation method with T-S diagrams, the introduction of the new characteristic number expressing the possibility of thermal efficiency improvement by regeneration, and the investigation of the effect of the difference of working fluid on thermal efficiency were carried out. Next, as the cycle approximately realizing isothermal compression process with condensation process, the super-critical pressure cycle with liquid phase compression was rated, and four working fluids, NH 3 , SO 2 , CO 2 and H 2 O were examined as perfect gas and real gas. The advantage of CO 2 regeneration for the thermal efficiency improvement was clarified by using the dimensionless characteristic number. The graphical presentation of effective work, the thermal efficiency improvement by regeneration, the thermal efficiency improvement by making compression process isothermal, the effect on thermal efficiency due to various factors and working fluids, the characteristic number by regeneration, and the application to real working fluids are reported. (Kako, I.)

  14. Method for limiting movement of a thermal shield for a nuclear reactor, and thermal shield displacement limiter therefor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meuschke, R.E.; Boyd, C.H.

    1989-01-01

    This patent describes a method of limiting the movement of a thermal shield of a nuclear reactor. It comprises: machining at least four (4) pockets in upper portions of a thermal shield circumferentially about a core barrel of a nuclear reactor to receive key-wave inserts; tapping bolt holes in the pockets of the thermal shield to receive bolts; positioning key-wave inserts into the pockets of the thermal shield to be bolted in place with the bolt holes; machining dowel holes at least partially through the positioned key-way inserts and the thermal shield to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the key-way insert and thermal shield to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; sliding limiter keys into the key-way inserts and bolting the limiter keys to the core barrel to tangentially restrain movement of the thermal shield relative and the core barrel while allowing radial and axial movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel; machining dowel holes through the limiter key and at least partially through the core barrel to receive dowel pins; positioning dowel pins in the dowel holes in the limiter key and core barrel to restrain tangential movement of the thermal shield relative to the core barrel of the nuclear reactor

  15. Weldability investigation steel P 91 by weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper elaborates results of hardness and impact energy of thermal cycle simulated specimens of high-alloy steel P 91 and their dependence on cooling time from 800 to 500 °C. Results were obtained by measuring hardness HV 1 and by experimental testing of Charpy notched specimens. Metallographic analysis of samples was performed on scanning electronic microscope.

  16. Rainfall limit of the N cycle on Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing, Stephanie A.; Michalski, Greg; Thiemens, Mark; Quinn, Richard C.; Macalady, Jennifer L.; Kohl, Steven; Wankel, Scott D.; Kendall, Carol; McKay, Christopher P.; Amundson, Ronald

    2007-09-01

    In most climates on Earth, biological processes control soil N. In the Atacama Desert of Chile, aridity severely limits biology, and soils accumulate atmospheric NO3-. We examined this apparent transformation of the soil N cycle using a series of ancient Atacama Desert soils (>2 My) that vary in rainfall (21 to Mars.

  17. Centres and limit cycles for an extended Kukles system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane M. Pearson

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available We present conditions for the origin to be a centre for a class of cubic systems. Some of the centre conditions are determined by finding complicated invariant functions. We also investigate the coexistence of fine foci and the simultaneous bifurcation of limit cycles from them.

  18. 47 CFR 27.50 - Power limits and duty cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Technical Standards § 27.50 Power limits and duty cycle. (a) The.... In measuring transmissions in this band using an average power technique, the peak-to-average ratio (PAR) of the transmission may not exceed 13 dB. (6) Peak transmit power must be measured over any...

  19. New criteria on the existence of stable-limit cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales-Gascon, F [Instituto de Estructura de la Materia (GIFT) y Dep. de Fisica Teorica Universidad Complutense, Madrid (Espana); Kumpera, A [Universidade Estadual de Campinas (Brazil). Inst. de Matematica

    1978-06-10

    Negative criteria are given assuring the absence of stable limit cycles. These criteria are valid for vector fields over R/sup 3/ and R/sup 4/ and some of them can be applied to vector fields over Rsup(n).

  20. Limit cycles and stiffness control with variable stiffness actuators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carloni, Raffaella; Marconi, L.

    2012-01-01

    Variable stiffness actuators realize highly dynamic systems, whose inherent mechanical compliance can be properly exploited to obtain a robust and energy-efficient behavior. The paper presents a control strategy for variable stiffness actuators with the primarily goal of tracking a limit cycle

  1. Thermal cycling behaviour and thermal stability of uranium-molybdenum alloys of low molybdenum content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decours, J.; Fabrique, B.; Peault, O.

    1963-01-01

    We have studied the behaviour during thermal cycling of as-cast U-Mo alloys whose molybdenum content varies from 0.5 to 3 per cent; results are given concerning grain stability during extended heat treatments and the effect of treatments combining protracted heating with thermal cycling. The thermal cycling treatments were carried out at 550, 575, 600 and 625 deg C for 1000 cycles; the protracted heating experiments were done at 550, 575, 600 and 625 deg C for 2000 hours (4000 hrs at 625 deg C). The 0.5 per cent alloy resists much better to the thermal cycling than does the non-alloyed uranium. This resistance is, however, much lower than that of alloys containing over l per cent, even at 550 deg C it improves after a heat treatment for grain-refining. Alloys of over 1.1 per cent have a very good resistance to a cycling treatment even at 625 deg C, and this behaviour improves with increasing concentrations up to 3 per cent. An increase in the temperature up to the γ-phase has few disadvantages provided that it is followed by rapid cooling (50 to 100 deg C/min). The α grain is fine, the γ-phase is of the modular form, and the behaviour during a thermal cycling treatment is satisfactory. If this cooling is slow (15 deg /hr) the α-grain is coarse and cycling treatment behaviour is identical to that of the 0.5 per cent alloy. The protracted heat treatments showed that the α-grain exhibits satisfactory stability after 2000 hours at 575, 600 and 625 deg C, and after 4000 hours at 625 deg C. A heat cycling treatment carried out after these tests affects only very little the behaviour of these alloys during cycling. (authors) [fr

  2. Thermal cycling behaviour of lanthanum zirconate as EB-PVD thermal barrier coating

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bobzin, K.; Lugscheider, E.; Bagcivan, N.

    2006-01-01

    Thermal cycling tests with two different EB-PVD thermal barrier coatings (TBC) were performed in a furnace cycle test. The results of these tests showed an increase of endurable cycle number when pyrochloric La 2 Zr 2 O 7 was used as TBC. 1865 cycles were reached with La 2 Zr 2 O 7 and 1380 cycles with 7 weigth-% yttria stabilised zirconia (YSZ) EB-PVD TBC. Additional investigation was made with scanning electron microscope (SEM) to investigate morphology and to determine chemical composition by electron dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis. X-Ray diffraction was performed to analyze structural constitution of deposited coatings. (Abstract Copyright [2006], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  3. High-speed thermal cycling system and method of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, A.D.A.; Jaklevic, J.M.

    1996-04-16

    A thermal cycling system and method of use are described. The thermal cycling system is based on the circulation of temperature-controlled water directly to the underside of thin-walled polycarbonate plates. The water flow is selected from a manifold fed by pumps from heated reservoirs. The plate wells are loaded with typically 15-20 microliters of reagent mix for the PCR process. Heat transfer through the thin polycarbonate is sufficiently rapid that the contents reach thermal equilibrium with the water in less than 15 seconds. Complete PCR amplification runs of 40 three-step cycles have been performed in as little as 14.5 minutes, with the results showing substantially enhanced specificity compared to conventional technology requiring run times in excess of 100 minutes. The plate clamping station is designed to be amenable to robotic loading and unloading of the system. It includes a heated lid, thus eliminating the need for mineral oil overlay of the reactants. The present system includes three or more plate holder stations, fed from common reservoirs but operating with independent switching cycles. The system can be modularly expanded. 13 figs.

  4. Increasing thermal efficiency of Rankine cycles by using refrigeration cycles: A theoretical analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarr, Joachim-André Raymond; Mathieu-Potvin, François

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A new stratagem is proposed to improve thermal efficiency of Rankine cycles. • Three new configurations are optimized by means of numerical simulations. • The Rankine-1SCR design is advantageous for 1338 different fluid combinations. • The Rankine-2SCR design is advantageous for 772 different fluid combinations. • The Rankine-3SCR design is advantageous for 768 different fluid combinations. - Abstract: In this paper, three different modifications of the basic Rankine thermodynamic cycle are proposed. The objective is to increase the thermal efficiency of power systems based on Rankine cycles. The three new systems are named “Rankine-1SCR”, “Rankine-2SCR”, and “Rankine-3SCR” cycles, and they consist of linking a refrigeration cycle to the basic Rankine cycle. The idea is to use the refrigeration cycle to create a low temperature heat sink for the Rankine cycle. These three new power plant configurations are modeled and optimized with numerical tools, and then they are compared with the basic Rankine cycle. The objective function is the thermal efficiency of the systems (i.e., net power output (kW) divided by heat rate (kW) entering the system), and the design variables are the operating temperatures within the systems. Among the 84 × 84 (i.e., 7056) possible combinations of working and cooling fluids investigated in this paper, it is shown that: (i) the Rankine-1SCR system is advantageous for 1338 different fluid combinations, (ii) the Rankine-2SCR system is advantageous for 772 different fluid combinations, and (iii) the Rankine-3SCR system is advantageous for 768 different fluid combinations.

  5. Limit cycle analysis of nuclear coupled density wave oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    An investigation of limit cycle behavior for the nuclear-coupled density wave oscillation (NCDWO) in a boiling water reactor (BWR) was performed. A simplified nonlinear model of BWR core behavior was developed using a two-region flow channel representation, coupled with a form of the point-kinetics equation. This model has been used to investigate the behavior of large amplitude NCDWO's through conventional time-integration solutions and through application of a direct relaxation-oscillation limit cycle solution in phase space. The numerical solutions demonstrate the potential for severe global power and flow oscillations in a BWR core at off-normal conditions, such as might occur during Anticipated Transients without Scram. Because of the many simplifying assumptions used, it is felt that the results should not be interpreted as an absolute prediction of core behavior, but as an indication of the potential for large oscillations and a demonstration of the corresponding limit cycle mechanisms. The oscillations in channel density drive the core power variations, and are reinforced by heat flux variations due to the changing fuel temperature. A global temperature increase occurs as energy is accumulated in the fuel, and limits the magnitude of the oscillations because as the average channel density decreases, the amplitude and duration of positive void reactivity at a given oscillation amplitude is lessened

  6. The role of heater thermal response in reactor thermal limits during oscillartory two-phase flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruggles, A.E.; Brown, N.W. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States); Vasil`ev, A.D. [Nuclear Safety Institute, Moscow, (Russian Federation); Wendel, M.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analytical and numerical investigations of critical heat flux (CHF) and reactor thermal limits are conducted for oscillatory two-phase flows often associated with natural circulation conditions. It is shown that the CHF and associated thermal limits depend on the amplitude of the flow oscillations, the period of the flow oscillations, and the thermal properties and dimensions of the heater. The value of the thermal limit can be much lower in unsteady flow situations than would be expected using time average flow conditions. It is also shown that the properties of the heater strongly influence the thermal limit value in unsteady flow situations, which is very important to the design of experiments to evaluate thermal limits for reactor fuel systems.

  7. Failure of sheathed thermocouples due to thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.L.; Ludwig, R.L.

    1982-03-01

    Open circuit failures (up to 100%) in small-diameter thermocouples used in electrically heated nuclear fuel rod simulator prototypes during thermal cycling tests were investigated to determine the cause(s) of the failures. The experiments conducted to determine the relative effects of differential thermal expansion, wire size, grain size, and manufacturing technology are described. It was concluded that the large grain size and embrittlement which result from certain common manufacturing annealing and drawing procedures were a major contributing factor in the breakage of the thermocouple wires

  8. Environmental Impacts of Solar Thermal Systems with Life Cycle Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    De Laborderie , Alexis; Puech , Clément; Adra , Nadine; Blanc , Isabelle; Beloin-Saint-Pierre , Didier; Padey , Pierryves; Payet , Jérôme; Sie , Marion; Jacquin , Philippe

    2011-01-01

    Available on: http://www.ep.liu.se/ecp/057/vol14/002/ecp57vol14_002.pdf; International audience; Solar thermal systems are an ecological way of providing domestic hot water. They are experiencing a rapid growth since the beginning of the last decade. This study characterizes the environmental performances of such installations with a life-cycle approach. The methodology is based on the application of the international standards of Life Cycle Assessment. Two types of systems are presented. Fir...

  9. Limit Cycle Analysis in a Class of Hybrid Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Favela-Contreras

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hybrid systems are those that inherently combine discrete and continuous dynamics. This paper considers the hybrid system model to be an extension of the discrete automata associating a continuous evolution with each discrete state. This model is called the hybrid automaton. In this work, we achieve a mathematical formulation of the steady state and we show a way to obtain the initial conditions region to reach a specific limit cycle for a class of uncoupled and coupled continuous-linear hybrid systems. The continuous-linear term is used in the sense of the system theory and, in this sense, continuous-linear hybrid automata will be defined. Thus, some properties and theorems that govern the hybrid automata dynamic behavior to evaluate a limit cycle existence have been established; this content is explained under a theoretical framework.

  10. Laser Theory for Optomechanics: Limit Cycles in the Quantum Regime

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Lörch

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Optomechanical systems can exhibit self-sustained limit cycles where the quantum state of the mechanical resonator possesses nonclassical characteristics such as a strongly negative Wigner density, as was shown recently in a numerical study by Qian et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 253601 (2012]. Here, we derive a Fokker-Planck equation describing mechanical limit cycles in the quantum regime that correctly reproduces the numerically observed nonclassical features. The derivation starts from the standard optomechanical master equation and is based on techniques borrowed from the laser theory due to Haake and Lewenstein. We compare our analytical model with numerical solutions of the master equation based on Monte Carlo simulations and find very good agreement over a wide and so far unexplored regime of system parameters. As one main conclusion, we predict negative Wigner functions to be observable even for surprisingly classical parameters, i.e., outside the single-photon strong-coupling regime, for strong cavity drive and rather large limit-cycle amplitudes. The approach taken here provides a natural starting point for further studies of quantum effects in optomechanics.

  11. Thermal shock considerations for the TFCX limiter and first wall

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haines, J.R.; Fuller, G.M.

    1983-01-01

    Resistance to thermal shock fracture of limiter and first wall surface material candidates during plasma disruption heating conditions is evaluated. A simple, figure-of-merit type thermal shock parameter which provides a mechanism to rank material candidates is derived. Combining this figure-of-merit parameter with the parameters defining specific heating conditions yields a non-dimensional thermal shock parameter. For values of this parameter below a critical value, a given material is expected to undergo thermal shock damage. Prediction of thermal shock damage with this parameter is shown to exhibit good agreement with test data. Applying this critical parameter value approach, all materials examined in this study are expected to experience thermal shock damage for nominal TFCX plasma disruption conditions. Since the extent of this damage is not clear, tests which explore the range of expected conditions for TFCX are recommended

  12. Modelling aging effects on a thermal cycling absorption process column

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laquerbe, C.; Contreras, S. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - CEA/Valduc, F-21121 Is sur Tille (France); Baudouin, O. [ProSim SA, Stratege Bat. A, BP 27210, F-31672 Labege Cedex (France); Demoment, J. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique - CEA/Valduc, F-21121 Is sur Tille (France)

    2008-07-15

    Palladium coated on alumina is used in hydrogen separation systems operated at CEA/Valduc, and more particularly in Thermal Cycling Absorption Process columns. With such materials, tritium decay is known to induce aging effects which have direct side effects on hydrogen isotopes absorption isotherms. Furthermore in a TCAP column, aging occurs in an heterogeneous way. The possible impacts of these intrinsic material evolutions on the separation performances are investigated here through a numerical approach. (authors)

  13. Simulation and parametric optimisation of thermal power plant cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ravindra Kumar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the paper is to analyse parametric studies and optimum steam extraction pressures of three different (subcritical, supercritical and ultra-supercritical coal fired power plant cycles at a particular main steam temperature of 600 °C by keeping the reheat temperature at 537 °C and condenser pressure at 0.09 bar as constant. In order to maximize the heat rate gain possible with supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions, eight stages of feed water heater arrangement with single reheater is considered. The system is optimized in such a way that the percentage exergetic losses are reduced for the increase of the exergetic efficiency and higher fuel utilization. The plant cycles are simulated and optimized by using Cycle Tempo 5.0 simulation software tool. From the simulation study, it is observed that the thermal efficiency of the three different power plant cycles obtained as 41.40, 42.48 and 43.03%, respectively. The specific coal consumption for three different power plant cycles are 0.56, 0.55 and 0.54 Tonnes/MWh. The improvement in feed water temperatures at the inlet of steam generator of respective cycles are 291, 305 and 316 °C.

  14. Testing of High Thermal Cycling Stability of Low Strength Concrete as a Thermal Energy Storage Material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Wu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Concrete has the potential to become a solution for thermal energy storage (TES integrated in concentrating solar power (CSP systems due to its good thermal and mechanical properties and low cost of material. In this study, a low strength concrete (C20 is tested at high temperatures up to 600 °C. Specimens are thermally cycled at temperatures in the range of 400–300 °C, 500–300 °C, and 600–300 °C, which TES can reach in operation. For comparison, specimens also cycled at temperature in the range of 400–25 °C (room temperature, 500–25 °C, and 600–25 °C. It is found from the test results that cracks are not observed on the surfaces of concrete specimens until the temperature is elevated up to 500 °C. There is mechanical deterioration of concrete after exposure to high temperature, especially to high thermal cycles. The residual compressive strength of concrete after 10 thermal cycles between 600 °C and 300 °C is about 58.3%, but the specimens remain stable without spalling, indicating possible use of low strength concrete as a TES material.

  15. Factors which could limit the nuclear fuel cycle development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pecqueur, M.; Barre, B.

    1977-01-01

    The nuclear fuel cycle is a most important industry for the energy future of the world. It has also a leading part as regards the physical continuity of energy supply of the countries engaged in the nuclear field. The development of this industry is subject to the economic or political constraints involved by the availability of raw materials, technologies or production means. The various limiting factors which could affect the different stages of the fuel cycle are linked with the technical, economic and financial aspects, with the impact on the environment, nuclear safety, risks of non-pacific uses and proliferation of arms. Interesting to note is also the correlation between the fuel cycle development and the problems of energy independence and security of nuclear programs. As a conclusion, the nuclear fuel cycle industry is confronted to difficulties due to its extremely rapid growth (doubling time 5 years) which only few heavy industries have encountered for long periods. It is more over submitted to the political and safety constraints always linked with nuclear matters. The task is therefore a difficult one. But the objective is worth-while since it is a condition to the development of nuclear industry [fr

  16. Thermal Limits and Thresholds of Red Sea Biota

    KAUST Repository

    Chaidez, Veronica

    2018-05-01

    As ocean temperatures continue to rise, the effect of temperature on marine organisms becomes highly relevant. The Red Sea is the warmest sea and is rapidly warming with current surface temperatures (28 – 34 °C) already exceeding those of most tropical systems. This has major consequences for organisms that may already find themselves at their thermal limits. The aim of this project was to define the thermal limits and thresholds of certain Red Sea species. Firstly, to better understand the thermal regimes of the Red Sea, we looked at decadal trends in maximum sea surface temperature across the basin. Then, we tested the thermal capacities of Red Sea mangroves and zooplankton, two key ecological groups, by performing thermal stress experiments in the laboratory. We found that the Red Sea basin is warming faster than the global average (0.17 °C decade-1), the thermal limit of mangrove propagules is between 33 and 35 °C, and the limits among the most common zooplankton groups range from 30 to 36 °C. This project gives us a better understanding of how organisms respond to extreme temperatures and how they may be affected in a future, warmer, ocean.

  17. Reversing the irreversible: From limit cycles to emergent time symmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortês, Marina; Smolin, Lee

    2018-01-01

    In 1979 Penrose hypothesized that the arrows of time are explained by the hypothesis that the fundamental laws are time irreversible [R. Penrose, in General Relativity: An Einstein Centenary Survey (1979)]. That is, our reversible laws, such as the standard model and general relativity are effective, and emerge from an underlying fundamental theory which is time irreversible. In [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.084007; 90, 044035 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.044035; 93, 084039 (2016), 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.084039] we put forward a research program aiming at realizing just this. The aim is to find a fundamental description of physics above the Planck scale, based on irreversible laws, from which will emerge the apparently reversible dynamics we observe on intermediate scales. Here we continue that program and note that a class of discrete dynamical systems are known to exhibit this very property: they have an underlying discrete irreversible evolution, but in the long term exhibit the properties of a time reversible system, in the form of limit cycles. We connect this to our original model proposal in [M. Cortês and L. Smolin, Phys. Rev. D 90, 084007 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevD.90.084007], and show that the behaviors obtained there can be explained in terms of the same phenomenon: the attraction of the system to a basin of limit cycles, where the dynamics appears to be time reversible. Further than that, we show that our original models exhibit the very same feature: the emergence of quasiparticle excitations obtained in the earlier work in the space-time description is an expression of the system's convergence to limit cycles when seen in the causal set description.

  18. Stability of limit cycles in autonomous nonlinear systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náprstek, Jiří; Fischer, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 49, č. 8 (2014), s. 1929-1943 ISSN 0025-6455 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA200710902; GA ČR(CZ) GA103/09/0094; GA ČR(CZ) GC13-34405J Institutional support: RVO:68378297 Keywords : limit cycle * nonlinear oscillator * stability Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering Impact factor: 1.949, year: 2014 http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11012-014-9899-8

  19. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Rimmer, Robert; Preble, Joseph P; Reece, Charles E

    2005-01-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maint...

  20. SRF Performance of CEBAF After Thermal Cycle to Ambient Temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert Rimmer; Jay Benesch; Joseph Preble; Charles Reece

    2005-01-01

    In September 2003, in the wake of Hurricane Isabel, JLab was without power for four days after a tree fell on the main power lines feeding the site. This was long enough to lose insulating vacuum in the cryomodules and cryogenic systems resulting in the whole accelerator warming up and the total loss of the liquid helium inventory. This thermal cycle stressed many of the cryomodule components causing several cavities to become inoperable due to helium to vacuum leaks. At the same time the thermal cycle released years of adsorbed gas from the cold surfaces. Over the next days and weeks this gas was pumped away, the insulating vacuum was restored and the machine was cooled back down and re-commissioned. In a testament to the robustness of SRF technology, only a small loss in energy capability was apparent, although individual cavities had quite different field-emission characteristics compared to before the event. In Summer 2004 a section of the machine was again cycled to room temperature during the long maintenance shutdown. We report on the overall SRF performance of the machine after these major disturbances and on efforts to characterize and optimize the new behavior for high-energy running

  1. Thermal power generation during heat cycle near room temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Takayuki; Fukuzumi, Yuya; Kobayashi, Wataru; Moritomo, Yutaka

    2018-01-01

    We demonstrate that a sodium-ion secondary battery (SIB)-type thermocell consisting of two types of Prussian blue analogue (PBA) with different electrochemical thermoelectric coefficients (S EC ≡ ∂V/∂T V and T are the redox potential and temperature, respectively) produces electrical energy during heat cycles. The device produces an electrical energy of 2.3 meV/PBA per heat cycle between 295 K (= T L) and 323 K (= T H). The ideal thermal efficiency (η = 1.0%), which is evaluated using the heat capacity (C = 4.16 meV/K) of ideal Na2Co[Fe(CN)6], reaches 11% of the Carnot efficiency (ηth = 8.7%). Our SIB-type thermocell is a promising thermoelectric device that harvests waste heat near room temperature.

  2. General Linearized Theory of Quantum Fluctuations around Arbitrary Limit Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Weiss, Talitha; Walter, Stefan; de Valcárcel, Germán J

    2017-09-29

    The theory of Gaussian quantum fluctuations around classical steady states in nonlinear quantum-optical systems (also known as standard linearization) is a cornerstone for the analysis of such systems. Its simplicity, together with its accuracy far from critical points or situations where the nonlinearity reaches the strong coupling regime, has turned it into a widespread technique, being the first method of choice in most works on the subject. However, such a technique finds strong practical and conceptual complications when one tries to apply it to situations in which the classical long-time solution is time dependent, a most prominent example being spontaneous limit-cycle formation. Here, we introduce a linearization scheme adapted to such situations, using the driven Van der Pol oscillator as a test bed for the method, which allows us to compare it with full numerical simulations. On a conceptual level, the scheme relies on the connection between the emergence of limit cycles and the spontaneous breaking of the symmetry under temporal translations. On the practical side, the method keeps the simplicity and linear scaling with the size of the problem (number of modes) characteristic of standard linearization, making it applicable to large (many-body) systems.

  3. Avoiding thermal striping damage: Experimentally-based design procedures for high-cycle thermal fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betts, C.; Judd, A.M.; Lewis, M.W.J.

    1994-01-01

    In the coolant circuits of a liquid metal cooled reactor (LMR), where there is turbulent mixing of coolant streams at different temperatures, there are temperature fluctuations in the fluid. If an item of the reactor structure is immersed in this fluid it will, because of the good heat transfer from the flowing liquid metal, experience surface temperature fluctuations which will induce dynamic surface strains. It is necessary to design the reactor so that these temperature fluctuations do not, over the life of the plant, cause damage. The purpose of this paper is to describe design procedures to prevent damage of this type. Two such procedures are given, one to prevent the initiation of defects in a nominally defect-free structure or to allow initiation only at the end of the component life, and the other to prevent significant growth of undetectable pre-existing defects of the order of 0.2 to 0.4 mm in depth. Experimental validation of these procedures is described, and the way they can be applied in practice is indicated. To set the scene the paper starts with a brief summary of cases in which damage of this type, or the need to avoid such damage, have had important effects on reactor operation. Structural damage caused by high-cycle thermal fatigue has had a significant adverse influence on the operation of LMRs on several occasions. It is necessary to eliminate the risk of such damage at the design stage. In the absence of detailed knowledge of the temperature history to which it will be subject, an LMR structure can be designed so that, if it is initially free of defects more than 0.1 mm deep, no such defects will be initiated by high-cycle fatigue. This can be done by ensuring that the maximum source temperature difference in the liquid metal is less than a limiting value, which depends on temperature. The limit is very low, however, and likely to be restrictive. This method, by virtue of its safety margin, takes into account pre-existing surface crack

  4. Thermal energy storage for low grade heat in the organic Rankine cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soda, Michael John

    Limits of efficiencies cause immense amounts of thermal energy in the form of waste heat to be vented to the atmosphere. Up to 60% of unrecovered waste heat is classified as low or ultra-low quality, making recovery difficult or inefficient. The organic Rankine cycle can be used to generate mechanical power and electricity from these low temperatures where other thermal cycles are impractical. A variety of organic working fluids are available to optimize the ORC for any target temperature range. San Diego State University has one such experimental ORC using R245fa, and has been experimenting with multiple expanders. One limitation of recovering waste heat is the sporadic or cyclical nature common to its production. This inconsistency makes sizing heat recovery ORC systems difficult for a variety of reasons including off-design-point efficiency loss, increased attrition from varying loads, unreliable outputs, and overall system costs. Thermal energy storage systems can address all of these issues by smoothing the thermal input to a constant and reliable level and providing back-up capacity for times when the thermal input is deactivated. Multiple types of thermal energy storage have been explored including sensible, latent, and thermochemical. Latent heat storage involves storing thermal energy in the reversible phase change of a phase change material, or PCM, and can have several advantages over other modalities including energy storage density, cost, simplicity, reliability, relatively constant temperature output, and temperature customizability. The largest obstacles to using latent heat storage include heat transfer rates, thermal cycling stability, and potentially corrosive PCMs. Targeting 86°C, the operating temperature of SDSU's experimental ORC, multiple potential materials were explored and tested as potential PCMs including Magnesium Chloride Hexahydrate (MgCl2˙6H2O), Magnesium Nitrate Hexahydrate (Mg(NO3)2˙6H 2O), montan wax, and carnauba wax. The

  5. Cycle Trades for Nuclear Thermal Rocket Propulsion Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, C.; Guidos, M.; Greene, W.

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear fission has been used as a reliable source for utility power in the United States for decades. Even in the 1940's, long before the United States had a viable space program, the theoretical benefits of nuclear power as applied to space travel were being explored. These benefits include long-life operation and high performance, particularly in the form of vehicle power density, enabling longer-lasting space missions. The configurations for nuclear rocket systems and chemical rocket systems are similar except that a nuclear rocket utilizes a fission reactor as its heat source. This thermal energy can be utilized directly to heat propellants that are then accelerated through a nozzle to generate thrust or it can be used as part of an electricity generation system. The former approach is Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) and the latter is Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP), which is then used to power thruster technologies such as ion thrusters. This paper will explore a number of indirect-NTP engine cycle configurations using assumed performance constraints and requirements, discuss the advantages and disadvantages of each cycle configuration, and present preliminary performance and size results. This paper is intended to lay the groundwork for future efforts in the development of a practical NTP system or a combined NTP/NEP hybrid system.

  6. Thermal cycling characteristics of plasma synthesized mullite films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monteiro, O.R.; Hou, P.Y.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The authors have developed a plasma-based technique for the synthesis of mullite and mullite-like films on silicon carbide substrate material. The method, which they refer to as MePIIID (for Metal Plasma Immersion Ion Implantation and Deposition), uses two vacuum arc plasma sources and simultaneous pulse biasing of the substrate in a low pressure oxygen atmosphere. The Al:Si ratio can be controlled via the separate plasma guns, and the film adhesion, structure and morphology can be controlled via the ion energy which in turn is controlled by the pulse bias voltage. The films are amorphous as-deposited, and crystalline mullite is formed by subsequent annealing at 1000 C for 2 hours in air. Adhesion between the aluminum-silicon oxide film and the substrate increases after this first annealing. They have tested the behavior of films when subjected to repetitive thermal cycling between room temperature and 1100 C, and found that the films retain their adhesion and quality. Here they review the plasma synthesis technique and the characteristics of the mullite films prepared in this way, and summarize the status of the thermal cycling experiments.

  7. Thermal modeling of cylindrical lithium ion battery during discharge cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeon, Dong Hyup; Baek, Seung Man

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. → This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. → A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. → The contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate. → The contribution of heat source due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. - Abstract: Transient and thermo-electric finite element analysis (FEA) of cylindrical lithium ion (Li-ion) battery was presented. The simplified model by adopting a cylindrical coordinate was employed. This model provides the thermal behavior of Li-ion battery during discharge cycle. The mathematical model solves conservation of energy considering heat generations due to both joule heating and entropy change. A LiCoO 2 /C battery at various discharge rates was investigated. The temperature profile from simulation had similar tendency with experiment. The temperature profile was decomposed with contributions of each heat sources and was presented at several discharge rates. It was found that the contribution of heat source due to joule heating was significant at a high discharge rate, whereas that due to entropy change was dominant at a low discharge rate. Also the effect of cooling condition and the LiNiCoMnO 2 /C battery were analyzed for the purpose of temperature reduction.

  8. Thermally Induced Ultra High Cycle Fatigue of Copper Alloys of the High Gradient Accelerating Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Heikkinen, Samuli; Wuensch, Walter

    2010-01-01

    In order to keep the overall length of the compact linear collider (CLIC), currently being studied at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), within reasonable limits, i.e. less than 50 km, an accelerating gradient above 100 MV/m is required. This imposes considerable demands on the materials of the accelerating structures. The internal surfaces of these core components of a linear accelerator are exposed to pulsed radio frequency (RF) currents resulting in cyclic thermal stresses expected to cause surface damage by fatigue. The designed lifetime of CLIC is 20 years, which results in a number of thermal stress cycles of the order of 2.33•1010. Since no fatigue data existed in the literature for CLIC parameter space, a set of three complementary experiments were initiated: ultra high cycle mechanical fatigue by ultrasound, low cycle fatigue by pulsed laser irradiation and low cycle thermal fatigue by high power microwaves, each test representing a subset of the original problem. High conductiv...

  9. Thermal relic dark matter beyond the unitarity limit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harigaya, Keisuke [Berkeley Center for Theoretical Physics, Department of Physics, University of California,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Theoretical Physics Group, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory,Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ibe, Masahiro [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); ICRR, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan); Kaneta, Kunio [Center for Theoretical Physics of the Universe, Institute for Basic Science (IBS),Daejeon 34051 (Korea, Republic of); Nakano, Wakutaka; Suzuki, Motoo [Kavli IPMU (WPI), UTIAS, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8583 (Japan); ICRR, The University of Tokyo,Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8582 (Japan)

    2016-08-25

    We discuss a simple model of thermal relic dark matter whose mass can be much larger than the so-called unitarity limit on the mass of point-like particle dark matter. The model consists of new strong dynamics with one flavor of fermions in the fundamental representation which is much heavier than the dynamical scale of the new strong dynamics. Dark matter is identified with the lightest baryonic hadron of the new dynamics. The baryonic hadrons annihilate into the mesonic hadrons of the new strong dynamics when they have large radii. Resultantly, thermal relic dark matter with a mass in the PeV range is possible.

  10. The effect of spheroidizing by thermal cycling in low concentration Cr-Mo alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yun, H.S.; Kang, C.Y.

    1979-01-01

    An intensive study was carried out on spheroidizing of pearlite (Sph) and number of spherical carbide in proeutectoid ferrite (No/100) of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling. Physical and mechanical properties of steel containing 0.33 % C with thermal cycling were compared with those of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling. The effect of normal heat treatment and cooling rate on spheroidizing of pearlite and precipitation of fine spherical carbide in the steels were investigated. The results obtained were as follows: 1) Thermal cycling of low concentration Cr-Mo steel promoted the spheroidizing of pearlite compared with that of steel without Cr and Mo to steel had significant effect on spheroidizing of pearlite. 2) Number of fine spherical carbides of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with thermal cycling was over 5 times to that of fine spherical carbides of hypoeutectoid steel with thermal cycling. 3) Spheroidizing of pearlite and number of fine spherical carbide in proeutectoid ferrite of low concentration Cr-Mo steel with increasing thermal cycle and cooling rate. 4) Hardness of steel with thermal cycling was decreased. However, low concentration Cr-Mo steel had little decreasing rate in hardness with increasing thermal cycle on the basis of 100 times in thermal cycle. Therefore, toughness was considered to be increased with increasing spheroidizing of pearlite without changing mechanical properties. (author)

  11. Holographic thermal DC response in the hydrodynamic limit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Elliot; Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.; Griffin, Tom; Melgar, Luis

    2017-02-01

    We consider black hole solutions of Einstein gravity that describe deformations of CFTs at finite temperature in which spatial translations have been broken explicitly. We focus on deformations that are periodic in the non-compact spatial directions, which effectively corresponds to considering the CFT on a spatial torus with a non-trivial metric. We apply a DC thermal gradient and show that in a hydrodynamic limit the linearised, local thermal currents can be determined by solving linearised, forced Navier-Stokes equations for an incompressible fluid on the torus. We also show how sub-leading corrections to the thermal current can be calculated as well as showing how the full stress tensor response that is generated by the DC source can be obtained. We also compare our results with the fluid-gravity approach.

  12. On the thermal noise limit of cellular membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincze, Gy; Szasz, N; Szasz, A

    2005-01-01

    Comparison of thermal noise limits and the effects of low frequency electromagnetic fields (LFEMF) on the cellular membrane have important implications for the study of bioelectro-magnetism in this regime. Over a decade ago, Weaver and Astumian developed a model to show that thermal noise can limit the efficacy of LFEMF. A recent report by Kaune [Kaune (2002) Bioelectromagnetics 23:622-628], however, contradicted their findings. Kaune assumes that the conductance noise current of cell membrane can be decomposed into two components, where one of them is identical regarding all segments (coherent), while the other is different (incoherent). Besides, this decomposition is not unequivocal and contradicts to the statistical independence of the segment noise currents, and therefore to the second law of thermodynamics as well. We suggest the procedure based on the method of symmetrical components, by the means of which we can re-interpret the result of Kaune in a correct way. 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Thermal Cooling Limits of Sbotaged Spent Fuel Pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Thomas G. Hughes; Dr. Thomas F. Lin

    2010-09-10

    To develop the understanding and predictive measures of the post “loss of water inventory” hazardous conditions as a result of the natural and/or terrorist acts to the spent fuel pool of a nuclear plant. This includes the thermal cooling limits to the spent fuel assembly (before the onset of the zircaloy ignition and combustion), and the ignition, combustion, and the subsequent propagation of zircaloy fire from one fuel assembly to others

  14. Thermal limits for passive safety of fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kazimi, M.S.; Massidda, J.E.; Oshima, M.

    1989-01-01

    The thermal response of the first wall and blanket due to power/cooling mismatch in the absence of operation action is examined. The analyses of coolant and power transients are carried out on six reference blanket designs representing a broad range of fusion first wall and blanket technology. It is concluded that the requirement of plant protection will impose sufficiently stringent peak neutron wall loading limits to avoid a serious threat to the public. It is found that for the D-T design,s the operating wall loading may have to be limited to 3 - 8 MW/m/sup 2/ for passive plant protection, depending on the plant design

  15. Thermal fracture and pump limit of Nd: glass

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Mingzhe; Ma Wen; Tan Jichun; Zhang Yongliang; Li Mingzhong; Jing Feng

    2011-01-01

    Based on published fracture experiments and 3D transient finite-element analyses, and taking the first principal stress as the criterion and the Griffith crack theory to determine the critical fracture stress, a Weibull statistical model is established to predict the fracture possibility of Nd: glass with certain pump parameters. Other issues which limit the pump power are also presented. The results show that the fracture limit of laser medium depends on the optical polishing technology. For a short pulse and high energy Nd: glass laser, taking America's polishing technology in the 1990s as reference,the pump saturation limits the pump power to 18 kW/cm 2 when the repetition rate is lower than 1 Hz, while the thermal fracture limits the pump power when the repetition rate is higher than 10 Hz. (authors)

  16. Study of Physical Properties of SiCw/Al Composites During Unloaded Thermal Cycling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Xin-ming; TIAN zhi-gang; CHENG hua; ZHU Xiao-gang; CHEN Wen-li

    2004-01-01

    The thermal expansion coefficient of SiCw/Al composites squeeze cast during unloaded thermal cycling was determined and analyzed. The study had shown that the thermal expansion coefficient of SiCw/Al composites reduced greatly with temperature raising. The thermal expansion coefficient of artificial ageing treatment SiCw/Al composites during unloaded thermal cycling reduced gradually, while the thermal expansion coefficient of squeezing SiCw/Al composites increased gradually. In addition, the thermal expansion coefficient of SiCw/Al composites reduced drastically with fiber fraction increasing.

  17. Crack propagation under thermal cycling loading inducing a thermal gradient in the specimen thickness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le, H.N.

    2009-05-01

    This study aims to figure out the crack growth phenomenon by thermal fatigue induced by thermal gradient through thickness of specimen. Firstly, an experimental facility has been developed: a rectangular parallelepiped specimen is subjected to thermal cycling between 350 C and 100 C; the specimen is freed to expand and contract. Two semi-circular notches (0,1 mm depth and 4 mm length) have been machined on the surface of the specimen. A series of interrupted tests has been carried out to characterize and quantify the crack growth in depth and surface of the pre-existing crack. Next, a three-dimensional crack growth simulation has been implemented in ABAQUS. Automation using Python was used to simulate the propagation of a crack under thermal cycling, with re-meshing at crack front after each calculation step. No assumption has been taken on the crack front during the crack propagation. A comparison with test results showed very good agreement on the evolution of crack front shape and on the kinetics of propagation on the edge and the heart of pre-existing crack. An analytical approach was also developed based on the calculation of stress intensity factors (SIC). A two-dimensional approach was first introduced enabling us to better understand the influence of various thermal and geometric parameters. Finally, a three dimensional approach, with an elliptical assumption crack shape during the propagation, leading to a prediction of crack growth on the surface and in depth which is very similar to that obtained numerically, but with computational time much lower. (author)

  18. Thermal Cycle Reliability and Failure Mechanisms of CCGA and PBGA Assemblies with and without Corner Staking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaffarian, Reza

    2008-01-01

    Area array packages (AAPs) with 1.27 mm pitch have been the packages of choice for commercial applications; they are now starting to be implemented for use in military and aerospace applications. Thermal cycling characteristics of plastic ball grid array (PBGA) and chip scale package assemblies, because of their wide usage for commercial applications, have been extensively reported on in literature. Thermal cycling represents the on-off environmental condition for most electronic products and therefore is a key factor that defines reliability.However, very limited data is available for thermal cycling behavior of ceramic packages commonly used for the aerospace applications. For high reliability applications, numerous AAPs are available with an identical design pattern both in ceramic and plastic packages. This paper compares assembly reliability of ceramic and plastic packages with the identical inputs/outputs(I/Os) and pattern. The ceramic package was in the form of ceramic column grid array (CCGA) with 560 I/Os peripheral array with the identical pad design as its plastic counterpart.

  19. Dimetrodon: Processor-level Preventive Thermal Management via Idle Cycle Injection

    OpenAIRE

    Reddi, Vijay Janapa; Gandhi, Sanjay; Brooks, David M.; Seltzer, Margo I.; Bailis, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Processor-level dynamic thermal management techniques have long targeted worst-case thermal margins. We examine the thermal-performance trade-offs in average-case, preventive thermal management by actively degrading application performance to achieve long-term thermal control. We propose Dimetrodon, the use of idle cycle injection, a flexible, per-thread technique, as a preventive thermal management mechanism and demonstrate its efficiency compared to hardware techniques in a commodity operatin...

  20. Experimental modeling of weld thermal cycle of the heat affected zone (HAZ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Kulhánek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Contribution deals with experimental modeling of quick thermal cycles of metal specimens. In the introduction of contribution will be presented measured graphs of thermal cycle of heat affected zone (HAZ of weld. Next will be presented experimental simulation of measured thermal cycle on the standard specimens, useable for material testing. This approach makes possible to create material structures of heat affected zone of weld, big enough for standard material testing.

  1. Analysis of limit cycling on a boiler feedwater control system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, P.J.; Harrison, T.A.; Hollywell, P.D.

    1986-01-01

    During operation of the UKAEA Prototype Fast Reactor, it was found that oscillations sometimes occurred in the boiler feedwater systems. These were normally of relatively low amplitude, but led to the adoption of low controller gains so that control was rather slack. While control performance proved generally adequate for steady running, the lack of tight control of steam drum levels sometimes led to difficulties during periods when plant conditions were undergoing major change. The paper discusses the methods used to gain a full understanding of the phenomena occurring, and describes how that knowledge is being used to improve the control system so as to eliminate the limit cycling modes and ensure good control of steam drum levels. A noteworthy feature of the study was the use of two independent representations of plant behaviour: (i) a frequency response model, FWRFREQ, and (ii) a time-domain simulation model, PFRTDM. The simplified analysis of FWRFREQ proved to be of enormous value in identifying modes of system behaviour; PFRTDM was used as a detailed check on the accuracy and validity of the results obtained. (author)

  2. Thermal characteristics of combined thermoelectric generator and refrigeration cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yilbas, Bekir S.; Sahin, Ahmet Z.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TEM location in between the evaporator and condenser results in low coefficient of performance. • TEM location in between condenser and its ambient improves coefficient of performance of the combined system. • High temperature ratio enhances coefficient of performance of combined system. • Certain values of parameters enhance combined system performance. - Abstract: A combined thermal system consisting of a thermoelectric generator and a refrigerator is considered and the effect of location of the thermoelectric generator, in the refrigeration cycle, on the performance characteristics of the combined system is investigated. The operating conditions and their influence on coefficient of performance of the combined system are examined through introducing the dimensionless parameters, such as λ(λ = Q HTE /Q H , where Q HTE is heat transfer to the thermoelectric generator from the condenser, Q H is the total heat transfer from the condenser to its ambient), temperature ratio (θ L = T L /T H , where T L is the evaporator temperature and T H is the condenser temperature), r C (r C = C L /C H , where C L is the thermal capacitance due to heat transfer to evaporator and C H , is the thermal capacitance due to heat rejected from the condenser), θ W (θ W = T W /T H , where T W is the ambient temperature), θ C (θ C = T C /T H , where T C is the cold space temperature). It is found that the location of the thermoelectric generator in between the condenser and the evaporator decreases coefficient of performance of the combined system. Alternatively, the location of thermoelectric device in between the condenser and its ambient enhances coefficient of performance of the combined system. The operating parameters has significant effect on the performance characteristics of the combined system; in which case temperature ratio (θ L ) within the range of 0.68–0.70, r C = 2.5, θ W = 0.85, and θ C = 0.8 improve coefficient of performance of the

  3. Geosynthetic clay liners shrinkage under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarabadani, Hamid; Rayhani, Mohammad T

    2014-06-01

    Geosynthetic clay liners are used as part of composite liner systems in municipal solid waste landfills and other applications to restrict the escape of contaminants into the surrounding environment. This is attainable provided that the geosynthetic clay liner panels continuously cover the subsoil. Previous case histories, however, have shown that some geosynthetic clay liner panels are prone to significant shrinkage and separation when an overlying geomembrane is exposed to solar radiation. Experimental models were initiated to evaluate the potential shrinkage of different geosynthetic clay liner products placed over sand and clay subsoils, subjected to simulated daily thermal cycles (60°C for 8 hours and 22°C for 16 hours) modelling field conditions in which the liner is exposed to solar radiation. The variation of geosynthetic clay liner shrinkage was evaluated at specified times by a photogrammetry technique. The manufacturing techniques, the initial moisture content, and the aspect ratio (ratio of length to width) of the geosynthetic clay liner were found to considerably affect the shrinkage of geosynthetic clay liners. The particle size distribution of the subsoil and the associated suction at the geosynthetic clay liner-subsoil interface was also found to have significant effects on the shrinkage of the geosynthetic clay liner. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. HVI Ballistic Limit Charaterization of Fused Silica Thermal Pane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohl, William E.; Miller, Joshua E.; Christiansen, Eric L.; Deighton, Kevin.; Davis, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    The Orion spacecraft's windows are exposed to the micrometeroid and orbital debris (MMOD) space environments while in space as well as the Earth entry environment at the mission's conclusion. The need for a low-mass spacecraft window design drives the need to reduce conservatism when assessing the design for loss of crew due to MMOD impact and subsequent Earth entry. Therefore, work is underway at NASA and Lockheed Martin to improve characterization of the complete penetration ballistic limit of an outer fused silica thermal pane. Hypervelocity impact tests of the window configuration at up to 10 km/s and hydrocode modeling have been performed with a variety of projectile materials to enable refinement of the fused silica ballistic limit equation.

  5. How Thermal Fatigue Cycles Change the Rheological Behavior of Polymer Modified Bitumen?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glaoui, B.; Merbouh, M.; Van de Ven, M.F.C.; Chailleux, E.; Youcefi, A.

    2013-01-01

    The paper deals with the problem of thermal fatigue cycles phenomenon, which affects the performance of flexible pavement. The purpose of the paper is to extent the knowledge on the rheology of polymer modified bitumen which was affected by cycles of thermal fatigue. The aim of this research is to

  6. Weldability prediction of high strength steel S960QL after weld thermal cycle simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dunđer

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents weld thermal cycle simulation of high strength steel S960QL, and describes influence of cooling time t8/5 on hardness and impact toughness of weld thermal cycle simulated specimens. Furthermore, it presents analysis of characteristic fractions done by electron scanning microscope which can contribute to determination of welding parameters for S960QL steel.

  7. Theoretical thermodynamic analysis of Rankine power cycle with thermal driven pump

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakew, Amlaku Abie; Bolland, Olav; Ladam, Yves

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The work is focused on theoretical aspects of thermal driven pump (TDP) Rankine cycle. → The mechanical pump is replaced by thermal driven pump. → Important parameters of thermal driven pump Rankine cycle are investigated. → TDP Rankine cycle produce more power but it requires additional low grade heat. - Abstract: A new approach to improve the performance of supercritical carbon dioxide Rankine cycle which uses low temperature heat source is presented. The mechanical pump in conventional supercritical carbon dioxide Rankine cycle is replaced by thermal driven pump. The concept of thermal driven pump is to increase the pressure of a fluid in a closed container by supplying heat. A low grade heat source is used to increase the pressure of the fluid instead of a mechanical pump, this increase the net power output and avoid the need for mechanical pump which requires regular maintenance and operational cost. The thermal driven pump considered is a shell and tube heat exchanger where the working fluid is contained in the tube, a tube diameter of 5 mm is chosen to reduce the heating time. The net power output of the Rankine cycle with thermal driven pump is compared to that of Rankine cycle with mechanical pump and it is observed that the net power output is higher when low grade thermal energy is used to pressurize the working fluid. The thermal driven pump consumes additional heat at low temperature (60 o C) to pressurize the working fluid.

  8. Thermal stress and creep fatigue limitations in first wall design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Misra, B.; Harkness, S.D.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal-hydraulic performance of a lithium cooled cylindrical first wall module has been analyzed as a function of the incident neutron wall loading. Three criteria were established for the purpose of defining the maximum wall loading allowable for modules constructed of Type 316 stainless steel and a vanadium alloy. Of the three, the maximum structural temperature criterion of 750 0 C for vanadium resulted in the limiting wall loading value of 7 MW/m 2 . The second criterion limited thermal stress levels to the yield strength of the alloy. This led to the lowest wall loading value for the Type 316 stainless steel wall (1.7 MW/m 2 ). The third criterion required that the creep-fatigue characteristics of the module allow a lifetime of 10 MW-yr/m 2 . At wall temperatures of 600 0 C, this lifetime could be achieved in a stainless steel module for wall loadings less than 3.2 MW/m 2 , while the same lifetime could be achieved for much higher wall loadings in a vanadium module

  9. Precipitate evolution in underaged Al-Mg-Si alloy during thermal cycling between 25 deg. C and 65 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uan, J.-Y.; Cho, C.-Y.; Chen, Z.-M.; Lin, J.-K.

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of metastable precipitates and the aging response in underaged Al-Mg-Si alloy during environmental temperature cycling was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and hardness tests. After the alloy underwent thermal cycling between 25 deg. C and 65 deg. C, the hardness tests revealed that hardness decreased slightly, rather than following a concave downward curve, with the cycle times. Needle-shaped G.P. zones transformed during the environmental thermal cycling. The fraction of the zones declined sharply from almost 100% to only approximately 10% after 90 cycles, accompanied by an increase in the fraction of lath-shaped precipitates and the formation of β'' precipitates in the matrix. The precipitate developed with the 25-65 deg. C cycling time as follows: needle-shaped G.P. zones → lath-shaped ppt + β'' ppt + needle-shaped G.P. zones → lath-shaped ppt + β'' ppt + rod-shaped ppt + needle-shaped G.P. zones. Therefore, three or four precipitates coexisted in the underaged alloy following prolonged cycling. The formation of a limited number of β'' precipitates and the presence of a rod-shaped phase in the alloy during environmental temperature cycling reduced the hardness as the cycle time increases

  10. Useful work and the thermal efficiency in the ideal Lenolr cycle with regenerative preheating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiou, Demos P.

    2000-11-01

    In the existing thermal engine concepts negative work transfer (usually needed to drive a compression process) is supplied by the work produced by the engine itself. The remaining difference (i.e., the net work transfer) becomes the useful work, since it is available for external consumption. The thermal efficiency is the parameter that compares this against the heat input into the system. It forms the main optimization parameter in any engine design. The objective of the present study is to show that for the case of the Lenoir cycle with regenerative preheating the entire positive work is available for external consumption, since the negative (i.e., the compression) work is supplied by the atmospheric air. Not only this, but, during the compression process and due to the pressure difference across the two sides of the moving piston, an additional (useful) work transfer may be generated. Thus, the proposed power plant may be considered as a combination of a thermal engine and a wind turbine. In the ideal cycle limit (at least), the total amount of useful work exceeds the heat entering the system. This leads to the definition of a new parameter for the efficiency (called the technical efficiency), which compares the combined positive work transfer (i.e., the useful one) against the heat entering the system and which may exceed the 100% level.

  11. Resistance of heat resisting steels and alloys to thermal and mechanical low-cycle fatigue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulyakov, G.A.

    1980-01-01

    Carried out is a comparative evalUation of resistance of different materials to thermocyclic deformation and fracture on the base of the experimental data on thermal and mechanical low-cycle fatigUe. Considered are peculiarities of thermal fatigue resistance depending on strength and ductility of the material. It is shown, that in the range of the cycle small numbers before the fracture preference is given to the high-ductility cyclically strengthening austenitic steels of 18Cr-10Ni type with slight relation of yield strength to the σsub(0.2)/σsub(B) tensile strength Highly alloyed strength chromium-nickel steels, as well as cyclically destrengthening perlitic and ferritic steels with stronger σsub(0.2)/σsub(B) relation as compared with simple austenitic steels turn to be more long-lived in the range of the cycle great numbers berore fracture. Perlitic steels are stated to have the lowest parameter values of the K crack growth intensity under the similar limiting conditions of the experiment, while steels and alloys with austenite structure-higher values of the K parameter

  12. [Effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Da; Liu, Kai-Lei; Yao, Yao; Zhang, Wei-Sheng; Liao, Chu-Hong; Jiang, Hong

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the effect of thermal cycling on surface microstructure of different light-curing composite resins. A nanofilled composite (Z350) and 4 microhybrid composites (P60, Z250, Spectrum, and AP-X) were fabricated from lateral to center to form cubic specimens. The lateral surfaces were abrased and polished before water storage and 40 000 thermal cycles (5/55 degrees celsius;). The mean surface roughness (Ra) were measured and compared before and after thermal cycling, and the changes of microstructure were observed under scanning electron microscope (SEM). Significant decreases of Ra were observed in the composites, especially in Spectrum (from 0.164±0.024 µm to 0.140±0.017 µm, Presins, and fissures occurred on Z350 following the thermal cycling. Water storage and thermal cycling may produce polishing effect on composite resins and cause fissures on nanofilled composite resins.

  13. The risk of PCI damage to 8x8 fuel rods during limit cycle instability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schrire, D.; Oguma, R.; Malen, K.

    1994-12-31

    A BWR reactor core may experience thermal-hydraulic instability under certain operating conditions. Generally, the instability results in neutron flux (i e generated neutronic power) and coolant flow and pressure oscillations, which reach a maximum `limit cycle` amplitude. The cladding response to power transients has been studied using noise analysis. These results have been compared to results from code calculations using the fuel code TOODEE 2. From these results the risk for fuel rod failure due to pellet-clad mechanical interaction and possible failure due to stress corrosion cracking (PCI) has been estimated. It turns out that for the oscillation frequencies of interest (0,3-0,5 Hz) the fuel response amplitude reduction makes PCI-failure improbable. 17 refs.

  14. Flexible thermal cycle test equipment for concentrator solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebert, Peter H [Glendale, CA; Brandt, Randolph J [Palmdale, CA

    2012-06-19

    A system and method for performing thermal stress testing of photovoltaic solar cells is presented. The system and method allows rapid testing of photovoltaic solar cells under controllable thermal conditions. The system and method presents a means of rapidly applying thermal stresses to one or more photovoltaic solar cells in a consistent and repeatable manner.

  15. Cubic and quartic planar differential systems with exact algebraic limit cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bendjeddou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We construct cubic and quartic polynomial planar differential systems with exact limit cycles that are ovals of algebraic real curves of degree four. The result obtained for the cubic case generalizes a proposition of [9]. For the quartic case, we deduce for the first time a class of systems with four algebraic limit cycles and another for which nested configurations of limit cycles occur.

  16. HVI Ballistic Limit Characterization of Fused Silica Thermal Panes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, J. E.; Bohl, W. D.; Christiansen, E. L.; Davis, B. A.; Deighton, K. D.

    2015-01-01

    Fused silica window systems are used heavily on crewed reentry vehicles, and they are currently being used on the next generation of US crewed spacecraft, Orion. These systems improve crew situational awareness and comfort, as well as, insulating the reentry critical components of a spacecraft against the intense thermal environments of atmospheric reentry. Additionally, these materials are highly exposed to space environment hazards like solid particle impacts. This paper discusses impact studies up to 10 km/s on a fused silica window system proposed for the Orion spacecraft. A ballistic limit equation that describes the threshold of perforation of a fuse silica pane over a broad range of impact velocities, obliquities and projectile materials is discussed here.

  17. Laser Soldering and Thermal Cycling Tests of Monolithic Silicon Pixel Chips

    CERN Document Server

    Strand, Frode Sneve

    2015-01-01

    An ALPIDE-1 monolithic silicon pixel sensor prototype has been laser soldered to a flex printed circuit using a novel interconnection technique using lasers. This technique is to be optimised to ensure stable, good quality connections between the sensor chips and the FPCs. To test the long-term stability of the connections, as well as study the effects on hit thresholds and noise in the sensor, it was thermally cycled in a climate chamber 1200 times. The soldered connections showed good qualities like even melting and good adhesion on pad/flex surfaces, and the chip remained in working condition for 1080 cycles. After this, a few connections failed, having cracks in the soldering tin, rendering the chip unusable. Threshold and noise characteristics seemed stable, except for the noise levels of sector 2 in the chip, for 1000 cycles in a temperature interval of "10^{\\circ}" and "50^{\\circ}" C. Still, further testing with wider temperature ranges and more cycles is needed to test the limitations of the chi...

  18. Thermal hydraulic and power cycle analysis of liquid lithium blanket designs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, B.; Stevens, H.C.; Maroni, V.A.

    1977-01-01

    Thermal hydraulic and power cycle analyses were performed for the first-wall and blanket systems of tokamak-type fusion reactors under a typical set of design and operating conditions. The analytical results for lithium-cooled blanket cells show that with stainless steel as construction material and with no divertor present, the maximum allowable neutron wall loading is approximately 2 MW/m 2 and is limited by thermal stress criteria. With vanadium alloy as construction material and no divertor present, the maximum allowable neutron wall loading is approximately 8 MW/m 2 and is limited by an interplay of constraints imposed on the maximum allowable structural temperature and the minimum allowable coolant inlet temperature. With a divertor these wall loadings can be increased by from 40 to 90 percent. The cost of the vanadium system is found to be competitive with the stainless steel system because of the higher allowable structural temperatures and concomitant higher thermal efficiencies afforded by the vanadium alloys

  19. Equivalent linearization method for limit cycle flutter analysis of plate-type structure in axial flow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu Li; Yang Yiren

    2009-01-01

    The responses and limit cycle flutter of a plate-type structure with cubic stiffness in viscous flow were studied. The continuous system was dispersed by utilizing Galerkin Method. The equivalent linearization concept was performed to predict the ranges of limit cycle flutter velocities. The coupled map of flutter amplitude-equivalent linear stiffness-critical velocity was used to analyze the stability of limit cycle flutter. The theoretical results agree well with the results of numerical integration, which indicates that the equivalent linearization concept is available to the analysis of limit cycle flutter of plate-type structure. (authors)

  20. Equilibrium limit of thermal conduction and boundary scattering in nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin B; Kınacı, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Çağın, Tahir

    2014-06-28

    Determining the lattice thermal conductivity (κ) of nanostructures is especially challenging in that, aside from the phonon-phonon scattering present in large systems, the scattering of phonons from the system boundary greatly influences heat transport, particularly when system length (L) is less than the average phonon mean free path (MFP). One possible route to modeling κ in these systems is through molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, inherently including both phonon-phonon and phonon-boundary scattering effects in the classical limit. Here, we compare current MD methods for computing κ in nanostructures with both L ⩽ MFP and L ≫ MFP, referred to as mean free path constrained (cMFP) and unconstrained (uMFP), respectively. Using a (10,0) CNT (carbon nanotube) as a benchmark case, we find that while the uMFP limit of κ is well-defined through the use of equilibrium MD and the time-correlation formalism, the standard equilibrium procedure for κ is not appropriate for the treatment of the cMFP limit because of the large influence of boundary scattering. To address this issue, we define an appropriate equilibrium procedure for cMFP systems that, through comparison to high-fidelity non-equilibrium methods, is shown to be the low thermal gradient limit to non-equilibrium results. Further, as a means of predicting κ in systems having L ≫ MFP from cMFP results, we employ an extrapolation procedure based on the phenomenological, boundary scattering inclusive expression of Callaway [Phys. Rev. 113, 1046 (1959)]. Using κ from systems with L ⩽ 3 μm in the extrapolation, we find that the equilibrium uMFP κ of a (10,0) CNT can be predicted within 5%. The equilibrium procedure is then applied to a variety of carbon-based nanostructures, such as graphene flakes (GF), graphene nanoribbons (GNRs), CNTs, and icosahedral fullerenes, to determine the influence of size and environment (suspended versus supported) on κ. Concerning the GF and GNR systems, we find that

  1. Thermal cycle efficiency of the indirect combined HTGR-GT power generation system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muto, Yasushi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment

    1996-02-01

    High thermal efficiency of 50% could be expected in a power generation system coupling a high temperature gas-cooled reactor(HTGR) with a closed cycle gas turbine(GT). There are three candidate systems such as a direct cycle(DC), an indirect cycle(ICD) and an indirect combined cycle(IDCC). The IDCC could solve many problems in both the DC and the IDC and consists of a primary circuit and a secondary circuit where a topping cycle is a Brayton cycle and a bottoming cycle is a steam cycle. In this report, the thermal cycle efficiency of the IDCC is examined regarding configurations of components and steam pressure. It has been shown that there are two types of configurations, that is, a perfect cascade type and a semi-cascade one and the latter can be further classified into Case A, Case B and Case C. The conditions achieving the maximum thermal cycle efficiency were revealed for these cases. In addition, the optimum system configurations were proposed considering the thermal cycle efficiency, safety and plant arrangement. (author).

  2. Stress hysteresis during thermal cycling of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited silicon oxide films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurn, Jeremy; Cook, Robert F.

    2002-02-01

    The mechanical response of plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposited SiO2 to thermal cycling is examined by substrate curvature measurement and depth-sensing indentation. Film properties of deposition stress and stress hysteresis that accompanied thermal cycling are elucidated, as well as modulus, hardness, and coefficient of thermal expansion. Thermal cycling is shown to result in major plastic deformation of the film and a switch from a compressive to a tensile state of stress; both athermal and thermal components of the net stress alter in different ways during cycling. A mechanism of hydrogen incorporation and release from as-deposited silanol groups is proposed that accounts for the change in film properties and state of stress.

  3. Limiting fragmentation in a thermal model with flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar Tiwari, Swatantra; Sahoo, Raghunath [Indian Institute of Technology Indore, Discipline of Physics, School of Basic Sciences, Simrol, Indore (India)

    2016-12-15

    The property of limiting fragmentation of various observables such as rapidity distributions (dN/dy), elliptic flow (v{sub 2}), average transverse momentum (left angle p{sub T} right angle) etc. of charged particles is observed when they are plotted as a function of rapidity (y) shifted by the beam rapidity (y{sub beam}) for a wide range of energies from AGS to RHIC. Limiting fragmentation (LF) is a well-studied phenomenon as observed in various collision energies and colliding systems experimentally. It is very interesting to verify this phenomenon theoretically. We study such a phenomenon for pion rapidity spectra using our hydrodynamic-like model where the collective flow is incorporated in a thermal model in the longitudinal direction. Our findings advocate the observation of extended longitudinal scaling in the rapidity spectra of pions from AGS to lower RHIC energies, while it is observed to be violated at top RHIC and LHC energies. Prediction of LF hypothesis for Pb+Pb collisions at √(s{sub NN}) = 5.02 TeV is given. (orig.)

  4. Quantitative consideration for the tempering effect during multi-pass thermal cycle in HAZ of low-alloy steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Lina; Nakabayashi, Yuma; Saida, Kazuyoshi; Mochizuki, Masahito; Nishimoto, Kazutoshi; Kameyama, Masashi; Hirano, Shinro; Chigusa, Naoki

    2011-01-01

    A new Thermal Cycle Tempering Parameter (TCTP) to deal with the tempering effect during multi-pass thermal cycles has been proposed by extending Larson-Miller parameter (LMP). Experimental result revealed that the hardness in synthetic HAZ of the low alloy steel subjected to multi tempering thermal cycles has a good linear relationship with TCTP. By using this relationship, the hardness of the low-alloy steel reheated with tempering thermal cycles can be predicted when the original hardness is known. (author)

  5. Thermal cycling tests of actively cooled beryllium copper joints

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roedig, M.; Duwe, R.; Linke, J.; Schuster, A.; Wiechers, B. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    Screening tests (steady state heating) and thermal fatigue tests with several kinds of beryllium-copper joints have been performed in an electron beam facility. Joining techniques under investigation were brazing with silver containing and silver-free braze materials, hot isostatic pressing (HIP) and diffusion bonding (hot pressing). Best thermal fatigue performance was found for the brazed samples. (author)

  6. Modelling and Improvement of Thermal Cycling in Power Electronics for Motor Drive Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vernica, Ionut; Ma, Ke; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that the dynamical change of the thermal stress in the power devices is one of the major factors that have influences on the overall efficiency and reliability of power electronics. The main objective of this paper consists of identifying the main parameters that affect the thermal...... are identified during the acceleration and deceleration periods of the motor. The main causes for these adverse thermal cycles have been presented and, consequently, the influence of the deceleration slope, modulation technique and reactive current on the thermal cycles has been analyzed. Finally, the improved...

  7. Evaluation of the of thermal shock resistance of a castable containing andalusite aggregates by thermal shock cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, G.C.R.; Santos, E.M.B.; Ribeiro, S.; Rodrigues, J.A.

    2011-01-01

    The thermal shock resistance of refractory materials is one of the most important characteristics that determine their performance in many applications, since abrupt and drastic differences in temperature can damage them. Resistance to thermal shock damage can be evaluated based on thermal cycles, i.e., successive heating and cooling cycles followed by an analysis of the drop in Young's modulus occurring in each cycle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance to thermal shock damage in a commercial refractory concrete with andalusite aggregate. Concrete samples that were sintered at 1000 deg C and 1450 deg C for 5 hours to predict and were subjected to 30 thermal shock cycles, soaking in the furnace for 20 minutes at a temperature of 1000 deg C, and subsequent cooling in circulating water at 25 deg C. The results showed a decrease in Young's modulus and rupture around 72% for samples sintered at 1000 ° C, and 82% in sintered at 1450 ° C. The refractory sintered at 1450 deg C would show lower thermal shock resistance than the refractory sintered at 1000 deg C. (author)

  8. Thermal cycling influence on microstructural characterization of alloys with high nickel content

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abrudeanu, M.; Gradin, O.; Vulpe, S. C.; Ohai, D.

    2013-01-01

    The IV nuclear energy generation systems are aimed at making revolutionary improvements in economics, safety and reliability, and sustainability. To achieve these goals, Generation IV systems will operate at higher temperatures and in higher radiation fields. This paper shows the thermal cycling influences on microstructure and hardness of nickel based alloys: Incoloy 800 HT and Inconel 617. These alloys were meekly at a thermal cycling of 25, 50, 75 and 100 cycles. The temperature range of a cycle was between 400 O C and 700 O C. Nickel base alloys develop their properties by solid solution and/or precipitation strengthening. (authors)

  9. The detection and stabilisation of limit cycle for deterministic finite automata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xiaoguang; Chen, Zengqiang; Liu, Zhongxin; Zhang, Qing

    2018-04-01

    In this paper, the topological structure properties of deterministic finite automata (DFA), under the framework of the semi-tensor product of matrices, are investigated. First, the dynamics of DFA are converted into a new algebraic form as a discrete-time linear system by means of Boolean algebra. Using this algebraic description, the approach of calculating the limit cycles of different lengths is given. Second, we present two fundamental concepts, namely, domain of attraction of limit cycle and prereachability set. Based on the prereachability set, an explicit solution of calculating domain of attraction of a limit cycle is completely characterised. Third, we define the globally attractive limit cycle, and then the necessary and sufficient condition for verifying whether all state trajectories of a DFA enter a given limit cycle in a finite number of transitions is given. Fourth, the problem of whether a DFA can be stabilised to a limit cycle by the state feedback controller is discussed. Criteria for limit cycle-stabilisation are established. All state feedback controllers which implement the minimal length trajectories from each state to the limit cycle are obtained by using the proposed algorithm. Finally, an illustrative example is presented to show the theoretical results.

  10. Swing-Leg Retraction for Limit Cycle Walkers Improves Disturbance Rejection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hobbelen, D.G.E.; Wisse, M.

    2008-01-01

    Limit cycle walkers are bipeds that exhibit a stable cyclic gaitwithout requiring local controllability at all times during gait. A well-known example of limit cycle walking is McGeer’s “passive dynamic walking,” but the concept expands to actuated bipeds as involved in this study. One of the

  11. To What Degree Thermal Cycles Affect Chalk Strength

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Livada, Tijana; Nermoen, Anders; Korsnes, Reidar Inger

    triaxial cell experiments. For dry rock, no significant effects of temperature cycling was found on average tensile strength, however the range of the tensile failure stress is doubled for the samples exposed to 50 temperature cycles, as opposed to those to none. For water saturated cores, the temperature......Chalk reservoirs could potentially undergo destabilization as the result of repeated cold water injection into a hot reservoir during water flooding. Preliminary results of an ongoing study are presented in this paper, which compare the impact of temperature cycling on mechanical behavior on dry...... and water saturated chalk. Sixty disks of dry Kansas chalk exposed to different number of temperature cycles were tested for tensile strength using a Brazilian test. Changes in elastic properties as function of number of temperature cycles of the same chalk, but now saturated in water, were studied using...

  12. New method of thermal cycling stability test of phase change material

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Putra Nandy

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Phase Change Material (PCM is the most promising material as thermal energy storage nowadays. As thermal energy storage, examination on endurance of material for long-term use is necessary to be carried out. Therefore, thermal cycling test is performed to ensure thermal stability of PCM. This study have found a new method on thermal cycling test of PCM sample by using thermoelectric as heating and cooling element. RT 22 HC was used as PCM sample on this thermal cycling test. The new method had many advantages compared to some references of the same test. It just needed a small container for PCM sample. The thermoelectric could release heat to PCM sample and absorb heat from PCM sample uniformly, respectively, was called as heating and cooling process. Hence, thermoelectric had to be supported by a relay control device to change its polarity so it could heat and cool PCM sample alternately and automatically. On the other hand, the thermoelectric was cheap, easy to be found and available in markets. It can be concluded that new method of thermal cycling test by using thermoelectric as source of heating and cooling can be a new reference for performing thermal cycling test on PCM.

  13. Effect of Thermal Cycling on the Tensile Behavior of CF/AL Fiber Metal Laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farhan Noor

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research work was to estimate the effect of thermal cycling on the tensile behavior of CARALL composites. Fiber metal laminates (FMLs, based on 2D woven carbon fabric and 2024-T3 Alclad aluminum alloy sheet, was manufactured by pressure molding technique followed by hand layup method. Before fabrication, aluminum sheets were anodized with phosphoric acid to produce micro porous alumina layer on surface. This micro-porous layer is beneficial to produce strong bonding between metal and fiber surfaces in FMLs. The effect of thermal cycling (-65 to +70ºC on the tensile behavior of Cf/Al based FML was studied. Tensile strength was increased after 10 thermal cycles, but it was slightly decreased to some extent after 30, and 50 thermal cycles. Tensile modulus also shown the similar behavior as that of tensile strength.

  14. Efficient cycles for carbon capture CLC power plants based on thermally balanced redox reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike; Zhao, Zhenlong; Ghoniem, Ahmed F.

    2015-01-01

    undergoing oxidation and reduction. An earlier study showed that this thermal coupling between the oxidation and reduction reactors increases the efficiency by up to 2% points when implemented in a regenerative Brayton cycle. The present study extends

  15. Characterizing Observed Limit Cycles in the Cassini Main Engine Guidance Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizvi, Farheen; Weitl, Raquel M.

    2011-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft dynamics-related telemetry during long Main Engine (ME) burns has indicated the presence of stable limit cycles between 0.03-0.04 Hz frequencies. These stable limit cycles cause the spacecraft to possess non-zero oscillating rates for extended periods of time. This indicates that the linear ME guidance control system does not model the complete dynamics of the spacecraft. In this study, we propose that the observed limit cycles in the spacecraft dynamics telemetry appear from a stable interaction between the unmodeled nonlinear elements in the ME guidance control system. Many nonlinearities in the control system emerge from translating the linear engine gimbal actuator (EGA) motion into a spacecraft rotation. One such nonlinearity comes from the gear backlash in the EGA system, which is the focus of this paper. The limit cycle characteristics and behavior can be predicted by modeling this gear backlash nonlinear element via a describing function and studying the interaction of this describing function with the overall dynamics of the spacecraft. The linear ME guidance controller and gear backlash nonlinearity are modeled analytically. The frequency, magnitude, and nature of the limit cycle are obtained from the frequency response of the ME guidance controller and nonlinear element. In addition, the ME guidance controller along with the nonlinearity is simulated. The simulation response contains a limit cycle with similar characterstics as predicted analytically: 0.03-0.04 Hz frequency and stable, sustained oscillations. The analytical and simulated limit cycle responses are compared to the flight telemetry for long burns such as the Saturn Orbit Insertion and Main Engine Orbit Trim Maneuvers. The analytical and simulated limit cycle characteristics compare well with the actual observed limit cycles in the flight telemetry. Both have frequencies between 0.03-0.04 Hz and stable oscillations. This work shows that the stable limit cycles occur

  16. Joint Removal Implications : Thermal Analysis and Life-Cycle Cost

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-01

    Deck joints are causing significant bridge deterioration and maintenance problems for Departments of Transportation (DOTs). Colorado State University researchers partnered with the Colorado DOT to analyze the effects of temperature change and thermal...

  17. Models for optimum thermo-ecological criteria of actual thermal cycles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Açikkalp Emin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ecological optimization point of irreversible thermal cycles (refrigerator, heat pump and power cycles was investigated. The importance of ecological optimization is to propose a way to use fuels and energy source more efficiently because of an increasing energy need and environmental pollution. It provides this by maximizing obtained (or minimizing supplied work and minimizing entropy generation for irreversible (actual thermal cycles. In this research, ecological optimization was defined for all basic irreversible thermal cycles, by using the first and second laws of thermodynamics. Finally, the ecological optimization was defined in thermodynamic cycles and results were given to show the effects of the cycles’ ecological optimization point, efficiency, COP and power output (or input, and exergy destruction.

  18. The Effects of Thermal Cycling on Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide Semiconductor Devices for Aerospace Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These Include radiation, extreme temperatures, thermal cycling, to name a few. Preliminary data obtained on new Gallium Nitride and Silicon Carbide power devices under exposure to radiation followed by long term thermal cycling are presented. This work was done in collaboration with GSFC and JPL in support of the NASA Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  19. Cardboard Based Packaging Materials as Renewable Thermal Insulation of Buildings: Thermal and Life Cycle Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Čekon, Miroslav; Struhala, Karel; Slávik, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Cardboard based packaging components represent a material with a significant potential of renewable exploitation in buildings. This study presents the results of thermal and environmental analysis of existing packaging materials compared with standard conventional thermal insulations. Experimental measurements were performed to identify the thermal performance of studied cardboard packaging materials. Real-size samples were experimentally tested in laboratory measurements. The thermal resi...

  20. Low cycle thermal fatigue testing of beryllium grades for ITER plasma facing components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watson, R.D.; Youchison, D.L.; Dombrowski, D.E.; Guiniatouline, R.N.; Kupriynov, I.B.

    1996-01-01

    A novel technique has been used to test the relative low cycle thermal fatigue resistance of different grades of US and Russian beryllium, which is proposed as plasma facing armor for fusion reactor first wall, limiter, and divertor components. The 30 kW electron beam test system at Sandia National Laboratories was used to sweep the beam spot along one direction at 1 Hz. This produces a localized temperature ''spike'' of 750 degree C for each pass of the beam. Large thermal stresses in excess of the yield strength are generated due to very high spot heat flux, 250 MW/m 2 . Cyclic plastic strains on the order of 0.6% produced visible cracking on the heated surface in less than 3000 cycles. An in-vacuo fiber optic borescope was used to visually inspect the beryllium surfaces for crack initiation. Grades of US beryllium tested included: S-65C, S- 65H, S-200F, S-200F-H, SR-200, I-400, extruded high purity, HIP'd spherical powder, porous beryllium (94% and 98% dense), Be/30% BeO, Be/60% BeO, and TiBe 12 . Russian grades included: TGP-56, TShGT, DShG-200, and TShG-56. Both the number of cycles to crack initiation, and the depth of crack propagation, were measured. The most fatigue resistant grades were S-65C, DShG-200, TShGT, and TShG-56. Rolled sheet Be (SR-200) showed excellent crack propagation resistance in the plane of rolling, despite early formation of delamination cracks. Only one sample showed no evidence of surface melting, Extruded (T). Metallographic and chemical analyses are provided. Good agreement was found between the measured depth of cracks and a 2-D elastic-plastic finite element stress analysis

  1. Thermal Width for Heavy Quarkonium in the Static Limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Chao-Yi; Zhu Jia-Qing; Ma Zhi-Lei; Li Yun-De

    2015-01-01

    The thermal widths for heavy quarkonia are calculated for both Coulomb gauge (CG) and Feynman gauge (FG), and the comparisons between these results with the hard thermal loop (HTL) approximation ones are illustrated. The dissociation temperatures of heavy quarkonia in thermal medium are also discussed for CG, FG and HTL cases. It is shown that the thermal widths, derived from the HTL approximation and used in many research studies, cause some errors in the practical calculations at the temperature range accessible in the present experiment, and the problem of gauge dependence cannot be avoided when the complete self energy is used in the derivation of potential. (paper)

  2. Flutter and limit cycle oscillation suppression using linear and nonlinear tuned vibration absorbers

    OpenAIRE

    Verstraelen, Edouard; Kerschen, Gaëtan; Dimitriadis, Grigorios

    2017-01-01

    Aircraft are more than ever pushed to their limits for performance reasons. Consequently, they become increasingly nonlinear and they are more prone to undergo aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations. Structural nonlinearities affect aircraft such as the F-16, which can undergo store-induced limit cycle oscillations (LCOs). Furthermore, transonic buzz can lead to LCOs because of moving shock waves in transonic flight conditions on many aircraft. This study presents a numerical investigation o...

  3. Assessment of the influence of design limits to the economics of WWER fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dementiev, V.G.; Shishkov, L.K.

    2010-01-01

    The paper discusses the influence of the reactor parameters limits for normal operation on the economical performance of WWER fuel cycles. It is shown for the typical WWER fuel cycles that decreasing the limits for the main power distribution parameters to 10% leads to decreasing the fuel components of the electricity cost price up to 4-5%. As the nowadays limitations are reached the dependence becomes weaker. (Authors)

  4. Thermal performance analysis of Brayton cycle with waste heat recovery boiler for diesel engines of offshore oil production facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Xianglong; Gong, Guangcai; Wu, Yi; Li, Hangxin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Comparison of Brayton cycle with WHRB adopted in diesel engines with and without fans by thermal performance. • Waste heat recovery technology for FPSO. • The thermoeconomic analysis for the heat recovery for FPSO. - Abstract: This paper presents the theoretical analysis and on-site testing on the thermal performance of the waste heat recovery system for offshore oil production facilities, including the components of diesel engines, thermal boilers and waste heat boilers. We use the ideal air standard Brayton cycle to analyse the thermal performance. In comparison with the traditional design, the fans at the engine outlet of the waste heat recovery boiler is removed due to the limited space of the offshore platform. The cases with fan and without fan are compared in terms of thermal dynamics performance, energy efficiency and thermo-economic index of the system. The results show that the application of the WHRB increases the energy efficiency of the whole system, but increases the flow resistance in the duct. It is proved that as the waste heat recovery boiler takes the place of the thermal boiler, the energy efficiency of whole system without fan is slightly reduced but heat recovery efficiency is improved. This research provides an important guidance to improve the waste heat recovery for offshore oil production facilities.

  5. A non-conventional interpretation of thermal regeneration in steam cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bracco, Stefano; Damiani, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► A better understanding of the concept of thermal regeneration in steam cycles. ► Use of a system composed by a non-regenerative cycle and several reverse cycles. ► Calculation of the heat pumps coefficients of performance. ► New interesting formulations of the regenerative cycle efficiency. -- Abstract: The paper aims to contribute to a better understanding of the thermodynamic concept of heat regeneration in steam power plants with a finite number of bleedings. A regenerative Rankine cycle is compared to a complex system (CHC – complete hybrid cycle) composed by one non-regenerative Rankine cycle (HEC – hybrid engine cycle) and more reverse cycles (RCs – reverse cycles), as many as the number of the bleedings, able to pump heat from the condenser to a series of surface feedwater heaters, disposed upstream of the steam plant boiler. The COPs (coefficients of performance) of the heat pumps are evaluated, and new interesting formulations of the efficiency of the regenerative steam cycle are proposed. In particular a steam cycle with two bleedings is analyzed, neglecting heat losses and pressure drops in the boiler and considering irreversibility only along the expansion line of the steam turbine and into the feedwater heaters. The efficiency and the work of the regenerative cycle are compared to the analogous values of the CHC cycle composed by one simple steam cycle (HEC) and two heat pump cycles (RCs), with steam as the working fluid. The two reverse cycles are considered completely reversible and raising heat from the condenser temperature to the bled steam condensing temperature. The paper shows the most significant results of the study in order to analyze the regenerative cycle and the CHC cycle in comparison with the non-regenerative Rankine cycle; in particular, the analysis is focused on the evaluation of the useful work, the heat supplied and the heat rejected for the examined cycles.

  6. Experimental investigation of high cycle thermal fatigue in a T-junction piping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selvam, P. Karthick; Kulenovic, Rudi; Laurien, Eckart [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. of Nuclear Technology and Energy Systems (IKE)

    2015-10-15

    High cycle thermal fatigue damage of structure in the vicinity of T-junction piping systems in nuclear power plants is of importance. Mixing of coolant streams at significant temperature differences causes thermal fluctuations near piping wall leading to gradual thermal degradation. Flow mixing in a T-junction is performed. The determined factors result in bending stresses being imposed on the piping system ('Banana effect').

  7. Phase-amplitude reduction of transient dynamics far from attractors for limit-cycling systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirasaka, Sho; Kurebayashi, Wataru; Nakao, Hiroya

    2017-02-01

    Phase reduction framework for limit-cycling systems based on isochrons has been used as a powerful tool for analyzing the rhythmic phenomena. Recently, the notion of isostables, which complements the isochrons by characterizing amplitudes of the system state, i.e., deviations from the limit-cycle attractor, has been introduced to describe the transient dynamics around the limit cycle [Wilson and Moehlis, Phys. Rev. E 94, 052213 (2016)]. In this study, we introduce a framework for a reduced phase-amplitude description of transient dynamics of stable limit-cycling systems. In contrast to the preceding study, the isostables are treated in a fully consistent way with the Koopman operator analysis, which enables us to avoid discontinuities of the isostables and to apply the framework to system states far from the limit cycle. We also propose a new, convenient bi-orthogonalization method to obtain the response functions of the amplitudes, which can be interpreted as an extension of the adjoint covariant Lyapunov vector to transient dynamics in limit-cycling systems. We illustrate the utility of the proposed reduction framework by estimating the optimal injection timing of external input that efficiently suppresses deviations of the system state from the limit cycle in a model of a biochemical oscillator.

  8. Efficient cycles for carbon capture CLC power plants based on thermally balanced redox reactors

    KAUST Repository

    Iloeje, Chukwunwike

    2015-10-01

    © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. The rotary reactor differs from most alternative chemical looping combustion (CLC) reactor designs because it maintains near-thermal equilibrium between the two stages of the redox process by thermally coupling channels undergoing oxidation and reduction. An earlier study showed that this thermal coupling between the oxidation and reduction reactors increases the efficiency by up to 2% points when implemented in a regenerative Brayton cycle. The present study extends this analysis to alternative CLC cycles with the objective of identifying optimal configurations and design tradeoffs. Results show that the increased efficiency from reactor thermal coupling applies only to cycles that are capable of exploiting the increased availability in the reduction reactor exhaust. Thus, in addition to the regenerative cycle, the combined CLC cycle and the combined-regenerative CLC cycle are suitable for integration with the rotary reactor. Parametric studies are used to compare the sensitivity of the different cycle efficiencies to parameters like pressure ratio, turbine inlet temperature, carrier-gas fraction and purge steam generation. One of the key conclusions from this analysis is that while the optimal efficiency for regenerative CLC cycle was the highest of the three (56% at 3. bars, 1200. °C), the combined-regenerative cycle offers a trade-off that combines a reasonably high efficiency (about 54% at 12. bars, 1200. °C) with much lower gas volumetric flow rate and consequently, smaller reactor size. Unlike the other two cycles, the optimal compressor pressure ratio for the regenerative cycle is weakly dependent on the design turbine inlet temperature. For the regenerative and combined regenerative cycles, steam production in the regenerator below 2× fuel flow rate improves exhaust recovery and consequently, the overall system efficiency. Also, given that the fuel side regenerator flow is unbalanced, it is more efficient to generate steam from the

  9. A Peltier thermal cycling unit for radiopharmaceutical synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKinney, C.J.; Nader, M.W.

    2001-01-01

    We have investigated the use of Peltier devices to rapidly cycle the temperature of reaction vessels in a radiopharmaceutical synthesis system. Peltier devices have the advantage that they can be actively cooled as well as heated, allowing precise and rapid control of vessel temperatures. Reaction vessel temperatures of between -6 deg. C and 110 deg. C have been obtained with commercially available devices with reasonable cycle times. Two devices have been used as the basis for a general purpose, two-pot synthesis system for production of [ 11 C] compounds such as raclopride

  10. Thermal mixing in T-junction piping system concerned with high-cycle thermal fatigue in structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, Masaaki; Ohshima, Hiroyuki; Monji, Hideaki

    2008-01-01

    In Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA), a numerical simulation code 'MUGTHES' has been developed to investigate thermal striping phenomena caused by turbulence mixing of fluids in different temperature and to provide transient data for an evaluation method of high-cycle thermal fatigue. MUGTHES adopts Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approach to predict unsteady phenomena in thermal mixing and employs boundary fitted coordinate system to be applied to complex geometry in a power reactor. Numerical simulation of thermal striping phenomena in a T-junction piping system (T-pipe) is conducted. Boundary condition for the simulation is chosen from an existing water experiment in JAEA, named as WATLON experiment. In the numerical simulation, standard Smagorinsky model is employed as eddy viscosity model with the model coefficient of 0.14 (=Cs). Numerical results of MUGTHES are verified by the comparisons with experimental results of velocity and temperature. Through the numerical simulation in the T-pipe, applicability of MUGTHES to the thermal striping phenomena is confirmed and the characteristic large-scale eddy structure which dominates thermal mixing and may cause high-cycle thermal fatigue is revealed. (author)

  11. Limit cycles from a cubic reversible system via the third-order averaging method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linping Peng

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the bifurcation of limit cycles from a cubic integrable and non-Hamiltonian system. By using the averaging theory of the first and second orders, we show that under any small cubic homogeneous perturbation, at most two limit cycles bifurcate from the period annulus of the unperturbed system, and this upper bound is sharp. By using the averaging theory of the third order, we show that two is also the maximal number of limit cycles emerging from the period annulus of the unperturbed system.

  12. Plastic response of thin films due to thermal cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nicola, L.; van der Giessen, E.; Needleman, A.; Ahzi, S; Cherkaoui, M; Khaleel, MA; Zbib, HM; Zikry, MA; Lamatina, B

    2004-01-01

    Discrete dislocation simulations of thin films on semi-infinite substrates under cyclic thermal loading are presented. The thin film is modelled as a two-dimensional single crystal under plane strain conditions. Dislocations of edge character can be generated from initially present sources and glide

  13. Hydraulic performance of compacted clay liners under simulated daily thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldaeef, A A; Rayhani, M T

    2015-10-01

    Compacted clay liners (CCLs) are commonly used as hydraulic barriers in several landfill applications to isolate contaminants from the surrounding environment and minimize the escape of leachate from the landfill. Prior to waste placement in landfills, CCLs are often exposed to temperature fluctuations which can affect the hydraulic performance of the liner. Experimental research was carried out to evaluate the effects of daily thermal cycles on the hydraulic performance of CCLs under simulated landfill conditions. Hydraulic conductivity tests were conducted on different soil specimens after being exposed to various thermal and dehydration cycles. An increase in the CCL hydraulic conductivity of up to one order of magnitude was recorded after 30 thermal cycles for soils with low plasticity index (PI = 9.5%). However, medium (PI = 25%) and high (PI = 37.2%) plasticity soils did not show significant hydraulic deviation due to their self-healing potential. Overlaying the CCL with a cover layer minimized the effects of daily thermal cycles, and maintained stable hydraulic performance in the CCLs even after exposure to 60 thermal cycles. Wet-dry cycles had a significant impact on the hydraulic aspect of low plasticity CCLs. However, medium and high plasticity CCLs maintained constant hydraulic performance throughout the test intervals. The study underscores the importance of protecting the CCL from exposure to atmosphere through covering it by a layer of geomembrane or an interim soil layer. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Performance Limits and Opportunities for Low Temperature Thermal Desalination

    OpenAIRE

    Nayar, Kishor Govind; Swaminathan, Jaichander; Warsinger, David Elan Martin; Lienhard, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional low temperature thermal desalination (LTTD) uses ocean thermal temperature gradients to drive a single stage flash distillation process to produce pure water from seawater. While the temperature difference in the ocean drives distillation and provides cooling in LTTD, external electrical energy is required to pump the water streams from the ocean and to maintain a near vacuum in the flash chamber. In this work, an LTTD process from the literature is compared against, the thermody...

  15. Estimating the boundaries of a limit cycle in a 2D dynamical system using renormalization group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Ayan; Das, Debapriya; Banerjee, Dhruba; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K.

    2018-04-01

    While the plausibility of formation of limit cycle has been a well studied topic in context of the Poincare-Bendixson theorem, studies on estimates in regard to the possible size and shape of the limit cycle seem to be scanty in the literature. In this paper we present a pedagogical study of some aspects of the size of this limit cycle using perturbative renormalization group by doing detailed and explicit calculations upto second order for the Selkov model for glycolytic oscillations. This famous model is well known to lead to a limit cycle for certain ranges of values of the parameters involved in the problem. Within the tenets of the approximations made, reasonable agreement with the numerical plots can be achieved.

  16. Existence of 121 limit cycles in a perturbed planar polynomial Hamiltonian vector field of degree 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, S.; Yu, P.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a systematic procedure has been explored to studying general Z q -equivariant planar polynomial Hamiltonian vector fields for the maximal number of closed orbits and the maximal number of limit cycles after perturbation. Following the procedure by taking special consideration of Z 12 -equivariant vector fields of degree 11, the maximal of 99 closed orbits are obtained under a well-defined coefficient group. Consequently, perturbation parameter control in limit cycle computation leads to the existence of 121 limit cycles in the perturbed Hamiltonian vector field, which gives rise to the lower bound of Hilbert number of 11th-order systems as H(11) ≥ 11 2 . Two conjectures are proposed regarding the maximal number of closed orbits for equivariant polynomial Hamiltonian vector fields and the maximal number of limit cycles bifurcated from the well defined Hamiltonian vector fields after perturbation

  17. Modified LMI condition for the realization of limit cycle-free digital filters using saturation arithmetic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Vimal

    2007-01-01

    A criterion in the form of linear matrix inequality for the elimination of limit cycles in a class of state-space digital filters using saturation arithmetic is presented. The criterion is a modified form of a previously reported criterion

  18. Analysis of thermal cycles and working fluids for power generation in space

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarlecki, Jason; Lior, Noam; Zhang Na

    2007-01-01

    Production of power in space for terrestrial use is of great interest in view of the rapidly rising power demand and its environmental impacts. Space also offers a very low temperature, making it a perfect heat sink for power plants, thus offering much higher efficiencies. This paper focuses on the evaluation and analysis of thermal Brayton, Ericsson and Rankine power cycles operating at space conditions on several appropriate working fluids. Under the examined conditions, the thermal efficiency of Brayton cycles reaches 63%, Ericsson 74%, and Rankine 85%. These efficiencies are significantly higher than those for the computed or real terrestrial cycles: by up to 45% for the Brayton, and 17% for the Ericsson; remarkably 44% for the Rankine cycle even when compared with the best terrestrial combined cycles. From the considered working fluids, the diatomic gases (N 2 and H 2 ) produce somewhat better efficiencies than the monatomic ones in the Brayton and Rankine cycles. The Rankine cycles require radiator areas that are larger by up to two orders of magnitude than those required for the Brayton and Ericsson cycles. The results of the analysis of the sensitivity of the cycle performance parameters to major parameters such as turbine inlet temperature and pressure ratio are presented, equations or examining the effects of fluid properties on the radiator area and pressure drop were developed, and the effects of the working fluid properties on cycle efficiency and on the power production per unit radiator area were explored to allow decisions on the optimal choice of working fluids

  19. Accelerated Thermal Cycling Test of Microencapsulated Paraffin Wax/Polyaniline Made by Simple Preparation Method for Solar Thermal Energy Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silakhori, Mahyar; Naghavi, Mohammad Sajad; Metselaar, Hendrik Simon Cornelis; Mahlia, Teuku Meurah Indra; Fauzi, Hadi; Mehrali, Mohammad

    2013-04-29

    Microencapsulated paraffin wax/polyaniline was prepared using a simple in situ polymerization technique, and its performance characteristics were investigated. Weight losses of samples were determined by Thermal Gravimetry Analysis (TGA). The microencapsulated samples with 23% and 49% paraffin showed less decomposition after 330 °C than with higher percentage of paraffin. These samples were then subjected to a thermal cycling test. Thermal properties of microencapsulated paraffin wax were evaluated by Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC). Structure stability and compatibility of core and coating materials were also tested by Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometer (FTIR), and the surface morphology of the samples are shown by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM). It has been found that the microencapsulated paraffin waxes show little change in the latent heat of fusion and melting temperature after one thousand thermal recycles. Besides, the chemical characteristics and structural profile remained constant after one thousand thermal cycling tests. Therefore, microencapsulated paraffin wax/polyaniline is a stable material that can be used for thermal energy storage systems.

  20. Exotic Homoclinic Surface of a Saddle-Node Limit Cycle in a Leech Neuron Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yooer, Chi-Feng; Wei, Fang; Xu, Jian-Xue; Zhang, Xin-Hua

    2011-03-01

    We carry out numerical and theoretical investigations on the global unstable invariant set (manifold) of a saddle-node limit cycle in a leech heart interneuron model. The corresponding global bifurcation is accompanied by an explosion of secondary bifurcations of limit cycles and the emergence of loop-shaped bifurcation structures. The dynamical behaviors of the trajectories of the invariant set are very complicated and can only be partially explained by existing theories.

  1. Residual Tensile Property of Plain Woven Jute Fiber/Poly(Lactic Acid Green Composites during Thermal Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hideaki Katogi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This study investigated the residual tensile properties of plain woven jute fiber reinforced poly(lactic acid (PLA during thermal cycling. Temperature ranges of thermal cycling tests were 35–45 °C and 35–55 °C. The maximum number of cycles was 103 cycles. The quasi-static tensile tests of jute fiber, PLA, and composite were conducted after thermal cycling tests. Thermal mechanical analyses of jute fiber and PLA were conducted after thermal cycling tests. Results led to the following conclusions. For temperatures of 35–45 °C, tensile strength of composite at 103 cycles decreased 10% compared to that of composite at 0 cycles. For temperatures of 35–55 °C, tensile strength and Young’s modulus of composite at 103 cycles decreased 15% and 10%, respectively, compared to that of composite at 0 cycles. Tensile properties and the coefficient of linear expansion of PLA and jute fiber remained almost unchanged after thermal cycling tests. From observation of a fracture surface, the length of fiber pull out in the fracture surface of composite at 103 cycles was longer than that of composite at 0 cycles. Therefore, tensile properties of the composite during thermal cycling were decreased, probably because of the decrease of interfacial adhesion between the fiber and resin.

  2. Residual Tensile Property of Plain Woven Jute Fiber/Poly(Lactic Acid) Green Composites during Thermal Cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katogi, Hideaki; Takemura, Kenichi; Akiyama, Motoki

    2016-07-14

    This study investigated the residual tensile properties of plain woven jute fiber reinforced poly(lactic acid) (PLA) during thermal cycling. Temperature ranges of thermal cycling tests were 35-45 °C and 35-55 °C. The maximum number of cycles was 10³ cycles. The quasi-static tensile tests of jute fiber, PLA, and composite were conducted after thermal cycling tests. Thermal mechanical analyses of jute fiber and PLA were conducted after thermal cycling tests. Results led to the following conclusions. For temperatures of 35-45 °C, tensile strength of composite at 10³ cycles decreased 10% compared to that of composite at 0 cycles. For temperatures of 35-55 °C, tensile strength and Young's modulus of composite at 10³ cycles decreased 15% and 10%, respectively, compared to that of composite at 0 cycles. Tensile properties and the coefficient of linear expansion of PLA and jute fiber remained almost unchanged after thermal cycling tests. From observation of a fracture surface, the length of fiber pull out in the fracture surface of composite at 10³ cycles was longer than that of composite at 0 cycles. Therefore, tensile properties of the composite during thermal cycling were decreased, probably because of the decrease of interfacial adhesion between the fiber and resin.

  3. Numerical investigation into the existence of limit cycles in two-dimensional predator�prey systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quay van der Hoff

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available There has been a surge of interest in developing and analysing models of interacting species in ecosystems, with specific interest in investigating the existence of limit cycles in systems describing the dynamics of these species. The original Lotka–Volterra model does not possess any limit cycles. In recent years this model has been modified to take disturbances into consideration and allow populations to return to their original numbers. By introducing logistic growth and a Holling Type II functional response to the traditional Lotka–Volterra-type models, it has been proven analytically that a unique, stable limit cycle exists. These proofs make use of Dulac functions, Liénard equations and invariant regions, relying on theory developed by Poincaré, Poincaré-Bendixson, Dulac and Liénard, and are generally perceived as difficult. Computer algebra systems are ideally suited to apply numerical methods to confirm or refute the analytical findings with respect to the existence of limit cycles in non-linear systems. In this paper a class of predator–prey models of a Gause type is used as the vehicle to illustrate the use of a simple, yet novel numerical algorithm. This algorithm confirms graphically the existence of at least one limit cycle that has analytically been proven to exist. Furthermore, adapted versions of the proposed algorithm may be applied to dynamic systems where it is difficult, if not impossible, to prove analytically the existence of limit cycles.

  4. Conductivity-limiting bipolar thermal conductivity in semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanyu; Yang, Jiong; Toll, Trevor; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Tang, Xinfeng

    2015-01-01

    Intriguing experimental results raised the question about the fundamental mechanisms governing the electron-hole coupling induced bipolar thermal conduction in semiconductors. Our combined theoretical analysis and experimental measurements show that in semiconductors bipolar thermal transport is in general a “conductivity-limiting” phenomenon, and it is thus controlled by the carrier mobility ratio and by the minority carrier partial electrical conductivity for the intrinsic and extrinsic cases, respectively. Our numerical method quantifies the role of electronic band structure and carrier scattering mechanisms. We have successfully demonstrated bipolar thermal conductivity reduction in doped semiconductors via electronic band structure modulation and/or preferential minority carrier scatterings. We expect this study to be beneficial to the current interests in optimizing thermoelectric properties of narrow gap semiconductors. PMID:25970560

  5. Oscillating in synchrony with a metronome: serial dependence, limit cycle dynamics, and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torre, Kjerstin; Balasubramaniam, Ramesh; Delignières, Didier

    2010-07-01

    We analyzed serial dependencies in periods and asynchronies collected during oscillations performed in synchrony with a metronome. Results showed that asynchronies contain 1/f fluctuations, and the series of periods contain antipersistent dependence. The analysis of the phase portrait revealed a specific asymmetry induced by synchronization. We propose a hybrid limit cycle model including a cycle-dependent stiffness parameter provided with fractal properties, and a parametric driving function based on velocity. This model accounts for most experimentally evidenced statistical features, including serial dependence and limit cycle dynamics. We discuss the results and modeling choices within the framework of event-based and emergent timing.

  6. High-frequency thermal-electrical cycles for pyroelectric energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatia, Bikram; Damodaran, Anoop R.; Cho, Hanna; Martin, Lane W.; King, William P.

    2014-01-01

    We report thermal to electrical energy conversion from a 150 nm thick BaTiO 3 film using pyroelectric cycles at 1 kHz. A microfabricated platform enables temperature and electric field control with temporal resolution near 1 μs. The rapid electric field changes as high as 11 × 10 5  kV/cm-s, and temperature change rates as high as 6 × 10 5  K/s allow exploration of pyroelectric cycles in a previously unexplored operating regime. We investigated the effect of phase difference between electric field and temperature cycles, and electric field and temperature change rates on the electrical energy generated from thermal-electrical cycles based on the pyroelectric Ericsson cycle. Complete thermodynamic cycles are possible up to the highest cycle rates tested here, and the energy density varies significantly with phase shifts between temperature and electric field waveforms. This work could facilitate the design and operation of pyroelectric cycles at high cycle rates, and aid in the design of new pyroelectric systems

  7. Widespread range expansions shape latitudinal variation in insect thermal limits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lancaster, Lesley T.

    2016-06-01

    Current anthropogenic impacts, including habitat modification and climate change, may contribute to a sixth mass extinction. To mitigate these impacts and slow further losses of biodiversity, we need to understand which species are most at risk and identify the factors contributing to current and future declines. Such information is often obtained through large-scale, comparative and biogeographic analysis of lineages or traits that are potentially sensitive to ongoing anthropogenic change--for instance to predict which regions are most susceptible to climate change-induced biodiversity loss. However, for this approach to be generally successful, the underlying causes of identified geographical trends need to be carefully considered. Here, I augment and reanalyse a global data set of insect thermal tolerances, evaluating the contribution of recent and contemporary range expansions to latitudinal variation in thermal niche breadth. Previous indications that high-latitude ectotherms exhibit broad thermal niches and high warming tolerances held only for species undergoing range expansions or invasions. In contrast, species with stable or declining geographic ranges exhibit latitudinally decreasing absolute thermal tolerances and no latitudinal variation in tolerance breadths. Thus, non-range-expanding species, particularly insular or endemic species, which are often of highest conservation priority, are unlikely to tolerate future climatic warming at high latitudes.

  8. Anaerobic metabolism at thermal extremes: a metabolomic test of the oxygen limitation hypothesis in an aquatic insect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberk, W C E P; Sommer, U; Davidson, R L; Viant, M R

    2013-10-01

    Thermal limits in ectotherms may arise through a mismatch between supply and demand of oxygen. At higher temperatures, the ability of their cardiac and ventilatory activities to supply oxygen becomes insufficient to meet their elevated oxygen demand. Consequently, higher levels of oxygen in the environment are predicted to enhance tolerance of heat, whereas reductions in oxygen are expected to reduce thermal limits. Here, we extend previous research on thermal limits and oxygen limitation in aquatic insect larvae and directly test the hypothesis of increased anaerobic metabolism and lower energy status at thermal extremes. We quantified metabolite profiles in stonefly nymphs under varying temperatures and oxygen levels. Under normoxia, the concept of oxygen limitation applies to the insects studied. Shifts in the metabolome of heat-stressed stonefly nymphs clearly indicate the onset of anaerobic metabolism (e.g., accumulation of lactate, acetate, and alanine), a perturbation of the tricarboxylic acid cycle (e.g., accumulation of succinate and malate), and a decrease in energy status (e.g., ATP), with corresponding decreases in their ability to survive heat stress. These shifts were more pronounced under hypoxic conditions, and negated by hyperoxia, which also improved heat tolerance. Perturbations of metabolic pathways in response to either heat stress or hypoxia were found to be somewhat similar but not identical. Under hypoxia, energy status was greatly compromised at thermal extremes, but energy shortage and anaerobic metabolism could not be conclusively identified as the sole cause underlying thermal limits under hyperoxia. Metabolomics proved useful for suggesting a range of possible mechanisms to explore in future investigations, such as the involvement of leaking membranes or free radicals. In doing so, metabolomics provided a more complete picture of changes in metabolism under hypoxia and heat stress.

  9. A thermal model for the seasonal nitrogen cycle on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Candice J.; Paige, David A.

    1992-01-01

    The seasonal N2-cycle model presently used to characterize such observed phenomena on Triton as atmospheric pressure and surface albedo features at the time of the Voyager encounter incorporates diurnal and seasonal subsurface heat conduction, and can account for the heat capacity of N2 frost deposits. The results obtained by this model differ from those of previous studies in that they do not predict the seasonal freezing-out of the Triton atmosphere; even for a wide range of input parameters, the bright southern polar cap is seen as rather unlikely to be N2. The results support the microphysical arguments for the presence of either dark or smooth translucent N2 frosts on the Triton surface.

  10. THE THERMAL PROPERTIES OF SOLAR FLARES OVER THREE SOLAR CYCLES USING GOES X-RAY OBSERVATIONS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryan, Daniel F.; Gallagher, Peter T.; Milligan, Ryan O.; Dennis, Brian R.; Kim Tolbert, A.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Alex Young, C.

    2012-01-01

    Solar flare X-ray emission results from rapidly increasing temperatures and emission measures in flaring active region loops. To date, observations from the X-Ray Sensor (XRS) on board the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) have been used to derive these properties, but have been limited by a number of factors, including the lack of a consistent background subtraction method capable of being automatically applied to large numbers of flares. In this paper, we describe an automated Temperature and Emission measure-Based Background Subtraction method (TEBBS), that builds on the methods of Bornmann. Our algorithm ensures that the derived temperature is always greater than the instrumental limit and the pre-flare background temperature, and that the temperature and emission measure are increasing during the flare rise phase. Additionally, TEBBS utilizes the improved estimates of GOES temperatures and emission measures from White et al. TEBBS was successfully applied to over 50,000 solar flares occurring over nearly three solar cycles (1980-2007), and used to create an extensive catalog of the solar flare thermal properties. We confirm that the peak emission measure and total radiative losses scale with background subtracted GOES X-ray flux as power laws, while the peak temperature scales logarithmically. As expected, the peak emission measure shows an increasing trend with peak temperature, although the total radiative losses do not. While these results are comparable to previous studies, we find that flares of a given GOES class have lower peak temperatures and higher peak emission measures than previously reported. The TEBBS database of flare thermal plasma properties is publicly available at http://www.SolarMonitor.org/TEBBS/.

  11. Aeroelastic Limit-Cycle Oscillations resulting from Aerodynamic Non-Linearities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Rooij, A.C.L.M.

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamic non-linearities, such as shock waves, boundary layer separation or boundary layer transition, may cause an amplitude limitation of the oscillations induced by the fluid flow around a structure. These aeroelastic limit-cycle oscillations (LCOs) resulting from aerodynamic non-linearities

  12. Exergetic comparison of two different cooling technologies for the power cycle of a thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco-Marigorta, Ana M.; Victoria Sanchez-Henriquez, M.; Pena-Quintana, Juan A.

    2011-01-01

    Exergetic analysis is without any doubt a powerful tool for developing, evaluating and improving an energy conversion system. In the present paper, two different cooling technologies for the power cycle of a 50 MWe solar thermal power plant are compared from the exergetic viewpoint. The Rankine cycle design is a conventional, single reheat design with five closed and one open extraction feedwater heaters. The software package GateCycle is used for the thermodynamic simulation of the Rankine cycle model. The first design configuration uses a cooling tower while the second configuration uses an air cooled condenser. With this exergy analysis we identify the location, magnitude and the sources or thermodynamic inefficiencies in this thermal system. This information is very useful for improving the overall efficiency of the power system and for comparing the performance of both technologies.

  13. Economic optimization of a Kalina cycle for a parabolic trough solar thermal power plant

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modi, Anish; Kærn, Martin Ryhl; Andreasen, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    -water mixture evaporates and condenses with a temperature glide, thus providing a better match with the heat source/sink temperature profile. This better match results in reduced thermal irreversibility, but at the cost of relatively larger heat exchanger areas. The parabolic trough collector is the most mature...... heat transfer correlations, and appropriate cost functions were used to estimate the costs for the various plant components. The optimal capital investment costs were determined for several values of the turbine inlet ammonia mass fraction and among the compared cases, the Kalina cycle has the minimum......The Kalina cycle has recently seen increased interest as a replacement for the more traditional steam Rankine cycle for geothermal, solar, ocean thermal energy conversion and waste heat recovery applications. The Kalina cycle uses a mixture of ammonia and water as the working fluid. The ammonia...

  14. Quantum correlations and limit cycles in the driven-dissipative Heisenberg lattice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owen, E. T.; Jin, J.; Rossini, D.; Fazio, R.; Hartmann, M. J.

    2018-04-01

    Driven-dissipative quantum many-body systems have attracted increasing interest in recent years as they lead to novel classes of quantum many-body phenomena. In particular, mean-field calculations predict limit cycle phases, slow oscillations instead of stationary states, in the long-time limit for a number of driven-dissipative quantum many-body systems. Using a cluster mean-field and a self-consistent Mori projector approach, we explore the persistence of such limit cycles as short range quantum correlations are taken into account in a driven-dissipative Heisenberg model.

  15. Effects of Thermal Cycling on Control and Irradiated EPC 2nd Generation GaN FETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2013-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Results of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  16. Thermal Cycling and High Temperature Reverse Bias Testing of Control and Irradiated Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Boomer, Kristen T.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2014-01-01

    The power systems for use in NASA space missions must work reliably under harsh conditions including radiation, thermal cycling, and exposure to extreme temperatures. Gallium nitride semiconductors show great promise, but information pertaining to their performance is scarce. Gallium nitride N-channel enhancement-mode field effect transistors made by EPC Corporation in a 2nd generation of manufacturing were exposed to radiation followed by long-term thermal cycling and testing under high temperature reverse bias conditions in order to address their reliability for use in space missions. Result of the experimental work are presented and discussed.

  17. Effects of Radiation and Long-Term Thermal Cycling on EPC 1001 Gallium Nitride Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif; Lauenstein, Jean-Marie; Casey, Megan; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Data obtained on long-term thermal cycling of new un-irradiated and irradiated samples of EPC1001 gallium nitride enhancement-mode transistors are presented. This work was done by a collaborative effort including GRC, GSFC, and support the NASA www.nasa.gov 1 JPL in of Electronic Parts and Packaging (NEPP) Program

  18. Mineralogical control on thermal damage and the presence of a thermal Kaiser effect during temperature-cycling experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browning, J.; Daoud, A.; Meredith, P. G.; Mitchell, T. M.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic and geothermal systems are in part controlled by the mechanical and thermal stresses acting on them and so it is important to understand the response of volcanic rocks to thermo-mechanical loading. One such response is the well-known `Kaiser stress-memory' effect observed under cyclic mechanical loading. By contrast, the presence of an analogous `Kaiser temperature-memory effect' during cyclic thermal loading has received little attention. We have therefore explored the possibility of a Kaiser temperature-memory effect using three igneous rocks of different composition, grain size and origin; Slaufrudalur Granophyre (SGP), Nea Kameni Andesite (NKA) and Seljadalur Basalt (SB). We present results from a series of thermal stressing experiments in which acoustic emissions (AE) were recorded contemporaneously with changing temperature. Samples of each rock were subjected to both a single heating and cooling cycle to a maximum temperature of 900 °C and multiple heating/cooling cycles to peak temperatures of 350°C, 500°C, 700°C and 900 °C (all at a constant rate of 1°C/min on heating and a natural cooling rate of memory effect in SGP, but not in either NKA and SB. We further find that the vast majority of thermal crack damage is generated upon cooling in the finer grained materials (NKA and SB), but that substantial thermal crack damage is generated during heating in the coarser grained SGP. The total amount of crack damage generated due to heating or cooling is dependent on the mineral composition and, most importantly, the grain size and arrangement, as well as the maximum temperature to which the rock is exposed. Knowledge of thermal stress history and the presence of a Kaiser temperature-memory effect is potentially important in understanding magma chamber dynamics, where the cyclic nature of mechanical and thermal inflation and deflation can lead to sequential accumulation of damage, potentially leading to critical rupture.

  19. Estimating the power efficiency of the thermal power plant modernization by using combined-cycle technologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hovhannisyan, L.S.; Harutyunyan, N.R.

    2013-01-01

    The power efficiency of the thermal power plant (TPP) modernization by using combined-cycle technologies is introduced. It is shown that it is possible to achieve the greatest decrease in the specific fuel consumption at modernizing the TPP at the expense of introducing progressive 'know-how' of the electric power generation: for TPP on gas, it is combined-cycle, gas-turbine superstructures of steam-power plants and gas-turbines with heat utilization

  20. Development potential for thermal reactors and their fuel cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogers, J.T.; Dodds, H.L. Jr.; Florido, P.C.; Gat, U.; Kondo, S.; Spinks, N.S.

    1997-01-01

    Water-cooled reactors represent the only types which have reached widespread commercial use up to the present day. Given the plentiful supply of uranium in the world today, this situation might be expected to continue for some time into the future. Nevertheless, for different reasons several countries consider that either new reactor types should be developed or that existing types should be improved substantially. The predominant reason in the short term is to improve the competitive position of nuclear energy supply versus fossil energy. In the longer term, regional and national fuel supply independence may become the dominant driving forces. This paper outlines several possible means for responding to these driving forces. It is not meant to include an exhaustive list of all possibilities, but only to illustrate some alternative routes. These routes range from enhancement of existing reactor concepts to combination of nuclear with fossil systems, and finally to the introduction of radically new thermal reactor concepts. Each of these has its obvious advantages and disadvantages and will come forward or will recede depending on technical feasibility, economics, long-term sustainability, and national policy. (author)

  1. Energy audit: thermal power, combined cycle, and cogeneration plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbi, Yash Pal

    2012-07-01

    The availability of fossil fuels required for power plants is reducing and their costs increasing rapidly. This gives rise to increase in the cost of generation of electricity. But electricity regulators have to control the price of electricity so that consumers are not stressed with high costs. In addition, environmental considerations are forcing power plants to reduce CO2 emissions. Under these circumstances, power plants are constantly under pressure to improve the efficiency of operating plants, and to reduce fuel consumption. In order to progress in this direction, it is important that power plants regularly audit their energy use in terms of the operating plant heat rate and auxiliary power consumption. The author attempts to refresh the fundamentals of the science and engineering of thermal power plants, establish its link with the real power plant performance data through case studies, and further develop techno-economics of the energy efficiency improvement measures. This book will rekindle interest in energy audits and analysis of the data for designing and implementation of energy conservation measures on a continuous basis.

  2. Effect of Thermal Cycling on the Tensile Behavior of Polymer Composites Reinforced by Basalt and Carbon Fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, S. Mohammad Reza; Najafi, Moslem; Eslami-Farsani, Reza

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to investigate the effect of thermal cycling on the tensile behavior of three types of polymer-matrix composites — a phenolic resin reinforced with woven basalt fibers, woven carbon fibers, and hybrid basalt and carbon fibers — in an ambient environment. For this purpose, tensile tests were performed on specimens previously subjected to a certain number of thermal cycles. The ultimate tensile strength of the specimen reinforced with woven basalt fibers had by 5% after thermal cycling, but the strength of the specimen with woven carbon fibers had reduced to a value by 11% higher than that before thermal cycling.

  3. Open cycle ocean thermal energy conversion system structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittig, J. Michael

    1980-01-01

    A generally mushroom-shaped, open cycle OTEC system and distilled water producer which has a skirt-conduit structure extending from the enlarged portion of the mushroom to the ocean. The enlarged part of the mushroom houses a toroidal casing flash evaporator which produces steam which expands through a vertical rotor turbine, partially situated in the center of the blossom portion and partially situated in the mushroom's stem portion. Upon expansion through the turbine, the motive steam enters a shell and tube condenser annularly disposed about the rotor axis and axially situated beneath the turbine in the stem portion. Relatively warm ocean water is circulated up through the radially outer skirt-conduit structure entering the evaporator through a radially outer portion thereof, flashing a portion thereof into motive steam, and draining the unflashed portion from the evaporator through a radially inner skirt-conduit structure. Relatively cold cooling water enters the annular condenser through the radially inner edge and travels radially outwardly into a channel situated along the radially outer edge of the condenser. The channel is also included in the radially inner skirt-conduit structure. The cooling water is segregated from the potable, motive steam condensate which can be used for human consumption or other processes requiring high purity water. The expansion energy of the motive steam is partially converted into rotational mechanical energy of the turbine rotor when the steam is expanded through the shaft attached blades. Such mechanical energy drives a generator also included in the enlarged mushroom portion for producing electrical energy. Such power generation equipment arrangement provides a compact power system from which additional benefits may be obtained by fabricating the enclosing equipment, housings and component casings from low density materials, such as prestressed concrete, to permit those casings and housings to also function as a floating

  4. Possibilities and Limitations of Thermally Activated Building Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, Benjamin

    The strong political market drive towards energy savings in the building sector calls for efficient solutions. Using so called low temperature heating and high temperature cooling systems such as for instance thermally activated building systems (TABS) has a significant impact on the required...... will be mostly needed to operate the building within acceptable boundaries. It will also allow the user to see if dehumidification will be needed for undisturbed operation of TABS. With the combination of both tools it is possible to provide a holistic evaluation of a building proposal at a very early design...

  5. Influence of thermal cycling on flexural properties of composites reinforced with unidirectional silica-glass fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meriç, Gökçe; Ruyter, I Eystein

    2008-08-01

    The purpose was to investigate the effect of water storage and thermal cycling on the flexural properties of differently sized unidirectional fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) containing different quantities of fibers. The effect of fiber orientation on the thermal expansion of FRCs as well as how the stresses in the composites can be affected was considered. An experimental polymeric base material was reinforced with silica-glass fibers. The cleaned and silanized fibers were sized with either linear PBMA-size or crosslinked PMMA-size. For the determination of flexural properties and water uptake, specimens were processed with various quantities of differently sized unidirectional fibers. Water uptake of FRC was measured. Water immersed specimens were thermally cycled for 500 and 12,000 cycles (5 degrees C/55 degrees C). Flexural properties of "dry" and wet specimens with and without thermal cycling were determined by a three-point bending test. The linear coefficients of thermal expansion (LCTE) for FRC samples with different fiber orientations were determined using a thermomechanical analyzer. Water uptake of the FRC specimens increased with a decrease in fiber content of the FRC. Flexural properties of FRCs improved with increasing fiber content, whereas the flexural properties were not influenced significantly by water and thermal cycling. Fiber orientation had different effects on LCTE of FRCs. Unidirectional FRCs had two different LCTE in longitudinal and transverse directions whereas bidirectional FRCs had similar LCTE in two directions and a higher one in the third direction. The results of the study suggest that the surface-treated unidirectional silica-glass FRC can be used for long-term clinical applications in the oral cavity.

  6. Thermal cycling effects on adhesion of resin-bovine enamel junction among different composite resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Cheng; Ko, Chia-Ling; Wu, Hui-Yu; Lai, Pei-Ling; Shih, Chi-Jen

    2014-10-01

    Thermal cycling is used to mimic the changes in oral cavity temperature experienced by composite resins when used clinically. The purpose of this study is to assess the thermal cycling effects of in-house produced composite resin on bonding strength. The dicalcium phosphate anhydrous filler surfaces are modified using nanocrystals and silanization (w/NP/Si). The resin is compared with commercially available composite resins Filtek Z250, Z350, and glass ionomer restorative material GIC Fuji-II LC (control). Different composite resins were filled into the dental enamel of bovine teeth. The bond force and resin-enamel junction graphical structures of the samples were determined after thermal cycling between 5 and 55°C in deionized water for 600 cycles. After thermal cycling, the w/NP/Si 30wt%, 50wt% and Filtek Z250, Z350 groups showed higher shear forces than glass ionomer GIC, and w/NP/Si 50wt% had the highest shear force. Through SEM observations, more of the fillings with w/NP/Si 30wt% and w/NP/Si 50wt% groups flowed into the enamel tubule, forming closed tubules with the composite resins. The push-out force is proportional to the resin flow depth and uniformity. The push-out tubule pore and resin shear pattern is the most uniform and consistent in the w/NP/Si 50wt% group. Accordingly, this developed composite resin maintains great mechanical properties after thermal cycling. Thus, it has the potential to be used in a clinical setting when restoring non-carious cervical lesions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Imposed Thermal Fatigue and Post-Thermal-Cycle Wear Resistance of Biomimetic Gray Cast Iron by Laser Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sui, Qi; Zhou, Hong; Zhang, Deping; Chen, Zhikai; Zhang, Peng

    2017-08-01

    The present study aims to create coupling biomimetic units on gray cast iron substrate by laser surface treatment (LST). LSTs for single-step (LST1) and two-step (LST2) processes, were carried out on gray cast iron in different media (air and water). Their effects on microstructure, thermal fatigue, and post-thermal-cycle wear (PTW) resistance on the specimens were studied. The tests were carried out to examine the influence of crack-resistance behavior as well as the biomimetic surface on its post-thermal-cycle wear behavior and different units, with different laser treatments for comparison. Results showed that LST2 enhanced the PTW behaviors of gray cast iron, which then led to an increase in its crack resistance. Among the treated cast irons, the one treated by LST2 in air showed the lowest residual stress, due to the positive effect of the lower steepness of the thermal gradient. Moreover, the same specimen showed the best PTW performance, due to its superior crack resistance and higher hardness as a result of it.

  8. Optimizing the Environmental Performance of In Situ Thermal Remediation Technologies Using Life Cycle Assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemming, Gitte; Nielsen, Steffen G.; Weber, Klaus

    2013-01-01

    In situ thermal remediation technologies provide efficient and reliable cleanup of contaminated soil and groundwater, but at a high cost of environmental impacts and resource depletion due to the large amounts of energy and materials consumed. This study provides a detailed investigation of four...... in situ thermal remediation technologies (steam enhanced extraction, thermal conduction heating, electrical resistance heating, and radio frequency heating) in order to (1) compare the life-cycle environmental impacts and resource consumption associated with each thermal technology, and (2) identify...... improvements is a 10 to 21% decrease in environmental impacts and an 8 to 20% decrease in resource depletion depending on the thermal remediation technology considered. The energy consumption was found to be the main contributor to most types of environmental impacts; this will, however, depend...

  9. Approximating the amplitude and form of limit cycles in the weakly nonlinear regime of Lienard systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez, J.L.; Lopez-Ruiz, R.

    2007-01-01

    Lienard equations, x+εf(x)x+x=0, with f(x) an even continuous function are considered. In the weak nonlinear regime (ε->0), the number and O(ε 0 ) approximation of the amplitude of limit cycles present in this type of systems, can be obtained by applying a methodology recently proposed by the authors [Lopez-Ruiz R, Lopez JL. Bifurcation curves of limit cycles in some Lienard systems. Int J Bifurcat Chaos 2000;10:971-80]. In the present work, that method is carried forward to higher orders in ε and is embedded in a general recursive algorithm capable to approximate the form of the limit cycles and to correct their amplitudes as an expansion in powers of ε. Several examples showing the application of this scheme are given

  10. Mathematical interpretation of Brownian motor model: Limit cycles and directed transport phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianqiang; Ma, Hong; Zhong, Suchuang

    2018-03-01

    In this article, we first suggest that the attractor of Brownian motor model is one of the reasons for the directed transport phenomenon of Brownian particle. We take the classical Smoluchowski-Feynman (SF) ratchet model as an example to investigate the relationship between limit cycles and directed transport phenomenon of the Brownian particle. We study the existence and variation rule of limit cycles of SF ratchet model at changing parameters through mathematical methods. The influences of these parameters on the directed transport phenomenon of a Brownian particle are then analyzed through numerical simulations. Reasonable mathematical explanations for the directed transport phenomenon of Brownian particle in SF ratchet model are also formulated on the basis of the existence and variation rule of the limit cycles and numerical simulations. These mathematical explanations provide a theoretical basis for applying these theories in physics, biology, chemistry, and engineering.

  11. Circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of Neochloris oleoabundans under nitrogen limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, Lenneke; Schepers, Lutz W; Cuaresma, Maria; Barbosa, Maria J; Martens, Dirk E; Wijffels, René H

    2014-10-10

    The circadian clock schedules processes in microalgae cells at suitable times in the day/night cycle. To gain knowledge about these biological time schedules, Neochloris oleoabundans was grown under constant light conditions and nitrogen limitation. Under these constant conditions, the only variable was the circadian clock. The results were compared to previous work done under nitrogen-replete conditions, in order to determine the effect of N-limitation on circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of N. oleoabundans. The circadian clock was not affected by nitrogen-limitation, and cell division was timed in the natural night, despite of constant light conditions. However, because of nitrogen-limitation, not the entire population was able to divide every day. Two subpopulations were observed, which divided alternately every other day. This caused oscillations in biomass yield and composition. Starch and total fatty acids (TFA) were accumulated during the day. Also, fatty acid composition changed during the cell cycle. Neutral lipids were built up during the day, especially in cells that were arrested in their cell cycle (G2 and G3). These findings give insight in the influence of circadian rhythms on the cell cycle and biomass composition. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Improved thermal cycling durability and PCR compatibility of polymer coated quantum dot

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xun Zhe; Guan Yifu; Zhao Xiaoyun

    2013-01-01

    Quantum dots have experienced rapid development in imaging, labeling and sensing in medicine and life science. To be suitable for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, we have tested QD thermal cycling durability and compatibility, which have not been addressed in previous reports. In this study, we synthesized CdSe/ZnS QDs with a surface modification with high-MW amphiphilic copolymers and observed that Mg 2+ ions in the PCR reaction could induce the QDs to precipitate and reduce their fluorescence signal significantly after thermal cycling. To overcome this problem, we used mPEG2000 to conjugate the QD surface for further protection, and found that this modification enables QDs to endure 40 thermal cycles in the presence of other components essential for PCR reactions. We have also identified that QDs have different effects on rTaq and Ex Taq polymerization systems. A high QD concentration could apparently reduce the PCR efficiency, but this inhibition was relieved significantly in the Ex PCR system as the concentration of Ex Taq polymerase was increased. Real-time PCR amplification results showed that QDs could provide a sufficiently measurable fluorescence signal without excessively inhibiting the DNA amplification. Based on this improved thermal cycling durability and compatibility with the PCR system, QDs have the potential to be developed as stable fluorescent sensors in PCR and real-time PCR amplification. (paper)

  13. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, B. J.; Miller, D. T.

    2017-01-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  14. 'Crud' detection and evaluation during the Embalse nuclear power plant's thermal cycle for powers of 100%

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, A.; Rosales, A.H.; Mura, V.R.; Sentupery, C.; Rascon, H.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes the 'crud' measurements performed during the Embalse nuclear power plant's thermal cycle for a power of 100% (645 MWe) under different purification conditions. The aim of this work is to optimize the four steam generators' tube plate cleaning in function of the sweeping produced by their purification. (Author)

  15. Mechanical and thermal cycling effects on the flexural strength of glass ceramics fused to titanium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vasquez, Vanessa; Ozcan, Mutlu; Nishioka, Renato; Souza, Rodrigo; Mesquita, Alfredo; Pavanelli, Carlos

    This study evaluated the effects of mechanical and thermal cycling on the flexural strength (ISO 9693) of three brands of ceramics fused to commercially pure titanium (cpTi). Metallic frameworks of 25 x 3 x 0.5 mm dimensions (N = 84) were cast in cpTi, followed by 150-mu m aluminum oxide airborne

  16. Observations on thermally cycled 20% Cr/25% Ni/Nb stabilised stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lobb, R.C.

    1984-06-01

    A variety of optical and electron techniques, such as optical metallography, scanning electron microscopy and electron probe microanalysis, have been used to study the morphology and composition of oxides formed on 20 Cr/25 Ni/Nb stainless steel during oxidation at 850 0 C and subsequent thermal cycling in simulated reactor gas. (author)

  17. A reliability model for interlayer dielectric cracking during fast thermal cycling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Van Hieu; Salm, Cora; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Krabbenborg, B.H.; Bisschop, J.; Mouthaan, A.J.; Kuper, F.G.; Ray, Gary W.; Smy, Tom; Ohta, Tomohiro; Tsujimura, Manabu

    2003-01-01

    Interlayer dielectric (ILD) cracking can result in short circuits of multilevel interconnects. This paper presents a reliability model for ILD cracking induced by fast thermal cycling (FTC) stress. FTC tests have been performed under different temperature ranges (∆T) and minimum temperatures (Tmin).

  18. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 160A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B. J. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, D. T. [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2017-06-06

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 160A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  19. Limited capacity for developmental thermal acclimation in three tropical wrasses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motson, K.; Donelson, J. M.

    2017-06-01

    For effective conservation and management of marine systems, it is essential that we understand the biological impacts of and capacity for acclimation to increased ocean temperatures. This study investigated for the first time the effects of developing in projected warmer ocean conditions in the tropical wrasse species: Halichoeres melanurus, Halichoeres miniatus and Thalassoma amblycephalum. New recruits were reared for 11 weeks in control (29 °C) and +2 °C (31 °C) temperature treatments, consistent with predicted increases in sea surface temperature by 2100. A broad range of key attributes and performance parameters was tested, including aerobic metabolism, swimming ability, burst escape performance and physical condition. Response latency of burst performance was the only performance parameter in which evidence of beneficial thermal developmental acclimation was found, observed only in H. melanurus. Generally, development in the +2 °C treatment came at a significant cost to all species, resulting in reduced growth and physical condition, as well as metabolic and swimming performance relative to controls. Development in +2 °C conditions exacerbated the effects of warming on aerobic metabolism and swimming ability, compared to short-term warming effects. Burst escape performance parameters were only mildly affected by development at +2 °C, with non-locomotor performance (response latency) showing greater thermal sensitivity than locomotor performance parameters. These results indicate that the effects of future climate change on tropical wrasses would be underestimated with short-term testing. This study highlights the importance of holistic, longer-term developmental experimental approaches, with warming found to yield significant, species-specific responses in all parameters tested.

  20. Performance analysis of an integrated gas-, steam- and organic fluid-cycle thermal power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oko, C.O.C.; Njoku, I.H.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents the performance analysis of an existing combined cycle power plant augmented with a waste heat fired organic Rankine cycle power plant for extra power generation. This was achieved by performing energy and exergy analysis of the integrated gas-, steam- and organic fluid-cycle thermal power plant (IPP). Heat source for the subcritical organic Rankine cycle (ORC) was the exhaust flue gases from the heat recovery steam generators of a 650 MW natural gas fired combined cycle power plant. The results showed that extra 12.4 MW of electricity was generated from the attached ORC unit using HFE7100 as working fluid. To select ORC working fluid, ten isentropic fluids were screened and HFE7100 produced the highest net power output and cycle efficiency. Exergy and energy efficiencies of the IPP improved by 1.95% and 1.93%, respectively. The rate of exergy destruction in the existing combined cycle plant was highest in the combustion chamber, 59%, whereas in the ORC, the highest rate of exergy destruction occurred in the evaporator, 62%. Simulations showed exergy efficiency of the IPP decreased with increasing ambient temperature. Exit stack flue gas temperature reduced from 126 °C in the combined cycle power plant to 100 °C in the integrated power plant. - Highlights: • Combined cycle plant retrofitted with ORC produced extra 12.4 MW electric power. • ORC is powered with low temperature flue gas from an existing combined cycle plant. • Exergy destruction rate in integrated plant(IPP) is less than in combined plant. • Exit stack temperature of the IPP has less environmental thermal pollution. • Exergy and energy efficiencies of the IPP improved by 1.95% and 1.93%, respectively.

  1. Evaluation of thermal striping risks: Limitation of cracks initiation and propagation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drubay, B.; Acker, D.

    1994-01-01

    Thermal striping is the effect of a rapid random oscillation of surface temperature inducing a corresponding fluctuation of surface strains. It occurs on components situated in the mixing zone of coolant streams of different temperatures and is characterised by large numbers of strain cycles having the potential to add to the fatigue damage produced by strain cycles associated with all other plant operating events. The purpose of this paper is to describe the R and D works performed in the frame of the European Fast Reactor project between 1985 and 1992 on the thermal striping: experimental works and validation of assessment methodology. (author)

  2. Fluctuations in the limit cycle state and the problem of phase chaos

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szepfalusy, P.; Tel, T.

    1981-11-01

    Gaussian fluctuations and first order fluctuation corrections to the deterministic solution are investigated in the framework of the generalized Ginzburg-Landau type equation of motion exhibiting a hard mode transition leading a to homogeneous limit cycle state. It is shown that the stationary distribution of the fluctuations around the limit cycle is not of the form of a Ginzburg-Landau functional. The nature of the further instability in the post bifurcational region, resulting in the phase chaos in the deterministic problem, is found to be qualitatively changed by the presence of noise. (author)

  3. Analytical estimations of limit cycle amplitude for delay-differential equations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Molnár

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The amplitude of limit cycles arising from Hopf bifurcation is estimated for nonlinear delay-differential equations by means of analytical formulas. An improved analytical estimation is introduced, which allows more accurate quantitative prediction of periodic solutions than the standard approach that formulates the amplitude as a square-root function of the bifurcation parameter. The improved estimation is based on special global properties of the system: the method can be applied if the limit cycle blows up and disappears at a certain value of the bifurcation parameter. As an illustrative example, the improved analytical formula is applied to the problem of stick balancing.

  4. Thermal-CFD Analysis of Combined Solar-Nuclear Cycle Systems.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fathi, Nima [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); McDaniel, Patrick [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Vorobieff, Peter [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); de Oliveira, Cassiano [Univ. of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodriguez, Salvador B. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Aleyasin, Seyed Sobhan [Univ. of Manitoba (Canada)

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this paper is evaluating the efficiency of a novel combined solar-nuclear cycle. CFD-Thermal analysis is performed to apply the available surplus heat from the nuclear cycle and measure the available kinetic energy of air for the turbine of a solar chimney power plant system (SCPPS). The presented idea helps to decrease the thermal pollution and handle the water shortage supply for water plant by replacing the cooling tower by solar chimney power plant to get the surplus heat from the available warm air in the secondary loop of the reactor. By applying this idea to a typical 1000 MW nuclear power plant with a 0.33 thermal efficiency, we can increase it to 0.39.

  5. Development of Thermal Performance Analysis Computer Program on Turbine Cycle of Yoggwang 3,4 Units

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, S.Y.; Choi, K.H.; Jee, M.H.; Chung, S.I. [Korea Electric Power Research Institute, Taejon (Korea)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of the study ''Development of Thermal Performance Analysis Computer Program on Turbine Cycle of Yonggwang 3,4 Units'' is to utilize computerized program to the performance test of the turbine cycle or the analysis of the operational status of the thermal plants. In addition, the result can be applicable to the analysis of the thermal output at the abnormal status and be a powerful tool to find out the main problems for such cases. As a results, the output of this study can supply the way to confirm the technical capability to operate the plants efficiently and to obtain the economic gains remarkably. (author). 27 refs., 73 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Thermal and isothermal low cycle fatigue of MANET I and II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, C.; Schmitt, R.; Garnier, D.

    1996-01-01

    Structural components of a DEMO-blanket are subjected during service to alternating thermal and mechanical stresses as a consequence of the pulsed reactor operation. Of particular concern is the fatigue endurance of martensitic steels like MANET under cyclic strains and stresses produced by these temperature changes. In order to design such structures, operating under combined mechanical and thermal cycling, fatigue life has to be calculated with reasonable accuracy. This paper proposes a description of thermal and isothermal mechanical low-cycle fatigue of MANET I and II steels using a single damage model, including plastic strain, temperature and strain rate as variables. This model presents notable advantages for the designer. As it corresponds to a single and continuous 'fatigue strength surface', it enables a reliable interpolation to be made throughout the studied domain of strains and temperatures, and allows for a reasonable extrapolation out of this domain, provided that no different metallurgical phenomena occur. (orig.)

  7. Finite Element Modeling of Thermal Cycling Induced Microcracking in Carbon/Epoxy Triaxial Braided Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chao; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Morscher, Gregory; Martin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The microcrack distribution and mass change in PR520/T700s and 3502/T700s carbon/epoxy braided composites exposed to thermal cycling was evaluated experimentally. Acoustic emission was utilized to record the crack initiation and propagation under cyclic thermal loading between -55 C and 120 C. Transverse microcrack morphology was investigated using X-ray Computed Tomography. Different performance of two kinds of composites was discovered and analyzed. Based on the observations of microcrack formation, a meso-mechanical finite element model was developed to obtain the resultant mechanical properties. The simulation results exhibited a decrease in strength and stiffness with increasing crack density. Strength and stiffness reduction versus crack densities in different orientations were compared. The changes of global mechanical behavior in both axial and transverse loading conditions were studied. Keywords: Thermal cycles; Microcrack; Finite Element Model; Braided Composite

  8. Transport properties of MnTe films with cracks produced in thermal cycling process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Liang; Wang, Zhenhua; Zhang, Zhidong [Institute of Metal Research, University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang National Laboratory for Materials Science, Shenyang (China)

    2017-10-15

    As a promising material in antiferromagnetic spintronics, MnTe films manifested complex characteristics according to previous reports. In this work, we investigate in details the temperature dependence of resistivity of MnTe films grown on SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate and focus on the divaricating of cooling and warming resistivity-temperature (R-T) curves. It is found that such a divaricating in resistivity is associated with cracks produced in thermal cycles. By comparing the crystalline character and the morphology before and after the cycles, we verify the appearance of cracks and the release of stress in the films. Based on the temperature dependence of thermal-expansion coefficient of Si and MnTe, the origin of the cracks is the mismatched thermal-expansion coefficient (α). The humps, which only appear in the R-T curve of the first cooling process, are attributed to the produced cracks and/or the unreleased stress. (orig.)

  9. Generic Repository Concepts and Thermal Analysis for Advanced Fuel Cycles - 12477

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardin, Ernest [Sandia National Laboratories, P.O. Box 5800 MS 0736, Albuquerque, NM 87185 (United States); Blink, James [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, P.O. Box 808, Livermore, CA 94551-0808 (United States); Carter, Joe [Savannah River National Laboratory, Savannah River Site, Aiken, SC 29808 (United States); Fratoni, Massimiliano; Greenberg, Harris; Sutton, Mark [Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (United States); Howard, Robert [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    A geologic disposal concept for spent nuclear fuel (SNF) or high-level waste (HLW) consists of three components: waste inventory, geologic setting, and concept of operations. A set of reference geologic disposal concepts has been developed by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Used Fuel Disposition campaign. Reference concepts are identified for crystalline rock, clay/shale, bedded salt, and deep borehole (crystalline basement) geologic settings. These were analyzed for waste inventory cases representing a range of waste types that could be produced by advanced nuclear fuel cycles. Concepts of operation consisting of emplacement mode, repository layout, and engineered barrier descriptions, were selected based on international progress. All of these disposal concepts are enclosed emplacement modes, whereby waste packages are in direct contact with encapsulating engineered or natural materials. Enclosed modes have less capacity to dissipate heat than open modes such as that proposed for a repository at Yucca Mountain. Thermal analysis has identified important relationships between waste package size and capacity, and the duration of surface decay storage needed to meet temperature limits for different disposal concepts. For the crystalline rock and clay/shale repository concepts, a waste package surface temperature limit of 100 deg. C was assumed to prevent changes in clay-based buffer material or clay-rich host rock. Surface decay storage of 50 to 100 years is needed for disposal of high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR packages, or disposal of HLW glass from reprocessing LWR uranium oxide (UOX) fuel. High-level waste (HLW) from reprocessing of metal fuel used in a fast reactor could be disposed after decay storage of 50 years or less. For disposal in salt the rock thermal conductivity is significantly greater, and higher temperatures (200 deg. C) can be tolerated at the waste package surface. Decay storage of 10 years or less is needed for high-burnup LWR SNF in 4-PWR

  10. GEM, Fuel Cycle Cost and Economics for Thermal Reactor, Present Worth Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hughes, J.A.; Hang, D.F.

    1974-01-01

    1- Description of problem or function: GEM is used to predict fuel cycle costs for any type nuclear system (i.e., BWR, HTGR, PWR, LMFBR, GCFR,... ). The current version is limited to thermal reactors. GEM is designed for production use by large utilities which have several reactor types on their system. GEM has been written so as to accommodate all major fuel management activities undertaken by a utility - (1) fuel bid analysis, (2) evaluation of actual day to day operation, and (3) system simulation and optimization studies. 2 - Method of solution: Costs are calculated using present-worth techniques and continuous compounding. The equations are based on an investor-owned utility capitalization structure which easily covers the range of industrial, private, and public (government) owned utilities. Three distinct types of analysis (cash flow, allocated costs, yearly cash flow) are performed, each yielding identical results. Using these as a basis many other analyses are undertaken. 3 - Restrictions on the complexity of the problem: Dimensions of all arrays are carried as variables throughout the analysis. The maximum size of each array is set by the user in program MAIN. Current values are set so that maxima are: 50 batches per case study, 20 year batch life, 30 year case study, 120 batch burn time-steps, 20 individual payments (sales) associated with each cost component

  11. Solar panel thermal cycling testing by solar simulation and infrared radiation methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nuss, H. E.

    1980-01-01

    For the solar panels of the European Space Agency (ESA) satellites OTS/MAROTS and ECS/MARECS the thermal cycling tests were performed by using solar simulation methods. The performance data of two different solar simulators used and the thermal test results are described. The solar simulation thermal cycling tests for the ECS/MARECS solar panels were carried out with the aid of a rotatable multipanel test rig by which simultaneous testing of three solar panels was possible. As an alternative thermal test method, the capability of an infrared radiation method was studied and infrared simulation tests for the ultralight panel and the INTELSAT 5 solar panels were performed. The setup and the characteristics of the infrared radiation unit using a quartz lamp array of approx. 15 sq and LN2-cooled shutter and the thermal test results are presented. The irradiation uniformity, the solar panel temperature distribution, temperature changing rates for both test methods are compared. Results indicate the infrared simulation is an effective solar panel thermal testing method.

  12. Structural-Phase Transformations of CuZn Alloy Under Thermal-Impact Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Chaplygina, A. A.; Kulagina, V. V.; Chaplygin, P. A.; Starostenkov, M. D.; Grinkevich, L. S.

    2017-02-01

    Using the Monte Carlo method, special features of structural - phase transformations in β-brass are investigated during thermal impact using thermal cycling as an example (a number of successive order - disorder and disorder - order phase transitions in the course of several heating - cooling cycles). It is shown that a unique hysteresis is observed after every heating and cooling cycle, whose presence indicates irreversibility of the processes, which suggests a difference in the structural - phase states both in the heating and cooling stages. A conclusion is drawn that the structural - phase transformations in the heating and cooling stages occur within different temperature intervals, where the thermodynamic stimuli of one or the other structural - phase state are low. This is also demonstrated both in the plots of configurational energy, long- and short-range order parameter, atomic structure variations, and structural - phase state distributions. Simultaneously, there coexist ordered and disordered phases and a certain collection of superstructure domains. This implies the presence of low - stability states in the vicinity of the order - disorder phase transition. The results of investigations demonstrate that the structural - phase transitions within two successive heating and cooling cycles at the same temperature are different in both stages. These changes, though not revolutionary, occur in every cycle and decrease with the increasing cycle number. In fact, the system undergoes training with a tendency towards a certain sequence of structural - phase states.

  13. Effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformation and mechanical strengthening of stainless steels – A phase-field study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yeddu, Hemantha Kumar; Shaw, Brian A.; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2017-01-01

    A 3D elastoplastic phase-field model is used to study the effect of thermal cycling on martensitic transformationas well as on mechanical strengthening of both austenite and martensite in stainless steel. The results show that with an increasing number of thermal cycles, martensite becomes more...

  14. Friction induced hunting limit cycles : a comparison between the LuGre and switch friction model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hensen, R.H.A.; Molengraft, van de M.J.G.; Steinbuch, M.

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, friction induced limit cycles are predicted for a simple motion system consisting of a motor-driven inertia subjected to friction and a PID-controlled regulator task. The two friction models used, i.e., (i) the dynamic LuGre friction model and (ii) the static switch friction model,

  15. Limit cycles bifurcating from the periodic annulus of cubic homogeneous polynomial centers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaume Llibre

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We obtain an explicit polynomial whose simple positive real roots provide the limit cycles which bifurcate from the periodic orbits of any cubic homogeneous polynomial center when it is perturbed inside the class of all polynomial differential systems of degree n.

  16. Coexistence of algebraic and non-algebraic limit cycles for quintic polynomial differential systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Bendjeddou

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the work by Gine and Grau [11], a planar differential system of degree nine admitting a nested configuration formed by an algebraic and a non-algebraic limit cycles explicitly given was presented. As an improvement, we obtain by a new method a similar result for a family of quintic polynomial differential systems.

  17. Explosion of limit cycles and chaotic waves in a simple nonlinear chemical system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøns, Morten; Sturis, Jeppe

    2001-01-01

    A model of an autocatalytic chemical reaction was employed to study the explosion of limit cycles and chaotic waves in a nonlinear chemical system. The bifurcation point was determined using asymptotic analysis and perturbations. Scaling laws for amplitude and period were derived. A strong sensit...... sensitivity was introduced due to bifurcation to infinity resulting in chaotic dynamics on adding diffusion....

  18. Circadian rhythms in the cell cycle and biomass composition of Neochloris oleoabundans under nitrogen limitation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter, de L.; Schepers, L.W.; Cuaresma Franco, M.; Barbosa, M.J.; Martens, D.E.; Wijffels, R.H.

    2014-01-01

    The circadian clock schedules processes in microalgae cells at suitable times in the day/night cycle. To gain knowledge about these biological time schedules, Neochloris oleoabundans was grown under constant light conditions and nitrogen limitation. Under these constant conditions, the only variable

  19. Thermal enhancement of charge and discharge cycles for adsorbed natural gas storage

    KAUST Repository

    Rahman, Kazi Afzalur

    2011-07-01

    The usage of adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage is hindered by the thermal management during the adsorption and desorption processes. An effective thermal enhancement is thus essential for the development of the ANG technology and the motivation for this study is the investigation of a gas storage system with internal thermal control. We employed a fin-tube type heat exchanger that is placed in a pressurized cylinder. A distributed-parameter model is used for the theoretical modeling and simulations are conducted at assorted charging and discharging conditions. These studies included the transient thermal behaviours of the elements within the ANG-charged cylinder and parameters such as pressure and temperature profiles of adsorbent have been obtained during charge and discharge cycles, and results are compared with a conventional compressed methane vessel. © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Thermal Stability of Hexamethyldisiloxane (MM for High-Temperature Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Preißinger

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The design of efficient Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC units for the usage of industrial waste heat at high temperatures requires direct contact evaporators without intermediate thermal oil circuits. Therefore, the thermal stability of high-temperature working fluids gains importance. In this study, the thermal degradation of hexamethyldisiloxane (MM is investigated in an electrically heated tube. Qualitative results concerning remarks on degradation products as well as quantitative results like the annual degradation rate are presented. It is shown that MM is stable up to a temperature of 300 °C with annual degradation rates of less than 3.5%. Furthermore, the break of a silicon–carbon bond can be a main chemical reaction that influences the thermal degradation. Finally, it is discussed how the results may impact the future design of ORC units.

  1. Failure Mechanisms of SAC/Fe-Ni Solder Joints During Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Li-Yin; Liu, Zhi-Quan; Li, Cai-Fu

    2017-08-01

    Thermal cycling tests have been conducted on Sn-Ag-Cu/Fe- xNi ( x = 73 wt.% or 45 wt.%) and Sn-Ag-Cu/Cu solder joints according to the Joint Electron Device Engineering Council industrial standard to study their interfacial reliability under thermal stress. The interfacial intermetallic compounds formed for solder joints on Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni were 4.5 μm, 1.7 μm, and 1.4 μm thick, respectively, after 3000 cycles, demonstrating excellent diffusion barrier effect of Fe-Ni under bump metallization (UBM). Also, two deformation modes, viz. solder extrusion and fatigue crack formation, were observed by scanning electron microscopy and three-dimensional x-ray microscopy. Solder extrusion dominated for solder joints on Cu, while fatigue cracks dominated for solder joints on Fe-45Ni and both modes were detected for those on Fe-73Ni. Solder joints on Fe-Ni presented inferior reliability during thermal cycling compared with those on Cu, with characteristic lifetime of 3441 h, 3190 h, and 1247 h for Cu, Fe-73Ni, and Fe-45Ni UBM, respectively. This degradation of the interfacial reliability for solder joints on Fe-Ni is attributed to the mismatch in coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) at interconnection level. The CTE mismatch at microstructure level was also analyzed by electron backscatter diffraction for clearer identification of recrystallization-related deformation mechanisms.

  2. Re-austenitisation of chromium-bearing pressure vessel steels during the weld thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, Druce; Li, Huijun; Jones, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Steels with chromium contents between 0.5 and 12 wt% are commonly used for fabrication of creep resistant pressure vessels (PV) for the power generation industry. Most of these steels are susceptible to Type IV creep failure in the intercritical and/ or grain refined regions of the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the parent metal. The re-austenitisation process plays a central role in establishing the transformed microstructures and the creep resistance of the various sub-zones of the HAZ. The high alloy content and the presence of alloy-rich carbides in the as-supplied parent plate can significantly retard the kinetics of transformation to austenite, resulting in both incomplete austenitisation and inhomogeneous austenite. Overlapping weld thermal cycles in multi-pass welds add further complexity to the progressive development of microstructure over the course of the welding process. In order to clarify structural evolution, thermal simulation has been used to study the effects of successive thermal cycles on the structures and properties of the HAZ of 2.25Cr-1Mo steel. The results showed that, before post-weld heat treatment (PWHT), the HAZ microstructures and properties, particularly in doubly reheated sub-zones, were highly heterogeneous and differed markedly from those of the base steel. It is concluded that close control of the thermal cycle by pre-heat, weld heat input and post-heat is necessary to obtain a heat affected zone with microstructures and properties compatible with those of the base plate.

  3. Weldability examination of ASTM A 240 S41500 martensitic stainless steel by thermal cycles simulation testings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto Velázquez-del Rosario

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The weldability assets of ASTM A 240 S41500 (ASTM A 240/A 240M martensitic stainless steel are presented through the study of the effects of single and double thermal weld cycles on mechanical properties and microstructure of base metal (BM and the artificial heat affected zone (HAZ created by thermal weld simulations. For single cycles, separate peak temperatures of 1000 ºC/12 s and 1350 ºC/12 s (cooling times: 12 s in both cases were evaluated, whilst two combinations of peak temperatures: (1350 ºC/5 s + 1000 ºC/5 s ºC and (1350 ºC/12 s + 1000 ºC/12 s ºC (cooling times: 5 s and 12 s, were applied for double cycles. Post weld heat treatment (PWHT with short and long holding times were applied and Vickers hardness, impact toughness and metallographic examinations were used in order to assess mechanical and metallographic properties in the as-simulated (no heat treated and postweld heat treated conditions. Best properties of the welded joint for double thermal weld cycles with long holding times were reached, which reveals the good weldability and applicability of the tested material in post weld heat treated conditions.

  4. Thermal Stress Limit Rafting Migration of Seahorses: Prediction Based on Physiological and Behavioral Responses to Thermal Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, G.; Li, C.; Lin, Q.

    2017-12-01

    Marine fish species escape from harmful environment by migration. Seahorses, with upright posture and low mobility, could migrate from unfavorable environment by rafting with their prehensile tail. The present study was designed to examine the tolerance of lined seahorse Hippocampus erectus to thermal stress and evaluate the effects of temperature on seahorse migration. The results figured that seahorses' tolerance to thermal stress was time dependent. Acute thermal stress (30°C) increased breathing rate and HSP genes expression significantly, but didn't affect seahorse feeding behavior. Chronic thermal treatment lead to persistent high expression of HSP genes, higher breathing rate, and decreasing feeding, and final higher mortality, suggesting that seahorse cannot adapt to thermal stress by acclimation. No significant negative effects were found in seahorse reproduction in response to chronic thermal stress. Given that seahorses make much slower migration by rafting on sea surface compared to other fishes, we suggest that thermal stress might limit seahorse migration range. and the influence might be magnified by global warming in future.

  5. Can Oxygen Set Thermal Limits in an Insect and Drive Gigantism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberk, Wilco C. E. P.; Bilton, David T.

    2011-01-01

    Background Thermal limits may arise through a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand in a range of animal taxa. Whilst this oxygen limitation hypothesis is supported by data from a range of marine fish and invertebrates, its generality remains contentious. In particular, it is unclear whether oxygen limitation determines thermal extremes in tracheated arthropods, where oxygen limitation may be unlikely due to the efficiency and plasticity of tracheal systems in supplying oxygen directly to metabolically active tissues. Although terrestrial taxa with open tracheal systems may not be prone to oxygen limitation, species may be affected during other life-history stages, particularly if these rely on diffusion into closed tracheal systems. Furthermore, a central role for oxygen limitation in insects is envisaged within a parallel line of research focussing on insect gigantism in the late Palaeozoic. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we examine thermal maxima in the aquatic life stages of an insect at normoxia, hypoxia (14 kPa) and hyperoxia (36 kPa). We demonstrate that upper thermal limits do indeed respond to external oxygen supply in the aquatic life stages of the stonefly Dinocras cephalotes, suggesting that the critical thermal limits of such aquatic larvae are set by oxygen limitation. This could result from impeded oxygen delivery, or limited oxygen regulatory capacity, both of which have implications for our understanding of the limits to insect body size and how these are influenced by atmospheric oxygen levels. Conclusions/Significance These findings extend the generality of the hypothesis of oxygen limitation of thermal tolerance, suggest that oxygen constraints on body size may be stronger in aquatic environments, and that oxygen toxicity may have actively selected for gigantism in the aquatic stages of Carboniferous arthropods. PMID:21818347

  6. Can oxygen set thermal limits in an insect and drive gigantism?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilco C E P Verberk

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Thermal limits may arise through a mismatch between oxygen supply and demand in a range of animal taxa. Whilst this oxygen limitation hypothesis is supported by data from a range of marine fish and invertebrates, its generality remains contentious. In particular, it is unclear whether oxygen limitation determines thermal extremes in tracheated arthropods, where oxygen limitation may be unlikely due to the efficiency and plasticity of tracheal systems in supplying oxygen directly to metabolically active tissues. Although terrestrial taxa with open tracheal systems may not be prone to oxygen limitation, species may be affected during other life-history stages, particularly if these rely on diffusion into closed tracheal systems. Furthermore, a central role for oxygen limitation in insects is envisaged within a parallel line of research focussing on insect gigantism in the late Palaeozoic. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we examine thermal maxima in the aquatic life stages of an insect at normoxia, hypoxia (14 kPa and hyperoxia (36 kPa. We demonstrate that upper thermal limits do indeed respond to external oxygen supply in the aquatic life stages of the stonefly Dinocras cephalotes, suggesting that the critical thermal limits of such aquatic larvae are set by oxygen limitation. This could result from impeded oxygen delivery, or limited oxygen regulatory capacity, both of which have implications for our understanding of the limits to insect body size and how these are influenced by atmospheric oxygen levels. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings extend the generality of the hypothesis of oxygen limitation of thermal tolerance, suggest that oxygen constraints on body size may be stronger in aquatic environments, and that oxygen toxicity may have actively selected for gigantism in the aquatic stages of Carboniferous arthropods.

  7. Thermal modelling of Li-ion polymer battery for electric vehicle drive cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacko, Salvio; Chung, Yongmann M.

    2012-09-01

    Time-dependent, thermal behaviour of a lithium-ion (Li-ion) polymer cell has been modelled for electric vehicle (EV) drive cycles with a view to developing an effective battery thermal management system. The fully coupled, three-dimensional transient electro-thermal model has been implemented based on a finite volume method. To support the numerical study, a high energy density Li-ion polymer pouch cell was tested in a climatic chamber for electric load cycles consisting of various charge and discharge rates, and a good agreement was found between the model predictions and the experimental data. The cell-level thermal behaviour under stressful conditions such as high power draw and high ambient temperature was predicted with the model. A significant temperature increase was observed in the stressful condition, corresponding to a repeated acceleration and deceleration, indicating that an effective battery thermal management system would be required to maintain the optimal cell performance and also to achieve a full battery lifesapn.

  8. A novel Carnot-based cycle for ocean thermal energy conversion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semmari, Hamza; Stitou, Driss; Mauran, Sylvain

    2012-01-01

    A thermodynamic engine cycle can be implemented by exploiting the temperature difference existing between the warm surface seawater and cold deep seawater. It employs a working fluid that evaporates by warm seawater, produces work in an expander device, such as a gas turbine and finally condenses by cold deep seawater. A new Carnot-based cycle for OTEC applications, called CAPILI cycle is presented. In this new engine cycle, work is produced by the movement of an inert liquid through a hydraulic turbine. This inert liquid characterized by a very low saturation pressure and immiscibility with the working fluid, acts as a liquid piston that moves alternately between two insulated cylinders. The insulated cylinders are connected alternately to an evaporator and a condenser, each of them operates at different pressure and temperature levels. A performance study which consists in a steady state energy balance is realised first to select the most suitable working fluid for this specific application. It was found that the best fluid is the HFC refrigerant R134a. A dynamic modelling based on the concept of equivalent Gibbs system is carried out to appreciate the dynamic behaviour and the performances of this new thermal conversion process. -- Highlights: ► A novel Carnot-based cycle operating with a liquid piston is investigated for OTEC application. ► The most suitable working fluid giving the best performances is found to be the HFC R134a. ► The performances of this new thermal process are evaluated using a dynamic modelling. ► A thermal efficiency of 1.9% can be obtained by exploiting seawater temperature difference of 20 °C. ► A net cycle efficiency of 1.2% is achieved considering a net to gross power production ratio of 61%.

  9. Notch size effects on high cycle fatigue limit stress of Udimet 720

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ren Weiju; Nicholas, Theodore

    2003-01-01

    Notch size effects on the high cycle fatigue (HCF) limit stress of Ni-base superalloy Udimet 720 were investigated on cylindrical specimens with three notch sizes of the same stress concentration factor K t =2.74. The HCF limit stress corresponding to a life of 10 6 cycles was experimentally determined at a stress ratio of 0.1 and a frequency of 25 Hz at room temperature. The stresses were calculated using finite element analysis (FEA) and the specimens analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Test results show that at the same K t value, notch size can slightly affect the HCF limit stress of U720 when notch root plasticity occurs. FEA and SEM results reveal that the notch size effects are influenced by a complicated combination of the stress and plastic strain fields at the notch tip, the nominal stress, and the effects of prior plastic deformation on fatigue crack initiation

  10. Martensitic transformation in an intergranular corrosion area of austenitic stainless steel during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    La Fontaine, Alexandre; Yen, Hung-Wei; Trimby, Patrick; Moody, Steven; Miller, Sarah; Chensee, Martin; Ringer, Simon; Cairney, Julie

    2014-01-01

    An oxidation-assisted martensitic phase transformation was observed in an austenitic stainless steel after thermal cycling up to 970 °C in air in a solar thermal steam reformer. The intergranular corrosion areas were investigated by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), transmission Kikuchi diffraction (TKD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The structural-and-chemical maps revealed that within intergranular corrosion areas this martensitic transformation primarily occurs in oxidation-induced chromium-depleted zones, rather than due to only sensitization. This displacive transformation may also play a significant role in the rate at which intergranular corrosion takes place

  11. Thermal analysis of heat and power plant with high temperature reactor and intermediate steam cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fic Adam

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermal analysis of a heat and power plant with a high temperature gas cooled nuclear reactor is presented. The main aim of the considered system is to supply a technological process with the heat at suitably high temperature level. The considered unit is also used to produce electricity. The high temperature helium cooled nuclear reactor is the primary heat source in the system, which consists of: the reactor cooling cycle, the steam cycle and the gas heat pump cycle. Helium used as a carrier in the first cycle (classic Brayton cycle, which includes the reactor, delivers heat in a steam generator to produce superheated steam with required parameters of the intermediate cycle. The intermediate cycle is provided to transport energy from the reactor installation to the process installation requiring a high temperature heat. The distance between reactor and the process installation is assumed short and negligable, or alternatively equal to 1 km in the analysis. The system is also equipped with a high temperature argon heat pump to obtain the temperature level of a heat carrier required by a high temperature process. Thus, the steam of the intermediate cycle supplies a lower heat exchanger of the heat pump, a process heat exchanger at the medium temperature level and a classical steam turbine system (Rankine cycle. The main purpose of the research was to evaluate the effectiveness of the system considered and to assess whether such a three cycle cogeneration system is reasonable. Multivariant calculations have been carried out employing the developed mathematical model. The results have been presented in a form of the energy efficiency and exergy efficiency of the system as a function of the temperature drop in the high temperature process heat exchanger and the reactor pressure.

  12. Advance reactor and fuel-cycle systems--potentials and limitations for United States utilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zebroski, E.L.; Williams, R.F.

    1979-01-01

    This paper reviews the potential benefits and limitations of advance reactor and fuel-cycle systems for United States utilities. The results of the review of advanced technologies show that for the near and midterm, the only advance reactor and fuel-cycle system with significant potential for United States utilities is the current LWR, and evolutionary, not revolutionary, enhancements. For the long term, the liquid-metal breeder reactor continues to be the most promising advance nuclear option. The major factors leading to this conclusion are summarized

  13. Radiation and Thermal Cycling Effects on EPC1001 Gallium Nitride Power Transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Scheick, Leif Z.; Lauenstein, Jean M.; Casey, Megan C.; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2012-01-01

    Electronics designed for use in NASA space missions are required to work efficiently and reliably under harsh environment conditions. These include radiation, extreme temperatures, and thermal cycling, to name a few. Information pertaining to performance of electronic parts and systems under hostile environments is very scarce, especially for new devices. Such data is very critical so that proper design is implemented in order to ensure mission success and to mitigate risks associated with exposure of on-board systems to the operational environment. In this work, newly-developed enhancement-mode field effect transistors (FET) based on gallium nitride (GaN) technology were exposed to various particles of ionizing radiation and to long-term thermal cycling over a wide temperature range. Data obtained on control (un-irradiated) and irradiated samples of these power transistors are presented and the results are discussed.

  14. Limits on the thermal energy release from radioactive wastes in a mined geologic repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scott, J.A.

    1983-03-01

    The theraml energy release of nuclear wastes is a major factor in the design of geologic repositories. Thermal limits need to be placed on various aspets of the geologic waste disposal system to avoid or retard the degradation of repository performance because of increased temperatures. The thermal limits in current use today are summarized in this report. These limits are placed in a hierarchial structure of thermal criteria consistent with the failure mechanism they are trying to prevent. The thermal criteria hierarchy is used to evaluate the thermal performance of a sample repository design. The design consists of disassembled BWR spent fuel, aged 10 years, close packed in a carbon steel canister with 15 cm of crushed salt backfill. The medium is bedded salt. The most-restrictive temperature for this design is the spent-fuel centerline temperature limit of 300 0 C. A sensitivity study on the effects of additional cooling prior to disposal on repository thermal limits and design is performed

  15. Critical thermal limits affected differently by developmental and adult thermal fluctuations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Salachan, Paul Vinu; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2017-01-01

    the developmental and adult life stages. For developmental acclimation, we found mildly detrimental effects of high amplitude fluctuations for critical thermal minima, while the critical thermal maxima showed a beneficial response to higher amplitude fluctuations. For adult acclimation involving shifts between...... fluctuating and constant regimes, cold tolerance was shown to be dictated by developmental temperature conditions irrespective of the adult treatments, while the acquired heat tolerance was readily lost when flies developed at fluctuating temperature were shifted to a constant regime as adults. Interestingly......, we also found that effect of fluctuations at any life stage was gradually lost with prolonged adult maintenance suggesting a more prominent effect of fluctuations during developmental compared to adult acclimation in Drosophila melanogaster....

  16. An integrated solar thermal power system using intercooled gas turbine and Kalina cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peng, Shuo; Hong, Hui; Jin, Hongguang; Wang, Zhifeng

    2012-01-01

    A new solar tower thermal power system integrating the intercooled gas turbine top cycle and the Kalina bottoming cycle is proposed in the present paper. The thermodynamic performance of the proposed system is investigated, and the irreversibility of energy conversion is disclosed using the energy–utilization diagram method. On the top cycle of the proposed system, the compressed air after being intercooled is heated at 1000 °C or higher at the solar tower receiver and is used to drive the gas turbine to generate power. The ammonia–water mixture as the working substance of the bottom cycle recovers the waste heat from the gas turbine to generate power. A concise analytical formula of solar-to-electric efficiency of the proposed system is developed. As a result, the peak solar-to-electric efficiency of the proposed system is 27.5% at a gas turbine inlet temperature of 1000 °C under the designed solar direct normal irradiance of 800 W/m 2 . Compared with a conventional solar power tower plant, the proposed integrated system conserves approximately 69% of consumed water. The results obtained in the current study provide an approach to improve solar-to-electric efficiency and offer a potential to conserve water for solar thermal power plants in arid area. -- Highlights: ► An Integrated Solar Thermal Power System is modeled. ► A formula forecasting the thermodynamic performance is proposed. ► The irreversibility of energy conversion is disclosed using an energy utilization method. ► The effect of key operational parameters on thermal performance is examined.

  17. Thermal Cycling and High-Temperature Corrosion Tests of Rare Earth Silicate Environmental Barrier Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darthout, Émilien; Gitzhofer, François

    2017-12-01

    Lutetium and yttrium silicates, enriched with an additional secondary zirconia phase, environmental barrier coatings were synthesized by the solution precursor plasma spraying process on silicon carbide substrates. A custom-made oven was designed for thermal cycling and water vapor corrosion testing. The oven can test four specimens simultaneously and allows to evaluate environmental barrier performances under similar corrosion kinetics compared to turbine engines. Coatings structural evolution has been observed by SEM on the polished cross sections, and phase composition has been analyzed by XRD. All coatings have been thermally cycled between 1300 °C and the ambient temperature, without spallation, due to their porosity and the presence of additional secondary phase which increases the thermal cycling resistance. During water vapor exposure at 1200 °C, rare earth disilicates showed a good stability, which is contradictory with the literature, due to impurities—such as Si- and Al-hydroxides—in the water vapor jets. The presence of vertical cracks allowed the water vapor to reach the substrate and then to corrode it. It has been observed that thin vertical cracks induced some spallation after 24 h of corrosion.

  18. Endurance of lead-free assembly under board level drop test and thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Yanghua [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)], E-mail: xia_yanghua@hotmail.com; Xie Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2008-06-12

    The reliability of lead-free electronic assemblies under board level drop test and thermal cycling was investigated. TSOP (thin small outline package) devices with FeNi leads were reflow soldered on FR4 PCB (printed circuit board) with Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu (wt%) solder. The effects of different PCB finishes (organic solderability preservative (OSP) and electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG)) on the reliability performance were studied. The results show that the assemblies with ENIG finishes reveal better reliability performance than its OSP counterparts under drop test, however, the OSP samples outperform those with ENIG finishes under thermal cycling. The failure mechanism is different under these two test conditions: the solder joints fracture into the intermetallic compounds (IMCs) layer under drop test, and cracks initiate in the bulk solder under thermal cycling. The surface finishes have an effect on the failure mode. The propagation of crack in the ENIG case is along the device/solder interface, while in the case of OSP, the crack extends parallel to the solder/PCB interface.

  19. Sensitivity of LWR fuel cycle costs to uncertainties in detailed thermal cross sections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryskamp, J.M.; Becker, M.; Harris, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Cross sections averaged over the thermal energy (< 1 or 2 eV) group have been shown to have an important economic role for light-water reactors. Cost implications of thermal cross section uncertainties at the few-group level were reported earlier. When it has been determined that costs are sensitive to a specific thermal-group cross section, it becomes desirable to determine how specific energy-dependent cross sections influence fuel cycle costs. Multigroup cross-section sensitivity coefficients vary with fuel exposure. By changing the shape of a cross section displayed on a view-tube through an interactive graphics system, one can compute the change in few-group cross section using the exposure dependent sensitivity coefficients. With the changed exposure dependent few-group cross section, a new fuel cycle cost is computed by a sequence of batch depletion, core analysis, and fuel batch cost code modules. Fuel cycle costs are generally most sensitive to cross section uncertainties near the peak of the hardened Maxwellian flux

  20. Determining passive cooling limits in CPV using an analytical thermal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gualdi, Federico; Arenas, Osvaldo; Vossier, Alexis; Dollet, Alain; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard

    2013-09-01

    We propose an original thermal analytical model aiming to predict the practical limits of passive cooling systems for high concentration photovoltaic modules. The analytical model is described and validated by comparison with a commercial 3D finite element model. The limiting performances of flat plate cooling systems in natural convection are then derived and discussed.

  1. Measured Thermal and Fast Neutron Fluence Rates for ATF-1 Holders During ATR Cycle 157D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 157D which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains measurements of the fluence rates corresponding to the particular elevations relative to the 80-ft. core elevation. The data in this report consist of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution.

  2. Evaluation of the energy efficiency of combined cycle gas turbine. Case study of Tashkent thermal power plant, Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aminov, Zarif; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Xuan, Tran Dang; Higashi, Osamu; Alikulov, Khusniddin

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The combined cycle power plant (CCPP) has a steam turbine and a gas turbine. • Fossil fuel savings and reduction of the CCGT of was evaluated. • The performance of a three pressure CCGT is modelled under different modes. • Energy efficiency of the combined cycle was 58.28%. • An annual reduction of 1760.18 tNO_x/annum and 981.25 ktCO_2/annum can be achieved. - Abstract: The power generation of Tashkent Thermal Power Plant (TPP) is based on conventional power units. Moreover, the facility suffers from limited efficiency in electricity generation. The plant was constructed during the Soviet era. Furthermore, the power plant is being used for inter-hour power generation regulation. As a result, the efficiency can be reduced by increasing specific fuel consumption. This research focuses on the evaluation of the energy efficiency of the combined cycle gas turbine (CCGT) for the Tashkent TPP. Specifically, the objective is an evaluation of fossil fuel savings and reduction of CO_2 and NO_x emissions with the using CCGT technology at conventional power plant. The proposed combined cycle power plant (CCPP) includes an existing steam turbine (ST) with 160 MW capacity, heat recovery steam generator (HRSG), and gas turbine (GT) technology with 300 MW capacity. The performance of a three pressure CCGT is modelled under different modes. As a result, the efficiency of the combined cycle was evaluated at 58.28%, while the conventional cycle had an efficiency of 34.5%. We can achieve an annual reduction of 1760.18 tNO_x/annum and 981.25 ktCO_2/annum.

  3. Structurally optimized analogs of the retrograde trafficking inhibitor Retro-2cycl limit Leishmania infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Evan; Huyghues-Despointes, Charles-Eugene; Yu, Chun; Handy, Emma L; Sello, Jason K; Kima, Peter E

    2017-05-01

    In infected mammalian cells, Leishmania parasites reside within specialized compartments called parasitophorous vacuoles (LPVs). We have previously shown that Retro-2, a member of a novel class of small retrograde pathway inhibitors caused reduced LPV sizes and lower parasite numbers during experimental L. mexicana sp. infections. The purpose of this study was to determine if structural analogs of Retro-2cycl reported to have superior potency in the inhibition of retrograde pathway-dependent phenomena (i.e., polyomavirus cellular infection by polyomavrius and Shiga toxin trafficking in cells) are also more effective than the parent compound at controlling Leishmania infections. In addition to their effects on LPV development, we show that two optimized analogs of Retro-2cycl, DHQZ 36 and DHQZ 36.1 limit Leishmania amazonensis infection in macrophages at EC50 of 13.63+/-2.58μM and10.57+/-2.66μM, respectively, which is significantly lower than 40.15μM the EC50 of Retro-2cycl. In addition, these analogs caused a reversal in Leishmania induced suppression of IL-6 release by infected cells after LPS activation. Moreover, we show that in contrast to Retro-2cycl that is Leishmania static, the analogs can kill Leishmania parasites in axenic cultures, which is a desirable attribute for any drug to treat Leishmania infections. Together, these studies validate and extend the published structure-activity relationship analyses of Retro-2cycl.

  4. Limit cycles and the benefits of a short memory in rock-paper-scissors games

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, James

    2015-10-01

    When playing games in groups, it is an advantage for individuals to have accurate statistical information on the strategies of their opponents. Such information may be obtained by remembering previous interactions. We consider a rock-paper-scissors game in which agents are able to recall their last m interactions, used to estimate the behavior of their opponents. At critical memory length, a Hopf bifurcation leads to the formation of stable limit cycles. In a mixed population, agents with longer memories have an advantage, provided the system has a stable fixed point, and there is some asymmetry in the payoffs of the pure strategies. However, at a critical concentration of long memory agents, the appearance of limit cycles destroys their advantage. By introducing population dynamics that favors successful agents, we show that the system evolves toward the bifurcation point.

  5. Limit cycles via higher order perturbations for some piecewise differential systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzi, Claudio A.; Lima, Maurício Firmino Silva; Torregrosa, Joan

    2018-05-01

    A classical perturbation problem is the polynomial perturbation of the harmonic oscillator, (x‧ ,y‧) =(- y + εf(x , y , ε) , x + εg(x , y , ε)) . In this paper we study the limit cycles that bifurcate from the period annulus via piecewise polynomial perturbations in two zones separated by a straight line. We prove that, for polynomial perturbations of degree n , no more than Nn - 1 limit cycles appear up to a study of order N. We also show that this upper bound is reached for orders one and two. Moreover, we study this problem in some classes of piecewise Liénard differential systems providing better upper bounds for higher order perturbation in ε, showing also when they are reached. The Poincaré-Pontryagin-Melnikov theory is the main technique used to prove all the results.

  6. Limit cycles and the benefits of a short memory in rock-paper-scissors games.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burridge, James

    2015-10-01

    When playing games in groups, it is an advantage for individuals to have accurate statistical information on the strategies of their opponents. Such information may be obtained by remembering previous interactions. We consider a rock-paper-scissors game in which agents are able to recall their last m interactions, used to estimate the behavior of their opponents. At critical memory length, a Hopf bifurcation leads to the formation of stable limit cycles. In a mixed population, agents with longer memories have an advantage, provided the system has a stable fixed point, and there is some asymmetry in the payoffs of the pure strategies. However, at a critical concentration of long memory agents, the appearance of limit cycles destroys their advantage. By introducing population dynamics that favors successful agents, we show that the system evolves toward the bifurcation point.

  7. Improvement of chemical control in the water-steam cycle of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rajakovic-Ognjanovic, Vladana N.; Zivojinovic, Dragana Z.; Grgur, Branimir N.; Rajakovic, Ljubinka V.

    2011-01-01

    A more effective chemical control in the water-steam cycle (WSC) of thermal power plants (TPP) is proposed in this paper. Minimization of corrosion effects by the production of ultra pure water and its strict control is the basis of all the investigated processes. The research involved the analysis of water samples in the WSC through key water quality parameters and by the most convenient analytical tools. The necessity for the stricter chemical control is demonstrated through a concrete example of the TPP Nikola Tesla, Serbia. After a thorough analysis of the chemical control system of the WSC, diagnostic and control parameters were chosen for continuous systematic measurements. Sodium and chloride ions were recognized as the ions which indicate the corrosion potential of the water and give insight into the proper production and maintenance of water within the WSC. Chemical transformations of crucial corrosion elements, iron and silica, were considered and related to their quantitative values. - Research highlights: → The more effective chemical control in the water-steam cycle of thermal power plant Nikola Tesla, Serbia. → In chemical control the diagnostic and control parameters were optimized and introduced for the systematic measurements in the water-steam cycle. → Sodium and chloride ions were recognized as ions which indicate corrosion potential of water and give insight to proper function of production and maintenance of water within water-team cycle. → Chemical transformations of crucial corrosion elements, iron and silica are considered and related with their quantitative values.

  8. Numerical Simulation Procedure for Modeling TGO Crack Propagation and TGO Growth in Thermal Barrier Coatings upon Thermal-Mechanical Cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Jun

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports a numerical simulation procedure to model crack propagation in TGO layer and TGO growth near a surface groove in metal substrate upon multiple thermal-mechanical cycles. The material property change method is employed to model TGO formation cycle by cycle, and the creep properties for constituent materials are also incorporated. Two columns of repeated nodes are placed along the interface of the potential crack, and these nodes are bonded together as one node at a geometrical location. In terms of critical crack opening displacement criterion, onset of crack propagation in TGO layer has been determined by finite element analyses in comparison with that without predefined crack. Then, according to the results from the previous analyses, the input values for the critical failure parameters for the subsequent analyses can be decided. The robust capabilities of restart analysis in ABAQUS help to implement the overall simulation for TGO crack propagation. The comparison of the TGO final deformation profile between numerical and experimental observation shows a good agreement indicating the correctness and effectiveness of the present procedure, which can guide the prediction of the failure in TGO for the future design and optimization for TBC system.

  9. ELMy-H mode as limit cycle and chaotic oscillations in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Sanae; Itoh, Kimitaka; Fukuyama, Atsushi.

    1991-06-01

    A model of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamaks is presented. A limit cycle solution is found in time-dependent Ginzburg Landau type model equation of L/H transition, which has a hysteresis curve between the plasma gradient and flux. The oscillation of edge density appears near the L/H transition boundary. Spatial structure of the intermediate state (mesophase) is obtained in the edge region. Chaotic oscillation is predicted due to random neutrals and external oscillations. (author)

  10. A Study on Stability of Limit Cycle Walking Model with Feet: Parameter Study

    OpenAIRE

    Yonggwon Jeon; Youn-sik Park; Youngjin Park

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, two kinds of feet, namely, curved and flat feet, are added to limit cycle walking model to investigate its stability properties. Although both models are already proposed and are investigated, most previous works are focused on efficiency and gait behaviors. Only the stability properties of the simplest walking model conceived Garcia et al. are well defined. Therefore, there is still a need for a precise research on the effect of feet, especially in the view of local stability,...

  11. ELMy-H mode as limit cycle and chaotic oscillations in tokamak plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh Sanae, I.; Itoh, Kimitaka; Fukuyama, Atsushi; Miura, Yukitoshi.

    1991-05-01

    A model of Edge Localized Modes (ELMs) in tokamak plasmas is presented. A limit cycle solution is found in the transport equation (time-dependent Ginzburg-Landau type), which a has hysteresis curve between the gradient and flux. Periodic oscillation of the particle outflux and L/H intermediate state are predicted near the L/H transition boundary. A mesophase in spatial structure appears near edge. Chaotic oscillation is also predicted. (author)

  12. Operating conditions of an open and direct solar thermal Brayton cycle with optimised cavity receiver and recuperator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, W.G.; Bello-Ochende, T.; Meyer, J.P.

    2011-01-01

    The small-scale open and direct solar thermal Brayton cycle with recuperator has several advantages, including low cost, low operation and maintenance costs and it is highly recommended. The main disadvantages of this cycle are the pressure losses in the recuperator and receiver, turbomachine efficiencies and recuperator effectiveness, which limit the net power output of such a system. The irreversibilities of the solar thermal Brayton cycle are mainly due to heat transfer across a finite temperature difference and fluid friction. In this paper, thermodynamic optimisation is applied to concentrate on these disadvantages in order to optimise the receiver and recuperator and to maximise the net power output of the system at various steady-state conditions, limited to various constraints. The effects of wind, receiver inclination, rim angle, atmospheric temperature and pressure, recuperator height, solar irradiance and concentration ratio on the optimum geometries and performance were investigated. The dynamic trajectory optimisation method was applied. Operating points of a standard micro-turbine operating at its highest compressor efficiency and a parabolic dish concentrator diameter of 16 m were considered. The optimum geometries, minimum irreversibility rates and maximum receiver surface temperatures of the optimised systems are shown. For an environment with specific conditions and constraints, there exists an optimum receiver and recuperator geometry so that the system produces maximum net power output. -- Highlights: → Optimum geometries exist such that the system produces maximum net power output. → Optimum operating conditions are shown. → Minimum irreversibility rates and minimum entropy generation rates are shown. → Net power output was described in terms of total entropy generation rate. → Effects such as wind, recuperator height and irradiance were investigated.

  13. POSSIBILITIES AND LIMITS OF THE CYCLE OF CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT -PDCA AS AN ELEMENT OF LEARNING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celso Machado Junior

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to investigate the possibilities and limits of the use of continuous improvement cycle, PDCA, as a tool that contributes to the development of individual learning in the organization. It is a qualitative, descriptive end uses the case study as a method. It was observed that the practice proposed by PDCA, can be used in the process of knowledge creation in line with the authors in the field, constituting a form of knowledge management within the organization, enabling the creation of tacit knowledge and its explicit transformation were not observed limits for their use.

  14. Bounding the number of limit cycles of discontinuous differential systems by using Picard-Fuchs equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jihua; Zhao, Liqin

    2018-05-01

    In this paper, by using Picard-Fuchs equations and Chebyshev criterion, we study the upper bounds of the number of limit cycles given by the first order Melnikov function for discontinuous differential systems, which can bifurcate from the periodic orbits of quadratic reversible centers of genus one (r19): x ˙ = y - 12x2 + 16y2, y ˙ = - x - 16 xy, and (r20): x ˙ = y + 4x2, y ˙ = - x + 16 xy, and the periodic orbits of the quadratic isochronous centers (S1) : x ˙ = - y +x2 -y2, y ˙ = x + 2 xy, and (S2) : x ˙ = - y +x2, y ˙ = x + xy. The systems (r19) and (r20) are perturbed inside the class of polynomial differential systems of degree n and the system (S1) and (S2) are perturbed inside the class of quadratic polynomial differential systems. The discontinuity is the line y = 0. It is proved that the upper bounds of the number of limit cycles for systems (r19) and (r20) are respectively 4 n - 3 (n ≥ 4) and 4 n + 3 (n ≥ 3) counting the multiplicity, and the maximum numbers of limit cycles bifurcating from the period annuluses of the isochronous centers (S1) and (S2) are exactly 5 and 6 (counting the multiplicity) on each period annulus respectively.

  15. Microstructure analysis and damage patterns of thermally cycled Ti–49.7Ni (at.%) wires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karhu, Marjaana; Lindroos, Tomi

    2012-01-01

    Long-term behaviour and fatigue endurance are the key issues in the utilization of SMA actuators, but systematic research work is still needed in this field. This study concentrates on the effects of three major design parameters on the long-term behaviour of binary Ti–49.7Ni-based actuators: the effect of the temperature interval used on thermal cycling, the effect of the stress level used and the effect of the heat-treatment state of the wire used. The long-term behaviour of the wires was studied in a custom-built fatigue test frame in which the wires were thermally cycled under a constant stress level. Before the fatigue testing, a series of heat treatments was carried out to generate optimal actuator properties for the wires. This paper concentrates on the systematic fractographic analysis of the fatigue fractured Ti–49.7Ni wires. The aim was to discover the relationships between the macro-scale behaviour and the microstructural changes of the material. During thermal cycling the surfaces of the Ti–49.7Ni wires were examined with an optical microscope. Clear connections between the detected surface defects and fracture nucleation sites were not established. Multiple cracks were initiated and grew during thermal cycling. SEM examinations showed that the fracture surfaces can be divided into different and separate zones: a smooth surface region with radial marks indicating the fatigue crack propagation area, a rougher ductile fracture surface region area and the roughest surface region on the interface of these two surfaces. It was detected that the size of the crack propagation area is related to the fatigue lives of the thermally cycled wires. Surface cracking and subsequent crack growth proved to be responsible for the accumulation of fatigue damage in the studied wires. It was detected from the fracture surface cross-sections that cracks were not initiated at the oxide layer. The major factor for nucleating the surface cracking and then shortening the

  16. Molecular Entropy, Thermal Efficiency, and Designing of Working Fluids for Organic Rankine Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingtao; Zhang, Jin; Chen, Zhiyou

    2012-06-01

    A shortage of fossil energy sources boosts the utilization of renewable energy. Among numerous novel techniques, recovering energy from low-grade heat sources through power generation via organic Rankine cycles (ORCs) is one of the focuses. Properties of working fluids are crucial for the ORC's performance. Many studies have been done to select proper working fluids or to design new working fluids. However, no researcher has systematically investigated the relationship between molecular structures and thermal efficiencies of various working fluids for an ideal ORC. This paper has investigated the interrelations of molecular structures, molecular entropies, and thermal efficiencies of various working fluids for an ideal ORC. By calculating thermal efficiencies and molecular entropies, we find that the molecular entropy is the most appropriate thermophysical property of a working fluid to determine how much energy can be converted into work and how much cannot in a system. Generally speaking, working fluids with low entropies will generally have high thermal efficiency for an ideal ORC. Based on this understanding, the direct interrelations of molecular structures and entropies provide an explicit interrelation between molecular structures and thermal efficiencies, and thus provide an insightful direction for molecular design of novel working fluids for ORCs.

  17. Adaptability of Brayton cycle conversion systems to fast, epithermal and thermal spectrum space nuclear reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tilliette, Z.P.

    1988-01-01

    The two French Government Agencies C.N.E.S. (Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales) and C.E.A. (Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique) are carrying out joint preliminary studies on space nuclear power systems for future ARIANE 5 launch vehicle applications. The Brayton cycle is the reference conversion system, whether the heat source is a liquid metal-cooled (NaK, Na or Li) reactor or a gas-cooled direct cycle concept. The search for an adequate utilization of this energy conversion means has prompted additional evaluations featuring the definition of satisfactory cycle conditions for these various kinds of reactor concepts. In addition to firstly studied fast and epithermal spectrum ones, thermal spectrum reactors can offer an opportunity of bringing out some distinctive features of the Brayton cycle, in particular for the temperature conditioning of the efficient metal hydrides (ZrH, Li/sub 7/H) moderators. One of the purposes of the paper is to confirm the potential of long lifetime ZrH moderated reactors associated with a gas cycle and to assess the thermodynamical consequences for both Nak(Na)-cooled or gas-cooled nuclear heat sources. This investigation is complemented by the definition of appropriate reactor arrangements which could be presented on a further occasion

  18. Influence of accelerated thermal charging and discharging cycles on thermo-physical properties of organic phase change materials for solar thermal energy storage applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raam Dheep, G.; Sreekumar, A.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Identification of organic phase change materials namely benzamide and sebacic acid. • Thermal reliability studies on identified phase change materials. • Measurement of phase transition temperature and latent heat of fusion. • Analysis of relative percentage difference (RPD%) in heat of fusion and melting temperature of benzamide and sebacic acid. - Abstract: Integration of appropriate thermal energy storage system plays a predominant role in upgrading the efficiency of solar thermal energy devices by reducing the incongruity between energy supply and demand. Latent heat thermal energy storage based on phase change materials (PCM) is found to be the most efficient and prospective method for storage of solar thermal energy. Ensuring the thermal reliability of PCM through large number of charging (melting) and discharging (solidification) cycles is a primary prerequisite to determine the suitability of PCM for a specific thermal energy storage applications. The present study explains the experimental analysis carried out on two PCM’s namely benzamide and sebacic acid to check the compatibility of the material in solar thermal energy storage applications. The selected materials were subjected to one thousand accelerated melting and solidification cycles in order to investigate the percentage of variation at different stages on latent heat of fusion, phase transition temperature, onset and peak melting temperature. Differential Scanning Calorimeter (DSC) was used to determine the phase transition temperature and heat of fusion upon completion of every 100 thermal cycles and continued up to 1000 cycles. Relative Percentage Difference (RPD%) is calculated to find out the absolute deviation of melting temperature and latent heat of fusion with respect to zeroth cycle. The experimental study recorded a melting temperatures of benzamide and sebacic acid as 125.09 °C and 135.92 °C with latent heat of fusion of 285.1 (J/g) and 374.4 (J/g). The

  19. Accurate expressions for the power efficiency of a class-D power amplifier in a limit-cycle transmitter configuration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarkeshi, M.; Mahmoudi, R.; Roermund, van A.H.M.

    2009-01-01

    Limit-cycle based, self-oscillating amplifiers are promising candidates for linear amplification of complex signals with high peak-to-average ratio, while maintaining high power efficiency. Limit-cycle transmitters employ switch class-D power amplifiers in order to achieve high Efficiency. In this

  20. Texture development and strain hysteresis in a NiTi shape-memory alloy during thermal cycling under load

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ye, B.; Majumdar, B.S.; Dutta, I.

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cycling experiments were conducted on a NiTi shape-memory alloy at different constant applied stresses below the yield strength of the martensite. The mechanical strain response manifested as strain hysteresis loops, whose range was proportional to the applied stress. In situ neutron diffraction experiments show that the strain hysteresis occurs as a result of the establishment of a stress-dependent crystallographic texture of the martensite during the first cool-down from austenite, and thereafter repeated during thermal cycling under the same load. This texture is found to depend on the stress during the thermal cycling experiments. A strain-pole map is derived and shown to explain the observed texture during thermal cycling. The strain-pole methodology is shown to work with similar martensitic transformations in other material systems.

  1. WESF cesium capsule behavior at high temperature or during thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tingey, G.L.; Gray, W.J.; Shippell, R.J.; Katayama, Y.B.

    1985-06-01

    Double-walled stainless steel (SS) capsules prepared for storage of radioactive 137 Cs from defense waste are now being considered for use as sources for commercial irradiation. Cesium was recovered at B-plant from the high-level radioactive waste generated during processing of defense nuclear fuel. It was then purified, converted to the chloride form, and encapsulated at the Hanford Waste Encapsulation and Storage Facility (WESF). The molten cesium chloride salt was encapsulated by pouring it into the inner of two concentric SS cylinders. Each cylinder was fitted with a SS end cap that was welded in place by inert gas-tungsten arc welding. The capsule configuration and dimensions are shown in Figure 1. In a recent review of the safety of these capsules, Tingey, Wheelwright, and Lytle (1984) indicated that experimental studies were continuing to produce long-term corrosion data, to reaffirm capsule integrity during a 90-min fire where capsule temperatures reached 800 0 C, to monitor mechanical properties as a function of time, and to assess the effects of thermal cycling due to periodic transfer of the capsules from a water storage pool to the air environment of an irradiator facility. This report covers results from tests that simulated the effects of the 90-min fire and from thermal cycling actual WESF cesium capsules for 3845 cycles over a period of six months. 11 refs., 39 figs., 9 tabs

  2. Thermal instability and current-voltage scaling in superconducting fault current limiters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeimetz, B [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Tadinada, K [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Eves, D E [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Coombs, T A [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom); Evetts, J E [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, Cambridge University, Pembroke Street, Cambridge CB1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Campbell, A M [Department of Engineering, Cambridge University, Trumpington Road, Cambridge CB2 1PZ (United Kingdom)

    2004-04-01

    We have developed a computer model for the simulation of resistive superconducting fault current limiters in three dimensions. The program calculates the electromagnetic and thermal response of a superconductor to a time-dependent overload voltage, with different possible cooling conditions for the surfaces, and locally variable superconducting and thermal properties. We find that the cryogen boil-off parameters critically influence the stability of a limiter. The recovery time after a fault increases strongly with thickness. Above a critical thickness, the temperature is unstable even for a small applied AC voltage. The maximum voltage and maximum current during a short fault are correlated by a simple exponential law.

  3. Thermal reliability test of Al-34%Mg-6%Zn alloy as latent heat storage material and corrosion of metal with respect to thermal cycling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun, J.Q.; Zhang, R.Y.; Liu, Z.P.; Lu, G.H.

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine the thermal reliability and corrosion of the Al-34%Mg-6%Zn alloy as a latent heat energy storage material with respect to various numbers of thermal cycles. The differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) analysis technique was applied to the alloy after 0, 50, 500 and 1000 melting/solidification cycles in order to measure the melting temperatures and the latent heats of fusion of the alloy. The containment materials were stainless steel (SS304L), carbon steel (steel C20) in the corrosion tests. The DSC results indicated that the change in melting temperature for the alloy was in the range of 3.06-5.3 K, and the latent heat of fusion decreased 10.98% after 1000 thermal cycles. The results show that the investigated Al-34%Mg-6%Zn alloy has a good thermal reliability as a latent heat energy storage material with respect to thermal cycling for thermal energy storage applications in the long term in view of the small changes in the latent heat of fusion and melting temperature. Gravimetric analysis as mass loss (mg/cm 2 ), corrosion rate (mg/day) and a microscopic or metallographic investigation were performed for corrosion tests and showed that SS304L may be considered a more suitable alloy than C20 in long term thermal storage applications

  4. Multi-objective optimization of a continuous thermally regenerative electrochemical cycle for waste heat recovery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long, Rui; Li, Baode; Liu, Zhichun; Liu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    An optimization analysis of a continuous TREC (thermally regenerative electrochemical cycle) was conducted with maximum power output and exergy efficiency as the objective functions simultaneously. For comparison, the power output, exergy efficiency, and thermal efficiency under the corresponding single-objective optimization schematics were also calculated. Under different optimization methods it was observed that the power output and the thermal efficiency increase with increasing inlet temperature of the heat source, whereas the exergy efficiency increases with increasing inlet temperature, reaches a maximum value, and then decreases. Results revealed that the optimal power output under the multi-objective optimization turned out to be slightly less than that obtained under the single-objective optimization for power output. However, the exergy and thermal efficiencies were much greater. Furthermore, the thermal exergy and exergy efficiency by single-objective optimization for energy efficiency shows no dominant advantage than that obtained under multi-objective optimization, comparing with the increase amplitude of the power output. This suggests that the multi-objective optimization could coordinate well both the power output and the exergy efficiency of the TREC system, and may serve as a more promising guide for operating and designing TREC systems. - Highlights: • An optimal analysis of a continuous TREC is conducted based on multi-objective optimization. • Performance under corresponding single-objective optimizations has also been calculated and compared. • Power under multi-objective optimization is slightly less than the maximum power. • Exergy and thermal efficiencies are much larger than that under the single-objective optimization.

  5. Does oxygen limit thermal tolerance in arthropods? A critical review of current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verberk, Wilco C E P; Overgaard, Johannes; Ern, Rasmus; Bayley, Mark; Wang, Tobias; Boardman, Leigh; Terblanche, John S

    2016-02-01

    Over the last decade, numerous studies have investigated the role of oxygen in setting thermal tolerance in aquatic animals, and there has been particular focus on arthropods. Arthropods comprise one of the most species-rich taxonomic groups on Earth, and display great diversity in the modes of ventilation, circulation, blood oxygen transport, with representatives living both in water (mainly crustaceans) and on land (mainly insects). The oxygen and capacity limitation of thermal tolerance (OCLTT) hypothesis proposes that the temperature dependent performance curve of animals is shaped by the capacity for oxygen delivery in relation to oxygen demand. If correct, oxygen limitation could provide a mechanistic framework to understand and predict both current and future impacts of rapidly changing climate. In arthropods, most studies testing the OCLTT hypothesis have considered tolerance to thermal extremes. These studies likely operate from the philosophical viewpoint that if the model can predict these critical thermal limits, then it is more likely to also explain loss of performance at less extreme, non-lethal temperatures, for which much less data is available. Nevertheless, the extent to which lethal temperatures are influenced by limitations in oxygen supply remains unresolved. Here we critically evaluate the support and universal applicability for oxygen limitation being involved in lethal temperatures in crustaceans and insects. The relatively few studies investigating the OCLTT hypothesis at low temperature do not support a universal role for oxygen in setting the lower thermal limits in arthropods. With respect to upper thermal limits, the evidence supporting OCLTT is stronger for species relying on underwater gas exchange, while the support for OCLTT in air-breathers is weak. Overall, strongest support was found for increased anaerobic metabolism close to thermal maxima. In contrast, there was only mixed support for the prediction that aerobic scope

  6. Research on transient thermal process of a friction brake during repetitive cycles of operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavchev, Yanko; Dimitrov, Lubomir; Dimitrov, Yavor

    2017-12-01

    Simplified models are used in the classical engineering analyses of the friction brake heating temperature during repetitive cycles of operation to determine basically the maximum and minimum brake temperatures. The objective of the present work is to broaden and complement the possibilities for research through a model that is based on the classical scheme of the Newton's law of cooling and improves the studies by adding a disturbance function for a corresponding braking process. A general case of braking in non-periodic repetitive mode is considered, for which a piecewise function is defined to apply pulse thermal loads to the system. Cases with rectangular and triangular waveforms are presented. Periodic repetitive braking process is also studied using a periodic rectangular waveform until a steady thermal state is achieved. Different numerical methods such as the Euler's method, the classical fourth order Runge-Kutta (RK4) and the Runge-Kutta-Fehlberg 4-5 (RKF45) are used to solve the non-linear differential equation of the model. The constructed model allows during pre-engineering calculations to be determined effectively the time for reaching the steady thermal state of the brake, to be simulated actual braking modes in vehicles and material handling machines, and to be accounted for the thermal impact when performing fatigue calculations.

  7. Rate equations modeling for hydrogen inventory studies during a real tokamak material thermal cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonnin, X., E-mail: xavier.bonnin@iter.org [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Hodille, E. [IRFM, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Ning, N. [LSPM-CNRS, Université Paris 13, Sorbonne Paris Cité, 99 avenue Jean-Baptiste Clément, F-93430 Villetaneuse (France); Sang, C. [School of Physics and Optoelectronics Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116024 (China); Grisolia, Ch. [IRFM, CEA-Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France)

    2015-08-15

    Prediction and control of tritium inventory in plasma-facing components (PFCs) is a critical nuclear safety issue for ITER and future fusion devices. This goal can be achieved through rate equations models as presented here. We calibrate our models with thermal desorption spectrometry results to obtain a validated set of material parameters relevant to hydrogen inventory processes in bulk tungsten. The best fits are obtained with two intrinsic trap types, deep and shallow, and an extrinsic trap created by plasma irradiation and plastic deformation of the tungsten matrix associated with blister formation. We then consider a realistic cycle of plasma discharges consisting of 400 s of plasma exposure followed by a resting period of 1000 s, repeating for several hours. This cycle is then closed by a long “overnight” period, thus providing an estimate of the amount of tritium retained in the PFCs after a full day of standard operation.

  8. Thermal and structural limitations for impurity-control components in FED/INTOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majumdar, S.; Cha, Y.; Mattas, R.; Abdou, M.; Cramer, B.; Haines, J.

    1983-02-01

    The successful operation of the impurity-control system of the FED/INTOR will depend to a large extent on the ability of its various components to withstand the imposed thermal and mechanical loads. The present paper explores the thermal and stress analyses aspects of the limiter and divertor operation of the FED/INTOR in its reference configuration. Three basic limitations governing the design of the limiter and the divertor are the maximum allowable metal temperature, the maximum allowable stress intensity and the allowable fatigue life of the structural material. Other important design limitations stemming from sputtering, evaporation, melting during disruptions, etc. are not considered in the present paper. The materials considered in the present analysis are a copper and a vanadium alloy for the structural material and graphite, beryllium, beryllium oxide, tungsten and silicon carbide for the coating or tile material

  9. Separation and prediction of irrecoverable strain components of concrete during the first thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khoury, G.A.

    1993-01-01

    Strains of three AGR type concretes were measured during the first heat cycle and their relative thermal stability determined. It was possible to isolate for the first time the shrinkage and creep components for the period during heating-up. Predictions of the residual strains for the loaded specimens can be made by simple superposition of creep and shrinkage components up to a certain critical temperature, which for basalt concrete is about 500 deg. C and limestone concrete is about 200-300 deg. C. Above the critical temperature, it is necessary to add a 'cracking component'. (author)

  10. Thermal energy storage for organic Rankine cycle solar dynamic space power systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidenreich, G. R.; Parekh, M. B.

    An organic Rankine cycle-solar dynamic power system (ORC-SDPS) comprises a concentrator, a radiator, a power conversion unit, and a receiver with a thermal energy storage (TES) subsystem which charges and discharges energy to meet power demands during orbital insolation and eclipse periods. Attention is presently given to the criteria used in designing and evaluating an ORC-SDPS TES, as well as the automated test facility employed. It is found that a substantial data base exists for the design of an ORC-SDPS TES subsystem.

  11. Effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on micro tensile bond strength of clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Reza Daneshkazemi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Certain studies have been conducted on the effects of mechanical and thermal load cycling on the microtensile bond strength (microTBS of composites to dentin, but the results were different. The authors therefore decided to evaluate these effects on the bonding of Clearfil SE bond to superficial dentin. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface of 42 molar teeth were bonded to Filtek-Z250 resin composite by Clearfil SE bond. The teeth were randomly divided into 7 groups and exposed to different mechanical and thermal load cycling. Thermocycling was at 5-55°C and mechanical load cycling was created with a force of 125 N and 0.5 Hz. Then, the teeth were sectioned and shaped to hour glass form and subjected to microTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by computer with three-way analysis of variance and T-test at P < 0.05 significant. To evaluate the location and mode of failure, the specimens were observed under the stereomicroscope. Then, one of the specimens in each group was evaluated under Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM for mode of failure. Results: All of the study groups had a significantly lower microTBS as compared to the control group ( P < 0.001. There was no statistically significant difference between mechanical cycling with 50K (kilo = 1000 cycles, and 50K mechanical cycles plus 1K thermal cycles. Most of the fractures in the control group were of adhesive type and this type of fracture increased after exposure to mechanical and thermal load cycling. Conclusion: Thermal and mechanical load cycling had significant negative effects on microTBS and the significant effects of mechanical load cycling started to be significant at 100K cycles.

  12. A Literature Review of Shock Sensitivity Changes of TATB Due to Thermal Cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Boyd [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); New Mexico Inst. of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2016-07-15

    Insensitive high explosives (IHEs) based on 1,3,5-triamino 2,4,6-trinitro-benzene (TATB) are the IHEs of choice for use in nuclear warheads over conventional high explosives when safety is the only consideration, because they are very insensitive to thermal or mechanical initiation stimuli. It is this inherent insensitivity to high temperatures, shock, and impact, which provides detonation design challenges when designing TATB explosive systems while at the same time providing a significant level of protection against accidental initiation. Although classified as IHE, over the past few years the focus on explosive safety has demonstrated that the shock sensitivity of TATB is influenced with respect to temperature. A number of studies have been performed on TATB and TATB formulations, plastic bonded explosives (PBX) 9502, and LX-17-01 (LX-17), which demonstrates the increase in shock sensitivity of the explosive after it has been preheated or thermally cycled over various temperature ranges. Many studies suggest the change in sensitivity is partly due to the decomposition rates of the temperature elevated TATB. Others point to the coefficient of thermal expansion, the crystalline structures of TATB and/or the combination of all factors, which create voids which can become active hot spots. During thermal cycling, TATB is known to undergo an irreversible increase in specific volume called ratchet growth. This increase in specific volume correlates to a decrease in density. This decrease in density and increase in volume, demonstrate the creations of additional void spaces which could serve as potential new initiation hot spots thus, increasing the overall sensitivity of the HE. This literature review evaluates the published works to understand why the shock sensitivity of TATB-based plastic bonded explosives (PBXs) changes with temperature.

  13. Limit cycle behaviour of the bump-on-tail and ion-acoustic instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Janssen, P.A.E.M.; Rasmussen, J.J.

    1980-12-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of the bump-on-tail and current-driven ion-acoustic instability is considered. The eigenmodes have discrete k because of finite periodic boundary conditions. Increasing a critical parameter (the number density and the electron drift velocity respectively) above its neutral stable value by a small fractional amount Δ 2 , one mode becomes unstable. The nonlinear dynamics of the unstable mode is determined by means of the multiple time scale method. Usually, limit cycle behaviour is found. A short comparison with quasi-linear theory is given, and the results are compared with experiment. (Auth.)

  14. Sinusoidal excitation on the Chua's circuit simulation of limit cycles and chaos

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindberg, Erik

    1994-01-01

    of charging”, and stable limit cycle behaviour based on the balance between the energy lost in the regions with mainly positive losses and the energy gained in the regions with mainly negative losses. Convergence problems observed in connection with simulation of the ideal piecewise-linear model are solved......Experiments with modelling and simulation of sinusoidal excitation on Chua's circuit are presented. It is demonstrated that the behaviour of the circuit is based on the interaction of two different kinds of energy balance: chaotic behaviour based on a balance between two unstable “states...

  15. Technical Feasibility Study of Thermal Energy Storage Integration into the Conventional Power Plant Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek D. Wojcik

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current load balance in the grid is managed mainly through peaking fossil-fuelled power plants that respond passively to the load changes. Intermittency, which comes from renewable energy sources, imposes additional requirements for even more flexible and faster responses from conventional power plants. A major challenge is to keep conventional generation running closest to the design condition with higher load factors and to avoid switching off periods if possible. Thermal energy storage (TES integration into the power plant process cycle is considered as a possible solution for this issue. In this article, a technical feasibility study of TES integration into a 375-MW subcritical oil-fired conventional power plant is presented. Retrofitting is considered in order to avoid major changes in the power plant process cycle. The concept is tested based on the complete power plant model implemented in the ProTRAX software environment. Steam and water parameters are assessed for different TES integration scenarios as a function of the plant load level. The best candidate points for heat extraction in the TES charging and discharging processes are evaluated. The results demonstrate that the integration of TES with power plant cycle is feasible and provide a provisional guidance for the design of the TES system that will result in the minimal influence on the power plant cycle.

  16. Fast thermal cycling of acetanilide and magnesium chloride hexahydrate for indoor solar cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Amir, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.M.; Faidah, Adel S.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Heniti, S.

    2009-01-01

    Solar cookers are broadly divided into a direct or focusing type, indirect or box-type and advanced solar cookers. The focusing and box-type solar cookers are for outdoor applications. The advanced solar cookers have the advantage of being usable indoors and thus solve one of the problems, which impede the social acceptance of solar cookers. The advanced type solar cookers are employing additional solar units that increase the cost. Therefore, the solar cooker must contain a heat storage medium to store thermal energy for use during off-sunshine hours. The main aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the melting/solidification fast cycling of the commercial grade acetanilide C 8 H 9 NO (T m = 116 deg. C) and magnesium chloride hexahydrate MgCl 2 .6H 2 O (T m = 116.7 deg. C) on their thermo-physical properties; such as melting point and latent heat of fusion, to be used as storage media inside solar cookers. Five hundred cycles have been performed. The thermo-physical properties are measured using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. The compatibility of the selected phase change materials (PCMs) with the containing material is also studied via the surface investigation, using the SIM technique, of aluminum and stainless steel samples embedded in the PCM during cycling. It is inferred that acetanilide is a promising PCM for cooking indoors and during law intensity solar radiation periods with good compatibility with aluminum as a containing material. However, MgCl 2 .6H 2 O is not stable during its thermal cycling (even with the extra water principle) due to the phase segregation problem; therefore, it is not recommended as a storage material inside solar cookers for cooking indoors. It is also indicated that MgCl 2 .6H 2 O is not compatible with either aluminum or stainless steel.

  17. Analysis of transition to fuel cycle system with continuous recycling in fast and thermal reactors - 5060

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Passereini, S.; Feng, B.; Fei, T.; Kim, T.K.; Taiwo, T.A.; Brown, N.R.; Cuadra, A.

    2015-01-01

    A recent Evaluation and Screening study of nuclear fuel cycle options identified a few groups of options as most promising. One of these most promising Evaluation Groups (EGs) is characterized by the continuous recycling of uranium (U) and transuranics (TRU) with natural uranium feed in both fast and thermal critical reactors. This evaluation group, designated as EG30, is represented by an example fuel cycle option that employs a two-technology, two-stage fuel cycle system. The first stage involves the continuous recycling of co-extracted U/TRU in Sodium-cooled Fast Reactors (SFRs) with metallic fuel and breeding ratio greater than 1. The second stage involves the use of the surplus TRU in Mixed Oxide (MOX) fuel in Pressurized Water Reactors that are MOX-capable (MOX-PWRs). This paper presents and discusses preliminary fuel cycle analysis results from the fuel cycle codes VISION and DYMOND for the transition to this fuel cycle option from the current once-through cycle in the United States (U.S.) that consists of Light Water Reactors (LWRs) that only use conventional UO 2 fuel. The analyses in this paper are applicable for a constant 100 GWe capacity, roughly the size of the U.S. nuclear fleet. Two main strategies for the transition to EG30 were analyzed: 1) deploying both SFRs and MOX-PWRs in parallel or 2) deploying them in series with the SFR fleet first. With an estimated retirement schedule for the existing LWRs, an assumed reactor lifetime of 60 years, and no growth, the nuclear system fully transitions to the new fuel cycle within 100 years for both strategies without SFR fuel shortages. Compared to the once-through cycle, transition to the SFR/MOX-PWR fleet with continuous recycle was shown to offer significant reductions in uranium consumption and waste disposal requirements. In addition, these initial calculations revealed a few notable modeling and strategy questions regarding how recycled resources are allocated, reactors that can switch between

  18. Experimental investigation of thermal limits in parallel plate configuration for the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siman-Tov, M.; Felde, D.K.; Kaminaga, M.; Yoder, G.L.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Neutron Source Reactor (ANSR) is currently being designed to become the world's highest-flux, steady-state, thermal neutron source for scientific experiments. Highly subcooled, heavy-water coolant flows vertically upward at a very high velocity of 25 m/s through parallel aluminum fuel-plates. The core has average and peak heat fluxes of 5.9 and 12 MW/m 2 , respectively. In this configuration, both flow excursion (FE) and true critical heat flux (CHF), represent potential thermal limitations. The availability of experimental data for both FE and true CHF at the conditions applicable to the ANSR is very limited. A Thermal Hydraulic Test Loop (THTL) facility was designed and built to simulate a full-length coolant subchannel of the core, allowing experimental determination of both thermal limits under the expected ANSR T/H conditions. A series of FE tests with water flowing vertically upward was completed over a nominal heat flux range of 6 to 14 MW/m 2 and a corresponding velocity range of 8 to 21 m/s. Both the exit pressure (1.7 MPa) and inlet temperature (45 degrees C) were maintained constant for these tests, while the loop was operated in a ''stiff''(constant flow) mode. Limited experiments were also conducted at 12 MW/m 2 using a ''soft'' mode (near constant pressure-drop) for actual FE burnout tests and using a ''stiff' mode for true CHF tests, to compare with the original FE experiments

  19. Lattice Boltzmann methods for thermal flows: Continuum limit and applications to compressible Rayleigh Taylor systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scagliarini, Andrea; Biferale, L.; Sbragaglia, M.; Sugiyama, K.; Toschi, F.

    2010-01-01

    We compute the continuum thermohydrodynamical limit of a new formulation of lattice kinetic equations for thermal compressible flows, recently proposed by Sbragaglia et al. [J. Fluid Mech. 628, 299 (2009)] . We show that the hydrodynamical manifold is given by the correct compressible

  20. Mathematical model of the competition life cycle under limited resources conditions: Problem statement for business community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelomentsev, A. G.; Medvedev, M. A.; Berg, D. B.; Lapshina, S. N.; Taubayev, A. A.; Davletbaev, R. H.; Savina, D. V.

    2017-12-01

    Present study is devoted to the development of competition life cycle mathematical model in the closed business community with limited resources. Growth of each agent is determined by the balance of input and output resource flows: input (cash) flow W is covering the variable V and constant C costs and growth dA/dt of the agent's assets A. Value of V is proportional to assets A that allows us to write down a first order non-stationary differential equation of the agent growth. Model includes the number of such equations due to the number of agents. The amount of resources that is available for agents vary in time. The balances of their input and output flows are changing correspondingly to the different stages of the competition life cycle. According to the theory of systems, the most complete description of any object or process is the model of its life cycle. Such a model describes all stages of its development: from the appearance ("birth") through development ("growth") to extinction ("death"). The model of the evolution of an individual firm, not contradicting the economic meaning of events actually observed in the market, is the desired result from modern AVMs for applied use. With a correct description of the market, rules for participants' actions, restrictions, forecasts can be obtained, which modern mathematics and the economy can not give.

  1. Theoretical analysis of saturation and limit cycles in short pulse FEL oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piovella, N.; Chaix, P.; Jaroszynski, D. [Commissariat a l`Energie Atomique, Bruyeres-le-Chatel (France)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    We derive a model for the non linear evolution of a short pulse oscillator from low signal up to saturation in the small gain regime. This system is controlled by only two independent parameters: cavity detuning and losses. Using a closure relation, this model reduces to a closed set of 5 non linear partial differential equations for the EM field and moments of the electron distribution. An analysis of the linearised system allows to define and calculate the eigenmodes characterising the small signal regime. An arbitrary solution of the complete nonlinear system can then be expanded in terms of these eigenmodes. This allows interpreting various observed nonlinear behaviours, including steady state saturation, limit cycles, and transition to chaos. The single mode approximation reduces to a Landau-Ginzburg equation. It allows to obtain gain, nonlinear frequency shift, and efficiency as functions of cavity detuning and cavity losses. A generalisation to two modes allows to obtain a simple description of the limit cycle behaviour, as a competition between these two modes. An analysis of the transitions to more complex dynamics is also given. Finally, the analytical results are compared to the experimental data from the FELIX experiment.

  2. Unsteady surface pressure measurements on a slender delta wing undergoing limit cycle wing rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arena, Andrew S., Jr.; Nelson, Robert C.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental investigation of slender wing limit cycle motion known as wing rock was investigated using two unique experimental systems. Dynamic roll moment measurements and visualization data on the leading edge vortices were obtained using a free to roll apparatus that incorporates an airbearing spindle. In addition, both static and unsteady surface pressure data was measured on the top and bottom surfaces of the model. To obtain the unsteady surface pressure data a new computer controller drive system was developed to accurately reproduce the free to roll time history motions. The data from these experiments include, roll angle time histories, vortex trajectory data on the position of the vortices relative to the model's surface, and surface pressure measurements as a function of roll angle when the model is stationary or undergoing a wing rock motion. The roll time history data was numerically differentiated to determine the dynamic roll moment coefficient. An analysis of these data revealed that the primary mechanism for the limit cycle behavior was a time lag in the position of the vortices normal to the wing surface.

  3. Mapped Chebyshev Pseudo-Spectral Method for Dynamic Aero-Elastic Problem of Limit Cycle Oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Dong Kyun; Kim, Hyun Soon; Choi, Seongim

    2018-05-01

    A mapped Chebyshev pseudo-spectral method is developed as one of the Fourier-spectral approaches and solves nonlinear PDE systems for unsteady flows and dynamic aero-elastic problem in a given time interval, where the flows or elastic motions can be periodic, nonperiodic, or periodic with an unknown frequency. The method uses the Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind for the basis function and redistributes the standard Chebyshev-Gauss-Lobatto collocation points more evenly by a conformal mapping function for improved numerical stability. Contributions of the method are several. It can be an order of magnitude more efficient than the conventional finite difference-based, time-accurate computation, depending on the complexity of solutions and the number of collocation points. The method reformulates the dynamic aero-elastic problem in spectral form for coupled analysis of aerodynamics and structures, which can be effective for design optimization of unsteady and dynamic problems. A limit cycle oscillation (LCO) is chosen for the validation and a new method to determine the LCO frequency is introduced based on the minimization of a second derivative of the aero-elastic formulation. Two examples of the limit cycle oscillation are tested: nonlinear, one degree-of-freedom mass-spring-damper system and two degrees-of-freedom oscillating airfoil under pitch and plunge motions. Results show good agreements with those of the conventional time-accurate simulations and wind tunnel experiments.

  4. A Study on Stability of Limit Cycle Walking Model with Feet: Parameter Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonggwon Jeon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, two kinds of feet, namely, curved and flat feet, are added to limit cycle walking model to investigate its stability properties. Although both models are already proposed and are investigated, most previous works are focused on efficiency and gait behaviors. Only the stability properties of the simplest walking model conceived Garcia et al. are well defined. Therefore, there is still a need for a precise research on the effect of feet, especially in the view of local stability, bifurcation route to chaos, global stability, falling boundary and energy balance line. Therefore, this article revisits the stability analysis of limit cycle walking model with various foot shape. To analyze the effects of feet, we re-derive the equation of motion of modified models by adding one more parameter of foot shape than the simplest walking model. Also, the falling boundary and energy balance line of modified models are derived to get proper initial conditions for stable walking and to explain global stability. Simulation results show us that the curved feet can enlarge both stable walking range and area of basin of attraction while the case of flat feet depends on foot shape parameter.

  5. Characterization of coarse bainite transformation in low carbon steel during simulated welding thermal cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lan, Liangyun, E-mail: lanly@me.neu.edu.cn [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Kong, Xiangwei [School of Mechanical Engineering and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China); Qiu, Chunlin [State Key Laboratory of Rolling Technology and Automation, Northeastern University, Shenyang 110819 (China)

    2015-07-15

    Coarse austenite to bainite transformation in low carbon steel under simulated welding thermal cycles was morphologically and crystallographically characterized by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and electron backscattered diffraction technology. The results showed that the main microstructure changes from a mixture of lath martensite and bainitic ferrite to granular bainite with the increase in cooling time. The width of bainitic laths also increases gradually with the cooling time. For a welding thermal cycle with relatively short cooling time (e.g. t{sub 8/5} is 30 s), the main mode of variant grouping at the scale of individual prior austenite grains changes from Bain grouping to close-packed plane grouping with the progress of phase transformation, which results in inhomogeneous distribution of high angle boundaries. As the cooling time is increased, the Bain grouping of variants becomes predominant mode, which enlarges the effective grain size of product phase. - Highlights: • Main microstructure changes and the width of lath structure increases with cooling time. • Variant grouping changes from Bain zone to close-packed plane grouping with the transformation. • The change of variant grouping results in uneven distribution of high angle grain boundary. • Bain grouping is main mode for large heat input, which lowers the density of high angle boundary.

  6. Characterization of coarse bainite transformation in low carbon steel during simulated welding thermal cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lan, Liangyun; Kong, Xiangwei; Qiu, Chunlin

    2015-01-01

    Coarse austenite to bainite transformation in low carbon steel under simulated welding thermal cycles was morphologically and crystallographically characterized by means of optical microscope, transmission electron microscope and electron backscattered diffraction technology. The results showed that the main microstructure changes from a mixture of lath martensite and bainitic ferrite to granular bainite with the increase in cooling time. The width of bainitic laths also increases gradually with the cooling time. For a welding thermal cycle with relatively short cooling time (e.g. t 8/5 is 30 s), the main mode of variant grouping at the scale of individual prior austenite grains changes from Bain grouping to close-packed plane grouping with the progress of phase transformation, which results in inhomogeneous distribution of high angle boundaries. As the cooling time is increased, the Bain grouping of variants becomes predominant mode, which enlarges the effective grain size of product phase. - Highlights: • Main microstructure changes and the width of lath structure increases with cooling time. • Variant grouping changes from Bain zone to close-packed plane grouping with the transformation. • The change of variant grouping results in uneven distribution of high angle grain boundary. • Bain grouping is main mode for large heat input, which lowers the density of high angle boundary

  7. Optimization of low temperature solar thermal electric generation with Organic Rankine Cycle in different areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jing, Li; Gang, Pei; Jie, Ji

    2010-01-01

    The presented low temperature solar thermal electric generation system mainly consists of compound parabolic concentrators (CPC) and the Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) working with HCFC-123. A novel design is proposed to reduce heat transfer irreversibility between conduction oil and HCFC-123 in the heat exchangers while maintaining the stability of electricity output. Mathematical formulations are developed to study the heat transfer and energy conversion processes and the numerical simulation is carried out based on distributed parameters. Annual performances of the proposed system in different areas of Canberra, Singapore, Bombay, Lhasa, Sacramento and Berlin are simulated. The influences of the collector tilt angle adjustment, the connection between the heat exchangers and the CPC collectors, and the ORC evaporation temperature on the system performance are investigated. The results indicate that the three factors have a major impact on the annual electricity output and should be the key points of optimization. And the optimized system shows that: (1) The annual received direct irradiance can be significantly increased by two or three times optimal adjustments even when the CPC concentration ratio is smaller than 3.0. (2) Compared with the traditional single-stage collectors, two-stage collectors connected with the heat exchangers by two thermal oil cycles can improve the collector efficiency by 8.1-20.9% in the simultaneous processes of heat collection and power generation. (3) On the use of the market available collectors the optimal ORC evaporation temperatures in most of the simulated areas are around 120 C. (author)

  8. Phenotypic variance, plasticity and heritability estimates of critical thermal limits depend on methodological context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chown, Steven L.; Jumbam, Keafon R.; Sørensen, Jesper Givskov

    2009-01-01

    used during assessments of critical thermal limits to activity. To date, the focus of work has almost exclusively been on the effects of rate variation on mean values of the critical limits. 2.  If the rate of temperature change used in an experimental trial affects not only the trait mean but also its...... this is the case for critical thermal limits using a population of the model species Drosophila melanogaster and the invasive ant species Linepithema humile. 4.  We found that effects of the different rates of temperature change are variable among traits and species. However, in general, different rates...... of temperature change resulted in different phenotypic variances and different estimates of heritability, presuming that genetic variance remains constant. We also found that different rates resulted in different conclusions regarding the responses of the species to acclimation, especially in the case of L...

  9. Precise numerical results for limit cycles in the quantum three-body problem

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, R.F.; Furnstahl, R.J.; Hammer, H.-W.; Perry, R.J.; Wilson, K.G.

    2006-01-01

    The study of the three-body problem with short-range attractive two-body forces has a rich history going back to the 1930s. Recent applications of effective field theory methods to atomic and nuclear physics have produced a much improved understanding of this problem, and we elucidate some of the issues using renormalization group ideas applied to precise nonperturbative calculations. These calculations provide 11-12 digits of precision for the binding energies in the infinite cutoff limit. The method starts with this limit as an approximation to an effective theory and allows cutoff dependence to be systematically computed as an expansion in powers of inverse cutoffs and logarithms of the cutoff. Renormalization of three-body bound states requires a short range three-body interaction, with a coupling that is governed by a precisely mapped limit cycle of the renormalization group. Additional three-body irrelevant interactions must be determined to control subleading dependence on the cutoff and this control is essential for an effective field theory since the continuum limit is not likely to match physical systems (e.g., few-nucleon bound and scattering states at low energy). Leading order calculations precise to 11-12 digits allow clear identification of subleading corrections, but these corrections have not been computed

  10. Application of a statistical thermal design procedure to evaluate the PWR DNBR safety analysis limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robeyns, J.; Parmentier, F.; Peeters, G.

    2001-01-01

    In the framework of safety analysis for the Belgian nuclear power plants and for the reload compatibility studies, Tractebel Energy Engineering (TEE) has developed, to define a 95/95 DNBR criterion, a statistical thermal design method based on the analytical full statistical approach: the Statistical Thermal Design Procedure (STDP). In that methodology, each DNBR value in the core assemblies is calculated with an adapted CHF (Critical Heat Flux) correlation implemented in the sub-channel code Cobra for core thermal hydraulic analysis. The uncertainties of the correlation are represented by the statistical parameters calculated from an experimental database. The main objective of a sub-channel analysis is to prove that in all class 1 and class 2 situations, the minimum DNBR (Departure from Nucleate Boiling Ratio) remains higher than the Safety Analysis Limit (SAL). The SAL value is calculated from the Statistical Design Limit (SDL) value adjusted with some penalties and deterministic factors. The search of a realistic value for the SDL is the objective of the statistical thermal design methods. In this report, we apply a full statistical approach to define the DNBR criterion or SDL (Statistical Design Limit) with the strict observance of the design criteria defined in the Standard Review Plan. The same statistical approach is used to define the expected number of rods experiencing DNB. (author)

  11. FIBWR2 evaluation of fuel thermal limits during density wave oscillaions in BWRs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nik, N.; Rajan, S.R.; Karasulu, M. [New York Power Authority, White Plains, NY (United States)

    1995-09-01

    Analyses were performed to evaluate hydraulic and thermal margin responses of three different BWR fuel designs subjected to the same periodic power/flow oscillations, such as those that might be exhibited during an instability event. The power/flow versus time information from the oscillations was used as a forcing function to calculate the hydraulic response and the MCPR performance of the limiting fuel bundles during the regional oscillations using the analytical code FIBWR2. The results of the calculations were used to determine the thermal margin variation as a function of oscillation magnitude.

  12. Hydriding and structural characteristics of thermally cycled and cold-worked V-0.5 at.%C alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, Dhanesh; Sharma, Archana; Chellappa, Raja; Cathey, William N.; Lynch, Franklin E.; Bowman, Robert C.; Wermer, Joseph R.; Paglieri, Stephen N.

    2008-01-01

    High pressure hydrides of V 0.995 C 0.005 were thermally cycled between β 2 - and γ-phases hydrides for potential use in cryocoolers/heat pumps for space applications. The effect of addition of carbon to vanadium, on the plateau enthalpies of the high pressure β 2 + γ region is minimal. This is in contrast to the calculated plateau enthalpies for low pressure (α + β 1 ) mixed phases which showed a noticeable lowering of the values. Thermal cycling between β 2 -and γ-phase hydrides increased the absorption pressures but desorption pressure did not change significantly and the free energy loss due to hysteresis also increased. Hydriding of the alloy with prior cold-work increased the pressure hysteresis significantly and lowered the hydrogen capacity. In contrast to the alloy without any prior straining (as-cast), desorption pressure of the alloy with prior cold-work also decreased significantly. Microstrains, 2 > 1/2 , in the β 2 -phase lattice of the thermally cycled hydrides decreased after 778 cycles and the domain sizes increased. However, in the γ-phase, both the microstrains and the domain sizes decreased after thermal cycling indicating no particle size effect. The dehydrogenated α-phase after 778 thermal cycles also showed residual microstrains in the lattice, similar to those observed in intermetallic hydrides. The effect of thermal cycling (up to 4000 cycles between β 2 - and γ-phases) and cold working on absorption/desorption pressures, hydrogen storage capacity, microstrains, long-range strains, and domain sizes of β 2 - and γ-phase hydrides of V 0.995 C 0.005 alloys are presented

  13. Passive residual energy utilization system in thermal cycles on water-cooled power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Placco, Guilherme M.; Guimaraes, Lamartine N.F.; Santos, Rubens S. dos

    2013-01-01

    This work presents a concept of a residual energy utilization in nuclear plants thermal cycles. After taking notice of the causes of the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, an idea arose to adapt a passive thermal circuit as part of the ECCS (Emergency Core Cooling System). One of the research topics of IEAv (Institute for Advanced Studies), as part of the heat conversion of a space nuclear power system is a passive multi fluid turbine. One of the main characteristics of this device is its passive capability of staying inert and be brought to power at moments notice. During the first experiments and testing of this passive device, it became clear that any small amount of gas flow would generate power. Given that in the first stages of the Fukushima accident and even during the whole event there was plenty availability of steam flow that would be the proper condition to make the proposed system to work. This system starts in case of failure of the ECCS, including loss of site power, loss of diesel generators and loss of the battery power. This system does not requires electricity to run and will work with bleed steam. It will generate enough power to supply the plant safety system avoiding overheating of the reactor core produced by the decay heat. This passive system uses a modified Tesla type turbine. With the tests conducted until now, it is possible to ensure that the operation of this new turbine in a thermal cycle is very satisfactory and it performs as expected. (author)

  14. Effect of long-term storage of LWR spent fuel on Pu-thermal fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurosawa, Masayoshi; Naito, Yoshitaka; Suyama, Kenya; Itahara, Kuniyuki; Suzuki, Katsuo; Hamada, Koji

    1998-01-01

    According to the Long-term Program for Research, Development and Utilization of Nuclear Energy (June, 1994) in Japan, the Rokkasho Reprocessing Plant will be operated shortly after the year 2000, and the planning of the construction of the second commercial plant will be decided around 2010. Also, it is described that spent fuel storage has a positive meaning as an energy resource for the future utilization of Pu. Considering the balance between the increase of spent fuels and the domestic reprocessing capacity in Japan, it can be expected that the long-term storage of UO 2 spent fuels will be required. Then, we studied the effect of long-term storage of spent fuels on Pu-thermal fuel cycle. The burnup calculation were performed on the typical Japanese PWR fuel, and the burnup and criticality calculations were carried out on the Pu-thermal cores with MOX fuel. Based on the results, we evaluate the influence of extending the spent fuel storage term on the criticality safety, shielding design of the reprocessing plant and the core life time of the MOX core, etc. As the result of this work on long-term storage of LWR spent fuels, it becomes clear that there are few demerits regarding the lifetime of a MOX reactor core, and that there are many merits regarding the safety aspects of the fuel cycle facilities. Furthermore, long-term storage is meaningful as energy storage for effective utilization of Pu to be improved by technological innovation in future, and it will allow for sufficient time for the important policymaking of nuclear fuel cycle establishment in Japan. (author)

  15. Thermal analysis of a Phase Change Material for a Solar Organic Rankine Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iasiello, M.; Braimakis, K.; Andreozzi, A.; Karellas, S.

    2017-11-01

    Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) is a promising technology for low temperature power generation, for example for the utilization of medium temperature solar energy. Since heat generated from solar source is variable throughout the day, the implementation of Thermal Energy Storage (TES) systems to guarantee the continuous operation of solar ORCs is a critical task, and Phase Change Materials (PCM) rely on latent heat to store large amounts of energy. In the present study, a thermal analysis of a PCM for a solar ORC is carried out. Three different types of PCMs are analyzed. The energy equation for the PCM is modeled by using the heat capacity method, and it is solved by employing a 1Dexplicit finite difference scheme. The solar source is modeled with a time-variable temperature boundary condition, with experimental data taken from the literature for two different solar collectors. Results are presented in terms of temperature profiles and stored energy. It has been shown that the stored energy depends on the heat source temperature, on the employed PCM and on the boundary conditions. It has been demonstrated that the use of a metal foam can drastically enhance the stored energy due to the higher overall thermal conductivity.

  16. Output power analyses for the thermodynamic cycles of thermal power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Chen; Cheng Xue-Tao; Liang Xin-Gang

    2014-01-01

    Thermal power plant is one of the important thermodynamic devices, which is very common in all kinds of power generation systems. In this paper, we use a new concept, entransy loss, as well as exergy destruction, to analyze the single reheating Rankine cycle unit and the single stage steam extraction regenerative Rankine cycle unit in power plants. This is the first time that the concept of entransy loss is applied to the analysis of the power plant Rankine cycles with reheating and steam extraction regeneration. In order to obtain the maximum output power, the operating conditions under variant vapor mass flow rates are optimized numerically, as well as the combustion temperatures and the off-design flow rates of the flue gas. The relationship between the output power and the exergy destruction rate and that between the output power and the entransy loss rate are discussed. It is found that both the minimum exergy destruction rate and the maximum entransy loss rate lead to the maximum output power when the combustion temperature and heat capacity flow rate of the flue gas are prescribed. Unlike the minimum exergy destruction rate, the maximum entransy loss rate is related to the maximum output power when the highest temperature and heat capacity flow rate of the flue gas are not prescribed. (general)

  17. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) investigation of thermal uniformity in a thermal cycling based calibration chamber for MEMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gui, Xulong; Luo, Xiaobing; Wang, Xiaoping; Liu, Sheng

    2015-12-01

    Micro-electrical-mechanical system (MEMS) has become important for many industries such as automotive, home appliance, portable electronics, especially with the emergence of Internet of Things. Volume testing with temperature compensation has been essential in order to provide MEMS based sensors with repeatability, consistency, reliability, and durability, but low cost. Particularly, in the temperature calibration test, temperature uniformity of thermal cycling based calibration chamber becomes more important for obtaining precision sensors, as each sensor is different before the calibration. When sensor samples are loaded into the chamber, we usually open the door of the chamber, then place fixtures into chamber and mount the samples on the fixtures. These operations may affect temperature uniformity in the chamber. In order to study the influencing factors of sample-loading on the temperature uniformity in the chamber during calibration testing, numerical simulation work was conducted first. Temperature field and flow field were simulated in empty chamber, chamber with open door, chamber with samples, and chamber with fixtures, respectively. By simulation, it was found that opening chamber door, sample size and number of fixture layers all have effects on flow field and temperature field. By experimental validation, it was found that the measured temperature value was consistent with the simulated temperature value.

  18. Limits to solar power conversion efficiency with applications to quantum and thermal systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byvik, C. E.; Buoncristiani, A. M.; Smith, B. T.

    1983-01-01

    An analytical framework is presented that permits examination of the limit to the efficiency of various solar power conversion devices. Thermodynamic limits to solar power efficiency are determined for both quantum and thermal systems, and the results are applied to a variety of devices currently considered for use in space systems. The power conversion efficiency for single-threshold energy quantum systems receiving unconcentrated air mass zero solar radiation is limited to 31 percent. This limit applies to photovoltaic cells directly converting solar radiation, or indirectly, as in the case of a thermophotovoltaic system. Photoelectrochemical cells rely on an additional chemical reaction at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface, which introduces additional second-law demands and a reduction of the solar conversion efficiency. Photochemical systems exhibit even lower possible efficiencies because of their relatively narrow absorption bands. Solar-powered thermal engines in contact with an ambient reservoir at 300 K and operating at maximum power have a peak conversion efficiency of 64 percent, and this occurs for a thermal reservoir at a temperature of 2900 K. The power conversion efficiency of a solar-powered liquid metal magnetohydrodydnamic generator, a solar-powered steam turbine electric generator, and an alkali metal thermoelectric converter is discussed.

  19. Effects of variations in coating materials and process conditions on the thermal cycle properties of NiCrAlY/YSZ thermal barrier coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang Feng [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)]. E-mail: ftang@ucdavis.edu; Ajdelsztajn, Leonardo [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Kim, George E. [Perpetual Technologies, Montreal, Que., H3E 1T8 (Canada); Provenzano, Virgil [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Schoenung, Julie M. [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of California, Davis, CA 95616 (United States)

    2006-06-15

    Thermal cycle tests were conducted on a variety of thermal barrier coating (TBC) specimens with bond coats that had been prepared in different ways. Variables include: (1) different thermal spray processes (high velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) spray and low pressure plasma spray (LPPS)) (2) different feedstock powder (gas-atomized and cryomilled) (3) the introduction of nano-sized alumina additives (particles and whiskers) and (4) with and without a post-spray vacuum heat treatment. The results show that the cryomilling of the NiCrAlY powder and the post-spray heat treatment in vacuum can both lead to significant improvement in the thermal cycle lifetime of the TBCs. The TBC specimens with LPPS bond coats also generally showed longer lifetimes than those with HVOF bond coats. In contrast, the intentional dispersion of alumina particles or whiskers in the NiCrAlY powders during cryomilling did not result in the further improvement of the lifetime of the TBCs. Microstructural evolution, including the thermally grown oxide (TGO) formation, the distribution of the dispersoids in the bond coat, the internal oxidation of the bond coat, the bond coat shrinkage during the thermal cycle tests and the reduction of the ZrO{sub 2} in the top coat during the heat treatment in vacuum, was investigated.

  20. Another Look at the Practical and Theoretical Limits of an Expander Cycle, LOX/H2 Engine

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Krach, A

    1999-01-01

    Advances in materials and increases in turbopump efficiencies necessitate another look at the theoretical and practical limits for growth in chamber pressure and thrust in a liquid rocket expander cycle engine...

  1. Effective reaction rates in diffusion-limited phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szymańska, Paulina; Kochańczyk, Marek; Miekisz, Jacek; Lipniacki, Tomasz

    2015-02-01

    We investigate the kinetics of the ubiquitous phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle on biological membranes by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations on the triangular lattice. We establish the dependence of effective macroscopic reaction rate coefficients as well as the steady-state phosphorylated substrate fraction on the diffusion coefficient and concentrations of opposing enzymes: kinases and phosphatases. In the limits of zero and infinite diffusion, the numerical results agree with analytical predictions; these two limits give the lower and the upper bound for the macroscopic rate coefficients, respectively. In the zero-diffusion limit, which is important in the analysis of dense systems, phosphorylation and dephosphorylation reactions can convert only these substrates which remain in contact with opposing enzymes. In the most studied regime of nonzero but small diffusion, a contribution linearly proportional to the diffusion coefficient appears in the reaction rate. In this regime, the presence of opposing enzymes creates inhomogeneities in the (de)phosphorylated substrate distributions: The spatial correlation function shows that enzymes are surrounded by clouds of converted substrates. This effect becomes important at low enzyme concentrations, substantially lowering effective reaction rates. Effective reaction rates decrease with decreasing diffusion and this dependence is more pronounced for the less-abundant enzyme. Consequently, the steady-state fraction of phosphorylated substrates can increase or decrease with diffusion, depending on relative concentrations of both enzymes. Additionally, steady states are controlled by molecular crowders which, mostly by lowering the effective diffusion of reactants, favor the more abundant enzyme.

  2. One thousand thermal cycles of magnesium chloride hexahydrate as a promising PCM for indoor solar cooking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Heniti, S.; Al-Agel, F.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Marzouki, F.

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → Solar cookers must contain a PCM for cooking indoors. → MgCl 2 .6H 2 O when it cycled in a sealed container. → MgCl 2 .6H 2 O shows maximum of 0.1-3.5 o C of supercooling. → MgCl 2 .6H 2 O is a promising PCM for thermal energy storage. -- Abstract: Cooking is the major necessity for people all over the world. It accounts for a major share of energy consumption in developing countries. There is a critical need for the development of alternative, appropriate, affordable methods of cooking for use in developing countries. There is a history for solar cooking since 1650 where they are broadly divided into direct or focusing type, box-type and indirect or advanced solar cookers. The advanced solar cookers have the advantage of being usable indoors and thus solve one of the problems, which impede the social acceptance of solar cookers. The advanced type solar cookers are employing additional solar units that increase the cost. Therefore, the solar cooker must contain a heat storage medium to store thermal energy for use during off-sunshine hours. The main aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of the melting/solidification fast thermal cycling of commercial grade magnesium chloride hexahydrate (MgCl 2 .6H 2 O) on its thermo-physical properties; such as melting point and latent heat of fusion, to be used as a storage medium inside solar cookers. One thousand cycles have been performed in a sealed container under the extra water principle. The thermo-physical properties are measured using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. It is indicated that MgCl 2 .6H 2 O with the extra water principle and hermetically sealing of the container is a promising phase change material (PCM) for cooking indoors and during law intensity solar radiation periods. It is also found from the melting/solidification behavior of MgCl 2 .6H 2 O that it is solidify almost without supercooling; except in few cases where it showed maximum of 0

  3. Resolution of the Poincare problem and nonexistence of algebraic limit cycles in family (I) of Chinese classification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavarriga, Javier; Garcia, Isaac A.; Sorolla, Jordi

    2005-01-01

    Any quadratic system with limit cycles can be written in one of the three families stated by the Chinese classification. In this paper we consider family (I), i.e., x-bar =δx-y+-bar x2+mxy+ny2,y-bar =x. We show that the degree of its real irreducible invariant algebraic curves is bounded by 3. By the way, we prove that there is not any algebraic limit cycle for this family

  4. Control of Limit Cycle Oscillations of a Two-Dimensional Aeroelastic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Ghommem

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Linear and nonlinear static feedback controls are implemented on a nonlinear aeroelastic system that consists of a rigid airfoil supported by nonlinear springs in the pitch and plunge directions and subjected to nonlinear aerodynamic loads. The normal form is used to investigate the Hopf bifurcation that occurs as the freestream velocity is increased and to analytically predict the amplitude and frequency of the ensuing limit cycle oscillations (LCO. It is shown that linear control can be used to delay the flutter onset and reduce the LCO amplitude. Yet, its required gains remain a function of the speed. On the other hand, nonlinear control can be effciently implemented to convert any subcritical Hopf bifurcation into a supercritical one and to significantly reduce the LCO amplitude.

  5. Robust Nonlinear Regulation of Limit Cycle Oscillations in UAVs Using Synthetic Jet Actuators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie Ramos Pedroza

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a synthetic jet actuators (SJA-based nonlinear robust controller is developed, which is capable of completely suppressing limit cycle oscillations (LCO in UAV systems with parametric uncertainty in the SJA dynamics and unmodeled external disturbances. Specifically, the control law compensates for uncertainty in an input gain matrix, which results from the unknown airflow dynamics generated by the SJA. Challenges in the control design include compensation for input-multiplicative parametric uncertainty in the actuator dynamic model. The result was achieved via innovative algebraic manipulation in the error system development, along with a Lyapunov-based robust control law. A rigorous Lyapunov-based stability analysis is utilized to prove asymptotic LCO suppression, considering a detailed dynamic model of the pitching and plunging dynamics. Numerical simulation results are provided to demonstrate the robustness and practical performance of the proposed control law.

  6. A review of chemical heat pumps, thermodynamic cycles and thermal energy storage technologies for low grade heat utilisation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, C.W.; Ling-Chin, J.; Roskilly, A.P.

    2013-01-01

    A major cause of energy inefficiency is a result of the generation of waste heat and the lack of suitable technologies for cost-effective utilisation of low grade heat in particular. The market potential for surplus/waste heat from industrial processes in the UK is between 10 TWh and 40 TWh, representing a significant potential resource which has remained unexploited to date. This paper reviews selected technologies suitable for utilisation of waste heat energy, with specific focus on low grade heat, including: (i) chemical heat pumps, such as adsorption and absorption cycles for cooling and heating; (ii) thermodynamic cycles, such as the organic Rankine cycle (ORC), the supercritical Rankine cycle (SRC) and the trilateral cycle (TLC), to produce electricity, with further focus on expander and zeotropic mixtures, and (iii) thermal energy storage, including sensible and latent thermal energy storages and their corresponding media to improve the performance of low grade heat energy systems. - Highlights: ► The review of various thermal technologies for the utilisation of under exploited low grade heat. ► The analyses of the absorption and adsorption heat pumps possibly with performance enhancement additives. ► The analyses of thermal energy storage technologies (latent and sensible) for heat storage. ► The analyses of low temperature thermodynamic cycles to maximise power production.

  7. Study of deformation mechanisms of zinc bicrystals by thermal cycling (1963); Etude des mecanismes de deformation par cyclage thermique de bicristaux de zinc (1963)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondon, J [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1963-06-15

    The thermal cycling of zinc bicrystals has been studied in order to precise the thermal cycling growth mechanism, proposed by Burke and TURKALO, specially the dependence of 'equi-cohesive' temperature of grains on their mutual orientation and the parameters of the thermal cycle. Dilatometric studies showed that a bicrystal had no equi-cohesive temperature and that the grain-boundary develops stress at all temperatures. The creep of single and bicrystal have been studied on a dilatometer with stress below the Yield-stress. At constant temperature secondary creep appears after a transient period, at cycled temperature creep stays transient for strains of about 10{sup -4} to 10{sup -3} when the crystal is plastically hard. Micrographic investigations show that grain-boundary migration accompanies the grain boundary shearing and that cycles produce a strong polygonisation, corroborating the fact that the grain boundary remains a stress-generator and that creep occurs in the volume of grains. The discussion of results shows that the transient creep of hard grain in a bicrystal makes the thermal cycling irreversible and allows on elongation at each cycle if that have the lower expansion coefficient. (author) [French] Le cyclage thermique de bicristaux de zinc a ete etudie pour preciser le mecanisme de la croissance au cyclage thermique propose par BURKE et TURKALO, notamment la temperature d' 'equicohesion' des grains en fonction de leur orientation mutuelle et du regime de cyclage impose. Des essais dilatometriques ont montre qu'un bicristal ne presentait pas de temperature d'equicohesion et que le joint exercait des contraintes quelle que soit la temperature superieure du cycle. Le fluage de monocristaux et de bicristaux a ete etudie sur un dilatometre avec des contraintes inferieures a la limite elastique. A temperature constante le fluage secondaire apparait apres une periode transitoire, a temperature cyclee le fluage reste transitoire pour des deformations de l

  8. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P.; McClarren, Ryan G.

    2015-01-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes

  9. Evaluation of error bands and confidence limits for thermal measurements in the CFTL bundle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Childs, K.W.; Sanders, J.P.; Conklin, J.C.

    1979-01-01

    Surface cladding temperatures for the fuel rod simulators in the Core Flow Test Loop (CFTL) must be inferred from a measurement at a thermocouple junction within the rod. This step requires the evaluation of the thermal field within the rod based on known parameters such as heat generation rate, dimensional tolerances, thermal properties, and contact coefficients. Uncertainties in the surface temperature can be evaluated by assigning error bands to each of the parameters used in the calculation. A statistical method has been employed to establish the confidence limits for the surface temperature from a combination of the standard deviations of the important parameters. This method indicates that for a CFTL fuel rod simulator with a total power of 38 kW and a ratio of maximum to average axial power of 1.21, the 95% confidence limit for the calculated surface temperature is +- 45 0 C at the midpoint of the rod

  10. Asymptotic diffusion limit of cell temperature discretisation schemes for thermal radiation transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smedley-Stevenson, Richard P., E-mail: richard.smedley-stevenson@awe.co.uk [AWE PLC, Aldermaston, Reading, Berkshire, RG7 4PR (United Kingdom); Department of Earth Science and Engineering, Imperial College London, SW7 2AZ (United Kingdom); McClarren, Ryan G., E-mail: rmcclarren@ne.tamu.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering, Texas A & M University, College Station, TX 77843-3133 (United States)

    2015-04-01

    This paper attempts to unify the asymptotic diffusion limit analysis of thermal radiation transport schemes, for a linear-discontinuous representation of the material temperature reconstructed from cell centred temperature unknowns, in a process known as ‘source tilting’. The asymptotic limits of both Monte Carlo (continuous in space) and deterministic approaches (based on linear-discontinuous finite elements) for solving the transport equation are investigated in slab geometry. The resulting discrete diffusion equations are found to have nonphysical terms that are proportional to any cell-edge discontinuity in the temperature representation. Based on this analysis it is possible to design accurate schemes for representing the material temperature, for coupling thermal radiation transport codes to a cell centred representation of internal energy favoured by ALE (arbitrary Lagrange–Eulerian) hydrodynamics schemes.

  11. Nutrient limitation reduces land carbon uptake in simulations with a model of combined carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. S. Goll

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrestrial carbon (C cycle models applied for climate projections simulate a strong increase in net primary productivity (NPP due to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration during the 21st century. These models usually neglect the limited availability of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P, nutrients that commonly limit plant growth and soil carbon turnover. To investigate how the projected C sequestration is altered when stoichiometric constraints on C cycling are considered, we incorporated a P cycle into the land surface model JSBACH (Jena Scheme for Biosphere–Atmosphere Coupling in Hamburg, which already includes representations of coupled C and N cycles.

    The model reveals a distinct geographic pattern of P and N limitation. Under the SRES (Special Report on Emissions Scenarios A1B scenario, the accumulated land C uptake between 1860 and 2100 is 13% (particularly at high latitudes and 16% (particularly at low latitudes lower in simulations with N and P cycling, respectively, than in simulations without nutrient cycles. The combined effect of both nutrients reduces land C uptake by 25% compared to simulations without N or P cycling. Nutrient limitation in general may be biased by the model simplicity, but the ranking of limitations is robust against the parameterization and the inflexibility of stoichiometry. After 2100, increased temperature and high CO2 concentration cause a shift from N to P limitation at high latitudes, while nutrient limitation in the tropics declines. The increase in P limitation at high-latitudes is induced by a strong increase in NPP and the low P sorption capacity of soils, while a decline in tropical NPP due to high autotrophic respiration rates alleviates N and P limitations. The quantification of P limitation remains challenging. The poorly constrained processes of soil P sorption and biochemical mineralization are identified as the main uncertainties in the strength of P limitation

  12. Fast thermal cycling of acetanilide and magnesium chloride hexahydrate for indoor solar cooking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sebaii, A.A.; Al-Amir, S.; Al-Marzouki, F.M.; Faidah, Adel S.; Al-Ghamdi, A.A.; Al-Heniti, S. [Physics Dept., Faculty of Science, King Abdul Aziz Univ., P.O. Box 80203, Jeddah 21589 (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-12-15

    Solar cookers are broadly divided into a direct or focusing type, indirect or box-type and advanced solar cookers. The focusing and box-type solar cookers are for outdoor applications. The advanced solar cookers have the advantage of being usable indoors and thus solve one of the problems, which impede the social acceptance of solar cookers. The advanced type solar cookers are employing additional solar units that increase the cost. Therefore, the solar cooker must contain a heat storage medium to store thermal energy for use during off-sunshine hours. The main aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the melting/solidification fast cycling of the commercial grade acetanilide C{sub 8}H{sub 9}NO (T{sub m} = 116 C) and magnesium chloride hexahydrate MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O (T{sub m} = 116.7 C) on their thermo-physical properties; such as melting point and latent heat of fusion, to be used as storage media inside solar cookers. Five hundred cycles have been performed. The thermo-physical properties are measured using the differential scanning calorimetric technique. The compatibility of the selected phase change materials (PCMs) with the containing material is also studied via the surface investigation, using the SIM technique, of aluminum and stainless steel samples embedded in the PCM during cycling. It is inferred that acetanilide is a promising PCM for cooking indoors and during low intensity solar radiation periods with good compatibility with aluminum as a containing material. However, MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O is not stable during its thermal cycling (even with the extra water principle) due to the phase segregation problem; therefore, it is not recommended as a storage material inside solar cookers for cooking indoors. It is also indicated that MgCl{sub 2}.6H{sub 2}O is not compatible with either aluminum or stainless steel. (author)

  13. Changes in phosphorus magnetic resonance spectra during the cell cycle of phosphorus limited phased culture of Candida utilis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dawson, P.S.S.; MacDonald, J.C.

    1987-01-01

    Cell extracts, serially obtained from Candida utilis grown in continuous (synchrony) culture under phosphate limitation during an 8-h cycle and examined by NMR spectroscopy, revealed changes in polyphosphate content during the cycle period: other phosphorus containing components showed relatively little change. Initially zero, the polyphosphate content increased rapidly to a maximum after 30 min that coincided with exhaustion of phosphate from the culture, and then decreased slowly back to zero at the end of the cycle. The results suggest that polyphosphate, usually considered to function as a reserve material, actively participates during the cell cycle. 12 refs.; 1 figure; 1 table

  14. Phylogenetic conservatism of thermal traits explains dispersal limitation and genomic differentiation of Streptomyces sister-taxa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choudoir, Mallory J; Buckley, Daniel H

    2018-06-07

    The latitudinal diversity gradient is a pattern of biogeography observed broadly in plants and animals but largely undocumented in terrestrial microbial systems. Although patterns of microbial biogeography across broad taxonomic scales have been described in a range of contexts, the mechanisms that generate biogeographic patterns between closely related taxa remain incompletely characterized. Adaptive processes are a major driver of microbial biogeography, but there is less understanding of how microbial biogeography and diversification are shaped by dispersal limitation and drift. We recently described a latitudinal diversity gradient of species richness and intraspecific genetic diversity in Streptomyces by using a geographically explicit culture collection. Within this geographically explicit culture collection, we have identified Streptomyces sister-taxa whose geographic distribution is delimited by latitude. These sister-taxa differ in geographic distribution, genomic diversity, and ecological traits despite having nearly identical SSU rRNA gene sequences. Comparative genomic analysis reveals genomic differentiation of these sister-taxa consistent with restricted gene flow across latitude. Furthermore, we show phylogenetic conservatism of thermal traits between the sister-taxa suggesting that thermal trait adaptation limits dispersal and gene flow across climate regimes as defined by latitude. Such phylogenetic conservatism of thermal traits is commonly associated with latitudinal diversity gradients for plants and animals. These data provide further support for the hypothesis that the Streptomyces latitudinal diversity gradient was formed as a result of historical demographic processes defined by dispersal limitation and driven by paleoclimate dynamics.

  15. Oxidation behavior of Hf-modified platinum aluminide coatings during thermal cycling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liya Ye

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Platinum aluminide coatings with different Hf contents were fabricated by using HfCl4. The oxidation kinetics and the rumpling behavior of oxide scale were investigated. After thermal cycling, the coating with 0.46 wt% Hf showed least weight gain. With the increase of Hf content, rumpling extent of the scale decreased. Meanwhile, HfO2 preferentially formed in the scale resulting in the increase of scale thickness. The oxidation of excessive Hf even caused the spallation of the scale. The results in the present study indicate that although Hf plays an important role in decreasing rumpling extent of TGO, the oxidation of Hf decreases the adhesion of the scale. Keywords: Pt-Al coating, Hf, Oxidation, Rumpling

  16. Recent advances in SRS on hydrogen isotope separation using thermal cycling absorption process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, X.; Kit Heung, L.; Sessions, H.T. [Savannah River National Laboratory - SRNL, Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-03-15

    TCAP (Thermal Cycling Absorption Process) is a gas chromatograph in principle using palladium in the column packing, but it is unique in the fact that the carrier gas, hydrogen, is being isotopically separated and the system is operated in a semi-continuous manner. TCAP units are used to purify tritium. The recent TCAP advances at Savannah River Site (SRS) include compressor-free concept for heating/cooling, push and pull separation using an active inverse column, and compact column design. The new developments allow significantly higher throughput and better reliability from 1/10 of the current production system's footprint while consuming 60% less energy. Various versions are derived in the meantime for external customers to be used in fusion energy projects.

  17. Thermal cycling tests on Li4SiO4 and beryllium pebbles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalle Donne, M.; Norajitra, P.; Weisenburger, A.

    1995-01-01

    The European B.O.T. Demo-relevant solid breeder blanket is based on the use of beds of beryllium and Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles. Particularly dangerous for the pebble integrity are the rapid temperature changes which could occur, for instance, by a sudden blanket power shut-down. A series of thermal cycle tests have been performed for various beds of beryllium and Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles. No breaking was observed in the beryllium pebbles, however the Li 4 SiO 4 pebbles broke by temperature rates of change of about -50 C/sec independently on pebbles size and lithium enrichment. This value is considerably higher than the peak temperature rates of change expected in the blanket. (orig.)

  18. The Effect of Thermal Cycling on Crystal-Liquid Separation During Lunar Magma Ocean Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Ryan D.

    2013-01-01

    Differentiation of magma oceans likely involves a mixture of fractional and equilibrium crystallization [1]. The existence of: 1) large volumes of anorthosite in the lunar highlands and 2) the incompatible- rich (KREEP) reservoir suggests that fractional crystallization may have dominated during differentiation of the Moon. For this to have occurred, crystal fractionation must have been remarkably efficient. Several authors [e.g. 2, 3] have hypothesized that equilibrium crystallization would have dominated early in differentiation of magma oceans because of crystal entrainment during turbulent convection. However, recent numerical modeling [4] suggests that crystal settling could have occurred throughout the entire solidification history of the lunar magma ocean if crystals were large and crystal fraction was low. These results indicate that the crystal size distribution could have played an important role in differentiation of the lunar magma ocean. Here, I suggest that thermal cycling from tidal heating during lunar magma ocean crystallization caused crystals to coarsen, leading to efficient crystal-liquid separation.

  19. Thermal stability of chloroform in the steam condensate cycle of CANDU-PHW nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepine, Louis; Gilbert, Roland; Ouellet, Lorenzo

    1992-01-01

    Analysis of samples taken at the Gentilly 2 (Quebec) CANDU-PHW (CANadian Deuterium Uranium - Pressurized Heavy Water) plant after chlorination and demineralization revealed the presence of all four trihalomethanes (THMs) (CHCl 3 , CHBrCl 2 , CHBr 2 Cl and CHBr 3 ) and other unidentified halogenated volatile compounds. Among the THMs, chloroform was the major contaminant. A study of its thermal stability in water at different temperatures confirmed the degradation of the CHCl 3 molecule according to the equation CHCl 3 + H2O → CO + 3 HCl. The reaction follows first order kinetics and has an activation energy of 100 kJ/mol. The estimated half-life is six seconds at 260 deg C, the maximum temperature of the steam condensate cycle

  20. Reliability of lead-free solder joints with different PCB surface finishes under thermal cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia Yanghua [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)], E-mail: xia_yanghua@hotmail.com; Xie Xiaoming [State Key Laboratory of Functional Materials for Informatics, Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200050 (China)

    2008-04-24

    The reliability of lead-free electronic assemblies under thermal cycling was investigated. Thin small outline package (TSOP) devices with FeNi leads were reflow soldered on FR4 PCB (printed circuit board) with Sn3.0Ag0.5Cu (wt%) solder. The effects of different PCB finishes (organic solderability preservative (OSP) and electroless nickel immersion gold (ENIG)) were studied. The results show that OSP finish reveals better performance than its ENIG counterparts. The crack originates at the fringe of heel fillet in both cases. The propagation of crack in the ENIG case is along the device/solder interface, while in the case of OSP, the crack extends parallel to the solder/PCB interface. When the OSP finishes are employed, many Cu6Sn5 precipitates form inside the bulk solder and have a strengthening effect on the solder joint, resulting in better reliability performance as compared to those with ENIG finishes.

  1. Effect of the combined stress on the life of components under thermal cycling conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuchowski, R.; Zietkowski, L.

    1987-01-01

    The life of structural components subjected to temperature changes is affected, among other factors, by the nature of the stress field. If life prediction for axially stressed components can be accomplished with a number of well established techniques, the behaviour under a complex state of stress and varying temperature conditions still is the object of intensive research. The present study was aimed at assessing the influence of the stress field upon the life of specimens made of chromium-nickel H23N18 steel under thermal cycling conditions. The designation of steel is in accordance with Polish Standards. The experiments were made on thin-walled tubular specimens loaded with various combinations of a static axial force and a static torque. (orig./GL)

  2. Heat transfer characteristics and limitations analysis of heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guangming, Xiao; Yanxia, Du; Yewei, Gui; Lei, Liu; Xiaofeng, Yang; Dong, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The theories of heat transfer, thermodynamics and fluid dynamics are employed to develop the coupled heat transfer analytical methods for the heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structure (HPC TPS), and a three-dimensional numerical method considering the sonic limit of heat pipe is proposed. To verify the calculation correctness, computations are carried out for a typical heat pipe and the results agree well with experimental data. Then, the heat transfer characteristics and limitations of HPC TPS are mainly studied. The studies indicate that the use of heat pipe can reduce the temperature at high heat flux region of structure efficiently. However, there is a frozen startup period before the heat pipe reaching a steady operating state, and the sonic limit will be a restriction on the heat transfer capability. Thus, the effects of frozen startup must be considered for the design of HPC TPS. The simulation model and numerical method proposed in this paper can predict the heat transfer characteristics of HPC TPS quickly and exactly, and the results will provide important references for the design or performance evaluation of HPC TPS. - Highlights: • Numerical methods for the heat-pipe-cooled thermal protection structure are studied. • Three-dimensional simulation model considering sonic limit of heat pipe is proposed. • The frozen startup process of the embedded heat pipe can be predicted exactly. • Heat transfer characteristics of TPS and limitations of heat pipe are discussed

  3. Topological Classification of Limit Cycles of Piecewise Smooth Dynamical Systems and Its Associated Non-Standard Bifurcations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Alexander Taborda

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a novel strategy for the synthesis and the classification of nonsmooth limit cycles and its bifurcations (named Non-Standard Bifurcations or Discontinuity Induced Bifurcations or DIBs in n-dimensional piecewise-smooth dynamical systems, particularly Continuous PWS and Discontinuous PWS (or Filippov-type PWS systems. The proposed qualitative approach explicitly includes two main aspects: multiple discontinuity boundaries (DBs in the phase space and multiple intersections between DBs (or corner manifolds—CMs. Previous classifications of DIBs of limit cycles have been restricted to generic cases with a single DB or a single CM. We use the definition of piecewise topological equivalence in order to synthesize all possibilities of nonsmooth limit cycles. Families, groups and subgroups of cycles are defined depending on smoothness zones and discontinuity boundaries (DB involved. The synthesized cycles are used to define bifurcation patterns when the system is perturbed with parametric changes. Four families of DIBs of limit cycles are defined depending on the properties of the cycles involved. Well-known and novel bifurcations can be classified using this approach.

  4. Study of cyclic thermal aging of tube type receivers as a function of the duration of the cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setien, Eneko; Fernández-Reche, Jesús; Ariza, María Jesús; Álvarez-de-Lara, Mónica

    2017-06-01

    The tube type receivers are exposed to variable duration cyclic operating conditions, which can jeopardize its reliability, and make it hard to estimate its long term performance. The designers have to deal with this problem and estimate the receiver long term performance based on the poor available litterature and the data sheets of the material. In order to help the designer better estimate the performance of the receivers, in this paper the cyclic thermal aging is analyzed as a function of the cycle duration. For this purpose, coated and uncoated Inconel alloy 625 tubular samples, similar to those used in the commercial receivers, are cyclically aged with different thermal cycle duration. The aging of these samples has been analyzed by means of oxidation kinetics, microstructure examination and mechanical and optical properties. The effect of the thermal cycle duration is studied and discussed by comparison of the results.

  5. Far-Field Superresolution of Thermal Electromagnetic Sources at the Quantum Limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, Ranjith; Tsang, Mankei

    2016-11-04

    We obtain the ultimate quantum limit for estimating the transverse separation of two thermal point sources using a given imaging system with limited spatial bandwidth. We show via the quantum Cramér-Rao bound that, contrary to the Rayleigh limit in conventional direct imaging, quantum mechanics does not mandate any loss of precision in estimating even deep sub-Rayleigh separations. We propose two coherent measurement techniques, easily implementable using current linear-optics technology, that approach the quantum limit over an arbitrarily large range of separations. Our bound is valid for arbitrary source strengths, all regions of the electromagnetic spectrum, and for any imaging system with an inversion-symmetric point-spread function. The measurement schemes can be applied to microscopy, optical sensing, and astrometry at all wavelengths.

  6. Ion irradiation and thermal cycling tests of TiC coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, S.; Ohara, H.; Son, P.; Miyake, M.

    1984-01-01

    Ion irradiation of TiC coatings prepared by diffusion annealing was performed with 20-40 keV He + ions for different doses at room temperature. The polished TiCsub(0.99) coatings irradiated with 40 keV He + ions showed the surface damage and erosion due to blistering and exfoliation above a dose of 1.8x10 17 ions/cm 2 , whereas no change in the surface morphology could be detected for the as-prepared coatings up to a dose of 1.4x10 18 ions/cm 2 . The results suggested that surface erosion due to blistering can be effectively reduced on the rough surface of the as-prepared TiC coating. The average blister diameter in the polished TiCsub(0.99) coating increased with increasing projectile energy. For the 40 keV He + ion irradiation of the polished TiCsub(0.5) coatings, general features in blisters were similar to those observed for the TiCsub(0.99) coatings, but the critical dose for blistering shifted to a higher value in comparison with the polished TiCsub(0.99) coating. Thermal cycling between 500 and 1200 0 C caused serious surface damage for the TiCsub(0.99) coating irradiated with 40 keV He + ions below the critical dose for blistering, while the coating with surface damage due to blistering showed no significant change in the surface topography after thermal cycling. (orig.)

  7. Effect of grit blasting on the thermal cycling behavior of diffusion aluminide/YSZ TBCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxuciac@163.com; Huang, Guanghong; He, Limin; Mu, Rende; Wang, Kai; Dai, Jianwei

    2014-02-15

    Highlights: • TBCs including of CVD NiAl bond coat and EB-PVD YSZ ceramic coating with and without grit blasting process. • Grain boundary ridges are the sites for spallation damage initiation in aluminide/YSZ TBCs. • Ridges are removed, and no cavity formation and this damage initiation mode are suppressed. • Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to TGO interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. -- Abstract: Thermal barrier coating system (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited NiAl bond coat and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}–stabilized-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) ceramic coating with and without grit blasting process were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, cyclic oxidation behaviors of these coatings were studied in detail. Grain boundary ridges form on the surface of aluminide bond coat prior to the deposition of the ceramic coating by EB-PVD, which are shown to be the sites for spallation damage initiation in aluminide/YSZ TBCs. When these ridges are removed, there is no cavity formation and this damage initiation mode is suppressed. Damage initiation and progression occurs at the bond coat to TGO interface leading to a buckling failure behavior. A buckle failure once started may be arrested when it runs into a region of high bond coat to TGO interface toughness. Thus, complete failure requires further loss in toughness of the bond coat to TGO interface with additional cycling. From the result of thermal cycling, an averaged four folds lifetime improvement can be achieved with samples after grit blasting of bond coat surface as compared with those samples existence in ridges on the bond coats’ surface.

  8. Thermal stability of hydrocarbons in nature: Limits, evidence, characteristics, and possible controls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, L.C.

    1993-01-01

    Numerous petroleum-geochemical analyses of deeply buried, high-rank, fine-grained rocks from ultra-deep wellbores by different investigators demonstrate that C15+ hydrocarbons (HCs) persist in moderate to high concentrations at vitrinite reflectance (R0) values of 2.0-5.0% and persist in measurable concentrations up to R0 = 7.0-8.0%, at which point the thermal deadline for C15+ HC's is finally approached. Qualitative analyses have been carried out on 1. (1) high-rank gas condensates which have been exposed to the HC-thermal-destructive phase, 2. (2) bitumens from high-temperature aqueous-pyrolysis experiments in the HC-thermal-destructive phase, and 3. (3) bitumens from high-rank, fine-grained rocks near the HC-thermal-destructive phase. These analyses clearly demonstrate that well-defined compositional suites are established in the saturated, aromatic, and sulfur-bearing aromatic HCs in and near the HC-thermal-destructive phase. On the other hand, accepted petroleum-geochemical paradigms place rigid limits on HC thermal stability: C15+ HCs begin thermal cracking at R0 values of 0.9% and are completely thermally destroyed by R0 = 1.35%; C2-C4 HC gases are thermally destroyed by R0 = 2.0% and methane is thermally destroyed by R0 = 4.0%. Furthermore, published data and observations in many HC basins worldwide support these models; for example, 1. (1) sharp basinal zonations of gas and oil deposits vs. maturation rank in HC basins and 2. (2) decreasing C15+ HC concentrations in some fine-grained rocks at ranks of R0 ??? 0.9%. The fact that observed data (C15+ HCs thermally stable to R0 = 7.0-8.0%) is so far removed from predicted behavior (C15+) HCs expected to be thermally destroyed by R0 = 1.35%) may be due to 1. (1) a lack of recognition of some important possible controlling parameters of organic matter (OM) metamorphism and too much importance given to other assumed controlling parameters; and 2. (2) assigning HC distribution patterns in petroleum basins to HC

  9. Pushing desalination recovery to the maximum limit: Membrane and thermal processes integration

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil

    2017-05-05

    The economics of seawater desalination processes has been continuously improving as a result of desalination market expansion. Presently, reverse osmosis (RO) processes are leading in global desalination with 53% share followed by thermally driven technologies 33%, but in Gulf Cooperation Council (GCC) countries their shares are 42% and 56% respectively due to severe feed water quality. In RO processes, intake, pretreatment and brine disposal cost 25% of total desalination cost at 30–35% recovery. We proposed a tri-hybrid system to enhance overall recovery up to 81%. The conditioned brine leaving from RO processes supplied to proposed multi-evaporator adsorption cycle driven by low temperature industrial waste heat sources or solar energy. RO membrane simulation has been performed using WinFlow and IMSDesign commercial softwares developed by GE and Nitto. Detailed mathematical model of overall system is developed and simulation has been conducted in FORTRAN. The final brine reject concentration from tri-hybrid cycle can vary from 166,000ppm to 222,000ppm if RO retentate concentration varies from 45,000ppm to 60,000ppm. We also conducted economic analysis and showed that the proposed tri-hybrid cycle can achieve highest recovery, 81%, and lowest energy consumption, 1.76kWhelec/m3, for desalination reported in the literature up till now.

  10. Fundamental-frequency and load-varying thermal cycles effects on lifetime estimation of DFIG power converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, G.; Zhou, D.; Yang, J.

    2017-01-01

    In respect to a Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) system, its corresponding time scale varies from microsecond level of power semiconductor switching to second level of the mechanical response. In order to map annual thermal profile of the power semiconductors, different approaches have been ...... adopted to handle the fundamental-frequency thermal cycles and load-varying thermal cycles. Their effects on lifetime estimation of the power device in the Back-to-Back (BTB) power converter are evaluated.......In respect to a Doubly-Fed Induction Generator (DFIG) system, its corresponding time scale varies from microsecond level of power semiconductor switching to second level of the mechanical response. In order to map annual thermal profile of the power semiconductors, different approaches have been...

  11. Mechanisms Controlling Species Responses to Climate Change: Thermal Tolerances and Shifting Range Limits. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, R. F.; Bykova, O.; Coiner, H.

    2010-12-01

    One of the main effects of anthropogenic climate change will be widespread shifts in species distribution, with the common assumption that they will migrate to higher elevation and latitude. While this assumption is supported by migration patterns following climate warming in the past 20,000 years, it has not been rigorously evaluated in terms of physiological mechanism, despite the implication that migration in response to climate warming is controlled by some form of thermal adaptation. We have been evaluating the degree to which species range limits are controlled by physiological patterns of thermal tolerance in bioinvaders of North America. Bioinvaders presumably have few biotic controls over their distribution and thus are more likely to fully exploit their thermal niche. In cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum), the minimum lethal temperature in winter is -32C, which corresponds to the mean winter minimum temperature at its northern range limit. In red brome (Bromus rubens), the minimum lethal temperature is also near -32C, which is well below the minimum winter temperature near -20C that corresponds to its northern distribution limit. In kudzu (Pueraria lobata), the minimum lethal temperature is near -20C, which corresponds to the midwinter minimum at its northern distribution limit; however, overwintering kudzu tissues are insulated by soil and snow cover, and thus do not experience lethal temperatures at kudzu's northern range limit. These results demonstrate that some invasive species can exploit the potential range defined by their low temperature tolerance and thus can be predicted by mechanistic models to migrate to higher latitudes with moderation of winter cold. The distribution of other invaders such as kudzu and red brome are not controlled by tolerance of midwinter cold. Developing mechanistic models of their distributions, and how these might change with climate warming, will require extensive physiological study.

  12. Evaluation of Electroless-Nickel Plated Polypropylene under Thermal Cycling and Mechanical Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.O. Ajibola

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The electroless-nickel composite (ENC consisting of bright metallic electroless-nickel (EN and dull electroless-nickel-phosphorus (EN-P were deposited on the polypropylene (PP substrate from the sodium hypophosphite baths. The ENC plated specimens were subjected to abrasive wear-adhesion test of 1750, 3500, 7000 and 14000 cycles; thermal cycle-adhesion tests, and tensile strength and creep tests. The deposition of ENC influenced the strength and creep strain properties of the PP. The maximum stress σ of 118 (MPa was obtained from EN-PP specimen at strain  of 0.1 mm/mm as compared with the PP having stress σ of 36 (MPa at strain  of 0.07 mm/mm before failure The surface appearances and microstructures of ENC film on PP substrates were examined under the higher resolution metallurgical microscope with digital camera and microscopic camera. The composition of ENC film was characterized using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Energy Dispersive X-Ray analyses (Jeol JSM-7600F Field Emission SEM/EDX, The micrographs and spectra lines data generated were used to interpret the results.

  13. Efficiency Study of a Commercial Thermoelectric Power Generator (TEG) Under Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatzikraniotis, E.; Zorbas, K. T.; Samaras, I.; Kyratsi, Th.; Paraskevopoulos, K. M.

    2010-09-01

    Thermoelectric generators (TEGs) make use of the Seebeck effect in semiconductors for the direct conversion of heat to electrical energy. The possible use of a device consisting of numerous TEG modules for waste heat recovery from an internal combustion (IC) engine could considerably help worldwide efforts towards energy saving. However, commercially available TEGs operate at temperatures much lower than the actual operating temperature range in the exhaust pipe of an automobile, which could cause structural failure of the thermoelectric elements. Furthermore, continuous thermal cycling could lead to reduced efficiency and lifetime of the TEG. In this work we investigate the long-term performance and stability of a commercially available TEG under temperature and power cycling. The module was subjected to sequential hot-side heating (at 200°C) and cooling for long times (3000 h) in order to measure changes in the TEG’s performance. A reduction in Seebeck coefficient and an increase in resistivity were observed. Alternating-current (AC) impedance measurements and scanning electron microscope (SEM) observations were performed on the module, and results are presented and discussed.

  14. Thermal Conductivity Changes Due to Degradation of Cathode Film Subjected to Charge-Discharge Cycles in a Li Ion Battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagannadham, K.

    2018-05-01

    A battery device with graphene platelets as anode, lithium nickel manganese oxide as cathode, and solid-state electrolyte consisting of layers of lithium phosphorous oxynitride and lithium lanthanum titanate is assembled on the stainless steel substrate. The battery in a polymer enclosure is subjected to several electrical tests consisting of charge and discharge cycles at different current and voltage levels. Thermal conductivity of the cathode layer is determined at the end of charge-discharge cycles using transient thermoreflectance. The microstructure and composition of the cathode layer and the interface between the cathode, the anode, and the electrolyte are characterized using scanning electron microscopy and elemental mapping. The decrease in the thermal conductivity of the same cathode observed after each set of electrical test cycles is correlated with the volume changes and formation of low ionic and thermal conductivity lithium oxide and lithium oxychloride at the interface and along porous regions. The interface between the metal current collector and the cathode is also found to be responsible for the increase in thermal resistance. The results indicate that changes in the thermal conductivity of the electrodes provide a measure of the resistance to heat transfer and degradation of ionic transport in the cathode accompanying the charge-discharge cycles in the batteries.

  15. Use of Guided Acoustic Waves to Assess the Effects of Thermal-Mechanical Cycling on Composite Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seale, Michael D.; Madaras, Eric I.

    2000-01-01

    The introduction of new, advanced composite materials into aviation systems requires it thorough understanding of the long-term effects of combined thermal and mechanical loading. As part of a study to evaluate the effects of thermal-mechanical cycling, it guided acoustic (Lamb) wave measurement system was used to measure the bending and out-of-plane stiffness coefficients of composite laminates undergoing thermal-mechanical loading. The system uses a pulse/receive technique that excites an antisymmetric Lamb mode and measures the time-of-flight over a wide frequency range. Given the material density and plate thickness, the bending and out-of-plane shear stiffnesses are calculated from a reconstruction of the velocity dispersion curve. A series of 16 and 32-ply composite laminates were subjected to it thermal-mechanical loading profile in load frames equipped with special environmental chambers. The composite systems studied were it graphite fiber reinforced amorphous thermoplastic polyimide and it graphite fiber reinforced bismaleimide thermoset. The samples were exposed to both high and low temperature extremes its well as high and low strain profiles. The bending and out-of-plane stiffnesses for composite sample that have undergone over 6,000 cycles of thermal-mechanical loading are reported. The Lamb wave generated elastic stiffness results have shown decreases of up to 20% at 4,936 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoplastic samples and up to 64% at 4,706 loading cycles for the graphite/thermoset samples.

  16. Evaluation of the properties of anodized aluminum 6061 subjected to thermal cycling treatment using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Yuelong [Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory (CEEL), Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0241 (United States); Shih Hong [Lam Research Corporation, 4400 Cushing Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States)], E-mail: hong.shih@lamrc.com; Daugherty, John [Lam Research Corporation, 4400 Cushing Parkway, Fremont, CA 94538 (United States); Mansfeld, Florian [Corrosion and Environmental Effects Laboratory (CEEL), Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, CA 90089-0241 (United States)], E-mail: mansfeld@usc.edu

    2009-10-15

    The corrosion resistance of anodized Al 6061 produced by two different anodizing and sealing processes was evaluated for 30 days during exposure to 3.5 wt% NaCl using EIS. Thermal cycling treatments at 120, 160 and 200 deg. C have been applied for the two types of samples. The degradation of the properties of the anodized layers has been determined by thorough analysis of the EIS data for control samples and samples that had undergone thermal cycling. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to evaluate the damage to the anodized aluminum layers due to thermal cycling. It was found that the thermal treatment produced considerable damage of both the porous layer and the barrier layer. The EIS data suggest that some cracks extended into the bare metal. The damage of the oxide layers increased with increasing thermal cycling temperature for both types of samples. Self-sealing of the porous layer and the barrier layer occurred during immersion in NaCl.

  17. Effect of thermal mass on life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dodoo, Ambrose; Gustavsson, Leif; Sathre, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► The effect of thermal mass on life cycle primary energy balance of concrete and wood building is analyzed. ► A concrete building has slightly lower space heating demand than a wood alternative. ► Still, a wood building has a lower life cycle primary energy use than a concrete alternative. ► The influence of thermal mass on space heating energy use for buildings in Nordic climate is small. -- Abstract: In this study we analyze the effect of thermal mass on space heating energy use and life cycle primary energy balances of a concrete- and a wood-frame building. The analysis includes primary energy use during the production, operation, and end-of-life phases. Based on hour-by-hour dynamic modeling of heat flows in building mass configurations we calculate the energy saving benefits of thermal mass during the operation phase of the buildings. Our results indicate that the energy savings due to thermal mass is small and varies with the climatic location and energy efficiency levels of the buildings. A concrete-frame building has slightly lower space heating demand than a wood-frame alternative, due to the higher thermal mass of concrete-based materials. Still, a wood-frame building has a lower life cycle primary energy balance than a concrete-frame alternative. This is due primarily to the lower production primary energy use and greater bioenergy recovery benefits of the wood-frame buildings. These advantages outweigh the energy saving benefits of thermal mass. We conclude that the influence of thermal mass on space heating energy use for buildings located in Nordic climate is small and that wood-frame buildings with cogeneration based district heating would be an effective means of reducing primary energy use in the built environment.

  18. Efficient cycle jumping techniques for the modelling of materials and structures under cyclic mechanical and thermal loading

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunne, F.P.E.; Hayhurst, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Highly efficient cycle jumping algorithms have been developed for the calculation of stress and damage histories for both cyclic mechanical and cycle thermal loading. The techniques have been shown to be suitable for cyclic plasticity; creep-cyclic plasticity interaction; and creep dominated material behaviour. The cycle jumping algorithms have been validated by comparison of the predictions made using both the cycle jumping technique, and the full calculation involving the integration of the equations around all cycles. Excellent agreement has been achieved, and significant reductions in computer processing time of up to 90% have been obtained by using the cycle jumping technique. A further cycle jumping technique has been developed for full component analysis, using a viscoplastic damage finite element solver, which enables stress redistribution to be modelled. The behaviour and lifetime of a slag tap component has been predicted when subjected to cyclic thermal loading. Cyclic plasticity damage and micro-crack initiation is predicted to occur at the water cooling duct after 2.974 cycles, with damage and micro-crack evolution arresting after 60.000. (author). 18 refs., 13 figs., 4 photos

  19. Improvement of high voltage cycling performance and thermal stability of lithium-ion cells by use of a thiophene additive

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Ki-Soo; Sun, Yang-Kook; Kim, Dong-Won [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hanyang University, Seungdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea); Noh, Jaegeun [Department of Chemistry, Hanyang University, Seungdong-gu, Seoul 133-791 (Korea); Song, Kwang Soup [Advanced Medical Device Center, Korea Electrotechnology, Research Institute, Ansan, Gyeonggi-do 426-170 (Korea)

    2009-10-15

    This study demonstrates that the addition of thiophene improves the cycle life of lithium-ion cells at high voltage. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy results suggest that addition of thiophene significantly suppresses the increase of the charge transfer resistance that occurs during cycling up to high voltage. Differential scanning calorimetric studies showed that the thermal stability of fully charged LiCoO{sub 2} cathode was also enhanced in the presence of thiophene. (author)

  20. Fatigue life of fibre reinforced plastics at 295 K after thermal cycling between 295 K and 77 K

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belisario, G.; Caproni, F.; Marchetti, E.

    Results of low cycle three-point end fatigue tests at 295 K are reported. These were obtained from fibre reinforced plastics (FRP) flat specimens made of epoxy matrix reinforced with glass rovings only or glass rovings and Kevlar cloth. It is shown that previous thermal cycles between 295 K and 77 K exert an influence on the fatigue life as well on the acoustic emission results.

  1. Estimate of the upper limit of amplitude of Solar Cycle No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silbergleit, V. M; Larocca, P. A [Departamento de Fisica, UBA (Argentina)

    2001-07-01

    AA* indices of values greater than 60 10{sup -9} Tesla are considered in order to characterize geomagnetic storms since the available series of these indices comprise the years from 1868 to 1998 (The longest existing interval of geomagnetic activity). By applying the precursor technique we have performed an analysis of the storm periods and the solar activity, obtaining a good correlation between the number of storms ({alpha})(characterized by the AA* indices) and the amplitudes of each solar cycle ({zeta}) and those of the next ({mu}). Using the multiple regression method applied to {alpha}=A+B{zeta} +C{mu}, the constants are calculated and the values found are: A=-33 {+-}18, B= 0.74{+-}0.13 y C= 0.56{+-}0.13. The present statistical method indicates that the current solar cycle (number 23) would have an upper limit of 202{+-}57 monthy mean sunspots. This value indicates that the solar activity would be high causing important effects on the Earth's environment. [Spanish] Se consideran los valores de los indices AA* de valor mayor que 60 10{sup -9} Tesla para caracterizar tormentas geomagneticas ya que las series disponibles de estos indices van desde 1868 hasta 1998 (el mas largo intervalo de la actividad geomagnetica existente). Aplicando la tecnica del precursor hemos realizado un analisis de los periodos de tormentas y la actividad solar obteniendo una buena correlacion entre el numero de tormentas ({alpha}) (caracterizado por los indices AA*) y las amplitudes de los ciclos solares corriente ({zeta}) y el proximo ({mu}). Usando el metodo de regresion multiple aplicado a {alpha}=A+B{zeta} +C{mu}, las consonantes resultaron: A=-33 {+-}18, B= 0.74{+-}0.13 y C= 0.56{+-}0.13. El metodo estadistico presentado indica que el ciclo actual (numero 23) tendria un pico de 202{+-} 57 manchas mensuales promedio. Este valor indica que la actividad solar seria alta produciendo importantes efectos en el medio ambiente terrestre.

  2. Continental growth and mantle hydration as intertwined feedback cycles in the thermal evolution of Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höning, Dennis; Spohn, Tilman

    2016-06-01

    A model of Earth's continental coverage and mantle water budget is discussed along with its thermal evolution. The model links a thermal evolution model based on parameterized mantle convection with a model of a generic subduction zone that includes the oceanic crust and a sedimentary layer as carriers of water. Part of the subducted water is used to produce continental crust while the remainder is subducted into the mantle. The total length of the subduction zones is calculated from the total surface area of continental crust assuming randomly distributed continents. The mantle viscosity is dependent of temperature and the water concentration. Sediments are generated by continental crust erosion, and water outgassing at mid-oceanic ridges closes the water cycle. We discuss the strongly coupled, non-linear model using a phase plane defined by the continental coverage and mantle water concentration. Fixed points are found in the phase plane at which the rates of change of both variables are zero. These fixed points evolve with time, but in many cases, three fixed points emerge of which two are stable and an intermediate point is unstable with respect to continental coverage. With initial conditions from a Monte-Carlo scheme we calculate evolution paths in the phase plane and find a large spread of final states that all have a mostly balanced water budget. The present day observed 40% continental surface coverage is found near the unstable fixed point. Our evolution model suggests that Earth's continental coverage formed early and has been stable for at least 1.5 Gyr. The effect of mantle water regassing (and mantle viscosity depending on water concentration) is found to lower the present day mantle temperature by about 120 K, but the present day mantle viscosity is affected little. The water cycle thus complements the well-known thermostat effect of viscosity and mantle temperature. Our results further suggest that the biosphere could impact the feedback cycles by

  3. Plasticity in thermal tolerance has limited potential to buffer ectotherms from global warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunderson, Alex R.; Stillman, Jonathon H.

    2015-01-01

    Global warming is increasing the overheating risk for many organisms, though the potential for plasticity in thermal tolerance to mitigate this risk is largely unknown. In part, this shortcoming stems from a lack of knowledge about global and taxonomic patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity. To address this critical issue, we test leading hypotheses for broad-scale variation in ectotherm tolerance plasticity using a dataset that includes vertebrate and invertebrate taxa from terrestrial, freshwater and marine habitats. Contrary to expectation, plasticity in heat tolerance was unrelated to latitude or thermal seasonality. However, plasticity in cold tolerance is associated with thermal seasonality in some habitat types. In addition, aquatic taxa have approximately twice the plasticity of terrestrial taxa. Based on the observed patterns of variation in tolerance plasticity, we propose that limited potential for behavioural plasticity (i.e. behavioural thermoregulation) favours the evolution of greater plasticity in physiological traits, consistent with the ‘Bogert effect’. Finally, we find that all ectotherms have relatively low acclimation in thermal tolerance and demonstrate that overheating risk will be minimally reduced by acclimation in even the most plastic groups. Our analysis indicates that behavioural and evolutionary mechanisms will be critical in allowing ectotherms to buffer themselves from extreme temperatures. PMID:25994676

  4. The Effect of Thermal Cycling Treatments on the Thermal Stability and Mechanical Properties of a Ti-Based Bulk Metallic Glass Composite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Bu

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The effect of thermal cycling treatments on the thermal stability and mechanical properties of a Ti48Zr20Nb12Cu5Be15 bulk metallic glass composite (BMGC has been investigated. Results show that moderate thermal cycles in a temperature range of −196 °C (cryogenic temperature, CT to 25 °C (room temperature, RT or annealing time at CT has not induced obvious changes of thermal stability and then it decreases slightly over critical thermal parameters. In addition, the dendritic second phases with a bcc structure are homogeneously embedded in the amorphous matrix; no visible changes are detected, which shows structural stability. Excellent mechanical properties as high as 1599 MPa yield strength and 34% plastic strain are obtained, and the yield strength and elastic modulus also increase gradually. The effect on the stability is analyzed quantitatively by crystallization kinetics and plastic-flow models, and indicates that the reduction of structural relaxation enthalpy, which is related to the degradation of spatial heterogeneity, reduces thermal stability but does not imperatively deteriorate the plasticity.

  5. Fused deposition modeling (FDM) fabricated part behavior under tensile stress, thermal cycling, and fluid pressure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad Shojib

    using visual feedback method led to an increase in UTS of 16% in XYZ, 7% in XZY, and 22% in ZXY. The FDM fabricated parts using PC were tested under thermal cycling of -30° C to 85° C. A series of experiments were performed (e.g., tensile test, deformation of fabricated part, glass transition measurement) to evaluate the possibility of FDM fabricated parts in the harsh environment (embedded electronics, wiring in automotive industry, etc.). The UTS results showed that the results were not significantly different using statistical analysis after 150 thermal cycles while average Young's modulus increased from 1389 MPa to 1469 MPa after 150 thermal cycles. The highest warping of the specimen was found to be 78 microm which was the result of continuous thermal expansion and contraction. A sealing algorithm was developed using LabVIEW and MATLAB programming. The LabVIEW program was developed to obtain the edge information of each layer of a 3D model part. The MATLAB programming was used to gather the output information from LabVIEW and calculate the suggested RW providing least amount of gap in between rasters and contours. As a result, each layer became sealed and was able to withstand air pressure within a pressure vessel. A test specimen was fabricated according to the developed sealing algorithm parameters and used to show entirely sealed walls capable of withstanding up to 138 kPa air pressure.

  6. Thermal-hydraulic limitations on water-cooled fusion reactor components

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cha, Y.S.; Misra, B.

    1986-01-01

    An assessment of the cooling requirements for fusion reactor components, such as the first wall and limiter/divertor, was carried out using pressurized water as the coolant. In order to establish the coolant operating conditions, a survey of the literature on departure from nucleate boiling, critical heat flux, asymmetrical heating and heat transfer augmentation techniques was carried out. The experimental data and the empirical correlations indicate that thermal protection for the fusion reactor components based on conventional design concepts can be provided with an adequate margin of safety without resorting to either high coolant velocities, excessive coolant pressures, or heat transfer augmentation techniques. If, however, the future designs require unconventional shapes or heat transfer enhancement techniques, experimental verification would be necessary since no data on heat transfer augmentation techniques exist for complex geometries, especially under asymmetrically heated conditions. Since the data presented herein are concerned primarily with thermal protection of the reactor components, the final design should consider other factors such as thermal stresses, temperature limits, and fatigue

  7. Thermodynamic and design considerations of organic Rankine cycles in combined application with a solar thermal gas turbine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, R.; Kusterer, K.; Sugimoto, T.; Tanimura, K.; Bohn, D.

    2013-12-01

    Concentrated Solar Power (CSP) technologies are considered to provide a significant contribution for the electric power production in the future. Different kinds of technologies are presently in operation or under development, e.g. parabolic troughs, central receivers, solar dish systems and Fresnel reflectors. This paper takes the focus on central receiver technologies, where the solar radiation is concentrated by a field of heliostats in a receiver on the top of a tall tower. To get this CSP technology ready for the future, the system costs have to reduce significantly. The main cost driver in such kind of CSP technologies are the huge amount of heliostats. To reduce the amount of heliostats, and so the investment costs, the efficiency of the energy conversion cycle becomes an important issue. An increase in the cycle efficiency results in a decrease of the solar heliostat field and thus, in a significant cost reduction. The paper presents the results of a thermodynamic model of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) for combined cycle application together with a solar thermal gas turbine. The gas turbine cycle is modeled with an additional intercooler and recuperator and is based on a typical industrial gas turbine in the 2 MW class. The gas turbine has a two stage radial compressor and a three stage axial turbine. The compressed air is preheated within a solar receiver to 950°C before entering the combustor. A hybrid operation of the gas turbine is considered. In order to achieve a further increase of the overall efficiency, the combined operation of the gas turbine and an Organic Rankine Cycle is considered. Therefore an ORC has been set up, which is thermally connected to the gas turbine cycle at two positions. The ORC can be coupled to the solar-thermal gas turbine cycle at the intercooler and after the recuperator. Thus, waste heat from different cycle positions can be transferred to the ORC for additional production of electricity. Within this investigation

  8. Cool-down flow-rate limits imposed by thermal stresses in LNG pipelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, J. K.; Edeskuty, F. J.; Bartlit, J. R.

    Warm cryogenic pipelines are usually cooled to operating temperature by a small, steady flow of the liquid cryogen. If this flow rate is too high or too low, undesirable stresses will be produced. Low flow-rate limits based on avoidance of stratified two-phase flow were calculated for pipelines cooled with liquid hydrogen or nitrogen. High flow-rate limits for stainless steel and aluminum pipelines cooled by liquid hydrogen or nitrogen were determined by calculating thermal stress in thick components vs flow rate and then selecting some reasonable stress limits. The present work extends these calculations to pipelines made of AISI 304 stainless steel, 6061 aluminum, or ASTM A420 9% nickel steel cooled by liquid methane or a typical natural gas. Results indicate that aluminum and 9% nickel steel components can tolerate very high cool-down flow rates, based on not exceeding the material yield strength.

  9. Thermal studies of a superconducting current limiter using Monte-Carlo method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leveque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    1999-01-01

    Considering the increase of the fault current level in electrical network, the current limiters become very interesting. The superconducting limiters are based on the quasi-instantaneous intrinsic transition from superconducting state to normal resistive one. Without detection of default or given order, they reduce the constraints supported by electrical installations above the fault. To avoid the destruction of the superconducting coil, the temperature must not exceed a certain value. Therefore the design of a superconducting coil needs the simultaneous resolution of an electrical equation and a thermal one. This papers deals with a resolution of this coupled problem by the method of Monte-Carlo. This method allows us to calculate the evolution of the resistance of the coil as well as the current of limitation. Experimental results are compared with theoretical ones. (orig.)

  10. Thermal analysis of supercritical CO{sub 2} power cycles: Assessment of their suitability to the forthcoming sodium fast reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez-Pichel, G.D., E-mail: gdp@icai.es [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies, Comillas Pontifical University, Madrid (Spain); Linares, J.I. [Rafael Marino Chair on New Energy Technologies, Comillas Pontifical University, Madrid (Spain); Herranz, L.E.; Moratilla, B.Y. [Unit of Nuclear Safety Research, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-09-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This paper investigates the potential use of S-CO{sub 2} cycles in SFRs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A wide range of configurations have been explored. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is feasible to reach a thermal efficiency as high as 43.5%. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A sensitivity analysis together with an exergy study have been done. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Potential use in SFRs of recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycles for their balance of plant. - Abstract: Sodium fast reactors (SFRs) potential to meet Gen. IV requirements is broadly acknowledged worldwide. The scientific and technological experience accumulated by operating test reactors and, even, by running commercial reactors, makes them be considered as the closest Gen. IV option in the near future. In the past their balance of plant has been always based on Rankine cycles. This paper investigates the potential use of supercritical recompression CO{sub 2} cycles (S-CO{sub 2}) in SFRs on the basis of the working parameters foreseen within the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) project. A wide range of configurations have been explored, from the simplest one to combined cycles (with organic Rankine cycles, ORC), and a comparison has been set in terms of thermal efficiency. As a result, it has been found out that the most basic configuration could reach a thermal efficiency as high as 43.31%, which is comparable to that obtained through super-critical Rankine cycles proposed elsewhere. A sensitivity analysis together with an exergy study of this configuration, pointed the pre-cooler and IHX{sub Na-CO{sub 2}} as key components in the cycle performance. These results highlight a main conclusion: the potential use in SFRs of recompression S-CO{sub 2} cycles for their balance of plant, whenever a sound and extensive database is built-up on S-CO{sub 2} turbo-machinery and IHX performance.

  11. Thermal analysis of supercritical CO2 power cycles: Assessment of their suitability to the forthcoming sodium fast reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pérez-Pichel, G.D.; Linares, J.I.; Herranz, L.E.; Moratilla, B.Y.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► This paper investigates the potential use of S-CO 2 cycles in SFRs. ► A wide range of configurations have been explored. ► It is feasible to reach a thermal efficiency as high as 43.5%. ► A sensitivity analysis together with an exergy study have been done. ► Potential use in SFRs of recompression S-CO 2 cycles for their balance of plant. - Abstract: Sodium fast reactors (SFRs) potential to meet Gen. IV requirements is broadly acknowledged worldwide. The scientific and technological experience accumulated by operating test reactors and, even, by running commercial reactors, makes them be considered as the closest Gen. IV option in the near future. In the past their balance of plant has been always based on Rankine cycles. This paper investigates the potential use of supercritical recompression CO 2 cycles (S-CO 2 ) in SFRs on the basis of the working parameters foreseen within the European Sodium Fast Reactor (ESFR) project. A wide range of configurations have been explored, from the simplest one to combined cycles (with organic Rankine cycles, ORC), and a comparison has been set in terms of thermal efficiency. As a result, it has been found out that the most basic configuration could reach a thermal efficiency as high as 43.31%, which is comparable to that obtained through super-critical Rankine cycles proposed elsewhere. A sensitivity analysis together with an exergy study of this configuration, pointed the pre-cooler and IHX Na–CO 2 as key components in the cycle performance. These results highlight a main conclusion: the potential use in SFRs of recompression S-CO 2 cycles for their balance of plant, whenever a sound and extensive database is built-up on S-CO 2 turbo-machinery and IHX performance.

  12. Experimental investigation of thermal limits in parallel plate configuration for the future material testing reactor (JHR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brigitte Noel

    2005-01-01

    Full text of publication follows: The design of the future material testing reactor, named Jules Horowitz Reactor and dedicated to technological irradiations, will allow very high performances. The JHR will be cooled and moderated by light water. The preliminary core of JHR consists of 46 assemblies, arranged in a triangular lattice inside a rectangular aluminium matrix. It is boarded on two sides by a beryllium reflector. The other two sides are left free in order to introduce mobile irradiation devices. The JHR assembly would be composed of 3 x 6 cylindrical fuel plates maintained by 3 stiffeners. The external diameter of the assembly is close to 8 cm with a 600 mm heated length, coolant channels having a 1.8 mm gap width. The JHR core must be designed to accommodate high power densities using a high coolant mass flux and sub-cooling level at moderate pressure. The JHR core configuration with multi-channels is subject to a potential excursive instability, called flow redistribution, and is distinguished from a true critical heat flux which would occur at a fixed channel flow rate. At thermal-hydraulic conditions applicable to the JHR, the availability of experimental data for both flow redistribution and CHF is very limited. Consequently, a thermal-hydraulic test facility (SULTAN-RJH) was designed and built in CEA-Grenoble to simulate a full-length coolant sub-channel representative of the JHR core, allowing determination of both thermal limits under relevant thermal hydraulics conditions. The SULTAN-RJH test section simulates a single sub-channel in the JHR core with a cross section corresponding to a mean span (∼50 mm) that has a full reactor length (600 mm), the same flow channel gap (1.5 mm) and Inconel plates of 1 mm thickness. The tests with light water flowing vertically upward will investigate a heat flux range of 0-7 MW/m 2 , velocity range of 0.6-18 m/s, exit pressure range of 0.2-1.0 MPa and inlet temperature range of 25-180 deg. C. The test section

  13. Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion Life Cycle Cost Assessment, Final Technical Report, 30 May 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martel, Laura [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Smith, Paul [John Halkyard and Associates: Glosten Associates, Houston, TX (United States); Rizea, Steven [Makai Ocean Engineering, Waimanalo, HI (United States); Van Ryzin, Joe [Makai Ocean Engineering, Waimanalo, HI (United States); Morgan, Charles [Planning Solutions, Inc., Vancouver, WA (United States); Noland, Gary [G. Noland and Associates, Inc., Pleasanton, CA (United States); Pavlosky, Rick [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Thomas, Michael [Lockheed Martin, Manassas, VA (United States); Halkyard, John [John Halkyard and Associates: Glosten Associates, Houston, TX (United States)

    2012-05-30

    The Ocean Thermal Energy Conversion (OTEC) Life Cycle Cost Assessment (OLCCA) is a study performed by members of the Lockheed Martin (LM) OTEC Team under funding from the Department of Energy (DOE), Award No. DE-EE0002663, dated 01/01/2010. OLCCA objectives are to estimate procurement, operations and maintenance, and overhaul costs for two types of OTEC plants: -Plants moored to the sea floor where the electricity produced by the OTEC plant is directly connected to the grid ashore via a marine power cable (Grid Connected OTEC plants) -Open-ocean grazing OTEC plant-ships producing an energy carrier that is transported to designated ports (Energy Carrier OTEC plants) Costs are developed using the concept of levelized cost of energy established by DOE for use in comparing electricity costs from various generating systems. One area of system costs that had not been developed in detail prior to this analysis was the operations and sustainment (O&S) cost for both types of OTEC plants. Procurement costs, generally referred to as capital expense and O&S costs (operations and maintenance (O&M) costs plus overhaul and replacement costs), are assessed over the 30 year operational life of the plants and an annual annuity calculated to achieve a levelized cost (constant across entire plant life). Dividing this levelized cost by the average annual energy production results in a levelized cost of electricity, or LCOE, for the OTEC plants. Technical and production efficiency enhancements that could result in a lower value of the OTEC LCOE were also explored. The thermal OTEC resource for Oahu, Hawaii and projected build out plan were developed. The estimate of the OTEC resource and LCOE values for the planned OTEC systems enable this information to be displayed as energy supplied versus levelized cost of the supplied energy; this curve is referred to as an Energy Supply Curve. The Oahu Energy Supply Curve represents initial OTEC deployment starting in 2018 and demonstrates the

  14. Performance analysis of a Kalina cycle for a central receiver solar thermal power plant with direct steam generation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modi, Anish; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Solar thermal power plants have attracted increasing interest in the past few years – with respect to both the design of the various plant components, and extending the operation hours by employing different types of storage systems. One approach to improve the overall plant efficiency is to use direct steam generation with water/steam as both the heat transfer fluid in the solar receivers and the cycle working fluid. This enables operating the plant with higher turbine inlet temperatures. Available literature suggests that it is feasible to use ammonia-water mixtures at high temperatures without corroding the equipment by using suitable additives with the mixture. The purpose of the study reported here was to investigate if there is any benefit of using a Kalina cycle for a direct steam generation, central receiver solar thermal power plant with high live steam temperature (450 °C) and pressure (over 100 bar). Thermodynamic performance of the Kalina cycle in terms of the plant exergy efficiency was evaluated and compared with a simple Rankine cycle. The rates of exergy destruction for the different components in the two cycles were also calculated and compared. The results suggest that the simple Rankine cycle exhibits better performance than the Kalina cycle when the heat input is only from the solar receiver. However, when using a two-tank molten-salt storage system as the primary source of heat input, the Kalina cycle showed an advantage over the simple Rankine cycle because of about 33 % reduction in the storage requirement. The solar receiver showed the highest rate of exergy destruction for both the cycles. The rates of exergy destruction in other components of the cycles were found to be highly dependent on the amount of recuperation, and the ammonia mass fraction and pressure at the turbine inlet. - Highlights: •Kalina cycle for a central receiver solar thermal power plant with direct steam generation. •Rankine cycle shows better plant exergy

  15. Observation of the limit cycle in the asymmetric plasma divided by the magnetic filter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohi, K.; Naitou, H.; Tauchi, Y.; Fukumasa, O. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yamaguchi Univ., Ube, Yamaguchi (Japan)

    2000-08-01

    Asymmetric plasma divided by the magnetic filter (MF) is numerically simulated by the one-dimensional particle-in-cell code VSIM1D. Depending on the asymmetry, the system behaves static or dynamic. In the static state, the potentials of the main plasma and the sub-plasma are given by the sheath potentials, {phi}{sub M} - 3T{sub Me}/e and {phi}{sub S} - 3T{sub Se}/e, respectively, with e being an electron charge and T{sub Me} and T{sub Se} being electron temperatures (T{sub Me} > T{sub Se}). In the dynamics state, while {phi}{sub M} - 3T{sub Me}/e, {phi}{sub S} oscillates periodically between {phi}{sub S,min} - 3T{sub Se}/e and {phi}{sub S,max} - 3T{sub Me}/e. The ions accelerated by the time varying potential gap get into the sub-plasma and excite the laminar shock waves. This periodic phenomenon can be understood as a limit cycle due to transitions between two bifurcated states of {phi}{sub S,min} and {phi}{sub S,max}. (author)

  16. Power harvesting by electromagnetic coupling from wind-induced limit cycle oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccalero, G.; Olivieri, S.; Mazzino, A.; Boragno, C.

    2017-09-01

    Recent developments of low-power microprocessors open to new applications such as wireless sensor networks (WSN) with the consequent problem of autonomous powering. For this purpose, a possible strategy is represented by energy harvesting from wind or other flows exploiting fluid-structure interactions. In this work, we present an updated picture of a flutter-based device characterized by fully passive dynamics and a simple constructive layout, where limit cycle oscillations are undergone by an elastically bounded wing. In this case, the conversion from mechanical to electrical energy is performed by means of an electromagnetic coupling between a pair of coils and magnets. A centimetric-size prototype is shown to harvest energy from low wind velocities (between 2 and 4 m s-1), reaching a power peak of 14 mW, representing a valuable amount for applications related to WSN. A mathematical description of the nonlinear dynamics is then provided by a quasi-steady phenomenological model, revealing satisfactory agreement with the experimental framework within a certain parametric range and representing a useful tool for future optimizations.

  17. Suppression and revival of oscillation in indirectly coupled limit cycle oscillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharma, P.R.; Kamal, N.K.; Verma, U.K.; Suresh, K.; Thamilmaran, K.; Shrimali, M.D.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • The phenomena of suppression and revival of oscillations are studied in indirectly coupled nonlinear oscillators. • The decay parameter and a feedback factor play a crucial role in emergent dynamical behavior of oscillators. • The critical curves for different dynamical regions are obtained analytically using linear stability analysis. • Electronic circuit experiments demonstrate these emergent dynamical states. - Abstract: We study the phenomena of suppression and revival of oscillations in a system of limit cycle oscillators coupled indirectly via a dynamic local environment. The dynamics of the environment is assumed to decay exponentially with time. We show that for appropriate coupling strength, the decay parameter of the environment plays a crucial role in the emergent dynamics such as amplitude death (AD) and oscillation death (OD). We also show that introducing a feedback factor in the diffusion term revives the oscillations in this system. The critical curves for the regions of different emergent states as a function of coupling strength, decay parameter of the environment and feedback factor in the coupling are obtained analytically using linear stability analysis. These results are found to be consistent with the numerics and are also observed experimentally.

  18. Observation of the limit cycle in the asymmetric plasma divided by the magnetic filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohi, K.; Naitou, H.; Tauchi, Y.; Fukumasa, O.

    2000-08-01

    Asymmetric plasma divided by the magnetic filter (MF) is numerically simulated by the one-dimensional particle-in-cell code VSIM1D. Depending on the asymmetry, the system behaves static or dynamic. In the static state, the potentials of the main plasma and the sub-plasma are given by the sheath potentials, φ M - 3T Me /e and φ S - 3T Se /e, respectively, with e being an electron charge and T Me and T Se being electron temperatures (T Me > T Se ). In the dynamics state, while φ M - 3T Me /e, φ S oscillates periodically between φ S,min - 3T Se /e and φ S,max - 3T Me /e. The ions accelerated by the time varying potential gap get into the sub-plasma and excite the laminar shock waves. This periodic phenomenon can be understood as a limit cycle due to transitions between two bifurcated states of φ S,min and φ S,max . (author)

  19. Bayesian inference of nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics from aeroelastic limit cycle oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandhu, Rimple [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Poirel, Dominique [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Royal Military College of Canada, Kingston, Ontario (Canada); Pettit, Chris [Department of Aerospace Engineering, United States Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD (United States); Khalil, Mohammad [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada); Sarkar, Abhijit, E-mail: abhijit.sarkar@carleton.ca [Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carleton University, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-07-01

    A Bayesian model selection and parameter estimation algorithm is applied to investigate the influence of nonlinear and unsteady aerodynamic loads on the limit cycle oscillation (LCO) of a pitching airfoil in the transitional Reynolds number regime. At small angles of attack, laminar boundary layer trailing edge separation causes negative aerodynamic damping leading to the LCO. The fluid–structure interaction of the rigid, but elastically mounted, airfoil and nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics is represented by two coupled nonlinear stochastic ordinary differential equations containing uncertain parameters and model approximation errors. Several plausible aerodynamic models with increasing complexity are proposed to describe the aeroelastic system leading to LCO. The likelihood in the posterior parameter probability density function (pdf) is available semi-analytically using the extended Kalman filter for the state estimation of the coupled nonlinear structural and unsteady aerodynamic model. The posterior parameter pdf is sampled using a parallel and adaptive Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) algorithm. The posterior probability of each model is estimated using the Chib–Jeliazkov method that directly uses the posterior MCMC samples for evidence (marginal likelihood) computation. The Bayesian algorithm is validated through a numerical study and then applied to model the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamic loads using wind-tunnel test data at various Reynolds numbers.

  20. Geographic divergence in upper thermal limits across insect life stages: does behavior matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Heidi J; Higgins, Jessica K; Buckley, Lauren B; Kingsolver, Joel G

    2016-05-01

    Insects with complex life cycles vary in size, mobility, and thermal ecology across life stages. We examine how differences in the capacity for thermoregulatory behavior influence geographic differences in physiological heat tolerance among egg and adult Colias butterflies. Colias adults exhibit differences in morphology (wing melanin and thoracic setal length) along spatial gradients, whereas eggs are morphologically indistinguishable. Here we compare Colias eriphyle eggs and adults from two elevations and Colias meadii from a high elevation. Hatching success and egg development time of C. eriphyle eggs did not differ significantly with the elevation of origin. Egg survival declined in response to heat-shock temperatures above 38-40 °C and egg development time was shortest at intermediate heat-shock temperatures of 33-38 °C. Laboratory experiments with adults showed survival in response to heat shock was significantly greater for Colias from higher than from lower elevation sites. Common-garden experiments at the low-elevation field site showed that C. meadii adults initiated heat-avoidance and over-heating behaviors significantly earlier in the day than C. eriphyle. Our study demonstrates the importance of examining thermal tolerances across life stages. Our findings are inconsistent with the hypothesis that thermoregulatory behavior inhibits the geographic divergence of physiological traits in mobile stages, and suggest that sessile stages may evolve similar heat tolerances in different environments due to microclimatic variability or evolutionary constraints.

  1. Optimisation of a Kalina cycle for a central receiver solar thermal power plant with direct steam generation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Modi, Anish; Haglind, Fredrik

    2014-01-01

    Central receiver solar thermal power plants are regarded as one of the promising ways to generate electricity in near future. They offer the possibility of using high temperatures and pressures to achieve high efficiencies with standard power cycles. A direct steam generation approach can be used...

  2. Characterization of Ternary NiTiPd High-Temperature Shape-Memory Alloys under Load-Biased Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigelow, Glen S.; Padula, Santo A.; Noebe, Ronald D.; Garg, Anita; Gaydosh, Darrell

    2010-01-01

    While NiTiPd alloys have been extensively studied for proposed use in high-temperature shape-memory applications, little is known about the shape-memory response of these materials under stress. Consequently, the isobaric thermal cyclic responses of five (Ni,Pd)49.5Ti50.5 alloys with constant stoichiometry and Pd contents ranging from 15 to 46 at. pct were investigated. From these tests, transformation temperatures, transformation strain (which is proportional to work output), and unrecovered strain per cycle (a measure of dimensional instability) were determined as a function of stress for each alloy. It was found that increasing the Pd content over this range resulted in a linear increase in transformation temperature, as expected. At a given stress level, work output decreased while the amount of unrecovered strain produced during each load-biased thermal cycle increased with increasing Pd content, during the initial thermal cycles. However, continued thermal cycling at constant stress resulted in a saturation of the work output and nearly eliminated further unrecovered strain under certain conditions, resulting in stable behavior amenable to many actuator applications.

  3. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates for ATF-1 holders during ATR cycle 158B/159A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Larry Don [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Miller, David Torbet [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Walker, Billy Justin [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for the ATF-1 holders located in core for ATR Cycle 158B/159A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML).

  4. Optimization and experimental validation of a thermal cycle that maximizes entropy coefficient fisher identifiability for lithium iron phosphate cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Sergio; Rothenberger, Michael; Hake, Alison; Fathy, Hosam

    2016-03-01

    This article presents a framework for optimizing the thermal cycle to estimate a battery cell's entropy coefficient at 20% state of charge (SOC). Our goal is to maximize Fisher identifiability: a measure of the accuracy with which a parameter can be estimated. Existing protocols in the literature for estimating entropy coefficients demand excessive laboratory time. Identifiability optimization makes it possible to achieve comparable accuracy levels in a fraction of the time. This article demonstrates this result for a set of lithium iron phosphate (LFP) cells. We conduct a 24-h experiment to obtain benchmark measurements of their entropy coefficients. We optimize a thermal cycle to maximize parameter identifiability for these cells. This optimization proceeds with respect to the coefficients of a Fourier discretization of this thermal cycle. Finally, we compare the estimated parameters using (i) the benchmark test, (ii) the optimized protocol, and (iii) a 15-h test from the literature (by Forgez et al.). The results are encouraging for two reasons. First, they confirm the simulation-based prediction that the optimized experiment can produce accurate parameter estimates in 2 h, compared to 15-24. Second, the optimized experiment also estimates a thermal time constant representing the effects of thermal capacitance and convection heat transfer.

  5. Thermally moderated hollow fiber sorbent modules in rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption mode for hydrogen purification

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.; Bessho, Naoki; Bhandari, Dhaval A.; Kawajiri, Yoshiaki; Koros, William J.

    2012-01-01

    We describe thermally moderated multi-layered pseudo-monolithic hollow fiber sorbents entities, which can be packed into compact modules to provide small-footprint, efficient H2 purification/CO2 removal systems for use in on-site steam methane reformer product gas separations. Dual-layer hollow fibers are created via dry-jet, wet-quench spinning with an inner "active" core of cellulose acetate (porous binder) and zeolite NaY (69 wt% zeolite NaY) and an external sheath layer of pure cellulose acetate. The co-spun sheath layer reduces the surface porosity of the fiber and was used as a smooth coating surface for a poly(vinyl-alcohol) post-treatment, which reduced the gas permeance through the fiber sorbent by at least 7 orders of magnitude, essentially creating an impermeable sheath layer. The interstitial volume between the individual fibers was filled with a thermally-moderating paraffin wax. CO2 breakthrough experiments on the hollow fiber sorbent modules with and without paraffin wax revealed that the "passively" cooled paraffin wax module had 12.5% longer breakthrough times than the "non-isothermal" module. The latent heat of fusion/melting of the wax offsets the released latent heat of sorption/desorption of the zeolites. One-hundred rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption cycles were performed on the "passively" cooled hollow fiber sorbents using 25 vol% CO2/75 vol% He (H2 surrogate) at 60 °C and 113 psia, resulting in a product purity of 99.2% and a product recovery of 88.1% thus achieving process conditions and product quality comparable to conventional pellet processes. Isothermal and non-isothermal dynamic modeling of the hollow fiber sorbent module and a traditional packed bed using gPROMS® indicated that the fiber sorbents have sharper fronts (232% sharper) and longer adsorbate breakthrough times (66% longer), further confirming the applicability of the new fiber sorbent approach for H2 purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  6. On the effect of brazing thermal cycle on the properties of niobium and its alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grishin, V.L.; Cherkasov, A.F.

    1975-01-01

    The effect of the main parameters of the soldering thermal cycle on the properties of Nb and its alloys was studied by heating the samples under modelled conditions of soldering. The studies were made on commercial VN-niobium, alloys of the Nb-Mo-Zr system VN2A, VN2AEHM) and alloys of the Nb-Mo-Zr-C system (VN5AEH,VN5A). The degree of a preliminary plastic deformation of samples 0.3 to 0.8 mm thick made up 60 to 80%. The heating was made in vacuum (10 -4 to 5x10 -5 mm Hg) or in argon by passing the electric current across the samples. After heating a metallographic study and X-ray electron-probe analysis were made. The studies have shown that the changes in the heating rate result in a proportional change in the recrystallization initiation temperature. At a heating rate 300 deg C/s the recrystallization initiation temperature of commercial Nb is 930 to 960 deg as soon as the heating rate increases up to 900 deg/c the recrystallization initiation temperature rises up to about 1200 deg C. The heating temperature effect on the mechanical characteristics of commercial Nb and alloys VN2, VN2AEH and VN5AEH is shown. It is found that soldered joints of Nb and its alloys could be made of good quality when observing the thermal cycles ensuring the minimum softening of the base material. The main factors affecting the properties of Nb and alloy-VN2 are the heating temperature and the extent of a preliminary cold deformation. In a more deformed material the annealing results in the activation of the recrystallization processes. The production of high-strength soldered joints of commercial Nb is possible at the soldering temperature equal to 1100 deg C, but of Nb-Mo-Zr alloys-at 1200 to 1300 deg C and hold-up periods not exceeding one hour. A heterophase structure of alloys of the Nb-Mo-Zr-C system and the presence of Mo- and Zr-carbide phases in them result in a considerable hardening of the alloys and the increase in their recrystallization temperature. The usage of alloys

  7. Thermally moderated hollow fiber sorbent modules in rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption mode for hydrogen purification

    KAUST Repository

    Lively, Ryan P.

    2012-10-01

    We describe thermally moderated multi-layered pseudo-monolithic hollow fiber sorbents entities, which can be packed into compact modules to provide small-footprint, efficient H2 purification/CO2 removal systems for use in on-site steam methane reformer product gas separations. Dual-layer hollow fibers are created via dry-jet, wet-quench spinning with an inner "active" core of cellulose acetate (porous binder) and zeolite NaY (69 wt% zeolite NaY) and an external sheath layer of pure cellulose acetate. The co-spun sheath layer reduces the surface porosity of the fiber and was used as a smooth coating surface for a poly(vinyl-alcohol) post-treatment, which reduced the gas permeance through the fiber sorbent by at least 7 orders of magnitude, essentially creating an impermeable sheath layer. The interstitial volume between the individual fibers was filled with a thermally-moderating paraffin wax. CO2 breakthrough experiments on the hollow fiber sorbent modules with and without paraffin wax revealed that the "passively" cooled paraffin wax module had 12.5% longer breakthrough times than the "non-isothermal" module. The latent heat of fusion/melting of the wax offsets the released latent heat of sorption/desorption of the zeolites. One-hundred rapidly cycled pressure swing adsorption cycles were performed on the "passively" cooled hollow fiber sorbents using 25 vol% CO2/75 vol% He (H2 surrogate) at 60 °C and 113 psia, resulting in a product purity of 99.2% and a product recovery of 88.1% thus achieving process conditions and product quality comparable to conventional pellet processes. Isothermal and non-isothermal dynamic modeling of the hollow fiber sorbent module and a traditional packed bed using gPROMS® indicated that the fiber sorbents have sharper fronts (232% sharper) and longer adsorbate breakthrough times (66% longer), further confirming the applicability of the new fiber sorbent approach for H2 purification. © 2012, Hydrogen Energy Publications, LLC

  8. Thermal cycling behavior of EB-PVD TBCs on CVD platinum modified aluminide coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Zhenhua, E-mail: zhxubiam@aliyun.com; Wang, Zhankao; Huang, Guanghong; Mu, Rende; He, Limin

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • The removed ridges at the grain boundaries with grit blasting. • The ridge, oxidation and cracking are features of damage initiation in TBCs. • Spalled location either at TGO/bond coat interface or inside of TGO layer. • The lower strain energy release rate within TGO layer can prolong of TBCs life. - Abstract: Thermal barrier coating systems (TBCs) including of chemical vapor deposited (Ni, Pt)Al bond coat with grit blasting process and electron beam physical vapor deposited Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-stabilized-ZrO{sub 2} (YSZ) ceramic coating were investigated. The phase structures, surface and cross-sectional morphologies, cyclic oxidation behaviors and residual stresses of the TBCs were studied in detail. It was found that the fracture path traverses through the ceramic coating to TGO interface, as well as at the TGO to bond coat interface is obviously detected. The change in fracture plane occurs at grain boundaries. The ridge top spallation leads to separate of sufficient size to result in unstable fracture driven by the strain energy stored in the TGO. The bond coat can undergo a volume increase upon oxidation, so that a cavity, enlarged strictly by oxidation would be full to overflowing with TGO layer. The spalled location of the TBCs probably occurs either at the interface of TGO layer and bond coat or inside of TGO layer. The lower strain energy release rate within TGO layer during thermal cycling is beneficial to prolong of TBCs life. The lower is the compressive stress within TGO layer, the longer is the lifetime of TBCs.

  9. Investigation of relation between singular points and number of limit cycles for a rotor-AMBs system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, J.; Tian, Y.; Zhang, W.

    2009-01-01

    The relation between singular points and the number of limit cycles is investigated for a rotor-active magnetic bearings system with time-varying stiffness and single-degree-of-freedom. The averaged equation of the system is a perturbed polynomial Hamiltonian system of degree 5. The dynamic characteristics of the unperturbed system are first analyzed for a certain parameter group. The number of limit cycles and their configurations of the perturbed system under eight different parametric groups are obtained and the influence of eight control conditions on the number of limit cycles is studied. The results obtained here will play an important leading role in the study of the properties of nonlinear dynamics and control of the rotor-active magnetic bearings system with time-varying stiffness.

  10. Numerical simulation of displacement instabilities of surface grooves on an alumina forming alloy during thermal cycling oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Feng Xun; Kang, Ki Ju [Chonnam National University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Ding, Jun [Chongqing University of Technology, Chongqing (China)

    2009-08-15

    Displacement instability of the thermally grown oxide (TGO) is a fundamental source of failure in thermal barrier systems. In this work, a finite element analysis has been performed to analyze the displacement instability occurring at a heat resistant metal with superficial TGO subjected to thermal cycling. Lateral and in-plane growth of the TGO which happens during high temperature is simulated by means of material property change from the substrate metal to the TGO. Most of the material properties including the TGO growth are based on the results experimentally obtained in-house. Results of the finite element analyses agree well with the experimental observation, which proves the accuracy and validity of this simulation. The technique will be useful for future work on more complicated phenomena such as deformation under thermo-mechanical cycling

  11. Thaumarchaeal ammonium oxidation and evidence for a nitrogen cycle in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring in the Austrian Central Alps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friedrich Wolfgang Gerbl

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies had suggested the presence of ammonium oxidizing Thaumarchaeota as well as nitrite oxidizing Bacteria in the subsurface spring called Franz Josef Quelle (FJQ, a slightly radioactive thermal mineral spring with a temperature of 43.6 - 47oC near the alpine village of Bad Gastein, Austria. The microbiological consortium of the FJQ was investigated for its utilization of nitrogen compounds and the putative presence of a subsurface nitrogen cycle. Microcosm experiments made with samples from the spring water, containing planktonic microorganisms, or from biofilms, were used in this study. Three slightly different media, enriched with vitamins and trace elements, and two incubation temperatures (30 and 40oC, respectively were employed. Under aerobic conditions, high rates of conversion of ammonium to nitrite, as well as nitrite to nitrate were measured. Under oxygen-limited conditions nitrate was converted to gaseous compounds. Stable isotope probing with 15NH4Cl or (15NH42SO4 as sole energy sources revealed incorporation of 15N into community DNA. Genomic DNA as well as RNA were extracted from all microcosms. The following genes or fragments of genes were successfully amplified, cloned and sequenced by standard PCR from DNA extracts: Ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA, nitrite oxidoreductase subunits A and B (nxrA and nxrB, nitrate reductase (narG, nitrite reductase (nirS, nitric oxide reductases (cnorB and qnorB, nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ. Reverse transcription of extracted total RNA and real-time PCR suggested the expression of each of those genes. Nitrogen fixation (as probed with nifH and nifD was not detected. However, a geological origin of NH4+ in the water of the FJQ cannot be excluded, considering the silicate, granite and gneiss containing environment. The data suggested the operation of a nitrogen cycle in the subsurface environment of the FJQ.

  12. Thaumarchaeal ammonium oxidation and evidence for a nitrogen cycle in a subsurface radioactive thermal spring in the Austrian Central Alps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerbl, Friedrich W; Weidler, Gerhard W; Wanek, Wolfgang; Erhardt, Angelika; Stan-Lotter, Helga

    2014-01-01

    Previous studies had suggested the presence of ammonium oxidizing Thaumarchaeota as well as nitrite oxidizing Bacteria in the subsurface spring called Franz Josef Quelle (FJQ), a slightly radioactive thermal mineral spring with a temperature of 43.6-47°C near the alpine village of Bad Gastein, Austria. The microbiological consortium of the FJQ was investigated for its utilization of nitrogen compounds and the putative presence of a subsurface nitrogen cycle. Microcosm experiments made with samples from the spring water, containing planktonic microorganisms, or from biofilms, were used in this study. Three slightly different media, enriched with vitamins and trace elements, and two incubation temperatures (30 and 40°C, respectively) were employed. Under aerobic conditions, high rates of conversion of ammonium to nitrite, as well as nitrite to nitrate were measured. Under oxygen-limited conditions nitrate was converted to gaseous compounds. Stable isotope probing with (15)NH4Cl or ((15)NH4)2SO4as sole energy sources revealed incorporation of (15)N into community DNA. Genomic DNA as well as RNA were extracted from all microcosms. The following genes or fragments of genes were successfully amplified, cloned and sequenced by standard PCR from DNA extracts: Ammonia monooxygenase subunit A (amoA), nitrite oxidoreductase subunits A and B (nxrA and nxrB), nitrate reductase (narG), nitrite reductase (nirS), nitric oxide reductases (cnorB and qnorB), nitrous oxide reductase (nosZ). Reverse transcription of extracted total RNA and real-time PCR suggested the expression of each of those genes. Nitrogen fixation (as probed with nifH and nifD) was not detected. However, a geological origin of NH(+) 4 in the water of the FJQ cannot be excluded, considering the silicate, granite and gneiss containing environment. The data suggested the operation of a nitrogen cycle in the subsurface environment of the FJQ.

  13. Studies of thermal energy confinement scaling in PDX plasmas: D0 → H+ limiter discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaye, S.M.; Goldston, R.J.; Bell, M.

    1984-06-01

    Experiments were performed on the PDX tokamak to study plasma heating and β scaling with higher power, near-perpendicular neutral beam injection. The data taken during these experiments were analyzed using a time-dependent data interpretation code (TRANSP) to study the transport and thermal confinement scaling over a wide range of plasma parameters. This study focuses on results from experiments with D 0 injection into H + plasmas using graphite rail limiters, a = 40 to 44 cm, R = 143 cm, I/sub p/ = 200 to 480 kA, B/sub T/ = 0.7 to 2.2 T, and typically anti n/sub e/ = 2.5 to 4.2 x 10 13 cm -3 . The results of this study indicate that for both ohmic and neutral beam heated discharges the energy flow out of the plasma is dominated by anomalous electron losses, attributed to electron thermal conduction. The ion conduction losses are well described to electron thermal conduction. The ion conduction losses are well described by neoclassical theory; however, the total ion loss influences the power balance significantly only at high toroidal fields and high plasma currents

  14. Thermal ionization mass spectrometry (TIMS) of actinides: Pushing the limits of accuracy and detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buerger, Stefan; Boulyga, Sergei; Cunningham, Alan; Klose, Dilani; Koepf, Andreas; Poths, Jane [Safeguards Analytical Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Richter, Stephan [Institute for Reference Materials and Measurements, JRC-EU, Geel (Belgium)

    2010-07-01

    New method developments in multi-collector thermal ionization mass spectrometry (MC-TIMS) for actinide isotope ratio analysis to improve accuracy and limits of detection will be presented. With respect to limits of detection, results on improving work function using various carbon additives will be reviewed and presented as well as developments in cavity ion source (as compared to standard flat ribbon filament ion source) for femto- and attogram levels of uranium, plutonium, and americium. With respect to accuracy, results on isotope ratio measurements of isotopes of uranium (relative accuracy of 0.3% to 0.01%) are presented with an example being U-234-Th-230 age-dating (NBL CRM 112-A). In this context, the importance of traceability (to the S.I. units) and the use of (certified) reference materials are emphasized. The focus of this presentation is on applications to nuclear safeguards / forensics.

  15. Near-thermal limit gating in heavily doped III-V semiconductor nanowires using polymer electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, A. R.; Carrad, D. J.; Krogstrup, P.; Nygârd, J.; Micolich, A. P.

    2018-02-01

    Doping is a common route to reducing nanowire transistor on-resistance but it has limits. A high doping level gives significant loss in gate performance and ultimately complete gate failure. We show that electrolyte gating remains effective even when the Be doping in our GaAs nanowires is so high that traditional metal-oxide gates fail. In this regime we obtain a combination of subthreshold swing and contact resistance that surpasses the best existing p -type nanowire metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs). Our subthreshold swing of 75 mV/dec is within 25 % of the room-temperature thermal limit and comparable with n -InP and n -GaAs nanowire MOSFETs. Our results open a new path to extending the performance and application of nanowire transistors, and motivate further work on improved solid electrolytes for nanoscale device applications.

  16. Transient thermal model of passenger car's cabin and implementation to saturation cycle with alternative working fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hoseong; Hwang, Yunho; Song, Ilguk; Jang, Kilsang

    2015-01-01

    A transient thermal model of a passenger car's cabin is developed to investigate the dynamic behavior of cabin thermal conditions. The model is developed based on a lumped-parameter model and solved using integral methods. Solar radiation, engine heat through the firewall, and engine heat to the air ducts are all considered. Using the thermal model, transient temperature profiles of the interior mass and cabin air are obtained. This model is used to investigate the transient behavior of the cabin under various operating conditions: the recirculation mode in the idling state, the fresh air mode in the idling state, the recirculation mode in the driving state, and fresh air mode in the driving state. The developed model is validated by comparing with experimental data and is within 5% of deviation. The validated model is then applied for evaluating the mobile air conditioning system's design. The study found that a saturation cycle concept (four-stage cycle with two-phase refrigerant injection) could improve the system efficiency by 23.9% and reduce the power consumption by 19.3%. Lastly, several alternative refrigerants are applied and their performance is discussed. When the saturation cycle concept is applied, R1234yf MAC (mobile air conditioning) shows the largest COP (coefficient of performance) improvement and power consumption reduction. - Highlights: • The transient thermal model of the passenger car cabin is developed. • The developed model is validated with experimental data and showed 5% deviation. • Saturation cycle concept is applied to the developed cabin model. • There is 24% COP improvement by applying the saturation cycle concept. • R1234yf showed the highest potential when it is applied to the saturation cycle.

  17. Multi-parameter fibre Bragg grating sensor-array for thermal vacuum cycling test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, L.; Ahlers, B.; Toet, P.; Casarosa, G.; Appolloni, M.

    2017-11-01

    strain transducer to generate strain via a dedicated feed through in the chamber. Thermocouples are used to log the temperature for comparison to the temperature FBG sensor. Extreme temperature ranges from -150°C and +70°C at a pressure down to 10-4 Pa (10-6 mbar) are covered as well as testing under ambient conditions. In total five thermal cycles during a week test are performed. The FBG temperature sensor test results performed in the ESA/ESTEC TV chamber reveal high reproducibility (within 1 °C) within the test temperature range without any evidence of hysteresis. Differences are detected to the previous calibration curve. Investigation is performed to find the cause of the discrepancy. Differences between the test set-ups are identified. Equipment of the TNO test is checked and excluded to be the cause. Additional experiments are performed. The discrepancy is most likely caused by a 'thermal shock' due to rapid cooling down to LN2 temperature, which results in a wavelength shift. Test data of the FBG strain sensor is analysed. The read-out of the FBG strain sensor varies with the temperature during the test. This can be caused by temperature induced changes in the mechanical setup (fastening of the mechanical parts) or impact of temperature to the mechanical strain transfer to the FBG. Improvements are identified and recommendations given for future activities.

  18. Internal cycling, not external loading, decides the nutrient limitation in eutrophic lake: A dynamic model with temporal Bayesian hierarchical inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhen; Liu, Yong; Liang, Zhongyao; Wu, Sifeng; Guo, Huaicheng

    2017-06-01

    Lake eutrophication is associated with excessive anthropogenic nutrients (mainly nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)) and unobserved internal nutrient cycling. Despite the advances in understanding the role of external loadings, the contribution of internal nutrient cycling is still an open question. A dynamic mass-balance model was developed to simulate and measure the contributions of internal cycling and external loading. It was based on the temporal Bayesian Hierarchical Framework (BHM), where we explored the seasonal patterns in the dynamics of nutrient cycling processes and the limitation of N and P on phytoplankton growth in hyper-eutrophic Lake Dianchi, China. The dynamic patterns of the five state variables (Chla, TP, ammonia, nitrate and organic N) were simulated based on the model. Five parameters (algae growth rate, sediment exchange rate of N and P, nitrification rate and denitrification rate) were estimated based on BHM. The model provided a good fit to observations. Our model results highlighted the role of internal cycling of N and P in Lake Dianchi. The internal cycling processes contributed more than external loading to the N and P changes in the water column. Further insights into the nutrient limitation analysis indicated that the sediment exchange of P determined the P limitation. Allowing for the contribution of denitrification to N removal, N was the more limiting nutrient in most of the time, however, P was the more important nutrient for eutrophication management. For Lake Dianchi, it would not be possible to recover solely by reducing the external watershed nutrient load; the mechanisms of internal cycling should also be considered as an approach to inhibit the release of sediments and to enhance denitrification. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The interrelationship between the lower oxygen limit, chlorophyll fluorescence and the xanthophyll cycle in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, A Harrison; DeLong, John M; Gunawardena, Arunika H L A N; Prange, Robert K

    2011-03-01

    The lower oxygen limit (LOL) in plants may be identified through the measure of respiratory gases [i.e. the anaerobic compensation point (ACP) or the respiratory quotient breakpoint (RQB)], but recent work shows it may also be identified by a sudden rise in dark minimum fluorescence (F(o)). The interrelationship between aerobic respiration and fermentative metabolism, which occur in the mitochondria and cytosol, respectively, and fluorescence, which emanates from the chloroplasts, is not well documented in the literature. Using spinach (Spinacia oleracea), this study showed that F(o) and photochemical quenching (q(P)) remained relatively unchanged until O(2) levels dropped below the LOL. An over-reduction of the plastoquinone (PQ) pool is believed to increase F(o) under dark + anoxic conditions. It is proposed that excess cytosolic reductant due to inhibition of the mitochondria's cytochrome oxidase under low-O(2), may be the primary reductant source. The maximum fluorescence (F(m)) is largely unaffected by low-O(2) in the dark, but was severely quenched, mirroring changes to the xanthophyll de-epoxidation state (DEPS), under even low-intensity light (≈4 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). In low light, the low-O(2)-induced increase in F(o) was also quenched, likely by non-photochemical and photochemical means. The degree of quenching in the light was negatively correlated with the level of ethanol fermentation in the dark. A discussion detailing the possible roles of cyclic electron flow, the xanthophyll cycle, chlororespiration and a pathway we termed 'chlorofermentation' were used to interpret fluorescence phenomena of both spinach and apple (Malus domestica) over a range of atmospheric conditions under both dark and low-light.

  20. The hype cycle in 3D displays: inherent limits of autostereoscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasnick, Armin

    2013-06-01

    Since a couple of years, a renaissance of 3dimensional cinema can be observed. Even though the stereoscopy was quite popular within the last 150 years, the 3d cinema has disappeared and re-established itself several times. The first boom in the late 19th century stagnated and vanished after a few years of success, the same happened again in 50's and 80's of the 20th century. With the commercial success of the 3d blockbuster "Avatar" in 2009, at the latest, it is obvious that the 3d cinema is having a comeback. How long will it last this time? There are already some signs of a declining interest in 3d movies, as the discrepancy between expectations and the results delivered becomes more evident. From the former hypes it is known: After an initial phase of curiosity (high expectations and excessive fault tolerance), a phase of frustration and saturation (critical analysis and subsequent disappointment) will follow. This phenomenon is known as "Hype Cycle" The everyday experienced evolution of technology has conditioned the consumers. The expectation "any technical improvement will preserve all previous properties" cannot be fulfilled with present 3d technologies. This is an inherent problem of stereoscopy and autostereoscopy: The presentation of an additional dimension caused concessions in relevant characteristics (i.e. resolution, brightness, frequency, viewing area) or leads to undesirable physical side effects (i.e. subjective discomfort, eye strain, spatial disorientation, feeling of nausea). It will be verified that the 3d apparatus (3d glasses or 3d display) is also the source for these restrictions and a reason for decreasing fascination. The limitations of present autostereoscopic technologies will be explained.

  1. Parameters of Models of Structural Transformations in Alloy Steel Under Welding Thermal Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkin, A. S.; Makarov, E. L.; Kurkin, A. B.; Rubtsov, D. E.; Rubtsov, M. E.

    2017-05-01

    A mathematical model of structural transformations in an alloy steel under the thermal cycle of multipass welding is suggested for computer implementation. The minimum necessary set of parameters for describing the transformations under heating and cooling is determined. Ferritic-pearlitic, bainitic and martensitic transformations under cooling of a steel are considered. A method for deriving the necessary temperature and time parameters of the model from the chemical composition of the steel is described. Published data are used to derive regression models of the temperature ranges and parameters of transformation kinetics in alloy steels. It is shown that the disadvantages of the active visual methods of analysis of the final phase composition of steels are responsible for inaccuracy and mismatch of published data. The hardness of a specimen, which correlates with some other mechanical properties of the material, is chosen as the most objective and reproducible criterion of the final phase composition. The models developed are checked by a comparative analysis of computational results and experimental data on the hardness of 140 alloy steels after cooling at various rates.

  2. Structural changes in complex steels with 12 % Cr during welding thermal cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ul'yanova, N.V.; Kurnosova, N.D.

    1981-01-01

    The structural changes in the heat affected zones of welded steam tubes of the 12Kh11V2MF and 18Kh12VMBFR steels, are investigated. A short-time heating of thin samples up to 1300-900 deg C with the aim of imitating the thermal welding cycle permits to determine temperatures of specific region formation in heat affeced zones of 12% Cr steels. The difference in the amounts and structure of σ-ferrite and γ-phase in these regions is established. A ''tongue'' nature of γ-phase grain growth is found in the temperature range of 1150-1100 deg C, while at 1300-1250 deg C σ-ferrite growth with the formation of saw-shape boundaries is observed. It is shown that tensile properties of imitated heat affected zone of 12Kh12VMBFP steel increase with heating temperature with the insignificant plasticity decrease. Impact strength on longitudinal samples decreases but remains higher than that determined by specifications [ru

  3. The Seasonal Cycle of Water Vapour on Mars from Assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Liam J.; Lewis, Stephen R.; Patel, Manish R.; Montmessin, Franck; Forget, Francois; Smith, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    We present for the first time an assimilation of Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) water vapour column data into a Mars global climate model (MGCM). We discuss the seasonal cycle of water vapour, the processes responsible for the observed water vapour distribution, and the cross-hemispheric water transport. The assimilation scheme is shown to be robust in producing consistent reanalyses, and the global water vapour column error is reduced to around 2-4 pr micron depending on season. Wave activity is shown to play an important role in the water vapour distribution, with topographically steered flows around the Hellas and Argyre basins acting to increase transport in these regions in all seasons. At high northern latitudes, zonal wavenumber 1 and 2 stationary waves during northern summer are responsible for spreading the sublimed water vapour away from the pole. Transport by the zonal wavenumber 2 waves occurs primarily to the west of Tharsis and Arabia Terra and, combined with the effects of western boundary currents, this leads to peak water vapour column abundances here as observed by numerous spacecraft. A net transport of water to the northern hemisphere over the course of one Mars year is calculated, primarily because of the large northwards flux of water vapour which occurs during the local dust storm around L(sub S) = 240-260deg. Finally, outlying frost deposits that surround the north polar cap are shown to be important in creating the peak water vapour column abundances observed during northern summer.

  4. Fiber-reinforced composite analysis using optical coherence tomography after mechanical and thermal cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyotoku, B. B. C.; Braz, A. K. S.; Braz, R.; Gomes, A. S. L.

    2007-02-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites are new materials which have been used for a variety of dental applications, including tooth splinting, replacement of missing teeth, treatment of dental emergencies, reinforcement of resin provisional fixed prosthodontic restorations, orthodontic retention, and other clinical applications. Different fiber types are available, but little clinical information has been disseminated. The traditional microscopy investigation, most commonly used to study this material, is a destructive technique, which requires specimen sectioning and are essentially surface measurements. On the basis of these considerations, the aim of this research is to analyze the interior of a dental sample reinforced with fiber after a mechanical and thermal cycling to emulate oral conditions using optical coherence tomography (OCT). The device we are using is a home built Fourier domain OCT working at 800 nm with 6 μm resolution. The results are compared with microscopy images to validate OCT as a working method. In long term, fractures allow bacterial invasion provoking plaque and calculus formation that can cause caries and periodontal disease. Therefore, non invasive imaging of the bridge fiber enables the possibility of periodic clinical evaluation to ensure the patient health. Furthermore, OCT images can provide a powerful method for quantitative analysis of crack propagation, and can potentially be used for in vivo assessment.

  5. Resistance to radiation and concretes thermal cycles for conditioning of spent radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez N, M.; Monroy G, F.; Gonzalez D, R. C.; Corona P, I. J.; Ortiz A, G.

    2014-10-01

    In order to know the concrete type most suitable for use as a matrix of conditioning of spent radioactive sources, concrete test tubes using 4 different types of cement were prepared: CPC 30-Rs Extra, CPC 30-R Impercem, CPC 30-R Rs and CPC 30-R with two gravel sizes >30 mm and <10 mm. The concrete test tubes were subjected to testing compressive strength after 28 days of hardening and after being irradiated and subjected to thermal cycles. Subsequently they were characterized by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy, in order to evaluate whether these concretes accredited the tests set by the NOM-019-Nucl-1995. The results show that the compressive strength of the hardened concretes to 28 days presents values between 36 and 25 MPa; applying irradiation the resistance may decrease to 30% of its original strength; and if subjected to high and low temperatures the ettringite formation also causes a decrease in resistance. The results show that concretes made from cement Impercem, Cruz Azul with gravel <10 mm comply with the provisions of standard and they can be used for conditioning of spent radioactive sources. (Author)

  6. Seasonality in swimming and cycling: Exploring a limitation of accelerometer based studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flo Harrison

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accelerometer-based studies of children's physical activity have reported seasonal patterns in activity levels. However, the inability of many accelerometers to detect activity while the wearer is swimming or cycling may introduce a bias to the estimation of seasonality if participation in these activities are themselves seasonally patterned. We explore seasonal patterns in children's swimming and cycling among a sample of 7–8 year olds (N = 591 participating in the Millennium Cohort Study, UK. Participating children wore an accelerometer for one week on up to five occasions over the year and their parents completed a diary recording daily minutes spent swimming and cycling. Both swimming and cycling participation showed seasonal patterns, with 2.7 (SE 0.8 more minutes swimming and 5.7 (0.7 more minutes cycling performed in summer compared to winter. Adding swimming and cycling time to accelerometer-determined MVPA increased the summer-winter difference in MVPA from 16.6 (1.6 to 24.9 min. The seasonal trend in swimming and cycling appears to follow the same pattern as accelerometer-measured MVPA. Studies relying solely on accelerometers may therefore underestimate seasonal differences in children's activity.

  7. The Menstrual Cycle Influences Emotion but Has Limited Effect on Cognitive Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundström-Poromaa, Inger

    2018-01-01

    From a psychological perspective, the menstrual cycle has been a research topic for more than 50 years. The most recent menstrual cycle research has been driven by an increased interest in sex differences in neuroscience, and the urge to understand sex disparities in prevalence, clinical presentation, and treatment response in psychiatric or neurologic disorders. Indeed, the menstrual cycle is an excellent model of ovarian steroid influence on emotion, behavior, and cognition. This review summarizes the emotion-related and cognitive findings of methodologically sound menstrual cycle studies. In particular, the review is devoted to the sex hormone-induced emotional disturbances in women with premenstrual dysphoric disorder, a subgroup of women responding with enhanced sensitivity to the normal fluctuations in endogenous hormone levels during the menstrual cycle. In addition, emotion processing and cognitive findings across the menstrual cycle in healthy women are also discussed. The overall conclusion is that that menstrual cycle differences in sexually dimorphic cognitive tasks are small and difficult to replicate. Emotion-related changes are more consistently found and are better associated with progesterone and the luteal phase, than with estradiol. © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Establishment of a JSME code for the evaluation of high-cycle thermal fatigue in mixing tees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriya, Shoichi; Fukuda, Toshihiko; Matsunaga, Tomoya; Hirayama, Hiroshi; Shiina, Kouji; Tanimoto, Koichi

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes a JSME code for high-cycle thermal fatigue evaluation by thermal striping in mixing tees with hot and cold water flows. The evaluation of thermal striping in a mixing tee has four steps to screen design parameters one-by-one according to the severity of the thermal load assessed from design conditions using several evaluation charts. In order to make these charts, visualization tests with acrylic pipes and temperature measurement tests with metal pipes were conducted. The influence of the configurations of mixing tees, flow velocity ratio, pipe diameter ratio and so on was examined from the results of the experiments. This paper makes a short mention of the process of providing these charts. (author)

  9. Assessment of Accrued Damage and Remaining Useful Life in Leadfree Electronics Subjected to Multiple Thermal Environments of Thermal Aging and Thermal Cycling

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A method has been developed for prognostication of accrued prior damage in electronics subjected to overlapping sequential environments of thermal aging and thermal...

  10. Comparison of the Organic Flash Cycle (OFC) to other advanced vapor cycles for intermediate and high temperature waste heat reclamation and solar thermal energy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, Tony; Mao, Samuel S.; Greif, Ralph

    2012-01-01

    The Organic Flash Cycle (OFC) is proposed as a vapor power cycle that could potentially improve the efficiency with which high and intermediate temperature finite thermal sources are utilized. The OFC's aim is to improve temperature matching and reduce exergy losses during heat addition. A theoretical investigation is conducted using high accuracy equations of state such as BACKONE, Span–Wagner, and REFPROP in a detailed thermodynamic and exergetic analysis. The study examines 10 different aromatic hydrocarbons and siloxanes as potential working fluids. Comparisons are drawn between the OFC and an optimized basic Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC), a zeotropic Rankine cycle using a binary ammonia-water mixture, and a transcritical CO 2 cycle. Results showed aromatic hydrocarbons to be the better suited working fluid for the ORC and OFC due to higher power output and less complex turbine designs. Results also showed that the single flash OFC achieves comparable utilization efficiencies to the optimized basic ORC. Although the OFC improved heat addition exergetic efficiency, this advantage was negated by irreversibilities introduced during flash evaporation. A number of potentially significant improvements to the OFC are possible though which includes using a secondary flash stage or replacing the throttling valve with a two-phase expander. -- Highlights: ► The Organic Flash Cycle (OFC) is proposed to improve temperature matching. ► Ten aromatic hydrocarbon and siloxane working fluids are considered. ► Accurate equations of state explicit in Helmholtz energy are used in the analysis. ► The OFC is compared to basic ORCs, zeotropic, and transcritical cycles. ► The OFC achieves comparable power output to the optimized basic ORC.

  11. Life cycle assessment as a method of limitation of a negative environment impact of castings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Holtzer

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Casting production constitutes environmental problems going far beyond the foundry plant area. Applying a notion of the life cycle the input (suppliers side and output factors (clients side can be identified. The foundry plant activities for the environment hazard mitigation can be situated on various stages of the casting life cycle. The environment impact of motorisation castings made of different materials – during the whole life cycle of castings – are discussed in the paper. It starts from the charge material production, then follows via the casting process, car assembly, car exploitation and ends at the car breaking up for scrap.

  12. Thermal cycling in LWR components in OECD-NEA member countries - CSNI integrity and ageing working group

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faidy, Claude; Chapuliot, Stephane; Mathet, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Thermal cycling is a widespread and recurring problem in nuclear power plants worldwide. Several incidents with leakage of primary water inside the containment challenged the integrity of NPPs although no release outside of containment occurred. Thermal cycling was not taken into account at the design stage. Regulatory bodies, utilities and researchers have to address it for their operating plants. It is a complex phenomenon that involves and links thermal hydraulic, fracture mechanic, materials and plant operation. Thermal cycling is connected either to operating transients (low cycle fatigue) or to complex phenomenon like stratification, vortex and mixing (low and high cycle fatigue). The former is covered by existing rules and codes. The latter is partially addressed by national rules and constitutes the subject of this report. In 2002, the Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) requested the working group on the integrity of reactor components and structures (IAGE WG) to prepare a program of work on thermal cycling to provide information to NEA member countries on operational experience, regulatory policies, countermeasures in place, current status of research and development, and to identify areas where research is needed both at national and international levels. The working group proposed a 3 fold program that covered: - Review of operating experience, regulatory framework, countermeasures and current research; - Benchmark to assess calculation capabilities in NEA member countries for crack initiation and propagation under a cyclic thermal loading, and ultimately to develop screening criteria to identify susceptible components; results of the benchmark were published in 2005; - Organisation of an international conference in cooperation with the EPRI and the USNRC on fatigue of reactor components. This conference reviews progress in the areas and provides a forum for discussion and exchange of information between high level experts. The

  13. Use of polyethylene glycol for the improvement of the cycling stability of bischofite as thermal energy storage material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutierrez, Andrea; Ushak, Svetlana; Galleguillos, Hector; Fernandez, Angel; Cabeza, Luisa F.; Grágeda, Mario

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Bischofite as phase change material for TES is studied. • Thermophysical properties of bischofite mixtures with PEG were determined. • The aim was to improve the cycling stability of bischofite. • The heating and cooling during 30 cycles were measured. • The most stable sample was bischofite + 5% PEG 2 000. - Abstract: Bischofite is a by-product of the non-metallic mining industry. It has been evaluated as phase change material in thermal energy storage, but it shows little cycling stability, therefore in this paper the mixture of bischofite with an additive was studied. Since polyethylene glycol (PEG) is a PCM itself, in this paper PEG (with different molecular weights) is used as additive in a PCM (bischofite) to improve its thermal behaviour. Results show that adding 5% PEG 2 000 to bischofite gives a more cycling stable PCM without affecting its melting temperature neither decreasing significantly its heat of fusion. This research shows that mixing an inorganic PCM with an organic additive can be a good option to improve the thermal performance of the PCM

  14. An application of the Caputo-Fabrizio operator to replicator-mutator dynamics: Bifurcation, chaotic limit cycles and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doungmo Goufo, Emile Franc

    2018-02-01

    The physical behaviors of replicator-mutator processes found in theoretical biophysics, physical chemistry, biochemistry and population biology remain complex with unlimited expressibility. People languages, for instance, have impressively and unpredictably changed over the time in human history. This is mainly due to the collection of small changes and collaboration with other languages. In this paper, the Caputo-Fabrizio operator is applied to a replicator-mutator dynamic taking place in midsts with movement. The model is fully analyzed and solved numerically via the Crank-Nicolson scheme. Stability and convergence results are provided. A concrete application to replicator-mutator dynamics for a population with three strategies is performed with numerical simulations provided for some fixed values of the physical position of the population symbolized by r and the grid points. Physically, it happens that limit cycles appear, not only in function of the mutation parameter μ but also in function of the values given to r . The amplitudes of limit cycles also appear to be proportional to r but the stability of the system remains unaffected. However, those limit cycles instead of disappearing as expected, are immediately followed by chaotic and unpredictable behaviors certainly due to the non-singular kernel used in the model and suitable to non-linear dynamics. Hence, the appearance and disappearance of limit cycles might be controlled by the position variable r which can also apprehend chaos.

  15. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Fatigue life under cyclic thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The number of cycles to failure of specimens in fatigue tests can be estimated by predicting crack growth. Under a cyclic thermal stress caused by fluctuation of fluid temperature, due to the stress gradient in the thickness direction, the estimated fatigue life differs from that estimated for mechanical fatigue tests. In this paper, the influence of crack growth under cyclic thermal loading on the fatigue life was investigated. First, the thermal stress was derived by superposing analytical solutions, and then, the stress intensity factor was obtained by the weight function method. It was shown that the thermal stress depended not on the rate of the fluid temperature change but on the rise time, and the magnitude of the stress was increased as the rise time was decreased. The stress intensity factor under the cyclic thermal stress was smaller than that under the uniform stress distribution. The change in the stress intensity factor with the crack depth did not depend on the heat transfer coefficient and only slightly depended on the rise time. The estimated fatigue life under the cyclic thermal loading could be 1.6 times longer than that under the uniform stress distribution. The critical size for the fatigue life determination was assumed to be 3 mm for fatigue test specimens of 10 mm diameter. By evaluating the critical size by structural integrity analyses, the fatigue life was increased and the effect of the critical size on the fatigue life was more pronounced for the cyclic thermal stress. (author)

  16. Damage assessment of low-cycle fatigue by crack growth prediction. Fatigue life under cyclic thermal stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamaya, Masayuki

    2013-01-01

    The number of cycles to failure of specimens in fatigue tests can be estimated by predicting crack growth. Under a cyclic thermal stress caused by fluctuation of fluid temperature, due to the stress gradient in the thickness direction, the estimated fatigue life differs from that estimated for mechanical fatigue tests. In this paper, the influence of crack growth under cyclic thermal loading on the fatigue life was investigated. First, the thermal stress was derived by superposing analytical solutions, and then, the stress intensity factor was obtained by the weight function method. It was shown that the thermal stress depended not on the rate of the fluid temperature change but on the rise time, and the magnitude of the stress was increased as the rise time was decreased. The stress intensity factor under the cyclic thermal stress was smaller than that under the uniform stress distribution. The change in the stress intensity factor with the crack depth was almost the same regardless of the rise time. The estimated fatigue life under the cyclic thermal loading could be 1.6 times longer than that under the uniform stress distribution. The critical size for the fatigue life determination was assumed to be 3 mm for fatigue test specimens of 10 mm diameter. By evaluating the critical size by structural integrity analyses, the fatigue life was increased and the effect of the critical size on the fatigue life was more pronounced for the cyclic thermal stress. (author)

  17. Lyapunov-based control of limit cycle oscillations in uncertain aircraft systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, Brendan

    Store-induced limit cycle oscillations (LCO) affect several fighter aircraft and is expected to remain an issue for next generation fighters. LCO arises from the interaction of aerodynamic and structural forces, however the primary contributor to the phenomenon is still unclear. The practical concerns regarding this phenomenon include whether or not ordnance can be safely released and the ability of the aircrew to perform mission-related tasks while in an LCO condition. The focus of this dissertation is the development of control strategies to suppress LCO in aircraft systems. The first contribution of this work (Chapter 2) is the development of a controller consisting of a continuous Robust Integral of the Sign of the Error (RISE) feedback term with a neural network (NN) feedforward term to suppress LCO behavior in an uncertain airfoil system. The second contribution of this work (Chapter 3) is the extension of the development in Chapter 2 to include actuator saturation. Suppression of LCO behavior is achieved through the implementation of an auxiliary error system that features hyperbolic functions and a saturated RISE feedback control structure. Due to the lack of clarity regarding the driving mechanism behind LCO, common practice in literature and in Chapters 2 and 3 is to replicate the symptoms of LCO by including nonlinearities in the wing structure, typically a nonlinear torsional stiffness. To improve the accuracy of the system model a partial differential equation (PDE) model of a flexible wing is derived (see Appendix F) using Hamilton's principle. Chapters 4 and 5 are focused on developing boundary control strategies for regulating the bending and twisting deformations of the derived model. The contribution of Chapter 4 is the construction of a backstepping-based boundary control strategy for a linear PDE model of an aircraft wing. The backstepping-based strategy transforms the original system to a exponentially stable system. A Lyapunov-based stability

  18. Thermal enhancement of charge and discharge cycles for adsorbed natural gas storage

    KAUST Repository

    Rahman, Kazi Afzalur; Loh, Wai Soong; Chakraborty, Anutosh; Saha, Bidyut Baran; Chun, Won Gee; Ng, Kim Choon

    2011-01-01

    The usage of adsorbed natural gas (ANG) storage is hindered by the thermal management during the adsorption and desorption processes. An effective thermal enhancement is thus essential for the development of the ANG technology and the motivation

  19. Life cycle energy metrics and CO 2 credit analysis of a hybrid photovoltaic/thermal greenhouse dryer

    OpenAIRE

    P. Barnwal; G. N. Tiwari

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, life cycle energy metrics, such as energy payback time (EPBT), energy production factor (EPF) and life cycle conversion efficiency (LCCE), and mitigation of CO 2 emissions for a hybrid photovoltaic/thermal (PV/T) greenhouse dryer have been analyzed. The hybrid PV/T greenhouse (roof type even span) dryer, designed and constructed at Solar Energy Park, Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi (28°35′N, 77°12′E, 216 m above MSL), India, has a 2.50 m × 2.60 m floor area, 1.80 m ce...

  20. Limitations to the use of two-dimensional thermal modeling of a nuclear waste repository

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, B.W.

    1979-01-01

    Thermal modeling of a nuclear waste repository is basic to most waste management predictive models. It is important that the modeling techniques accurately determine the time-dependent temperature distribution of the waste emplacement media. Recent modeling studies show that the time-dependent temperature distribution can be accurately modeled in the far-field using a 2-dimensional (2-D) planar numerical model; however, the near-field cannot be modeled accurately enough by either 2-D axisymmetric or 2-D planar numerical models for repositories in salt. The accuracy limits of 2-D modeling were defined by comparing results from 3-dimensional (3-D) TRUMP modeling with results from both 2-D axisymmetric and 2-D planar. Both TRUMP and ADINAT were employed as modeling tools. Two-dimensional results from the finite element code, ADINAT were compared with 2-D results from the finite difference code, TRUMP; they showed almost perfect correspondence in the far-field. This result adds substantially to confidence in future use of ADINAT and its companion stress code ADINA for thermal stress analysis. ADINAT was found to be somewhat sensitive to time step and mesh aspect ratio. 13 figures, 4 tables

  1. Evidence of hot spot formation on carbon limiters due to thermal electron emission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Philipps, V.; Samm, U.; Tokar, M.Z.; Unterberg, B.; Pospieszczyk, A.; Schweer, B.

    1993-01-01

    Carbon test limiters have been exposed in TEXTOR to high heat loads up to about 30 MW/m 2 . The evolutions of the surface temperature distribution and of the carbon release have been observed by means of local diagnostics. A sudden acceleration of the rise of the surface temperature has been found at a critical temperature of approx. 2400 deg. C. The increase of the rate of the temperature rise is consistent with an enhancement of the power loading by a factor of 2.5-3. Following the temperature jump (hot spot), a quasi-equilibrium temperature establishes at approx. 2700 deg. C. The development of the hot spot is explained by an increase of the local power loading to the breakdown of the sheath potential by thermal emission of electrons from the carbon surface. Simultaneously with the appearance of the hot spot, the carbon release from the surface increases sharply. This increase can be explained by normal thermal sublimation. Sublimation cooling contributes to the establishment of the quasi-equilibrium temperature at about 2700 deg. C. (author). 16 refs, 10 figs

  2. Thermal performance of shallow solar pond under open cycle continuous flow heating mode for heat extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Sebaii, A.A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527 (Egypt)]. E-mail: aasebaii@yahoo.com; Aboul-Enein, S. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527 (Egypt); Ramadan, M.R.I. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527 (Egypt); Khallaf, A.M. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Tanta University, Tanta 31527 (Egypt)

    2006-05-15

    The thermal performance of a shallow solar pond (SSP) under an open cycle continuous flow heating mode for heat extraction has been investigated. A serpentine heat exchanger (HE), either welded to the absorber plate or immersed in the pond water, has been used for extracting the heat. Suitable computer programs have been developed based on analytical solutions of the energy balance equations for the various elements of the SSP in the presence of the HE. Numerical calculations have been performed to study the effect of different operational and configurational parameters on the pond performance. In order to improve the pond performance, optimization of the various dimensions of the pond with the HE has been performed. The effects of the design parameters of the HE's tube, i.e. length L{sub he}, diameter D and mass flow rate m-bar {sub f} of the fluid flowing through the HE, on the pond performance have been investigated. The outlet temperature of the HE's fluid T{sub fo} is found to increase with increase of the HE length L{sub he}, and it decreases with increase of the mass flow rate of the HE's fluid m-bar {sub f} up to typical values for these parameters. Typical values for L{sub he} and m-bar {sub f} are found to be 4m and 0.004kg/s beyond which the change in T{sub fo} becomes insignificant. Experiments have been performed for the pond under different operational conditions with a HE welded to the absorber plate. To validate the proposed mathematical models, comparisons between experimental and theoretical results have been performed. Good agreement has been achieved.

  3. Modeling the small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Willem G.; Meyer, Josua P.

    2016-05-01

    The small-scale dish-mounted solar thermal Brayton cycle (STBC) makes use of a sun-tracking dish reflector, solar receiver, recuperator and micro-turbine to generate power in the range of 1-20 kW. The modeling of such a system, using a turbocharger as micro-turbine, is required so that optimisation and further development of an experimental setup can be done. As a validation, an analytical model of the small-scale STBC in Matlab, where the net power output is determined from an exergy analysis, is compared with Flownex, an integrated systems CFD code. A 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish with open-cavity tubular receiver and plate-type counterflow recuperator is considered, based on previous work. A dish optical error of 10 mrad, a tracking error of 1° and a receiver aperture area of 0.25 m × 0.25 m are considered. Since the recuperator operates at a very high average temperature, the recuperator is modeled using an updated ɛ-NTU method which takes heat loss to the environment into consideration. Compressor and turbine maps from standard off-the-shelf Garrett turbochargers are used. The results show that for the calculation of the steady-state temperatures and pressures, there is good comparison between the Matlab and Flownex results (within 8%) except for the recuperator outlet temperature, which is due to the use of different ɛ-NTU methods. With the use of Matlab and Flownex, it is shown that the small-scale open STBC with an existing off-the-shelf turbocharger could generate a positive net power output with solar-to-mechanical efficiency of up to 12%, with much room for improvement.

  4. Electrical and thermal transport in the quasiatomic limit of coupled Luttinger liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szasz, Aaron; Ilan, Roni; Moore, Joel E.

    2017-02-01

    We introduce a new model for quasi-one-dimensional materials, motivated by intriguing but not yet well-understood experiments that have shown two-dimensional polymer films to be promising materials for thermoelectric devices. We consider a two-dimensional material consisting of many one-dimensional systems, each treated as a Luttinger liquid, with weak (incoherent) coupling between them. This approximation of strong interactions within each one-dimensional chain and weak coupling between them is the "quasiatomic limit." We find integral expressions for the (interchain) transport coefficients, including the electrical and thermal conductivities and the thermopower, and we extract their power law dependencies on temperature. Luttinger liquid physics is manifested in a violation of the Wiedemann-Franz law; the Lorenz number is larger than the Fermi liquid value by a factor between γ2 and γ4, where γ ≥1 is a measure of the electron-electron interaction strength in the system.

  5. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J. [GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC, Global Nuclear Fuel, Americas LLC, 3901 Castle Hayne Road, Wilmingtonm, North Carolina (United States); Avila N, A., E-mail: Gabriel.Cuevas-Vivas@ge.com [Comision Federal de Electricidad, Central Nucleoelectrica Laguna Verde, Carretera Cardel-Nautla Km 42.5, Alto Lucero, Veracruz (Mexico)

    2016-09-15

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  6. Thermal limits validation of gamma thermometer power adaption in CFE Laguna Verde 2 reactor core

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cuevas V, G.; Banfield, J.; Avila N, A.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents the status of GEH work on Gamma Thermometer (GT) validation using the signals of the instruments installed in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. The long-standing technical collaboration between Comision Federal de Electricidad (CFE), Global Nuclear Fuel - Americas LLC (GNF) and GE-Hitachi Nuclear Energy Americas LLC (GEH) is moving forward with solid steps to a final implementation of GTs in a nuclear reactor core. Each GT is integrated into a slightly modified Local Power Range Monitor (LPRM) assembly. Six instrumentation strings are equipped with two gamma field detectors for a total of twenty-four bundles whose calculated powers are adapted to the instrumentation readings in addition to their use as calibration instruments for LPRMs. Since November 2007, the six GT instrumentation strings have been operable with almost no degradation by the strong neutron and gamma fluxes in the Laguna Verde Unit 2 reactor core. In this paper, the thermal limits, Critical Power Ratio (CPR) and maximum Linear Heat Generation Rate (LHGR), of bundles directly monitored by either Traverse In-core Probes (TIPs) or GTs are used to establish validation results that confirm the viability of TIP system replacement with automatic fixed in-core probes (AFIPs, GTs, in a Boiling Water Reactor. The new GNF steady-state reactor core simulator AETNA02 is used to obtain power and exposure distribution. Using this code with an updated methodology for GT power adaption, a reduced value of the GT interpolation uncertainty is obtained that is fed into the LHGR calculation. This new method achieves margin recovery for the adapted thermal limits for use in the Economic Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR) or any other BWR in the future that employs a GT based AFIP system for local power measurements. (Author)

  7. Effects of vacuum thermal cycling on mechanical and physical properties of high performance carbon/bismaleimide composite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Qi; Chen Ping; Gao Yu; Mu Jujie; Chen Yongwu; Lu Chun; Liu Dong

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → The level of cross-links was improved to a certain extent. → The thermal stability was firstly improved and then decreased. → The transverse and longitudinal CTE were both determined by the degree of interfacial debonding. → The mass loss ratio increases firstly and then reaches a plateau value. → The surface morphology was altered and the surface roughness increased firstly and then decreased. → The transverse tensile strength was reduced. → The flexural strength increased firstly and then decreased to a plateau value. → The ILSS increased firstly and then decreased to a plateau value. - Abstract: The aim of this article was to investigate the effects of vacuum thermal cycling on mechanical and physical properties of high performance carbon/bismaleimide (BMI) composites used in aerospace. The changes in dynamic mechanical properties and thermal stability were characterized by dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), respectively. The changes in linear coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) were measured in directions perpendicular and parallel to the fiber direction, respectively. The outgassing behavior of the composites were examined. The evolution of surface morphology and surface roughness were observed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). Changes in mechanical properties including transverse tensile strength, flexural strength and interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) were measured. The results indicated that the vacuum thermal cycling could improve the crosslinking degree and the thermal stability of resin matrix to a certain extent, and induce matrix outgassing and thermal stress, thereby leading to the mass loss and the interfacial debonding of the composite. The degradation in transverse tensile strength was caused by joint effects of the matrix outgassing and the interfacial debonding, while the changes in flexural strength and ILSS were affected by a competing effect between the crosslinking degree

  8. Recent developments in thermally-driven seawater desalination: Energy efficiency improvement by hybridization of the MED and AD cycles

    KAUST Repository

    Ng, Kim Choon

    2015-01-01

    The energy, water and environment nexus is a crucial factor when considering the future development of desalination plants or industry in the water-stressed economies. New generation of desalination processes or plants has to meet the stringent environment discharge requirements and yet the industry remains highly energy efficient and sustainable when producing good potable water. Water sources, either brackish or seawater, have become more contaminated as feed while the demand for desalination capacities increase around the world. One immediate solution for energy efficiency improvement comes from the hybridization of the proven desalination processes to the newer processes of desalination: For example, the integration of the available thermally-driven to adsorption desalination (AD) cycles where significant thermodynamic synergy can be attained when cycles are combined. For these hybrid cycles, a quantum improvement in energy efficiency as well as in increase in water production can be expected. The advent of MED with AD cycles, or simply called the MEDAD cycles, is one such example where seawater desalination can be pursued and operated in cogeneration with the electricity production plants: The hybrid desalination cycles utilize only the low exergy bled-steam at low temperatures, complemented with waste exhaust or renewable solar thermal heat at temperatures between 60 and 80. °C. In this paper, the authors have reported their pioneered research on aspects of AD and related hybrid MEDAD cycles, both at theoretical models and experimental pilots. Using the cogeneration of electricity and desalination concept, the authors examined the cost apportionment of fuel cost by the quality or exergy of working steam for such cogeneration configurations.

  9. Performance Evaluation of HP/ORC (Heat Pump/Organic Rankine Cycle) System with Optimal Control of Sensible Thermal Storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Do Carmo, Carolina Madeira Ramos; Dumont, Olivier; Nielsen, Mads Pagh

    2016-01-01

    In energy systems with high share of renewable energy sources, like wind and solar power, it is paramount to deal with their intrinsic variability. The interaction between electric and thermal energy (heating and cooling) demands represent a potential area for balancing supply and demand that could...... come to contribute to the integration of intermittent renewables.This paper describes an innovative concept that consists of the addition of an Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC) to a combined solar system coupled to a ground-source heat pump (HP) in a single-family building. The ORC enables the use of solar...... energy in periods of no thermal energy demand and reverses the heat pump cycle to supply electrical power. A dynamic model based on empirical data of this system is used to determine the annual performance. Furthermore, this work assesses the benefits of different control strategies that address...

  10. Effect of thermal cycling on the microstructure of a directionally solidified Fe, Cr, Al-TaC eutectic alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harf, F. H.; Tewari, S. N.

    1977-01-01

    Cylindrical bars (1.2 cm diameter) of Fe-13.6Cr-3.7Al-9TaC (wt %) eutectic alloy were directionally solidified in a modified Bridgman type furnace at 1 cm/h. The alloy microstructure consisted of aligned TaC fibers imbedded in a bcc Fe-Cr-Al matrix. Specimens of the alloy were thermally cycled from 1100 to 425 C in a burner rig. The effects of 1800 thermal cycles on the microstructure was examined by scanning electron microscopy, revealing a zig-zag shape of TaC fibers aligned parallel to the growth direction. The mechanism of carbide solution and reprecipitation on the (111) easy growth planes, suggested previously to account for the development of irregular serrations in Co-Cr-Ni matrix alloys, is believed to be responsible for these zig-zag surfaces.

  11. Detailed analysis of the effect of the turbine and compressor isentropic efficiency on the thermal and exergy efficiency of a Brayton cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Živić Marija

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Energy and exergy analysis of a Brayton cycle with an ideal gas is given. The irreversibility of the adiabatic processes in turbine and compressor is taken into account through their isentropic efficiencies. The net work per cycle, the thermal efficiency and the two exergy efficiencies are expressed as functions of the four dimensionless variables: the isentropic efficiencies of turbine and compressor, the pressure ratio, and the temperature ratio. It is shown that the maximal values of the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiency are achieved when the isentropic efficiencies and temperature ratio are as high as possible, while the different values of pressure ratio that maximize the net work per cycle, the thermal and the exergy efficiencies exist. These pressure ratios increase with the increase of the temperature ratio and the isentropic efficiency of compressor and turbine. The increase of the turbine isentropic efficiency has a greater impact on the increase of the net work per cycle and the thermal efficiency of a Brayton cycle than the same increase of compressor isentropic efficiency. Finally, two goal functions are proposed for thermodynamic optimization of a Brayton cycle for given values of the temperature ratio and the compressor and turbine isentropic efficiencies. The first maximizes the sum of the net work per cycle and thermal efficiency while the second the net work per cycle and exergy efficiency. In both cases the optimal pressure ratio is closer to the pressure ratio that maximizes the net work per cycle.

  12. Fracture resistance of metal-free composite crowns-effects of fiber reinforcement, thermal cycling, and cementation technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Franziska; Eickemeyer, Grit; Rammelsberg, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The improved mechanical properties of contemporary composites have resulted in their extensive use for the restoration of posterior teeth. However, the influence of fiber reinforcement, cementation technique, and physical stress on the fracture resistance of metal-free crowns is unknown. This in vitro study evaluated the effect of fiber reinforcement, physical stress, and cementation methods on the fracture resistance of posterior metal-free Sinfony crowns. Ninety-six extracted human third molars received a standardized tooth preparation: 0.5-mm chamfer preparation and occlusal reduction of 1.3 to 1.5 mm. Sinfony (nonreinforced crowns, n=48) and Sinfony-Vectris (reinforced crowns, n=48) crowns restoring original tooth contour were prepared. Twenty-four specimens of each crown type were cemented, using either glass ionomer cement (GIC) or resin cement. Thirty-two crowns (one third) were stored in humidity for 48 hours. Another third was exposed to 10,000 thermal cycles (TC) between 5 degrees C and 55 degrees C. The remaining third was treated with thermal cycling and mechanical loading (TCML), consisting of 1.2 million axial loads of 50 N. The artificial crowns were then vertically loaded with a steel sphere until failure occurred. Significant differences in fracture resistance (N) between experimental groups were assessed by nonparametric Mann-Whitney U-test (alpha=.05). Fifty percent of the Sinfony and Sinfony-Vectris crowns cemented with glass ionomer cement loosened after thermal cycling. Thermal cycling resulted in a significant reduction in the mean fracture resistance for Sinfony crowns cemented with GIC, from 2037 N to 1282 N (P=.004). Additional fatigue produced no further effects. Fiber reinforcement significantly increased fracture resistance, from 1555 N to 2326 N (P=.001). The minimal fracture resistance was above 600 N for all combinations of material, cement and loading. Fracture resistance of metal-free Sinfony crowns was significantly increased by

  13. University of Minnesota Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) project report on the first long-term cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, M.

    1991-10-01

    The technical feasibility of high-temperature (greater than 100 C) aquifer thermal energy storage (IOTAS) in a deep, confined aquifer was tested in a series of experimental cycles at the University of Minnesota's St. Paul field test facility (FTF). This report describes the additions to the FTF for the long-term cycles and the details of the first long-term cycle (LT1) that was conducted from November 1984 through May 1985. Heat recovery; operational experience; and thermal, chemical, hydrologic, and geologic aspects of LT1 are reported. The permits for long-term cycles required the addition of a monitoring well 30.5 m from the storage well for monitoring near the edge of the thermally affected area and allowed the addition of a cation-exchange water softener to enable continuous operation during the injection phase. Approximately 62 percent of the 9.47 GWh of energy added to the 9.21 x 10(exp 4) cu m of ground water stored in the aquifer LT1 was recovered. Ion-exchange water softening of the heated and stored ground water prevented scaling in the system heat exchangers and the storage well and changed the major-ion chemistry of the stored water. Temperatures at the storage horizons in site monitoring wells reached as high as 108 C during the injection phase of LT1. Following heat recovery, temperatures were less than 30 C at the same locations. Less permeable horizons underwent slow temperature changes. No thermal or chemical effects were observed at the remote monitoring site.

  14. Pre- and post-irradiation properties of copper alloys at 250 deg. C following bonding and bakeout thermal cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Edwards, D.J.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.

    1997-01-01

    Screening experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of the oxide dispersion strengthened (GlidCop, CuAl-25) and the precipitation hardened (CuCrZr, CuNiBe) copper alloys. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing, and bonding thermal treatment followed by re-ageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 350 deg. C for 100 h. Tensile specimens of CuAl-25 were given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of heat treated specimens were neuron irradiated at 250 deg. C to a dose level of ∼ 0.3 dpa in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with various heat treatments were tensile tested at 250 deg. C. The microstructure and electrical resistivity of these specimens were determined in the unirradiated as well as irradiated conditions. The post-deformation microstructure of the irradiated specimens was also investigated. The fracture surfaces of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were examined. Results of these investigations are reported in the present report. The main effect of the bonding thermal cycle heat treatment was a slight decrease in strength of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. The strength of CuAl-25, on the other hand, remained almost unaltered. The post irradiation tests at 250 deg. C showed a severe loss of ductility in the case of CuNiBe alloy. The irradiated CuAl-25 and CuCrZr specimens, on the other hand, exhibited a reasonable amount of uniform elongation. The results are briefly discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and particles and irradiation-induced segregation, precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. (au) 7 tabs., 28 ills., 15 refs

  15. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, ATR Cycle 102-A, 11/28/93 thru 1/16/94

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1994-02-01

    This report contains the thermal (2,200 m/s) and fast (E > 1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 102-A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All ''H'' holder monitoring wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All ''SR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, ''BR'' holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All ''BR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle

  16. Bond Coat Engineering Influence on the Evolution of the Microstructure, Bond Strength, and Failure of TBCs Subjected to Thermal Cycling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, R. S.; Nagy, D.; Marple, B. R.

    2015-01-01

    Different types of thermal spray systems, including HVOF (JP5000 and DJ2600-hybrid), APS (F4-MB and Axial III), and LPPS (Oerlikon Metco system) were employed to spray CoNiCrAlY bond coats (BCs) onto Inconel 625 substrates. The chemical composition of the BC powder was the same in all cases; however, the particle size distribution of the powder employed with each torch was that specifically recommended for the torch. For optimization purposes, these BCs were screened based on initial evaluations of roughness, porosity, residual stress, relative oxidation, and isothermal TGO growth. A single type of standard YSZ top coat was deposited via APS (F4MB) on all the optimized BCs. The TBCs were thermally cycled by employing a furnace cycle test (FCT) (1080 °C-1 h—followed by forced air cooling). Samples were submitted to 10, 100, 400, and 1400 cycles as well as being cycled to failure. The behavior of the microstructures, bond strength values (ASTM 633), and the TGO evolution of these TBCs, were investigated for the as-sprayed and thermally cycled samples. During FCT, the TBCs found to be both the best and poorest performing and had their BCs deposited via HVOF. The results showed that engineering low-oxidized BCs does not necessarily lead to an optimal TBC performance. Moreover, the bond strength values decrease significantly only when the TBC is about to fail (top coat spall off) and the as-sprayed bond strength values cannot be used as an indicator of TBC performance.

  17. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates ATR Cycle 99-A, November 23, 1992--January 23, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1993-03-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>me) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 99-A which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power ReactorPrograms (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All ''H'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All ''SR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, ''BR'' holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All ''BR'' holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle

  18. Effect of thermal cycling on the transformation temperature ranges of a Ni-Ti shape memory alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, A.S.; Canejo, J.P.H.G.; Martins, R.M.S.; Braz Fernandes, F.M.

    2003-01-01

    Shape memory alloys (SMA) represents a class of metallic materials that has the capability of recovering a previously defined initial shape when subject to an adequate thermomechanical treatment. The present work aims to study the influence of thermal cycles on the transition temperatures of a Ni-Ti alloy. In this system, small variations around the equiatomic composition give rise to significant transformation temperature variations ranging from 173 to 373 K. SMA usually presents the shape memory effect after an annealing treatment at ca. 973 K. The optimisation of the thermomechanical treatment will allow to 'tune' the material to different transformation temperature ranges from the same starting material, just by changing the processing conditions. Differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to identify the transformation temperatures and the phases that are present after different thermal cycles. The results concerning a series of thermal cycles with different heating and cooling rates (from 1.67x10 -2 to 1.25x10 -1 K/s) and different holding temperatures (from 473 to 1033 K) are presented

  19. Changes in reactivity and in the margins to thermal limits by the inclusion of control rods of advanced type in the Laguna Verde Power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez, J.L.; Perusquia, R.; Montes, J.L.; Ortiz, J.J.; Ramirez, J.R.

    2004-01-01

    The obtained results are presented when simulating with CM-PRESTO code the cycle 10 of the unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Central, using two advanced types of control bars, besides the originally loaded ones. The two advanced types, to those that are denominated 1AV and 2AV in this work, are of different design, however both have in some place of the bar, a section with hafnium like neutron absorber material. They thought about three different scenarios, in the first one, used as reference, is simulated the cycle 10 using the original control bars, while in the other two cases the advanced types are used. The values of the reactivity were compared and of some margins to the thermal limits obtained when using the bars of advanced type, with those obtained in the case in that alone they are considered those original bars. It was found that in condition of power both advanced types present bigger absorber power of neutrons that the original bars, being quantified in average this bigger power in 0.22 pcm/notch for the type 1AV and in 0.51 pcm/notch for the type 2AV. The affectation of the margins to the observed thermal limits is minimum. (Author)

  20. Thermal studies of a superconducting current limiter using Monte-Carlo method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévêque, J.; Rezzoug, A.

    1999-07-01

    Considering the increase of the fault current level in electrical network, the current limiters become very interesting. The superconducting limiters are based on the quasi-instantaneous intrinsic transition from superconducting state to normal resistive one. Without detection of default or given order, they reduce the constraints supported by electrical installations above the fault. To avoid the destruction of the superconducting coil, the temperature must not exceed a certain value. Therefore the design of a superconducting coil needs the simultaneous resolution of an electrical equation and a thermal one. This papers deals with a resolution of this coupled problem by the method of Monte-Carlo. This method allows us to calculate the evolution of the resistance of the coil as well as the current of limitation. Experimental results are compared with theoretical ones. L'augmentation des courants de défaut dans les grands réseaux électriques ravive l'intérêt pour les limiteurs de courant. Les limiteurs supraconducteurs de courants peuvent limiter quasi-instantanément, sans donneur d'ordre ni détection de défaut, les courants de court-circuit réduisant ainsi les contraintes supportées par les installations électriques situées en amont du défaut. La limitation s'accompagne nécessairement de la transition du supraconducteur par dépassement de son courant critique. Pour éviter la destruction de la bobine supraconductrice la température ne doit pas excéder une certaine valeur. La conception d'une bobine supraconductrice exige donc la résolution simultanée d'une équation électrique et d'une équation thermique. Nous présentons une résolution de ce problème electrothermique par la méthode de Monte-Carlo. Cette méthode nous permet de calculer l'évolution de la résistance de la bobine et du courant de limitation. Des résultats expérimentaux sont comparés avec les résultats théoriques.

  1. Thermal limits of wild and laboratory strains of two African malaria vector species, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyons Candice L

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Malaria affects large parts of the developing world and is responsible for almost 800,000 deaths annually. As climates change, concerns have arisen as to how this vector-borne disease will be impacted by changing rainfall patterns and warming temperatures. Despite the importance and controversy surrounding the impact of climate change on the potential spread of this disease, little information exists on the tolerances of several of the vector species themselves. Methods Using a ramping protocol (to assess critical thermal limits - CT and plunge protocol (to assess lethal temperature limits - LT information on the thermal tolerance of two of Africa’s important malaria vectors, Anopheles arabiensis and Anopheles funestus was collected. The effects of age, thermal acclimation treatment, sex and strain (laboratory versus wild adults were investigated for CT determinations for each species. The effects of age and sex for adults and life stage (larvae, pupae, adults were investigated for LT determinations. Results In both species, females are more tolerant to low and high temperatures than males; larvae and pupae have higher upper lethal limits than do adults. Thermal acclimation of adults has large effects in some instances but small effects in others. Younger adults tend to be more tolerant of low or high temperatures than older age groups. Long-standing laboratory colonies are sufficiently similar in thermal tolerance to field-collected animals to provide reasonable surrogates when making inferences about wild population responses. Differences between these two vectors in their thermal tolerances, especially in larvae and pupae, are plausibly a consequence of different habitat utilization. Conclusions Limited plasticity is characteristic of the adults of these vector species relative to others examined to date, suggesting limited scope for within-generation change in thermal tolerance. These findings and the greater tolerance

  2. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates ATR Cycle 101-B, October 11, 1993--November 27, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>lMeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 101-B which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein

  3. Effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on the properties of copper alloys irradiated at 350 deg. C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J.

    1997-02-01

    Screening experiments were carried out to investigate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of the oxide dispersion strengthened (GlidCop, CuAl-25) and the precipitation hardened (CuCrZr, CuNiBe) cooper alloys. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime-ageing, and bonding thermal treatment followed by re-ageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 350 deg. C for 100 h. Tensile specimens of CuAl-25 were given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of heat treated specimens were neutron irradiated at 350 deg. C to a dose level of ∼ 0.3 dpa in the DR-3 reactor at Risoe. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with various heat treatments were tensile tested at 350 deg. C. The microstructure and electrical resistivity of these specimens were determined in the unirradiated as well as irradiated conditions. The post-deformation microstructure of the irradiated specimens was also investigated. The fracture surfaces of both unirradiated and irradiated specimens were examined. Results of these investigations are reported in the present report. The results are briefly discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and particles and irradiation-induced segregation, precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. (au) 6 tabs., 24 ills., 9 refs

  4. Evaluate depth of field limits of fixed focus lens arrangements in thermal infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Norbert

    2016-05-01

    More and more modern thermal imaging systems use uncooled detectors. High volume applications work with detectors that have a reduced pixel count (typically between 200x150 and 640x480). This reduces the usefulness of modern image treatment procedures such as wave front coding. On the other hand, uncooled detectors demand lenses with fast fnumbers, near f/1.0, which reduces the expected Depth of Field (DoF). What are the limits on resolution if the target changes distance to the camera system? The desire to implement lens arrangements without a focusing mechanism demands a deeper quantification of the DoF problem. A new approach avoids the classic "accepted image blur circle" and quantifies the expected DoF by the Through Focus MTF of the lens. This function is defined for a certain spatial frequency that provides a straightforward relation to the pixel pitch of imaging device. A certain minimum MTF-level is necessary so that the complete thermal imaging system can realize its basic functions, such as recognition or detection of specified targets. Very often, this technical tradeoff is approved with a certain lens. But what is the impact of changing the lens for one with a different focal length? Narrow field lenses, which give more details of targets in longer distances, tighten the DoF problem. A first orientation is given by the hyperfocal distance. It depends in a square relation on the focal length and in a linear relation on the through focus MTF of the lens. The analysis of these relations shows the contradicting requirements between higher thermal and spatial resolution, faster f-number and desired DoF. Furthermore, the hyperfocal distance defines the DoF-borders. Their relation between is such as the first order imaging formulas. A calculation methodology will be presented to transfer DoF-results from an approved combination lens and camera to another lens in combination with the initial camera. Necessary input for this prediction is the accepted DoF of

  5. Thermal cycling tests of 1st wall mock-ups with beryllium/CuCrZr bonding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uda, M.; Iwadachi, T.; Uchida, M.; Yamada, H.; Nakamichi, M.; Kawamura, H.

    2004-01-01

    The innovative bonding technology between beryllium and CuCrZr with Hot Isostatic Pressing (HIP) has been proposed for the manufacturing of the ITER first wall. In the next step, thermal cycling test of first wall mock-ups manufactured with the bonding technology, were carried out under the ITER heat load condition. The test condition is 1000 cycles of On and Off under 5 MW/m 2 , and two types of the mock-up were manufactured for evaluation of the effects on HIP temperature (520 degree C and 610 degree C). The tensile properties of the bonding were also evaluated in room temperature and 200 degree C. As for the results of the thermal cycling tests, the temperature near the bonding interface were scarcely any change up to 1000 cycles, and obvious damage of the mock-up was not detected under the tests. As for the results of the tensile tests in 200 degree C, the test pieces of the HIP bonding at 610 degree C were broken in parent CuCrZr material, not broken in the bonding interface. (author)

  6. Thermal stress analysis and the effect of temperature dependence of material properties on Doublet III limiter design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McKelvey, T.E.; Koniges, A.E.; Marcus, F.; Sabado, M.; Smith, R.

    1979-10-01

    Temperature and thermal stress parametric design curves are presented for two materials selected for Doublet III primary limiter applications. INC X-750 is a candidate for the medium Z limiter design and ATJ graphite for the low Z design. The dependence of significant material properties on temperature is shown and the impact of this behavior on the decision to actively or passively cool the limiter is discussed

  7. Transition of chaotic motion to a limit cycle by intervention of economic policy: an empirical analysis in agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Kenshi; Managi, Shunsuke; Vitanov, Nikolay K; Demura, Katsuhiko

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the transition of dynamics observed in an actual real agricultural economic dataset. Lyapunov spectrum analysis is conducted on the data to distinguish deterministic chaos and the limit cycle. Chaotic and periodic oscillation were identified before and after the second oil crisis, respectively. The statitonarity of the time series is investigated using recurrence plots. This shows that government intervention might reduce market instability by removing a chaotic market's long-term unpredictability.

  8. Human power output during repeated sprint cycle exercise: the influence of thermal stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ball, D.; Burrows, C.; Sargeant, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    Thermal stress is known to impair endurance capacity during moderate prolonged exercise. However, there is relatively little available information concerning the effects of thermal stress on the performance of high-intensity short-duration exercise. The present experiment examined human power output

  9. On the formation of limit cycle of the friction-induced stick-slip vibration in oilwell drillstring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua Zhu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the stick-slip vibration in oilwell drillstring is studied. The drilling system is modelled as a lumped-parameter torsional pendulum and the interaction between the drill bit and the rock is treated as Coulomb friction. Equation of motion of the drill bit is established and the dynamic responses of the drill bit are obtained. A drilling system with the drillstring length 3000 m is analysed, in which the system parameters are selected by reference to the actual drilling situation. After the slip vibrations in the initial stage, final state of the drill bit is a stable stick-slip vibration of which the limit cycle is a closed loop. In order to find the stability of the limit cycle corresponds to the periodically stick-slip vibration, different initial conditions for the drill bit are studied. Results show that the drill bit will lead to a periodic motion and the phase trajectories ultimately converge to the same limit cycle corresponds to stable stick-slip vibration.

  10. Variants of Regenerated Fissile Materials Usage in Thermal Reactors as the First Stage of Fuel Cycle Closing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrianova, E. A.; Tsibul'skiy, V. F.

    2017-12-01

    At present, 240 000 t of spent nuclear fuel (SF) has been accumulated in the world. Its long-term storage should meet safety conditions and requires noticeable finances, which grow every year. Obviously, this situation cannot exist for a long time; in the end, it will require a final decision. At present, several variants of solution of the problem of SF management are considered. Since most of the operating reactors and those under construction are thermal reactors, it is reasonable to assume that the structure of the nuclear power industry in the near and medium-term future will be unchanged, and it will be necessary to utilize plutonium in thermal reactors. In this study, different strategies of SF management are compared: open fuel cycle with long-term SF storage, closed fuel cycle with MOX fuel usage in thermal reactors and subsequent long-term storage of SF from MOX fuel, and closed fuel cycle in thermal reactors with heterogeneous fuel arrangement. The concept of heterogeneous fuel arrangement is considered in detail. While in the case of traditional fuel it is necessary to reprocess the whole amount of spent fuel, in the case of heterogeneous arrangement, it is possible to separate plutonium and 238U in different fuel rods. In this case, it is possible to achieve nearly complete burning of fissile isotopes of plutonium in fuel rods loaded with plutonium. These fuel rods with burned plutonium can be buried after cooling without reprocessing. They would contain just several percent of initially loaded plutonium, mainly even isotopes. Fuel rods with 238U alone should be reprocessed in the usual way.

  11. Assessing the potential of hybrid fossil–solar thermal plants for energy policy making: Brayton cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardos, Eva; López, Ignacio; Rodríguez, Javier; Abánades, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a first study in-depth of solar–fossil hybridization from a general perspective. It develops a set of useful parameters for analyzing and comparing hybrid plants, it studies the case of hybridizing Brayton cycles with current solar technologies and shows a tentative extrapolation of the results to integrated combined cycle systems (ISCSS). In particular, three points have been analyzed: the technical requirements for solar technologies to be hybridized with Brayton cycles, the temperatures and pressures at which hybridization would produce maximum power per unit of fossil fuel, and their mapping to current solar technologies and Brayton cycles. Major conclusions are that a hybrid plant works in optimum conditions which are not equal to those of the solar or power blocks considered independently, and that hybridizing at the Brayton cycle of a combined cycle could be energetically advantageous. -- Highlights: •We model a generic solar–fossil hybrid Brayton cycle. •We calculate the operating conditions for maximum ratio power/fuel consumption. •Best hybrid plant conditions are not the same as solar or power blocks separately. •We study potential for hybridization with current solar technologies. •Hybridization at the Brayton in a combined cycle may achieve high power/fuel ratio

  12. Effect of the self-pumped limiter concept on the tritium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Sze, D.K.; Hassanein, A.

    1988-01-01

    The self-pumped limiter concept for impurity control of the plasma of a fusion reactor has a major impact on the design of the tritium systems. To achieve a sustained burn, conventional limiters and divertors remove large quantities of unburnt tritium and deuterium from the plasma which must be then recycled using a plasma processing system. The self-pumped limiter which does not remove the hydrogen species, does not require any plasma processing equipment. The blanket system and the coolant processing systems acquire greater importance with the use of this unconventional impurity control system. 3 refs., 2 figs

  13. Generalization of the Rabi population inversion dynamics in the sub-one-cycle pulse limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doslic, N.

    2006-01-01

    We consider the population inversion in a two-level system generated by a sub-one-cycle pulse excitation. Specifically, we explore the effect that the time derivative of the pulse envelope has on the Rabi dynamics. Our analysis is based on a combination of analytical, perturbative, and nonperturbative treatments and is complemented by numerical simulations. We find a shortening of the Rabi inversion period and show that complete inversion is unobtainable under resonant, ultrashort pulse conditions. The impact of nonresonant and carrier-envelope phase-dependent effects on the dynamics of two-level and multilevel systems is studied numerically, and conditions for complete population inversion are derived

  14. Relation between Wet-Bulb Globe Temperature and Thermal Work Limit Indices with Body Core Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahdi Jalali

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Occupational exposure to heat stress in casting and smelting industries can cause adverse health effects on employees who working in such industries. The present study was set to assess the correlation and agreement of heat stress indices, including wet bulb globe temperature (WBGT, and thermal work limit (TWL, and the deep body temperature indices in workers of several casting and smelting industries located in the vicinity of Tehran, Iran. In This cross-sectional study 40 workers randomly selected and were examined. WBGT and TWL were the indices used for assessing heat stress, and the tympanic temperature and the oral temperature were measured as the heat strain indices. The correlation and agreement of indices were measured using SPSS vs.16. The results of the assessment of WBGT, TWL, the tympanic temperature, and oral temperature showed that 80, 17.5, 40, and 32.5 percent of workers exposed to heat stress higher than permissible limits proposed by standard bodies. Moreover, the present study showed that the significant correlation coefficient between heat stress and heat strain indices was in the range of 0.844- 0.869. Further, there was observed a good agreement between TWL and heat strain indices. The agreement between TWL and the oral temperature was 0.63 (P-value≤ 0.001 and between TWL and tympanic temperature was 0.612 (P-value≤ 0.001. However, the agreement between WBGT and heat strain indices was not satisfactory. These values were 0.154 (P-value ≥ 0.068 and 0.215 (P-value≥ 0.028 for the oral temperature and the tympanic temperature, respectively. The TWL index had a better agreement than WBGT with heat strain indices so TWL index is the better choice for assessing the heat stress in casting and metal smelting industries.

  15. Effects of bonding bakeout thermal cycles on pre- and post irradiation microstructures, physical, and mechanical properties of copper alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, B.N.; Eldrup, M.; Toft, P.; Edwards, D.J. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    At present, dispersion strengthened (DS) copper is being considered as the primary candidate material for the ITER first wall and divertor components. Recently, it was agreed among the ITER parties that a backup alloy should be selected from the two well known precipitation hardened copper alloys, CuCrZr and CuNiBe. It was therefore decided to carry out screening experiments to simulate the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties, and electrical resistivity of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys. On the basis of the results of these experiments, one of the two alloys will be selected as a backup material. Tensile specimens of CuCrZr and CuNiBe alloys were given various heat treatments corresponding to solution anneal, prime ageing, and bonding thermal cycle followed by reageing and the reactor bakeout treatment at 623K for 100 hours. Tensile specimens of the DS copper were also given the heat treatment corresponding to the bonding thermal cycle. A number of these heat treated specimens of CuCrZr, CuNiBe, and DS copper were neutron irradiated at 523K to a dose level of {approx}0.3 dpa (NRT) in the DR-3 reactor at Riso. Both unirradiated and irradiated specimens with the various heat treatments were tensile tested at 532K. The dislocation, precipitate and void microstructures and electrical resistivity of these specimens were also determined. Results of these investigations will be reported and discussed in terms of thermal and irradiation stability of precipitates and irradiation-induced precipitation and recovery of dislocation microstructure. Results show that the bonding and bakeout thermal cycles are not likely to have any serious deleterious effects on the performance of these alloys. The CuNiBe alloys were found to be susceptible to radiation-induced embrittlement, however, the exact mechanism is not yet known. It is thought that radiation-induced precipitation and segregation of the beryllium may be responsible.

  16. Transcriptional Orchestration of the Global Cellular Response of a Model Pennate Diatom to Diel Light Cycling under Iron Limitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Smith

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Environmental fluctuations affect distribution, growth and abundance of diatoms in nature, with iron (Fe availability playing a central role. Studies on the response of diatoms to low Fe have either utilized continuous (24 hr illumination or sampled a single time of day, missing any temporal dynamics. We profiled the physiology, metabolite composition, and global transcripts of the pennate diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum during steady-state growth at low, intermediate, and high levels of dissolved Fe over light:dark cycles, to better understand fundamental aspects of genetic control of physiological acclimation to growth under Fe-limitation. We greatly expand the catalog of genes involved in the low Fe response, highlighting the importance of intracellular trafficking in Fe-limited diatoms. P. tricornutum exhibited transcriptomic hallmarks of slowed growth leading to prolonged periods of cell division/silica deposition, which could impact biogeochemical carbon sequestration in Fe-limited regions. Light harvesting and ribosome biogenesis transcripts were generally reduced under low Fe while transcript levels for genes putatively involved in the acquisition and recycling of Fe were increased. We also noted shifts in expression towards increased synthesis and catabolism of branched chain amino acids in P. tricornutum grown at low Fe whereas expression of genes involved in central core metabolism were relatively unaffected, indicating that essential cellular function is protected. Beyond the response of P. tricornutum to low Fe, we observed major coordinated shifts in transcript control of primary and intermediate metabolism over light:dark cycles which contribute to a new view of the significance of distinctive diatom pathways, such as mitochondrial glycolysis and the ornithine-urea cycle. This study provides new insight into transcriptional modulation of diatom physiology and metabolism across light:dark cycles in response to Fe availability

  17. Preferred temperature and thermal breadth of birds wintering in peninsular Spain: the limited effect of temperature on species distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis M. Carrascal

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background. The availability of environmental energy, as measured by temperature, is expected to limit the abundance and distribution of endotherms wintering at temperate latitudes. A prediction of this hypothesis is that birds should attain their highest abundances in warmer areas. However, there may be a spatial mismatch between species preferred habitats and species preferred temperatures, so some species might end-up wintering in sub-optimal thermal environments. Methods. We model the influence of minimum winter temperature on the relative abundance of 106 terrestrial bird species wintering in peninsular Spain, at 10 ×10 km2 resolution, using 95%-quantile regressions. We analyze general trends across species on the shape of the response curves, the environmental preferred temperature (at which the species abundance is maximized, the mean temperature in the area of distribution and the thermal breadth (area under the abundance-temperature curve. Results. Temperature explains a low proportion of variation in abundance. The most significant effect is on limiting the maximum potential abundance of species. Considering this upper-limit response, there is a large interspecific variability on the thermal preferences and specialization of species. Overall, there is a preponderance of positive relationships between species abundance and temperature; on average, species attain their maximum abundances in areas 1.9 °C warmer than the average temperature available in peninsular Spain. The mean temperature in the area of distribution is lower than the thermal preferences of the species. Discussion. Many species prefer the warmest areas to overwinter, which suggests that temperature imposes important restrictions to birds wintering in the Iberian Peninsula. However, one third of species overwinter in locations colder than their thermal preferences, probably reflecting the interaction between habitat and thermal requirements. There is a high inter

  18. Effect of the self-pumped limiter concept on the tritium fuel cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, P.A.; Sze, D.K.; Hassanein, A.

    1988-01-01

    The self-pumped limiter concept was the impurity control system for the reactor in the Tokamak Power Systems Study (TPSS). The use of a self-pumped limiter had a major impact on the design of the tritium systems of the TPSS fusion reactor. The self-pumped limiter functions by depositing the helium ash under a layer of metal (vanadium). The majority of the hydrogen species are recycled at the plasma edge; a small fraction permeates to the blanket/coolant which was lithium in TPSS. Use of the self-pumped limiter results in the elimination of the plasma processing system. Thus, the blanket tritium processing system becomes the major tritium system. The main advantages achieved for the tritium systems with a self-pumped limiter are a reduction in the capital cost of tritium processing equipment as well as a reduction in building space, a reduced tritium inventory for processing and for reserve storage, an increase in the inherent safety of the fusion plant and an improvement in economics for a fusion world economy

  19. Measured thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, ATR Cycle 100-BC, April 23, 1993--May 13, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, L.D.; Murray, R.K.; Rogers, J.W.

    1993-07-01

    This report contains the thermal (2200 m/s) and fast (E>1MeV) neutron fluence rate data for ATR Cycle 100-BC which were measured by the Radiation Measurements Laboratory (RML) as requested by the Power Reactor Programs (ATR Experiments) Radiation Measurements Work Order. This report contains fluence rate values corresponding to the particular elevations (relative to the 80 ft. core elevation) where the measurements were taken. The data in this report consists of (1) a table of the ATR power history and distribution, (2) a hard copy listing of all thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, (3) plots of both the thermal and fast neutron fluence rates, and (4) a magnetic record (3.5 inch diskette) containing a listing of only the fast neutron fluence rates, their assigned elevations and proper header identification of all monitor positions contained herein. The fluence rates reported are for the average power levels given in the table of power history and distribution. All open-quotes Hclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 54 inches long. All open-quotes SRclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 55 inches long. This length allows measurement of the full core region and makes the first count elevation 24.73 inches above core midplane. Due to the safety rod problems in the west lobe, open-quotes BRclose quotes holders were used in the W-1, 2, 3, and 4 positions. All open-quotes BRclose quotes holder monitor wires for this cycle are 56.25 inches long. The distance from the end of the wires to the first count position was 4.25 inches for all wires counted from this cycle. The results from the measurements in the W-1, 2, 3, 4 monitor positions indicate that the safety rod followers were rotated to a different azimuthal orientation relative to the normal orientation. The results indicate that the rotation was counterclockwise from their normal orientation. This is the same condition observed starting with Cycle 99-B

  20. Limitation of future radiation exposures from the present operation of nuclear fuel cycle installations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beninson, D.

    1982-01-01

    This paper reviews the bases and the formulation for limiting the doses in the future from the combined contribution of present and future practices causing radiation exposures. Local, regional and global contributions to the exposure of given population groups are discussed, and the use of the collective dose commitments for predicting future exposures from continuing practice is presented. The paper discusses the limitation of the dose commitment and of the collective dose commitment per unit practice as procedures for controlling future exposures. It also presents the bases used to assign upperbounds of exposure, which are fractions of the relevant dose limits, to exposures caused by a given source or practice. These considerations have been introduced in the regulatory requirements used in Argentina, and the paper examines the bases of the relevant provisions. (author)

  1. Thermal single-gluon exchange potential for heavy quarkonium in the static limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Jia-Qing; Ma, Zhi-Lei; Shi, Chao-Yi; Li, Yun-De

    2015-01-01

    The calculations of thermal single-gluon exchange potential for heavy quarkonium in Feynman and Coulomb gauges are presented, and the comparisons between them and the hard thermal loop approximation ones which were first calculated by Laine et al. are illustrated. The numerical results show that the hard thermal loop thermal single-gluon exchange potential (especially its imaginary part) which used in many researches make some errors in the practical calculations at the temperature range accessible in the present experiment, and the problem of gauge dependent cannot be avoided when the complete self energy is used in the derivation of potential

  2. A Life-cycle Approach to Improve the Sustainability of Rural Water Systems in Resource-Limited Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Stacey

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A WHO and UNICEF joint report states that in 2008, 884 million people lacked access to potable drinking water. A life-cycle approach to develop potable water systems may improve the sustainability for such systems, however, a review of the literature shows that such an approach has primarily been used for urban systems located in resourced countries. Although urbanization is increasing globally, over 40 percent of the world’s population is currently rural with many considered poor. In this paper, we present a first step towards using life-cycle assessment to develop sustainable rural water systems in resource-limited countries while pointing out the needs. For example, while there are few differences in costs and environmental impacts for many improved rural water system options, a system that uses groundwater with community standpipes is substantially lower in cost that other alternatives with a somewhat lower environmental inventory. However, a LCA approach shows that from institutional as well as community and managerial perspectives, sustainability includes many other factors besides cost and environment that are a function of the interdependent decision process used across the life cycle of a water system by aid organizations, water user committees, and household users. These factors often present the biggest challenge to designing sustainable rural water systems for resource-limited countries.

  3. Underwater Cycle Ergometry: Power Requirements With and Without Diver Thermal Dress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shykoff, B

    2009-01-01

    .... An ongoing problem has been that, although the power requirement of cycling in the water is known to be greater than that in air for the same ergometer setting, the magnitude of the difference...

  4. A comparison of advanced thermal cycles suitable for upgrading existing power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heyen, G.; Kalitventzeff, B.

    1999-01-01

    In view of the constant growth of electricity usage and public pressure to reduce the dependence on nuclear power plants in the energy supply, solutions are sought to increase the capacity of power plants using fossil fuels. Highly efficient cycles are available: gas turbines combined with waste heat boilers and steam cycles are able to achieve efficiencies above 50-55%. However building new plants requires a large amount of capital.Alternative proposals are based on upgrades of existing plants : capital savings are expected by reusing part of the facilities. In the present study, three parallel proposals are compared on the basis of exergy efficiency; cost of investment and flexibility of operation are also discussed. They are compared with classical Rankine cycle and state of the art combined cycles. (Copyright (c) 1999 Elsevier Science B.V., Amsterdam. All rights reserved.)

  5. Multiple steady states, limit cycles and chaotic attractors in evolutionary games with Logit Dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hommes, C.H.; Ochea, M.I.

    2010-01-01

    This paper investigates, by means of simple, three and four strategy games, the occurrence of periodic and chaotic behaviour in a smooth version of the Best Response Dynamics, the Logit Dynamics. The main finding is that, unlike Replicator Dynamics, generic Hopf bifurcation and thus, stable limit

  6. Analysis and mitigation of systematic errors in spectral shearing interferometry of pulses approaching the single-cycle limit [Invited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birge, Jonathan R.; Kaertner, Franz X.

    2008-01-01

    We derive an analytical approximation for the measured pulse width error in spectral shearing methods, such as spectral phase interferometry for direct electric-field reconstruction (SPIDER), caused by an anomalous delay between the two sheared pulse components. This analysis suggests that, as pulses approach the single-cycle limit, the resulting requirements on the calibration and stability of this delay become significant, requiring precision orders of magnitude higher than the scale of a wavelength. This is demonstrated by numerical simulations of SPIDER pulse reconstruction using actual data from a sub-two-cycle laser. We briefly propose methods to minimize the effects of this sensitivity in SPIDER and review variants of spectral shearing that attempt to avoid this difficulty

  7. Thermal and pseudoelastic cycling in Cu-14.1Al-4.2Ni (wt%) single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gastien, R.; Corbellani, C.E.; Sade, M.; Lovey, F.C.

    2005-01-01

    Thermally and stress induced martensitic transformations between β and a mixture of martensitic structures, β' and γ', were studied in Cu-14.1Al-4.2Ni (wt%) single crystals. In this way information on the relative stability between β' and γ' martensites, compared to the β phase, was obtained. The measurement of electrical resistance as a function of temperature was used to follow the evolution of thermally induced transitions. The stress induced transformations were analyzed in the small temperature range at which the pseudoelastic behavior between β and a mixture of both martensites plays the main role. A clear inhibition of the γ' martensite is detected as the number of cycles increases, no matter which thermodynamic coordinate is varied to induce the phase transition, i.e., temperature or stress. An evaluation of the magnitude of the relative stabilization of the β' martensite compared with γ' was obtained by a suitably designed experiment

  8. Propagation of internal stresses in composite materials during heating and cooling according to thermal cycles of welding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gukasyan, L.E.; Belov, V.V.

    1977-01-01

    Investigations of free thermal expansion of a composite material, of fibre and matrix during welding thermal cycle make it possible to estimate mean internal strain and stress in the composite components, as well as the residual internal stress and strain present in the composite material after manufacturing. The samples investigated consisted of nickel-chromium EhI445 alloy, reinforced by tungsten-rhenium alloy fibres. As the composite material was cooled and heated in course of welding, the stress and strain changed their sign twice, the first time upon heating, the second time upon cooling. After complete cooling of the composite material residual stresses in the fibre stay at the proportionality level, while those in the matrix are lower. Experimental evidence of internal stress and strain appearing in the composite material during heating are fairly consistent with calculations in the elastic region, if account is taken of the temperature of internal residual stress relaxation upon heating

  9. Equilibrium Limit of Boundary Scattering in Carbon Nanostructures: Molecular Dynamics Calculations of Thermal Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haskins, Justin; Kinaci, Alper; Sevik, Cem; Cagin, Tahir

    2012-01-01

    It is widely known that graphene and many of its derivative nanostructures have exceedingly high reported thermal conductivities (up to 4000 W/mK at 300 K). Such attractive thermal properties beg the use of these structures in practical devices; however, to implement these materials while preserving transport quality, the influence of structure on thermal conductivity should be thoroughly understood. For graphene nanostructures, having average phonon mean free paths on the order of one micron, a primary concern is how size influences the potential for heat conduction. To investigate this, we employ a novel technique to evaluate the lattice thermal conductivity from the Green-Kubo relations and equilibrium molecular dynamics in systems where phonon-boundary scattering dominates heat flow. Specifically, the thermal conductivities of graphene nanoribbons and carbon nanotubes are calculated in sizes up to 3 microns, and the relative influence of boundary scattering on thermal transport is determined to be dominant at sizes less than 1 micron, after which the thermal transport largely depends on the quality of the nanostructure interface. The method is also extended to carbon nanostructures (fullerenes) where phonon confinement, as opposed to boundary scattering, dominates, and general trends related to the influence of curvature on thermal transport in these materials are discussed.

  10. Nanodomain Engineered (K, Na)NbO3 Lead-Free Piezoceramics: Enhanced Thermal and Cycling Reliabilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yao, Fang-Zhou; Wang, Ke; Cheng, Li-Qian

    2015-01-01

    - based materials, accepting the drawbacks of high temperature and cycling instabilities. Here, we present that CaZrO3-modified (K, Na)NbO3 piezoceramics not only possess excellent performance at ambient conditions benefiting from nanodomain engineering, but also exhibit superior stability against......The growing environmental concerns have been pushing the development of viable green alternatives for lead-based piezoceramics to be one of the priorities in functional ceramic materials. A polymorphic phase transition has been utilized to enhance piezoelectric properties of lead-free (K, Na)NbO3...... temperature fluctuation and electrical fatigue cycling. It was found that the piezoelectric coefficient d33 is temperature independent under 4 kV/mm, which can be attributed to enhanced thermal stability of electric field engineered domain configuration; whereas the electric field induced strain exhibits...

  11. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-01-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  12. Effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on the properties of copper alloys irradiated at 350 degrees C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Singh, B.N.; Edwards, D.J.; Eldrup, Morten Mostgaard

    2001-01-01

    Screening experiments were carried out to determine the effect of bonding and bakeout thermal cycles on microstructure, mechanical properties and electrical resistivity of the oxide dispersion strengthened (GlidCop, CuAl-25) and the precipitation hardened (CuCrZr, CuNiBe) copper alloys. Tensile...... results are described and their salient features discussed. The most significant effect of neutron irradiation is a severe loss of ductility in the case of CuNiBe alloys. (C) 2001 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved....

  13. A review of test results on solar thermal power modules with dish-mounted Stirling and Brayton cycle engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, Leonard D.

    1988-11-01

    This paper presents results of development tests of various solar thermal parabolic dish modules and assemblies that used dish-mounted Brayton or Stirling cycle engines for production of electric power. These tests indicate that early modules achieve net efficiencies up to 29 percent in converting sunlight to electricity, as delivered to the grid. Various equipment deficiencies were observed and a number of malfunctions occurred. The performance measurements, as well as the malfunctions and other test experience, provided information that should be of value in developing systems with improved performance and reduced maintenance.

  14. Diagnosing phosphorus limitations in natural terrestrial ecosystems in carbon cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan; Peng, Shushi; Goll, Daniel S.; Ciais, Philippe; Guenet, Bertrand; Guimberteau, Matthieu; Hinsinger, Philippe; Janssens, Ivan A.; Peñuelas, Josep; Piao, Shilong; Poulter, Benjamin; Violette, Aurélie; Yang, Xiaojuan; Yin, Yi; Zeng, Hui

    2017-07-01

    Most of the Earth System Models (ESMs) project increases in net primary productivity (NPP) and terrestrial carbon (C) storage during the 21st century. Despite empirical evidence that limited availability of phosphorus (P) may limit the response of NPP to increasing atmospheric CO2, none of the ESMs used in the previous Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change assessment accounted for P limitation. We diagnosed from ESM simulations the amount of P need to support increases in carbon uptake by natural ecosystems using two approaches: the demand derived from (1) changes in C stocks and (2) changes in NPP. The C stock-based additional P demand was estimated to range between -31 and 193 Tg P and between -89 and 262 Tg P for Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) 2.6 and RCP8.5, respectively, with negative values indicating a P surplus. The NPP-based demand, which takes ecosystem P recycling into account, results in a significantly higher P demand of 648-1606 Tg P for RCP2.6 and 924-2110 Tg P for RCP8.5. We found that the P demand is sensitive to the turnover of P in decomposing plant material, explaining the large differences between the NPP-based demand and C stock-based demand. The discrepancy between diagnosed P demand and actual P availability (potential P deficit) depends mainly on the assumptions about availability of the different soil P forms. Overall, future P limitation strongly depends on both soil P availability and P recycling on ecosystem scale.

  15. Integration of photovoltaic and concentrated solar thermal technologies for H2 production by the hybrid sulfur cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liberatore, Raffaele; Ferrara, Mariarosaria; Lanchi, Michela; Turchetti, Luca

    2017-06-01

    It is widely agreed that hydrogen used as energy carrier and/or storage media may significantly contribute in the reduction of emissions, especially if produced by renewable energy sources. The Hybrid Sulfur (HyS) cycle is considered as one of the most promising processes to produce hydrogen through the water-splitting process. The FP7 project SOL2HY2 (Solar to Hydrogen Hybrid Cycles) investigates innovative material and process solutions for the use of solar heat and power in the HyS process. A significant part of the SOL2HY2 project is devoted to the analysis and optimization of the integration of the solar and chemical (hydrogen production) plants. In this context, this work investigates the possibility to integrate different solar technologies, namely photovoltaic, solar central receiver and solar troughs, to optimize their use in the HyS cycle for a green hydrogen production, both in the open and closed process configurations. The analysis carried out accounts for different combinations of geographical location and plant sizing criteria. The use of a sulfur burner, which can serve both as thermal backup and SO2 source for the open cycle, is also considered.

  16. Effect of Gaseous Impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and Aging Properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Dhanesh [Primary Contact; Lamb, Joshua; Chien, Wen-Ming; Talekar, Anjali; and Pal, Narendra

    2011-03-28

    This program was dedicated to understanding the effect of impurities on Long-Term Thermal Cycling and aging properties of Complex Hydrides for Hydrogen Storage. At the start of the program we found reversibility between Li2NH+LiH LiH+LiNH2 (yielding ~5.8 wt.%H capacity). Then we tested the effect of impurity in H2 gas by pressure cycling at 255°C; first with industrial gas containing ppm levels of O2 and H2O as major impurities. Both these impurities had a significant impact on the reversibility and decreased the capacity by 2.65 wt.%H. Further increase in number of cycles from 500 to 1100 showed only a 0.2 wt%H more weight loss, showing some capacity is still maintained after a significant number of cycles. The loss of capacity is attributed to the formation of ~55 wt% LiH and ~30% Li2O, as major contaminant phases, along with the hydride Li2NH phase; suggesting loss of nitrogen during cycling. The effect of 100 ppm H2O in H2 also showed a decrease of ~2.5 wt.%H (after 560 cycles), and 100ppm O2 in H2; a loss of ~4.1 wt.%. Methane impurity (100 ppm, 100cycles), showed a very small capacity loss of 0.9 wt.%H under similar conditions. However, when Li3N was pressure cycled with 100ppmN2-H2 there were beneficial effects were observed (255oC); the reversible capacity increased to 8.4wt.%H after 853 cycles. Furthermore, with 20 mol.%N2-H2 capacity increased to ~10 wt.%H after 516 cycles. We attribute this enhancement to the reaction of nitrogen with liquid lithium during cycling as the Gibbs free energy of formation of Li3N (Go = -98.7 kJ/mol) is more negative than that of LiH (Go = -50.3 kJ/mol). We propose that the mitigation of hydrogen capacity losses is due to the destabilization of the LiH phase that tends to accumulate during cycling. Also more Li2NH phase was found in the cycled product. Mixed Alanates (3LiNH2:Li3AlH6) showed that 7 wt% hydrogen desorbed under dynamic vacuum. Equilibrium experiments (maximum 12 bar H2) showed up to 4wt% hydrogen reversibly

  17. Assessment of drug-induced arrhythmic risk using limit cycle and autocorrelation analysis of human iPSC-cardiomyocyte contractility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby, R. Jason [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics, 6400 Sanger Rd, Orlando, FL 32827 (United States); Qi, Feng [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, Applied Bioinformatics Facility, 6400 Sanger Rd, Orlando, FL 32827 (United States); Phatak, Sharangdhar; Smith, Layton H. [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics, 6400 Sanger Rd, Orlando, FL 32827 (United States); Malany, Siobhan, E-mail: smalany@sbpdiscovery.org [Sanford Burnham Prebys Medical Discovery Institute, Conrad Prebys Center for Chemical Genomics, 6400 Sanger Rd, Orlando, FL 32827 (United States)

    2016-08-15

    Cardiac safety assays incorporating label-free detection of human stem-cell derived cardiomyocyte contractility provide human relevance and medium throughput screening to assess compound-induced cardiotoxicity. In an effort to provide quantitative analysis of the large kinetic datasets resulting from these real-time studies, we applied bioinformatic approaches based on nonlinear dynamical system analysis, including limit cycle analysis and autocorrelation function, to systematically assess beat irregularity. The algorithms were integrated into a software program to seamlessly generate results for 96-well impedance-based data. Our approach was validated by analyzing dose- and time-dependent changes in beat patterns induced by known proarrhythmic compounds and screening a cardiotoxicity library to rank order compounds based on their proarrhythmic potential. We demonstrate a strong correlation for dose-dependent beat irregularity monitored by electrical impedance and quantified by autocorrelation analysis to traditional manual patch clamp potency values for hERG blockers. In addition, our platform identifies non-hERG blockers known to cause clinical arrhythmia. Our method provides a novel suite of medium-throughput quantitative tools for assessing compound effects on cardiac contractility and predicting compounds with potential proarrhythmia and may be applied to in vitro paradigms for pre-clinical cardiac safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Impedance-based monitoring of human iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte contractility • Limit cycle analysis of impedance data identifies aberrant oscillation patterns. • Nonlinear autocorrelation function quantifies beat irregularity. • Identification of hERG and non-hERG inhibitors with known risk of arrhythmia • Automated software processes limit cycle and autocorrelation analyses of 96w data.

  18. Implications of incorporating N cycling and N limitations on primary production in an individual-based dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, B.; Wårlind, D.; Arneth, A.; Hickler, T.; Leadley, P.; Siltberg, J.; Zaehle, S.

    2014-04-01

    The LPJ-GUESS dynamic vegetation model uniquely combines an individual- and patch-based representation of vegetation dynamics with ecosystem biogeochemical cycling from regional to global scales. We present an updated version that includes plant and soil N dynamics, analysing the implications of accounting for C-N interactions on predictions and performance of the model. Stand structural dynamics and allometric scaling of tree growth suggested by global databases of forest stand structure and development were well reproduced by the model in comparison to an earlier multi-model study. Accounting for N cycle dynamics improved the goodness of fit for broadleaved forests. N limitation associated with low N-mineralisation rates reduces productivity of cold-climate and dry-climate ecosystems relative to mesic temperate and tropical ecosystems. In a model experiment emulating free-air CO2 enrichment (FACE) treatment for forests globally, N limitation associated with low N-mineralisation rates of colder soils reduces CO2 enhancement of net primary production (NPP) for boreal forests, while some temperate and tropical forests exhibit increased NPP enhancement. Under a business-as-usual future climate and emissions scenario, ecosystem C storage globally was projected to increase by ca. 10%; additional N requirements to match this increasing ecosystem C were within the high N supply limit estimated on stoichiometric grounds in an earlier study. Our results highlight the importance of accounting for C-N interactions in studies of global terrestrial N cycling, and as a basis for understanding mechanisms on local scales and in different regional contexts.

  19. The path-integral analysis of an associative memory model storing an infinite number of finite limit cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mimura, Kazushi; Kawamura, Masaki; Okada, Masato

    2004-01-01

    An exact solution of the transient dynamics of an associative memory model storing an infinite number of limit cycles with l finite steps is shown by means of the path-integral analysis. Assuming the Maxwell construction ansatz, we have succeeded in deriving the stationary state equations of the order parameters from the macroscopic recursive equations with respect to the finite-step sequence processing model which has retarded self-interactions. We have also derived the stationary state equations by means of the signal-to-noise analysis (SCSNA). The signal-to-noise analysis must assume that crosstalk noise of an input to spins obeys a Gaussian distribution. On the other hand, the path-integral method does not require such a Gaussian approximation of crosstalk noise. We have found that both the signal-to-noise analysis and the path-integral analysis give completely the same result with respect to the stationary state in the case where the dynamics is deterministic, when we assume the Maxwell construction ansatz. We have shown the dependence of the storage capacity (α c ) on the number of patterns per one limit cycle (l). At l = 1, the storage capacity is α c = 0.138 as in the Hopfield model. The storage capacity monotonically increases with the number of steps, and converges to α c = 0.269 at l ≅ 10. The original properties of the finite-step sequence processing model appear as long as the number of steps of the limit cycle has order l = O(1)

  20. Assessment of drug-induced arrhythmic risk using limit cycle and autocorrelation analysis of human iPSC-cardiomyocyte contractility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirby, R. Jason; Qi, Feng; Phatak, Sharangdhar; Smith, Layton H.; Malany, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac safety assays incorporating label-free detection of human stem-cell derived cardiomyocyte contractility provide human relevance and medium throughput screening to assess compound-induced cardiotoxicity. In an effort to provide quantitative analysis of the large kinetic datasets resulting from these real-time studies, we applied bioinformatic approaches based on nonlinear dynamical system analysis, including limit cycle analysis and autocorrelation function, to systematically assess beat irregularity. The algorithms were integrated into a software program to seamlessly generate results for 96-well impedance-based data. Our approach was validated by analyzing dose- and time-dependent changes in beat patterns induced by known proarrhythmic compounds and screening a cardiotoxicity library to rank order compounds based on their proarrhythmic potential. We demonstrate a strong correlation for dose-dependent beat irregularity monitored by electrical impedance and quantified by autocorrelation analysis to traditional manual patch clamp potency values for hERG blockers. In addition, our platform identifies non-hERG blockers known to cause clinical arrhythmia. Our method provides a novel suite of medium-throughput quantitative tools for assessing compound effects on cardiac contractility and predicting compounds with potential proarrhythmia and may be applied to in vitro paradigms for pre-clinical cardiac safety evaluation. - Highlights: • Impedance-based monitoring of human iPSC-derived cardiomyocyte contractility • Limit cycle analysis of impedance data identifies aberrant oscillation patterns. • Nonlinear autocorrelation function quantifies beat irregularity. • Identification of hERG and non-hERG inhibitors with known risk of arrhythmia • Automated software processes limit cycle and autocorrelation analyses of 96w data

  1. Life cycle cost optimization of buildings with regard to energy use, thermal indoor environment and daylight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Toke Rammer; Svendsen, Svend

    2002-01-01

    by the life cycle cost taking all expenses in the buildings service life into consideration. Also the performance of buildings is important as the performance influences the comfort of the occupants, heating demand etc. Different performance requirements are stated in building codes, standards......Buildings represent a large economical investment and have long service lives through which expenses for heating, cooling, maintenance and replacement depends on the chosen building design. Therefore, the building cost should not only be evaluated by the initial investment cost but rather...... and by the customer. The influence of different design variables on life cycle cost and building performance is very complicated and the design variables can be combined in an almost unlimited number of ways. Optimization can be applied to achieve a building design with low life cycle cost and good performance...

  2. Existence of limit cycles in a three level trophic chain with Lotka–Volterra and Holling type II functional responses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellanos, Víctor; Chan-López, Ramón E.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we analyze a three level trophic chain model, considering a logistic growth for the lowest trophic level, a Lotka–Volterra and Holling type II functional responses for predators in the middle and in the cusp in the chain, respectively. The differential system is based on the Leslie–Gower scheme. We establish conditions on the parameters that guarantee the coexistence of populations in the habitat. We find that an Andronov–Hopf bifurcation takes place. The first Lyapunov coefficient is computed explicitly and we show the existence of a stable limit cycle. Numerically, we observe a strange attractor and there exist evidence of the model to exhibit chaotic dynamics.

  3. Optimizing phonon scattering by tuning surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing to break the random-alloy limit of thermal conductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaolong; Li, Wu

    2018-01-01

    We investigate the evolution of the cross-plane thermal conductivity κ of superlattices (SLs) as interfaces change from perfectly abrupt to totally intermixed, by using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in combination with the spectral heat current calculations. We highlight the role of surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing by calculating the κ of SLs with changing interface roughness, whose tuning allows for κ values much lower than the "alloy limit" and the abrupt interface limit in same cases. The interplay between alloy and interface scattering in different frequency ranges provides a physical basis to predict a minimum of thermal conductivity. More specifically, we also explore how the interface roughness affects the thermal conductivities for SL materials with a broad span of atomic mass and bond strength. In particular, we find that (i) only when the "spacer" thickness of SLs increases up to a critical value, κ of rough SLs can break the corresponding "alloy limit," since SLs with different "spacer" thickness have different characteristic length of phonon transport, which is influenced by surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing to different extend. (ii) Whether κ changes monotonically with interface roughness strongly depends on the period length and intrinsic behavior of phonon transport for SL materials. Especially, for the SL with large period length, there exists an optimal interface roughness that can minimize the thermal conductivity. (iii) Surface-interdiffusion-driven intermixing is more effective in achieving a low κ below the alloy limit for SL materials with large mass mismatch than with small one. (iv) It is possible for SL materials with large lattice mismatch (i.e., bond strength) to design an ideally abrupt interface structure with κ much below the alloy limit. These results have clear implications for optimization of thermal transport for heat management and for the development of thermoelectric materials.

  4. Reactive power influence on the thermal cycling of multi-MW wind power inverter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Ke; Liserre, Marco; Blaabjerg, Frede

    2012-01-01

    converter system are first presented at different wind speeds. Furthermore, the interaction between paralleled converter systems in a wind park is also considered and analyzed. By controlling the reactive power circulated among paralleled converters, a new concept is then proposed to stabilize the thermal...

  5. Effect of Thermal Cycling on Zinc Antimonide Thin Film Thermoelectric Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mirhosseini, M.; Rezania, A.; Rosendahl, L.

    2017-01-01

    In this study, performance and stability of zinc antimonide thin film thermoelectric sample is analyzed under transient thermal conditions. The thermoelectric materials are deposited on glass based substrate where the heat flow is parallel with the thermoelectric element length. The specimen...

  6. Thermophysical characterization and thermal cycling stability of two TCM: CaCl2 and zeolite

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barreneche, C.; Fernández, A.I.; Cabeza, L.F.; Cuypers, R.

    2015-01-01

    At this moment, the global energy consumption in buildings is around 40% of the total energy consumption in developed countries. Thermal energy storage (TES) is presented as one way to address this energy-related problem proposing an alternative to reduce the gap between energy supply and energy

  7. Pushing desalination recovery to the maximum limit: Membrane and thermal processes integration

    KAUST Repository

    Shahzad, Muhammad Wakil; Burhan, Muhammad; Ng, Kim Choon

    2017-01-01

    The economics of seawater desalination processes has been continuously improving as a result of desalination market expansion. Presently, reverse osmosis (RO) processes are leading in global desalination with 53% share followed by thermally driven

  8. Multiple regression models for the prediction of the maximum obtainable thermal efficiency of organic Rankine cycles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ulrik; Pierobon, Leonardo; Wronski, Jorrit

    2014-01-01

    Much attention is focused on increasing the energy efficiency to decrease fuel costs and CO2 emissions throughout industrial sectors. The ORC (organic Rankine cycle) is a relatively simple but efficient process that can be used for this purpose by converting low and medium temperature waste heat ...

  9. COMBINED CYCLE GAS TURBINE FOR THERMAL POWER STATIONS: EXPERIENCE IN DESIGNING AND OPERATION, PROSPECTS IN APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Karnitsky

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper has reviewed main world tendencies in power consumption and power system structure. Main schemes of combined cycle gas turbines have been considered in the paper. The paper contains an operational analysis of CCGT blocks that are operating within the Belarusian energy system. The analysis results have been given in tables showing main operational indices of power blocks

  10. Variational calculation of the limit cycle and its frequency in a two-neuron model with delay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brandt, Sebastian F.; Wessel, Ralf; Pelster, Axel

    2006-01-01

    We consider a model system of two coupled Hopfield neurons, which is described by delay differential equations taking into account the finite signal propagation and processing times. When the delay exceeds a critical value, a limit cycle emerges via a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. First, we calculate its frequency and trajectory perturbatively by applying the Poincare-Lindstedt method. Then, the perturbation series are resummed by means of the Shohat expansion in good agreement with numerical values. However, with increasing delay, the accuracy of the results from the Shohat expansion worsens. We thus apply variational perturbation theory (VPT) to the perturbation expansions to obtain more accurate results, which moreover hold even in the limit of large delays

  11. Optimization of Brayton cycles for low-to-moderate grade thermal energy sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rovira, Antonio; Muñoz-Antón, Javier; Montes, María José; Martínez-Val, José María

    2013-01-01

    Future electricity generation will involve low or moderate temperature technologies. In such a scenario, optimisation of thermodynamic cycles will be a key task. This work presents a systematic analysis to find the operating regime where Brayton cycles reach the highest efficiency, using real substances and given heat source and sink temperatures. Several configurations using fluids close to its critical point at the compressor inlet are considered. Irreversibility sources are carefully analysed, as well as the type of working fluid. The analysis is performed by means of a theoretical approach to obtain some trends, which are afterwards validated with real gases. Results show that the efficiency and the specific work improve if the compressor inlet is close to the critical point. Furthermore, these cycles are less sensitive to pressure drops and politropic efficiencies than those working with ideal gases. The above features are more evident when the ratio of heat source and heat sink temperatures is low. The selection of the gas becomes a fundamental issue in this quest. Critical temperature should be close to ambient temperature, low critical pressure is advisable and the R/c p factor measured at the ideal gas condition should be low to further enhance the efficiency. - Highlights: • Performance analysis of Brayton cycles with the compressor inlet close to the critical point. • Cycles are not very sensitive to pressure drops and isentropic efficiencies of the compressor. • Gas selection becomes important, regarding the critical pressure and temperature as well as the kind of fluid. • R/c p factor measured at the ideal gas condition should be as low as possible

  12. Analysis of environmental effect of hybrid solar-assisted desalination cycle in Sirdarya Thermal Power Plant, Uzbekistan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alikulov, Khusniddin; Xuan, Tran Dang; Higashi, Osamu; Nakagoshi, Nobukazu; Aminov, Zarif

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • A hybrid solar-assisted desalination cycle was designed and stimulated. • Maximum of 21,064.00 kW effective solar heat can be achieved. • The use of parabolic-trough collectors in the Multi Effect Distillation is potential. • The cycle can be applied in other regions with high Direct Normal Irradiation. - Abstract: This study was to investigate possible reduction of fossil fuel consumption and carbon dioxide emission in one of energy sectors of Sirdarya Thermal Power Plant (TPP), Uzbekistan. A hybrid solar-assisted desalination cycle has been designed and simulated for partially supplying saturated steam with 200 °C, 8 bar, and 32 t/h parameters to a Multi Effect Distillation (MED) process in the Sirdarya Thermal Power Plant. The outcome of the parental design model stated that maximum, 21,064.00 kW effective solar heat can be achieved, which is equivalent to 31.76 t/h of saturated steam with 200 °C and 8 bar parameters. Total saved fossil fuel in each month proved that it is possible to reduce fossil fuel (heavy oil and natural gas) consumption with 59.64, 95.24, 389.96, and 298.26 tons during available Direct Normal Irradiation (DNI) by using parabolic-trough collectors. Moreover, the above-mentioned fossil fuel savings accounted for CO_2 reduction with amounts of 182.50, 255.46, 1045.87 & 799.96 tons per each consistent month. Findings proved that integration of parabolic-trough collectors into the MED process is feasible in terms of high DNI availability and demand for retrofitting old existing heat-consuming facilities in Sirdarya Thermal Power Plant. Besides, the cycle also can be applied in other regions of Uzbekistan with high DNI for generating solar heat. Therefore, conducted study is eligible to be applied on the research site by taking into account of sufficient meteorological data and required steam parameters.

  13. The efficiency of an open-cavity tubular solar receiver for a small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Roux, W.G.; Bello-Ochende, T.; Meyer, J.P.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Results show efficiencies of a low-cost stainless steel tubular cavity receiver. • Optimum ratio of 0.0035 is found for receiver aperture area to concentrator area. • Smaller receiver tube and higher mass flow rate increase receiver efficiency. • Larger tube and smaller mass flow rate increase second law efficiency. • Large-tube receiver performs better in the small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle. - Abstract: The first law and second law efficiencies are determined for a stainless steel closed-tube open rectangular cavity solar receiver. It is to be used in a small-scale solar thermal Brayton cycle using a micro-turbine with low compressor pressure ratios. There are many different variables at play to model the air temperature increase of the air running through such a receiver. These variables include concentrator shape, concentrator diameter, concentrator rim angle, concentrator reflectivity, concentrator optical error, solar tracking error, receiver aperture area, receiver material, effect of wind, receiver tube diameter, inlet temperature and mass flow rate through the receiver. All these variables are considered in this paper. The Brayton cycle requires very high receiver surface temperatures in order to be successful. These high temperatures, however, have many disadvantages in terms of heat loss from the receiver, especially radiation heat loss. With the help of ray-tracing software, SolTrace, and receiver modelling techniques, an optimum receiver-to-concentrator-area ratio of A′ ≈ 0.0035 was found for a concentrator with 45° rim angle, 10 mrad optical error and 1° tracking error. A method to determine the temperature profile and net heat transfer rate along the length of the receiver tube is presented. Receiver efficiencies are shown in terms of mass flow rate, receiver tube diameter, pressure drop, maximum receiver surface temperature and inlet temperature of the working fluid. For a 4.8 m diameter parabolic dish, the

  14. Assessment of Thermal Maturity Trends in Devonian–Mississippian Source Rocks Using Raman Spectroscopy: Limitations of Peak-Fitting Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lupoi, Jason S., E-mail: jlupoi@rjlg.com; Fritz, Luke P. [RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States); Parris, Thomas M. [Kentucky Geological Survey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Hackley, Paul C. [UniversityS. Geological Survey, Reston, VA (United States); Solotky, Logan [RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States); Eble, Cortland F. [Kentucky Geological Survey, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY (United States); Schlaegle, Steve [RJ Lee Group, Inc., Monroeville, PA (United States)

    2017-09-27

    The thermal maturity of shale is often measured by vitrinite reflectance (VRo). VRo measurements for the Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks evaluated herein predicted thermal immaturity in areas where associated reservoir rocks are oil-producing. This limitation of the VRo method led to the current evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a suitable alternative for developing correlations between thermal maturity and Raman spectra. In this study, Raman spectra of Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks were regressed against measured VRo or sample-depth. Attempts were made to develop quantitative correlations of thermal maturity. Using sample-depth as a proxy for thermal maturity is not without limitations as thermal maturity as a function of depth depends on thermal gradient, which can vary through time, subsidence rate, uplift, lack of uplift, and faulting. Correlations between Raman data and vitrinite reflectance or sample-depth were quantified by peak-fitting the spectra. Various peak-fitting procedures were evaluated to determine the effects of the number of peaks and maximum peak widths on correlations between spectral metrics and thermal maturity. Correlations between D-frequency, G-band full width at half maximum (FWHM), and band separation between the G- and D-peaks and thermal maturity provided some degree of linearity throughout most peak-fitting assessments; however, these correlations and those calculated from the G-frequency, D/G FWHM ratio, and D/G peak area ratio also revealed a strong dependence on peak-fitting processes. This dependency on spectral analysis techniques raises questions about the validity of peak-fitting, particularly given the amount of subjective analyst involvement necessary to reconstruct spectra. This research shows how user interpretation and extrapolation affected the comparability of different samples, the accuracy of generated trends, and therefore, the potential of the Raman spectral method to become an

  15. Assessment of Thermal Maturity Trends in Devonian–Mississippian Source Rocks Using Raman Spectroscopy: Limitations of Peak-Fitting Method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lupoi, Jason S.; Fritz, Luke P.; Parris, Thomas M.; Hackley, Paul C.; Solotky, Logan; Eble, Cortland F.; Schlaegle, Steve

    2017-01-01

    The thermal maturity of shale is often measured by vitrinite reflectance (VRo). VRo measurements for the Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks evaluated herein predicted thermal immaturity in areas where associated reservoir rocks are oil-producing. This limitation of the VRo method led to the current evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a suitable alternative for developing correlations between thermal maturity and Raman spectra. In this study, Raman spectra of Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks were regressed against measured VRo or sample-depth. Attempts were made to develop quantitative correlations of thermal maturity. Using sample-depth as a proxy for thermal maturity is not without limitations as thermal maturity as a function of depth depends on thermal gradient, which can vary through time, subsidence rate, uplift, lack of uplift, and faulting. Correlations between Raman data and vitrinite reflectance or sample-depth were quantified by peak-fitting the spectra. Various peak-fitting procedures were evaluated to determine the effects of the number of peaks and maximum peak widths on correlations between spectral metrics and thermal maturity. Correlations between D-frequency, G-band full width at half maximum (FWHM), and band separation between the G- and D-peaks and thermal maturity provided some degree of linearity throughout most peak-fitting assessments; however, these correlations and those calculated from the G-frequency, D/G FWHM ratio, and D/G peak area ratio also revealed a strong dependence on peak-fitting processes. This dependency on spectral analysis techniques raises questions about the validity of peak-fitting, particularly given the amount of subjective analyst involvement necessary to reconstruct spectra. This research shows how user interpretation and extrapolation affected the comparability of different samples, the accuracy of generated trends, and therefore, the potential of the Raman spectral method to become an

  16. Assessment of Thermal Maturity Trends in Devonian–Mississippian Source Rocks Using Raman Spectroscopy: Limitations of Peak-Fitting Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason S. Lupoi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The thermal maturity of shale is often measured by vitrinite reflectance (VRo. VRo measurements for the Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks evaluated herein predicted thermal immaturity in areas where associated reservoir rocks are oil-producing. This limitation of the VRo method led to the current evaluation of Raman spectroscopy as a suitable alternative for developing correlations between thermal maturity and Raman spectra. In this study, Raman spectra of Devonian–Mississippian black shale source rocks were regressed against measured VRo or sample-depth. Attempts were made to develop quantitative correlations of thermal maturity. Using sample-depth as a proxy for thermal maturity is not without limitations as thermal maturity as a function of depth depends on thermal gradient, which can vary through time, subsidence rate, uplift, lack of uplift, and faulting. Correlations between Raman data and vitrinite reflectance or sample-depth were quantified by peak-fitting the spectra. Various peak-fitting procedures were evaluated to determine the effects of the number of peaks and maximum peak widths on correlations between spectral metrics and thermal maturity. Correlations between D-frequency, G-band full width at half maximum (FWHM, and band separation between the G- and D-peaks and thermal maturity provided some degree of linearity throughout most peak-fitting assessments; however, these correlations and those calculated from the G-frequency, D/G FWHM ratio, and D/G peak area ratio also revealed a strong dependence on peak-fitting processes. This dependency on spectral analysis techniques raises questions about the validity of peak-fitting, particularly given the amount of subjective analyst involvement necessary to reconstruct spectra. This research shows how user interpretation and extrapolation affected the comparability of different samples, the accuracy of generated trends, and therefore, the potential of the Raman spectral

  17. Effect of Thermal cycles and Dimensions of the Geometry on Residual stress of the Alumina-Kovar Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Srishti; Pal, Snehanshu; Karak, Swapan Kumar; Shah, Sejal; Venakata Nagaraju, M.; Chakraborty, Arun Kumar

    2018-03-01

    Finite element method is employed to determine the effect of variation of residual stress with dimension and the stress generated under its working condition along the Kovar. 3 different dimensions of Alumina-Kovar joint with height to diameter ratio of 3/10, using TiCuSil as a filler material. Transient Structural Analysis is carried out for three different dimensions (diameter × height) (i) 60mm × 20mm (Geometry 1) (ii) 90mm × 20mm (Geometry 2) (iii) 120mm × 20mm (Geometry 3). A comparative study has been carried out between the residual stresses developed in the brazed joint that have undergone 5 thermal cycles subsequent to brazing and that between the brazed joint. The heating and cooling rates from the brazed temperature is 10°C/up to room temperature. The brazing temperature and holding time considered for the analysis are 900°C and 10 minutes. Representative Volume Element (RVE) model is used for simulation. Sparse Matrix Direct Solver method is used to evaluate the results, using Augmented Lagrange method formulation in the contact region. All the simulations are performed in ANSYS Workbench 15.0, using solver target Mechanical APDL. From, the above simulations it is observed high concentration of residual stress is observed along the filler region i.e. in between Alumina and Kovar, as a result of difference in coefficient of thermal expansion between Alumina and Kovar. The residual stress decreases with increasing dimensions of the geometry and upon application of thermal cycles, subsequent to brazing.

  18. Influence of Thermal Aging on Tensile and Low Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Type 316LN Austenitic Stainless Steel Weld Joint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Kumar, T.; Nagesha, A.; Ganesh Kumar, J.; Parameswaran, P.; Sandhya, R.

    2018-05-01

    Influence of short-term thermal aging on the low-cycle fatigue (LCF) behavior of 316LN austenitic stainless steel weld joint with 0.07 wt pct N has been investigated. Prior thermal exposure was found to improve the fatigue life compared with the as-welded condition. Besides, the treatment also imparted a softening effect on the weld metal, leading to an increase in the ductility of the weld joint which had a bearing on the cyclic stress response. The degree of cyclic hardening was seen to increase after aging. Automated ball-indentation (ABI) technique was employed toward understanding the mechanical properties of individual zones across the weld joint. It was observed that the base metal takes most of the applied cyclic strain during LCF deformation in the as-welded condition. In the aged condition, however, the weld also participates in the cyclic deformation. The beneficial effect of thermal aging on cyclic life is attributed to a reduction in the severity of the metallurgical notch leading to a restoration of ductility of the weld region. The transformation of δ-ferrite to σ-phase during the aging treatment was found to influence the location of crack initiation. Fatigue cracks were found to initiate in the base metal region of the joint in most of the testing conditions. However, embrittlement in the weld metal caused a shift in the point of crack initiation with increasing strain amplitude under LCF.

  19. Thermal cycling damage evolution of a thermal barrier coating and the influence of substrate creep, interface roughness and pre-oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schweda, Mario; Beck, Tilmann; Singheiser, Lorenz [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (DE). Inst. fuer Energie- und Klimaforschung (IEK), Werkstoffstruktur und Eigenschaften (IEK-2)

    2012-01-15

    The influence of roughness profile shape, roughness depth, bond coat creep strength and pre-oxidation on the thermal cycling damage evolution and lifetime of a plasma-sprayed ZrO{sub 2} thermal barrier coating system was investigated. A simplified model system was used where FeCrAlY substrates simulated the bond coat. Substrate creep was varied by using the oxide dispersoid strengthened alloy MA956 and the conventional material Fecralloy. Stochastic 3- and periodic 2-dimensional roughness profiles were produced by sand blasting and high speed turning. Damage evolution is significantly influenced by substrate creep with a trend to higher lifetimes for the fast creeping substrate. Pre-oxidation has no influence. Lifetimes of the periodically profiled samples are up to 100 times lower than these of stochastically profiled samples. In the case of periodically profiled samples, the highest lifetime was reached for the highest roughness depth combined with local undercuttings in the roughness profile. For stochastically profiled samples the influence of roughness depth could not be determined due to the wide lifetime scatter. (orig.)

  20. Analyze and Improve Lifetime in 3L-NPC Inverter from Power Cycle and Thermal Balance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Quan; Chen, Zhe; Wang, Qunjing

    2014-01-01

    Three-level Neutral-point-clamped (3L-NPC) topology is becoming a realistic alternative to the conventional one in high-voltage and high-power application. Studies show that the power cycling mean time to failure (MTTF) of the semiconductor bond wire in 3L-NPC inverter system may be very short...... under some common conditions. Firstly, this paper shows the impact of some key parameters on power electronic system lifetime according the analysis of semiconductor failure mechanism. Secondly, a switching frequency reduction method based on the position relationship between the flowing current...... and load voltage is applied to reduce power cycle and switching losses. And then, three-level active neutral point-clamped topology is taken into account to wake the most thermo stressed device. In order to validate the improve lifetime method in this paper, a 2MW 3L-NPC converter used in wind energy has...

  1. Thermal efficiency improvement in high output diesel engines a comparison of a Rankine cycle with turbo-compounding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weerasinghe, W.M.S.R.; Stobart, R.K.; Hounsham, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Thermal management, in particular, heat recovery and utilisation in internal combustion engines result in improved fuel economy, reduced emissions, fast warm up and optimized cylinder head temperatures. turbo-compounding is a heat recovery technique that has been successfully used in medium and large scale engines. Heat recovery to a secondary fluid and expansion is used in large scale engines, such as in power plants in the form of heat recovery steam generators (HRSG) . The present paper presents a thermodynamic analysis of turbo-compounding and heat recovery and utilisation through a fluid power cycle, a technique that is also applicable to medium and small scale engines. In a fluid power cycle, the working fluid is stored in a reservoir and expanded subsequently. The reservoir acts as an energy buffer that improves the overall efficiency, significantly. This paper highlights the relative advantage of exhaust heat secondary power cycles over turbo-compounding with the aid of MATLAB based QSS Toolbox simulation results. Steam has been selected as the working fluid in this work for its superior heat capacity over organic fluids and gases.

  2. Analytical Investigation of the Limits for the In-Plane Thermal Conductivity Measurement Using a Suspended Membrane Setup

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linseis, V.; Völklein, F.; Reith, H.; Woias, P.; Nielsch, K.

    2018-06-01

    An analytical study has been performed on the measurement capabilities of a 100-nm thin suspended membrane setup for the in-plane thermal conductivity measurements of thin film samples using the 3 ω measurement technique, utilizing a COSMOL Multiphysics simulation. The maximum measurement range under observance of given boundary conditions has been studied. Three different exemplary sample materials, with a thickness from the nanometer to the micrometer range and a thermal conductivity from 0.4 W/mK up to 100 W/mK have been investigated as showcase studies. The results of the simulations have been compared to a previously published evaluation model, in order to determine the deviation between both and thereby the measurement limit. As thermal transport properties are temperature dependent, all calculations refer to constant room temperature conditions.

  3. Performance analysis of a potassium-steam two stage vapour cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitachi, Kohshi; Saito, Takeshi

    1983-01-01

    It is an important subject to raise the thermal efficiency in thermal power plants. In present thermal power plants which use steam cycle, the plant thermal efficiency has already reached 41 to 42 %, steam temperature being 839 K, and steam pressure being 24.2 MPa. That is, the thermal efficiency in a steam cycle is facing a limit. In this study, analysis was made on the performance of metal vapour/steam two-stage Rankine cycle obtained by combining a metal vapour cycle with a present steam cycle. Three different combinations using high temperature potassium regenerative cycle and low temperature steam regenerative cycle, potassium regenerative cycle and steam reheat and regenerative cycle, and potassium bleed cycle and steam reheat and regenerative cycle were systematically analyzed for the overall thermal efficiency, the output ratio and the flow rate ratio, when the inlet temperature of a potassium turbine, the temperature of a potassium condenser, and others were varied. Though the overall thermal efficiency was improved by lowering the condensing temperature of potassium vapour, it is limited by the construction because the specific volume of potassium in low pressure section increases greatly. In the combinatipn of potassium vapour regenerative cycle with steam regenerative cycle, the overall thermal efficiency can be 58.5 %, and also 60.2 % if steam reheat and regenerative cycle is employed. If a cycle to heat steam with the bled vapor out of a potassium vapour cycle is adopted, the overall thermal efficiency of 63.3 % is expected. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Light brick mortar with low thermal conductivity for stressed brickwork. Types, properties, limits of application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plank, A [Bundesanstalt fuer Materialpruefung, Berlin (Germany, F.R.)

    1980-03-01

    Between 40 and 50% of the total energy consumption are used for space heating. 40% of the total heat loss dissipate through external walls due to transmission. The heat insulation properties of a brickwork is decisively determined by the mortar joints. Using light brick mortars with low thermal conductivity an improvement of the total thermal insulation of nearly 20% can be reached in most of the cases. The mechanical properties of these mortars that differ from the common mortars decisively reduce the application of the light brick mortar in brick working and require special measures for stability which are described in detail.

  5. Fundamental limitations of non-thermal plasma processing for internal combustion engine NOx control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penetrante, B.M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the physics and chemistry of non-thermal plasma processing for post-combustion NO x control in internal combustion engines. A comparison of electron beam and electrical discharge processing is made regarding their power consumption, radical production, NO x removal mechanisms, and by product formation. Can non-thermal deNO x operate efficiently without additives or catalysts? How much electrical power does it cost to operate? What are the by-products of the process? This paper addresses these fundamental issues based on an analysis of the electron-molecule processes and chemical kinetics

  6. The effects of stacking sequence and thermal cycling on the flexural properties of laminate composites of aluminium-epoxy/basalt-glass fibres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdollahi Azghan, Mehdi; Eslami-Farsani, Reza

    2018-02-01

    The current study aimed at investigating the effects of different stacking sequences and thermal cycling on the flexural properties of fibre metal laminates (FMLs). FMLs were composed of two aluminium alloy 2024-T3 sheets and epoxy polymer-matrix composites that have four layers of basalt and/or glass fibres with five different stacking sequences. For FML samples the thermal cycle time was about 6 min for temperature cycles from 25 °C to 115 °C. Flexural properties of samples evaluated after 55 thermal cycles and compared to non-exposed samples. Surface modification of aluminium performed by electrochemical treatment (anodizing) method and aluminium surfaces have been examined by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Also, the flexural failure mechanisms investigated by the optical microscope study of fractured surfaces. SEM images indicated that the porosity of the aluminium surface increased after anodizing process. The findings of the present study showed that flexural modulus were maximum for basalt fibres based FML, minimum for glass fibres based FML while basalt/glass fibres based FML lies between them. Due to change in the failure mechanism of basalt/glass fibres based FMLs that have glass fibres at outer layer of the polymer composite, the flexural strength of this FML is lower than glass and basalt fibres based FML. After thermal cycling, due to the good thermal properties of basalt fibres, flexural properties of basalt fibres based FML structures decreased less than other composites.

  7. Influence of cycling thermal loading on brazed composites for fusion applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smid, I.; Kny, E.; Kneringer, G.; Reheis, N.

    1995-01-01

    Reactor grade graphite and molybdenum (TZM) were brazed with different high temperature brazes. The resulting tiles had a size of 50 x 50 mm 2 with a graphite thickness of 10 mm and a TZM thickness of 5 mm. The brazed composites have been tested in electron beam simulation for their thermal fatigue properties. The parameters of these tests were chosen to match NET design specifications for normal operation and 'slow' peak energy deposition. The resulting damage and microstructural changes on the graphites and the brazes are discussed. Additional information is supplied on X-ray diffraction data proving the presence of different phases in the brazes. (author)

  8. Investigation of ferroelectric materials by the thermal noise method: advantages and limitations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bednyakov, Petr; Shnaidshtein, I. V.; Strukov, B. A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 500, č. 1 (2016), 203-217 ISSN 0015-0193 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-15110S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : thermal noise * ferroelectricity * thin films * dielectric permittivity * equivalent circuit Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 0.551, year: 2016

  9. A Novel Organic Rankine Cycle System with Improved Thermal Stability and Low Global Warming Fluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panesar Angad S

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes a novel Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC system for long haul truck application. Rather than typical tail pipe heat recovery configurations, the proposed setup exploits the gaseous streams that are already a load on the engine cooling module. The system uses dual loops connected only by the Exhaust Gas Recirculation (EGR stream. A water blend study is conducted to identify suitable mixtures for the High Temperature (HT loop, while the Low Temperature (LT loop utilises a Low Global Warming (GWP Hydrofluoroether.

  10. The Annual Cycle of Water Vapor on Mars as Observed by the Thermal Emission Spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Michael D.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Spectra taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) have been used to monitor the latitude, longitude, and seasonal dependence of water vapor for over one full Martian year (March 1999-March 2001). A maximum in water vapor abundance is observed at high latitudes during mid-summer in both hemispheres, reaching a maximum value of approximately 100 pr-micrometer in the north and approximately 50 pr-micrometer in the south. Low water vapor abundance (water vapor. The latitudinal and seasonal dependence of the decay of the northern summer water vapor maximum implies cross-equatorial transport of water to the southern hemisphere, while there is little or no corresponding transport during the decay of the southern hemisphere summer maximum. The latitude-longitude dependence of annually-averaged water vapor (corrected for topography) has a significant positive correlation with albedo and significant negative correlations with thermal inertia and surface pressure. Comparison of TES results with those retrieved from the Viking Orbiter Mars Atmospheric Water Detectors (MAWD) experiments shows some similar features, but also many significant differences. The southern hemisphere maximum observed by TES was not observed by MAWD and the large latitudinal gradient in annually-averaged water vapor observed by MAWD does not appear in the TES results.

  11. Tracheal sound parameters of respiratory cycle phases show differences between flow-limited and normal breathing during sleep

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkas, A; Huupponen, E; Virkkala, J; Saastamoinen, A; Rauhala, E; Tenhunen, M; Himanen, S-L

    2010-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to develop new computational parameters to examine the characteristics of respiratory cycle phases from the tracheal breathing sound signal during sleep. Tracheal sound data from 14 patients (10 males and 4 females) were examined. From each patient, a 10 min long section of normal and a 10 min section of flow-limited breathing during sleep were analysed. The computationally determined proportional durations of the respiratory phases were first investigated. Moreover, the phase durations and breathing sound amplitude levels were used to calculate the area under the breathing sound envelope signal during inspiration and expiration phases. An inspiratory sound index was then developed to provide the percentage of this type of area during the inspiratory phase with respect to the combined area of inspiratory and expiratory phases. The proportional duration of the inspiratory phase showed statistically significantly higher values during flow-limited breathing than during normal breathing and inspiratory pause displayed an opposite difference. The inspiratory sound index showed statistically significantly higher values during flow-limited breathing than during normal breathing. The presented novel computational parameters could contribute to the examination of sleep-disordered breathing or as a screening tool

  12. Evaluation of the of thermal shock resistance of a castable containing andalusite aggregates by thermal shock cycles; Avaliacao da resistencia ao dano por choque termico por ciclagem de um concreto refratario contendo agregados de andaluzita

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, G.C.R.; Santos, E.M.B.; Ribeiro, S., E-mail: girribeiro@yahoo.com.br [Universidade de Sao Paulo (DEMAR/EEL/USP), Lorena, SP (Brazil). Escola de Engenharia de. Departamento de Engenharia de Materiais; Resende, W.S. [Industrias Brasileiras de Artigos Refratarios (IBAR), Lorena, SP (Brazil); Rodrigues, J.A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The thermal shock resistance of refractory materials is one of the most important characteristics that determine their performance in many applications, since abrupt and drastic differences in temperature can damage them. Resistance to thermal shock damage can be evaluated based on thermal cycles, i.e., successive heating and cooling cycles followed by an analysis of the drop in Young's modulus occurring in each cycle. The aim of this study was to evaluate the resistance to thermal shock damage in a commercial refractory concrete with andalusite aggregate. Concrete samples that were sintered at 1000 deg C and 1450 deg C for 5 hours to predict and were subjected to 30 thermal shock cycles, soaking in the furnace for 20 minutes at a temperature of 1000 deg C, and subsequent cooling in circulating water at 25 deg C. The results showed a decrease in Young's modulus and rupture around 72% for samples sintered at 1000 ° C, and 82% in sintered at 1450 ° C. The refractory sintered at 1450 deg C would show lower thermal shock resistance than the refractory sintered at 1000 deg C. (author)

  13. Use of thermal cycling to reduce adhesion of OTS coated coated MEMS cantilevers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shaikh M.; Phinney, Leslie M.

    2003-01-01

    °Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have enormous potential to contribute in diverse fields such as automotive, health care, aerospace, consumer products, and biotechnology, but successful commercial applications of MEMS are still small in number. Reliability of MEMS is a major impediment to the commercialization of laboratory prototypes. Due to the multitude of MEMS applications and the numerous processing and packaging steps, MEMS are exposed to a variety of environmental conditions, making the prediction of operational reliability difficult. In this paper, we investigate the effects of operating temperature on the in-use adhesive failure of electrostatically actuated MEMS microcantilevers coated with octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) films. The cantilevers are subjected to repeated temperature cycles and electrostatically actuated at temperatures between 25°C and 300°C in ambient air. The experimental results indicate that temperature cycling of the OTS coated cantilevers in air reduces the sticking probability of the microcantilevers. The sticking probability of OTS coated cantilevers was highest during heating, which decreased during cooling, and was lowest during reheating. Modifications to the OTS release method to increase its yield are also discussed.

  14. Thermal analysis of W VII-AS limiter system and presentation of a graphite-block concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mukherjee, S.; Grigull, P.

    1989-01-01

    A 2D-finite element thermal analysis of the initial W VII-AS limiter system has been performed and is discussed. Furhter to this analysis a graphite block concept is presented. This concept has been numerically analyzed for applications as a limiter in plasma and nuclear fusion experimental devices. The results are described in this paper. This block concept seems to be also applicable to first wall and divertor designs; the graphite elements could be replaced by ceramic ones. (author). 10 refs.; 13 figs

  15. Support-Vector-Machine-Based Reduced-Order Model for Limit Cycle Oscillation Prediction of Nonlinear Aeroelastic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available It is not easy for the system identification-based reduced-order model (ROM and even eigenmode based reduced-order model to predict the limit cycle oscillation generated by the nonlinear unsteady aerodynamics. Most of these traditional ROMs are sensitive to the flow parameter variation. In order to deal with this problem, a support vector machine- (SVM- based ROM was investigated and the general construction framework was proposed. The two-DOF aeroelastic system for the NACA 64A010 airfoil in transonic flow was then demonstrated for the new SVM-based ROM. The simulation results show that the new ROM can capture the LCO behavior of the nonlinear aeroelastic system with good accuracy and high efficiency. The robustness and computational efficiency of the SVM-based ROM would provide a promising tool for real-time flight simulation including nonlinear aeroelastic effects.

  16. Limit Cycles and Chaos via Quasi-periodicity in Two Coupled Ensembles of Ultra-cold Atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Aniket; Yuzbashyan, Emil; Altshuler, Boris

    We study the dynamics of two mesoscopic ensembles of ultra-cold two level atoms, which are collectively coupled to an optical cavity and are being pumped incoherently to the excited state. Whereas the time independent steady states are well understood, little is known about the time dependent ones. We explore and categorize various time dependent steady states, e.g. limit cycles and chaotic behavior. We draw a non-equilibrium phase diagram indicating different steady-state behaviors in different parts of the parameter space. We discuss the synchronization of the two ensembles in the time dependent steady states. We also show the onset of chaos via quasi-periodicity. The rich time dependent steady-state behavior, especially the existence of chaos, opens up possibilities for several engineering applications. Supported in part by the University and Louis Bevier Graduate Fellowship.

  17. Deposition Time and Thermal Cycles of Fabricating Thin-wall Steel Parts by Double Electrode GMAW Based Additive Manufacturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Dongqing

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The deposition time for fabricating the thin-wall part as well as the peak temperature of the substrate during the process was analyzed in the double electrode gas metal arc welding (DE-GMAW based additive manufacturing (AM. The total deposition time and the interlayer idle time of the manufacturing process decreased with the increasing of the bypass current under the same interlayer temperature and the same deposition rate. The thermal cycling curves illustrated that the peak temperature of the substrate was lower in the DE-GMAW base AM under the same conditions. When depositing the thin-wall parts, the DE-GMAW based AM can reduce the heat input to the substrate and improve the fabrication efficiency, compared with the GMAW based AM.

  18. Thermal-Economic Modularization of Small, Organic Rankine Cycle Power Plants for Mid-Enthalpy Geothermal Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yodha Y. Nusiaputra

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The costs of the surface infrastructure in mid-enthalpy geothermal power systems, especially in remote areas, could be reduced by using small, modular Organic Rankine Cycle (ORC power plants. Thermal-economic criteria have been devised to standardize ORC plant dimensions for such applications. We designed a modular ORC to utilize various wellhead temperatures (120–170 °C, mass flow rates and ambient temperatures (−10–40 °C. A control strategy was developed using steady-state optimization, in order to maximize net power production at off-design conditions. Optimum component sizes were determined using specific investment cost (SIC minimization and mean cashflow (MCF maximization for three different climate scenarios. Minimizing SIC did not yield significant benefits, but MCF proved to be a much better optimization function.

  19. Period doubling cascades of limit cycles in cardiac action potential models as precursors to chaotic early Afterdepolarizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kügler, Philipp; Bulelzai, M A K; Erhardt, André H

    2017-04-04

    Early afterdepolarizations (EADs) are pathological voltage oscillations during the repolarization phase of cardiac action potentials (APs). EADs are caused by drugs, oxidative stress or ion channel disease, and they are considered as potential precursors to cardiac arrhythmias in recent attempts to redefine the cardiac drug safety paradigm. The irregular behaviour of EADs observed in experiments has been previously attributed to chaotic EAD dynamics under periodic pacing, made possible by a homoclinic bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the deterministic AP system of differential equations. In this article we demonstrate that a homoclinic bifurcation in the fast subsystem of the action potential model is neither a necessary nor a sufficient condition for the genesis of chaotic EADs. We rather argue that a cascade of period doubling (PD) bifurcations of limit cycles in the full AP system paves the way to chaotic EAD dynamics across a variety of models including a) periodically paced and spontaneously active cardiomyocytes, b) periodically paced and non-active cardiomyocytes as well as c) unpaced and spontaneously active cardiomyocytes. Furthermore, our bifurcation analysis reveals that chaotic EAD dynamics may coexist in a stable manner with fully regular AP dynamics, where only the initial conditions decide which type of dynamics is displayed. EADs are a potential source of cardiac arrhythmias and hence are of relevance both from the viewpoint of drug cardiotoxicity testing and the treatment of cardiomyopathies. The model-independent association of chaotic EADs with period doubling cascades of limit cycles introduced in this article opens novel opportunities to study chaotic EADs by means of bifurcation control theory and inverse bifurcation analysis. Furthermore, our results may shed new light on the synchronization and propagation of chaotic EADs in homogeneous and heterogeneous multicellular and cardiac tissue preparations.

  20. Summary of the Effects of Two Years of Hygro-Thermal Cycling on a Carbon/Epoxy Composite Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlman, Lee W.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Miller, Sandi G.; Pereira, J. Michael; Bail, Justin L.

    2011-01-01

    Composite materials are beginning to be used for structures in the fan section of commercial gas turbine engines. This paper explores the type of damage that could occur within one type of composite material after exposure to hygrothermal cycles (temperature/humidity cycles) that are representative of the environment in the fan section of an engine. The effect of this damage on composite material properties is measured. Chemical changes in the matrix material were limited to the exposed surface. Microcrack formation was identified in the composite material. This damage did not cause a significant reduction in tensile strength or impact penetration resistance of the composite material. Additional data is needed to assess the effect of damage on compressive strength.