WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapy tumor volume

  1. Density overwrites of internal tumor volumes in intensity modulated proton therapy plans for mobile lung tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botas, Pablo; Grassberger, Clemens; Sharp, Gregory; Paganetti, Harald

    2018-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate internal tumor volume density overwrite strategies to minimize intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) plan degradation of mobile lung tumors. Four planning paradigms were compared for nine lung cancer patients. Internal gross tumor volume (IGTV) and internal clinical target volume (ICTV) structures were defined encompassing their respective volumes in every 4DCT phase. The paradigms use different planning CT (pCT) created from the average intensity projection (AIP) of the 4DCT, overwriting the density within the IGTV to account for movement. The density overwrites were: (a) constant filling with 100 HU (C100) or (b) 50 HU (C50), (c) maximum intensity projection (MIP) across phases, and (d) water equivalent path length (WEPL) consideration from beam’s-eye-view. Plans were created optimizing dose-influence matrices calculated with fast GPU Monte Carlo (MC) simulations in each pCT. Plans were evaluated with MC on the 4DCTs using a model of the beam delivery time structure. Dose accumulation was performed using deformable image registration. Interplay effect was addressed applying 10 times rescanning. Significantly less DVH metrics degradation occurred when using MIP and WEPL approaches. Target coverage (D99≥slant 70 Gy(RBE)) was fulfilled in most cases with MIP and WEPL (D{{99}WEPL}=69.2+/- 4.0 Gy (RBE)), keeping dose heterogeneity low (D5-D{{95}WEPL}=3.9+/- 2.0 Gy(RBE)). The mean lung dose was kept lowest by the WEPL strategy, as well as the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs). The impact on dose levels in the heart, spinal cord and esophagus were patient specific. Overall, the WEPL strategy gives the best performance and should be preferred when using a 3D static geometry for lung cancer IMPT treatment planning. Newly available fast MC methods make it possible to handle long simulations based on 4D data sets to perform studies with high accuracy and efficiency, even prior to individual treatment planning.

  2. Lung Volume Reduction After Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy of Lung Tumors: Potential Application to Emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Binkley, Michael S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Shrager, Joseph B. [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Leung, Ann N. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Popat, Rita [Department of Health Research and Policy, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Trakul, Nicholas [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Southern California Keck School of Medicine, Los Angeles, California (United States); Atwood, Todd F.; Chaudhuri, Aadel [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Maxim, Peter G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Diehn, Maximilian, E-mail: Diehn@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Institute for Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Loo, Billy W., E-mail: BWLoo@Stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. Methods and Materials: We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). Results: 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, −0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, −3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r{sup 2}=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r{sup 2}=0.47, P<.0001). Conclusions: We identified a dose-volume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across

  3. Lung volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy of lung tumors: potential application to emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Michael S; Shrager, Joseph B; Leung, Ann N; Popat, Rita; Trakul, Nicholas; Atwood, Todd F; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Maxim, Peter G; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2014-09-01

    Lung volume reduction surgery (LVRS) improves dyspnea and other outcomes in selected patients with severe emphysema, but many have excessive surgical risk for LVRS. We analyzed the dose-volume relationship for lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR) of lung tumors, hypothesizing that SABR could achieve therapeutic volume reduction if applied in emphysema. We retrospectively identified patients treated from 2007 to 2011 who had SABR for 1 lung tumor, pre-SABR pulmonary function testing, and ≥6 months computed tomographic (CT) imaging follow-up. We contoured the treated lobe and untreated adjacent lobe(s) on CT before and after SABR and calculated their volume changes relative to the contoured total (bilateral) lung volume (TLV). We correlated lobar volume reduction with the volume receiving high biologically effective doses (BED, α/β = 3). 27 patients met the inclusion criteria, with a median CT follow-up time of 14 months. There was no grade ≥3 toxicity. The median volume reduction of the treated lobe was 4.4% of TLV (range, -0.4%-10.8%); the median expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe was 2.6% of TLV (range, -3.9%-11.6%). The volume reduction of the treated lobe was positively correlated with the volume receiving BED ≥60 Gy (r(2)=0.45, P=.0001). This persisted in subgroups determined by high versus low pre-SABR forced expiratory volume in 1 second, treated lobe CT emphysema score, number of fractions, follow-up CT time, central versus peripheral location, and upper versus lower lobe location, with no significant differences in effect size between subgroups. Volume expansion of the untreated adjacent lobe(s) was positively correlated with volume reduction of the treated lobe (r(2)=0.47, Pvolume response for treated lobe volume reduction and adjacent lobe compensatory expansion after lung tumor SABR, consistent across multiple clinical parameters. These data serve to inform our ongoing prospective trial of stereotactic

  4. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yock, Adam D.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results: In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: −11.6%–23.8%) and 14.6% (range: −7.3%–27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: −6.8%–40.3%) and 13.1% (range: −1.5%–52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: −11.1%–20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. Conclusions: A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography

  5. Predicting oropharyngeal tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy from pretreatment computed tomography data using general linear models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yock, Adam D., E-mail: ADYock@mdanderson.org; Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Rao, Arvind [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and the Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California 92121 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Court, Laurence E. [Department of Radiation Physics and Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to develop and evaluate the accuracy of several predictive models of variation in tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Nineteen patients with oropharyngeal cancers were imaged daily with CT-on-rails for image-guided alignment per an institutional protocol. The daily volumes of 35 tumors in these 19 patients were determined and used to generate (1) a linear model in which tumor volume changed at a constant rate, (2) a general linear model that utilized the power fit relationship between the daily and initial tumor volumes, and (3) a functional general linear model that identified and exploited the primary modes of variation between time series describing the changing tumor volumes. Primary and nodal tumor volumes were examined separately. The accuracy of these models in predicting daily tumor volumes were compared with those of static and linear reference models using leave-one-out cross-validation. Results: In predicting the daily volume of primary tumors, the general linear model and the functional general linear model were more accurate than the static reference model by 9.9% (range: −11.6%–23.8%) and 14.6% (range: −7.3%–27.5%), respectively, and were more accurate than the linear reference model by 14.2% (range: −6.8%–40.3%) and 13.1% (range: −1.5%–52.5%), respectively. In predicting the daily volume of nodal tumors, only the 14.4% (range: −11.1%–20.5%) improvement in accuracy of the functional general linear model compared to the static reference model was statistically significant. Conclusions: A general linear model and a functional general linear model trained on data from a small population of patients can predict the primary tumor volume throughout the course of radiation therapy with greater accuracy than standard reference models. These more accurate models may increase the prognostic value of information about the tumor garnered from pretreatment computed tomography

  6. Modifying the planning target volume to optimize the dose distribution in dynamic conformal arc therapy for large metastatic brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogura, Kengo; Kosaka, Yasuhiro; Imagumbai, Toshiyuki; Ueki, Kazuhito; Narukami, Ryo; Hattori, Takayuki; Kokubo, Masaki

    2017-06-01

    When treating large metastatic brain tumors with stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), high dose conformity to target is difficult to achieve. Employing a modified planning target volume (mPTV) instead of the original PTV may be one way to improve the dose distribution in linear accelerator-based SRT using a dynamic conformal technique. In this study, we quantitatively analyzed the impact of a mPTV on dose distribution. Twenty-four tumors with a maximum diameter of >2 cm were collected. For each tumor, two plans were created: one used a mPTV and the other did not. The mPTV was produced by shrinking or enlarging the original PTV according to the dose distribution in the original plan. The dose conformity was evaluated and compared between the plans using a two-sided paired t test. The conformity index defined by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group was 1.34 ± 0.10 and 1.41 ± 0.13, and Paddick's conformity index was 0.75 ± 0.05 and 0.71 ± 0.06, for the plans with and without a mPTV, respectively. All of these improvements were statistically significant (P < 0.05). The use of a mPTV can improve target conformity when planning SRT for large metastatic brain tumors.

  7. Photothermal Therapy Using Gold Nanorods and Near-Infrared Light in a Murine Melanoma Model Increases Survival and Decreases Tumor Volume

    OpenAIRE

    Popp, Mary K.; Imane Oubou; Colin Shepherd; Zachary Nager; Courtney Anderson; Len Pagliaro

    2014-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) treatments have shown strong potential in treating tumors through their ability to target destructive heat preferentially to tumor regions. In this paper we demonstrate that PTT in a murine melanoma model using gold nanorods (GNRs) and near-infrared (NIR) light decreases tumor volume and increases animal survival to an extent that is comparable to the current generation of melanoma drugs. GNRs, in particular, have shown a strong ability to reach ablative temperatur...

  8. Prognostic prediction across a gradient of total tumor volume in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma undergoing locoregional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Han C

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The size and number of tumors are important prognostic indicators for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. However, it is difficult to assess the prognosis for patients with a variable number and size of tumors. By combining these two factors, we investigated the role and prognostic accuracy of total tumor volume (TTV for HCC. Methods A total of 786 patients undergoing locoregional therapy (transarterial chemoembolization, percutaneous radiofrequency ablation and acetic acid or ethanol injection for HCC were prospectively evaluated. Results The mean and median TTV was 177 cm3 (range, 0.1-3,591 cm3 and 21 cm3, respectively. Of all, 38%, 29%, 15%, 7% and 11% of patients had TTV of 3, 10-50 cm3, 50-200 cm3, 200-500 cm3 and >500 cm3, respectively. TTV was significantly larger in patients with higher serum α-fetoprotein (AFP levels or with vascular invasion. The Child-Turcotte-Pugh score, performance status, vascular invasion, AFP level and TTV were significant independent prognostic predictors in the Cox proportional hazards model. After adjustment, patients with TTV 50-200 cm3 (relative risk [RR]: 1.74, p = 0.009, 200-500 cm3 (RR: 2.15, p = 0.006 and >500 cm3 (RR: 3.92, p 3. Conclusions TTV is a feasible prognostic predictor across a wide gradient and can be used to predict the mortality risk of HCC. Selecting appropriate cutoffs of TTV may help refine the design of cancer staging system and treatment planning. Future clinical trials of HCC may include this parameter for mortality risk stratification.

  9. Impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor volume segmentation on patient-specific targeted radionuclide therapy dosimetry using CLR1404

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besemer, Abigail E.; Titz, Benjamin; Grudzinski, Joseph J.; Weichert, Jamey P.; Kuo, John S.; Robins, H. Ian; Hall, Lance T.; Bednarz, Bryan P.

    2017-08-01

    Variations in tumor volume segmentation methods in targeted radionuclide therapy (TRT) may lead to dosimetric uncertainties. This work investigates the impact of PET and MRI threshold-based tumor segmentation on TRT dosimetry in patients with primary and metastatic brain tumors. In this study, PET/CT images of five brain cancer patients were acquired at 6, 24, and 48 h post-injection of 124I-CLR1404. The tumor volume was segmented using two standardized uptake value (SUV) threshold levels, two tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) threshold levels, and a T1 Gadolinium-enhanced MRI threshold. The dice similarity coefficient (DSC), jaccard similarity coefficient (JSC), and overlap volume (OV) metrics were calculated to compare differences in the MRI and PET contours. The therapeutic 131I-CLR1404 voxel-level dose distribution was calculated from the 124I-CLR1404 activity distribution using RAPID, a Geant4 Monte Carlo internal dosimetry platform. The TBR, SUV, and MRI tumor volumes ranged from 2.3-63.9 cc, 0.1-34.7 cc, and 0.4-11.8 cc, respectively. The average  ±  standard deviation (range) was 0.19  ±  0.13 (0.01-0.51), 0.30  ±  0.17 (0.03-0.67), and 0.75  ±  0.29 (0.05-1.00) for the JSC, DSC, and OV, respectively. The DSC and JSC values were small and the OV values were large for both the MRI-SUV and MRI-TBR combinations because the regions of PET uptake were generally larger than the MRI enhancement. Notable differences in the tumor dose volume histograms were observed for each patient. The mean (standard deviation) 131I-CLR1404 tumor doses ranged from 0.28-1.75 Gy GBq-1 (0.07-0.37 Gy GBq-1). The ratio of maximum-to-minimum mean doses for each patient ranged from 1.4-2.0. The tumor volume and the interpretation of the tumor dose is highly sensitive to the imaging modality, PET enhancement metric, and threshold level used for tumor volume segmentation. The large variations in tumor doses clearly demonstrate the need for standard

  10. Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad R. Issa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP, composite nodal volumes (GTVN and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance.

  11. The relationship between working memory and cerebral white matter volume in survivors of childhood brain tumors treated with conformal radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacola, Lisa M; Ashford, Jason M; Reddick, Wilburn E; Glass, John O; Ogg, Robert J; Merchant, Thomas E; Conklin, Heather M

    2014-08-01

    Survivors of childhood brain tumors (BTs) treated with CNS-directed therapy show changes in cerebral white matter that are related to neurocognitive late effects. We examined the association between white matter volume and working memory ability in survivors treated with conformal radiation therapy (CRT). Fifty survivors (25 males, age at assessment = 13.14 ± 2.88, age at CRT = 7.41 ± 3.41 years) completed Digit Span from the Wechsler Intelligence Scales for Children, 4th Edition and experimental Self-Ordered Search (SOS) tasks as measures of working memory. Caregiver ratings were obtained using the Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Function. MRI exams were acquired on a 1.5 T scanner. Volumes of normal appearing white matter (NAWM) were quantified using a well-validated automated segmentation and classification program. Correlational analyses demonstrated that NAWM volumes were significantly larger in males and participants with tumors located in the infratentorial space. Correlations between NAWM volume and Digit Span Backward were distributed across anterior and posterior regions, with evidence for greater right hemisphere involvement (r = .32-.34, p ≤ .05). Correlations between NAWM volume with Digit Span Backward (r = .44-.52; p ≤ .05) and NAWM volume with SOS-Object Total (r = .45-.52, p ≤ .05) were of greater magnitude in females. No relationship was found between NAWM volume and caregiver report. Working memory performance in survivors of pediatric BTs treated with CRT are related to regionally specific NAWM volume. Developmental differences in cerebral myelination may explain findings of greater risk for neurocognitive late effects in female survivors. Future studies are needed to better isolate vulnerable white matter pathways, thus facilitating the development of neuroprotective interventions.

  12. Photothermal Therapy Using Gold Nanorods and Near-Infrared Light in a Murine Melanoma Model Increases Survival and Decreases Tumor Volume

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K. Popp

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Photothermal therapy (PTT treatments have shown strong potential in treating tumors through their ability to target destructive heat preferentially to tumor regions. In this paper we demonstrate that PTT in a murine melanoma model using gold nanorods (GNRs and near-infrared (NIR light decreases tumor volume and increases animal survival to an extent that is comparable to the current generation of melanoma drugs. GNRs, in particular, have shown a strong ability to reach ablative temperatures quickly in tumors when exposed to NIR light. The current research tests the efficacy of GNRs PTT in a difficult and fast growing murine melanoma model using a NIR light-emitting diode (LED light source. LED light sources in the NIR spectrum could provide a safer and more practical approach to photothermal therapy than lasers. We also show that the LED light source can effectively and quickly heat in vitro and in vivo models to ablative temperatures when combined with GNRs. We anticipate that this approach could have significant implications for human cancer therapy.

  13. The brain relaxation and cerebral metabolism in stroke volume variation-directed fluid therapy during supratentorial tumors resection: crystalloid solution versus colloid solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Juan; He, Zhiyong; Cao, Xiaoying; Che, Xuehua; Chen, Liang; Zhang, Jun; Liang, Weimin

    2014-10-01

    Compared with goal-directed crystalloid therapy, goal-directed colloid therapy during high-risk surgery may improve postoperative outcome. Whether intraoperative fluid therapy based on goal-directed protocol with different types of fluid has distinctive effects on brain relaxation and cerebral metabolism during craniotomy remains unclear. Forty patients with supratentorial brain tumors undergoing craniotomy were randomly assigned to either a Ringer's Lactate-based goal-directed group (LR group, n=20) or a 6% hydroxyethyl starch-based goal-directed group (HES group, n=20). The goal was achieved by maintaining a target stroke volume variation (SVVcerebral metabolism variables (jugular venous oxygen saturation [SjvO(2)], arterial-jugular venous differences in oxygen [CajvO(2)], glucose [A-JvGD], lactate [A-JvLD], and cerebral extraction ratio for oxygen [CERO(2)]) and fluid volumes. There is no significant difference between the LR and HES groups on brain relaxation scales (P=0.845), or measures of cerebral oxygenation and metabolism. Intragroup comparisons showed that CERO(2) increased by 14.3% (P=0.009, LR group) and 13.2% (P=0.032, HES group), respectively, and SjvO(2) was decreased by 8.8% (P=0.016, LR group) and 8.1% (P=0.026, HES group), respectively, after tumor removal, compared with baseline. During surgery, the LR group (3070±1138 mL) received more fluid than the HES group (2041±758 mL, P=0.002). In patients undergoing supratentorial tumor resection, goal-directed HES therapy was not superior to goal-directed LR therapy for brain relaxation or cerebral metabolism, although less fluid was needed to maintain the target SVV in the HES-based group than in the LR-based group.

  14. Correlation of magnetic resonance imaging tumor volume with histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turkbey, Baris; Mani, Haresh; Aras, Omer; Rastinehad, Ardeshir R; Shah, Vijay; Bernardo, Marcelino; Pohida, Thomas; Daar, Dagane; Benjamin, Compton; McKinney, Yolanda L; Linehan, W Marston; Wood, Bradford J; Merino, Maria J; Choyke, Peter L; Pinto, Peter A

    2012-10-01

    The biology of prostate cancer may be influenced by the index lesion. The definition of index lesion volume is important for appropriate decision making, especially for image guided focal treatment. We determined the accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging for determining index tumor volume compared with volumes derived from histopathology. We evaluated 135 patients (mean age 59.3 years) with a mean prostate specific antigen of 6.74 ng/dl who underwent multiparametric 3T endorectal coil magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate and subsequent radical prostatectomy. Index tumor volume was determined prospectively and independently by magnetic resonance imaging and histopathology. The ellipsoid formula was applied to determine histopathology tumor volume, whereas manual tumor segmentation was used to determine magnetic resonance tumor volume. Histopathology tumor volume was correlated with age and prostate specific antigen whereas magnetic resonance tumor volume involved Pearson correlation and linear regression methods. In addition, the predictive power of magnetic resonance tumor volume, prostate specific antigen and age for estimating histopathology tumor volume (greater than 0.5 cm(3)) was assessed by ROC analysis. The same analysis was also conducted for the 1.15 shrinkage factor corrected histopathology data set. There was a positive correlation between histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.633, p histopathology tumor volume (Pearson coefficient 0.237, p = 0.003). On linear regression analysis histopathology tumor volume and magnetic resonance tumor volume were correlated (r(2) = 0.401, p histopathology were 0.949 (p histopathology. Magnetic resonance imaging can accurately estimate index tumor volume as determined by histology. Magnetic resonance imaging has better accuracy in predicting histopathology tumor volume in tumors larger than 0.5 cm(3) than prostate specific antigen and age. Index tumor volume as

  15. Repeatability of a planning target volume expansion protocol for radiation therapy of regional lymph nodes in canine and feline patients with head tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hiroto; Harmon, Joseph F; Custis, James T; Larue, Susan M

    2012-01-01

    For canine and feline patients with head tumors, simultaneous irradiation of the primary tumor and mandibular and retropharyngeal lymph nodes (LNs) is often indicated. The purpose of this study was to assess the repeatability of a planning target volume (PTV) expansion protocol for these LNs. Two CT image sets from 44 dogs and 37 cats that underwent radiation therapy for head tumors were compared to determine LN repositioning accuracy and precision; planning-CT (for radiation therapy planning) and cone-beam CT (at the time of actual treatment sessions). Eleven percent of dogs and 65% of cats received treatment to their LNs. In dogs, the mandibular LNs were positioned more caudally (P = 0.0002) and the right mandibular and right retropharyngeal LNs were positioned more to the left side of the patient (P = 0.00015 and P = 0.003, respectively). In cats, left mandibular LN was positioned higher (toward roof) than the planning-CT (P = 0.028). In conclusion, when the patient immobilization devices and bony anatomy matching are used to align the primary head target and these LNs are treated simultaneously, an asymmetrical PTV expansion that ranges 4-9 mm (dogs) and 2-4 mm (cats), depending on the directions of couch movement, should be used to include the LNs within the PTV at least 95% of the time. © 2012 Veterinary Radiology & Ultrasound.

  16. Beam specific planning target volumes incorporating 4DCT for pencil beam scanning proton therapy of thoracic tumors

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Liyong; Huang, Sheng; Mayer, Rulon; Thomas, Andrew; Solberg, Timothy D; McDonough, James E; Simone, Charles B

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using +-3% uncertainty in stopping power, and +-3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8X12X10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and...

  17. Proton Therapy for Thoracoabdominal Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurai, Hideyuki; Okumura, Toshiyuki; Sugahara, Shinji; Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Tokuuye, Koichi

    In advanced-stage disease of certain thoracoabdominal tumors, proton therapy (PT) with concurrent chemotherapy may be an option to reduce side effects. Several technological developments, including a respiratory gating system and implantation of fiducial markers for image guided radiation therapy (IGRT), are necessary for the treatment in thoracoabdominal tumors. In this chapter, the role of PT for tumors of the lung, the esophagus, and liver are discussed.

  18. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas (United States); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yao, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony [American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter Medical Group, Sacramento, California (United States); Harari, Paul [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Foote, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  19. Risk Factors for Neovascular Glaucoma After Proton Beam Therapy of Uveal Melanoma: A Detailed Analysis of Tumor and Dose–Volume Parameters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Kavita K., E-mail: kmishra@radonc.ucsf.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Daftari, Inder K.; Weinberg, Vivian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Cole, Tia [The Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States); Quivey, Jeanne M.; Castro, Joseph R.; Phillips, Theodore L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Char, Devron H. [The Tumori Foundation, San Francisco, California (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: To determine neovascular glaucoma (NVG) incidence and identify contributing tumor and dosing factors in uveal melanoma patients treated with proton beam radiation therapy (PBRT). Methods and Materials: A total of 704 PBRT patients treated by a single surgeon (DHC) for uveal melanoma (1996-2010) were reviewed for NVG in our prospectively maintained database. All patients received 56 GyE in 4 fractions. Median follow-up was 58.3 months. Analyses included the Kaplan-Meier method to estimate NVG distributions, univariate log–rank tests, and Cox's proportional hazards multivariate analysis using likelihood ratio tests to identify independent risk factors of NVG among patient, tumor, and dose–volume histogram parameters. Results: The 5-year PBRT NVG rate was 12.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 10.2%-15.9%). The 5-year rate of enucleation due to NVG was 4.9% (95% CI 3.4%-7.2%). Univariately, the NVG rate increased significantly with larger tumor diameter (P<.0001), greater height (P<.0001), higher T stage (P<.0001), and closer proximity to the disc (P=.002). Dose–volume histogram analysis revealed that if >30% of the lens or ciliary body received ≥50% dose (≥28 GyE), there was a higher probability of NVG (P<.0001 for both). Furthermore, if 100% of the disc or macula received ≥28 GyE, the NVG rate was higher (P<.0001 and P=.03, respectively). If both anterior and posterior doses were above specified cut points, NVG risk was highest (P<.0001). Multivariate analysis confirmed significant independent risk factors to include tumor height (P<.0001), age (P<.0001), %disc treated to ≥50% Dose (<100% vs 100%) (P=.0007), larger tumor diameter (P=.01), %lens treated to ≥90% Dose (0 vs >0%-30% vs >30%) (P=.01), and optic nerve length treated to ≥90% Dose (≤1 mm vs >1 mm) (P=.02). Conclusions: Our current PBRT patients experience a low rate of NVG and resultant enucleation compared with historical data. The present analysis shows that tumor height

  20. In vivo evaluation of battery-operated light-emitting diode-based photodynamic therapy efficacy using tumor volume and biomarker expression as endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Rizvi, Imran; Hempstead, Joshua; Arnason, Stephen; Celli, Jonathan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. In view of the increase in cancer-related mortality rates in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), there is an urgent need to develop economical therapies that can be utilized at minimal infrastructure institutions. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, offers such a possibility provided that low-cost light sources and photosensitizers are available. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on adapting the PDT light source to a low-resource setting and compare an inexpensive, portable, battery-powered light-emitting diode (LED) light source with a standard, high-cost laser source. The comparison studies were performed in vivo in a xenograft murine model of human squamous cell carcinoma subjected to 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX PDT. We observed virtually identical control of the tumor burden by both the LED source and the standard laser source. Further insights into the biological response were evaluated by biomarker analysis of necrosis, microvessel density, and hypoxia [carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression] among groups of control, LED-PDT, and laser-PDT treated mice. There is no significant difference in the percent necrotic volume and CAIX expression in tumors that were treated with the two different light sources. These encouraging preliminary results merit further investigations in orthotopic animal models of cancers prevalent in LMICs. PMID:25909707

  1. In vivo evaluation of battery-operated light-emitting diode-based photodynamic therapy efficacy using tumor volume and biomarker expression as endpoints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallidi, Srivalleesha; Mai, Zhiming; Rizvi, Imran; Hempstead, Joshua; Arnason, Stephen; Celli, Jonathan; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2015-04-01

    In view of the increase in cancer-related mortality rates in low- to middle-income countries (LMIC), there is an urgent need to develop economical therapies that can be utilized at minimal infrastructure institutions. Photodynamic therapy (PDT), a photochemistry-based treatment modality, offers such a possibility provided that low-cost light sources and photosensitizers are available. In this proof-of-principle study, we focus on adapting the PDT light source to a low-resource setting and compare an inexpensive, portable, battery-powered light-emitting diode (LED) light source with a standard, high-cost laser source. The comparison studies were performed in vivo in a xenograft murine model of human squamous cell carcinoma subjected to 5-aminolevulinic acid-induced protoporphyrin IX PDT. We observed virtually identical control of the tumor burden by both the LED source and the standard laser source. Further insights into the biological response were evaluated by biomarker analysis of necrosis, microvessel density, and hypoxia [carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression] among groups of control, LED-PDT, and laser-PDT treated mice. There is no significant difference in the percent necrotic volume and CAIX expression in tumors that were treated with the two different light sources. These encouraging preliminary results merit further investigations in orthotopic animal models of cancers prevalent in LMICs.

  2. Tumor-suppressing gene therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Bingliang; Roth, Jack A

    2003-01-01

    Tumor-suppressor genes play pivotal roles in maintaining genome integrity and in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. Their loss-of-function mutations are related directly to tumorigenesis. Thus, use of tumor-suppressor genes as anticancer therapeutics has been investigated rigorously in both experimental and clinical researches. Transfer of various tumor-suppressor genes directly to cancer cells has been demonstrated to suppress tumor growth via induction of apoptosis and cell-cycle arrest and, in some cases, with evidence for bystander effects. Various studies also have shown that combination of tumor-suppressor gene therapy with conventional anticancer therapy can yield synergistic therapeutic benefits. Clinical trials with tumor-suppressor genes, especially the p53 gene, have demonstrated that the treatment is well tolerated, and; favorable clinical responses, including a pathologically complete responses, have been observed in a subset of patients with advanced disease or with cancers resistant to conventional therapy. Yet, current gene replacement approaches in cancer gene therapy must be improved if they are to have a broader clinical impact. Efficient systemic gene delivery systems will be required ultimately for treatment of metastatic disease. In this review, we have recently summarized achievements in tumor-suppressor gene therapy with a focus on the p53 gene.

  3. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dian, E-mail: dwang@mcw.edu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Bosch, Walter [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Roberge, David [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wolfson, Aaron H. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on computed tomography (CT) images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results: A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. The GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. Fusion of magnetic resonance and images is recommended to delineate the GTV. The CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes the GTV plus 3-cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm, including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone, or skin surface. Conclusion: The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images and in a descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment.

  4. Tumor therapy evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blattmann, H. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Kaser-Hotz, B.; Parvis, A. [Zurich Univ., Zurich (Switzerland)] [and others

    1997-08-01

    The aim of this program is to acquire data in order to evaluate the advantages of the proton spot scan technique compared to other forefront radiotherapy procedures, and to integrate the diagnostic and therapeutic possibilities of the life science department for human cancer therapy by testing it in veterinary radio-oncology. (author) 1 fig., 2 tab., 2 refs.

  5. Reduction in Tumor Volume by Cone Beam Computed Tomography Predicts Overall Survival in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Treated With Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jabbour, Salma K., E-mail: jabbousk@cinj.rutgers.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Kim, Sinae [Division of Biometrics, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Biostatistics, School of Public Health, Rutgers University, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Haider, Syed A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Xu, Xiaoting [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Soochow (China); Wu, Alson [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Surakanti, Sujani; Aisner, Joseph [Division of Medical Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Langenfeld, John [Division of Surgery, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Yue, Ning J.; Haffty, Bruce G.; Zou, Wei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, Rutgers The State University of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: We sought to evaluate whether tumor response using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) performed as part of the routine care during chemoradiation therapy (CRT) could forecast the outcome of unresectable, locally advanced, non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: We manually delineated primary tumor volumes (TV) of patients with NSCLC who were treated with radical CRT on days 1, 8, 15, 22, 29, 36, and 43 on CBCTs obtained as part of the standard radiation treatment course. Percentage reductions in TV were calculated and then correlated to survival and pattern of recurrence using Cox proportional hazard models. Clinical information including histologic subtype was also considered in the study of such associations. Results: We evaluated 38 patients with a median follow-up time of 23.4 months. The median TV reduction was 39.3% (range, 7.3%-69.3%) from day 1 (D1) to day 43 (D43) CBCTs. Overall survival was associated with TV reduction from D1 to D43 (hazard ratio [HR] 0.557, 95% CI 0.39-0.79, P=.0009). For every 10% decrease in TV from D1 to D43, the risk of death decreased by 44.3%. For patients whose TV decreased ≥39.3 or <39.3%, log-rank test demonstrated a separation in survival (P=.02), with median survivals of 31 months versus 10 months, respectively. Neither local recurrence (HR 0.791, 95% CI 0.51-1.23, P=.29), nor distant recurrence (HR 0.78, 95% CI 0.57-1.08, P=.137) correlated with TV decrease from D1 to D43. Histologic subtype showed no impact on our findings. Conclusions: TV reduction as determined by CBCT during CRT as part of routine care predicts post-CRT survival. Such knowledge may justify intensification of RT or application of additional therapies. Assessment of genomic characteristics of these tumors may permit a better understanding of behavior or prediction of therapeutic outcomes.

  6. Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Based Target Volume Delineation in Radiation Therapy Treatment Planning for Brain Tumors Using Localized Region-Based Active Contour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aslian, Hossein [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Sadeghi, Mahdi [Agricultural, Medical and Industrial Research School, Karaj (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Mahdavi, Seied Rabie [Department of Medical Physics, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Babapour Mofrad, Farshid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Astarakee, Mahdi, E-mail: M-Astarakee@Engineer.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaledi, Navid [Department of Medical Radiation, Science and Research Branch, Islamic Azad University, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fadavi, Pedram [Department of Radiation Oncology, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2013-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical application of a robust semiautomatic image segmentation method to determine the brain target volumes in radiation therapy treatment planning. Methods and Materials: A local robust region-based algorithm was used on MRI brain images to study the clinical target volume (CTV) of several patients. First, 3 oncologists delineated CTVs of 10 patients manually, and the process time for each patient was calculated. The averages of the oncologists’ contours were evaluated and considered as reference contours. Then, to determine the CTV through the semiautomatic method, a fourth oncologist who was blind to all manual contours selected 4-8 points around the edema and defined the initial contour. The time to obtain the final contour was calculated again for each patient. Manual and semiautomatic segmentation were compared using 3 different metric criteria: Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance. A comparison also was performed between volumes obtained from semiautomatic and manual methods. Results: Manual delineation processing time of tumors for each patient was dependent on its size and complexity and had a mean (±SD) of 12.33 ± 2.47 minutes, whereas it was 3.254 ± 1.7507 minutes for the semiautomatic method. Means of Dice coefficient, Hausdorff distance, and mean absolute distance between manual contours were 0.84 ± 0.02, 2.05 ± 0.66 cm, and 0.78 ± 0.15 cm, and they were 0.82 ± 0.03, 1.91 ± 0.65 cm, and 0.7 ± 0.22 cm between manual and semiautomatic contours, respectively. Moreover, the mean volume ratio (=semiautomatic/manual) calculated for all samples was 0.87. Conclusions: Given the deformability of this method, the results showed reasonable accuracy and similarity to the results of manual contouring by the oncologists. This study shows that the localized region-based algorithms can have great ability in determining the CTV and can be appropriate alternatives for manual approaches in brain cancer.

  7. Under conditions of large geometric miss, tumor control probability can be higher for static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy compared to volume-modulated arc therapy for prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balderson, Michael, E-mail: michael.balderson@rmp.uhn.ca; Brown, Derek; Johnson, Patricia; Kirkby, Charles

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare static gantry intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in terms of tumor control probability (TCP) under scenarios involving large geometric misses, i.e., those beyond what are accounted for when margin expansion is determined. Using a planning approach typical for these treatments, a linear-quadratic–based model for TCP was used to compare mean TCP values for a population of patients who experiences a geometric miss (i.e., systematic and random shifts of the clinical target volume within the planning target dose distribution). A Monte Carlo approach was used to account for the different biological sensitivities of a population of patients. Interestingly, for errors consisting of coplanar systematic target volume offsets and three-dimensional random offsets, static gantry IMRT appears to offer an advantage over VMAT in that larger shift errors are tolerated for the same mean TCP. For example, under the conditions simulated, erroneous systematic shifts of 15 mm directly between or directly into static gantry IMRT fields result in mean TCP values between 96% and 98%, whereas the same errors on VMAT plans result in mean TCP values between 45% and 74%. Random geometric shifts of the target volume were characterized using normal distributions in each Cartesian dimension. When the standard deviations were doubled from those values assumed in the derivation of the treatment margins, our model showed a 7% drop in mean TCP for the static gantry IMRT plans but a 20% drop in TCP for the VMAT plans. Although adding a margin for error to a clinical target volume is perhaps the best approach to account for expected geometric misses, this work suggests that static gantry IMRT may offer a treatment that is more tolerant to geometric miss errors than VMAT.

  8. Baseline Metabolic Tumor Volume and Total Lesion Glycolysis Are Associated With Survival Outcomes in Patients With Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer Receiving Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dholakia, Avani S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chaudhry, Muhammad; Leal, Jeffrey P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chang, Daniel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Raman, Siva P. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Hacker-Prietz, Amy [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Su, Zheng; Pai, Jonathan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); Oteiza, Katharine E.; Griffith, Mary E. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wahl, Richard L. [Department of Radiology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Tryggestad, Erik [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Pawlik, Timothy [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Laheru, Daniel A. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Wolfgang, Christopher L. [Department of Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Koong, Albert C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States); and others

    2014-07-01

    Purpose: Although previous studies have demonstrated the prognostic value of positron emission tomography (PET) parameters in other malignancies, the role of PET in pancreatic cancer has yet to be well established. We analyzed the prognostic utility of PET for patients with locally advanced pancreatic cancer (LAPC) undergoing fractionated stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-two patients with LAPC in a prospective clinical trial received up to 3 doses of gemcitabine, followed by 33 Gy in 5 fractions of 6.6 Gy, using SBRT. All patients received a baseline PET scan prior to SBRT (pre-SBRT PET). Metabolic tumor volume (MTV), total lesion glycolysis (TLG), and maximum and peak standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub peak}) on pre-SBRT PET scans were calculated using custom-designed software. Disease was measured at a threshold based on the liver SUV, using the equation Liver{sub mean} + [2 × Liver{sub sd}]. Median values of PET parameters were used as cutoffs when assessing their prognostic potential through Cox regression analyses. Results: Of the 32 patients, the majority were male (n=19, 59%), 65 years or older (n=21, 66%), and had tumors located in the pancreatic head (n=27, 84%). Twenty-seven patients (84%) received induction gemcitabine prior to SBRT. Median overall survival for the entire cohort was 18.8 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 15.7-22.0). An MTV of 26.8 cm{sup 3} or greater (hazard ratio [HR] 4.46, 95% CI 1.64-5.88, P<.003) and TLG of 70.9 or greater (HR 3.08, 95% CI 1.18-8.02, P<.021) on pre-SBRT PET scan were associated with inferior overall survival on univariate analysis. Both pre-SBRT MTV (HR 5.13, 95% CI 1.19-22.21, P=.029) and TLG (HR 3.34, 95% CI 1.07-10.48, P=.038) remained independently associated with overall survival in separate multivariate analyses. Conclusions: Pre-SBRT MTV and TLG are potential predictive factors for overall survival in patients with LAPC and may assist in

  9. Hormone therapy and ovarian borderline tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mørch, Lina Steinrud; Løkkegaard, Ellen; Andreasen, Anne Helms

    2012-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk.......Little is known about the influence of postmenopausal hormone therapy on the risk of ovarian borderline tumors. We aimed at assessing the influence of different hormone therapies on this risk....

  10. Targeting the tumor microenvironment for cancer therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sounni, Nor Eddine; Noel, Agnès

    With the emergence of the tumor microenvironment as an essential ingredient of cancer malignancy, therapies targeting the host compartment of tumors have begun to be designed and applied in the clinic...

  11. Tumor-colonizing bacteria: a potential tumor targeting therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Chao; Wang, Jiansheng

    2014-08-01

    In 1813, Vautier published his observation of tumor regression in patients who had suffered from gas gangrene. Since then, many publications have described the use of bacteria as antitumor therapy. For example, Bifidobacterium and Clostridium have been shown to selectively colonize tumors and to reduce tumor size. In addition, recent studies have focused on the use of genetic engineering to induce the expression of pro-drug converting enzymes, cytokines, specific antibodies, or suicide genes in tumor-colonizing bacteria. Moreover, some animal experiments have reported the treatment of tumors with engineered bacteria, and few side effects were observed. Therefore, based on these advances in tumor targeting therapy, bacteria may represent the next generation of cancer therapy.

  12. Radiation therapy for intracranial germ cell tumors. Predictive value of tumor response as evaluated by computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Toita, Takafumi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Yamaguchi, Keiichiro; Miyagi, Koichi; Kinjo, Toshihiko; Yamashiro, Katsumi; Sawada, Satoshi [Ryukyu Univ., Nishihara, Okinawa (Japan). School of Medicine

    1997-07-01

    This retrospective study analyzed the outcome in patients with intracranial germ-cell tumors to determine whether tumor response during radiation therapy can predict achievement of primary local with radiation therapy alone. Between 1983 and 1993, 22 patients with untreated primary intracranial germ cell tumors received a total whole brain radiation dose of between 18 Gy and 45 Gy (mean 31.3 Gy) with or without a localized field of 10 to 36.4 Gy (mean, 22.4 Gy), or local irradiation only (1 patient). In 10 patients with pineal tumor only, who were treated first with radiation therapy, tumor response to radiation therapy was evaluated using computed tomography (CT) (at baseline, and approximately 20 Gy and 50 Gy). Areas of calcification in the tumor were subtracted from total tumor volume. Follow-up time ranged from 2 to 12 years. Five-year actuarial survival rates for patients with germinoma were 71%, 100% for patients with a teratoma component, and 100% for patients without histologic verification. Patients with germinomas or tumors suspected of being germinomas who were given more than 50 Gy had no local relapse. There was no correlation between primary local control by radiation therapy alone and initial tumor volume. The rate of tumor volume response to irradiation assessed by CT was significantly different in those patients who relapsed compared to those who did not relapse. Tumor response during radiation therapy using CT was considered to be predictive of primary local control with radiation therapy alone. (author)

  13. TU-G-BRA-05: Predicting Volume Change of the Tumor and Critical Structures Throughout Radiation Therapy by CT-CBCT Registration with Local Intensity Correction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, S; Robinson, A; Kiess, A; Quon, H; Wong, J; Lee, J [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD (United States); Plishker, W [IGI Technologies Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Shekhar, R [IGI Technologies Inc., College Park, MD (United States); Children’s National Medical Center, Washington, D.C. (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to develop an accurate and effective technique to predict and monitor volume changes of the tumor and organs at risk (OARs) from daily cone-beam CTs (CBCTs). Methods: While CBCT is typically used to minimize the patient setup error, its poor image quality impedes accurate monitoring of daily anatomical changes in radiotherapy. Reconstruction artifacts in CBCT often cause undesirable errors in registration-based contour propagation from the planning CT, a conventional way to estimate anatomical changes. To improve the registration and segmentation accuracy, we developed a new deformable image registration (DIR) that iteratively corrects CBCT intensities using slice-based histogram matching during the registration process. Three popular DIR algorithms (hierarchical B-spline, demons, optical flow) augmented by the intensity correction were implemented on a graphics processing unit for efficient computation, and their performances were evaluated on six head and neck (HN) cancer cases. Four trained scientists manually contoured nodal gross tumor volume (GTV) on the planning CT and every other fraction CBCTs for each case, to which the propagated GTV contours by DIR were compared. The performance was also compared with commercial software, VelocityAI (Varian Medical Systems Inc.). Results: Manual contouring showed significant variations, [-76, +141]% from the mean of all four sets of contours. The volume differences (mean±std in cc) between the average manual segmentation and four automatic segmentations are 3.70±2.30(B-spline), 1.25±1.78(demons), 0.93±1.14(optical flow), and 4.39±3.86 (VelocityAI). In comparison to the average volume of the manual segmentations, the proposed approach significantly reduced the estimation error by 9%(B-spline), 38%(demons), and 51%(optical flow) over the conventional mutual information based method (VelocityAI). Conclusion: The proposed CT-CBCT registration with local CBCT intensity correction

  14. Therapy of melanocytic conjunctival tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halas, Jr M; Svetlosakova, Z; Babal, P

    2013-01-01

    Clinical experience of our single center in dealing with pigmented epibulbar lesions - melanocytic conjunctival tumors is presented. Since 2008 we use the topical treatment with mitomycin C (MMC) as an alternative or adjunctive method for excision in the treatment of melanocytic neoplasia of the conjunctiva. The retrospective case series of 85 patients with pigmented lesions of the conjunctiva - melanocytic conjunctival tumors, histopathologically examined in the period 2001-2010 is presented. Since 2008 we started to apply MMC in the treatment of primary acquired melanosis (PAM) and dysplastic nevi. We apply MMC topically directly after an excision as 2-times five minutes application. In 85 patients with pigmented lesions of the conjunctiva histopathological findings after excision of the lesion showed in 68 (80 %) cases melanocytic nevocelullar nevus, out of which 55 cases were combined and 13 cases were junctional nevi. In 60 (80 %) cases of melanocytic nevi atypia was found in 25 patients (42 %), nevus without atypia was present in 35 cases (58 %). PAM with atypia was found in 16 patients (classified since 2000). During the period of application of MMC we diagnosed only one patient with primary conjunctival melanoma. There was no presence of relapse of the pigmented lesion either after primary excision or after excision with MMC. Resection of more than one quadrant of bulbar conjunctiva in patients with pigmented lesions of the conjunctiva in cases of conjunctival nevus with atypia and PAM with atypia combined with topical MMC chemotherapy is an alternative therapy for residual pigmented lesions. There was no presence of relapse of pigmentation in area of excision with or without using MMC during the surgery in patients with PAM. The number of our patients is not sufficient yet to draw a conclusion (Fig. 6, Ref. 21).

  15. Photodynamic therapy for implanted VX2 tumor in rabbit brains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Fei; Feng, Hua; Lin, Jiangkai; Zhu, Gang; Chen, Zhi; Li, Cong-yan

    2005-07-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effect and the safety of single photodynamic therapy (PDT) with hematoporphyrin derivative produced in China, 60 New Zealand adult rabbits with VX2 tumor implanted into the brain were divided randomly into non-PDT-group and PDT-group. 36 rabbits of the PDT-group were performed photodynamic therapy. The survival time, neurological deteriorations, intracranial pressure (ICP), histology, pathology, tumor volume and brain water content were measured. Other 12 rabbits were received hematoporphyrin derivative and light irradiation of the normal brain. The ICP, histology, pathology, and brain water content were measured. The result indicated that Simple PDT may elongate the average survival time of the rabbits with VX2 tumors significantly; kill tumor cells; cause transient brain edema and increase ICP, but it is safe to be used in treating brain tumor.

  16. Distribution of Functional Liver Volume in Hepatocellular Carcinoma Patients with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombus in the 1st Branch and Main Trunk Using Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography—Application to Radiation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akira Ikoma

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To analyze the distribution of functional liver volume (FLV in the margin volume (MV surrounding hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC with portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT before radiation therapy (RT and to verify the safety of single photon emission computed tomography-based three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (SPECT-B3DCRT by exploring the relation of FLV in MV to radiation-induced liver disease (RILD. Methods and Materials: Clinical target volume (CTV included main tumor and PVTT, and planning target volume (PTV included CTV with a 10 mm margin. MV was defined as PTV–CTV. FLV ratio in MV was calculated as FLV in MV/MV × 100 (%. The two high-dose beams were planned to irradiate FLV as little as possible. Fifty-seven cases of HCC (26/57, 46%; Child–Pugh grade B with PVTT underwent SPECT-B3DCRT which targeted the CTV to a total dose of 45 Gy/18 fractions. The destructive ratio was defined as radiation induced dysfunctional volume/FLV × 100 (%. Results: We observed a significant negative correlation between FLV ratio in MV and CTV (p < 0.001. Three cases with CTVs of 287, 587 and 1184 cm3 experienced transient RILD. The FLV ratio in MV was highest in patients with RILD: nine patients with CTV of 200–300 cm3, three with CTV of 500–600 cm3, and two with CTV of 1100–1200 cm3. The destructive ratio yielded a mean value of 24.2 ± 1.5%. Conclusions: Radiation planning that takes into account the distribution of FLV appears to result in the least possible RILD.

  17. SU-E-T-147: Beam Specific Planning Target Volumes Incorporating 4DCT for Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy of Thoracic Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, L; Kang, M; Huang, S; McDonough, J; Solberg, T; Simone, C [University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Mayer, R [Henry Jackson Foundation, Bethesda, MD (United States); Thomas, A [ATC healthcare, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to determine whether organ sparing and target coverage can be simultaneously maintained for pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy treatment of thoracic tumors in the presence of motion, stopping power uncertainties and patient setup variations. Methods: Ten consecutive patients that were previously treated with proton therapy to 66.6/1.8 Gy (RBE) using double scattering (DS) were replanned with PBS. Minimum and maximum intensity images from 4DCT were used to introduce flexible smearing in the determination of the beam specific PTV (BSPTV). Datasets from eight 4DCT phases, using ±3% uncertainty in stopping power, and ±3 mm uncertainty in patient setup in each direction were used to create 8*12*10=960 PBS plans for the evaluation of ten patients. Plans were normalized to provide identical coverage between DS and PBS. Results: The average lung V20, V5, and mean doses were reduced from 29.0%, 35.0%, and 16.4 Gy with DS to 24.6%, 30.6%, and 14.1 Gy with PBS, respectively. The average heart V30 and V45 were reduced from 10.4% and 7.5% in DS to 8.1% and 5.4% for PBS, respectively. Furthermore, the maximum spinal cord, esophagus and heart dose were decreased from 37.1 Gy, 71.7 Gy and 69.2 Gy with DS to 31.3 Gy, 67.9 Gy and 64.6 Gy with PBS. The conformity index (CI), homogeneity index (HI), and global maximal dose were improved from 3.2, 0.08, 77.4 Gy with DS to 2.8, 0.04 and 72.1 Gy with PBS. All differences are statistically significant, with p values <0.05, with the exception of the heart V45 (p= 0.146). Conclusion: PBS with BSPTV achieves better organ sparing and improves target coverage using a repainting method for the treatment of thoracic tumors. Incorporating motion-related uncertainties is essential This work was supported by the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command under Contract Agreement No. DAMD17-W81XWH-07-2-0121 and W81XWH-09-2-0174.

  18. Targeted Radionuclide Therapy of Human Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey V. Gudkov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Targeted radionuclide therapy is one of the most intensively developing directions of nuclear medicine. Unlike conventional external beam therapy, the targeted radionuclide therapy causes less collateral damage to normal tissues and allows targeted drug delivery to a clinically diagnosed neoplastic malformations, as well as metastasized cells and cellular clusters, thus providing systemic therapy of cancer. The methods of targeted radionuclide therapy are based on the use of molecular carriers of radionuclides with high affinity to antigens on the surface of tumor cells. The potential of targeted radionuclide therapy has markedly grown nowadays due to the expanded knowledge base in cancer biology, bioengineering, and radiochemistry. In this review, progress in the radionuclide therapy of hematological malignancies and approaches for treatment of solid tumors is addressed.

  19. Ablative therapies for small renal tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tworkiewicz, Jakub; Siekiera, Jerzy; Drewa, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Ablative therapies of renal tumors are steadily gaining popularity in clinical practice due to the many benefits they offer to patients. Moreover, ablative procedures hold promise in the field of uro-oncology for the best compromise between low invasiveness, high efficacy and advantages in terms of procedural costs. Reported outcomes with ablative therapies for small renal tumors are excellent and without significant differences for surgical procedures based on nephron-sparing surgery. Nevertheless, these methods for treatment of small renal tumors should still be confined to carefully selected patients. This review discusses the currently used ablative techniques in urology. PMID:23788957

  20. Ablative therapies for small renal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamowicz, Jan; Tworkiewicz, Jakub; Siekiera, Jerzy; Drewa, Tomasz

    2013-01-01

    Ablative therapies of renal tumors are steadily gaining popularity in clinical practice due to the many benefits they offer to patients. Moreover, ablative procedures hold promise in the field of uro-oncology for the best compromise between low invasiveness, high efficacy and advantages in terms of procedural costs. Reported outcomes with ablative therapies for small renal tumors are excellent and without significant differences for surgical procedures based on nephron-sparing surgery. Nevertheless, these methods for treatment of small renal tumors should still be confined to carefully selected patients. This review discusses the currently used ablative techniques in urology.

  1. Correlation between metabolic tumor volume and pathologic tumor volume in squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James D.; Chisholm, Karen M.; Daly, Megan E.; Wiegner, Ellen A.; Truong, Daniel; Iagaru, Andre; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy W.; Graves, Edward E.; Kaplan, Michael J.; Kong, Christina; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To explore the relationship between pathologic tumor volume and volume estimated from different tumor segmentation techniques on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in oral cavity cancer. Materials and Methods Twenty-three patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the oral tongue had PET-CT scans before definitive surgery. Pathologic tumor volume was estimated from surgical specimens. Metabolic tumor volume (MTV) was defined from PET-CT scans as the volume of tumor above a given SUV threshold. Multiple SUV thresholds were explored including absolute SUV thresholds, relative SUV thresholds, and gradient-based techniques. Results Multiple MTV's were associated with pathologic tumor volume; however the correlation was poor (R2 range 0.29–0.58). The ideal SUV threshold, defined as the SUV that generates an MTV equal to pathologic tumor volume, was independently associated with maximum SUV (p=0.0005) and tumor grade (p=0.024). MTV defined as a function of maximum SUV and tumor grade improved the prediction of pathologic tumor volume (R2 = 0.63). Conclusions Common SUV thresholds fail to predict pathologic tumor volume in head and neck cancer. The optimal technique that allows for integration of PET-CT with radiation treatment planning remains to be defined. Future investigation should incorporate biomarkers such as tumor grade into definitions of MTV. PMID:21665308

  2. Intraoperative photodynamic therapy for nonorgan retroperitoneal tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. А. Vashakmadze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of treatment in 17 patients with morphologically confirmed resectable primary or recurrent retroperitoneal tumor using intraoperative photodynamic therapy with photogem (5 patients, radaсhlorin (7 patients and photodithazine (5 patients. The drugs were administered intravenously in following regimen: photogem 48 h before surgery in dose 2.5–3.0 mg/kg, radaсhlorin and photodithazine – 0.7 and 0.7–1.0 mg/kg, respectively, 2–3 h before resection. Irradiation was performed to tumor bed after complete radical removal from one or several positions depending on tumor localization. The light dose accounted for 30 J/cm2, duration of treatment session depended on area of irradiation. Two patients with recurrent tumor had two reoperations with session of photodynamic therapy. One patient had repeated recurrence requiring third surgery with photodynamic therapy. Thus, 17 patients underwent 25 sessions of intraoperative photodynamic therapy. There were no intraoperative complications. One patient had an early post-operative complication in the form of pancreonecrosis which could be associated with extended resection. The recurrence rate was 17.6%. The results showed safety of the method and affinity of utilized photosensitizers to retroperitoneal tumors of different histological types (sarcoma, gastrointestinal stromal tumor and others. 

  3. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kida, Akio; Fukuda, Haruyuki [Osaka City Univ. (Japan). Medical School; Taniguchi, Shuji; Sakai, Kazuaki

    2000-02-01

    The results of radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors were evaluated in terms of pain relief, improvement of neurological impairment, and survival. Between 1986 and 1995, 52 symptomatic patients with metastatic spinal tumors treated with radiation therapy were evaluated. The patients all received irradiation of megavoltage energy. Therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in terms of pain relief and improvement of neurological impairment. Pain relief was observed in 29 (61.7%) of 47 patients with pain. Therapy was effective for 17 (70.8%) of 24 patients without neurological impairment, and efficacy was detected in 12 (52.2%) of 23 patients with neurological impairment. Improvement of neurological symptoms was obtained in seven (25.0%) of 28 patients with neurological impairment. Radiation therapy was effective for pain relief in patients with metastatic spinal tumors. In patients with neurological impairment, less pain relief was observed than in those without impairment. Improvement of neurological impairment was restricted, but radiation therapy was thought to be effective in some cases in the early stage of neurological deterioration. Radiation therapy for metastatic spinal tumors contraindicated for surgery was considered effective for improvement of patients' activities of daily living. (author)

  4. INTRAOPERATIVE PHOTODYNAMIC THERAPY FOR METASTATIC PERITONEAL TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Suleimanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review is devoted to the cytoreductive treatment of malignant tumors of the abdominal organs. The actuality of the issue is determined both by increase of the incidence of abdominal cancer in Russia and in majority of developed countries and by high rate diagnosis on late stages of disease. The methods of treatment of peritoneal carcinomatosis, based on possible effects on the secondary peritoneal tumors after surgical cytoreduction to reduce the risk of local recurrence and disease progression are described. These methods of additional intraoperative specific antitumor action include intraoperative radiation therapy, hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy, intraoperative photodynamic therapy characterized by differences in difficulty of performance, mechanisms of effect on tumor and healthy tissues, efficiency. Benefits, opportunities and possibilities of application of intraoperative photodynamic therapy (IOPDT for secondary peritoneal tumors are described in details, the results of a number of domestic and foreign clinical studies are shown, the successful application of intraoperative photodynamic therapy in clinical oncology, which allows reducing the risk of secondary tumor lesions of the peritoneum significantly, is demonstrated. Photodynamic therapy – a method with high efficiency and almost no side effects and complications, based on the ability of photosensitizer to accumulate selectively and retain in the high proliferative tissues. The advantages of this type of treatment of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis are a selective effect on the peritoneal carcinomatosis and on visually detected tumor tissue, high efficiency in patients with malignant tumors of the abdominal cavity and pelvis combined with surgical cytoreduction, minimal effect on normal organs and tissues of the patient, well tolerated procedure.

  5. Tumor Volume Reduction Rate After Preoperative Chemoradiotherapy as a Prognostic Factor in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Seung-Gu [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiation Oncology, Soonchunhyang University College of Medicine, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dae Yong, E-mail: radiopiakim@hanmail.net [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Park, Ji Won; Oh, Jae Hwan; Kim, Sun Young; Chang, Hee Jin; Kim, Tae Hyun; Kim, Byung Chang; Sohn, Dae Kyung; Kim, Min Ju [Center for Colorectal Cancer, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the prognostic significance of tumor volume reduction rate (TVRR) after preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) in locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC). Methods and Materials: In total, 430 primary LARC (cT3-4) patients who were treated with preoperative CRT and curative radical surgery between May 2002 and March 2008 were analyzed retrospectively. Pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes were measured using three-dimensional region-of-interest MR volumetry. Tumor volume reduction rate was determined using the equation TVRR (%) = (pre-CRT tumor volume - post-CRT tumor volume) Multiplication-Sign 100/pre-CRT tumor volume. The median follow-up period was 64 months (range, 27-99 months) for survivors. Endpoints were disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results: The median TVRR was 70.2% (mean, 64.7% {+-} 22.6%; range, 0-100%). Downstaging (ypT0-2N0M0) occurred in 183 patients (42.6%). The 5-year DFS and OS rates were 77.7% and 86.3%, respectively. In the analysis that included pre-CRT and post-CRT tumor volumes and TVRR as continuous variables, only TVRR was an independent prognostic factor. Tumor volume reduction rate was categorized according to a cutoff value of 45% and included with clinicopathologic factors in the multivariate analysis; ypN status, circumferential resection margin, and TVRR were significant prognostic factors for both DFS and OS. Conclusions: Tumor volume reduction rate was a significant prognostic factor in LARC patients receiving preoperative CRT. Tumor volume reduction rate data may be useful for tailoring surgery and postoperative adjuvant therapy after preoperative CRT.

  6. Cervical Gross Tumor Volume Dose Predicts Local Control Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging/Diffusion-Weighted Imaging—Guided High-Dose-Rate and Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography—Guided Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyk, Pawel; Jiang, Naomi; Sun, Baozhou; DeWees, Todd A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Fowler, Kathryn J.; Narra, Vamsi [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Garcia-Ramirez, Jose L.; Schwarz, Julie K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Grigsby, Perry W., E-mail: pgrigsby@wustl.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Nuclear Medicine, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Division of Gynecologic Oncology, Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States); Alvin J. Siteman Cancer Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, Missouri (United States)

    2014-11-15

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance imaging/diffusion weighted-imaging (MRI/DWI)-guided high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy and {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) — positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT)-guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for the definitive treatment of cervical cancer is a novel treatment technique. The purpose of this study was to report our analysis of dose-volume parameters predicting gross tumor volume (GTV) control. Methods and Materials: We analyzed the records of 134 patients with International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stages IB1-IVB cervical cancer treated with combined MRI-guided HDR and IMRT from July 2009 to July 2011. IMRT was targeted to the metabolic tumor volume and lymph nodes by use of FDG-PET/CT simulation. The GTV for each HDR fraction was delineated by use of T2-weighted or apparent diffusion coefficient maps from diffusion-weighted sequences. The D100, D90, and Dmean delivered to the GTV from HDR and IMRT were summed to EQD2. Results: One hundred twenty-five patients received all irradiation treatment as planned, and 9 did not complete treatment. All 134 patients are included in this analysis. Treatment failure in the cervix occurred in 24 patients (18.0%). Patients with cervix failures had a lower D100, D90, and Dmean than those who did not experience failure in the cervix. The respective doses to the GTV were 41, 58, and 136 Gy for failures compared with 67, 99, and 236 Gy for those who did not experience failure (P<.001). Probit analysis estimated the minimum D100, D90, and Dmean doses required for ≥90% local control to be 69, 98, and 260 Gy (P<.001). Conclusions: Total dose delivered to the GTV from combined MRI-guided HDR and PET/CT-guided IMRT is highly correlated with local tumor control. The findings can be directly applied in the clinic for dose adaptation to maximize local control.

  7. Prognostic value of tumor volume for patients with advanced lung cancer treated with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Chung-Feng Jeffrey; Ke, Bo-Han; Wu, Nain-Ying; Kuo, Joseph; Hsu, Hsian-He

    2017-06-01

    We aim to develop a reference system utilizing computed tomography to calculate changes in tumor volume of lung cancer patients after chemotherapy to assist physicians in clinical treatment and evaluation. Image processing techniques were used to analyze the computed tomography of lung cancer, locate the tumor, and calculate the tumor volume. The medical indicator was then evaluated and analyzed. We examined the correlation between reduced tumor volume and survival duration of 88 patients after chemotherapy at Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan. The innovative survival prediction index was obtained by four statistical methods: receiver operating characteristic curve, Youden index, Kaplan-Meier method, and log rank test. From the image processing techniques, tumor volume from each patient were obtained within an average of 7.25 seconds. The proposed method was shown to achieve rapid positioning of lung tumors and volume reconstruction with an estimation error of 1.92% when calibrated with an irregularly shaped stone. In medical indicator evaluation and analysis, the area below the receiver operating characteristic curve is greater than 0.8, indicating good predictability of the medical index used herein. The Youden index spotted the best cut-off point of volume, and the correlation between the volume's cut-off point and survival time was confirmed again by Kaplan-Meier and log rank test. The p-values were all less than 0.05, presenting a high degree of correlation between the two, indicating that this medical indicator is highly reliable. The proposed techniques can automatically find the location of tumors in the lung, reconstruct the volume, and calculate changes in volume before and after treatment, thus obtaining an innovative survival prediction index. This will help facilitate early and accurate predictions of disease outcomes during the course of therapy, and categorize patient stratification into risk groups for more efficient therapies. Copyright © 2017

  8. Local iontophoretic administration of cytotoxic therapies to solid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James D; Jajja, Mohammad R N; O'Neill, Adrian T; Bickford, Lissett R; Keeler, Amanda W; Hyder, Nabeel; Wagner, Kyle; Deal, Allison; Little, Ryan E; Moffitt, Richard A; Stack, Colleen; Nelson, Meredith; Brooks, Christopher R; Lee, William; Luft, J Chris; Napier, Mary E; Darr, David; Anders, Carey K; Stack, Richard; Tepper, Joel E; Wang, Andrew Z; Zamboni, William C; Yeh, Jen Jen; DeSimone, Joseph M

    2015-02-04

    Parenteral and oral routes have been the traditional methods of administering cytotoxic agents to cancer patients. Unfortunately, the maximum potential effect of these cytotoxic agents has been limited because of systemic toxicity and poor tumor perfusion. In an attempt to improve the efficacy of cytotoxic agents while mitigating their side effects, we have developed modalities for the localized iontophoretic delivery of cytotoxic agents. These iontophoretic devices were designed to be implanted proximal to the tumor with external control of power and drug flow. Three distinct orthotopic mouse models of cancer and a canine model were evaluated for device efficacy and toxicity. Orthotopic patient-derived pancreatic cancer xenografts treated biweekly with gemcitabine via the device for 7 weeks experienced a mean log2 fold change in tumor volume of -0.8 compared to a mean log2 fold change in tumor volume of 1.1 for intravenous (IV) gemcitabine, 3.0 for IV saline, and 2.6 for device saline groups. The weekly coadministration of systemic cisplatin therapy and transdermal device cisplatin therapy significantly increased tumor growth inhibition and doubled the survival in two aggressive orthotopic models of breast cancer. The addition of radiotherapy to this treatment further extended survival. Device delivery of gemcitabine in dogs resulted in more than 7-fold difference in local drug concentrations and 25-fold lower systemic drug levels than the IV treatment. Overall, these devices have potential paradigm shifting implications for the treatment of pancreatic, breast, and other solid tumors. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. SU-E-J-266: Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) Inter-Scan and Inter-Observer Tumor Volume Variability Assessment in Patients Treated with Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT) for Early Stage Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, Y; Aileen, C; Kozono, D; Killoran, J; Wagar, M; Lee, S; Hacker, F; Aerts, H; Lewis, J; Mak, R [Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Quantification of volume changes on CBCT during SBRT for NSCLC may provide a useful radiological marker for radiation response and adaptive treatment planning, but the reproducibility of CBCT volume delineation is a concern. This study is to quantify inter-scan/inter-observer variability in tumor volume delineation on CBCT. Methods: Twenty earlystage (stage I and II) NSCLC patients were included in this analysis. All patients were treated with SBRT with a median dose of 54 Gy in 3 to 5 fractions. Two physicians independently manually contoured the primary gross tumor volume on CBCTs taken immediately before SBRT treatment (Pre) and after the same SBRT treatment (Post). Absolute volume differences (AVD) were calculated between the Pre and Post CBCTs for a given treatment to quantify inter-scan variability, and then between the two observers for a given CBCT to quantify inter-observer variability. AVD was also normalized with respect to average volume to obtain relative volume differences (RVD). Bland-Altman approach was used to evaluate variability. All statistics were calculated with SAS version 9.4. Results: The 95% limit of agreement (mean ± 2SD) on AVD and RVD measurements between Pre and Post scans were −0.32cc to 0.32cc and −0.5% to 0.5% versus −1.9 cc to 1.8 cc and −15.9% to 15.3% for the two observers respectively. The 95% limit of agreement of AVD and RVD between the two observers were −3.3 cc to 2.3 cc and −42.4% to 28.2% respectively. The greatest variability in inter-scan RVD was observed with very small tumors (< 5 cc). Conclusion: Inter-scan variability in RVD is greatest with small tumors. Inter-observer variability was larger than inter-scan variability. The 95% limit of agreement for inter-observer and inter-scan variability (∼15–30%) helps define a threshold for clinically meaningful change in tumor volume to assess SBRT response, with larger thresholds needed for very small tumors. Part of the work was funded by a Kaye

  10. VOLUME THERAPY IN ACUTE PANCREATITIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biljana Stošić

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental management is required soon after a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis has been made and includes monitoring of the conscious state, the respiratory and cardiovascular system, the urinary output, adequate fluid replacement and pain control, blood purification therapy and nutritional support. An adequate dose of fluid replacement is essential to stabilize cardiovascular dynamics and the dose should be adjusted while assessing circulatory dynamics constantly. Current clinical practice guidelines recommend aggressive fluid resuscitation despite limited prospective data. Fluid therapy remains the mainstay of early management of patients with acute pancreatitis and severe acute pancreatitis. High-level evidence is lacking to guide protocols for fluid resuscitation in patients presenting with acute pancreatitis. In those patients with severe acute pancreatitis, the available evidence indicates that controlled fluid resuscitation with crystalloids and colloids offers the best outcome. Hematocrit remains a useful marker to guide fluid resuscitation in acute pancreatitis. However, the timing and ideal “cut-off” level needs to be determined.

  11. Complications of bone tumors after multimodal therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapeero, L.G., E-mail: lshapeero@usuhs.edu [Department of Radiology, Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences, 4301 Jones Bridge Road, Bethesda, MD 20814 (United States); Bone and Soft Tissue Program, United States Military Cancer Institute, 6900 Georgia Ave, NW, Washington, DC 20307 (United States); Poffyn, B. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); De Visschere, P.J.L. [Department of Radiology and Magnetic Resonance/MR-1K12 IB, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Sys, G. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Uyttendaele, D. [Department of Radiology and Magnetic Resonance/MR-1K12 IB, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Vanel, D. [Department of Radiology, Rizzoli Institute, 40136 Bologna (Italy); Forsyth, R. [Department of Pathology, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium); Verstraete, K.L. [Department of Radiology and Magnetic Resonance/MR-1K12 IB, Ghent University Hospital, De Pintelaan 185, B-9000 Ghent (Belgium)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: To define and compare the complications of bone tumors after resection, extracorporeal irradiation and re-implantation, with or without radiotherapy. Materials and methods: Eighty patients (40 males and 40 females, ages 4-77 years) with 61 malignant and 19 benign bone tumors were evaluated for local and distant complications after treatment. Two groups of patients were studied: (1) 53 patients had resection without (43 patients) or with external beam radiotherapy (RadRx) (10 patients) and (2) 27 patients underwent extracorporeal irradiation and re-implantation without (22 patients) or with RadRx (5 patients). Patient follow-up varied from 1 month to 13.63 years with mean follow-up of 4.7 years. Imaging studies included bone and chest radiography, spin echo T1- and T2-weighted (or STIR) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI), computed tomography (CT) for thoracic and abdominopelvic metastases and 3-phase technetium-99m-labeled-methylene-diphosphonate (Tc99m MDP) scintigraphy for bone metastases. Results: DCE-MRI differentiated the rapidly enhancing recurrences, residual tumors and metastases from the slowly enhancing inflammation, and the non-enhancing seromas and fibrosis. Recurrences, metastases (mainly to lung and bone), and seromas were greater than twice as frequent in patients after resection than after ECCRI. Although 11.3% of post-resection patients had residual tumor, no ECRRI-treated patient had residual tumor. In contrast, after ECRRI, infection was almost three times as frequent and aseptic loosening twice as frequent as compared with the post-resection patients. Bones treated with RadRx and/or ECRRI showed increased prevalence of fractures and osteoporosis. In addition, muscle inflammation was more common in the externally irradiated patient as compared with the patient who did not receive this therapy. However, another soft tissue complication, heterotopic ossification, was rare in the

  12. Co-clinical quantitative tumor volume imaging in ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishino, Mizuki; Sacher, Adrian G; Gandhi, Leena; Chen, Zhao; Akbay, Esra; Fedorov, Andriy; Westin, Carl F; Hatabu, Hiroto; Johnson, Bruce E; Hammerman, Peter; Wong, Kwok-Kin

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate and compare the volumetric tumor burden changes during crizotinib therapy in mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Volumetric tumor burden was quantified on serial imaging studies in 8 bitransgenic mice with ALK-rearranged adenocarcinoma treated with crizotinib, and in 33 human subjects with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. The volumetric tumor burden changes and the time to maximal response were compared between mice and humans. The median tumor volume decrease (%) at the maximal response was -40.4% (range: -79.5%-+11.7%) in mice, and -72.9% (range: -100%-+72%) in humans (Wilcoxon p=0.03). The median time from the initiation of therapy to maximal response was 6 weeks in mice, and 15.7 weeks in humans. Overall volumetric response rate was 50% in mice and 97% in humans. Spider plots of tumor volume changes during therapy demonstrated durable responses in the human cohort, with a median time on therapy of 13.1 months. The present study described an initial attempt to evaluate quantitative tumor burden changes in co-clinical imaging studies of genomically-matched mice and human cohorts with ALK-rearranged NSCLC treated with crizotinib. Differences are noted in the degree of maximal volume response between the two cohorts in this well-established paradigm of targeted therapy, indicating a need for further studies to optimize co-clinical trial design and interpretation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Targeting tumor suppressor genes for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunhua; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Han, Cecil; Wang, Liana; Zhang, Xinna; He, Xiaoming; Lu, Xiongbin

    2015-12-01

    Cancer drugs are broadly classified into two categories: cytotoxic chemotherapies and targeted therapies that specifically modulate the activity of one or more proteins involved in cancer. Major advances have been achieved in targeted cancer therapies in the past few decades, which is ascribed to the increasing understanding of molecular mechanisms for cancer initiation and progression. Consequently, monoclonal antibodies and small molecules have been developed to interfere with a specific molecular oncogenic target. Targeting gain-of-function mutations, in general, has been productive. However, it has been a major challenge to use standard pharmacologic approaches to target loss-of-function mutations of tumor suppressor genes. Novel approaches, including synthetic lethality and collateral vulnerability screens, are now being developed to target gene defects in p53, PTEN, and BRCA1/2. Here, we review and summarize the recent findings in cancer genomics, drug development, and molecular cancer biology, which show promise in targeting tumor suppressors in cancer therapeutics. © 2015 WILEY Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Multimodal OCT for complex assessment of tumors response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Matveev, Lev A.; Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Sovetsky, Alexander A.; Moiseev, Alexander A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Vitkin, Alex; Gladkova, Natalia D.

    2017-07-01

    Multimodal OCT is a promising tool for monitoring of individual tumor response to antitumor therapies. The changes of tumor cells, connective tissue, microcirculation and stiffness can be estimated simultaneously in real time with high resolution.

  15. Reduction sensitive nanosystems for tumor targeted imaging and therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhu, Yaqin

    2017-01-01

    Nanomedicines based on biodegradable polymers for tumor imaging and therapy receive more and more attention due to their improved water solibility, bioavailability, and extended blood circulation times. Advanced polymer chemistry combined with a thorough understanding of the tumor microenvironment,

  16. From the palliative concept to R0 resection. SIRT in the individual tumor therapy; Vom Palliativkonzept zur R0-Resektion. Die SIRT in der individuellen Tumortherapie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wetter, Axel [Universitaetsklinik Essen (Germany). Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie; Theysohn, Jens; Schotten, Clemens; Schulze, Maren; Mueller, Stefan

    2017-02-15

    The selective internal radiotherapy (SIRT) with Y-90 charged microspheres is predominantly used for palliative therapy of hepatocellular tumors. In connection with additional medication SIRT can also trigger a volume reduction of the tumor for possible surgery.

  17. Sensitivity of MRI tumor biomarkers to VEGFR inhibitor therapy in an orthotopic mouse glioma model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian T Farrar

    Full Text Available MRI biomarkers of tumor edema, vascular permeability, blood volume, and average vessel caliber are increasingly being employed to assess the efficacy of tumor therapies. However, the dependence of these biomarkers on a number of physiological factors can compromise their sensitivity and complicate the assessment of therapeutic efficacy. Here we examine the response of these MRI tumor biomarkers to cediranib, a potent vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR inhibitor, in an orthotopic mouse glioma model. A significant increase in the tumor volume and relative vessel caliber index (rVCI and a slight decrease in the water apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were observed for both control and cediranib treated animals. This contrasts with a clinical study that observed a significant decrease in tumor rVCI, ADC and volume with cediranib therapy. While the lack of a difference between control and cediranib treated animals in these biomarker responses might suggest that cediranib has no therapeutic benefit, cediranib treated mice had a significantly increased survival. The increased survival benefit of cediranib treated animals is consistent with the significant decrease observed for cediranib treated animals in the relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV, relative microvascular blood volume (rMBV, transverse relaxation time (T2, blood vessel permeability (K(trans, and extravascular-extracellular space (ν(e. The differential response of pre-clinical and clinical tumors to cediranib therapy, along with the lack of a positive response for some biomarkers, indicates the importance of evaluating the whole spectrum of different tumor biomarkers to properly assess the therapeutic response and identify and interpret the therapy-induced changes in the tumor physiology.

  18. SU-E-T-79: A Study of the Effect of Clinical Tumor Volume Displacement On the Dosage of Post Modified Radical Mastectomy Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy Plans for Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, W; Ma, C; Li, D; Wu, F [Cancer Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, Shantou, Guangdong (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the effect of clinical tumor volume (CTV) displacement on the dosage of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for left-sided breast cancer after modified radical mastectomy. Methods: We created 2 sets of IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 and PTV0.7 (with CTV displacement of 0.5cm and 0.7cm respectively) for each of the ten consecutive left-sided breast cancer patients after modified radical mastectomy, and compared the difference in PTV coverage and organ at risk (OAR) sparing between the two groups. And then, we compared the difference in PTV coverage in IMRT plans based on PTV0.5 between the group with properly estimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.5cm) and the one with underestimated CTV displacement (presuming the actual CTV displacement was 0.7cm). The difference in results between the corresponding two groups was compared using paired-sample t-test. P values less than 0.05 were considered statistically significant. Results: IMRT plans derived from PTV0.5 had more homogenous PTV coverage, and less heart, left lung, right breast, right lung, left humeral head and B-P radiation exposure, as well as less total Mu as compared with the ones stemmed from PTV0.7 (all p<0.05). IMRT plans with appropriate estimation of CTV displacement had better PTV coverage compared with the ones with underestimated CTV displacement (all p<0.01). Conclusion: The IMRT plans with smaller CTV displacement in post modified radical mastectomy radiotherapy for left-sided breast cancer has dosimetrical advantages over the ones with larger CTV displacement. Underestimation of CTV displacement can lead to significant reduction of PTV coverage. Individually quantifying and minimizing CTV displacement can significantly improve PTV coverage and OAR (including heart and left lung) sparing. This work was supported by the Medical Scientific Research Foundation of Guangdong Procvince (A2014455 to Changchun Ma)

  19. Recent Progress in the Medical Therapy of Pituitary Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabienne Langlois

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Management of pituitary tumors is multidisciplinary, with medical therapy playing an increasingly important role. With the exception of prolactin-secreting tumors, surgery is still considered the first-line treatment for the majority of pituitary adenomas. However, medical/pharmacological therapy plays an important role in controlling hormone-producing pituitary adenomas, especially for patients with acromegaly and Cushing disease (CD. In the case of non-functioning pituitary adenomas (NFAs, pharmacological therapy plays a minor role, the main objective of which is to reduce tumor growth, but this role requires further studies. For pituitary carcinomas and atypical adenomas, medical therapy, including chemotherapy, acts as an adjuvant to surgery and radiation therapy, which is often required to control these aggressive tumors. In the last decade, knowledge about the pathophysiological mechanisms of various pituitary adenomas has increased, thus novel medical therapies that target specific pathways implicated in tumor synthesis and hormonal over secretion are now available. Advancement in patient selection and determination of prognostic factors has also helped to individualize therapy for patients with pituitary tumors. Improvements in biochemical and “tumor mass” disease control can positively affect patient quality of life, comorbidities and overall survival. In this review, the medical armamentarium for treating CD, acromegaly, prolactinomas, NFA, and carcinomas/aggressive atypical adenomas will be presented. Pharmacological therapies, including doses, mode of administration, efficacy, adverse effects, and use in special circumstances are provided. Medical therapies currently under clinical investigation are also briefly discussed.

  20. Influence of pretreatment polarographically measured oxygenation levels in spontaneous canine tumors treated with radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bley, C.R.; Ohlerth, S.; Wergin, M.; Achermann, R.; Kaser-Hotz, B. [Section of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Vetsuisse Faculty, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Roos, M. [Biostatistics, ISPM, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2006-09-15

    Background and purpose: the level of hypoxia in primary tumors has been described to influence response to treatment. The aim of the present study was to investigate the impact of pretreatment oxygen level measurements in spontaneous canine tumors on treatment outcome. Material and methods: data of pretreatment tumor oxygenation status and local tumor response after primary radiation therapy in a group of spontaneously occurring tumors in dogs (n = 52) was collected. Radiation therapy was given with curative (14-17 x 3-3.5 Gy) or palliative intent (3 x 8 Gy or 4-5 x 6 Gy). Progression-free interval and overall survival were correlated to polarographically measured tumor oxygenation status. Results: in the curatively irradiated group, tumors with median p0{sub 2} values {<=} 10 mmHg tended to have shorter median progression-free interval compared to better oxygenated tumors (246 vs. 739 days). The same trend could be shown for overall survival (330 vs. 745 days), indicating a cutoff value in this region. In the group treated with lower doses of radiation, the level of oxygen was no longer found to be of prognostic value; however, in this group hemoglobin had a significant impact on outcome. Conclusion: in curatively irradiated spontaneous canine tumors, tumor hypoxia was found to be a prognostic indicator, independent of tumor histologies and volume. (orig.)

  1. A novel magnetic resonance imaging segmentation technique for determining diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma tumor volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ranjodh; Zhou, Zhiping; Tisnado, Jamie; Haque, Sofia; Peck, Kyung K; Young, Robert J; Tsiouris, Apostolos John; Thakur, Sunitha B; Souweidane, Mark M

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Accurately determining diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG) tumor volume is clinically important. The aims of the current study were to 1) measure DIPG volumes using methods that require different degrees of subjective judgment; and 2) evaluate interobserver agreement of measurements made using these methods. METHODS Eight patients from a Phase I clinical trial testing convection-enhanced delivery (CED) of a therapeutic antibody were included in the study. Pre-CED, post-radiation therapy axial T2-weighted images were analyzed using 2 methods requiring high degrees of subjective judgment (picture archiving and communication system [PACS] polygon and Volume Viewer auto-contour methods) and 1 method requiring a low degree of subjective judgment (k-means clustering segmentation) to determine tumor volumes. Lin's concordance correlation coefficients (CCCs) were calculated to assess interobserver agreement. RESULTS The CCCs of measurements made by 2 observers with the PACS polygon and the Volume Viewer auto-contour methods were 0.9465 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.8472) and 0.7514 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.3143), respectively. Both were considered poor agreement. The CCC of measurements made using k-means clustering segmentation was 0.9938 (lower 1-sided 95% confidence limit 0.9772), which was considered substantial strength of agreement. CONCLUSIONS The poor interobserver agreement of PACS polygon and Volume Viewer auto-contour methods highlighted the difficulty in consistently measuring DIPG tumor volumes using methods requiring high degrees of subjective judgment. k-means clustering segmentation, which requires a low degree of subjective judgment, showed better interobserver agreement and produced tumor volumes with delineated borders.

  2. Tumor volume in subcutaneous mouse xenografts measured by microCT is more accurate and reproducible than determined by 18F-FDG-microPET or external caliper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Mette Munk; Jørgensen, Jesper Tranekjaer; Binderup, Tina

    2008-01-01

    and reproducible measures of tumor size in mice compared with caliper measurements. Furthermore, we evaluated the accuracy of tumor volume determined from 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET. METHODS: Subcutaneously implanted human breast adenocarcinoma cells in NMRI nude mice served as tumor model. Tumor volume......BACKGROUND: In animal studies tumor size is used to assess responses to anticancer therapy. Current standard for volumetric measurement of xenografted tumors is by external caliper, a method often affected by error. The aim of the present study was to evaluate if microCT gives more accurate...... (n = 20) was determined in vivo by external caliper, microCT and 18F-FDG-PET and subsequently reference volume was determined ex vivo. Intra-observer reproducibility of the microCT and caliper methods were determined by acquiring 10 repeated volume measurements. Volumes of a group of tumors (n = 10...

  3. Journal of Financial Therapy Editorial, Volume 4, Issue 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristy L. Archuleta

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This is the editorial for Volume 4, Issue 2, featuring the 2013 Financial Therapy Association membership profile, articles on narrative financial therapy and Hoarding Disorder, two professional financial therapy profiles, and a book review.

  4. Modeling the Interplay Between Tumor Volume Regression and Oxygenation in Uterine Cervical Cancer During Radiotherapy Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belfatto, Antonella; Riboldi, Marco; Ciardo, Delia; Cattani, Federica; Cecconi, Agnese; Lazzari, Roberta; Jereczek-Fossa, Barbara Alicja; Orecchia, Roberto; Baroni, Guido; Cerveri, Pietro

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a patient-specific mathematical model to predict the evolution of uterine cervical tumors at a macroscopic scale, during fractionated external radiotherapy. The model provides estimates of tumor regrowth and dead-cell reabsorption, incorporating the interplay between tumor regression rate and radiosensitivity, as a function of the tumor oxygenation level. Model parameters were estimated by minimizing the difference between predicted and measured tumor volumes, these latter being obtained from a set of 154 serial cone-beam computed tomography scans acquired on 16 patients along the course of the therapy. The model stratified patients according to two different estimated dynamics of dead-cell removal and to the predicted initial value of the tumor oxygenation. The comparison with a simpler model demonstrated an improvement in fitting properties of this approach (fitting error average value <5%, p < 0.01), especially in case of tumor late responses, which can hardly be handled by models entailing a constant radiosensitivity, failing to model changes from initial severe hypoxia to aerobic conditions during the treatment course. The model predictive capabilities suggest the need of clustering patients accounting for cancer cell line, tumor staging, as well as microenvironment conditions (e.g., oxygenation level).

  5. Therapeutic Impact of Nanoparticle Therapy Targeting Tumor Associate Macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penn, Courtney; Yang, Kun; Zong, Hong; Lim, Jae-Young; Cole, Alex; Yang, Dongli; Baker, James; Goonewardena, Sascha N; Buckanovich, Ronald J

    2017-11-13

    Antiangiogenic therapies, despite initial encouragement, have demonstrated a limited benefit in ovarian cancer. Laboratory studies suggest anti-angiogenic therapy induced hypoxia can induce tumor "stemness' as resistance to antiangiogenic therapy develops and limits the therapeutic benefit. Resistance to antiangiogenic therapy and an induction of tumor stemness may be mediated by proangiogenic tumor associated macrophages (TAMs). As such TAMs have been proposed as a therapeutic target. We demonstrate here that ovarian TAMs express high levels of the folate receptor-2 (FOLR2) and can be selectively targeted using G5-dendrimer nanoparticles using methotrexate as both a ligand and a toxin. G5-methotrexate (G5-MTX) Nps deplete tumor associated macrophages in both solid tumor and ascites models of ovarian cancer. As a therapeutic these nanoparticles are more effective than cisplatin. Importantly, these nanoparticles could (i) overcome resistance to anti-angiogenic therapy, (ii) prevent antiangiogenic therapy induced increases in cancer stem-like cells in both murine and human tumor cell models, and (iii) prevent anti-angiogenic therapy induced increases in VEGF-C (iv) prevent anti-angiogenic therapy induce BRCA1 gene expression. Combine this work strongly supports the development of TAM targeted nanoparticle therapy. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Patients With Brain Tumors: Who Receives Postacute Occupational Therapy Services?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Vincy; Xiong, Chen; Colantonio, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Data on the utilization of occupational therapy among patients with brain tumors have been limited to those with malignant tumors and small samples of patients outside North America in specialized palliative care settings. We built on this research by examining the characteristics of patients with brain tumors who received postacute occupational therapy services in Ontario, Canada, using health care administrative data. Between fiscal years 2004-2005 and 2008-2009, 3,199 patients with brain tumors received occupational therapy services in the home care setting after hospital discharge; 12.4% had benign brain tumors, 78.2% had malignant brain tumors, and 9.4% had unspecified brain tumors. However, patients with benign brain tumors were older (mean age=63.3 yr), and a higher percentage were female (65.2%). More than 90% of patients received in-home occupational therapy services. Additional research is needed to examine the significance of these differences and to identify factors that influence access to occupational therapy services in the home care setting. Copyright © 2015 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

  7. Ozone Therapy for Tumor Oxygenation: a Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardino Clavo

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor hypoxia is an adverse factor for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Ozone therapy is a non-conventional form of medicine that has been used successfully in the treatment of ischemic disorders. This prospective study was designed to assess the effect of ozone therapy on tumor oxygenation. Eighteen subjects were recruited for the study. Systemic ozone therapy was administered by autohemotransfusion on three alternate days over one week. Tumor oxygenation levels were measured using polarographic needle probes before and after the first and the third ozone therapy session. Overall, no statistically significant change was observed in the tumor oxygenation in the 18 patients. However, a significant decrease was observed in hypoxic values ≤10 and ≤5 mmHg of pO2. When individually assessed, a significant and inverse non-linear correlation was observed between increase in oxygenation and the initial tumor pO2 values at each measuring time-point, thus indicating that the more poorly-oxygenated tumors benefited most (rho = −0.725; P = 0.001. Additionally, the effect of ozone therapy was found to be lower in patients with higher hemoglobin concentrations (rho = −0.531; P < 0.034. Despite being administered over a very short period, ozone therapy improved oxygenation in the most hypoxic tumors. Ozone therapy as adjuvant in chemo-radiotherapy warrants further research.

  8. Ozone Therapy for Tumor Oxygenation: a Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Tumor hypoxia is an adverse factor for chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Ozone therapy is a non-conventional form of medicine that has been used successfully in the treatment of ischemic disorders. This prospective study was designed to assess the effect of ozone therapy on tumor oxygenation. Eighteen subjects were recruited for the study. Systemic ozone therapy was administered by autohemotransfusion on three alternate days over one week. Tumor oxygenation levels were measured using polarographic needle probes before and after the first and the third ozone therapy session. Overall, no statistically significant change was observed in the tumor oxygenation in the 18 patients. However, a significant decrease was observed in hypoxic values ≤10 and ≤5 mmHg of pO2. When individually assessed, a significant and inverse non-linear correlation was observed between increase in oxygenation and the initial tumor pO2 values at each measuring time-point, thus indicating that the more poorly-oxygenated tumors benefited most (rho = −0.725; P = 0.001). Additionally, the effect of ozone therapy was found to be lower in patients with higher hemoglobin concentrations (rho = −0.531; P ozone therapy improved oxygenation in the most hypoxic tumors. Ozone therapy as adjuvant in chemo-radiotherapy warrants further research. PMID:15257330

  9. Applications of nanotechnology to imaging and therapy of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohs, Aaron M; Provenzale, James M

    2010-08-01

    In the past decade, numerous advances in the understanding of brain tumor physiology, tumor imaging, and tumor therapy have been attained. In some cases, these advances have resulted from refinements of pre-existing technologies (eg, improvements of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging). In other instances, advances have resulted from development of novel technologies. The development of nanomedicine (ie, applications of nanotechnology to the field of medicine) is an example of the latter. In this review, the authors explain the principles that underlay nanoparticle design and function as well as the means by which nanoparticles can be used for imaging and therapy of brain tumors. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Target volumes in gastric cancer radiation therapy; Les volumes-cibles de la radiotherapie des adenocarcinomes gastriques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caudry, M.; Maire, J.P. [Hopital Saint Andre, Service de Cancerologie, 33 - Bordeaux (France); Ratoanina, J.L.; Escarmant, P. [Hopital Clarac, Service de Radiotherapie et de Cancerologie, 97 - Fort de France (France)

    2001-10-01

    The spread of gastric adenocarcinoma may follow three main patterns: hemato-genic, lymphatic and intraperitoneal. A GTV should be considered in preoperative or exclusive radiation therapy. After non-radical surgery, a 'residual GTV' will be defined with the help of the surgeon. The CTV encompasses three intricated volumes. a) A 'tumor bed' volume. After radical surgery, local recurrences appear as frequent as distant metastases. The risk depends upon the depth of parietal invasion and the nodal status. Parietal infiltration may extend beyond macroscopic limits of the tumor, especially in dinitis plastica. Therefore this volume will include: the tumor and the remaining stomach or their 'bed of resection', a part of the transverse colon, the duodenum, the pancreas and the troncus of the portal vein. In postoperative RT, this CTV also includes the jejuno-gastric or jejuno-esophageal anastomosis. b) A peritoneal volume. For practical purposes, two degrees of spread must be considered: (1) contiguous microscopic extension from deeply invasive T3 and T4 tumors, that remain amenable to local sterilization with doses of 45-50 Gy, delivered in a CTV including the peritoneal cavity at the level of the gastric bed, and under the parietal incision; (2) true 'peritoneal carcinomatosis', with widespread seeds, where chemotherapy (systemic or intraperitoneal) is more appropriate. c) A lymphatic volume including the lymph node groups 1 to 16 of the Japanese classification. This volume must encompass the hepatic pedicle and the splenic hilum. In proximal tumors, it is possible to restrict the lover part of the CTV to the lymphatic volume, and therefore to avoid irradiation of large intestinal and renal volumes. In distal and proximal tumors, involvement of resection margins is of poor prognosis -a radiation boost must be delivered at this level. The CTV in tumors of the cardia should encompass the lover part of the thoracic esophagus and the

  11. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth, E-mail: ganss@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth 6000 (Australia)

    2012-03-27

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Liposomal cancer therapy: exploiting tumor characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2010-01-01

    the reader will gain: The review focuses on strategies that exploit characteristic features of solid tumors, such as abnormal vasculature, overexpression of receptors and enzymes, as well as acidic and thiolytic characteristics of the tumor microenvironment. Take home message: It is concluded that the design...... of new liposomal drug delivery systems that better exploit tumor characteristic features is likely to result in more efficacious cancer treatments....

  13. Towards a Novel Approach for Tumor Volume Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amina Kharbach

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In medical image processing, evaluating the variations of lesion volume plays a major role in many medical applications. It helps radiologists to follow-up with patients and examine the effects of therapy. Several approaches have been proposed to meet with medical expectations. The present work comes within this context. We present a new approach based on the local dissimilarity volume (LDV that is a 3D representation of the local dissimilarity map (LDM. This map presents a useful means to compare two images, offering a localization of information. We proved the effectiveness of this method (LDV compared to medical techniques used by radiologists. The result of simulations shows that we can quantify lesion volume by using the LDV method, which is an efficient way to calculate and localize the volume variation of anomalies. It allowed a time savings with the compete satisfaction of an expert during the medical treatment.

  14. Automatic estimation of extent of resection and residual tumor volume of patients with glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Raphael; Porz, Nicole; Knecht, Urspeter; Loosli, Tina; Schucht, Philippe; Beck, Jürgen; Slotboom, Johannes; Wiest, Roland; Reyes, Mauricio

    2017-10-01

    OBJECTIVE In the treatment of glioblastoma, residual tumor burden is the only prognostic factor that can be actively influenced by therapy. Therefore, an accurate, reproducible, and objective measurement of residual tumor burden is necessary. This study aimed to evaluate the use of a fully automatic segmentation method-brain tumor image analysis (BraTumIA)-for estimating the extent of resection (EOR) and residual tumor volume (RTV) of contrast-enhancing tumor after surgery. METHODS The imaging data of 19 patients who underwent primary resection of histologically confirmed supratentorial glioblastoma were retrospectively reviewed. Contrast-enhancing tumors apparent on structural preoperative and immediate postoperative MR imaging in this patient cohort were segmented by 4 different raters and the automatic segmentation BraTumIA software. The manual and automatic results were quantitatively compared. RESULTS First, the interrater variabilities in the estimates of EOR and RTV were assessed for all human raters. Interrater agreement in terms of the coefficient of concordance (W) was higher for RTV (W = 0.812; p automatic estimates. BraTumIA showed a tendency to overestimate contrast-enhancing tumors, leading to moderate agreement with expert raters with respect to the literature-based, survival-relevant threshold values for EOR. CONCLUSIONS BraTumIA can generate volumetric estimates of EOR and RTV, in a fully automatic fashion, which are comparable to the estimates of human experts. However, automated analysis showed a tendency to overestimate the volume of a contrast-enhancing tumor, whereas manual analysis is prone to subjectivity, thereby causing considerable interrater variability.

  15. Immune microenvironments in solid tumors: new targets for therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Ganesan, A. Preethi; Rugo, Hope S; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2011-01-01

    In this timely review, Coussens and colleagues delve into the current landscape of tumor inflammation. They survey the current literature on cancer-associated immune microenvironments and assess the effects of various types of immune cells—from both the adaptive and immune arms—on tumor growth. This review further discusses the immune-based mechanisms that regulate the response to conventional cytotoxic therapy and evaluates combinational strategies for cancer therapy that combine cytotoxins ...

  16. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Bressy

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic virus (OV therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53 or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73 were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  17. Combining Oncolytic Virotherapy with p53 Tumor Suppressor Gene Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z

    2017-06-16

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of generating more potent OVs that function synergistically with host immunity and/or other therapies to reduce or eliminate tumor burden. Such transgenes have proven effective at improving OV therapies, and basic research has shown mechanisms of p53-mediated enhancement of OV therapy, provided optimized p53 transgenes, explored drug-OV combinational treatments, and challenged canonical roles for p53 in virus-host interactions and tumor suppression. This review summarizes studies combining p53 gene therapy with replication-competent OV therapy, reviews preclinical and clinical studies with replication-deficient gene therapy vectors expressing p53 transgene, examines how wild-type p53 and p53 modifications affect OV replication and anti-tumor effects of OV therapy, and explores future directions for rational design of OV therapy combined with p53 gene therapy.

  18. Oxygenation of spontaneous canine tumors during fractionated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Achermann, R.E.; Ohlerth, S.M.; Bley, C.R.; Inteeworn, N.; Schaerz, M.; Wergin, M.C.; Kaser-Hotz, B. [Section of Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Oncology, Veterinary School, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Gassmann, M. [Inst. for Veterinary Physiology, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Roos, M. [Inst. for Social and Preventive Medicine, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2004-05-01

    Background and purpose: tumor oxygenation predicts treatment outcome, and reoxygenation is considered important in the efficacy of fractionated radiation therapy. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to document the changes of the oxygenation status in spontaneous canine tumors during fractionated radiation therapy using polarographic needle electrodes. Material and methods: tumor oxygen partial pressure (pO{sub 2}) measurements were performed with the eppendorf-pO{sub 2}-Histograph. The measurements were done under general anesthesia, and probe tracks were guided with ultrasound. pO{sub 2} was measured before radiation therapy in all dogs. In patients treated with curative intent, measurements were done sequentially up to eight times (total dose: 45-59.5 Gy). Oxygenation status of the palliative patient group was examined before each fraction of radiation therapy up to five times (total dose: 24-30 Gy). Results: 15/26 tumors had a pretreatment median pO{sub 2} {<=} 10 mmHg. The pO{sub 2} values appeared to be quite variable in individual tumors during fractionated radiation therapy. The pO{sub 2} of initially hypoxic tumors (pretreatment median pO{sub 2} {<=} 10 mmHg) remained unchanged during fractionated radiotherapy, whereas in initially normoxic tumors the pO{sub 2} decreased. Conclusion: hypoxia is common in spontaneous canine tumors, as 57.7% of the recorded values were {>=} 10 mmHg. The data of this study showed that initially hypoxic tumors remained hypoxic, whereas normoxic tumors became more hypoxic. (orig.)

  19. Improving cancer therapies by targeting the physical and chemical hallmarks of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, Jill W; Bonakdar, Mohammad; Kanitkar, Akanksha; Davalos, Rafael V; Verbridge, Scott S

    2016-09-28

    Tumors are highly heterogeneous at the patient, tissue, cellular, and molecular levels. This multi-scale heterogeneity poses significant challenges for effective therapies, which ideally must not only distinguish between tumorous and healthy tissue, but also fully address the wide variety of tumorous sub-clones. Commonly used therapies either leverage a biological phenotype of cancer cells (e.g. high rate of proliferation) or indiscriminately kill all the cells present in a targeted volume. Tumor microenvironment (TME) targeting represents a promising therapeutic direction, because a number of TME hallmarks are conserved across different tumor types, despite the underlying genetic heterogeneity. Historically, TME targeting has largely focused on the cells that support tumor growth (e.g. vascular endothelial cells). However, by viewing the intrinsic physical and chemical alterations in the TME as additional therapeutic opportunities rather than barriers, a new class of TME-inspired treatments has great promise to complement or replace existing therapeutic strategies. In this review we summarize the physical and chemical hallmarks of the TME, and discuss how these tumor characteristics either currently are, or may ultimately be targeted to improve cancer therapies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Towards clinical TCR gene therapy: tumor models and receptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.C.M. Straetemans (Trudy)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractDuring the past few decades great progress has been made in the field of cancer immune therapy. There has been increased understanding on strategies tumors use to induce immune tolerance and evade immune responses, which enabled the design of clinical immune therapy trials. Two recent

  1. Targeted toxins in brain tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yan Michael; Hall, Walter A

    2010-11-01

    Targeted toxins, also known as immunotoxins or cytotoxins, are recombinant molecules that specifically bind to cell surface receptors that are overexpressed in cancer and the toxin component kills the cell. These recombinant proteins consist of a specific antibody or ligand coupled to a protein toxin. The targeted toxins bind to a surface antigen or receptor overexpressed in tumors, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor or interleukin-13 receptor. The toxin part of the molecule in all clinically used toxins is modified from bacterial or plant toxins, fused to an antibody or carrier ligand. Targeted toxins are very effective against cancer cells resistant to radiation and chemotherapy. They are far more potent than any known chemotherapy drug. Targeted toxins have shown an acceptable profile of toxicity and safety in early clinical studies and have demonstrated evidence of a tumor response. Currently, clinical trials with some targeted toxins are complete and the final results are pending. This review summarizes the characteristics of targeted toxins and the key findings of the important clinical studies with targeted toxins in malignant brain tumor patients. Obstacles to successful treatment of malignant brain tumors include poor penetration into tumor masses, the immune response to the toxin component and cancer heterogeneity. Strategies to overcome these limitations are being pursued in the current generation of targeted toxins.

  2. Tumor Stiffening, a Key Determinant of Tumor Progression, is Reversed by Nanomaterial-Induced Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marangon, Iris; Silva, Amanda A K; Guilbert, Thomas; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Marchiol, Carmen; Natkhunarajah, Sharuja; Chamming's, Foucault; Ménard-Moyon, Cécilia; Bianco, Alberto; Gennisson, Jean-Luc; Renault, Gilles; Gazeau, Florence

    2017-01-01

    Tumor stiffening, stemming from aberrant production and organization of extracellular matrix (ECM), has been considered a predictive marker of tumor malignancy, non-invasively assessed by ultrasound shear wave elastography (SWE). Being more than a passive marker, tumor stiffening restricts the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents to the tumor and per se could modulate cellular mechano-signaling, tissue inflammation and tumor progression. Current strategies to modify the tumor extracellular matrix are based on ECM-targeting chemical agents but also showed deleterious systemic effects. On-demand excitable nanomaterials have shown their ability to perturb the tumor microenvironment in a spatiotemporal-controlled manner and synergistically with chemotherapy. Here, we investigated the evolution of tumor stiffness as well as tumor integrity and progression, under the effect of mild hyperthermia and thermal ablation generated by light-exposed multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in an epidermoid carcinoma mouse xenograft. SWE was used for real-time mapping of the tumor stiffness, both during the two near infrared irradiation sessions and over the days after the treatment. We observed a transient and reversible stiffening of the tumor tissue during laser irradiation, which was lowered at the second session of mild hyperthermia or photoablation. In contrast, over the days following photothermal treatment, the treated tumors exhibited a significant softening together with volume reduction, whereas non-treated growing tumors showed an increase of tumor rigidity. The organization of the collagen matrix and the distribution of CNTs revealed a spatio-temporal correlation between the presence of nanoheaters and the damages on collagen and cells. This study highlights nanohyperthermia as a promising adjuvant strategy to reverse tumor stiffening and normalize the mechanical tumor environment.

  3. Modulation of the tumor vasculature and oxygenation to improve therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siemann, Dietmar W; Horsman, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment is increasingly recognized as a major factor influencing the success of therapeutic treatments and has become a key focus for cancer research. The progressive growth of a tumor results in an inability of normal tissue blood vessels to oxygenate and provide sufficient......, and extracellular molecules which together are essential for the initiation, progression and spread of tumor cells. The physical conditions that arise are imposing and manifold, and include elevated interstitial pressure, localized extracellular acidity, and regions of oxygen and nutrient deprivation. No less...... that create a significant hindrance to the control of cancers by conventional anticancer therapies. However, the aberrant nature of the tumor microenvironments also offers unique therapeutic opportunities. Particularly interventions that seek to improve tumor physiology and alleviate tumor hypoxia...

  4. Contributions of nuclear medicine to the therapy of malignant tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feinendegen, L.E. (Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Medizin Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik)

    1991-11-01

    The diagnostic and therapeutic application of radionuclides on oncology has led to an increased efficiency in the treatment of malignant tumors. - Regarding diagnosis, measuring metabolic reactions in tumor tissue, especially by positron emission tomography, opened the potential for assaying tumor response to different treatment modalities and thus eventually for tailoring effective treatment of a given tumor in the individual patient. - Regarding treatment, attention is given to the choice of the radionuclide for optimal deposition of the desired radiation in tumor cells avoiding exposure of normal cells; in this context microdosimetric considerations are essential with respect to {beta}-emitters, {alpha}-emitters, the Auger-effect and neutron capture therapy. Examples of therapeutic uses of radionuclides in the inorganic form are 131-I for thyroid cancer and 32-P for polycythemia vera; organically bound radionuclides are employed with precursors for tumor cell metabolism or with receptor seeking agents, such as MIBG and monoclonal antibodies which presently enjoy a particular interest and bear great promise. Stable nuclides, if property accumulated within tumors, may be activated for therapy in situ, for example by thermal neutrons, as in neutron capture therapy using the 10-B (n, {alpha})7-Li reaction. - Treatment planning and execution with radionuclides have gained momentum over the past decade, yet much more needs to be done. (orig.).

  5. EPR oximetry of tumors in vivo in cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šentjurc, Marjeta; Čemažar, Maja; Serša, Gregor

    2004-05-01

    The partial oxygen pressure ( pO 2) in tumors is considered to be one of important factors that affect the response of tumors to different treatment. Therefore, we anticipate that the information about the variation of oxygen concentration in tumors can be used as a guide for individualizing radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and especially the combined therapies. There is thus a need to obtain quantitative data on the effects of different therapies on tumor oxygenation under in vivo conditions. One of the methods, which enable these measurements is EPR oximetry. In this work basic principles of the method will be described as well as some examples of tumor oxygenation changes after application of chemotherapeutic drugs (vinblastine, cisplatin, bleomycin) or electric pulses in combination with cisplatin or bleomycin to fibrosarcoma SA-1 tumors in mice. A paramagnetic probe, a char of Bubinga tree, was implanted into the tumor (center and periphery) and in the muscle or subcutis. EPR spectra line-width, which is proportional to oxygen concentration, was measured with time after the treatments. Tumor oxygenation was reduced for 58% of pretreatment value 1 h after intraperitoneal injection of 2.5 mg kg -1 VLB and returned to pretreatment level within 24 h. Reduction in oxygenation of muscle and subcutis was much smaller and returned to pretreatment value faster as in tumors. With cisplatin (4 mg kg -1) and bleomicyn (1 mg kg -1) the reduction was less than 15%, but increases in combined therapy to 70%. Similar reduction was observed also with electric pulses alone (eight pulses, 1300 V cm -1, 100 μs, 1 Hz) with fast recovery of 8 h. After electrochemotherapy the recovery was slower and occurs only after 48 h. This study demonstrates that EPR oximetry is a sensitive method for monitoring changes in tissue oxygenation after different treatments, which may have implications in controlling side effects of therapy and in the planning of combined treatments.

  6. A stochastic model for tumor geometry evolution during radiation therapy in cervical cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yifang; Lee, Chi-Guhn [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8 (Canada); Chan, Timothy C. Y., E-mail: tcychan@mie.utoronto.ca [Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering, University of Toronto, 5 King' s College Road, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G8, Canada and Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada); Cho, Young-Bin [Department of Radiation Physics, Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, 610 University of Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9, Canada and Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Islam, Mohammad K. [Department of Radiation Physics, Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, 610 University of Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5T 2M9 (Canada); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, 148-150 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3S2 (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, 124-100 College Street, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1P5 (Canada)

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: To develop mathematical models to predict the evolution of tumor geometry in cervical cancer undergoing radiation therapy. Methods: The authors develop two mathematical models to estimate tumor geometry change: a Markov model and an isomorphic shrinkage model. The Markov model describes tumor evolution by investigating the change in state (either tumor or nontumor) of voxels on the tumor surface. It assumes that the evolution follows a Markov process. Transition probabilities are obtained using maximum likelihood estimation and depend on the states of neighboring voxels. The isomorphic shrinkage model describes tumor shrinkage or growth in terms of layers of voxels on the tumor surface, instead of modeling individual voxels. The two proposed models were applied to data from 29 cervical cancer patients treated at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and then compared to a constant volume approach. Model performance was measured using sensitivity and specificity. Results: The Markov model outperformed both the isomorphic shrinkage and constant volume models in terms of the trade-off between sensitivity (target coverage) and specificity (normal tissue sparing). Generally, the Markov model achieved a few percentage points in improvement in either sensitivity or specificity compared to the other models. The isomorphic shrinkage model was comparable to the Markov approach under certain parameter settings. Convex tumor shapes were easier to predict. Conclusions: By modeling tumor geometry change at the voxel level using a probabilistic model, improvements in target coverage and normal tissue sparing are possible. Our Markov model is flexible and has tunable parameters to adjust model performance to meet a range of criteria. Such a model may support the development of an adaptive paradigm for radiation therapy of cervical cancer.

  7. A stochastic model for tumor geometry evolution during radiation therapy in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifang; Chan, Timothy C Y; Lee, Chi-Guhn; Cho, Young-Bin; Islam, Mohammad K

    2014-02-01

    To develop mathematical models to predict the evolution of tumor geometry in cervical cancer undergoing radiation therapy. The authors develop two mathematical models to estimate tumor geometry change: a Markov model and an isomorphic shrinkage model. The Markov model describes tumor evolution by investigating the change in state (either tumor or nontumor) of voxels on the tumor surface. It assumes that the evolution follows a Markov process. Transition probabilities are obtained using maximum likelihood estimation and depend on the states of neighboring voxels. The isomorphic shrinkage model describes tumor shrinkage or growth in terms of layers of voxels on the tumor surface, instead of modeling individual voxels. The two proposed models were applied to data from 29 cervical cancer patients treated at Princess Margaret Cancer Centre and then compared to a constant volume approach. Model performance was measured using sensitivity and specificity. The Markov model outperformed both the isomorphic shrinkage and constant volume models in terms of the trade-off between sensitivity (target coverage) and specificity (normal tissue sparing). Generally, the Markov model achieved a few percentage points in improvement in either sensitivity or specificity compared to the other models. The isomorphic shrinkage model was comparable to the Markov approach under certain parameter settings. Convex tumor shapes were easier to predict. By modeling tumor geometry change at the voxel level using a probabilistic model, improvements in target coverage and normal tissue sparing are possible. Our Markov model is flexible and has tunable parameters to adjust model performance to meet a range of criteria. Such a model may support the development of an adaptive paradigm for radiation therapy of cervical cancer.

  8. Technological progress in radiation therapy for brain tumors

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vernimmen, Frederik Jozef

    2014-01-01

    To achieve a good therapeutic ratio the radiation dose to the tumor should be as high as possible with the lowest possible dose to the surrounding normal tissue. This is especially the case for brain tumors. Technological ad- vancements in diagnostic imaging, dose calculations, and radiation delivery systems, combined with a better un- derstanding of the pathophysiology of brain tumors have led to improvements in the therapeutic results. The widely used technology of delivering 3-D conformal therapy with photon beams (gamma rays) produced by Li-near Accelerators has progressed into the use of Intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Particle beams have been used for several decades for radiotherapy because of their favorable depth dose characteristics. The introduction of clinically dedicated proton beam therapy facilities has improved the access for cancer patients to this treatment. Proton therapy is of particular interest for pediatric malignancies. These technical improvements are further enhanced by the evolution in tumor physiology imaging which allows for improved delineation of the tumor. This in turn opens the potential to adjust the radiation dose to maximize the radiobiological effects. The advances in both imaging and radiation therapy delivery will be discussed.

  9. Tumor-penetrating peptide fused to a pro-apoptotic peptide facilitates effective gastric cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ying; Li, Xihan; Sha, Huizi; Zhang, Lianru; Bian, Xinyu; Han, Xiao; Liu, Baorui

    2017-04-01

    KLA (sequence, KLAKLAKKLAKLAK) is a peptide which leads to programmed cell death by disrupting the mitochondrial membrane. However, low penetration in tumors greatly limits its application and efficacy. To develop a KLA-based cancer therapy, KLA-iRGD, a recombinant protein was constructed. It consists of the KLA peptide and iRGD (CRGDKGPDC), a tumor-homing peptide with high penetration into tumor tissue and cells. The conjugated KLA exhibits pro-apoptotic activity to prevent the growth of a tumor once it is inside the cell. Once KLA-iRGD is internalized in cultured tumor cells, via the activation of the receptor neuropilin-1, it spreads extensively throughout the mass of the tumor. The recombinant KLA-iRGD protein showed antitumor activity in vivo in mice and in vitro in tumor cell lines. Repeated treatment with KLA-iRGD greatly prevented tumor growth, resulting in a considerable reduction in tumor volume. According to our data, KLA-iRGD may serve as a potential anticancer agent with limited systemic toxicity and high selectivity for the treatment of MKN45 gastric cancer, which may lead to the enhancement of new targeted anticancer agents.

  10. Molecular Imaging Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Spontaneous Nasal Tumors in Canines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradshaw, Tyler J. [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bowen, Stephen R. [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Radiology, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Deveau, Michael A. [Department of Small Animal Clinical Sciences, Texas A& M University, College Station, Texas (United States); Kubicek, Lyndsay [Angell Animal Medical Center, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); White, Pamela [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Bentzen, Søren M. [Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, University of Maryland Greenebaum Cancer Center, and Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Chappell, Richard J. [Department of Biostatistics and Medical Informatics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Forrest, Lisa J. [Department of Surgical Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Jeraj, Robert, E-mail: rjeraj@wisc.edu [Department of Medical Physics, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Human Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Imaging biomarkers of resistance to radiation therapy can inform and guide treatment management. Most studies have so far focused on assessing a single imaging biomarker. The goal of this study was to explore a number of different molecular imaging biomarkers as surrogates of resistance to radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Twenty-two canine patients with spontaneous sinonasal tumors were treated with accelerated hypofractionated radiation therapy, receiving either 10 fractions of 4.2 Gy each or 10 fractions of 5.0 Gy each to the gross tumor volume. Patients underwent fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-, fluorothymidine (FLT)-, and Cu(II)-diacetyl-bis(N4-methylthiosemicarbazone) (Cu-ATSM)-labeled positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging before therapy and FLT and Cu-ATSM PET/CT imaging during therapy. In addition to conventional maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUV{sub max}; SUV{sub mean}) measurements, imaging metrics providing response and spatiotemporal information were extracted for each patient. Progression-free survival was assessed according to response evaluation criteria in solid tumor. The prognostic value of each imaging biomarker was evaluated using univariable Cox proportional hazards regression. Multivariable analysis was also performed but was restricted to 2 predictor variables due to the limited number of patients. The best bivariable model was selected according to pseudo-R{sup 2}. Results: The following variables were significantly associated with poor clinical outcome following radiation therapy according to univariable analysis: tumor volume (P=.011), midtreatment FLT SUV{sub mean} (P=.018), and midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.006). Large decreases in FLT SUV{sub mean} from pretreatment to midtreatment were associated with worse clinical outcome (P=.013). In the bivariable model, the best 2-variable combination for predicting poor outcome was high midtreatment FLT SUV{sub max} (P=.022) in

  11. Radiation immunomodulatory gene tumor therapy of rats with intracerebral glioma tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Bertil R R; Koch, Catrin Bauréus; Grafström, Gustav

    2010-01-01

    Single-fraction radiation therapy with 5 or 15 Gy (60)Co gamma radiation was combined with intraperitoneal injections of syngeneic interferon gamma (IFN-gamma)-transfected cells in rats with intracerebral N29 or N32 glioma tumors at days 7, 21 and 35 after inoculation. For intracerebral N29 tumors......, single-fraction radiation therapy with 5 or 15 Gy had no significant effect on the survival time. Immunization with IFN-gamma-transfected N29 cells significantly increased the survival time by 61%. Single-fraction radiation therapy with 5 Gy combined with immunization increased the survival time...... significantly by 87% and complete remissions by 75% while with 15 Gy the survival time increased 45% with 38% complete remissions. For intracerebral N32 tumors, single-fraction radiation therapy with 15 Gy increased the survival time significantly by 20%. Immunization by itself had no significant effect...

  12. Prognostic role of tumor volume for radiotherapy outcome in patient with T2 laryngeal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, T.; Wygoda, A.; Skladowski, K.; Rutkowski, R.; Maciejewski, B. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Hejduk, B. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Radiodiagnostic; Kolosza, Z. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Centre and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice (Poland). Dept. of Epidemiology

    2013-10-15

    Background and purpose: Tumor volume (TV) is recognized as a prognostic factor of treatment outcome for head and neck tumors but is not routinely included in the treatment decision-making process. The purpose of the study was to define its prognostic role for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. Material and methods: TV of 160 patients who underwent RT between 2002 and 2006 for T2 laryngeal squamous cell carcinoma were reviewed. The tumor was located in the glottis and epiglottis in 82 (51 %) and 78 (49 %) patients, respectively. TV was manually contoured on pretreatment, planning, contrast-enhanced CT scans and the volumetric measurement (cm{sup 3}) was calculated by the volume algorithm. Results: The median TV value was 2.01 cm{sup 3} (range 0.15-21.68 cm{sup 3}). The median TV was significantly lower in patients with glottic tumors (p < 0.0001), N0 (p < 0.001), or well histopatologically differentiated tumors (p = 0.01). A significant correlation between TV, hemoglobin concentration (p < 0.01), and total dose (TD; p < 0.001) was observed. On univariate analyses, TV influenced local control (LC; p = 0.02) and overall survival (OS, p < 0.001). On multivariate analysis, both age (HR 1.038, p = 0.03) and TV (HR = 1.075, p = 0.01) remained significantly related to LC and OS (age: HR 1.038, p = 0.005; TV: HR 1.097, p = 0.0001). Conclusion: Large TV worsen prognosis of patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. A large TV is more common for supraglottic, poorly differentiated tumors and may suggest higher risk of nodal spread. The routine estimation of TV prior to therapy may be essential in order to select the best treatment option for patients with T2 laryngeal cancer. (orig.)

  13. Permeability of Brain Tumor Vessels Induced by Uniform or Spatially Microfractionated Synchrotron Radiation Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Audrey; Potez, Marine; Coquery, Nicolas; Rome, Claire; Lemasson, Benjamin; Bräuer-Krisch, Elke; Rémy, Chantal; Laissue, Jean; Barbier, Emmanuel L; Djonov, Valentin; Serduc, Raphael

    2017-08-01

    To compare the blood-brain barrier permeability changes induced by synchrotron microbeam radiation therapy (MRT, which relies on spatial fractionation of the incident x-ray beam into parallel micron-wide beams) with changes induced by a spatially uniform synchrotron x-ray radiation therapy. Male rats bearing malignant intracranial F98 gliomas were randomized into 3 groups: untreated, exposed to MRT (peak and valley dose: 241 and 10.5 Gy, respectively), or exposed to broad beam irradiation (BB) delivered at comparable doses (ie, equivalent to MRT valley dose); both applied by 2 arrays, intersecting orthogonally the tumor region. Vessel permeability was monitored in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging 1 day before (T-1) and 1, 2, 7, and 14 days after treatment start. To determine whether physiologic parameters influence vascular permeability, we evaluated vessel integrity in the tumor area with different values for cerebral blood flow, blood volume, edema, and tissue oxygenation. Microbeam radiation therapy does not modify the vascular permeability of normal brain tissue. Microbeam radiation therapy-induced increase of tumor vascular permeability was detectable from T2 with a maximum at T7 after exposure, whereas BB enhanced vessel permeability only at T7. At this stage MRT was more efficient at increasing tumor vessel permeability (BB vs untreated: +19.1%; P=.0467; MRT vs untreated: +44.8%; Ptumor than BB. Microbeam radiation therapy-induced increased tumor vascular permeability is: (1) significantly greater; (2) earlier and more prolonged than that induced by BB irradiation, especially in highly proliferative tumor areas; and (3) targets all tumor areas discriminated by physiologic characteristics, including those not damaged by homogeneous irradiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation therapy-associated invasive bladder tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sella, A.; Dexeus, F.H.; Chong, C.; Ro, J.Y.; Logothetis, C.J.

    1989-03-01

    Radiotherapy-associated bladder carcinoma was found in 3.7 percent of 244 cases of advanced urothelial carcinoma. Average age at diagnosis of the bladder tumor was 63.1 years, with a mean of 20.5 years between radiation treatment and diagnosis. All 9 patients presented with gross hematuria. Eight patients had transitional cell carcinoma, 7/8 (87.5%) also had vascular or lymphatic invasion, and 1 was adenocarcinoma. Mean survival was 15.4 months (range 1-40 mos.), with a 55.5 percent one-year disease-free survival after diagnosis. Four patients died of bladder tumor, 4 were alive with no evidence of disease, and 1 was alive with metastasis.

  15. Chemothermal Therapy for Localized Heating and Ablation of Tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Shan Deng

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemothermal therapy is a new hyperthermia treatment on tumor using heat released from exothermic chemical reaction between the injected reactants and the diseased tissues. With the highly minimally invasive feature and localized heating performance, this method is expected to overcome the ubiquitous shortcomings encountered by many existing hyperthermia approaches in ablating irregular tumor. This review provides a relatively comprehensive review on the latest advancements and state of the art in chemothermal therapy. The basic principles and features of two typical chemothermal ablation strategies (acid-base neutralization-reaction-enabled thermal ablation and alkali-metal-enabled thermal/chemical ablation are illustrated. The prospects and possible challenges facing chemothermal ablation are analyzed. The chemothermal therapy is expected to open many clinical possibilities for precise tumor treatment in a minimally invasive way.

  16. Gene therapy with IL-12 induced enhanced anti-tumor activity in fibrosarcoma mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razi Soofiyani, Saiedeh; Kazemi, Tohid; Lotfipour, Farzaneh; Mohammad Hosseini, Akbar; Shanehbandi, Dariush; Hallaj-Nezhadi, Somayeh; Baradaran, Behzad

    2016-12-01

    Context Immunotherapy is among the most promising modalities for treatment of cancer. Recently, interleukin 12 (IL-12) has been used as an immunotherapeutic agent in cancer gene therapy. IL-12 can activate dendritic cells (DCs) and boost anti-tumor immune responses. Objective In the current study, we have investigated if IL-12 gene therapy can lead to the regression of tumor mass in a mouse model of fibrosarcoma. Material and methods To investigate the therapeutic efficacy of IL-12, WEHI-164 tumor cells were transfected with murine-IL12 plasmids using Lipofectamine. Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was used to confirm IL-12 expression in transfected cells. The fibrosarcoma mouse model was established by subcutaneous injection of transfected cells to Balb/C mice. Mice were sacrificed and the tumors were extracted. Tumor sizes were measured by caliper. The expression of IL-12 and IFN-γ was studied with real-time PCR and western blotting. The expression of Ki-67(a tumor proliferation marker) in tumor mass was studied by immunohistochemistry staining. Results and discussion The group treated with IL-12 showed a significant decrease in tumor mass volume (P: 0.000). The results of real-time PCR and western blotting showed that IL-12 and IFN-γ expression increased in the group treated with IL-12 (relative expression of IL-12: 1.9 and relative expression of IFN-γ: 1.766). Immunohistochemistry staining showed that Ki-67 expression was reduced in the group treated with IL-12. Conclusion IL-12 gene therapy successfully led to regress of tumor mass in the fibrosarcoma mouse model. This may serve as a candidate therapeutic approach for treatment of cancer.

  17. Intravitreal bevacizumab combined with plaque brachytherapy reduces melanoma tumor volume and enhances resolution of exudative detachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Houston SK

    2013-01-01

    volume following combined therapy was shown to be reduced by 22.2% at 3 months, 28.9% at 6 months, 39.3% at 12 months, and 52.2% at 24 months (all P < 0.001. All patients tolerated the procedure well without systemic side effects.Conclusion: Intravitreal bevacizumab may be used as an adjuvant agent following plaque brachytherapy. Treated choroidal melanomas show reduction in tumor volume as well as resolution of exudative retinal detachments.Keywords: choroidal melanoma, brachytherapy, Avastin (bevacizumab, retinal detachment

  18. Engineering of magnetic DNA nanoparticles for tumor-targeted therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosseinkhani, Hossein, E-mail: hosseinkhani@yahoo.com [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Chen Yiru [National Yang-Ming University, Department of Biomedical Engineering (China); He Wenjie; Hong Poda [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Taiwan University of Science and Technology (Taiwan Tech) (China); Yu, Dah-Shyong [Nanomedicine Research Center, National Defense Medical Center (China); Domb, Abraham J. [Institute of Drug Research, The Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, School of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine, Hebrew University of Jerusalem (Israel)

    2013-01-15

    This study aims to engineer novel targeted delivery system composed of magnetic DNA nanoparticles to be effective as an efficient targeted gene therapy vehicle for tumor therapy. A polysaccharide, dextran, was chosen as the vector of plasmid DNA-encoded NK4 that acts as an HGF-antagonist and anti-angiogenic regulator for inhibitions of tumor growth, invasion, and metastasis. Spermine (Sm) was chemically introduced to the hydroxyl groups of dextran to obtain dextran-Sm. When Fe{sup 2+} solution was added to the mixture of dextran-Sm and a plasmid DNA, homogenous DNA nanoparticles were formed via chemical metal coordination bonding with average size of 230 nm. Characterization of DNA nanoparticles was performed via dynamic light scattering measurement, electrophoretic light scattering measurement, as well as transmission electron microscope. DNA nanoparticles effectively condensed plasmid DNA into nanoparticles and enhanced the stability of DNA, while significantly improved transfection efficiency in vitro and tumor accumulation in vivo. In addition, magnetic DNA nanoparticles exhibited high efficiency in antitumor therapy with regards to tumor growth as well as survival of animals evaluated in the presence of external magnetic field. We conclude that the magnetic properties of these DNA nanoparticles would enhance the tracking of non-viral gene delivery systems when administrated in vivo in a test model. These findings suggest that DNA nanoparticles effectively deliver DNA to tumor and thereby inhibiting tumor growth.

  19. Transarterial therapies for primary liver tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talenfeld, Adam D; Sista, Akhilesh K; Madoff, David C

    2014-04-01

    Over the last decade, transarterial therapies have gained worldwide acceptance as standard of care for inoperable primary liver cancer. Survival times after transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) continue to improve as the technique and selection criteria are refined. Transarterial treatments, frequently provided in an outpatient setting, are now safely and effectively being applied to patients with even advanced malignancy or partially decompensated cirrhosis. In the coming years, newer transarterial therapies such as radiation segmentectomy, boosted-transarterial radioembolzation, combined TACE-ablation, TACE-portal vein embolization, and transarterial infusion of cancer-specific metabolic inhibitors promise to continue improving survival and quality of life. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Genetic tumor profiling and genetically targeted cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetsch, Cathleen M

    2011-02-01

    To discuss how understanding and manipulation of tumor genetics information and technology shapes cancer care today and what changes might be expected in the near future. Published articles, web resources, clinical practice. Advances in our understanding of genes and their regulation provide a promise of more personalized cancer care, allowing selection of the most safe and effective therapy in an individual situation. Rapid progress in the technology of tumor profiling and targeted cancer therapies challenges nurses to keep up-to-date to provide quality patient education and care. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Epigenetic Therapy for Solid Tumors: Highlighting the Impact of Tumor Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaliny Ramachandran

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, epigenetics has emerged as an exciting new field in development and disease, with a more recent focus towards cancer. Epigenetics has classically referred to heritable patterns of gene expression, primarily mediated through DNA methylation patterns. More recently, it has come to include the reversible chemical modification of histones and DNA that dictate gene expression patterns. Both the epigenetic up-regulation of oncogenes and downregulation of tumor suppressors have been shown to drive tumor development. Current clinical trials for cancer therapy include pharmacological inhibition of DNA methylation and histone deacetylation, with the aim of reversing these cancer-promoting epigenetic changes. However, the DNA methyltransferase and histone deacetylase inhibitors have met with less than promising results in the treatment of solid tumors. Regions of hypoxia are a common occurrence in solid tumors. Tumor hypoxia is associated with increased aggressiveness and therapy resistance, and importantly, hypoxic tumor cells have a distinct epigenetic profile. In this review, we provide a summary of the recent clinical trials using epigenetic drugs in solid tumors, discuss the hypoxia-induced epigenetic changes and highlight the importance of testing the epigenetic drugs for efficacy against the most aggressive hypoxic fraction of the tumor in future preclinical testing.

  2. Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumor: current therapy and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin F. Ginn

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Atypical teratoid rhabdoid tumors (ATRTs are rare central nervous system tumors that comprise approximately 1-2% of all pediatric brain tumors; however, in patients less than three years of age this tumor accounts for up to 20% of cases. ATRT is characterized by loss of the long arm of chromosome 22 which results in loss of the hSNF5/INI-1 gene. INI1, a member of the SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling complex, is important in maintenance of the mitotic spindle and cell cycle control. Overall survival in ATRT is poor with median survival around 17 months. Radiation is an effective component of therapy but is avoided in patients younger than three years of age due to long term neurocognitive sequelae. Most long term survivors undergo radiation therapy as a part of their upfront or salvage therapy, and there is a suggestion that sequencing the radiation earlier in therapy may improve outcome. There is no standard curative chemotherapeutic regimen, but anectdotal reports advocate the use of intensive therapy with alkylating agents, high dose methotrexate, or therapy that includes high dose chemotherapy with stem cell rescue. Due to the rarity of this tumor and the lack of randomized controlled trials it has been challenging to define optimal therapy and advance treatment. Recent laboratory investigations have identified aberrant function and/or regulation of cyclin D1, aurora kinase, and insulin-like growth factor pathways in ATRT. There has been significant interest in identifying and testing therapeutic agents that target these pathways.

  3. Radionuclide tumor therapy with ultrasound contrast microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Wamel, Annemieke; Bouakaz, Ayache; Bernard, Bert; ten Cate, Folkert; de Jong, N.

    2004-01-01

    Radionuclides have shown to be effective in tumour therapy. However, the side effects determine the maximum deliverable dose. Recently, it has been demonstrated that cells can be permeabilised through sonoporation using ultrasound and contrast microbubbles. The use of sonoporation in treatment of

  4. Radiation therapy for metastatic choroidal tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ochiai, Yuko; Sunakawa, Mitsuko (National Kyoto Hospital (Japan)); Hiraoka, Masahiro

    1992-03-01

    We treated 3 eyes in 2 cases of metastatic choroidal malignancy by applying x-ray angled 5deg from a linear accelerator. One case was a 35-year-old female with breast cancer metastasized in both choroids. The second was a 59-year-old male with choroidal metastasis in one eye from malignant lymphoma of the cerebellum. Immediate regression of the tumor followed in all the eyes with resolution of secondary retinal detachment. The treatment was free of complications including cataract or corneal erosion. (author).

  5. Quantitative Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J L Schreurs

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize response to photodynamic therapy (PDT in a mouse cancer model using a multi-parametric quantitative MRI protocol and to identify MR parameters as potential biomarkers for early assessment of treatment outcome.CT26.WT colon carcinoma tumors were grown subcutaneously in the hind limb of BALB/c mice. Therapy consisted of intravenous injection of the photosensitizer Bremachlorin, followed by 10 min laser illumination (200 mW/cm2 of the tumor 6 h post injection. MRI at 7 T was performed at baseline, directly after PDT, as well as at 24 h, and 72 h. Tumor relaxation time constants (T1 and T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were quantified at each time point. Additionally, Gd-DOTA dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI was performed to estimate transfer constants (Ktrans and volume fractions of the extravascular extracellular space (ve using standard Tofts-Kermode tracer kinetic modeling. At the end of the experiment, tumor viability was characterized by histology using NADH-diaphorase staining.The therapy induced extensive cell death in the tumor and resulted in significant reduction in tumor growth, as compared to untreated controls. Tumor T1 and T2 relaxation times remained unchanged up to 24 h, but decreased at 72 h after treatment. Tumor ADC values significantly increased at 24 h and 72 h. DCE-MRI derived tracer kinetic parameters displayed an early response to the treatment. Directly after PDT complete vascular shutdown was observed in large parts of the tumors and reduced uptake (decreased Ktrans in remaining tumor tissue. At 24 h, contrast uptake in most tumors was essentially absent. Out of 5 animals that were monitored for 2 weeks after treatment, 3 had tumor recurrence, in locations that showed strong contrast uptake at 72 h.DCE-MRI is an effective tool for visualization of vascular effects directly after PDT. Endogenous contrast parameters T1, T2, and ADC, measured at 24 to 72 h after PDT, are

  6. Analysis of Lung Tumor Motion in a Large Sample: Patterns and Factors Influencing Precise Delineation of Internal Target Volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knybel, Lukas [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Cvek, Jakub, E-mail: Jakub.cvek@fno.cz [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic); Molenda, Lukas; Stieberova, Natalie; Feltl, David [Department of Oncology, University Hospital Ostrava, Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose/Objective: To evaluate lung tumor motion during respiration and to describe factors affecting the range and variability of motion in patients treated with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Log file analysis from online respiratory tumor tracking was performed in 145 patients. Geometric tumor location in the lungs, tumor volume and origin (primary or metastatic), sex, and tumor motion amplitudes in the superior-inferior (SI), latero-lateral (LL), and anterior-posterior (AP) directions were recorded. Tumor motion variability during treatment was described using intrafraction/interfraction amplitude variability and tumor motion baseline changes. Tumor movement dependent on the tumor volume, position and origin, and sex were evaluated using statistical regression and correlation analysis. Results: After analysis of >500 hours of data, the highest rates of motion amplitudes, intrafraction/interfraction variation, and tumor baseline changes were in the SI direction (6.0 ± 2.2 mm, 2.2 ± 1.8 mm, 1.1 ± 0.9 mm, and −0.1 ± 2.6 mm). The mean motion amplitudes in the lower/upper geometric halves of the lungs were significantly different (P<.001). Motion amplitudes >15 mm were observed only in the lower geometric quarter of the lungs. Higher tumor motion amplitudes generated higher intrafraction variations (R=.86, P<.001). Interfraction variations and baseline changes >3 mm indicated tumors contacting mediastinal structures or parietal pleura. On univariate analysis, neither sex nor tumor origin (primary vs metastatic) was an independent predictive factor of different movement patterns. Metastatic lesions in women, but not men, showed significantly higher mean amplitudes (P=.03) and variability (primary, 2.7 mm; metastatic, 4.9 mm; P=.002) than primary tumors. Conclusion: Online tracking showed significant irregularities in lung tumor movement during respiration. Motion amplitude was significantly lower in upper lobe

  7. Anti-tumor immune response after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Wu, Mei X.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-06-01

    Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due a number of factors including: the acute inflammatory response caused by PDT, release of antigens from PDT-damaged tumor cells, priming of the adaptive immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and induction of heat-shock proteins. The induction of specific CD8+ T-lymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy as it would allow the treatment of tumors that may have already metastasized. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. We have carried out in vivo PDT with a BPD-mediated vascular regimen using a pair of BALB/c mouse colon carcinomas: CT26 wild type expressing the naturally occurring retroviral antigen gp70 and CT26.CL25 additionally expressing beta-galactosidase (b-gal) as a model tumor rejection antigen. PDT of CT26.CL25 cured 100% of tumors but none of the CT26WT tumors (all recurred). Cured CT26.CL25 mice were resistant to rechallenge. Moreover mice with two bilateral CT26.CL25 tumors that had only one treated with PDT demonstrated spontaneous regression of 70% of untreated contralateral tumors. T-lymphocytes were isolated from lymph nodes of PDT cured mice that recognized a particular peptide specific to b-gal antigen. T-lymphocytes from LN were able to kill CT26.CL25 target cells in vitro but not CT26WT cells as shown by a chromium release assay. CT26.CL25 tumors treated with PDT and removed five days later had higher levels of Th1 cytokines than CT26 WT tumors showing a higher level of immune response. When mice bearing CT26WT tumors were treated with a regimen of low dose cyclophosphamide (CY) 2 days before, PDT led to 100% of cures (versus 0% without CY) and resistance to rechallenge. Low dose CY is thought to deplete regulatory T-cells (Treg, CD4+CD25+foxp

  8. Hormone therapy in ovarian granulosa cell tumors: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Meurs, Hannah S.; van Lonkhuijzen, Luc R. C. W.; Limpens, Jacqueline; van der Velden, Jacobus; Buist, Marrije R.

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review assessed the effectiveness of hormone therapy (HT) in patients with a granulosa cell tumor (GCT) of the ovary. Medline (OVID), EMBASE (OVID), the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), prospective trial registers and PubMed (as supplied by publisher-subset)

  9. Interleukin 21 therapy increases the density of tumor infiltrating CD8+ T cells and inhibits the growth of syngeneic tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Henrik; Frederiksen, Klaus S; Thygesen, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Interleukin (IL)-21 is a recently discovered cytokine in early clinical development, which has shown anti-tumor activity in various animal models. In the present study, we examine the anti-tumor activity of IL-21 protein therapy in two syngeneic tumor models and its effect on the density of tumor...

  10. Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Sonodynamic and Photodynamic Therapies in a Colon Carcinoma Tumor Model (CT26

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ameneh Sazgarnia

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Photodynamic therapy is a noninvasive therapeutic method for tumors with a maximum depth of 5 mm. On the other hand, most photosensitizers are also susceptible to ultrasound waves (the basis of sonodynamic therapy. Therefore, it is expected that a combination of the two therapeutic methods will increase effectiveness of photodynamic therapies for lower doses of sensitizer and curing deeper tumors. This study evaluates the synergistic effects of photodynamic and sonodynamic therapies.     Materials and methods: The study was conducted on a colon carcinoma tumor model in Balb/c mice. The colon carcinoma tumors were induced in the mice by subcutaneous injection. Twenty four hours after intraperitoneal injection of Zinc Phthalocyanine liposome as a sensitizer, at first ultrasound irradiation with a known frequency and intensity was performed followed by illumination of the tumor area. Evaluation of the treatment efficacy was done using daily measurement of the tumors and calculation of their relative volumes. Also, all control groups were considered to confirm the effect of each therapeutic option in the study.   Results: In the first ten days post treatment, the relative volumes of all groups decreased significantly in comparison with the main control group, but the best response was observed in the photodynamic or sonodynamic therapy groups. The longest doubling time of tumor size was related to groups under photodynamic, sonodynamic and main therapies, and the shortest belonged to the control group.   Discussion and conclusion: Zinc phthalocyanine liposome is both a photosensitizer and sonsensitizer. Photodynamic and sonodynamic therapies can be efficient in retarding tumor growth rate. In this study, combination of the two methods did not cause improved therapeutic outcomes. It is predicted that this result is related to the choice of therapeutic agents and could be optimized in future.

  11. Exploiting tumor cell senescence in anticancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Minyoung; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2014-01-01

    Cellular senescence is a physiological process of irreversible cell-cycle arrest that contributes to various physiological and pathological processes of aging. Whereas replicative senescence is associated with telomere attrition after repeated cell division, stress-induced premature senescence occurs in response to aberrant oncogenic signaling, oxidative stress, and DNA damage which is independent of telomere dysfunction. Recent evidence indicates that cellular senescence provides a barrier to tumorigenesis and is a determinant of the outcome of cancer treatment. However, the senescence-associated secretory phenotype, which contributes to multiple facets of senescent cancer cells, may influence both cancer-inhibitory and cancer-promoting mechanisms of neighboring cells. Conventional treatments, such as chemo- and radiotherapies, preferentially induce premature senescence instead of apoptosis in the appropriate cellular context. In addition, treatment-induced premature senescence could compensate for resistance to apoptosis via alternative signaling pathways. Therefore, we believe that an intensive effort to understand cancer cell senescence could facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies for improving the efficacy of anticancer therapies. This review summarizes the current understanding of molecular mechanisms, functions, and clinical applications of cellular senescence for anticancer therapy. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(2): 51-59] PMID:24411464

  12. Implementation of image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT for patients with uterine cervix cancer: a tumor volume kinetics approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloisa de Andrade Carvalho

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To evaluate tumor shrinking kinetics in order to implement image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT for the treatment of patients with cervix cancer. Material and methods : This study has prospectively evaluated tumor shrinking kinetics of thirteen patients with uterine cervix cancer treated with combined chemoradiation. Four high dose rate brachytherapy fractions were delivered during the course of pelvic external beam radiation therapy (EBRT. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI exams were acquired at diagnosis (D, first (B1, and third (B3 brachytherapy fractions. Target volumes (GTV and HR-CTV were calculated by both the ellipsoid formula (VE and MRI contouring (VC, which were defined by a consensus between at least two radiation oncologists and a pelvic expert radiologist. Results: Most enrolled patients had squamous cell carcinoma and FIGO stage IIB disease, and initiated brachytherapy after the third week of pelvic external beam radiation. Gross tumor volume volume reduction from diagnostic MRI to B1 represented 61.9% and 75.2% of the initial volume, when measured by VE and VC, respectively. Only a modest volume reduction (15-20% was observed from B1 to B3. Conclusions : The most expressive tumor shrinking occurred in the first three weeks of oncological treatment and was in accordance with gynecological examination. These findings may help in IGBT implementation.

  13. Proton therapy for tumors of the skull base

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munzenrider, J.E.; Liebsch, N.J. [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Harvard Univ. Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    1999-06-01

    Charged particle beams are ideal for treating skull base and cervical spine tumors: dose can be focused in the target, while achieving significant sparing of the brain, brain stem, cervical cord, and optic nerves and chiasm. For skull base tumors, 10-year local control rates with combined proton-photon therapy are highest for chondrosarcomas, intermediate for male chordomas, and lowest for female chordomas (94%, 65%, and 42%, respectively). For cervical spine tumors, 10-year local control rates are not significantly different for chordomas and chondrosarcomas (54% and 48%, respectively), nor is there any difference in local control between males and females. Observed treatment-related morbidity has been judged acceptable, in view of the major morbidity and mortality which accompany uncontrolled tumor growth. (orig.)

  14. Trojan horse at cellular level for tumor gene therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collet, Guillaume; Grillon, Catherine; Nadim, Mahdi; Kieda, Claudine

    2013-08-10

    Among innovative strategies developed for cancer treatments, gene therapies stand of great interest despite their well-known limitations in targeting, delivery, toxicity or stability. The success of any given gene-therapy is highly dependent on the carrier efficiency. New approaches are often revisiting the mythic trojan horse concept to carry therapeutic nucleic acid, i.e. DNAs, RNAs or small interfering RNAs, to pathologic tumor site. Recent investigations are focusing on engineering carrying modalities to overtake the above limitations bringing new promise to cancer patients. This review describes recent advances and perspectives for gene therapies devoted to tumor treatment, taking advantage of available knowledge in biotechnology and medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Pre-treatment amygdala volume predicts electroconvulsive therapy response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Doesschate, Freek; van Eijndhoven, Philip; Tendolkar, Indira; van Wingen, Guido A.; van Waarde, Jeroen A.

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for patients with severe depression. Knowledge on factors predicting therapeutic response may help to identify patients who will benefit most from the intervention. Based on the neuroplasticity hypothesis, volumes of the amygdala and

  16. Target volume delineation and field setup. A practical guide for conformal and intensity-modulated radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Nancy Y. [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States). Radiation Oncology; Lu, Jiade J. (eds.) [National Univ. Health System, Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; National Univ. of Singapore (Singapore). Dept. of Medicine

    2013-03-01

    Practical handbook on selection and delineation of tumor volumes and fields for conformal radiation therapy, including IMRT. Helpful format facilitating use on a step-by-step basis in daily practice. Designed to ensure accurate coverage of commonly encountered tumors along their routes of spread. This handbook is designed to enable radiation oncologists to appropriately and confidently delineate tumor volumes/fields for conformal radiation therapy, including intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), in patients with commonly encountered cancers. The orientation of this handbook is entirely practical, in that the focus is on the illustration of clinical target volume (CTV) delineation for each major malignancy. Each chapter provides guidelines and concise knowledge on CTV selection for a particular disease, explains how the anatomy of lymphatic drainage shapes the selection of the target volume, and presents detailed illustrations of volumes, slice by slice, on planning CT images. While the emphasis is on target volume delineation for three-dimensional conformal therapy and IMRT, information is also provided on conventional radiation therapy field setup and planning for certain malignancies for which IMRT is not currently suitable.

  17. Post-Radiation Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, James D; La, Trang H.; Chu, Karen; Quon, Andrew; Fischbein, Nancy J.; Maxim, Peter G.; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To explore the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on post-radiation 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) imaging in head-and-neck cancer patients. Methods and Materials Forty-seven head-and-neck cancer patients who received pre- and post-treatment PET/CT imaging along with definitive chemoradiotherapy were included in this study. PET/CT parameters evaluated include the maximum standardized uptake value, metabolic tumor volume (MTV2.0-MTV4.0; where MTV2.0 refers to the volume above an SUV threshold of 2.0), and integrated tumor volume. Kaplan-Meier and Cox-regression models were used to test for association between PET endpoints and disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Multiple post-radiation PET endpoints correlated significantly with outcome, however the most robust predictor of disease progression and death was MTV2.0. An increase in MTV2.0 of 21cm3 (difference between 75th and 25th percentile) was associated with an increased risk of disease progression (hazard ratio [HR]=2.5, p=0.0001) and death (HR=2.0, p=0.003). In patients with non-nasopharyngeal carcinoma (non-NPC) histology (n=34), MTV2.0<18cm3 and MTV2.0≥18cm3 yielded 2-year DFS rates of 100% and 63%, respectively (p=0.006) and 2-year OS rates of 100% and 81%, respectively (p=0.009). There was no correlation between MTV2.0 and DFS or OS with NPC histology (n=13). On multivariate analysis only post-radiation MTV2.0 was predictive of DFS (HR=2.47, p=0.0001) and OS (HR=1.98, p=0.003). Conclusions Post-radiation metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor in head-and-neck cancer. Biomarkers such as MTV are important for risk stratification, and will be valuable in the future with risk-adapted therapies. PMID:20646870

  18. Adjuvant photodynamic therapy in surgical management of cerebral tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zong-Qian; Wu, Si-En; Zhu, Shu-Gan

    1993-03-01

    We have performed high dose photoradiation therapy in patients with cerebral tumors. Twenty-seven patients had gliomas, two had metastatic cancer of the brain, one had malignant meningioma. Hematoporphyrin derivative was administered intravenously. All patients underwent a craniotomy with a radical or partial excision of the tumor. There was no evidence of increased cerebral edema and other toxicity from the therapy, and all patients were discharged from the hospital within 15 days after surgery. On the basis of animal experiments our institute started using photodynamic therapy (PDT) as an adjuvant measure to the operative therapy in 30 cases of cerebral tumors. Ten of these patients were excluded from this group because of the short postoperative following time. Here, the details of our experiences are presented as follows: 106 of C6 type glioma cell strain were implanted into the frontal lobe of a Chinese hamster. Fourteen days later intracranial gliomas developed, which were larger than 4 mm in diameter, HpD in a dosage of 4 mg/kg was injected into the tail vein of the animals. The fluorescence was seen 5 minutes later. The diagnostic laser used was He-Ca (Hc-type 15A, made at Shanghai Laser Institute) with a wavelength of 441.6 nm, power of 30 mw. The fluorescence reached its peak point 24 hours later, and the normal tissue can be identified by the lack of fluorescence. Then, the tumor tissue was further radiated with an Ar laser (made in Nanjing Electronic Factory, type 360), pumped dye-laser (made in Changchun Optic Machinery Institute, type 901) with a wavelength of 630 nm, and an energy density of more than 200 Joules/cm2, which might get the tumor cells destroyed selectively. The effect of photoradiation may reach as deep as 4 - 7 mm into the brain tissue without cerebral edema or necrosis.

  19. Tumor biology and cancer therapy – an evolving relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lother Ulrike

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The aim of palliative chemotherapy is to increase survival whilst maintaining maximum quality of life for the individual concerned. Although we are still continuing to explore the optimum use of traditional chemotherapy agents, the introduction of targeted therapies has significantly broadened the therapeutic options. Interestingly, the results from current trials put the underlying biological concept often into a new, less favorable perspective. Recent data suggested that altered pathways underlie cancer, and not just altered genes. Thus, an effective therapeutic agent will sometimes have to target downstream parts of a signaling pathway or physiological effects rather than individual genes. In addition, over the past few years increasing evidence has suggested that solid tumors represent a very heterogeneous group of cells with different susceptibility to cancer therapy. Thus, since therapeutic concepts and pathophysiological understanding are continuously evolving a combination of current concepts in tumor therapy and tumor biology is needed. This review aims to present current problems of cancer therapy by highlighting exemplary results from recent clinical trials with colorectal and pancreatic cancer patients and to discuss the current understanding of the underlying reasons.

  20. Tumor Metabolism, the Ketogenic Diet and β-Hydroxybutyrate: Novel Approaches to Adjuvant Brain Tumor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Eric C; Syed, Nelofer; Scheck, Adrienne C

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD). The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma.

  1. Tumor Metabolism, the Ketogenic Diet and β-Hydroxybutyrate: Novel Approaches to Adjuvant Brain Tumor Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolf, Eric C.; Syed, Nelofer; Scheck, Adrienne C.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD). The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate (βHB) in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma. PMID:27899882

  2. Tumor metabolism, the ketogenic diet and β-hydroxybutyrate: novel approaches to adjuvant brain tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C. Woolf

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Malignant brain tumors are devastating despite aggressive treatments such as surgical resection, chemotherapy and radiation therapy. The average life expectancy of patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma is approximately ~18 months. It is clear that increased survival of brain tumor patients requires the design of new therapeutic modalities, especially those that enhance currently available treatments and/or limit tumor growth. One novel therapeutic arena is the metabolic dysregulation that results in an increased need for glucose in tumor cells. This phenomenon suggests that a reduction in tumor growth could be achieved by decreasing glucose availability, which can be accomplished through pharmacological means or through the use of a high-fat, low-carbohydrate ketogenic diet (KD. The KD, as the name implies, also provides increased blood ketones to support the energy needs of normal tissues. Preclinical work from a number of laboratories has shown that the KD does indeed reduce tumor growth in vivo. In addition, the KD has been shown to reduce angiogenesis, inflammation, peri-tumoral edema, migration and invasion. Furthermore, this diet can enhance the activity of radiation and chemotherapy in a mouse model of glioma, thus increasing survival. Additional studies in vitro have indicated that increasing ketones such as β-hydroxybutyrate in the absence of glucose reduction can also inhibit cell growth and potentiate the effects of chemotherapy and radiation. Thus, while we are only beginning to understand the pluripotent mechanisms through which the KD affects tumor growth and response to conventional therapies, the emerging data provide strong support for the use of a KD in the treatment of malignant gliomas. This has led to a limited number of clinical trials investigating the use of a KD in patients with primary and recurrent glioma.

  3. Tumor volume as a prognostic factor for local control and overall survival in advanced larynx cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermans, Adriana J; Lange, Charlotte A H; de Bois, Josien A; van Werkhoven, Erik; Hamming-Vrieze, Olga; Hilgers, Frans J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2016-02-01

    Tumor volume has been postulated to be an important prognostic factor for oncological outcome after radiotherapy or chemoradiotherapy. This postulate was retrospectively investigated in a consecutively treated cohort of T3-T4 larynx cancer patients. Retrospective cohort study. For 166 patients with T3-T4 larynx cancer (1999-2008), pretreatment computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging scans were available for tumor volume delineation. Patients were treated with radiotherapy, chemoradiotherapy, or total laryngectomy with postoperative radiotherapy. Both a dedicated head and neck radiologist and the first author determined all tumor volumes. Statistical analysis was by Kaplan-Meier plots and Cox proportional hazard models. Patients with T3 larynx cancer had significantly smaller tumor volumes than patients with T4 larynx cancer (median = 8.1 cm(3) and 15.8 cm(3), respectively; P < .0001). In the group treated with total laryngectomy and postoperative radiotherapy, no association was found between tumor volume and local or locoregional control or overall survival. In the group treated with radiotherapy, a nonsignificant trend was observed between local control and tumor volume. In the chemoradiotherapy group, however, a significant impact of tumor volume was found on local control (hazard ratio = 1.07; 95% confidence interval = 1.01-1.13; P = .028). Tumor volume was not significantly associated with local control, locoregional control, or overall survival in the surgically treated group. In the group treated with radiotherapy, there was no statistically significant association, but a trend was observed between local control and tumor volume. Only in patients treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy was a significant impact of tumor volume on local control found. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  4. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaleh Barar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. Methods: To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. Results: The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H+ pump V-ATPase resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5 into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. Conclusion: It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors.

  5. Dysregulated pH in Tumor Microenvironment Checkmates Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barar, Jaleh; Omidi, Yadollah

    2013-01-01

    The dysregulation of pH by cancerous cells of solid tumors is able to create a unique milieu that is in favor of progression, invasion and metastasis as well as chemo-/immuno-resistance traits of solid tumors. Bioelements involved in pH dysregulation provide new set of oncotargets, inhibition of which may result in better clinical outcome. To study the impacts of pH dysregulation, we investigated the tumor development and progression in relation with Warburg effect, glycolysis and formation of aberrant tumor microenvironment. The upregulation of glucose transporter GLUT-1 and several enzymes involve in glycolysis exacerbates this phenomenon. The accumulation of lactic acids in cancer cells provokes upregulation of several transport machineries (MCT-1, NHE-1, CA IX and H(+) pump V-ATPase) resulting in reinforced efflux of proton into extracellular fluid. This deviant event makes pH to be settled at 7.4 and 6.6 respectively in cancer cells cytoplasm and extracellular fluid within the tumor microenvironment, which in return triggers secretion of lysosomal components (various enzymes in acidic milieu with pH 5) into cytoplasm. All these anomalous phenomena make tumor microenvironment (TME) to be exposed to cocktail of various enzymes with acidic pH, upon which extracellular matrix (ECM) can be remodeled and even deformed, resulting in emergence of a complex viscose TME with high interstitial fluid pressure. It seems that pH dysregulation is able to remodel various physiologic functions and make solid tumors to become much more invasive and metastatic. It also can cause undesired resistance to chemotherapy and immunotherapy. Hence, cancer therapy needs to be reinforced using specific inhibitors of bioelements involved in pH dysregulation of TME in solid tumors.

  6. Overcoming tumor resistance by heterologous adeno-poxvirus combination therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Vähä-Koskela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Successful cancer control relies on overcoming resistance to cell death and on activation of host antitumor immunity. Oncolytic viruses are particularly attractive in this regard, as they lyse infected tumor cells and trigger robust immune responses during the infection. However, repeated injections of the same virus promote antiviral rather than antitumor immunity and tumors may mount innate antiviral defenses to restrict oncolytic virus replication. In this article, we have explored if alternating the therapy virus could circumvent these problems. We demonstrate in two virus-resistant animal models a substantial delay in antiviral immune- and innate cellular response induction by alternating injections of two immunologically distinct oncolytic viruses, adenovirus, and vaccinia virus. Our results are in support of clinical development of heterologous adeno-/vaccinia virus therapy of cancer.

  7. Heavy-ion tumor therapy: Physical and radiobiological benefits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, Dieter; Elsässer, Thilo; Schulz-Ertner, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    High-energy beams of charged nuclear particles (protons and heavier ions) offer significant advantages for the treatment of deep-seated local tumors in comparison to conventional megavolt photon therapy. Their physical depth-dose distribution in tissue is characterized by a small entrance dose and a distinct maximum (Bragg peak) near the end of range with a sharp fall-off at the distal edge. Taking full advantage of the well-defined range and the small lateral beam spread, modern scanning beam systems allow delivery of the dose with millimeter precision. In addition, projectiles heavier than protons such as carbon ions exhibit an enhanced biological effectiveness in the Bragg peak region caused by the dense ionization of individual particle tracks resulting in reduced cellular repair. This makes them particularly attractive for the treatment of radio-resistant tumors localized near organs at risk. While tumor therapy with protons is a well-established treatment modality with more than 60 000 patients treated worldwide, the application of heavy ions is so far restricted to a few facilities only. Nevertheless, results of clinical phase I-II trials provide evidence that carbon-ion radiotherapy might be beneficial in several tumor entities. This article reviews the progress in heavy-ion therapy, including physical and technical developments, radiobiological studies and models, as well as radiooncological studies. As a result of the promising clinical results obtained with carbon-ion beams in the past ten years at the Heavy Ion Medical Accelerator facility (Japan) and in a pilot project at GSI Darmstadt (Germany), the plans for new clinical centers for heavy-ion or combined proton and heavy-ion therapy have recently received a substantial boost.

  8. Biomarkers in Tumor Angiogenesis and Anti-Angiogenic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Medinger

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Tumor angiogenesis has been identified to play a critical role in tumor growth and tumor progression, and is regulated by a balance of angiogenic and anti-angiogenic cytokines. Among them VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor and its signaling through its receptors are of crucial relevance. Inhibition of VEGF signaling by monoclonal antibodies or small molecules (kinase inhibitors has already been successfully established for the treatment of different cancer entities and multiple new drugs are being tested in clinical trials. However not all patients are likely to respond to these therapies, but to date there are no reliable biomarkers available to predict therapy response. Many studies integrated biomarker programs in their study protocols, thus several potential biomarkers have been identified which are currently under clinical investigation in prospective randomized studies. This review intends to give an overview of the described potential biomarkers as well as different imaging techniques such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging that can indicate benefit, resistance and toxicity to anti-angiogenic therapies.

  9. Influence of Residual Tumor Volume and Radiation Dose Coverage in Outcomes for Clival Chordoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, Mark W., E-mail: markmcdonaldmd@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Indiana University Health Proton Therapy Center, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Linton, Okechukwu R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Moore, Michael G.; Ting, Jonathan Y. [Department of Otolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Cohen-Gadol, Aaron A.; Shah, Mitesh V. [Department of Neurological Surgery, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Goodman Campbell Brain and Spine, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to evaluate factors associated with tumor control in clival chordomas. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review of 39 patients treated with surgery and proton therapy for clival chordomas between 2004 and 2014 was performed. The median prescribed dose was 77.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]); range was 70.2-79.2 Gy (RBE). Minimum and median doses to gross tumor volume (GTV), radiation dose received by 1 cm{sup 3} of GTV (D1cm{sup 3}), and the equivalent uniform dose were calculated. Receiver operating characteristics curves evaluated the predictive sensitivity and specificity for local failure of potential cutpoint values for GTV and D1cm{sup 3}. Results: After a median follow-up of 51 months, the 5-year estimate of local control (LC) was 69.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 50.0%-89.2%), and overall survival (OS) was 81.4% (95% CI: 65.3%-97.5%). Tumor histology, GTV at the time of radiation, and prescribed radiation dose were significantly associated with local control on multivariate analysis, whereas D1cm{sup 3} was associated with overall survival. Compared to those patients whose conditions remained controlled, patients experiencing tumor failure had statistically significant larger GTVs and lower D1cm{sup 3}, and prescribed and median doses to GTV. A subset of 21 patients with GTV of ≤20 cm{sup 3} and D1cm{sup 3} of >67 Gy (RBE) had a median follow-up of 47 months. The 5-year estimate of local control in this subset was 81.1% (95% CI: 61.7%-100%; P=.004, overall comparison by GTV ≤20 cm{sup 3} stratified by D1cm{sup 3}). A D1cm{sup 3} of 74.5 Gy (RBE) had 80% sensitivity for local control and 60% specificity, whereas a GTV of 9.3 cm{sup 3} had 80% sensitivity for local control and 66.7% specificity. Conclusions: Local control of clival chordomas was associated with both smaller size of residual tumor and more complete high-dose coverage of residual tumor. Multidisciplinary care should seek

  10. A Novel Technique for Endovascular Removal of Large Volume Right Atrial Tumor Thrombus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickel, Barbara, E-mail: nickel.ba@gmail.com [US Teleradiology and Quantum Medical Radiology Group (United States); McClure, Timothy, E-mail: tmcclure@gmail.com; Moriarty, John, E-mail: jmoriarty@mednet.ucla.edu [UCLA Medical Center, Department of Interventional Radiology (United States)

    2015-08-15

    Venous thromboembolic disease is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality, particularly in the setting of large volume pulmonary embolism. Thrombolytic therapy has been shown to be a successful treatment modality; however, its use somewhat limited due to the risk of hemorrhage and potential for distal embolization in the setting of large mobile thrombi. In patients where either thrombolysis is contraindicated or unsuccessful, and conventional therapies prove inadequate, surgical thrombectomy may be considered. We present a case of percutaneous endovascular extraction of a large mobile mass extending from the inferior vena cava into the right atrium using the Angiovac device, a venovenous bypass system designed for high-volume aspiration of undesired endovascular material. Standard endovascular methods for removal of cancer-associated thrombus, such as catheter-directed lysis, maceration, and exclusion, may prove inadequate in the setting of underlying tumor thrombus. Where conventional endovascular methods either fail or are unsuitable, endovascular thrombectomy with the Angiovac device may be a useful and safe minimally invasive alternative to open resection.

  11. Effects of vascular targeting photodynamic therapy on lymphatic tumor metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fateye, B.; He, C.; Chen, B.

    2009-06-01

    Vascular targeting photodynamic therapy (vPDT) is currently in clinical trial for prostate cancer (PCa) treatment. In order to study the effect of vPDT on tumor metastasis, GFP-PC3 or PC-3 xenografts were treated with verteporfin (BPD) PDT. Vascular function was assessed by ultrasound imaging; lymph node and lung metastasis were assessed by fluorescence imaging. vPDT significantly reduced tumor blood flow within 30minutes to 2 hours of treatment. Sub-curative treatment resulted in re-perfusion within 2 weeks of treatment and increased lymph node metastasis. With curative doses, no metastasis was observed. In order to identify cellular or matrix factors and cytokines implicated, conditioned medium from BPD PDTtreated endothelial cells was incubated with PC3 cells in vitro. Tumor cell proliferation and migration was assessed. By immunoblotting, we evaluated the change in mediators of intracellular signaling or that may determine changes in tumor phenotype. Low sub-curative dose (200ng/ml BPD) of endothelial cells was associated with ~15% greater migration in PC3 cells when compared with control. This dose was also associated with sustained activation of Akt at Ser 473, an upstream effector in the Akt/ mTOR pathway that has been correlated with Gleason scores in PCa and with survival and metastasis in vitro and in vivo. In conclusion, the study implicates efficacy of PDT of endothelial cells as an important determinant of its consequences on adjacent tumor proliferation and metastasis.

  12. Modeling the oxygen microheterogeneity of tumors for photodynamic therapy dosimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pogue, Brian W.; Paulsen, Keith D.; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Swartz, Harold

    2000-03-01

    Photodynamic theory of tumors uses optical excitation of a sensitizing drug within tissue to produce large deposits of singlet oxygen, which are thought to ultimately cause the tumor destruction. Predicting dose deposition of singlet oxygen in vivo is challenging because measurement of this species in vivo is not easily achieved. But it is possible to follow the concentration of oxygen in vivo, and so measuring the oxygen concentration transients during PDT may provide a viable method of estimating the delivered dose of singlet oxygen. However modeling the microscopic heterogeneity of the oxygen distribution within a tumor is non-trivial, and predicting the microscopic dose deposition requires further study, but this study present the framework and initial calibration needed or modeling oxygen transport in complex geometries. Computational modeling with finite elements provides a versatile structure within which oxygen diffusion and consumption can be modeled within realistic tissue geometries. This study develops the basic tools required to simulate a tumor region, and examines the role of (i) oxygen supply and consumption rates, (ii) inter- capillary spacing, (iii) photosensitizer distribution, and (iv) differences between simulated tumors and those derived directly from histology. The result of these calculations indicate that realistic tumor tissue capillary networks can be simulated using the finite element method, without excessive computational burden for 2D regions near 1 mm2, and 3D regions near 0.1mm3. These simulations can provide fundamental information about tissue and ways to implement appropriate oxygen measurements. These calculations suggest that photodynamic therapy produces the majority of singlet oxygen in and near the blood vessels, because these are the sites of highest oxygen tension. These calculations support the concept that tumor vascular regions are the major targets for PDT dose deposition.

  13. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  14. Margin on gross tumor volume and risk of local recurrence in head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caudell, Jimmy J; Meredith, Ruby F; Spencer, Sharon A; Keene, Kimberley S; Dobelbower, M Christian; Bonner, James A

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether the method or extent of construction of the high-dose clinical target volume (CTV) and high-dose planning target volume (PTV) in intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for head-and-neck cancer are associated with an increased risk of locoregional failure. Patients with nasopharyngeal, oropharyngeal, oral cavity, hypopharyngeal, or laryngeal squamous cell carcinomas treated definitively with IMRT were included. All patients without local relapse had a minimum follow-up of 12 months. Median follow-up for all patients was 24 months. Treatment plans of 85 available patients were reviewed, and the gross tumor volume (GTV) to PTV expansion method was estimated. The GTVs were expanded volumetrically in 71 of 85 patients, by a median of 15 mm (range, 4-25 mm). An anatomic component to the expansion of GTV was used in 14 of 85 patients. Eighteen patients failed locoregionally, for an actuarial locoregional control rate of 77.2% at 2 years. There was no significant difference in locoregional control between patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically vs. those with a component of anatomic expansion. In patients with GTVs expanded volumetrically, no increase in risk of local failure was seen in patients with a total GTV expansion of margins or expanding GTVs volumetrically when treating head-and-neck cancer patients definitively with IMRT.

  15. Composite Configuration Interventional Therapy Robot for the Microwave Ablation of Liver Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Ying-Yu; Xue, Long; Qi, Bo-Jin; Jiang, Li-Pei; Deng, Shuang-Cheng; Liang, Ping; Liu, Jia

    2017-11-01

    The existing interventional therapy robots for the microwave ablation of liver tumors have a poor clinical applicability with a large volume, low positioning speed and complex automatic navigation control. To solve above problems, a composite configuration interventional therapy robot with passive and active joints is developed. The design of composite configuration reduces the size of the robot under the premise of a wide range of movement, and the robot with composite configuration can realizes rapid positioning with operation safety. The cumulative error of positioning is eliminated and the control complexity is reduced by decoupling active parts. The navigation algorithms for the robot are proposed based on solution of the inverse kinematics and geometric analysis. A simulation clinical test method is designed for the robot, and the functions of the robot and the navigation algorithms are verified by the test method. The mean error of navigation is 1.488 mm and the maximum error is 2.056 mm, and the positioning time for the ablation needle is in 10 s. The experimental results show that the designed robot can meet the clinical requirements for the microwave ablation of liver tumors. The composite configuration is proposed in development of the interventional therapy robot for the microwave ablation of liver tumors, which provides a new idea for the structural design of medical robots.

  16. Dosimetric comparison of intensity modulated radiation, Proton beam therapy and proton arc therapy for para-aortic lymph node tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Hoon [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Konyang University Hospital. Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-12-15

    To test feasibility of proton arc therapy (PAT) in the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor and compare its dosimetric properties with advanced radiotherapy techniques such as intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) and conventional 3D conformal proton beam therapy (PBT). The treatment plans for para-aortic lymph node tumor were planned for 9 patients treated at our institution using IMRT, PBT, and PAT. Feasibility test and dosimetric evaluation were based on comparisons of dose volume histograms (DVHs) which reveal mean dose, D{sub 30%}, D{sub 60%}, D{sub 90%}, V{sub 30%}, V{sub 60%}, V{sub 90}%, organ equivalent doses (OEDs), normal tissue complication probability (NTCP), homogeneity index (HI) and conformity index (CI). The average doses delivered by PAT to the liver, kidney, small bowel, duodenum, stomach were 7.6%, 3%, 17.3%, 26.7%, and 14.4%, of the prescription dose (PD), respectively, which is higher than the doses delivered by IMRT (0.4%, 7.2%, 14.2%, 15.9%, and 12.8%, respectively) and PBT (4.9%, 0.5%, 14.12%, 16.1% 9.9%, respectively). The average homogeneity index and conformity index of tumor using PAT were 12.1 and 1.21, respectively which were much better than IMRT (21.5 and 1.47, respectively) and comparable to PBT (13.1 and 1.23, respectively). The result shows that both NTCP and OED of PAT are generally lower than IMRT and PBT. This study demonstrates that PAT is better in target conformity and homogeneity than IMRT and PBT but worse than IMRT and PBT for most of dosimetric factor which indicate that PAT is not recommended for the treatment of para-aortic lymph node tumor.

  17. Validation of Heat Shock Protein 70 as a Tumor-Specific Biomarker for Monitoring the Outcome of Radiation Therapy in Tumor Mouse Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bayer, Christine; Liebhardt, Michael E.; Schmid, Thomas E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Trajkovic-Arsic, Marija [II Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Hube, Kathrin; Specht, Hanno M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Schilling, Daniela [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Clinical Kooperation Group, Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, HelmholtzZentrum München, Munich (Germany); Gehrmann, Mathias; Stangl, Stefan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Siveke, Jens T. [II Medizinische Klinik, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Wilkens, Jan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Multhoff, Gabriele, E-mail: Gabriele.multhoff@lrz.tum.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universität München, Munich (Germany); Clinical Kooperation Group, Innate Immunity in Tumor Biology, HelmholtzZentrum München, Munich (Germany)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Tumor cells, in contrast to normal cells, frequently overexpress heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70) in the cytosol, present it on their cell surface, and actively release it. Therefore, soluble Hsp70 (sHsp70) was investigated as a potential tumor biomarker for monitoring the outcome of radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Plasma from mice bearing membrane Hsp70 (mHsp70)-positive FaDu human squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck and spontaneous pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) was investigated. A cohort of mice with FaDu tumors (0.32 cm{sup 3}) was irradiated with 30 Gy, and plasma was collected 24 hours after irradiation, after the tumors had shrunk to 50% of their starting volume and after complete remission. sHsp70 levels in the plasma were quantified by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Results: sHsp70 levels were significantly higher in the blood of tumor-bearing mice than that of control animals. A correlation between increasing sHsp70 plasma levels and tumor volume in the range of 0.01 cm{sup 3} to 0.66 cm{sup 3} was observed. Radiation-induced regression of the tumors was associated with significantly decreased sHsp70 levels, which returned to the level of control animals after complete remission. Conclusion: We propose sHsp70 as an innovative biomarker for detecting tumors and for monitoring the clinical outcome of radiation therapy in cancer patients.

  18. Mangiferin functionalized radioactive gold nanoparticles (MGF-198AuNPs) in prostate tumor therapy: green nanotechnology for production, in vivo tumor retention and evaluation of therapeutic efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Yasiri, A Y; Khoobchandani, M; Cutler, C S; Watkinson, L; Carmack, T; Smith, C J; Kuchuk, M; Loyalka, S K; Lugão, A B; Katti, K V

    2017-10-31

    We report here an innovative feature of green nanotechnology-focused work showing that mangiferin-a glucose functionalized xanthonoid, found in abundance in mango peels-serves dual roles of chemical reduction and in situ encapsulation, to produce gold nanoparticles with optimum in vivo stability and tumor specific characteristics. The interaction of mangiferin with a Au-198 gold precursor affords MGF-198AuNPs as the beta emissions of Au-198 provide unique advantages for tumor therapy while gamma rays are used for the quantitative estimation of gold within the tumors and various organs. The laminin receptor specificity of mangiferin affords specific accumulation of therapeutic payloads of this new therapeutic agent within prostate tumors (PC-3) of human prostate tumor origin induced in mice which overexpress this receptor subtype. Detailed in vivo therapeutic efficacy studies, through the intratumoral delivery of MGF-198AuNPs, show the retention of over 80% of the injected dose (ID) in prostate tumors up to 24 h. By three weeks post treatment, tumor volumes of the treated group of animals showed an over 5 fold reduction as compared to the control saline group. New opportunities for green nanotechnology and a new paradigm of using mangiferin as a tumor targeting agent in oncology for the application of MGF-198AuNPs in the treatment of cancer are discussed.

  19. Quantitative CD3 PET Imaging Predicts Tumor Growth Response to Anti-CTLA-4 Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larimer, Benjamin M; Wehrenberg-Klee, Eric; Caraballo, Alexander; Mahmood, Umar

    2016-10-01

    Immune checkpoint inhibitors have made rapid advances, resulting in multiple Food and Drug Administration-approved therapeutics that have markedly improved survival. However, these benefits are limited to a minority subpopulation that achieves a response. Predicting which patients are most likely to benefit would be valuable for individual therapy optimization. T-cell markers such as CD3-by examining active recruitment of the T cells responsible for cancer-cell death-represent a more direct approach to monitoring tumor immune response than pretreatment biopsy or genetic screening. This approach could be especially effective as numerous different therapeutic strategies emerge, decreasing the need for drug-specific biomarkers and instead focusing on T-cell infiltration, which has been previously correlated with treatment response. A CD3 PET imaging agent targeting T cells was synthesized to test the role of such imaging as a predictive marker. The (89)Zr-p-isothiocyanatobenzyl-deferoxamine-CD3 PET probe was assessed in a murine tumor xenograft model of anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) immunotherapy of colon cancer. Imaging on day 14 revealed 2 distinct groups of mice stratified by PET signal intensity. Although there was no significant difference in tumor volume on the day of imaging, in the high-uptake group subsequent measurements revealed significantly smaller tumors than in either the low-uptake group or the untreated controls. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the size of tumors between the low-uptake and untreated control mice. These findings indicate that high CD3 PET uptake in the anti-CTLA-4-treated mice correlated with subsequent reduced tumor volume and was a predictive biomarker of response. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  20. Predictive Biomarkers for Bevacizumab in Anti-tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingqing PAN

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Bevacizumab, the monoclonal antibody of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF has been applied to the therapy of several neoplasms, but an appropriate biomarker to predict the efficacy has not been found. Those markers can originate from peripheral circulation, tumor tissue and genes. Some researches have found that low level of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1, E-selectin, angiopoietin 2 (Ang-2 in circulation or carbonic anhydrase 9 (CA9, CD31-microvessel density (CD31-MVD in tumor tissue can predict better activity of bevacizumab. Moreover, high level of soluble VEGFR2 (sVEGFR2 in circulation or the ratio of phosphorylated-VEGFR2 (p-VEGFR2 and VEGFR2 in tumor tissue increasing has the same predictive function. As to the gene, VEGF-634 CC, VEGF-1498 TT and VEGFR2 H472Q are only related to the side effct. Thus more clinical tirals and basic researches should be performed to find out effective biomarkers in bevacizumab’s therapy.

  1. Targeted PDT agent eradicates TrkC expressing tumors via photodynamic therapy (PDT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kue, Chin Siang; Kamkaew, Anyanee; Lee, Hong Boon; Chung, Lip Yong; Kiew, Lik Voon; Burgess, Kevin

    2015-01-05

    This contribution features a small molecule that binds TrkC (tropomyosin receptor kinase C) receptor that tends to be overexpressed in metastatic breast cancer cells but not in other breast cancer cells. A sensitizer for (1)O2 production conjugated to this structure gives 1-PDT for photodynamic therapy. Isomeric 2-PDT does not bind TrkC and was used as a control throughout; similarly, TrkC- cancer cells were used to calibrate enhanced killing of TrkC+ cells. Ex vivo, 1- and 2-PDT where only cytotoxic when illuminated, and 1-PDT, gave higher cell death for TrkC+ breast cancer cells. A 1 h administration-to-illumination delay gave optimal TrkC+/TrkC--photocytotoxicity, and distribution studies showed the same delay was appropriate in vivo. In Balb/c mice, a maximum tolerated dose of 20 mg/kg was determined for 1-PDT. 1- and 2-PDT (single, 2 or 10 mg/kg doses and one illumination, throughout) had similar effects on implanted TrkC- tumors, and like those of 2-PDT on TrkC+ tumors. In contrast, 1-PDT caused dramatic TrkC+ tumor volume reduction (96% from initial) relative to the TrkC- tumors or 2-PDT in TrkC+ models. Moreover, 71% of the mice treated with 10 mg/kg 1-PDT (n = 7) showed full tumor remission and survived until 90 days with no metastasis to key organs.

  2. Targeting sarcoma tumor-initiating cells through differentiation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Han

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Human leukocyte antigen class I (HLA-I down-regulation has been reported in many human cancers to be associated with poor clinical outcome. However, its connection to tumor-initiating cells (TICs remains unknown. In this study, we report that HLA-I is down-regulated in a subpopulation of cells that have high tumor initiating capacity in different types of human sarcomas. Detailed characterization revealed their distinct molecular profiles regarding proliferation, apoptosis and stemness programs. Notably, these TICs can be induced to differentiate along distinct mesenchymal lineages, including the osteogenic pathway. The retinoic acid receptor signaling pathway is overexpressed in HLA-1 negative TICs. All-trans retinoic acid treatment successfully induced osteogenic differentiation of this subpopulation, in vitro and in vivo, resulting in significantly decreased tumor formation. Thus, our findings indicate down-regulated HLA-I is a shared feature of TICs in a variety of human sarcomas, and differentiation therapy strategies may specifically target undifferentiated TICs and inhibit tumor formation.

  3. Rethinking Brain Cancer Therapy: Tumor Enzyme Activatable Theranostic Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E

    2017-01-01

    This invited commentary discusses a recent article by Mohanty et al in Molecular Cancer Therapeutics about significant therapeutic efficacies of novel theranostic nanoparticles (TNPs) for the treatment of human brain cancers in mouse models. The TNPs were cleaved by enzymes in the tumor tissue, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-14), which lead to release of a highly potent therapeutic drug, azademethylcolchicine. Data showed that the TNPs caused selective toxic effects in MMP-14-expressing glioblastoma and not normal brain. In addition, the iron oxide nanoparticle backbone enabled in vivo drug tracking with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). This commentary discusses previous efforts of MMP-targeted therapeutics as well as opportunities for further refinements of tumor enzyme-activatable TNPs. If successfully translated to clinical applications, the TNPs might hold substantial potential to improving cytotoxic indexes and long-term outcomes of patients with brain cancer compared to standard therapy.

  4. Correlation of pretreatment polarographically measured oxygen pressures with quantified contrast-enhanced power doppler ultrasonography in spontaneous canine tumors and their impact on outcome after radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohrer Bley, Carla; Laluhova, Dagmar [Section of Radiooncology, Vetsuisse Faculty, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Roos, Malgorzata [Inst. for Social and Preventive Medicine, Medical Faculty, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Kaser-Hotz, Barbara [Section of Radiooncology, Vetsuisse Faculty, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Section Imaging Diagnostics, Vetsuisse Faculty, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland); Ohlerth, Stefanie [Section Imaging Diagnostics, Vetsuisse Faculty, Univ. of Zurich (Switzerland)

    2009-11-15

    Purpose: to evaluate the use of noninvasive quantified contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography as a surrogate in the estimation of tumor hypoxia measured by invasive pO{sub 2} histography in canine tumors. Material and methods: data of pretreatment tumor oxygenation status, tumor vascularity and blood volume, and tumor response after radiation therapy was collected in 48 spontaneous malignant oral tumors (Table 1). Tumor oxygenation status was correlated to vascularity and blood volume, and influences on outcome after treatment were analyzed. Results: although vascularity and blood volume correlated moderately with median pO{sub 2} (r = 0.51 and 0.61; p = 0.001 and < 0.0001) and percentage of pO{sub 2} readings {<=} 2.5, 5, and 10 mmHg (r = -0.37 to -0.42; p < 0.01-0.03) for all tumors, they did not correlate within the different histology groups (p = 0.06-0.9). For all tumors, pretreatment oxygenation status, vascularity and blood volume were not found to be of prognostic value. Conclusion: these analyses show that quantified contrast-enhanced power Doppler ultrasonography does not represent a non-invasive indirect method to assess tumor hypoxia measured by invasive pO{sub 2} histography. Both technologies were nonprognostic indicators in spontaneous malignant canine oral tumors. (orig.)

  5. Double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging: basic concepts and application in brain tumors for the assessment of tumor blood volume and vascular permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uematsu, Hidemasa; Maeda, Masayuki

    2006-01-01

    Perfusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging using contrast agents plays a key role in characterizing tumors of the brain. We have shown that double-echo perfusion-weighted MR imaging (DEPWI) is potentially useful in assessing brain tumors. Quantitative indices, such as tumor blood volume, are obtained using DEPWI, which allows correction of underestimation of tumor blood volume due to leakage of contrast agents from tumor vessels, in addition to simultaneous acquisition of tumor vessel permeability. This article describes basic concepts of DEPWI and demonstrates clinical applications in brain tumors.

  6. Low-grade gliomas: six-month tumor growth predicts patient outcome better than admission tumor volume, relative cerebral blood volume, and apparent diffusion coefficient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasil Caseiras, Gisele; Ciccarelli, Olga; Altmann, Daniel R; Benton, Christopher E; Tozer, Daniel J; Tofts, Paul S; Yousry, Tarek A; Rees, Jeremy; Waldman, Adam D; Jäger, Hans Rolf

    2009-11-01

    To prospectively compare tumor volume, relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV), and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and short-term changes of these parameters as predictors of time to malignant transformation and time to death in patients with low-grade gliomas (LGGs). Patients gave written informed consent for this institutional ethics committee-approved study. Patients with histologically proved LGGs underwent conventional, perfusion-weighted, and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging at study entry and at 6 months. At both time points, tumor volume, maximum rCBV, and ADC histogram measures were calculated. Patient follow-up consisted of MR imaging every 6 months and clinical examinations. To investigate the association between MR imaging variables and time to progression and time to death, a Cox regression curve was applied at study entry and at 6 months. The models were corrected for age, sex, and histologic findings. Thirty-four patients (22 men, 12 women; mean age, 42 years) with histologically proved LGGs (eight oligodendrogliomas, 20 astrocytomas, and six oligoastrocytomas) were followed up clinically and radiologically for a median of 2.6 years (range, 0.4-5.5 years). Tumor growth over the course of 6 months was the best predictor of time to transformation, independent of rCBV, diffusion histogram parameters, age, sex, and histologic findings. When only single-time-point measurements were compared, tumor volume helped predict outcome best and was the only independent predictor of time to death (P < .02). Six-month tumor growth helps predict outcome in patients with LGG better than parameters derived from perfusion- or diffusion-weighed MR imaging. Tumor growth can readily be calculated from volume measurements on images acquired with standard MR imaging protocols and may well prove most useful among various MR imaging findings in clinical practice. (c) RSNA, 2009.

  7. Development of a center for light ion therapy and accurate tumor diagnostics at karolinska institutet and hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahme, Anders; Lind, Bengt K.

    2002-04-01

    Radiation therapy is today in a state of very rapid development with new intensity modulated treatment techniques continuously being developed. This has made intensity modulated electron and photon beams almost as powerful as conventional uniform beam proton therapy. To be able to cure also the most advanced hypoxic and radiation resistant tumors of complex local spread, intensity modulated light ion beams are really the ultimate tool and only slightly more expensive than proton therapy. The aim of the new center for ion therapy and tumor diagnostics in Stockholm is to develop radiobiologically optimized 3-dimensional pencil beam scanning techniques. Beside the "classical" approaches using low ionization density hydrogen ions (protons, but also deuterons and tritium nuclei) and high ionization density carbon ions, two new approaches will be developed. In the first one lithium or beryllium ions, that induce the least detrimental biological effect to normal tissues for a given biological effect in a small volume of the tumor, will be key particles. In the second approach, referred patients will be given a high-dose high-precision "boost" treatment with carbon or oxygen ions during one week preceding the final treatment with conventional radiations in the referring hospital. The rationale behind these approaches is to reduce the high ionization density dose to the normal tissue stroma inside the tumor and to ensure a microscopically uniform dose delivery. The principal idea of the center is to closely integrate ion therapy into the clinical routine and research of a large radiotherapy department. The light ion therapy center will therefore be combined with advanced tumor diagnostics including MR and PET-CT imaging to facilitate efficient high-precision high-dose boost treatment of remitted patients. The possibility to do 3D tumor diagnostics and 3D dose delivery verification with the same PET camera will be the ultimate step in high quality adaptive radiation therapy

  8. Subacute brain atrophy after radiation therapy for malignant brain tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asai, A.; Matsutani, M.; Kohno, T.; Nakamura, O.; Tanaka, H.; Fujimaki, T.; Funada, N.; Matsuda, T.; Nagata, K.; Takakura, K.

    1989-05-15

    Brain atrophy with mental and neurologic deterioration developing a few months after radiation therapy in patients without residual or recurrent brain tumors has been recognized. Two illustrative case reports of this pathologic entity are presented. Six autopsy cases with this entity including the two cases were reviewed neurologically, radiographically, and histopathologically. All patients presented progressive disturbances of mental status and consciousness, akinesia, and tremor-like involuntary movement. Computerized tomography (CT) demonstrated marked enlargement of the ventricles, moderate widening of the cortical sulci, and a moderately attenuated CT number for the white matter in all six patients. Four of the six patients had CSF drainage (ventriculoperitoneal shunt or continuous lumbar drainage), however, none of them improved. Histologic examination demonstrated swelling and loss of the myelin sheath in the white matter in all patients, and reactive astrocytosis in three of the six patients. Neither prominent neuronal loss in the cerebral cortex or basal ganglia, nor axonal loss in the white matter was generally identified. The blood vessels of the cerebral cortex and white matter were normal. Ependymal layer and the surrounding brain tissue were normal in all patients. These findings suggested that this pathologic condition results from demyelination secondary to direct neurotoxic effect of irradiation. The authors' previous report was reviewed and the differential diagnoses, the risk factors for this pathologic entity, and the indication for radiation therapy in aged patients with a malignant brain tumor are discussed.

  9. Endothelin receptors as novel targets in tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagnato Anna

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The endotelin (ET axis, that includes ET-1, ET-2, ET-3, and the ET receptors, ETA and ETB, plays an important physiological role, as modulator of vasomotor tone, tissue differentiation and development, cell proliferation, and hormone production. Recently, investigations into the role of the ET axis in mitogenesis, apoptosis inhibition, invasiveness, angiogenesis and bone remodeling have provided evidence of the importance of the ET-1 axis in cancer. Data suggest that ET-1 participates in the growth and progression of a variety of tumors such as prostatic, ovarian, renal, pulmonary, colorectal, cervical, breast carcinoma, Kaposi's sarcoma, brain tumors, melanoma, and bone metastases. ET-1 receptor antagonists beside providing ideal tools for dissecting the ET axis at molecular level have demonstrated their potential in developing novel therapeutic opportunity. The major relevance of ETA receptor in tumor development has led to an extensive search of highly selective antagonists. Atrasentan, one of such antagonists, is orally bioavailable, has suitable pharmacokinetic and toxicity profiles for clinical use. Preliminary data from clinical trials investigating atrasentan in patients with prostate cancer are encouraging. This large body of evidence demonstrates the antitumor activity of endothelin receptor antagonists and provides a rationale for the clinical evaluation of these molecules alone and in combination with cytotoxic drugs or molecular inhibitors leading to a new generation of anticancer therapies targeting endothelin receptors.

  10. Boron Neutron Capture Therapy for Malignant Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    MIYATAKE, Shin-Ichi; KAWABATA, Shinji; HIRAMATSU, Ryo; KUROIWA, Toshihiko; SUZUKI, Minoru; KONDO, Natsuko; ONO, Koji

    2016-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a biochemically targeted radiotherapy based on the nuclear capture and fission reactions that occur when non-radioactive boron-10, which is a constituent of natural elemental boron, is irradiated with low energy thermal neutrons to yield high linear energy transfer alpha particles and recoiling lithium-7 nuclei. Therefore, BNCT enables the application of a high dose of particle radiation selectively to tumor cells in which boron-10 compound has been accumulated. We applied BNCT using nuclear reactors for 167 cases of malignant brain tumors, including recurrent malignant gliomas, newly diagnosed malignant gliomas, and recurrent high-grade meningiomas from January 2002 to May 2014. Here, we review the principle and history of BNCT. In addition, we introduce fluoride-18-labeled boronophenylalanine positron emission tomography and the clinical results of BNCT for the above-mentioned malignant brain tumors. Finally, we discuss the recent development of accelerators producing epithermal neutron beams. This development could provide an alternative to the current use of specially modified nuclear reactors as a neutron source, and could allow BNCT to be performed in a hospital setting. PMID:27250576

  11. Identification of responders to sorafenib in hepatocellular carcinoma: is tumor volume measurement the way forward?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bargellini, Irene; Scionti, Alessandra; Mismas, Valeria; Masi, Gianluca; Vivaldi, Caterina; Bartolozzi, Carlo; Sacco, Rodolfo

    2014-01-01

    Early assessment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) response during sorafenib (SO) treatment is challenging, since tumor necrosis, extension and radiological appearance can be inhomogeneous. We evaluated the predictive value of different imaging criteria - such as Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1, European Association for the Study of the Liver (EASL), modified RECIST (mRECIST), tumor density and volume variations - in the early follow-up of SO treatment. The study included 22 patients. CT images from baseline and 2 months were reviewed to assess response according to RECIST 1.1, mRECIST, EASL, Choi's criteria (decreased tumor density by ≥15%) and arterial-enhancing tumor volume ratio; α-fetoprotein (AFP) variations were expressed as AFP ratio. The response criteria and volume measurements were reproducible (k > 0.80). The overall disease control rate was 40.9% by EASL and mRECIST, and 27.3% by RECIST 1.1; a ≥15% decrease in tumor density was observed in 9 patients (40.9%). The mean volume ratio was 1.73 ± 2.12, the mean AFP ratio 14 ± 37. The 1-year survival rate was 65.9%. Volume ratio was the only predictive factor for survival, with 1-year cumulative survival rates of 90% for volume ratios ≤1.1 and of 45.4% for volume ratios >1.1 (p = 0.04). Tumor volume measurements are reproducible and might provide an early predictive marker of response in HCC patients treated with SO. © 2014 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy demonstrated in mice bearing EMT6 tumors following selective delivery of boron by rationally designed liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kueffer, Peter J; Maitz, Charles A; Khan, Aslam A; Schuster, Seth A; Shlyakhtina, Natalia I; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Brockman, John D; Nigg, David W; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2013-04-16

    The application of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) following liposomal delivery of a (10)B-enriched polyhedral borane and a carborane against mouse mammary adenocarcinoma solid tumors was investigated. Unilamellar liposomes with a mean diameter of 134 nm or less, composed of an equimolar mixture of cholesterol and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and incorporating Na3[1-(2'-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] in the aqueous interior and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the bilayer, were injected into the tail veins of female BALB/c mice bearing right flank EMT6 tumors. Biodistribution studies indicated that two identical injections given 24 h apart resulted in tumor boron levels exceeding 67 µg/g tumor at 54 h--with tumor/blood boron ratios being greatest at 96 h (5.68:1; 43 µg boron/g tumor)--following the initial injection. For BNCT experiments, tumor-bearing mice were irradiated 54 h after the initial injection for 30 min with thermal neutrons, resulting in a total fluence of 1.6 × 10(12) neutrons per cm(2) (±7%). Significant suppression of tumor growth was observed in mice given BNCT vs. control mice (only 424% increase in tumor volume at 14 d post irradiation vs. 1551% in untreated controls). In a separate experiment in which mice were given a second injection/irradiation treatment 7 d after the first, the tumor growth was vastly diminished (186% tumor volume increase at 14 d). A similar response was obtained for mice irradiated for 60 min (169% increase at 14 d), suggesting that neutron fluence was the limiting factor controlling BNCT efficacy in this study.

  13. A lot to a little or a little to a lot-which dose-volume relationship ensures the best clinical outcome in the high dose radiation therapy of thoracic tumors? A prospective approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christina; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Vorwerk, Hilke; Schmidt, Michael; Huhnt, Winfried; Blank, Eyck; Sidow, Dietrich; Buchali, André

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective randomized trial is to determine which constellation of dose and corresponding volume of the lung tissue-either a lot to a little or a little to a lot-should be preferred to ensure the best possible outcome for patients with thoracic carcinomas. From Apr 2012 to Oct 2015, 81 patients with NSCLC, SCLC or esophageal carcinoma were randomized and treated with either a 4-field-IMRT or a VMAT technique with or without additional chemotherapy. Data regarding clinical outcome, pulmonary function tests (PFT) and quality of life (QoL) was collected before RT, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 6 months after treatment, QoL data additionally 1 year post RT. Follow up CTs were done 12 weeks and 6 months after RT. There is no significant difference regarding the local (P=0.954) and distant (P=0.206) outcome, side effects (all P>0.05) or survival (P=0.633) at any follow-up appointment. The comparison of the PFT shows a statistically significant difference for the DLCO 6 weeks post RT (P=0.028). All other parameters do not differ significantly at any follow up appointment. Regarding the QoL there is no statistically significant difference at any follow up appointment (P>0.1). There is a statistically significant difference between the mean density of the lung parenchyma at 12 weeks (P<0.0005) and 6 months post RT (P<0.0005). Since there is no significant and relevant difference between both treatment arms regarding PFT, clinical outcome and QoL it does not seem to relevant how the DVH is shaped exactly as long as established dose constraints for the organs at risk are respected. As to whether the difference between the CT density changes is clinically relevant further analysis is needed.

  14. Photothermal therapy of melanoma tumor using multiwalled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobhani, Zahra; Behnam, Mohammad Ali; Emami, Farzin; Dehghanian, Amirreza; Jamhiri, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Photothermal therapy (PTT) is a therapeutic method in which photon energy is transformed into heat rapidly via different operations to extirpate cancer. Nanoparticles, such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have exceptional optical absorbance in visible and near infrared spectra. Therefore, they could be a good converter to induce hyperthermia in PTT technique. In our study, for improving the dispersibility of multiwalled CNTs in water, the CNTs were oxidized (O-CNTs) and then polyethylene glycol (PEG) was used for wrapping the surface of nanotubes. The formation of a thin layer of PEG around the nanotubes was confirmed through Fourier transform infrared, thermogravimetric analysis, and field emission scanning electron microscopy techniques. Results of thermogravimetric analysis showed that the amount of PEG component in the O-CNT-PEG was approximately 80% (w/w). Cell cytotoxicity study showed that O-CNT was less cytotoxic than pristine multiwalled nanotubes, and O-CNT-PEG had the lowest toxicity against HeLa and HepG2 cell lines. The effect of O-CNT-PEG in reduction of melanoma tumor size after PTT was evaluated. Cancerous mice were exposed to a continuous-wave near infrared laser diode (λ=808 nm, P=2 W and I=8 W/cm(2)) for 10 minutes once in the period of the treatment. The average size of tumor in mice receiving O-CNT-PEG decreased sharply in comparison with those that received laser therapy alone. Results of animal studies indicate that O-CNT-PEG is a powerful candidate for eradicating solid tumors in PTT technique.

  15. Change in brain and lesion volumes after CEE therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Mark A.; Hogan, Patricia E.; Resnick, Susan M.; Bryan, R. Nick; Robinson, Jennifer G.; Goveas, Joseph S.; Davatzikos, Christos; Kuller, Lewis H.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Bushnell, Cheryl D.; Shumaker, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: To determine whether smaller brain volumes in older women who had completed Women's Health Initiative (WHI)-assigned conjugated equine estrogen–based hormone therapy (HT), reported by WHI Memory Study (WHIMS)-MRI, correspond to a continuing increased rate of atrophy an average of 6.1 to 7.7 years later in WHIMS-MRI2. Methods: A total of 1,230 WHI participants were contacted: 797 (64.8%) consented, and 729 (59%) were rescanned an average of 4.7 years after the initial MRI scan. Mean annual rates of change in total brain volume, the primary outcome, and rates of change in ischemic lesion volumes, the secondary outcome, were compared between treatment groups using mixed-effect models with adjustment for trial, clinical site, age, intracranial volumes, and time between MRI measures. Results: Total brain volume decreased an average of 3.22 cm3/y in the active arm and 3.07 cm3/y in the placebo arm (p = 0.53). Total ischemic lesion volumes increased in both arms at a rate of 0.12 cm3/y (p = 0.88). Conclusions: Conjugated equine estrogen–based postmenopausal HT, previously assigned at WHI baseline, did not affect rates of decline in brain volumes or increases in brain lesion volumes during the 4.7 years between the initial and follow-up WHIMS-MRI studies. Smaller frontal lobe volumes were observed as persistent group differences among women assigned to active HT compared with placebo. Women with a history of cardiovascular disease treated with active HT, compared with placebo, had higher rates of accumulation in white matter lesion volume and total brain lesion volume. Further study may elucidate mechanisms that explain these findings. PMID:24384646

  16. PET imaging in a longitudinal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma study: association with tumor volume

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Maija; Jaervenpaeae, Ritva (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)), email: maija.rossi@pshp.fi; Korkola, Pasi (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)); Pertovaara, Hannu (Dept. of Oncology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)); Dastidar, Prasun; Soimakallio, Seppo (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Tampere Medical School, Tampere (Finland)); Wu, Xingchen (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Dept. of Oncology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland)); Eskola, Hannu (Medical Imaging Centre, Dept. of Radiology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, Tampere Univ. of Technology, Tampere (Finland)); Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa (Dept. of Oncology, Tampere Univ. Hospital, Tampere (Finland); Tampere Medical School, Tampere (Finland))

    2011-11-15

    Background. Computed tomography (CT) is generally used in the evaluation of the treatment response of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) patients. Instead of morphological images, positron emission tomography (PET) shows metabolic information that is connected to tumor activity, cell proliferation rate, and, thus, prognosis. Purpose. To determine the prognostic value of PET for tumor volume reduction measured by CT and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) along with clinical characteristics in NHL patients. Material and Methods. We imaged 21 B-cell type NHL patients using whole-body 18F-FDG-PET at the onset and the completion of treatment and at six-month follow-up. The maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) was calculated. Morphological tumor volume calculations were assessed using both MRI and CT. Additionally, patients underwent thorough clinical examination including several laboratory tests. Results. A high SUV{sub max} was able to predict significant tumor volume reduction at the beginning of treatment, but the relation to pure tumor volume was poor. Conclusion. The SUV{sub max} values derived from FDG-PET seemed to correlate with volume changes but not with their absolute values or laboratory tests. Unlike MRI and CT, FDG-PET showed the disappearance of active tumors after treatment

  17. Target volumes in radiation therapy of childhood brain tumours; La determination des volumes-cibles en radiotherapie pediatrique: application aux tumeurs cerebrales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Habrand, J.L.; Abdulkarim, B. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Dept. de Radiotherapie, 94 - Villejuif (France); Beaudre, A. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Unite de Radiophysique, 94 - Villejuif (France); El Khouri, M. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Dept. d' Imagerie Medicale, 94 - Villejuif (France); Kalifa, C. [Institut Gustave Roussy, Dept. de Pediatrie, 94 - Villejuif (France)

    2001-10-01

    Pediatric tumors have enjoyed considerable improvements for the past 30 years. This is mainly due to the extensive use of combined therapeutical modalities in which chemotherapy plays a prominent role. In many children, local treatment including radiotherapy, can nowadays be adapted in terms of target volume and dose to the 'response' to an initial course of chemotherapy almost on a case by case basis. This makes precise recommendation on local therapy highly difficult in this age group. We will concentrate in this paper on brain tumors in which chemotherapy is of limited value and radiotherapy still plays a key-role. (authors)

  18. Preliminary study of the internal margin of the gross tumor volume in thoracic esophageal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiancheng; Wang, Linhua; Wang, Xiaoliang; Zhao, Yunhui; Liu, Di; Chen, Cheng; Zhang, He Ping; Pan, Jianji

    2012-10-01

    To measure the displacement of the tumor of the gross tumor volume (GTV) of thoracic esophageal cancer in the calm states of end-inspiration and end-expiration for determining the internal margin of the GTV (IGTV). Twenty-two patients with thoracic esophageal cancer who were unable to undergo surgery were identified in our hospital. The patients received radiotherapy. By using 16-slice spiral computed tomography (CT), we acquired the calm states of end-inspiration and end-expiration. The displacement and volume changes in tumor target volume were measured, and the changes were analyzed to determine if these were associated with the tidal volume and the location and length of the target volume V. In the end, we analyzed the displacement of tumor target volume and calculated the internal margin of the GTV by empirical formula. The average tidal volume was 463.6 ml. The average GTV at end-inspiration was 33.3 ml and at end-expiration was 33.35 ml. Three was not any significant between two groups (T=-0.034, P>0.05). The IGTV (X-axis direction) was 3.09 mm for the right sector and 4.08 mm for the left border; the IGTV (Z-axis direction) was 3.96 mm for the anterior border and 2.83 mm for the posterior border; and the IGTV (Y-axis direction) was 7.31 mm for the upper boundary (head direction) and 10.16 mm for the lower boundary (feet direction). The motion of the GTV showed no significant correlation with the tidal volume of patients and the length of the tumor, but in relation to the tumor location, the displacement of the lower thoracic and the middle thoracic target volumes occurred in the direction of the anterior and right, which were not significantly different (T=0.859, 0.229, P>0.05) The significant differences were observed for the other directions (P<0.05). Because of respiratory and organ movements, the displacement of the tumor target volume was different in all directions. Therefore, we recommend that expansion of the planning target volume during clinical

  19. Sparing healthy tissue and increasing tumor dose using bayesian modeling of geometric uncertainties for planning target volume personalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herschtal, Alan; Te Marvelde, Luc; Mengersen, Kerrie; Foroudi, Farshad; Eade, Thomas; Pham, Daniel; Caine, Hannah; Kron, Tomas

    2015-06-01

    To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy-induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Disease Control After Reduced Volume Conformal and Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Childhood Craniopharyngioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merchant, Thomas E., E-mail: thomas.merchant@stjude.org [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Kun, Larry E.; Hua, Chia-Ho [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Radiological Sciences, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Wu, Shengjie; Xiong, Xiaoping [St Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Biostatistics, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Sanford, Robert A.; Boop, Frederick A. [Semmes Murphey Neurologic and Spine Institute, Neurosurgery, Memphis, Tennessee (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To estimate the rate of disease control after conformal radiation therapy using reduced clinical target volume (CTV) margins and to determine factors that predict for tumor progression. Methods and Materials: Eighty-eight children (median age, 8.5 years; range, 3.2-17.6 years) received conformal or intensity modulated radiation therapy between 1998 and 2009. The study group included those prospectively treated from 1998 to 2003, using a 10-mm CTV, defined as the margin surrounding the solid and cystic tumor targeted to receive the prescription dose of 54 Gy. The CTV margin was subsequently reduced after 2003, yielding 2 groups of patients: those treated with a CTV margin greater than 5 mm (n=26) and those treated with a CTV margin less than or equal to 5 mm (n=62). Disease progression was estimated on the basis of additional variables including sex, race, extent of resection, tumor interventions, target volume margins, and frequency of weekly surveillance magnetic resonance (MR) imaging during radiation therapy. Median follow-up was 5 years. Results: There was no difference between progression-free survival rates based on CTV margins (>5 mm vs ≤5 mm) at 5 years (88.1% ± 6.3% vs 96.2% ± 4.4% [P=.6386]). There were no differences based on planning target volume (PTV) margins (or combined CTV plus PTV margins). The PTV was systematically reduced from 5 to 3 mm during the time period of the study. Factors predictive of superior progression-free survival included Caucasian race (P=.0175), no requirement for cerebrospinal fluid shunting (P=.0066), and number of surveillance imaging studies during treatment (P=.0216). Patients whose treatment protocol included a higher number of weekly surveillance MR imaging evaluations had a lower rate of tumor progression. Conclusions: These results suggest that targeted volume reductions for radiation therapy using smaller margins are feasible and safe but require careful monitoring. We are currently investigating

  1. Acceptable Toxicity After Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Liver Tumors Adjacent to the Central Biliary System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriguchi, Takahisa; Takeda, Atsuya; Sanuki, Naoko; Oku, Yohei; Aoki, Yousuke [Radiation Oncology Center, Ofuna Chuo Hospital, Kanagawa (Japan); Shigematsu, Naoyuki [Department of Radiology, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo, E-mail: kunieda-mi@umin.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokai University, Kanagawa (Japan)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate biliary toxicity after stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for liver tumors. Methods and Materials: Among 297 consecutive patients with liver tumors treated with SBRT of 35 to 50 Gy in 5 fractions, patients who were irradiated with >20 Gy to the central biliary system (CBS), including the gallbladder, and had follow-up times >6 months were retrospectively analyzed. Toxicity profiles, such as clinical symptoms and laboratory and radiologic data especially for obstructive jaundice and biliary infection, were investigated in relation to the dose volume and length relationship for each biliary organ. Results: Fifty patients with 55 tumors were irradiated with >20 Gy to the CBS. The median follow-up period was 18.2 months (range, 6.0-80.5 months). In the dose length analysis, 39, 34, 14, and 2 patients were irradiated with >20 Gy, >30 Gy, >40 Gy, and >50 Gy, respectively, to >1 cm of the biliary tract. Seven patients were irradiated with >20 Gy to >20% of the gallbladder. Only 2 patients experienced asymptomatic bile duct stenosis. One patient, metachronously treated twice with SBRT for tumors adjacent to each other, had a transient increase in hepatic and biliary enzymes 12 months after the second treatment. The high-dose area >80 Gy corresponded to the biliary stenosis region. The other patient experienced biliary stenosis 5 months after SBRT and had no laboratory changes. The biliary tract irradiated with >20 Gy was 7 mm and did not correspond to the bile duct stenosis region. No obstructive jaundice or biliary infection was found in any patient. Conclusions: SBRT for liver tumors adjacent to the CBS was feasible with minimal biliary toxicity. Only 1 patient had exceptional radiation-induced bile duct stenosis. For liver tumors adjacent to the CBS without other effective treatment options, SBRT at a dose of 40 Gy in 5 fractions is a safe treatment with regard to biliary toxicity.

  2. Mechanisms of tumor necrosis in photodynamic therapy with a chlorine photosensitizer: experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Bigbov, Elmir N.

    2011-02-01

    A photodynamic therapy experiment on 118 inbred white mice with transplanted Ehrlich's tumor (mouse mammary gland adenocarcinoma) is performed to reveal mechanisms of necrosis formation. In 7-10 days the tumor of 1-1.5 cm diameter is formed under skin at the injection point, and PDT procedure is applied. There were used a chlorine type photosensitizer RadachlorineTM and 662 nm wavelength diode laser. The drug is injected by intravenously at the dose of 40 mg/kg; the irradiation is executed in 2-2.5 hours at the surface dose of about 200 J/cm2. Each of the mice had a photochemical reaction in form of destructive changes at the irradiation region with subsequent development of dry coagulation necrosis. After rejection of the necrosis there occurred epithelization of defect tissues in a tumor place. Histological investigations were conducted in different follow-up periods, in 5 and 30 min, 1, 3, 6, and 12 hours, 1, 3, 7 and 28 days after irradiation. They included optical microscopy, immune marker analysis, morphometry with measurements of volume density of epithelium, tumor stroma and necroses, vascular bed. The investigations showed that an important role in damaging mechanisms of photodynamic action belongs to hypoxic injuries of tumor mediated by micro vascular disorders and blood circulatory disturbances. The injuries are formed in a few stages: microcirculation angiospasm causing vessel paresis, irreversible stases in capillaries, diapedetic hemorrhages, thromboses, and thrombovasculitis. It is marked mucoid swelling and fibrinoid necrosis of vascular tissue. Progressive vasculitises result in total vessel obliteration and tumor necrosis.

  3. Correlation of Tumor and Peritumoral Edema Volumes with Survival in Patients with Cerebral Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerschbaumer, Johannes; Bauer, Marlies; Popovscaia, Marina; Grams, Astrid E; Thomé, Claudius; Freyschlag, Christian F

    2017-02-01

    Surgical resection in combination with radiotherapy in selected cases remains the best option for patients with cerebral metastases. Postoperative relapse of brain metastases occurs frequently and can be reduced by postoperative whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT). Continuous spread of tumor cells from the primary lesions is debated as a cause of recurrence. It is well known that in gliomas, infiltration takes place within the surrounding edema. Obviously, most brain metastases are usually associated with peritumoral edema, which may act as an indicator of infiltration and more aggressive tumor biology. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the correlation of tumor and edema volumes with overall survival in patients with cerebral metastases. A total of 143 patients diagnosed with brain metastasis (male:female=1.1:1) who underwent surgical resection were included retrospectively in this analysis. Clinical data were retrieved from electronic patient files. The volumes of tumor and edema calculated by manual delineation. The ratio of edema to tumor volume was calculated, leading to dichotomization of the patients. The median tumor volume was 20.1 cc (range=0.8-90.8 cc) and the median volume of edema 49.5 cc (range=0-179.9 cc). The volume of metastases did not significantly correlate with overall survival. The ratio of edema to tumor volume was also not a prognostic factor in terms of overall survival. Only surgical resection, preoperative recursive partitioning analysis class, and postoperative addition of WBRT, as well as female sex, demonstrated beneficial effects. The extent of edema surrounding cerebral metastases does not appear to influence overall survival in patients suffering from brain metastases, although it seems to be responsible for most of the patients' symptoms. The hypothesis that the extent of edema was disadvantageous concerning survival was supported by our data. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios

  4. USE OF PROTON MAGNETIC RESONANCE SPECTROSCOPIC IMAGING DATA IN PLANNING FOCAL RADIATION THERAPIES FOR BRAIN TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward E Graves

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Advances in radiation therapy for malignant neoplasms have produced techniques such as Gamma Knife radiosurgery, capable of delivering an ablative dose to a specific, irregular volume of tissue. However, efficient use of these techniques requires the identification of a target volume that will produce the best therapeutic response while sparing surrounding normal brain tissue. Accomplishing this task using conventional computed tomography (CT and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques has proven difficult because of the difficulties in identifying the effective tumor margin. Magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging (MRSI has been shown to offer a clinically-feasible metabolic assessment of the presence and extent of neoplasm that can complement conventional anatomic imaging. This paper reviews current Gamma Knife protocols and MRSI acquisition, reconstruction, and interpretation techniques, and discusses the motivation for including magnetic resonance spectroscopy findings while planning focal radiation therapies. A treatment selection and planning strategy incorporating MRSI is then proposed, which can be used in the future to assess the efficacy of spectroscopy-based therapy planning.

  5. Research progress in nanographene oxide with tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YOU Peihong

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Nanographene oxide,one of graphene oxide derivatives and a novel two-dimensional carbon nanomaterial,has become a popular research topic in nanomedicine due to its unique properties such as ultra-high surface-to-volume ratio and great photo-thermal effect.It contains a large amount of reactive chemical groups,including carboxy group,carbonyl group,hydroxyl group and epoxy group,which enable its easy biological and chemical functionalization and excellent biocompatibility.Therefore,it has potential applications in biomedical field.This paper briefly describes the preparation and functionalization of nanographeme oxide,and then mainly focuses on its application studies in the biomedical field,including in vitro and in vivo toxicity tests and advanced research progress of tumor imaging and treatment.

  6. Time course and predictive factors for lung volume reduction following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of lung tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Binkley, Michael S.; Shrager, Joseph B.; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Popat, Rita; Maxim, Peter G.; Shultz, David Benjamin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2016-01-01

    Background Stereotactic ablative volume reduction (SAVR) is a potential alternative to lung-volume reduction surgery in patients with severe emphysema and excessive surgical risk. Having previously observed a dose-volume response for localized lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors, we investigated the time course and factors associated with volume reduction. Methods We retrospectively identified 70 eligible patients receiving lung tumor SABR du...

  7. Targeting distinct tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells by inhibiting CSF-1 receptor: combating tumor evasion of antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priceman, Saul J; Sung, James L; Shaposhnik, Zory; Burton, Jeremy B; Torres-Collado, Antoni X; Moughon, Diana L; Johnson, Mai; Lusis, Aldons J; Cohen, Donald A; Iruela-Arispe, M Luisa; Wu, Lily

    2010-02-18

    Tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells (TIMs) support tumor growth by promoting angiogenesis and suppressing antitumor immune responses. CSF-1 receptor (CSF1R) signaling is important for the recruitment of CD11b(+)F4/80(+) tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and contributes to myeloid cell-mediated angiogenesis. However, the impact of the CSF1R signaling pathway on other TIM subsets, including CD11b(+)Gr-1(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), is unknown. Tumor-infiltrating MDSCs have also been shown to contribute to tumor angiogenesis and have recently been implicated in tumor resistance to antiangiogenic therapy, yet their precise involvement in these processes is not well understood. Here, we use the selective pharmacologic inhibitor of CSF1R signaling, GW2580, to demonstrate that CSF-1 regulates the tumor recruitment of CD11b(+)Gr-1(lo)Ly6C(hi) mononuclear MDSCs. Targeting these TIM subsets inhibits tumor angiogenesis associated with reduced expression of proangiogenic and immunosuppressive genes. Combination therapy using GW2580 with an anti-VEGFR-2 antibody synergistically suppresses tumor growth and severely impairs tumor angiogenesis along with reverting at least one TIM-mediated antiangiogenic compensatory mechanism involving MMP-9. These data highlight the importance of CSF1R signaling in the recruitment and function of distinct TIM subsets, including MDSCs, and validate the benefits of targeting CSF1R signaling in combination with antiangiogenic drugs for the treatment of solid cancers.

  8. Delineation of Supraclavicular Target Volumes in Breast Cancer Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Lindsay C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Diehn, Felix E. [Department of Radiology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Boughey, Judy C. [Department of Surgery, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Childs, Stephanie K.; Park, Sean S.; Yan, Elizabeth S.; Petersen, Ivy A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Mutter, Robert W., E-mail: mutter.robert@mayo.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: To map the location of gross supraclavicular metastases in patients with breast cancer, in order to determine areas at highest risk of harboring subclinical disease. Methods and Materials: Patients with axial imaging of gross supraclavicular disease were identified from an institutional breast cancer registry. Locations of the metastatic lymph nodes were transferred onto representative axial computed tomography images of the supraclavicular region and compared with the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) breast cancer atlas for radiation therapy planning. Results: Sixty-two patients with 161 supraclavicular nodal metastases were eligible for study inclusion. At the time of diagnosis, 117 nodal metastases were present in 44 patients. Forty-four nodal metastases in 18 patients were detected at disease recurrence, 4 of whom had received prior radiation to the supraclavicular fossa. Of the 161 nodal metastases, 95 (59%) were within the RTOG consensus volume, 4 nodal metastases (2%) in 3 patients were marginally within the volume, and 62 nodal metastases (39%) in 30 patients were outside the volume. Supraclavicular disease outside the RTOG consensus volume was located in 3 regions: at the level of the cricoid and thyroid cartilage (superior to the RTOG volume), in the posterolateral supraclavicular fossa (posterolateral to the RTOG volume), and in the lateral low supraclavicular fossa (lateral to the RTOG volume). Only women with multiple supraclavicular metastases had nodal disease that extended superiorly to the level of the thyroid cartilage. Conclusions: For women with risk of harboring subclinical supraclavicular disease warranting the addition of supraclavicular radiation, coverage of the posterior triangle and the lateral low supraclavicular region should be considered. For women with known supraclavicular disease, extension of neck coverage superior to the cricoid cartilage may be warranted.

  9. Prediction of Long-term Post-operative Testosterone Replacement Requirement Based on the Pre-operative Tumor Volume and Testosterone Level in Pituitary Macroadenoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Cheng-Chi; Chen, Chung-Ming; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Pai, Ping-Ching; Toh, Cheng-Hong; Chuang, Chi-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Non-functioning pituitary macroadenomas (NFPAs) are the most prevalent pituitary macroadenomas. One common symptom of NFPA is hypogonadism, which may require long-term hormone replacement. This study was designed to clarify the association between the pre-operative tumor volume, pre-operative testosterone level, intraoperative resection status and the need of long-term post-operative testosterone replacement. Between 2004 and 2012, 45 male patients with NFPAs were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent transsphenoidal surgery. Hypogonadism was defined as total serum testosterone levels of operative magnetic resonance images. We prescribed testosterone to patients with defined hypogonadism or clinical symptoms of hypogonadism. Hormone replacement for longer than 1 year was considered as long-term therapy. The need for long-term post-operative testosterone replacement was significantly associated with larger pre-operative tumor volume (p = 0.0067), and lower pre-operative testosterone level (p = 0.0101). There was no significant difference between the gross total tumor resection and subtotal resection groups (p = 0.1059). The pre-operative tumor volume and testosterone level impact post-operative hypogonadism. By measuring the tumor volume and the testosterone level and by performing adequate tumor resection, surgeons will be able to predict post-operative hypogonadism and the need for long-term hormone replacement. PMID:26537232

  10. Navigating cancer network attractors for tumor-specific therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Creixell, Pau; Schoof, Erwin; Erler, Janine Terra

    2012-01-01

    Cells employ highly dynamic signaling networks to drive biological decision processes. Perturbations to these signaling networks may attract cells to new malignant signaling and phenotypic states, termed cancer network attractors, that result in cancer development. As different cancer cells reach...... these malignant states by accumulating different molecular alterations, uncovering these mechanisms represents a grand challenge in cancer biology. Addressing this challenge will require new systems-based strategies that capture the intrinsic properties of cancer signaling networks and provide deeper...... understanding of the processes by which genetic lesions perturb these networks and lead to disease phenotypes. Network biology will help circumvent fundamental obstacles in cancer treatment, such as drug resistance and metastasis, empowering personalized and tumor-specific cancer therapies....

  11. Target therapies for radioiodine refractory advanced thyroid tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlumberger, M

    2012-01-01

    A small but not irrelevant percentage of differentiated thyroid cancers become refractory to radioiodine treatment either because they lose the ability of taking up iodine over the time or because, despite a persistent uptaking ability, the effect of the radioiodine is lost in terms of tumor burden reduction. These patients receive only few and transient benefits from other conventional therapies and particularly from chemotherapy. In the last decade, several new drugs have been discovered as potentially useful and tested in clinical trials. They are mainly represented by protein kinase inhibitor molecules that should be proposed to advanced and progressive 131I refractory thyroid cancer patients by enrolling them in clinical trials or by the "off label" use of the drug.

  12. Segmentation-free direct tumor volume and metabolic activity estimation from PET scans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghanaki, Saeid Asgari; Duggan, Noirin; Ma, Hillgan; Hou, Xinchi; Celler, Anna; Benard, Francois; Hamarneh, Ghassan

    2018-01-01

    Tumor volume and metabolic activity are two robust imaging biomarkers for predicting early therapy response in F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET), which is a modality to image the distribution of radiotracers and thereby observe functional processes in the body. To date, estimation of these two biomarkers requires a lesion segmentation step. While the segmentation methods requiring extensive user interaction have obvious limitations in terms of time and reproducibility, automatically estimating activity from segmentation, which involves integrating intensity values over the volume is also suboptimal, since PET is an inherently noisy modality. Although many semi-automatic segmentation based methods have been developed, in this paper, we introduce a method which completely eliminates the segmentation step and directly estimates the volume and activity of the lesions. We trained two parallel ensemble models using locally extracted 3D patches from phantom images to estimate the activity and volume, which are derivatives of other important quantification metrics such as standardized uptake value (SUV) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). For validation, we used 54 clinical images from the QIN Head and Neck collection on The Cancer Imaging Archive, as well as a set of 55 PET scans of the Elliptical Lung-Spine Body Phantom™with different levels of noise, four different reconstruction methods, and three different background activities, namely; air, water, and hot background. In the validation on phantom images, we achieved relative absolute error (RAE) of 5.11 % ±3.5% and 5.7 % ±5.25% for volume and activity estimation, respectively, which represents improvements of over 20% and 6% respectively, compared with the best competing methods. From the validation performed using clinical images, we found that the proposed method is capable of obtaining almost the same level of agreement with a group of trained experts, as a single trained

  13. Forecasting longitudinal changes in oropharyngeal tumor morphology throughout the course of head and neck radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yock, Adam D; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M; Garden, Adam S; Kudchadker, Rajat J; Court, Laurence E

    2014-08-01

    To create models that forecast longitudinal trends in changing tumor morphology and to evaluate and compare their predictive potential throughout the course of radiation therapy. Two morphology feature vectors were used to describe 35 gross tumor volumes (GTVs) throughout the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal tumors. The feature vectors comprised the coordinates of the GTV centroids and a description of GTV shape using either interlandmark distances or a spherical harmonic decomposition of these distances. The change in the morphology feature vector observed at 33 time points throughout the course of treatment was described using static, linear, and mean models. Models were adjusted at 0, 1, 2, 3, or 5 different time points (adjustment points) to improve prediction accuracy. The potential of these models to forecast GTV morphology was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and the accuracy of the models was compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Adding a single adjustment point to the static model without any adjustment points decreased the median error in forecasting the position of GTV surface landmarks by the largest amount (1.2 mm). Additional adjustment points further decreased the forecast error by about 0.4 mm each. Selection of the linear model decreased the forecast error for both the distance-based and spherical harmonic morphology descriptors (0.2 mm), while the mean model decreased the forecast error for the distance-based descriptor only (0.2 mm). The magnitude and statistical significance of these improvements decreased with each additional adjustment point, and the effect from model selection was not as large as that from adding the initial points. The authors present models that anticipate longitudinal changes in tumor morphology using various models and model adjustment schemes. The accuracy of these models depended on their form, and the utility of these models includes the characterization of patient

  14. Forecasting longitudinal changes in oropharyngeal tumor morphology throughout the course of head and neck radiation therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yock, Adam D.; Rao, Arvind; Dong, Lei; Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S.; Kudchadker, Rajat J.; Court, Laurence E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To create models that forecast longitudinal trends in changing tumor morphology and to evaluate and compare their predictive potential throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Two morphology feature vectors were used to describe 35 gross tumor volumes (GTVs) throughout the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal tumors. The feature vectors comprised the coordinates of the GTV centroids and a description of GTV shape using either interlandmark distances or a spherical harmonic decomposition of these distances. The change in the morphology feature vector observed at 33 time points throughout the course of treatment was described using static, linear, and mean models. Models were adjusted at 0, 1, 2, 3, or 5 different time points (adjustment points) to improve prediction accuracy. The potential of these models to forecast GTV morphology was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and the accuracy of the models was compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: Adding a single adjustment point to the static model without any adjustment points decreased the median error in forecasting the position of GTV surface landmarks by the largest amount (1.2 mm). Additional adjustment points further decreased the forecast error by about 0.4 mm each. Selection of the linear model decreased the forecast error for both the distance-based and spherical harmonic morphology descriptors (0.2 mm), while the mean model decreased the forecast error for the distance-based descriptor only (0.2 mm). The magnitude and statistical significance of these improvements decreased with each additional adjustment point, and the effect from model selection was not as large as that from adding the initial points. Conclusions: The authors present models that anticipate longitudinal changes in tumor morphology using various models and model adjustment schemes. The accuracy of these models depended on their form, and the utility of these models

  15. Forecasting longitudinal changes in oropharyngeal tumor morphology throughout the course of head and neck radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yock, Adam D.; Kudchadker, Rajat J. [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Rao, Arvind [Department of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Dong, Lei [Scripps Proton Therapy Center, San Diego, California 92121 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Beadle, Beth M.; Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States); Court, Laurence E., E-mail: LECourt@MDAnderson.org [Department of Radiation Physics and Department of Imaging Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 and The Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, Houston, Texas 77030 (United States)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To create models that forecast longitudinal trends in changing tumor morphology and to evaluate and compare their predictive potential throughout the course of radiation therapy. Methods: Two morphology feature vectors were used to describe 35 gross tumor volumes (GTVs) throughout the course of intensity-modulated radiation therapy for oropharyngeal tumors. The feature vectors comprised the coordinates of the GTV centroids and a description of GTV shape using either interlandmark distances or a spherical harmonic decomposition of these distances. The change in the morphology feature vector observed at 33 time points throughout the course of treatment was described using static, linear, and mean models. Models were adjusted at 0, 1, 2, 3, or 5 different time points (adjustment points) to improve prediction accuracy. The potential of these models to forecast GTV morphology was evaluated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and the accuracy of the models was compared using Wilcoxon signed-rank tests. Results: Adding a single adjustment point to the static model without any adjustment points decreased the median error in forecasting the position of GTV surface landmarks by the largest amount (1.2 mm). Additional adjustment points further decreased the forecast error by about 0.4 mm each. Selection of the linear model decreased the forecast error for both the distance-based and spherical harmonic morphology descriptors (0.2 mm), while the mean model decreased the forecast error for the distance-based descriptor only (0.2 mm). The magnitude and statistical significance of these improvements decreased with each additional adjustment point, and the effect from model selection was not as large as that from adding the initial points. Conclusions: The authors present models that anticipate longitudinal changes in tumor morphology using various models and model adjustment schemes. The accuracy of these models depended on their form, and the utility of these models

  16. Verification of the tumor volume delineation method using a fixed threshold of peak standardized uptake value.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Kazuya; Mitsumoto, Takuya; Shiraishi, Takahiro; Tsuda, Keisuke; Nishiyama, Atsushi; Inoue, Kazumasa; Yoshikawa, Kyosan; Hatano, Kazuo; Kubota, Kazuo; Fukushi, Masahiro

    2017-09-01

    We aimed to determine the difference in tumor volume associated with the reconstruction model in positron-emission tomography (PET). To reduce the influence of the reconstruction model, we suggested a method to measure the tumor volume using the relative threshold method with a fixed threshold based on peak standardized uptake value (SUVpeak). The efficacy of our method was verified using 18F-2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/computed tomography images of 20 patients with lung cancer. The tumor volume was determined using the relative threshold method with a fixed threshold based on the SUVpeak. The PET data were reconstructed using the ordered-subset expectation maximization (OSEM) model, the OSEM + time-of-flight (TOF) model, and the OSEM + TOF + point-spread function (PSF) model. The volume differences associated with the reconstruction algorithm (%VD) were compared. For comparison, the tumor volume was measured using the relative threshold method based on the maximum SUV (SUVmax). For the OSEM and TOF models, the mean %VD values were -0.06 ± 8.07 and -2.04 ± 4.23% for the fixed 40% threshold according to the SUVmax and the SUVpeak, respectively. The effect of our method in this case seemed to be minor. For the OSEM and PSF models, the mean %VD values were -20.41 ± 14.47 and -13.87 ± 6.59% for the fixed 40% threshold according to the SUVmax and SUVpeak, respectively. Our new method enabled the measurement of tumor volume with a fixed threshold and reduced the influence of the changes in tumor volume associated with the reconstruction model.

  17. Permanent occlusion of feeding arteries and draining veins in solid mouse tumors by vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP with Tookad.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noa Madar-Balakirski

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiangiogenic and anti-vascular therapies present intriguing alternatives to cancer therapy. However, despite promising preclinical results and significant delays in tumor progression, none have demonstrated long-term curative features to date. Here, we show that a single treatment session of Tookad-based vascular targeted photodynamic therapy (VTP promotes permanent arrest of tumor blood supply by rapid occlusion of the tumor feeding arteries (FA and draining veins (DV, leading to tumor necrosis and eradication within 24-48 h. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A mouse earlobe MADB106 tumor model was subjected to Tookad-VTP and monitored by three complementary, non-invasive online imaging techniques: Fluorescent intravital microscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering Imaging and photosensitized MRI. Tookad-VTP led to prompt tumor FA vasodilatation (a mean volume increase of 70% with a transient increase (60% in blood-flow rate. Rapid vasoconstriction, simultaneous blood clotting, vessel permeabilization and a sharp decline in the flow rates then followed, culminating in FA occlusion at 63.2 sec+/-1.5SEM. This blockage was deemed irreversible after 10 minutes of VTP treatment. A decrease in DV blood flow was demonstrated, with a slight lag from FA response, accompanied by frequent changes in flow direction before reaching a complete standstill. In contrast, neighboring, healthy tissue vessels of similar sizes remained intact and functional after Tookad-VTP. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Tookad-VTP selectively targets the tumor feeding and draining vessels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first mono-therapeutic modality that primarily aims at the larger tumor vessels and leads to high cure rates, both in the preclinical and clinical arenas.

  18. Proton-beam therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma associated with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugahara, Shinji [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Research Center Hospital for Charged Particle Therapy, National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan); Nakayama, Hidetsugu; Mizumoto, Masashi; Tsuboi, Koji; Tokuuye, Koichi [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Fukuda, Kuniaki; Abei, Masato; Shoda, Junichi [Dept. of Gastroenterology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan); Tokita, Mari [Alpert Medical School of Brown Univ., Providence, RI (United States); Matsuzaki, Yasushi [Dept. of Gastroenterology, Tokyo Medical Univ. Kasumigaura Hospital, Ibaraki (Japan); Thono, Eriko [Dept. of Radiology, Inst. of Clinical Medicine, Univ. of Tsukuba, Ibaraki (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    Background and purpose: the prognosis of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) is extremely poor, as effective treatment options are limited. The authors performed a retrospective review to evaluate the efficacy of proton-beam therapy (PBT) for patients presenting with PVTT in the setting of HCC. Patients and methods: between February 1991 and September 2005, 35 patients with HCC and tumor thrombi in the main trunk or major branches of the portal vein presented for consideration of PBT. Their tumor sizes ranged from 25 mm to 130 mm (median, 60 mm). A median total dose of 72.6 GyE in 22 fractions was delivered over 31 days to a target volume that encompassed both the primary hepatic lesion and the PVTT. Results: 32 patients were progression-free during a median follow-up period of 21 months (range, 2-88 months) and three patients experienced disease progression. Local progression-free survival rates were 46% at 2 years and 20% at 5 years, and the median local progression-free survival was 21 months. Acute toxicity {>=} grade 3 was observed in three patients, and no patient experienced late toxicity {>=} grade 3. None of the patients had to discontinue treatment as a result of toxicity. Conclusion: PBT improved local control and significantly prolonged survival in HCC patients with PVTT. (orig.)

  19. Tumor Microenvironment Modulation via Gold Nanoparticles Targeting Malicious Exosomes: Implications for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catarina Roma-Rodrigues

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nanovesicles formed in the endosomal pathway with an important role in paracrine and autocrine cell communication. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells, malicious exosomes, have important roles in tumor microenvironment maturation and cancer progression. The knowledge of the role of exosomes in tumorigenesis prompted a new era in cancer diagnostics and therapy, taking advantage of the use of circulating exosomes as tumor biomarkers due to their stability in body fluids and targeting malignant exosomes’ release and/or uptake to inhibit or delay tumor development. In recent years, nanotechnology has paved the way for the development of a plethora of new diagnostic and therapeutic platforms, fostering theranostics. The unique physical and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs make them suitable vehicles to pursuit this goal. AuNPs’ properties such as ease of synthesis with the desired shape and size, high surface:volume ratio, and the possibility of engineering their surface as desired, potentiate AuNPs’ role in nanotheranostics, allowing the use of the same formulation for exosome detection and restraining the effect of malicious exosomes in cancer progression.

  20. Tumor Microenvironment Modulation via Gold Nanoparticles Targeting Malicious Exosomes: Implications for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roma-Rodrigues, Catarina; Raposo, Luís R; Cabral, Rita; Paradinha, Fabiana; Baptista, Pedro V; Fernandes, Alexandra R

    2017-01-14

    Exosomes are nanovesicles formed in the endosomal pathway with an important role in paracrine and autocrine cell communication. Exosomes secreted by cancer cells, malicious exosomes, have important roles in tumor microenvironment maturation and cancer progression. The knowledge of the role of exosomes in tumorigenesis prompted a new era in cancer diagnostics and therapy, taking advantage of the use of circulating exosomes as tumor biomarkers due to their stability in body fluids and targeting malignant exosomes' release and/or uptake to inhibit or delay tumor development. In recent years, nanotechnology has paved the way for the development of a plethora of new diagnostic and therapeutic platforms, fostering theranostics. The unique physical and chemical properties of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) make them suitable vehicles to pursuit this goal. AuNPs' properties such as ease of synthesis with the desired shape and size, high surface:volume ratio, and the possibility of engineering their surface as desired, potentiate AuNPs' role in nanotheranostics, allowing the use of the same formulation for exosome detection and restraining the effect of malicious exosomes in cancer progression.

  1. Quantification and controllability study of minimally invasive exothermic chemo-ablation therapy for tumor ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ran; Huang, Yu; Liu, Jing

    2009-01-01

    The recently proposed exothermic chemical reaction based tumor hyperthermia method presented a new way of realizing truly minimally invasive treatment for tumor. This method utilizes heat generated from the reaction between acid and alkali solutions to allow for tumor ablation. Successful clinical implementation of this method requires a clearer understanding and quantification of the ablation area such that a more controllable operation can be made. A number of in-vitro and in-vivo experiments are designed to examine the features of thermal chemo-ablation therapy which include micro and macro characteristics of ablated tissue and temperature change during the ablation process. A Quantitative study on the relationship between velocity and ablation volume as well as a Graphical User Interface in Matlab for computerized ablation area analysis are also presented in this article. We present in here two instrument designs for thermal chemo-ablation and have completed the prototype design for the injection pump which has been tested and successfully applied in ex-vivo and vivo experiments.

  2. The burden of chronic pain after major head and neck tumor therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Sulieman Terkawi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Our study highlighted the high burden of chronic pain after therapy for major head and neck tumors. We identified demographic and clinical factors that are associated with the presence of chronic pain. Further studies are required to better understand the risk factors to implement strategies to prevent, alleviate, and treat chronic pain associated with major head and neck tumor therapies.

  3. Inhibition of NF-kB in tumor cells exacerbates immune celll activation following photodynamic therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekgaarden, M.; Kos, M.; Jurg, F.A.; Beek, van A.A.; Gulik, van M.; Heger, M.

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields very good outcomes in numerous types of superficial solid cancers, some tumors respond suboptimally to PDT. Novel treatment strategies are therefore needed to enhance the efficacy in these therapy-resistant tumors. One of these strategies is to combine PDT

  4. Inhibition of NF-κB in Tumor Cells Exacerbates Immune Cell Activation Following Photodynamic Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broekgaarden, Mans; Kos, Milan; Jurg, Freek A.; van Beek, Adriaan A.; van Gulik, Thomas M.; Heger, Michal

    2015-01-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) yields very good outcomes in numerous types of superficial solid cancers, some tumors respond suboptimally to PDT. Novel treatment strategies are therefore needed to enhance the efficacy in these therapy-resistant tumors. One of these strategies is to combine PDT

  5. Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0041 TITLE: Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor- Initiating Cell Therapy PRINCIPAL...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Targeting Extracellular Matrix Glycoproteins in Metastases for Tumor-Initiating Cell Therapy 5b. GRANT

  6. Sparing Healthy Tissue and Increasing Tumor Dose Using Bayesian Modeling of Geometric Uncertainties for Planning Target Volume Personalization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herschtal, Alan, E-mail: Alan.Herschtal@petermac.org [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Faculty of Health, Arts and Design, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne (Australia); Te Marvelde, Luc [Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Mengersen, Kerrie [School of Mathematical Sciences, Science and Engineering Faculty, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane (Australia); Foroudi, Farshad [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Eade, Thomas [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Northern Clinical School, University of Sydney (Australia); Pham, Daniel [Department of Radiation Therapy, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Caine, Hannah [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Radiation Oncology Department, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, Sydney (Australia); Kron, Tomas [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne (Australia); Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-06-01

    Objective: To develop a mathematical tool that can update a patient's planning target volume (PTV) partway through a course of radiation therapy to more precisely target the tumor for the remainder of treatment and reduce dose to surrounding healthy tissue. Methods and Materials: Daily on-board imaging was used to collect large datasets of displacements for patients undergoing external beam radiation therapy for solid tumors. Bayesian statistical modeling of these geometric uncertainties was used to optimally trade off between displacement data collected from previously treated patients and the progressively accumulating data from a patient currently partway through treatment, to optimally predict future displacements for that patient. These predictions were used to update the PTV position and margin width for the remainder of treatment, such that the clinical target volume (CTV) was more precisely targeted. Results: Software simulation of dose to CTV and normal tissue for 2 real prostate displacement datasets consisting of 146 and 290 patients treated with a minimum of 30 fractions each showed that re-evaluating the PTV position and margin width after 8 treatment fractions reduced healthy tissue dose by 19% and 17%, respectively, while maintaining CTV dose. Conclusion: Incorporating patient-specific displacement patterns from early in a course of treatment allows PTV adaptation for the remainder of treatment. This substantially reduces the dose to healthy tissues and thus can reduce radiation therapy–induced toxicities, improving patient outcomes.

  7. Experience with and potential of Cf-252 therapy for other tumors: Lexington clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruyama, Y.

    1986-01-01

    Clinical observations of tumor response in a variety of sites to Cf-252 (Cf) neutron brachytherapy (NT) are described. Many tumors which are accessible and easily implanted are suitable for Cf-NT, but in advanced stages, must be integrated into a more comprehensive program of local, regional and systemic therapy. With local tumor clearance and control, there should be treatment for regional disease using conventional photon radiotherapy; adjuvant therapies for disseminated disease using systemic therapy is also needed. While potential for therapy exists for Cf-NT treatment of many tumors, additional clinical trials carried out in a variety of global settings are needed where different tumors are common and are available for studies. Tumors suitable for study include e.g. cervix, uterus, vagina, tonsil-oropharynx, anterior oral cavity, prostate, female urethra, nasopharynx, anus and rectum, malignant glioma, parotid, perhaps esophagus, bladder, non-oat cell lung, localized sarcoma and melanoma, etc.

  8. Total tumor volume predicts recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation in patients beyond Milan or UCSF criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macaron, C; Hanouneh, I A; Lopez, R; Aucejo, F; Zein, N N

    2010-12-01

    The aim of tumor-based selection criteria in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is to prevent orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) in patients likely to experience recurrence and to maximize OLT opportunities for those with a high likelihood of cure. Our aim was to assess total tumor volume (TTV) as a selection criterion for OLT in patients with HCC beyond Milan or University of California San Francisco criteria. We identified patients who underwent OLT for HCC between 2002 and 2008. TTV was calculated as the sum of the volumes of all tumors on pretransplant imaging before any therapy [(4/3)πr(3), where r is the maximum radius of each HCC]. Univariable and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was used to assess factors associated with recurrence of HCC. 107 patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up was 21 months (interquartile range, 11.8-32.5), during which 13 patients (12.1%) experienced recurrence of HCC. Twenty-nine patients (27.1%) had HCC beyond the Milan criteria. A TTV cutoff value of 33.5 cm(3) was chosen on the basis of the risk of recurrence by using a receiver operating characteristic curve. Patients beyond the Milan criteria with TTV <33.5 experienced less recurrence (13.3% vs 42.8%; P < .001) and higher survival (13.3% vs 57.1%; P = .006) than those who were beyond the Milan criteria with TTV ≥33.5. Similarly, TTV predicted HCC recurrence and survival in those beyond the UCSF criteria. TTV is useful in identifying patients at risk of tumor recurrence and poor survival among those with tumor burden beyond traditional criteria, and it may improve the selection of OLT candidates. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Integration of a real-time tumor monitoring system into gated proton spot-scanning beam therapy: an initial phantom study using patient tumor trajectory data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Shimizu, Shinichi; Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Maeda, Kenichiro; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki

    2013-07-01

    In spot-scanning proton therapy, the interplay effect between tumor motion and beam delivery leads to deterioration of the dose distribution. To mitigate the impact of tumor motion, gating in combination with repainting is one of the most promising methods that have been proposed. This study focused on a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton therapy system integrated with real-time tumor monitoring. The authors investigated the effectiveness of gating in terms of both the delivered dose distribution and irradiation time by conducting simulations with patients' motion data. The clinically acceptable range of adjustable irradiation control parameters was explored. Also, the relation between the dose error and the characteristics of tumor motion was investigated. A simulation study was performed using a water phantom. A gated proton beam was irradiated to a clinical target volume (CTV) of 5 × 5 × 5 cm(3), in synchronization with lung cancer patients' tumor trajectory data. With varying parameters of gate width, spot spacing, and delivered dose per spot at one time, both dose uniformity and irradiation time were calculated for 397 tumor trajectory data from 78 patients. In addition, the authors placed an energy absorber upstream of the phantom and varied the thickness to examine the effect of changing the size of the Bragg peak and the number of required energy layers. The parameters with which 95% of the tumor trajectory data fulfill our defined criteria were accepted. Next, correlation coefficients were calculated between the maximum dose error and the tumor motion characteristics that were extracted from the tumor trajectory data. With the assumed CTV, the largest percentage of the data fulfilled the criteria when the gate width was ± 2 mm. Larger spot spacing was preferred because it increased the number of paintings. With a prescribed dose of 2 Gy, it was difficult to fulfill the criteria for the target with a very small effective depth (the sum of an assumed

  10. Real-time noninvasive optoacoustic monitoring of nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy of tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esenaliev, R. O.; Petrov, Y. Y.; Cicenaite, I.; Chumakova, O. V.; Petrova, I. Y.; Patrikeev, I.; Liopo, A.

    2007-02-01

    We proposed and have been developing real-time, noninvasive monitoring of blood oxygenation, total hemoglobin concentration, and thermotherapy including hyperthermia, coagulation, and cryotherapy. In this paper we propose to use the optoacoustic technique for monitoring of nanoparticle-mediated photothermal therapy (NPT) of tumors. NPT is based on heating exogenous strongly-absorbing nanoparticles selectively delivered in tumors. Real-time monitoring of NPT is necessary for precise tumor therapy with minimal damage to normal tissues. In this study we injected PEGylated and non-PEGylated carbon nanoparticles in nude mice bearing human tumors (5-15 mm) and irradiated the tumors for 10 minutes with nanosecond Nd:YAG laser pulses which produced both thermal damage to the tumors and optoacoustic signals for monitoring NPT in real time. Irradiation of tumors was performed during or after (3 or 24 hours) nanoparticle injection. Amplitude and temporal parameters of optoacoustic signals (measured with a custom-made wide-band optoacoustic probe) correlated well with nanoparticle injection, temperature rise in tumors, and tumor coagulation. Substantial thermal damage in large areas of the tumors was produced when optimal irradiation parameters were used. Monte Carlo modeling of light distribution in tumors and optoacoustic theory were applied to study kinetics of nanoparticle concentration in the tumors. Our results demonstrated that the optoacoustic technique can be used for real-time monitoring of NTP and provide precise tumor therapy with minimal damage to normal tissues.

  11. A new therapy for highly effective tumor eradication using HVJ-E combined with chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanamori Toshihide

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inactivated HVJ (hemagglutinating virus of Japan; Sendai virus particles (HVJ envelope vector; HVJ-E can incorporate and deliver plasmid DNA, siRNA, antibody and peptide and anti-cancer drugs to cells both in vitro and in vivo. We attempted to eradicate tumors derived from mouse colon cancer cells, CT26, by combining bleomycin (BLM-incorporated HVJ-E (HVJ-E/BLM with cisplatin (CDDP administration. Methods CT-26 tumor mass was intradermally established in Balb/c mice. HVJ-E/BLM was directly injected into the tumor mass with or without intraperitoneal administration of CDDP. The anti-tumor effect was evaluated by measuring tumor size and cytotoxic T cell activity against CT26. Re-challenge of tumor cells to treated mice was performed 10 days or 8 months after the initial tumor inoculation. Results We found that three intratumoral injections of HVJ-E/BLM along with a single intraperitoneal administration of CDDP eradicated CT26 tumors with more than 75% efficiency. When tumor cells were intradermally re-injected on day 10 after the initial tumor inoculation, tumors on both sides disappeared in most of the mice that received the combination therapy of HVJ-E/BLM and CDDP. Eight months after the initial tumor eradication, surviving mice were re-challenged with CT26 cells. The re-challenged tumors were rejected in all of the surviving mice treated with the combination therapy. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for CT26 were generated in these surviving mice. Conclusion Combination therapy consisting of HVJ-E and chemotherapy completely eradicated the tumor, and generated anti-tumor immunity. The combination therapy could therefore be a promising new strategy for cancer therapy.

  12. A new therapy for highly effective tumor eradication using HVJ-E combined with chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawano, Hirokazu; Komaba, Shintarou; Kanamori, Toshihide; Kaneda, Yasufumi

    2007-09-21

    Inactivated HVJ (hemagglutinating virus of Japan; Sendai virus) particles (HVJ envelope vector; HVJ-E can incorporate and deliver plasmid DNA, siRNA, antibody and peptide and anti-cancer drugs to cells both in vitro and in vivo. We attempted to eradicate tumors derived from mouse colon cancer cells, CT26, by combining bleomycin (BLM)-incorporated HVJ-E (HVJ-E/BLM) with cisplatin (CDDP) administration. CT-26 tumor mass was intradermally established in Balb/c mice. HVJ-E/BLM was directly injected into the tumor mass with or without intraperitoneal administration of CDDP. The anti-tumor effect was evaluated by measuring tumor size and cytotoxic T cell activity against CT26. Re-challenge of tumor cells to treated mice was performed 10 days or 8 months after the initial tumor inoculation. We found that three intratumoral injections of HVJ-E/BLM along with a single intraperitoneal administration of CDDP eradicated CT26 tumors with more than 75% efficiency. When tumor cells were intradermally re-injected on day 10 after the initial tumor inoculation, tumors on both sides disappeared in most of the mice that received the combination therapy of HVJ-E/BLM and CDDP. Eight months after the initial tumor eradication, surviving mice were re-challenged with CT26 cells. The re-challenged tumors were rejected in all of the surviving mice treated with the combination therapy. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes specific for CT26 were generated in these surviving mice. Combination therapy consisting of HVJ-E and chemotherapy completely eradicated the tumor, and generated anti-tumor immunity. The combination therapy could therefore be a promising new strategy for cancer therapy.

  13. Mesenchymal stem cell 1 (MSC1-based therapy attenuates tumor growth whereas MSC2-treatment promotes tumor growth and metastasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth S Waterman

    Full Text Available Currently, there are many promising clinical trials using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in cell-based therapies of numerous diseases. Increasingly, however, there is a concern over the use of MSCs because they home to tumors and can support tumor growth and metastasis. For instance, we established that MSCs in the ovarian tumor microenvironment promoted tumor growth and favored angiogenesis. In parallel studies, we also developed a new approach to induce the conventional mixed pool of MSCs into two uniform but distinct phenotypes we termed MSC1 and MSC2.Here we tested the in vitro and in vivo stability of MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes as well as their effects on tumor growth and spread. In vitro co-culture of MSC1 with various cancer cells diminished growth in colony forming units and tumor spheroid assays, while conventional MSCs or MSC2 co-culture had the opposite effect in these assays. Co-culture of MSC1 and cancer cells also distinctly affected their migration and invasion potential when compared to MSCs or MSC2 treated samples. The expression of bioactive molecules also differed dramatically among these samples. MSC1-based treatment of established tumors in an immune competent model attenuated tumor growth and metastasis in contrast to MSCs- and MSC2-treated animals in which tumor growth and spread was increased. Also, in contrast to these groups, MSC1-therapy led to less ascites accumulation, increased CD45+leukocytes, decreased collagen deposition, and mast cell degranulation.These observations indicate that the MSC1 and MSC2 phenotypes may be convenient tools for the discovery of critical components of the tumor stroma. The continued investigation of these cells may help ensure that cell based-therapy is used safely and effectively in human disease.

  14. Induction of CD4(+) and CD8(+) anti-tumor effector T cell responses by bacteria mediated tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Christian; Kasnitz, Nadine; Kocijancic, Dino; Trittel, Stephanie; Riese, Peggy; Guzman, Carlos A; Leschner, Sara; Weiss, Siegfried

    2015-10-15

    Facultative anaerobic bacteria like E. coli can colonize solid tumors often resulting in tumor growth retardation or even clearance. Little mechanistic knowledge is available for this phenomenon which is however crucial for optimization and further implementation in the clinic. Here, we show that intravenous injections with E. coli TOP10 can induce clearance of CT26 tumors in BALB/c mice. Importantly, re-challenging mice which had cleared tumors showed that clearance was due to a specific immune reaction. Accordingly, lymphopenic mice never showed tumor clearance after infection. Depletion experiments revealed that during induction phase, CD8(+) T cells are the sole effectors responsible for tumor clearance while in the memory phase CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were involved. This was confirmed by adoptive transfer. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells could reject newly set tumors while CD8(+) T cells could even reject established tumors. Detailed analysis of adoptively transferred CD4(+) T cells during tumor challenge revealed expression of granzyme B, FasL, TNF-α and IFN-γ in such T cells that might be involved in the anti-tumor activity. Our findings should pave the way for further optimization steps of this promising therapy. © 2015 UICC.

  15. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio as measured on MRI: a possible predictor of breast-conserving surgery versus mastectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faermann, Renata; Sperber, Fani; Schneebaum, Schlomo; Barsuk, Daphna

    2014-02-01

    The surgical approach to breast cancer changed dramatically in the past 20 years. The surgical objective today is to remove the tumor, ensuring negative margins and good cosmetic results, and preserving the breast when possible. Magnetic resonance imaging of the breast has become an essential imaging tool prior to surgery, diagnosing additional tumors and assessing tumor extent. Tumor-to-breast volume ratio, an important predictor of breast conservation, can be measured with MRI and may change the surgical decision. To measure the tumor-to-breast volume ratio using MRI in order to assess whether there is a correlation between this ratio and the type of surgery selected (breast-conserving or mastectomy). The volumes of the tumor and the breast and the tumor-to-breast volume ratio were retrospectively calculated using preoperative breast MRI in 76 patients who underwent breast-conserving surgery or mastectomy. Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) was performed in 64 patients and mastectomy in 12. The average tumor-to-breast volume ratio was 0.06 (6%) in the lumpectomy group and 0.30 (30%) in the mastectomy group (P < 0.0001). The tumor-to-breast volume ratio correlated with the type of surgery. As measured on MRI, this ratio is an accurate means of determining the type of surgery best suited for a given patient. It is recommended that MRI-determined tumor-to-breast volume ratio become part of the surgical planning protocol for patients diagnosed with breast cancer.

  16. Photodynamic therapy for the treatment of induced mammary tumor in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Isabelle; Ferreira, Juliana; Vollet-Filho, José Dirceu; Moriyama, Lilian T; Bagnato, Vanderlei S; Salvadori, Daisy Maria Favero; Rocha, Noeme S

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this work was to evaluate photodynamic therapy (PDT) by using a hematoporphyrin derivative as a photosensitizer and light-emitting diodes (LEDs) as light source in induced mammary tumors of Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats. Twenty SD rats with mammary tumors induced by DMBA were used. Animals were divided into four groups: control (G1), PDT only (G2), surgical removal of tumor (G3), and submitted to PDT immediately after surgical removal of tumor (G4). Tumors were measured over 6 weeks. Lesions and surgical were LEDs lighted up (200 J/cm(2) dose). The light distribution in vivo study used two additional animals without mammary tumors. In the control group, the average growth of tumor diameter was approximately 0.40 cm/week. While for PDT group, a growth of less than 0.15 cm/week was observed, suggesting significant delay in tumor growth. Therefore, only partial irradiation of the tumors occurred with a reduction in development, but without elimination. Animals in G4 had no tumor recurrence during the 12 weeks, after chemical induction, when compared with G3 animals that showed 60 % recurrence rate after 12 weeks of chemical induction. PDT used in the experimental model of mammary tumor as a single therapy was effective in reducing tumor development, so the surgery associated with PDT is a safe and efficient destruction of residual tumor, preventing recurrence of the tumor.

  17. Ultrasonography During Surgery to Approach Cerebral Metastases: Effect on Karnofsky Index Scores and Tumor Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lima Oliveira, Marcelo; Picarelli, Helder; Menezes, Marcos Roberto; Amorim, Robson Luis; Teixeira, Manoel Jacobsen; Bor-Seng-Shu, Edson

    2017-07-01

    The goals of treating a cerebral metastasis (CM) are to achieve local control of the disease and to improve patient quality of life. The aim of this study was to analyze the effect of conventional surgery supported by intraoperative ultrasound (IOUS) to approach a CM. To perform this analysis, we determined the postoperative Karnofsky Performance Status Scale (KPS) scores and tumor resection grades. Patients with a CM diagnosis were included in this study. Surgical treatment was either supported or not by IOUS. Pre- and postoperative KPS scores were determined by the oncology team, and cerebral tumor volume was estimated through pre- and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging. The surgical team determined whether it was possible to perform a total CM resection. There were 78 patients treated using surgical management (35 with and 43 without IOUS). In the IOUS group, the postoperative KPS scores were higher (80 vs. 70, respectively; P = 0.045) and the KPS evolution was superior (P = 0.036), especially in the following subgroups: difficulty of tumor resection ranking score tumor in an eloquent area (P = 0.043), tumor not associated with vessels or nerves (P = 0.007), and solitary lesions (P = 0.038). The residual tumor volume was lower in the IOUS group (9.5% and 1.6 mm(3) vs. 30.8% and 9 mm(3), respectively; P = 0.05). In patients with a KPS score ≥70, 62% of them had tumors (76% in the IOUS group and 45% in the non-IOUS group; P = 0.032; odds ratio, 3.8). IOUS may improve postoperative KPS scores and decrease residual tumor volumes in CM surgeries. These findings should be confirmed in future studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical Implementation of Intrafraction Cone Beam Computed Tomography Imaging During Lung Tumor Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijiang; Han, Bin; Meng, Bowen; Maxim, Peter G.; Xing, Lei; Koong, Albert C.; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose To develop and clinically evaluate a volumetric imaging technique for assessing intrafraction geometric and dosimetric accuracy of stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR). Methods and Materials Twenty patients received SABR for lung tumors using volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT). At the beginning of each fraction, pretreatment cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to align the soft-tissue tumor position with that in the planning CT. Concurrent with dose delivery, we acquired fluoroscopic radiograph projections during VMAT using the Varian on-board imaging system. Those kilovolt projections acquired during megavolt beam-on were automatically extracted, and intrafraction CBCT images were reconstructed using the filtered backprojection technique. We determined the time-averaged target shift during VMAT by calculating the center of mass of the tumor target in the intrafraction CBCT relative to the planning CT. To estimate the dosimetric impact of the target shift during treatment, we recalculated the dose to the GTV after shifting the entire patient anatomy according to the time-averaged target shift determined earlier. Results The mean target shift from intrafraction CBCT to planning CT was 1.6, 1.0, and 1.5 mm; the 95th percentile shift was 5.2, 3.1, 3.6 mm; and the maximum shift was 5.7, 3.6, and 4.9 mm along the anterior-posterior, left-right, and superior-inferior directions. Thus, the time-averaged intrafraction gross tumor volume (GTV) position was always within the planning target volume. We observed some degree of target blurring in the intrafraction CBCT, indicating imperfect breath-hold reproducibility or residual motion of the GTV during treatment. By our estimated dose recalculation, the GTV was consistently covered by the prescription dose (PD), that is, V100% above 0.97 for all patients, and minimum dose to GTV >100% PD for 18 patients and >95% PD for all patients. Conclusions Intrafraction CBCT during VMAT can provide

  19. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression from various tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Yu Jin; Kim, Mi Sook; Jang, Won Il; Seo, Young Seok; Cho, Chul Koo; Yoo, Hyung Jun; Paik, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    To evaluate the outcomes of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for patients with liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression from various primary tumors. Between 2002 and 2013, 72 patients with liver oligo-recurrence (oligo-metastasis with a controlled primary tumor) and oligo-progression (contradictory progression of a few sites of disease despite an overall tumor burden response to therapy) underwent SBRT. Of these, 9 and 8 patients with uncontrollable distant metastases and patients immediate loss to follow-up, respectively, were excluded. The total planning target volume was used to select the SBRT dose (median, 48 Gy; range, 30 to 60 Gy, 3–4 fractions). Toxicity was evaluated using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events v4.0. We evaluated 55 patients (77 lesions) treated with SBRT for liver metastases. All patients had controlled primary lesions, and 28 patients had stable lesions at another site (oligo-progression). The most common primary site was the colon (36 patients), followed by the stomach (6 patients) and other sites (13 patients). The 2-year local control and progression-free survival rates were 68% and 22%, respectively. The 2- and 5-year overall survival rates were 56% and 20%, respectively. The most common adverse events were grade 1–2 fatigue, nausea, and vomiting; no grade ≥3 toxicities were observed. Univariate analysis revealed that oligo-progression associated with poor survival. SBRT for liver oligo-recurrence and oligo-progression appears safe, with similar local control rates. For liver oligo-progression, criteria are needed to select patients in whom improved overall survival can be expected through SBRT.

  20. Radiation Therapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seung Gyu; Kim, Jin Hee; Byun, Sang Jun; Kim, Ok Bae; Hwang, Jae Seok; Oh, Young Kee; Choi, Tae Jin [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-03-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of radiation therapy (RT) for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) and to analyze the prognostic factors. From December 2004 to April 2009, 70 patients who had HCC with PVTT were treated with RT at Keimyung University Dongsan Medical Center. Nineteen patients whose total dose was below 30 Gy and one patient who underwent liver transplantation were excluded. The remaining 50 patients (45 males, 5 females; median age 55 years) were analyzed. According to the LCSGJ TNM stage, there were 27 patients (54.0%) with stage III and 23 (46.0%) with stage IV. Total dose of 30-54 Gy was administered (median 45). Thirty patients (60.0%) were treated with concurrent chemoradiation therapy (CCRT). The median follow-up duration was from 13.5 months (range, 3 to 70 months). The median survival time from the start of RT was 9 months. One-year and 2-year overall survival rates were 24.9% and 11.2%, respectively. At the follow-up time, three patients (6.0%) displayed no evidence of disease. Seven patients (14.0%) were alive with disease, and 40 (80.0%) patients had expired due to disease progression. CCRT was associated with worse survival than RT alone (p=0.034). Response to RT (p=0.037), CLIP stage (p=0.017), and TNM stage (p=0.041) were statistically significant prognostic factors. There was no radiation-induced liver disease. RT is an effective and safe modality for HCC with PVTT. Further studies such as prospective randomized trials are needed to confirm the role of RT for HCC with PVTT.

  1. Temporal Lobe Toxicity Analysis After Proton Radiation Therapy for Skull Base Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pehlivan, Berrin [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Ares, Carmen, E-mail: carmen.ares@psi.ch [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Lomax, Antony J.; Stadelmann, Otto; Goitein, Gudrun; Timmermann, Beate; Schneider, Ralf A.; Hug, Eugen B. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: Temporal lobe (TL) parenchyma toxicity constitutes one of the most frequent late adverse event in high-dose proton therapy (PT) for tumors of the skull base. We analyzed clinical events with dosimetric parameters in our patients treated for skull base tumors with spot-scanning PT. Methods and Materials: Between 1998 and 2005, a total of 62 patients received PT to a median dose of 71.7 Gy (relative biologic effectiveness [RBE]) (range, 63-74 Gy). The dose-volume histogram of each TL and the entire brain parenchyma (BP) were analyzed according to maximum, mean, and minimum dose as well as doses to 0.5, 1, 2, and 3 cc of brain volume (D{sub 0.5}, D{sub 1}, D{sub 2}, D{sub 3}) and correlated with clinical events. Generalized equivalent uniform dose (gEUD) values were calculated. Results: At a mean follow-up of 38 months (range, 14-92 months), 2 patients had developed symptomatic Grade 3 and 5 patients asymptomatic Grade 1 TL toxicity. Mean doses to a 2-cc volume of BP increased from 71 {+-} 5 Gy (RBE) for no toxicity to 74 {+-} 5 Gy (RBE) for Grade 1 and to 76 {+-} 2 Gy (RBE) for Grade 3 toxicity. TL events occurred in 6 of 7 patients (86%) at or above dose levels of {>=}64 Gy (RBE) D{sub 3}, {>=}68 Gy (RBE) D{sub 2}, {>=}72 Gy (RBE) D{sub 1}, and {>=}73 Gy (RBE) D{sub 0.5}, respectively (p = NS). No statistically significant dose/volume threshold was detected between patients experiencing no toxicity vs. Grade 1 or Grade 3. A strong trend for Grade 1 and 3 events was observed, when the gEUD was 60 Gy. Conclusions: A statistically significant normal tissue threshold dose for BP has not been successfully defined. However, our data suggest that tolerance of TL and BP to fractionated radiotherapy appears to be correlated with tissue volume included in high-dose regions. Additional follow-up time and patient accrual is likely needed to achieve clinical significance for these dose-volume parameters investigated. Our findings support the importance of establishing

  2. Improvement of internal tumor volumes of non-small cell lung cancer patients for radiation treatment planning using interpolated average CT in PET/CT.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available Respiratory motion causes uncertainties in tumor edges on either computed tomography (CT or positron emission tomography (PET images and causes misalignment when registering PET and CT images. This phenomenon may cause radiation oncologists to delineate tumor volume inaccurately in radiotherapy treatment planning. The purpose of this study was to analyze radiology applications using interpolated average CT (IACT as attenuation correction (AC to diminish the occurrence of this scenario. Thirteen non-small cell lung cancer patients were recruited for the present comparison study. Each patient had full-inspiration, full-expiration CT images and free breathing PET images by an integrated PET/CT scan. IACT for AC in PET(IACT was used to reduce the PET/CT misalignment. The standardized uptake value (SUV correction with a low radiation dose was applied, and its tumor volume delineation was compared to those from HCT/PET(HCT. The misalignment between the PET(IACT and IACT was reduced when compared to the difference between PET(HCT and HCT. The range of tumor motion was from 4 to 17 mm in the patient cohort. For HCT and PET(HCT, correction was from 72% to 91%, while for IACT and PET(IACT, correction was from 73% to 93% (*p<0.0001. The maximum and minimum differences in SUVmax were 0.18% and 27.27% for PET(HCT and PET(IACT, respectively. The largest percentage differences in the tumor volumes between HCT/PET and IACT/PET were observed in tumors located in the lowest lobe of the lung. Internal tumor volume defined by functional information using IACT/PET(IACT fusion images for lung cancer would reduce the inaccuracy of tumor delineation in radiation therapy planning.

  3. Audiovisual biofeedback guided breath-hold improves lung tumor position reproducibility and volume consistency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Lee, PhD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: This study demonstrated that audiovisual biofeedback can be used to improve the reproducibility and consistency of breath-hold lung tumor position and volume, respectively. These results may provide a pathway to achieve more accurate lung cancer radiation treatment in addition to improving various medical imaging and treatments by using breath-hold procedures.

  4. Dosimetric Advantages of Midventilation Compared With Internal Target Volume for Radiation Therapy of Pancreatic Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lens, Eelco, E-mail: e.lens@amc.uva.nl; Horst, Astrid van der; Versteijne, Eva; Tienhoven, Geertjan van; Bel, Arjan

    2015-07-01

    Purpose: The midventilation (midV) approach can be used to take respiratory-induced pancreatic tumor motion into account during radiation therapy. In this study, the dosimetric consequences for organs at risk and tumor coverage of using a midV approach compared with using an internal target volume (ITV) were investigated. Methods and Materials: For each of the 18 patients, 2 treatment plans (25 × 2.0 Gy) were created, 1 using an ITV and 1 using a midV approach. The midV dose distribution was blurred using the respiratory-induced motion from 4-dimensional computed tomography. The resulting planning target volume (PTV) coverage for this blurred dose distribution was analyzed; PTV coverage was required to be at least V{sub 95%} >98%. In addition, the change in PTV size and the changes in V{sub 10Gy}, V{sub 20Gy}, V{sub 30Gy}, V{sub 40Gy}, D{sub mean} and D{sub 2cc} for the stomach and for the duodenum were analyzed; differences were tested for significance using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results: Using a midV approach resulted in sufficient target coverage. A highly significant PTV size reduction of 13.9% (P<.001) was observed. Also, all dose parameters for the stomach and duodenum, except the D{sub 2cc} of the duodenum, improved significantly (P≤.002). Conclusions: By using the midV approach to account for respiratory-induced tumor motion, a significant PTV reduction and significant dose reductions to the stomach and to the duodenum can be achieved when irradiating pancreatic tumors.

  5. Validation and Comparison of the Therapeutic Efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Mediated By Boron-Rich Liposomes in Multiple Murine Tumor Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitz, Charles A; Khan, Aslam A; Kueffer, Peter J; Brockman, John D; Dixson, Jonathan; Jalisatgi, Satish S; Nigg, David W; Everett, Thomas A; Hawthorne, M Frederick

    2017-08-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor in mice bearing CT26 colon carcinoma flank tumors and the results were compared with previously performed studies with mice bearing EMT6 breast cancer flank tumors. Mice were implanted with CT26 tumors subcutaneously in the caudal flank and were given two separate tail vein injections of unilamellar liposomes composed of cholesterol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycer-3-phosphocholine, and K[nido-7-CH3(CH2)15-7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer and encapsulated Na3[1-(2`-B10H9)-2-NH3B10H8] within the liposomal core. Mice were irradiated 30 hours after the second injection in a thermal neutron beam for various lengths of time. The tumor size was monitored daily for 72 days. Despite relatively lower tumor boron concentrations, as compared to EMT6 tumors, a 45 minute neutron irradiation BNCT resulted in complete resolution of the tumors in 50% of treated mice, 50% of which never recurred. Median time to tumor volume tripling was 38 days in BNCT treated mice, 17 days in neutron-irradiated mice given no boron compounds, and 4 days in untreated controls. Tumor response in mice with CT26 colon carcinoma was markedly more pronounced than in previous reports of mice with EMT6 tumors, a difference which increased with dose. The slope of the dose response curve of CT26 colon carcinoma tumors is 1.05 times tumor growth delay per Gy compared to 0.09 times tumor growth delay per Gy for EMT6 tumors, indicating that inherent radiosensitivity of tumors plays a role in boron neutron capture therapy and should be considered in the development of clinical applications of BNCT in animals and man. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Validation and Comparison of the Therapeutic Efficacy of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy Mediated By Boron-Rich Liposomes in Multiple Murine Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles A Maitz

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT was performed at the University of Missouri Research Reactor in mice bearing CT26 colon carcinoma flank tumors and the results were compared with previously performed studies with mice bearing EMT6 breast cancer flank tumors. Mice were implanted with CT26 tumors subcutaneously in the caudal flank and were given two separate tail vein injections of unilamellar liposomes composed of cholesterol, 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycer-3-phosphocholine, and K[nido-7-CH3(CH215–7,8-C2B9H11] in the lipid bilayer and encapsulated Na3[1-(2`-B10H9-2-NH3B10H8] within the liposomal core. Mice were irradiated 30 hours after the second injection in a thermal neutron beam for various lengths of time. The tumor size was monitored daily for 72 days. Despite relatively lower tumor boron concentrations, as compared to EMT6 tumors, a 45 minute neutron irradiation BNCT resulted in complete resolution of the tumors in 50% of treated mice, 50% of which never recurred. Median time to tumor volume tripling was 38 days in BNCT treated mice, 17 days in neutron-irradiated mice given no boron compounds, and 4 days in untreated controls. Tumor response in mice with CT26 colon carcinoma was markedly more pronounced than in previous reports of mice with EMT6 tumors, a difference which increased with dose. The slope of the dose response curve of CT26 colon carcinoma tumors is 1.05 times tumor growth delay per Gy compared to 0.09 times tumor growth delay per Gy for EMT6 tumors, indicating that inherent radiosensitivity of tumors plays a role in boron neutron capture therapy and should be considered in the development of clinical applications of BNCT in animals and man.

  7. Mixed integer programming with dose-volume constraints in intensity-modulated proton therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Pengfei; Fan, Neng; Shan, Jie; Schild, Steven E; Bues, Martin; Liu, Wei

    2017-09-01

    In treatment planning for intensity-modulated proton therapy (IMPT), we aim to deliver the prescribed dose to the target yet minimize the dose to adjacent healthy tissue. Mixed-integer programming (MIP) has been applied in radiation therapy to generate treatment plans. However, MIP has not been used effectively for IMPT treatment planning with dose-volume constraints. In this study, we incorporated dose-volume constraints in an MIP model to generate treatment plans for IMPT. We created a new MIP model for IMPT with dose volume constraints. Two groups of IMPT treatment plans were generated for each of three patients by using MIP models for a total of six plans: one plan was derived with the Limited-memory Broyden-Fletcher-Goldfarb-Shanno (L-BFGS) method while the other plan was derived with our MIP model with dose-volume constraints. We then compared these two plans by dose-volume histogram (DVH) indices to evaluate the performance of the new MIP model with dose-volume constraints. In addition, we developed a model to more efficiently find the best balance between tumor coverage and normal tissue protection. The MIP model with dose-volume constraints generates IMPT treatment plans with comparable target dose coverage, target dose homogeneity, and the maximum dose to organs at risk (OARs) compared to treatment plans from the conventional quadratic programming method without any tedious trial-and-error process. Some notable reduction in the mean doses of OARs is observed. The treatment plans from our MIP model with dose-volume constraints can meet all dose-volume constraints for OARs and targets without any tedious trial-and-error process. This model has the potential to automatically generate IMPT plans with consistent plan quality among different treatment planners and across institutions and better protection for important parallel OARs in an effective way. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on

  8. Impact of coronal and sagittal views on lung gross tumor volume delineation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitton, Isabelle; Duppen, Joop C; Steenbakkers, Roel J H M; Lotz, Heidi; Nowak, Peter J C M; Rasch, Coen R N; van Herk, Marcel

    2016-09-01

    To study the impact of coronal and sagittal views (CSV) on the gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation on CT and matched PET/CT scans in non-small cell lung cancer. GTV delineations were performed by 11 experienced radiation oncologists on CT and PET/CT in 22 patients. Two tumor groups were defined: Group I: Primary tumors surrounded by lung or visceral pleura, without venous invasion, and without large extensions to the chest wall or the mediastinum. Group II: Tumors invading the hilar region, heart, large vessels, pericardium, and the mediastinum and/or associated with atelectasis. Tumor volumes and inter-observers variations (SD) were calculated and compared according to the use of axial view only (AW), axial/coronal/sagittal views (ACSW) and ACSW/PET (ACSWP). CSV were not frequently used (57.4% out of 242 delineations on CT). For group I, ACSW didn't improve significantly mean GTVs. SDs were small on CT and on PET (SD=0.3cm). For group II, ACSW had 27-46% smaller observer variation (mean SD=0.7cm) than AW (mean SD=1.1cm). The smaller observer variation of ACSW users was associated with, on average, a 40% smaller delineated volume (p=0.038). Mean GTV of ACSWP was 21% larger than mean GTV of ACSW on CT. For smaller lung tumors surrounded by healthy lung tissue the effect of multiple axis delineation is limited. However, application of coronal and sagittal windows is highly beneficial for delineation of more complex tumors, with atelectasis and/or pathological lymph nodes even if PET is used. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Stereological estimates of nuclear volume and other quantitative variables in supratentorial brain tumors. Practical technique and use in prognostic evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Flemming Brandt; Braendgaard, H; Chistiansen, A O

    1991-01-01

    the practical technique. The continuous variables were correlated with the subjective, qualitative WHO classification of brain tumors, and the prognostic value of the parameters was assessed. Well differentiated astrocytomas (n = 14) had smaller estimates of the volume-weighted mean nuclear volume and mean...... was significantly increased in glioblastomas (2p = 0.01). Three-dimensional, shape-independent estimates of macroscopical tumor volume were not different in anaplastic astrocytomas and glioblastomas (2p = 0.39). Histological type of tumor and mitotic index were of significant prognostic value (2p = 8.2.10(-6) and 2...... techniques in the prognostic evaluation of primary brain tumors....

  10. Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Brain Tumor Diagnosis and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yu; Morshed, Ramin; Auffinger, Brenda; Tobias, Alex L.; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2013-01-01

    Brain tumors are a diverse group of neoplasms that often carry a poor prognosis for patients. Despite tremendous efforts to develop diagnostic tools and therapeutic avenues, the treatment of brain tumors remains a formidable challenge in the field of neuro-oncology. Physiological barriers including the blood-brain barrier result in insufficient accumulation of therapeutic agents at the site of a tumor, preventing adequate destruction of malignant cells. Furthermore, there is a need for improvements in brain tumor imaging to allow for better characterization and delineation of tumors, visualization of malignant tissue during surgery, and tracking of response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Multifunctional nanoparticles offer the potential to improve upon many of these issues and may lead to breakthroughs in brain tumor management. In this review, we discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic applications of nanoparticles for brain tumors with an emphasis on innovative approaches in tumor targeting, tumor imaging, and therapeutic agent delivery. Clinically feasible nanoparticle administration strategies for brain tumor patients are also examined. Furthermore, we address the barriers towards clinical implementation of multifunctional nanoparticles in the context of brain tumor management. PMID:24060923

  11. A comparison of two dose calculation algorithms-anisotropic analytical algorithm and Acuros XB-for radiation therapy planning of canine intranasal tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Koichi; Pethel, Timothy D

    2017-07-01

    Although anisotropic analytical algorithm (AAA) and Acuros XB (AXB) are both radiation dose calculation algorithms that take into account the heterogeneity within the radiation field, Acuros XB is inherently more accurate. The purpose of this retrospective method comparison study was to compare them and evaluate the dose discrepancy within the planning target volume (PTV). Radiation therapy (RT) plans of 11 dogs with intranasal tumors treated by radiation therapy at the University of Georgia were evaluated. All dogs were planned for intensity-modulated radiation therapy using nine coplanar X-ray beams that were equally spaced, then dose calculated with anisotropic analytical algorithm. The same plan with the same monitor units was then recalculated using Acuros XB for comparisons. Each dog's planning target volume was separated into air, bone, and tissue and evaluated. The mean dose to the planning target volume estimated by Acuros XB was 1.3% lower. It was 1.4% higher for air, 3.7% lower for bone, and 0.9% lower for tissue. The volume of planning target volume covered by the prescribed dose decreased by 21% when Acuros XB was used due to increased dose heterogeneity within the planning target volume. Anisotropic analytical algorithm relatively underestimates the dose heterogeneity and relatively overestimates the dose to the bone and tissue within the planning target volume for the radiation therapy planning of canine intranasal tumors. This can be clinically significant especially if the tumor cells are present within the bone, because it may result in relative underdosing of the tumor. © 2017 American College of Veterinary Radiology.

  12. Tumorer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prause, J.U.; Heegaard, S.

    2005-01-01

    oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer......oftalmologi, øjenlågstumorer, conjunctivale tumorer, malignt melanom, retinoblastom, orbitale tumorer...

  13. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume and Velocity in Predicting Head and Neck Cancer Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Karen P; Murphy, James D; La, Trang H; Krakow, Trevor E; Iagaru, Andrei; Graves, Edward E; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy; Chang, Daniel T; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2011-01-01

    Purpose We previously showed that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on PET-CT predicts for disease recurrence and death in head and neck cancer (HNC). We hypothesized that increases in MTV over time would correlate with tumor growth and biology, and predict outcome. We sought to examine tumor growth over time in serial pre-treatment PET-CT scans. Methods and Materials From 2006–2009, 51 patients had two PET-CT scans prior to HNC treatment. MTV was defined as the tumor volume ≥50% of maximum SUV (SUVmax). MTV was calculated for the primary tumor, nodal disease, and composite (primary tumor + nodes). MTV and SUV velocity were defined as the change in MTV or SUVmax over time respectively. Cox regression analyses were used to examine correlations between SUV, MTV velocity, and outcome (disease progression and overall survival [OS]). Results Median follow-up time was 17.5 months. Median time between PET-CT scans was 3 weeks. Unexpectedly, 51% of cases demonstrated a decrease in SUVmax (average −0.1cc/week) and MTV (average −0.3cc/week) over time. Despite the variability in MTV, primary tumor MTV velocity predicted disease progression (hazard ratio [HR] 2.94; p=0.01), and OS (HR 1.85; p=0.03). Conclusions Primary tumor MTV velocity appears to be a better prognostic indicator of disease progression and survival compared to nodal MTV velocity. However, substantial variability was found in PET-CT biomarkers between serial scans. Caution should be used when integrating PET-CT biomarkers into clinical protocols in HNC. PMID:22270168

  14. Prognostic Value of Metabolic Tumor Volume and Velocity in Predicting Head-and-Neck Cancer Outcomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, Karen P.; Murphy, James D.; La, Trang H.; Krakow, Trevor E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Iagaru, Andrei [Department of Radiology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Graves, Edward E.; Hsu, Annie; Maxim, Peter G.; Loo, Billy; Chang, Daniel T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We previously showed that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) on positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT) predicts for disease recurrence and death in head-and-neck cancer (HNC). We hypothesized that increases in MTV over time would correlate with tumor growth and biology, and would predict outcome. We sought to examine tumor growth over time in serial pretreatment PET-CT scans. Methods and Materials: From 2006 to 2009, 51 patients had two PET-CT scans before receiving HNC treatment. MTV was defined as the tumor volume {>=}50% of maximum SUV (SUV{sub max}). MTV was calculated for the primary tumor, nodal disease, and composite (primary tumor + nodes). MTV and SUV velocity were defined as the change in MTV or SUV{sub max} over time, respectively. Cox regression analyses were used to examine correlations between SUV, MTV velocity, and outcome (disease progression and overall survival). Results: The median follow-up time was 17.5 months. The median time between PET-CT scans was 3 weeks. Unexpectedly, 51% of cases demonstrated a decrease in SUV{sub max} (average, -0.1 cc/week) and MTV (average, -0.3 cc/week) over time. Despite the variability in MTV, primary tumor MTV velocity predicted disease progression (hazard ratio 2.94; p = 0.01) and overall survival (hazard ratio 1.85; p = 0.03). Conclusions: Primary tumor MTV velocity appears to be a better prognostic indicator of disease progression and survival in comparison to nodal MTV velocity. However, substantial variability was found in PET-CT biomarkers between serial scans. Caution should be used when PET-CT biomarkers are integrated into clinical protocols for HNC.

  15. Noninvasive referencing of intraocular tumors for external beam radiation therapy using optical coherence tomography: A proof of concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rüegsegger, Michael B.; Steiner, Patrick; Kowal, Jens H., E-mail: jens.kowal@artorg.unibe.ch [ARTORG Center for Biomedical Engineering Research, University of Bern, Bern 3010 (Switzerland); Geiser, Dominik [Berne University of Applied Sciences, HuCE OptoLab, 2501 (Switzerland); Pica, Alessia; Aebersold, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Inselspital, Bern University Hospital, University of Bern, Bern 3010 (Switzerland)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: External beam radiation therapy is currently considered the most common treatment modality for intraocular tumors. Localization of the tumor and efficient compensation of tumor misalignment with respect to the radiation beam are crucial. According to the state of the art procedure, localization of the target volume is indirectly performed by the invasive surgical implantation of radiopaque clips or is limited to positioning the head using stereoscopic radiographies. This work represents a proof-of-concept for direct and noninvasive tumor referencing based on anterior eye topography acquired using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods: A prototype of a head-mounted device has been developed for automatic monitoring of tumor position and orientation in the isocentric reference frame for LINAC based treatment of intraocular tumors. Noninvasive tumor referencing is performed with six degrees of freedom based on anterior eye topography acquired using OCT and registration of a statistical eye model. The proposed prototype was tested based on enucleated pig eyes and registration accuracy was measured by comparison of the resulting transformation with tilt and torsion angles manually induced using a custom-made test bench. Results: Validation based on 12 enucleated pig eyes revealed an overall average registration error of 0.26 ± 0.08° in 87 ± 0.7 ms for tilting and 0.52 ± 0.03° in 94 ± 1.4 ms for torsion. Furthermore, dependency of sampling density on mean registration error was quantitatively assessed. Conclusions: The tumor referencing method presented in combination with the statistical eye model introduced in the past has the potential to enable noninvasive treatment and may improve quality, efficacy, and flexibility of external beam radiotherapy of intraocular tumors.

  16. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immunity in a murine mastocytoma model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2008-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that eventually cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, recognition of tumor-specific antigens, and induction of heat-shock proteins, while the three commonest cancer therapies (surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy) all tend to suppress the immune system. Like many other immunotherapies, the extent of the immune response after PDT tends to depend on the antigenicity of the particular tumor, or in other words, whether the tumor contains proteins with the correct characteristics to provide peptides that can bind to MHC class I molecules and provide a target for cytolytic T lymphocytes. We have described certain mouse tumors containing defined or naturally occurring tumor associated antigens that respond particularly well to PDT, and potent immune responses capable of destroying distant untreated tumors can be induced. In this report we address the induction of immunity after PDT of the DBA2 mastocytoma known as P815. This tumor was the first mouse tumor to be shown to possess a tumor-rejection antigen capable of being recognized by cytotoxic T-cells.

  17. Chimeric antigen receptor-T cell therapy for solid tumors require new clinical regimens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jinjing; Tian, Kang; Zhang, Haixu; Li, Liantao; Liu, Hongyan; Liu, Jingjie; Zhang, Qing; Zheng, Junnian

    2017-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor modified T cell (CAR-T) therapy has achieved encouraging breakthroughs in the treatment of hematological malignancies. Nevertheless, this success has not yet been extrapolated to solid tumors. This review focuses on new clinical regimens that could improve the therapeutic efficacy of CAR-T in solid tumors. Areas covered: Herein, the authors reviewed recent clinical trials using CAR-T therapies for the treatment of solid tumors. Specifically, this review covered the following areas: (1) the current status of CAR-T cells in the treatment of solid tumors; (2) the major factors constraining the efficacy of CAR-T cells in solid tumors; and (3) opinions regarding the future of CAR-T as a treatment for solid tumors. Expert commentary: While some recent studies have shown promising results, the ultimate success of CAR-T therapies in solid tumor patients will require the following improvements to clinical regimens: (1) local delivery of CAR-T cells; (2) combination of CAR-T cells with chemotherapeutic drugs to treat metastatic tumors; (3) combination of CAR-T with immune checkpoint inhibitors; (4) combination therapy using CAR-T cells targeting two different antigens; and (5) the use of CAR-T as a strategy to prevent tumor recurrence and metastasis after radical resection.

  18. Manipulating the tumor microenvironment ex vivo for enhanced expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chacon, Jessica Ann; Sarnaik, Amod A; Chen, Jie Qing; Creasy, Caitlin; Kale, Charuta; Robinson, John; Weber, Jeffrey; Hwu, Patrick; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2015-02-01

    Cultured tumor fragments from melanoma metastases have been used for years as a source of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) for adoptive cell therapy (ACT). The expansion of tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells with interleukin-2 (IL2) in these early cultures is critical in generating clinically active TIL infusion products, with a population of activated 4-1BB CD8(+) T cells recently found to constitute the majority of tumor-specific T cells. We used an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody added during the initial tumor fragment cultures to provide in situ 4-1BB costimulation. We found that addition of an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody could activate 4-1BB signaling within early cultured tumor fragments and accelerated the rate of memory CD8(+) TIL outgrowth that were highly enriched for melanoma antigen specificity. This was associated with NFκB activation and the induction of T-cell survival and memory genes, as well as enhanced IL2 responsiveness, in the CD8(+) T cells in the fragments and emerging from the fragments. Early provision of 4-1BB costimulation also affected the dendritic cells (DC) by activating NFκB in DC and promoting their maturation inside the tumor fragments. Blocking HLA class I prevented the enhanced outgrowth of CD8(+) T cells with anti-4-1BB, suggesting that an ongoing HLA class I-mediated antigen presentation in early tumor fragment cultures plays a role in mediating tumor-specific CD8(+) TIL outgrowth. Our results highlight a previously unrecognized concept in TIL ACT that the tumor microenvironment can be dynamically regulated in the initial tumor fragment cultures to regulate the types of T cells expanded and their functional characteristics. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  19. Postmenopausal hormone therapy, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and brain volumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espeland, Mark A; Brinton, Roberta Diaz; Manson, JoAnn E; Yaffe, Kristine; Hugenschmidt, Christina; Vaughan, Leslie; Craft, Suzanne; Edwards, Beatrice J; Casanova, Ramon; Masaki, Kamal; Resnick, Susan M

    2015-09-29

    To examine whether the effect of postmenopausal hormone therapy (HT) on brain volumes in women aged 65-79 years differs depending on type 2 diabetes status during postintervention follow-up of a randomized controlled clinical trial. The Women's Health Initiative randomized clinical trials assigned women to HT (0.625 mg/day conjugated equine estrogens with or without 2.5 mg/day medroxyprogesterone acetate) or placebo for an average of 5.6 years. A total of 1,402 trial participants underwent brain MRI 2.4 years after the trials; these were repeated in 699 women 4.7 years later. General linear models were used to assess the interaction between diabetes status and HT assignment on brain volumes. Women with diabetes at baseline or during follow-up who had been assigned to HT compared to placebo had mean decrement in total brain volume of -18.6 mL (95% confidence interval [CI] -29.6, -7.6). For women without diabetes, this mean decrement was -0.4 (95% CI -3.8, 3.0) (interaction p=0.002). This interaction was evident for total gray matter (pNeurology.

  20. Tackling the vascular heterogeneity issue in tumors : identification of novel targets for tumor therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roodink, I.

    2009-01-01

    This thesis focuses on the identification of novel vascular targeting agents directed against tumor endothelium and the expression patterns of their targets in (clinical) tumor samples. Tumors obtain their blood supply by the formation of new vessels and/or by the incorporation, and possibly

  1. SU-F-207-06: CT-Based Assessment of Tumor Volume in Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qayyum, F; Armato, S; Straus, C; Husain, A; Vigneswaran, W; Kindler, H [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To determine the potential utility of computed tomography (CT) scans in the assessment of physical tumor bulk in malignant pleural mesothelioma patients. Methods: Twenty-eight patients with malignant pleural mesothelioma were used for this study. A CT scan was acquired for each patient prior to surgical resection of the tumor (median time between scan and surgery: 27 days). After surgery, the ex-vivo tumor volume was measured by a pathologist using a water displacement method. Separately, a radiologist identified and outlined the tumor boundary on each CT section that demonstrated tumor. These outlines then were analyzed to determine the total volume of disease present, the number of sections with outlines, and the mean volume of disease per outlined section. Subsets of the initial patient cohort were defined based on these parameters, i.e. cases with at least 30 sections of disease with a mean disease volume of at least 3mL per section. For each subset, the R- squared correlation between CT-based tumor volume and physical ex-vivo tumor volume was calculated. Results: The full cohort of 28 patients yielded a modest correlation between CT-based tumor volume and the ex-vivo tumor volume with an R-squared value of 0.66. In general, as the mean tumor volume per section increased, the correlation of CT-based volume with the physical tumor volume improved substantially. For example, when cases with at least 40 CT sections presenting a mean of at least 2mL of disease per section were evaluated (n=20) the R-squared correlation increased to 0.79. Conclusion: While image-based volumetry for mesothelioma may not generally capture physical tumor volume as accurately as one might expect, there exists a set of conditions in which CT-based volume is highly correlated with the physical tumor volume. SGA receives royalties and licensing fees through the University of Chicago for computer-aided diagnosis technology.

  2. Efficacy of adjuvant therapy with procarbazine, MCNU, and vincristine for oligodendroglial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wakabayashi, Toshihiko; Kajita, Yasukazu; Mizuno, Masaaki; Yoshida, Jun [Nagoya Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Nagasaka, Tetsurou

    2001-03-01

    An adjuvant chemotherapy regimen consisting of procarbazine, MCNU, and vincristine (PMV) was evaluated for the treatment of malignant oligodendroglial tumors. Ten patients with histologically proven oligodendroglial tumors were treated with PMV therapy and the effectiveness was assessed using magnetic resonance imaging. Four patients with primary tumors underwent PMV after radiation therapy, and six patients with recurrent tumors were treated using PMV only. Tumor response was defined as radiological evidence of mass size change after completion of three courses of PMV. Complete or partial responses (more than 50% reduction in tumor mass) were noted in six patients, and tumor growth stabilized in four patients. In particular, inhibition of tumor growth using PMV was achieved in three patients with recurrent oligodendroglial tumors, despite the initial response after chemoradiation therapy (interferon-{beta}, MCNU, radiation) or nitrosourea chemotherapy (ACNU, MCNU). This PMV regimen (a modified PCV regimen using drugs available in Japan) is effective for treating malignant oligodendroglial tumors despite recurrence after other initial treatment procedures. (author)

  3. Barriers Prevent Patient Access to Personalized Therapies Identified by Molecular Tumor Profiling of Gynecologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tyler Hillman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of commercial molecular tumor profiling to discover actionable mutations and to identify barriers that might prevent patient access to personalized therapies. Methods. We conducted an IRB-approved retrospective review of 26 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent commercial tumor profiling at our institution during the first 18 months of test availability. Tumor profiles reported targeted therapies and clinical trials matched to patient-specific mutations. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results. Most patients who underwent tumor profiling had serous epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma (46%. Patients underwent profiling after undergoing a median of two systemic therapies (range 0 to 13. A median of one targeted therapy was suggested per patient profile. Tumor profiling identified no clinically actionable mutations for seven patients (27%. Six patients sought insurance approval for a targeted therapy and two were declined (33%. One patient (4% received a targeted therapy and this was discontinued due to tumor progression. Conclusions. There are formidable barriers to targeted therapy for patients with gynecologic malignancies. These barriers include a dearth of FDA-approved targeted agents for gynecologic malignancies, lack of third party insurance coverage and limited geographic availability of clinical trials.

  4. Yoga Therapy in Treating Patients With Malignant Brain Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-27

    Adult Anaplastic Astrocytoma; Adult Anaplastic Ependymoma; Adult Anaplastic Meningioma; Adult Anaplastic Oligodendroglioma; Adult Brain Stem Glioma; Adult Choroid Plexus Tumor; Adult Diffuse Astrocytoma; Adult Ependymoblastoma; Adult Ependymoma; Adult Giant Cell Glioblastoma; Adult Glioblastoma; Adult Gliosarcoma; Adult Grade II Meningioma; Adult Medulloblastoma; Adult Meningeal Hemangiopericytoma; Adult Mixed Glioma; Adult Oligodendroglioma; Adult Papillary Meningioma; Adult Pineal Gland Astrocytoma; Adult Pineoblastoma; Adult Pineocytoma; Adult Supratentorial Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor (PNET); Recurrent Adult Brain Tumor

  5. Multifield Optimization Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors: A Translation to Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frank, Steven J., E-mail: sjfrank@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Cox, James D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Weber, Randal S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Kies, Merrill S. [Department of Head and Neck Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lewin, Jan S. [Department of Head and Neck Surgery, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Munsell, Mark F. [Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Palmer, Matthew B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Background: We report the first clinical experience and toxicity of multifield optimization (MFO) intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) for patients with head and neck tumors. Methods and Materials: Fifteen consecutive patients with head and neck cancer underwent MFO-IMPT with active scanning beam proton therapy. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) had comprehensive treatment extending from the base of the skull to the clavicle. The doses for chemoradiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 70 Gy and 66 Gy, respectively. The robustness of each treatment plan was also analyzed to evaluate sensitivity to uncertainties associated with variations in patient setup and the effect of uncertainties with proton beam range in patients. Proton beam energies during treatment ranged from 72.5 to 221.8 MeV. Spot sizes varied depending on the beam energy and depth of the target, and the scanning nozzle delivered the spot scanning treatment “spot by spot” and “layer by layer.” Results: Ten patients presented with SCC and 5 with adenoid cystic carcinoma. All 15 patients were able to complete treatment with MFO-IMPT, with no need for treatment breaks and no hospitalizations. There were no treatment-related deaths, and with a median follow-up time of 28 months (range, 20-35 months), the overall clinical complete response rate was 93.3% (95% confidence interval, 68.1%-99.8%). Xerostomia occurred in all 15 patients as follows: grade 1 in 10 patients, grade 2 in 4 patients, and grade 3 in 1 patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients: grade 1 in 1 patient, grade 2 in 8 patients, and grade 3 in 6 patients. No patient experienced grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials.

  6. Peritumoral Brain Edema in Meningiomas Depends on Aquaporin-4 Expression and Not on Tumor Grade, Tumor Volume, Cell Count, or Ki-67 Labeling Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawlitza, Matthias; Fiedler, Eckhard; Schob, Stefan; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus; Surov, Alexey

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate to which degree the peritumoral brain edema in patients with meningiomas depends on aquaporin-4 (AQP4) expression, tumor grade, tumor volume, Ki-67 expression, and cell count. Thirty-three patients (25 women, 8 men; mean age 56.6 ± 16.0 years) with an intracranial meningioma underwent a standardized magnetic resonance (MR) examination prior to surgical resection. Edema indices (EIs) and tumor volumes were measured on the MR images. Tumor grade was classified according to the World Health Organization, and the proliferation index was estimated on Ki-67 antigen-stained specimens. Tumor cell count was evaluated. Eighteen specimens were stained for AQP4 expressioon. Significant intergroup differences between AQP4 expression grades and EIs were observed (P = 0.03), and a positive correlation was detected between EIs and AQP4 expression grades (r = 0.54; P tumor grading, tumor volume, Ki-67 expression, or cell count. Moreover, we observed no significant positive or negative correlations between the EI and tumor grading (P = 0.7), tumor volume (P = 0.19), Ki-67 index (P = 0.9), and cell count (P = 0.34). Peritumoral brain edema in patients with meningiomas may depend on AQP4 expression grades and not on tumor grade, tumor volume, Ki-67 expression, and cell count. The amount of edema predicted AQP4 expressions with moderate-to-good sensitivity and specificity.

  7. Molecular pathology and targeted therapy of common tumors in central nervous system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei YANG

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available It is difficult to cure central nervous system tumors using traditional method, due to chemotherapy drugs lack of specificity. They kill the tumor cells, and damage normal tissues and organs at the same time. The latest hotspot is targeted therapy on the specific molecules in the molecular pathway of central nervous system tumor cells. This review introduces the relationship between molecularly biological characteristics of medulloblastoma, oligodendrocytoma, glioblastoma and the prognosis in the view of critical intracellular pathway and genetic mutation. Furthermore, it reviews the current situation and progress of targeted therapy of tumors. As a consequence, it offers some new information for the individualized therapy of central nervous system tumors. doi: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2014.12.017

  8. Updated Outcome and Analysis of Tumor Response in Mobile Spine and Sacral Chordoma Treated With Definitive High-Dose Photon/Proton Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabolizadeh, Peyman, E-mail: peyman.kabolizadeh@beaumont.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin; Liebsch, Norbert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Hornicek, Francis J.; Schwab, Joseph H. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Choy, Edwin [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Rosenthal, Daniel I. [Department of Radiology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Niemierko, Andrzej; DeLaney, Thomas F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: Treatment of spine and sacral chordoma generally involves surgical resection, usually in conjunction with radiation therapy. In certain circumstances where resection may result in significant neurologic or organ dysfunction, patients can be treated definitively with radiation therapy alone. Herein, we report the outcome and the assessment of tumor response to definitive radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: A retrospective analysis was performed on 40 patients with unresected chordoma treated with photon/proton radiation therapy. Nineteen patients had complete sets of imaging scans. The soft tissue and bone compartments of the tumor were defined separately. Tumor response was evaluated by the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and volumetric analysis. Results: With a median follow-up time of 50.3 months, the rates of 5-year local control, overall survival, disease-specific survival, and distant failure were 85.4%, 81.9%, 89.4%, and 20.2%, respectively. Eighty-four computed tomographic and magnetic resonance imaging scans were reviewed. Among the 19 patients, only 4 local failures occurred, and the median tumor dose was 77.4 GyRBE. Analysis at a median follow-up time of 18 months showed significant volumetric reduction of the total target volume (TTV) and the soft tissue target volume (STTV) within the first 24 months after treatment initiation, followed by further gradual reduction throughout the rest of the follow-up period. The median maximum percentage volumetric regressions of TTV and STTV were 43.2% and 70.4%, respectively. There was only a small reduction in bone target volume over time. In comparison with the modified RECIST, volumetric analysis was more reliable, more reproducible, and could help in measuring minimal changes in the tumor volume. Conclusion: These results continue to support the use of high-dose definitive radiation therapy for selected patients with unresected spine and sacral chordomas

  9. A benchmark analysis of radiation flux distribution for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy of canine brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moran, J.M.

    1992-02-01

    Calculations of radiation flux and dose distributions for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) of brain tumors are typically performed using sophisticated three-dimensional analytical models based on either a homogeneous approximation or a simplified few-region approximation to the actual highly-heterogeneous geometry of the irradiation volume. Such models should be validated by comparison with calculations using detailed models in which all significant macroscopic tissue heterogeneities and geometric structures are explicitly represented as faithfully as possible. This work describes a validation exercise for BNCT of canine brain tumors. Geometric measurements of the canine anatomical structures of interest for this work were performed by dissecting and examining two essentially identical Labrador Retriever heads. Chemical analyses of various tissue samples taken during the dissections were conducted to obtain measurements of elemental compositions for tissues of interest. The resulting geometry and tissue composition data were then used to construct a detailed heterogeneous calculational model of the Labrador Retriever head. Calculations of three-dimensional radiation flux distributions pertinent to BNCT were performed for the model using the TORT discrete-ordinates radiation transport code. The calculations were repeated for a corresponding volume-weighted homogeneous tissue model. Comparison of the results showed that the peak neutron and photon flux magnitudes were quite similar for the two models (within 5%), but that the spatial flux profiles were shifted in the heterogeneous model such that the fluxes in some locations away from the peak differed from the corresponding fluxes in the homogeneous model by as much as 10-20%. Differences of this magnitude can be therapeutically significant, emphasizing the need for proper validation of simplified treatment planning models.

  10. 5-Aminolevulinic acid coated microneedles for photodynamic therapy of skin tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Amit K; Lee, Chang Hyun; Gill, Harvinder S

    2016-10-10

    This study evaluated the potential of coated microneedles for improved dermal delivery of 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA), which naturally gets converted by cells of the tissue in to a photosensitizer called protoporphyrin IX (PPIX). Microneedle patches containing 57 microneedles were coated with 5-ALA using an in-house developed micro-precision dip coater. The coating process was optimized to achieve higher 5-ALA loading on microneedles and a high delivery efficiency into porcine cadaver skin. Using 5 dips with 25% w/v 5-ALA solution, a mass of about 350μg of 5-ALA was coated per patch, which gave a delivery efficiency of about 90% in porcine cadaver skin. Bright-field and scanning electron microscopy established that coatings of 5-ALA on microneedles of the patch were uniform. In vivo dermal pharmacokinetics showed that delivery of just 350μg of 5-ALA using coated microneedles led to about 3.2-fold higher PPIX formation after 4h, as compared to topical application of 20% w/w 5-ALA in a conventional cream formulation (25mg cream). Furthermore, with use of coated microneedles, PPIX was observed in deeper regions of the skin (~480μm) as compared to topical 5-ALA cream formulation (~150μm). The potential of PPIX for photodynamic therapy was tested in vivo. After light exposure (633nm; 118J/cm(2)), PPIX got photosensitized, and due to higher initial amount of PPIX in the coated microneedle group, about twice the amount of PPIX was photobleached compared to topical cream application. Finally, even with a lower dose of just 1.75mg 5-ALA, coated microneedles suppressed the growth of subcutaneous tumors by ~57%, while a topical cream containing 5mg of 5-ALA did not suppress the tumor volume and led to tumor growth comparable to the untreated control group. Overall, the strategy of delivering 5-ALA using coated microneedles could be a promising approach for photodynamic therapy of skin tumors. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Chemotherapy-Induced Macrophage Infiltration into Tumors Enhances Nanographene-Based Photodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Chenran; Gao, Liquan; Yu, Xinhe; Lai, Jianhao; Lu, Dehua; Bao, Rui; Wang, Yanpu; Jia, Bing; Wang, Fan; Liu, Zhaofei

    2017-11-01

    Increased recruitment of tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) to tumors following chemotherapy promotes tumor resistance and recurrence and correlates with poor prognosis. TAM depletion suppresses tumor growth, but is not highly effective due to the effects of tumorigenic mediators from other stromal sources. Here, we report that adoptive macrophage transfer led to a dramatically enhanced photodynamic therapy (PDT) effect of 2-(1-hexyloxyethyl)-2-devinyl pyropheophor-bide-alpha (HPPH)-coated polyethylene glycosylated nanographene oxide [GO(HPPH)-PEG] by increasing its tumor accumulation. Moreover, tumor treatment with commonly used chemotherapeutic drugs induced an increase in macrophage infiltration into tumors, which also enhanced tumor uptake and the PDT effects of GO(HPPH)-PEG, resulting in tumor eradication. Macrophage recruitment to tumors after chemotherapy was visualized noninvasively by near-infrared fluorescence and single-photon emission CT imaging using F4/80-specific imaging probes. Our results demonstrate that chemotherapy combined with GO(HPPH)-PEG PDT is a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors, especially those resistant to chemotherapy. Furthermore, TAM-targeted molecular imaging could potentially be used to predict the efficacy of combination therapy and select patients who would most benefit from this treatment approach. Cancer Res; 77(21); 6021-32. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. TH-A-BRF-02: BEST IN PHYSICS (JOINT IMAGING-THERAPY) - Modeling Tumor Evolution for Adaptive Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Y; Lee, CG [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Chan, TCY [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Techna Institute for the Advancement of Technology for Health, Toronto, ON (Canada); Cho, YB; Islam, MK [University of Toronto, Toronto, ON (Canada); Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Ontario Consortium for Adaptive Interventions in Radiation Oncology (OCAIRO) (Canada)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop mathematical models of tumor geometry changes under radiotherapy that may support future adaptive paradigms. Methods: A total of 29 cervical patients were scanned using MRI, once for planning and weekly thereafter for treatment monitoring. Using the tumor volumes contoured by a radiologist, three mathematical models were investigated based on the assumption of a stochastic process of tumor evolution. The “weekly MRI” model predicts tumor geometry for the following week from the last two consecutive MRI scans, based on the voxel transition probability. The other two models use only the first pair of consecutive MRI scans, and the transition probabilities were estimated via tumor type classified from the entire data set. The classification is based on either measuring the tumor volume (the “weekly volume” model), or implementing an auxiliary “Markov chain” model. These models were compared to a constant volume approach that represents the current clinical practice, using various model parameters; e.g., the threshold probability β converts the probability map into a tumor shape (larger threshold implies smaller tumor). Model performance was measured using volume conformity index (VCI), i.e., the union of the actual target and modeled target volume squared divided by product of these two volumes. Results: The “weekly MRI” model outperforms the constant volume model by 26% on average, and by 103% for the worst 10% of cases in terms of VCI under a wide range of β. The “weekly volume” and “Markov chain” models outperform the constant volume model by 20% and 16% on average, respectively. They also perform better than the “weekly MRI” model when β is large. Conclusion: It has been demonstrated that mathematical models can be developed to predict tumor geometry changes for cervical cancer undergoing radiotherapy. The models can potentially support adaptive radiotherapy paradigm by reducing normal tissue dose. This research

  13. Modeling tumor-associated edema in gliomas during anti-angiogenic therapy and its impact on imageable tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea eHawkins-Daarud

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma, the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor is predominantly assessed with gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted (T1Gd and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Pixel intensity enhancement on the T1Gd image is understood to correspond to the gadolinium contrast agent leaking from the tumor-induced neovasculature, while hyperintensity on the T2/FLAIR images corresponds with edema and infiltrated tumor cells. None of these modalities directly show tumor cells; rather, they capture abnormalities in the microenvironment caused by the presence of tumor cells. Thus, assessing disease response after treatments impacting the microenvironment remains challenging through the obscuring lens of MR imaging. Anti-angiogenic therapies have been used in the treatment of gliomas with spurious results ranging from no apparent response to significant imaging improvement with the potential for extremely diffuse patterns of tumor recurrence on imaging and autopsy. Anti-angiogenic treatment normalizes the vasculature, effectively decreasing vessel permeability and thus reducing tumor-induced edema, drastically altering T2-weighted MRI. We extend a previously developed mathematical model of glioma growth to explicitly incorporate edema formation allowing us to directly characterize and potentially predict the effects of anti-angiogenics on imageable tumor growth. A comparison of simulated glioma growth and imaging enhancement with and without bevacizumab supports the current understanding that anti-angiogenic treatment can serve as a surrogate for steroids and the clinically-driven hypothesis that anti-angiogenic treatment may not have any significant effect on the growth dynamics of the overall tumor-cell populations. However, the simulations do illustrate a potentially large impact on the level of edematous extracellular fluid, and thus on what would be imageable on T2/FLAIR MR for tumors with lower proliferation rates.

  14. Evaluating the Efficacy of ERG-Targeted Therapy in Vivo for Prostate Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    therapeutic attack and prevention through diet and nutrition . Semin Cancer Biol (2015). In press. PMID: 25869442. 3. Invited Articles (Since the...Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0272 TITLE: Evaluating the Efficacy of ERG-Targeted Therapy in Vivo for Prostate Tumors PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Evaluating the Efficacy of ERG-Targeted Therapy in Vivo for Prostate Tumors 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0272 5c

  15. SU-F-R-42: Association of Radiomic and Metabolic Tumor Volumes in Radiation Treatment of Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez, C; Nagornaya, N; Parra, N; Kwon, D; Ishkanian, F; Markoe, A; Maudsley, A; Stoyanova, R [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2016-06-15

    allow for exploration of relationships between sizes and intersection of imaging features of tumors, RT volumes, metabolite concentrations and comparing those to therapy outcome, quality of life evaluation and overall survival rate. This publication was supported by Grant 10BN03 from Bankhead Coley Cancer Research Program, R01EB000822, R01EB016064, and R01CA172210 from the National Institutes of Health, and Indo-US Science & Technology Forum award #20-2009. Bhaswati Roy received financial assistance from University Grant Commission, New Delhi, India.

  16. The use of amino acid PET and conventional MRI for monitoring of brain tumor therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galldiks, Norbert; Law, Ian; Pope, Whitney B

    2017-01-01

    Routine diagnostics and treatment monitoring of brain tumors is usually based on contrast-enhanced MRI. However, the capacity of conventional MRI to differentiate tumor tissue from posttherapeutic effects following neurosurgical resection, chemoradiation, alkylating chemotherapy, radiosurgery, and......),O-(2-[18F]fluoroethyl)-l-tyrosine (FET) and 3,4-dihydroxy-6-[18F]-fluoro-l-phenylalanine (FDOPA) and summarizes investigations regarding monitoring of brain tumor therapy....

  17. Prognostic factors of successful on-purpose tumor biopsies in metastatic cancer patients before targeted therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Desportes, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Purpose : to identify patient/tumor characteristics associated with success of biopsy in patients who received multiple lines of chemotherapy with refractory cancer. Material and methods : all patients with refractory cancer who were included in our center in a prospective randomized phase II trial comparing targeted therapies based on molecular profile of tumors versus conventional chemotherapy, were retrospectively included in this study. A biopsy of a tumor lesion was mandatory, performed ...

  18. Considering the oxygen effect: Further development of a volumetric model of tumor response to radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Stephanie S.

    Mathematical modeling of tumor response to radiation therapy (RT) has great potential for designing therapy plans that are more personalized, more adaptive, and more reliable for outcome predictions. A preexisting model of tumor response to radiation therapy for cervical cancer has been shown to generate model parameters that correlate strongly with both tumor local control and disease-specific survival. This model is further developed through incorporation of another effect of RT not previously accounted for: the oxygen effect. An easily obtainable form of input data, hemoglobin level, enables simulation of the oxygen effect simultaneously with the other major model effects. For the Local Control (LC) patient group, the changes in the model parameters caused by incorporation of the oxygen effect are found to significantly improve the agreement of those parameters with actual patient data. For the Local Failure (LF) group and the overall patient group, the oxygen effect is incorporated without significant change to the agreement between the model-simulated output parameters and the actual patient data. Also, a strategy is presented for solving the main model equations to obtain analytic expressions for surviving cell fraction and regression volume ratio as functions of time.

  19. Anticonvulsant therapy in brain-tumor related epilepsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fröscher Walter

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background. The lifetime risk of patients with brain tumors to have focal epileptic seizures is 10-100%; the risk depends on different histology. Specific guidelines for drug treatment of brain tumor-related seizures have not yet been established.

  20. Singlet oxygen explicit dosimetry to predict long-term local tumor control for Photofrin-mediated photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penjweini, Rozhin; Kim, Michele M.; Ong, Yi Hong; Zhu, Timothy C.

    2017-02-01

    Although photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established modality for the treatment of cancer, current dosimetric quantities do not account for the variations in PDT oxygen consumption for different fluence rates (φ). In this study we examine the efficacy of reacted singlet oxygen concentration ([1O2]rx) to predict long-term local control rate (LCR) for Photofrin-mediated PDT. Radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF) tumors in the right shoulders of female C3H mice are treated with different in-air fluences of 225-540 J/cm2 and in-air fluence rate (φair) of 50 and 75 mW/cm2 at 5 mg/kg Photofrin and a drug-light interval of 24 hours using a 1 cm diameter collimated laser beam at 630 nm wavelength. [1O2]rx is calculated by using a macroscopic model based on explicit dosimetry of Photofrin concentration, tissue optical properties, tissue oxygenation and blood flow changes during PDT. The tumor volume of each mouse is tracked for 90 days after PDT and Kaplan-Meier analyses for LCR are performed based on a tumor volume <=100 mm3, for the four dose metrics light fluence, photosensitizer photobleaching rate, PDT dose and [1O2]rx. PDT dose is defined as a temporal integral of photosensitizer concentration and Φ at a 3 mm tumor depth. φ is calculated throughout the treatment volume based on Monte-Carlo simulation and measured tissue optical properties. Our preliminary studies show that [1O2]rx is the best dosimetric quantity that can predict tumor response and correlate with LCR. Moreover, [1O2]rx calculated using the blood flow changes was in agreement with [1O2]rx calculated based on the actual tissue oxygenation.

  1. Engineering a prostate-specific membrane antigen-activated tumor endothelial cell prodrug for cancer therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denmeade, Samuel R; Mhaka, Annastasiah M; Rosen, D Marc

    2012-01-01

    Heterogeneous expression of drug target proteins within tumor sites is a major mechanism of resistance to anticancer therapies. We describe a strategy to selectively inhibit, within tumor sites, the function of a critical intracellular protein, the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum calcium...

  2. Drug-Resistant Brain Metastases: A Role for Pharmacology, Tumor Evolution, and Too-Late Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stricker, Thomas; Arteaga, Carlos L

    2015-11-01

    Two recent studies report deep molecular profiling of matched brain metastases and primary tumors. In both studies, somatic alterations in the brain metastases were frequently discordant with those in the primary tumor, suggesting divergent evolution at metastatic sites and raising questions about the use of biomarkers in patients in clinical trials with targeted therapies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Comparing immune-tumor growth models with drug therapy using optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Marisa C.; Rocha, Ana Maria A. C.; Costa, M. Fernanda P.; Fernandes, Edite M. G. P.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we compare the dynamics of three tumor growth models that include an immune system and a drug administration therapy using optimal control. The objective is to minimize a combined function of the total of tumor cells over time and a chemotherapeutic drug administration.

  4. Echosonography and surgical therapy of facial skin tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pešić Zoran U.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available In the second half of the 20 century, echosonography has been used in many medical specialties. In 1992 and 1993 highfrequencies echosonography was used in the examination of irritant and allergic skin lesions in order to examine the effects of different therapeuthical agents on the skin lesions [1-4]. Hoffmann used highfrequencies echosonography in the examination of healing of skin lesions [3]. By their incidence skin tumors are the largest group of newly discovered tumors, and their usual location is on the face [5-7]. By clinical examination it is not possible to precisely determine the depth of tumor border; therefore, the radically performed surgical excision is the only correct surgical treatment. The aim of this study was to estimate the results of preoperatively performed high frequencies echosonography in order to reduce the number of incorrectly performed surgical excisions of skin tumors. The group was composed of 40 patients with 45 tumors, who first underwent echosonographic diagnostic procedure (20 MHz, Hadsund electronic, Hadsund Technology, Denmark and then surgical excision; patients in control group (45 patients with 45 tumors were only subjected to surgical excision. Excised tumors were then pathohistologically analyzed, and measurements of tumor depth progression were performed. Margins of pathohistological specimen were controlled for the presence of tumor cells. Results of measurements of tumor depth obtained by echosonography and pathohistological measurements were compared. By Jate's modification of c2 test results regarding correct and incorrect surgical excision in patients and control group were compared. By linear regression analysis results of tumor depth obtained by echosonographic and pathohistologic examinations were compared. Hypoechogen zone echosonographic results were used like criteria for tumor expansion. Results of tumor depth measurements are presented in Table 1. Linear regression analysis showed (R = 0

  5. Automatic delineation of tumor volumes by co-segmentation of combined PET/MR data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibfarth, S.; Eckert, F.; Welz, S.; Siegel, C.; Schmidt, H.; Schwenzer, N.; Zips, D.; Thorwarth, D.

    2015-07-01

    Combined PET/MRI may be highly beneficial for radiotherapy treatment planning in terms of tumor delineation and characterization. To standardize tumor volume delineation, an automatic algorithm for the co-segmentation of head and neck (HN) tumors based on PET/MR data was developed. Ten HN patient datasets acquired in a combined PET/MR system were available for this study. The proposed algorithm uses both the anatomical T2-weighted MR and FDG-PET data. For both imaging modalities tumor probability maps were derived, assigning each voxel a probability of being cancerous based on its signal intensity. A combination of these maps was subsequently segmented using a threshold level set algorithm. To validate the method, tumor delineations from three radiation oncologists were available. Inter-observer variabilities and variabilities between the algorithm and each observer were quantified by means of the Dice similarity index and a distance measure. Inter-observer variabilities and variabilities between observers and algorithm were found to be comparable, suggesting that the proposed algorithm is adequate for PET/MR co-segmentation. Moreover, taking into account combined PET/MR data resulted in more consistent tumor delineations compared to MR information only.

  6. Predictive value of PET response combined with baseline metabolic tumor volume in peripheral T-cell lymphoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cottereau, Anne-Segolene; El-Galaly, Tarec C; Becker, Stéphanie

    2017-01-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL) is a heterogeneous group of aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphomas with poor outcomes with current therapy. We investigated if response assessed with Positron Emission Tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) combined with baseline total metabolic tumor volume (TMTV...... TMTV was computed with 41% SUVmax threshold, and PET response was reported with the Deauville 5-point scale (5-PS). Results: With 43 months median follow-up, the 2-year Progression free survival (PFS) and Overall survival (OS) were 51% and 67%. Positive iPET2 patients (5-PS ≥4) had a significantly......%/50%); TMTV>230cm(3) and iPET3/4 positive (0%/18%). Conclusion: IPET response is predictive of outcome and allows early detection of high-risk PTCL patients. Combining iPET with TMTV improves risk stratification in individual patients....

  7. A multimedia database system for thermal ablation therapy of brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dionisio, J D; Cárdenas, A F; Lufkin, R B; DeSalles, A; Black, K L; Taira, R K; Chu, W W

    1997-02-01

    A prototype multimedia medical database is described for supporting thermal ablation therapy of brain tumors. Its design is motivated by the major need to manage and access multimedia information on the progress and reaction of tumors to various therapy protocols. The database links images to patient data in a way that permits the use to view and query medical information using alphanumeric, temporal, and feature-based predicates. Visualization programs permit the user to view or annotate the query results in various ways. These results support the wide variety of data types and presentation methods required by neuroradiologists to manage thermal ablation therapy data. The database satisfactorily meets the requirements defined by thermal ablation therapy. A similar approach is being undertaken for supporting different therapies of other types of tumors, thus showing the generality of our approach.

  8. Radical prostatectomy and positive surgical margins: tumor volume and Gleason score predicts cancer outcome

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    La Roca, Ricardo L.R. Felts de, E-mail: Ricardo@delarocaurologia.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Fonseca, Francisco Paula da, E-mail: fpf@uol.com.br [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Divisao de Urologia. Dept. de Cirurgia Pelvica; Cunha, Isabela Werneck da; Bezerra, Stephania Martins, E-mail: iwerneck@gmail.com, E-mail: stephaniab@gmail.com [Hospital do Cancer A.C. Camargo, Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Patologia

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: positive surgical margins (PSMs) are common adverse factors to predict the outcome of a patient submitted to radical prostatectomy (PR). However, not all of these men will follow with biochemical (BCR) or clinical (CR) recurrence. Relationship between PSMs with these recurrent events has to be correlated with other clinicopathological findings in order to recognize more aggressive tumors in order to recommend complementary treatment to these selected patients. Materials and methods: we retrospectively reviewed the outcome of 228 patients submitted to open retropubic RP between March 1991 and June 2008, where 161 had and 67 did not have PSMs. Minimum follow-up time was considered 2 years after surgery. BCR was considered when PSA {>=} 0.2 ng/ml. CR was determined when clinical evidence of tumor appeared. Chi-square test was used to correlate clinical and pathologic variables with PSMs. The estimated 5-year risk of BCR and CR in presence of PSMs was determined using the Kaplan-Meier method and compared to log-rank tests. Results: from the total of 228 patients, 161 (71%) had PSMs, while 67 (29%) had negative surgical margins (NSMs). Prostatic circumferential margin was the most common (43.4%) site. Univariate analysis showed statistically significant (p < 0.001) associations between the presence of PSMs and BCR, but not with CR (p = 0.06). Among 161 patients with PSMs, 61 (37.8%) presented BCR, while 100 (62.8%) did not. Predicting progression-free survival for 5 years, BCR was correlated with pathological stage; Gleason score; pre-treatment PSA; tumor volume in specimen; capsular and perineural invasion; presence and number of PSMs. RC correlated only with angiolymphatic invasion and Gleason score. Considering univariate analyses the clinicopathological factors predicting BCR for 5 years, results statistically significant links with prostate weight; pre-treatment PSA; Gleason score; pathological stage; tumor volume; PSMs; capsular and perineural

  9. Metabolic tumor volume predicts for recurrence and death in head-and-neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Trang H; Filion, Edith J; Turnbull, Brit B; Chu, Jackie N; Lee, Percy; Nguyen, Khoa; Maxim, Peter; Quon, Andy; Graves, Edward E; Loo, Billy W; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2009-08-01

    To evaluate the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging and other clinical factors in patients treated for locally advanced head-and-neck cancer (HNC) at a single institution. Between March 2003 and August 2007, 85 patients received positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography-guided chemoradiotherapy for HNC. Metabolically active tumor regions were delineated on pretreatment PET scans semiautomatically using custom software. We evaluated the relationship of (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose-PET maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and total metabolic tumor volume (MTV) with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Mean follow-up for surviving patients was 20.4 months. The estimated 2-year locoregional control, DFS, and OS for the group were 88.0%, 69.5%, and 78.4%, respectively. The median time to first failure was 9.8 months among the 16 patients with relapse. An increase in MTV of 17.4 mL (difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles) was significantly associated with an increased hazard of first event (recurrence or death) (1.9-fold, p < 0.001), even after controlling for Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (1.8-fold, p = 0.001), and of death (2.1-fold, p < 0.001). We did not find a significant relationship of maximum SUV, stage, or other clinical factors with DFS or OS. Metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor for disease recurrence and death in HNC. MTV retained significance after controlling for KPS, the only other significant adverse prognostic factor found in this cohort. MTV is a direct measure of tumor burden and is a potentially valuable tool for risk stratification and guiding treatment in future studies.

  10. Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts for Recurrence and Death in Head and Neck Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, Trang H.; Filion, Edith J.; Turnbull, Brit B.; Chu, Jackie N.; Lee, Percy; Nguyen, Khoa; Maxim, Peter; Quon, Andy; Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W.; Le, Quynh-Thu

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the prognostic value of metabolic tumor volume measured on 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) imaging and other clinical factors in patients treated for locally advanced head and neck cancer at a single institution. Materials/Methods From March 2003 to August 2007, 85 patients received PET/CT-guided chemoradiotherapy for HNC. Metabolically active tumor regions were delineated on pretreatment PET scans semi-automatically using custom software. We evaluated the relationship of FDG-PET maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and total metabolic tumor volume (MTV) with disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Results Mean follow-up for surviving patients was 20.4 months. The estimated 2-year locoregional control, DFS, and OS for the group were 88.0%, 69.5% and 78.4%, respectively. The median time to first failure was 9.8 months among the 16 patients with relapse. An increase in MTV of 17.4 mL (difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles) was significantly associated with an increased hazard of first event (recurrence or death) (1.9-fold, p<0.001), even after controlling for Karnofsky performance status (KPS) (1.8-fold, p=0.001), and of death (2.1-fold, p<0.001). We did not find a significant relationship of maximum SUV, stage, or other clinical factors with DFS or OS. Conclusion Metabolic tumor volume is an adverse prognostic factor for disease recurrence and death in HNC. MTV retained significance after controlling for KPS, the only other significant adverse prognostic factor found in this cohort. MTV is a direct measure of tumor burden and is a potentially valuable tool for risk stratification and guiding treatment in future studies. PMID:19289263

  11. Changes in Tumor Volumes and Spatial Locations Relative to Normal Tissues During Cervical Cancer Radiotherapy Assessed by Cone Beam Computed Tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenjuan; Bai, Penggang; Pan, Jianji; Xu, Yuanji; Chen, Kaiqiang

    2017-04-01

    To assess changes in the volumes and spatial locations of tumors and surrounding organs by cone beam computed tomography during treatment for cervical cancer. Sixteen patients with cervical cancer had intensity-modulated radiotherapy and off-line cone beam computed tomography during chemotherapy and/or radiation therapy. The gross tumor volume (GTV-T) and clinical target volumes (CTVs) were contoured on the planning computed tomography and weekly cone beam computed tomography image, and changes in volumes and spatial locations were evaluated using the volume difference method and Dice similarity coefficients. The GTV-T was 79.62 cm3 at prior treatment (0f) and then 20.86 cm3 at the end of external-beam chemoradiation. The clinical target volume changed slightly from 672.59 cm3 to 608.26 cm3, and the uterine volume (CTV-T) changed slightly from 83.72 cm3 to 80.23 cm3. There were significant differences in GTV-T and CTV-T among the different groups ( P .05). The mean percent volume changes ranged from 23.05% to 70.85% for GTV-T, 4.71% to 6.78% for CTV-T, and 5.84% to 9.59% for clinical target volume, and the groups were significantly different ( P < .05). The Dice similarity coefficient of GTV-T decreased during the course of radiation therapy ( P < .001). In addition, there were significant differences in GTV-T among different groups ( P < .001), and changes in GTV-T correlated with the radiotherapy ( P < .001). There was a negative correlation between volume change rate (DV) and Dice similarity coefficient in the GTV-T and organs at risk ( r < 0; P < .05). The volume, volume change rate, and Dice similarity coefficient of GTV-T were all correlated with increase in radiation treatment. Significant variations in tumor regression and spatial location occurred during radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Adaptive radiotherapy approaches are needed to improve the treatment accuracy for cervical cancer.

  12. [Postoperative management of patients with sellar tumors through monitoring urine volume and urine electrolytes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Li-Lei; Dong, Wei; Zhou, Pei-Zhi; Ma, Wei-Chao; Li, You-Ping; Wu, Qian; Jiang, Shu

    2013-05-01

    To determine the value of urine volume and urine electrolytes in postoperative management of patients with sellar tumors. Medical records of 103 patients with sellar tumors in the West China Hospital from January 2009 to December 2009 were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were managed either based on blood electrolytes (Group A, n = 56) or based on urine volume and urine electrolytes (Group B, n = 47). The incidence of balance disturbance of water and electrolytes was compared between the two groups. The levels of blood electrolytes were normal in both groups 3 days after operations despite significant loss of electrolytes through urine. Balance disturbance of water and electrolytes was revealed 4-7 days after operations. Group B had a lower incidence of balance disturbance of water and electrolytes (17.02%, 8/47) compared with Group A (73.21%, 41/56, P electrolytes was found. Higher incidence of balance disturbance of water and electrolytes was found in craniopharyngioma (P electrolytes can be achieved for patients with sellar tumors through monitoring urine than through blood. It can also simplify the postoperative management of patients with sellar tumors.

  13. Computational Modeling of Medical Images of Brain Tumor Patients for Optimized Radiation Therapy Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agn, Mikael

    In brain tumor radiation therapy, the aim is to maximize the delivered radiation dose to the targeted tumor and at the same time minimize the dose to sensitive healthy structures – so-called organs-at-risk (OARs). When planning a radiation therapy session, the tumor and the OARs therefore need...... to be delineated on medical images of the patient’s head, to be able to optimize a radiation dose plan. In clinical practice, the delineation is performed manually with limited assistance from automatic procedures, which is both time-consuming and typically suffers from poor reproducibility. There is, therefore...

  14. [Possibilities of boron neutron capture therapy in the treatment of malignant brain tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanygin, V V; Kichigin, A I; Gubanova, N V; Taskaev, S Yu

    2015-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) that is of the highest attractiveness due to its selective action directly on malignant tumor cells is a promising approach to treating cancers. Clinical interest in BNCT focuses in neuro-oncology on therapy for gliomas, glioblastoma in particular, and BNCT may be used in brain metastatic involvement. This needs an epithermal neutron source that complies with the requirements for BNCT, as well as a 10B-containing agent that will selectively accumulate in tumor tissue. The introduction of BNCT into clinical practice to treat patients with glial tumors will be able to enhance therapeutic efficiency.

  15. Targeted Therapies Improve Survival for Patients with Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    In 2011, based on initial findings from two clinical trials, the Food and Drug Administration approved sunitinib and everolimus for patients with pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors. Updated results from the everolimus trial were published in September 2016.

  16. "Suicide" Gen Therapy for Malignant Central Nervous System Tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.J.P.E. Vincent (Arnoud)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractDespite development in surgical techniques, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, most malignancies of the central nervous system are still devastating tumors with a poor prognosis. For example, median survival of patients with malignant gliomas (astrocytoma, oligodendroglioma or mixed rype) is

  17. Proceedings of the 3. Muenster symposium on late effects after tumor therapy in childhood and adolescence. Abstracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Willich, Normann; Boelling, Tobias (eds.) [Univ. Hospital Muenster (Germany). Dept. of Radiotherapy

    2009-08-15

    The volume on the 3rd Muenster Symposion on late effects after tumor therapy in childhood and adolescence contains 7 contributions: Evaluation of side effects after radiotherapy in childhood and adolescence; from retrospective case reports to a perspective, multicentric and transnational approach; late effects surveillance system after childhood cancer in Germany, Austria and parts of Switzerland - update 2009; second malignant neoplasm after childhood cancer in Germany - results from the long-term follow-up of the German childhood cancer registry; secondary neoplasm after Wilm's tumor in Germany; second cancer after total-body irradiation (TBI) in childhood; late toxicity in children undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with TBI-containing conditioning regimens for hematological malignancies; radiation toxicity following busulfan/melphalan high-dose chemotherapy in the EURO-EWING-99-trials: review of GPOH data.

  18. Pattern of Ipsilateral Breast Tumor Recurrence After Breast-Conserving Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jobsen, Jan; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Riemersma, Sietske; Heijmans, Harald; Ong, Francisca; Struikmans, Henk

    2014-01-01

    The rate of ipsilateral breast tumor recurrence (IBTR) in breast cancer after breast-conserving therapy was analyzed. We demonstrate that after 12 years' follow-up, there is an especially high recurrence rate for women ≤40 years old. For women ≤40 years old, the absence of adjuvant systemic therapy

  19. Tumor treating fields therapy device for glioblastoma: physics and clinical practice considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lok, Edwin; Swanson, Kenneth D; Wong, Eric T

    2015-01-01

    Alternating electric fields therapy, as delivered by the tumor treating fields device, is a new modality of cancer treatment that has been approved by the US FDA for recurrent glioblastoma. At a frequency of 200 kHz, these fields emanate from transducer arrays on the surface of the patient's scalp into the brain and perturb processes necessary for cytokinesis during tumor cell mitosis. In the registration Phase III trial for recurrent glioblastoma patients, the efficacy of the tumor treating fields as monotherapy was equivalent to chemotherapy, while scalp irritation was its major adverse event compared with systemic toxicities that were associated with cytotoxic chemotherapies. Alternating electric fields therapy is, therefore, an essential option for the treatment of recurrent glioblastoma. Here, we summarize our current knowledge of the physics, cell biology and clinical data supporting the use of the tumor treating fields therapy.

  20. Compressive Stress Inhibits Proliferation in Tumor Spheroids through a Volume Limitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delarue, Morgan; Montel, Fabien; Vignjevic, Danijela; Prost, Jacques; Joanny, Jean-François; Cappello, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    In most instances, the growth of solid tumors occurs in constrained environments and requires a competition for space. A mechanical crosstalk can arise from this competition. In this article, we dissect the biomechanical sequence caused by a controlled compressive stress on multicellular spheroids (MCSs) used as a tumor model system. On timescales of minutes, we show that a compressive stress causes a reduction of the MCS volume, linked to a reduction of the cell volume in the core of the MCS. On timescales of hours, we observe a reversible induction of the proliferation inhibitor, p27Kip1, from the center to the periphery of the spheroid. On timescales of days, we observe that cells are blocked in the cell cycle at the late G1 checkpoint, the restriction point. We show that the effect of pressure on the proliferation can be antagonized by silencing p27Kip1. Finally, we quantify a clear correlation between the pressure-induced volume change and the growth rate of the spheroid. The compression-induced proliferation arrest that we studied is conserved for five cell lines, and is completely reversible. It demonstrates a generic crosstalk between mechanical stresses and the key players of cell cycle regulation. Our results suggest a role of volume change in the sensitivity to pressure, and that p27Kip1 is strongly influenced by this change. PMID:25418163

  1. Impact of initial tumor volume on radiotherapy outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutkowski, T. [Maria Sklodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and the Institute of Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, Gliwice (Poland)

    2014-05-15

    The aim of this study was to quantify the impact of initial tumor volume (TV) on radiotherapy (RT) outcome in patients with T2 glottic cancer. Initial TV was calculated for 115 consecutive patients with T2 glottic cancer who had been treated with definitive RT alone at a single institution. The results showed strong correlations of TV with 3-year local tumor control (LTC) and disease-free survival (DFS). For TV ≤ 0.7 cm{sup 3}, 3-year LTC was 83 %; for TV 0.7-3.6 cm{sup 3} this was 70 % and for TV 3.6-17 cm{sup 3} 44 %. Analysis of total dose vs. initial TV showed that larger T2 glottic tumors with a TV of around 5 cm{sup 3} (2-2.5 cm in diameter with 10{sup 10} cancer cells) need an extra 6.5 Gy to achieve similar 3-year LTC rates as for small tumors with a TV of 0.5 cm{sup 3} (∝1 cm in diameter with 10{sup 9} cancer cells). Although classification of tumors according to TV cannot replace TNM staging in daily practice, it could represent a valuable numerical supplement for planning the optimal dose fractionation scheme for individual patients. (orig.)

  2. Metabolic tumor volume of primary tumor predicts survival better than T classification in the larynx preservation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyabe, Junji; Hanamoto, Atsushi; Tatsumi, Mitsuaki; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Takenaka, Yukinori; Nakahara, Susumu; Kishikawa, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Motoyuki; Takemoto, Norihiko; Michiba, Takahiro; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Konishi, Koji; Ogawa, Kazuhiko; Hatazawa, Jun; Inohara, Hidenori

    2017-10-01

    We aimed to determine whether pretreatment metabolic tumor volume of the primary tumor (T-MTV) or T classification would be a better predictor of laryngectomy-free survival (LFS) and overall survival (OS) after chemoradiotherapy in patients with locally advanced laryngeal or hypopharyngeal cancer requiring total laryngectomy. We analyzed 85 patients using a Cox proportional hazards model and evaluated its usefulness by Akaike's information criterion. A T-MTV cut-off value was determined by time-dependent receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. Interobserver reliability for measuring T-MTV was estimated by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). After adjustment for covariables, T-MTV, irrespective of whether a continuous or dichotomized variable, and T classification remained independent predictors of LFS and OS. Large T-MTV (>28.7 mL) was associated with inferior LFS (hazard ratio [HR], 4.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.97-8.70; P = 0.0003) and inferior OS (HR, 3.18; 95% CI, 1.47-6.69; P = 0.004) compared with small T-MTV (≤28.7 mL). The T-MTV model outperformed the T classification model in predicting LFS and OS (P = 0.007 and 0.01, respectively). Three-year LFS and OS rates for patients with small versus large T-MTV were 68% vs 9% (P Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  3. Changes in Liver Volume Observed Following Sorafenib and Liver Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swaminath, Anand [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Knox, Jennifer J. [Department of Medical Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Brierley, James D.; Dinniwell, Rob; Wong, Rebecca; Kassam, Zahra; Kim, John; Coolens, Catherine; Brock, Kristy K. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada); Dawson, Laura A., E-mail: laura.dawson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto (Canada)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to quantify unexpected liver volume reductions in patients treated with sorafenib prior to and during liver radiation therapy (RT). Methods and Materials: Fifteen patients were treated in a phase 1 study of sorafenib for 1 week, followed by concurrent sorafenib-RT (in 6 fractions). Patients had either focal cancer (treated with stereotactic body RT [SBRT]) or diffuse disease (treated with whole-liver RT). Liver volumes were contoured and recorded at planning (day 0) from the exhale CT. After 1 week of sorafenib (day 8), RT image guidance at each fraction was performed using cone beam CT (CBCT). Planning liver contours were propagated and modified on the reconstructed exhale CBCT. This was repeated in 12 patients treated with SBRT alone without sorafenib. Three subsequent patients (2 sorafenib-RT and 1 non-sorafenib) were also assessed with multiphasic helical breath-hold CTs. Results: Liver volume reductions on CBCT were observed in the 15 sorafenib-RT patients (median decrease of 68 cc, P=.02) between day 0 and 8; greater in the focal (P=.025) versus diffuse (P=.52) cancer stratum. Seven patients (47%) had reductions larger than the 95% intraobserver contouring error. Liver reductions were also observed from multiphasic CTs in the 2 additional sorafenib-RT patients between days 0 and 8 (decreases of 232.5 cc and 331.7 cc, respectively) and not in the non-sorafenib patient (increase of 92 cc). There were no significant changes in liver volume between planning and first RT in 12 patients with focal cancer treated with SBRT alone (median increase, 4.8 cc, P=.86). Conclusions: Liver volume reductions were observed after 7 days of sorafenib, prior to RT, most marked in patients with focal liver tumors, suggesting an effect of sorafenib on normal liver. Careful assessment of potential liver volume changes immediately prior to SBRT may be necessary in patients in sorafenib or other targeted therapies.

  4. Upconversion nanoparticle as a theranostic agent for tumor imaging and therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenkai Fang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs as a promising material are widely studied due to their unique optical properties. The material can be excited by long wavelength light and emit visible wavelength light through multiphoton absorption. This property makes the particles highly attractive candidates for bioimaging and therapy application. This review aims at summarizing the synthesis and modification of UCNPs, especially the applications of UCNPs as a theranostic agent for tumor imaging and therapy. The biocompatibility and toxicity of UCNPs are also further discussed. Finally, we discuss the challenges and opportunities in the development of UCNP-based nanoplatforms for tumor imaging and therapy.

  5. Time course and predictive factors for lung volume reduction following stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) of lung tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binkley, Michael S; Shrager, Joseph B; Chaudhuri, Aadel; Popat, Rita; Maxim, Peter G; Shultz, David Benjamin; Diehn, Maximilian; Loo, Billy W

    2016-03-15

    Stereotactic ablative volume reduction (SAVR) is a potential alternative to lung-volume reduction surgery in patients with severe emphysema and excessive surgical risk. Having previously observed a dose-volume response for localized lobar volume reduction after stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) for lung tumors, we investigated the time course and factors associated with volume reduction. We retrospectively identified 70 eligible patients receiving lung tumor SABR during 2007-2013. We correlated lobar volume reduction (relative to total, bilateral lung volume [TLV]) with volume receiving high biologically effective doses (VXXBED3) and other pre-treatment factors in all patients, and measured the time course of volume changes on 3-month interval CT scans in patients with large V60BED3 (n = 21, V60BED3 ≥4.1 % TLV). Median CT follow-up was 15 months. Median volume reduction of treated lobes was 4.5 % of TLV (range 0.01-13.0 %), or ~9 % of ipsilateral lung volume (ILV); median expansion of non-target adjacent lobes was 2.2 % TLV (-4.6-9.9 %; ~4 % ILV). Treated lobe volume reduction was significantly greater with larger VXXBED3 (XX = 20-100 Gy, R (2) = 0.52-0.55, p volume reduction was reached by ~12 months and persisted. We identified a multivariable model for lobar volume reduction after SABR incorporating dose-volume and pre-treatment FEV1% and characterized its time course.

  6. Somatotroph tumor progression during pegvisomant therapy: a clinical and molecular study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marazuela, M; Paniagua, A E; Gahete, M D; Lucas, T; Alvarez-Escolá, C; Manzanares, R; Cameselle-Teijeiro, J; Luque-Ramirez, M; Luque, R M; Fernandez-Rodriguez, E; Castaño, J P; Bernabeu, I

    2011-02-01

    There is concern that pegvisomant could be associated with a higher risk of tumor growth. The rate and possible determinants of this tumor growth are unknown. The objective of the study was to investigate the clinical, immunohistological, and molecular factors conditioning tumor growth in patients taking pegvisomant. This was a cross-sectional study performed from 2004 to 2010 in four university hospitals in Spain. Seventy-five acromegalic patients with active disease resistant to somatostatin analogs treated with pegvisomant were followed up for a mean of 29 ± 20 months. Magnetic resonance images before initiation of pegvisomant, at 6 months, and then yearly were examined in all patients. Immunohistological and molecular studies were performed in tumors that grew. A significant increase in tumor size was observed in five patients (6.7%). Absence of previous irradiation (P = 0.014) and shorter duration of prepegvisomant somatostatin analog therapy (P < 0.001) were associated with an increased risk of tumor growth. A stepwise multivariate linear regression analysis (R(2) = 0.334, P < 0.001) identified the duration of somatostatin analog therapy prior to pegvisomant (beta = -4.509, P = 0.014) as the only significant predictor of tumor growth. In those tumors that grew, GH expression and insulin receptor expression were higher (P = 0.033 in both cases) than in the control group. No previous radiotherapy, shorter duration of prepegvisomant somatostatin analog therapy, and higher tumor expression of GH and insulin receptor could be risk factors for tumor growth during pegvisomant therapy.

  7. Gene therapy with tumor-specific promoter mediated suicide gene plus IL-12 gene enhanced tumor inhibition and prolonged host survival in a murine model of Lewis lung carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Wenjie

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Gene therapy is a promising therapeutic approach for cancer. Targeted expression of desired therapeutic proteins within the tumor is the best approach to reduce toxicity and improve survival. This study is to establish a more effective and less toxic gene therapy of cancer. Methods Combined gene therapy strategy with recombinant adenovirus expressing horseradish peroxidase (HRP mediated by human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT promoter (AdhTERTHRP and murine interleukin-12 (mIL-12 under the control of Cytomegalovirus (CMV promoter (AdCMVmIL-12 was developed and evaluated against Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC both in vivo and in vitro. The mechanism of action and systemic toxicities were also investigated. Results The combination of AdhTERTHRP/indole-3-acetic acid (IAA treatment and AdCMVmIL-12 resulted in significant tumor growth inhibition and survival improvement compared with AdhTERTHRP/IAA alone (tumor volume, 427.4 ± 48.7 mm3 vs 581.9 ± 46.9 mm3, p = 0.005 on day 15; median overall survival (OS, 51 d vs 33 d or AdCMVmIL-12 alone (tumor volume, 362.2 ± 33.8 mm3 vs 494.4 ± 70.2 mm3, p = 0.046 on day 12; median OS, 51 d vs 36 d. The combination treatment stimulated more CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocyte infiltration in tumors, compared with either AdCMVmIL-12 alone (1.3-fold increase for CD4+ T cells and 1.2-fold increase for CD8+ T cells, P + T cells and 2.2-fold increase for CD8+ T cells, P P P Conclusions Combination gene therapy with AdhTERTHRP/IAA and AdCMVmIL-12 could significantly inhibit tumor growth and improve host survival in LLC model, without significant systemic adverse effects.

  8. [Small-size betatron for electron therapy of surface tumors and its clinical evaluation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musabaeva, L I; Lisin, V A; Polishchuk, P F; Chakhlov, V L; Kashkovskiĭ, V V

    1987-12-01

    The paper is concerned with the physicotechnical characteristics of a small-size betatron (with the energy of 7 MeV) designed in the Tomsk Polytechnical Institute for therapy of patients with superficial malignant tumors. An electron beam with the energy of 7 MeV was produced on the small-size betatron, irradiation fields were formed, and absorbed dose distribution was studied. The efficacy of the use of the beam in 110 patients with superficial malignant tumors was analyzed. The use of electron beam radiation was found promising for therapy of patients with locally spread types of skin and lower lip cancers and breast cancer local recurrences. Complete tumor regression was noted in 75-90% of the patients. Intraoral cone electron therapy combined with 60Co-therapy of surgery was employed for early cancer of the oral cavity.

  9. Antibody or Antibody Fragments: Implications for Molecular Imaging and Targeted Therapy of Solid Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katerina T. Xenaki

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The use of antibody-based therapeutics has proven very promising for clinical applications in cancer patients, with multiple examples of antibodies and antibody–drug conjugates successfully applied for the treatment of solid tumors and lymphomas. Given reported recurrence rates, improvements are clearly still necessary. A major factor limiting the efficacy of antibody-targeted cancer therapies may be the incomplete penetration of the antibody or antibody–drug conjugate into the tumor. Incomplete tumor penetration also affects the outcome of molecular imaging, when using such targeting agents. From the injection site until they arrive inside the tumor, targeting molecules are faced with several barriers that impact intratumoral distribution. The primary means of antibody transport inside tumors is based on diffusion. The diffusive penetration inside the tumor is influenced by both antibody properties, such as size and binding affinity, as well as tumor properties, such as microenvironment, vascularization, and targeted antigen availability. Engineering smaller antibody fragments has shown to improve the rate of tumor uptake and intratumoral distribution. However, it is often accompanied by more rapid clearance from the body and in several cases also by inherent destabilization and reduction of the binding affinity of the antibody. In this perspective, we discuss different cancer targeting approaches based on antibodies or their fragments. We carefully consider how their size and binding properties influence their intratumoral uptake and distribution, and how this may affect cancer imaging and therapy of solid tumors.

  10. Plasmonic photothermal therapy increases the tumor mass penetration of HPMA copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Adam J; Larson, Nate; Banisadr, Afsheen; Robinson, Ryan; Frazier, Nick; Ray, Abhijit; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2013-03-10

    Effective drug delivery to tumors requires both transport through the vasculature and tumor interstitium. Previously, it was shown that gold nanorod (GNR) mediated plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT) is capable of increasing the overall accumulation of N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers in prostate tumors. In the present study, it is demonstrated that PPTT is also capable of increasing the distribution of these conjugates in tumors. Gadolinium labeled HPMA copolymers were administered to mice bearing prostate tumors immediately before treatment of the right tumor with PPTT. The left tumor served as internal, untreated control. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of both tumors showed that PPTT was capable of improving the tumor mass penetration of HPMA copolymers. Thermal enhancement of delivery, roughly 1.5-fold, to both the tumor center and periphery was observed. Confocal microscopy of fluorescently labeled copolymers corroborates these findings in that PPTT is capable of delivering more HPMA copolymers to the tumor's center and periphery. These results further demonstrate that PPTT is a useful tool to improve the delivery of polymer-drug conjugates. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Increased Delay Between Gadolinium Chelate Administration and T1-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Acquisition Increases Contrast-Enhancing Tumor Volumes and T1 Intensities in Brain Tumor Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piechotta, Paula L; Bonekamp, David; Sill, Martin; Wick, Antje; Wick, Wolfgang; Bendszus, Martin; Kickingereder, Philipp

    2018-04-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of delayed T1-weighted (T1-w) MRI acquisition after gadolinium chelate administration on brain tumor volumes and T1-w intensities. Fifty-five patients with histologically confirmed, contrast-enhancing intra-axial brain tumors were analyzed in this prospective test-retest study. Patients underwent 2 consecutive 3 T MRI scans (separated by a 1-minute break) during routine follow-up with contrast-enhanced T1 (ceT1-w), T2, and FLAIR acquisition. Macrocyclic gadolinium chelate-based contrast agent was only administered before the first ceT1-w acquisition; median latency to ceT1-w acquisition was 6.72 minutes (IQR, 6.53-6.92) in the first and 16.27 minutes (IQR, 15.49-17.26) in the second scan. Changes in tumor volumes and relative ceT1-w intensities between the 2 acquisitions were quantitatively assessed following semiautomated tumor segmentation (separately for contrast-enhancement [CE], necrosis [NEC], and nonenhancing [NE] tumor). Semiautomatically segmented CE tumor volumes were significantly larger in the second acquisition (median +32% [1.2 cm]; IQR, 16%-62%; P < 0.01), which corresponded to a 10% increase in CE tumor diameter (+0.3 cm). Contrarily, NEC and NE tumor volumes were significantly smaller (median -24% [IQR, -36% to -54%], P < 0.01 for NEC and -2% [IQR, -1% to -3%], P = 0.02 for NE tumor). Bland-Altman plots confirmed a proportional bias toward higher CE and lower NEC volumes for the second ceT1-w acquisition. Relative ceT1-w intensities for both early- (regions already enhancing in the first scan) and late-enhancing (newly enhancing regions in the second scan) tumor were significantly increased in the second acquisition (by 5.8% and 27.3% [P < 0.01, respectively]). Linear-mixed effects modeling confirmed that the increase in CE volumes and CE intensities is a function of the interval between contrast agent injection and ceT1-w acquisition (P < 0.01 each). Our study indicates that the maximum extent of CE

  12. Cerebral blood volume and blood flow responses to hyperventilation in brain tumors during isoflurane or propofol anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cenic, Aleksa; Craen, Rosemary A; Lee, Ting-Yim; Gelb, Adrian W

    2002-03-01

    Using computerized tomography, we measured absolute cerebral blood flow (CBF) and cerebral blood volume (CBV) in tumor, peri-tumor, and contralateral normal regions, at normocapnia and hypocapnia, in 16 rabbits with brain tumors (VX2 carcinoma), under isoflurane or propofol anesthesia. In both anesthetic groups, CBV and CBF were highest in the tumor region and lowest in the contralateral normal tissue. For isoflurane, a significant decrease in both CBV and CBF was observed in all tissue regions with hyperventilation (P hyperventilation for all regions (P > 0.10). In addition, there were no differences between CBV values for isoflurane at hypocapnia when compared with CBV values for propofol at normo- or hypocapnia (P > 0.34 and P > 0.35, respectively, in the tumor regions). Our results indicate that propofol increases cerebral vascular tone in both neoplastic and normal tissue vessels compared with isoflurane. CBV and CBF during normocapnia were significantly greater in all regions (tumor, peri-tumor, and contralateral normal tissue) with isoflurane than with propofol. CBV and CBF remained responsive to hyperventilation only with isoflurane. In rabbits with brain tumors, brain blood flow and volume were significantly larger in all regions (tumor, peri-tumor, and contralateral normal tissue) with isoflurane than with propofol during normocapnia, and remained responsive to a reduction in PaCO(2). Consequently, during hypocapnia, brain blood flow and volume values with isoflurane were similar to values with propofol.

  13. Herpes virus oncolytic therapy reverses tumor immune dysfunction and facilitates tumor antigen presentation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benencia, Fabian; Courrèges, Maria C; Fraser, Nigel W; Coukos, George

    2008-01-01

    We have previously shown that intratumor administration of HSV-1716 (an ICP34.5 null mutant) resulted in significant reduction of tumor growth and a significant survival advantage in a murine model of ovarian cancer...

  14. Magnetic nanoparticles: an emerging technology for malignant brain tumor imaging and therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wankhede, Mamta; Bouras, Alexandros; Kaluzova, Milota; Hadjipanayis, Costas G

    2012-01-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) represent a promising nanomaterial for the targeted therapy and imaging of malignant brain tumors. Conjugation of peptides or antibodies to the surface of MNPs allows direct targeting of the tumor cell surface and potential disruption of active signaling pathways present in tumor cells. Delivery of nanoparticles to malignant brain tumors represents a formidable challenge due to the presence of the blood–brain barrier and infiltrating cancer cells in the normal brain. Newer strategies permit better delivery of MNPs systemically and by direct convection-enhanced delivery to the brain. Completion of a human clinical trial involving direct injection of MNPs into recurrent malignant brain tumors for thermotherapy has established their feasibility, safety and efficacy in patients. Future translational studies are in progress to understand the promising impact of MNPs in the treatment of malignant brain tumors. PMID:22390560

  15. Antibody mediated therapy targeting CD47 inhibits tumor progression of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhenyu; Chung, Haniee; Banan, Babak; Manning, Pamela T; Ott, Katherine C; Lin, Shin; Capoccia, Benjamin J; Subramanian, Vijay; Hiebsch, Ronald R; Upadhya, Gundumi A; Mohanakumar, Thalachallour; Frazier, William A; Lin, Yiing; Chapman, William C

    2015-05-01

    Human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has a high rate of tumor recurrence and metastasis, resulting in shortened survival times. The efficacy of current systemic therapies for HCC is limited. In this study, we used xenograft tumor models to investigate the use of antibodies that block CD47 and inhibit HCC tumor growth. Immunostaining of tumor tissue and HCC cell lines demonstrated CD47 over-expression in HCC as compared to normal hepatocytes. Macrophage phagocytosis of HCC cells was increased after treatment with CD47 antibodies (CD47mAbs) that block CD47 binding to SIRPα. Further, CD47 blockade inhibited tumor growth in both heterotopic and orthotopic models of HCC, and promoted the migration of macrophages into the tumor mass. Our results demonstrate that targeting CD47 by specific antibodies has potential immunotherapeutic efficacy in human HCC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. On dynamic tumor eradication conditions under combined chemical/anti-angiogenic therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starkov, Konstantin E.

    2018-02-01

    In this paper ultimate dynamics of the five-dimensional cancer tumor growth model at the angiogenesis phase is studied. This model elaborated by Pinho et al. in 2014 describes interactions between normal/cancer/endothelial cells under chemotherapy/anti-angiogenic agents in tumor growth process. The author derives ultimate upper bounds for normal/tumor/endothelial cells concentrations and ultimate upper and lower bounds for chemical/anti-angiogenic concentrations. Global asymptotic tumor clearance conditions are obtained for two versions: the use of only chemotherapy and the combined application of chemotherapy and anti-angiogenic therapy. These conditions are established as the attraction conditions to the maximum invariant set in the tumor free plane, and furthermore, the case is examined when this set consists only of tumor free equilibrium points.

  17. Tumor infiltrating lymphocyte therapy for ovarian cancer and renal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Rikke; Donia, Marco; Westergaard, Marie Christine Wulff

    2015-01-01

    Personalized cancer immunotherapy based on infusion of T cells holds the promise to specifically target a patient's individual tumor. Accumulating evidence indicates that the T cells mediating these tumor regressions after cancer immunotherapies may primarily target patient-specific mutations...... expressed by the patients' tumors and that the presence of these "neo-antigen" specific T-cells may be related to a high number of mutations in the tumor. In melanoma, treatment with autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) can mediate durable complete responses. Previous trials investigating TIL...... therapy in solid tumors other than melanoma have shown limited success, however none of these early trials used current preparative chemotherapy regimens, and the methods for in vitro lymphocyte expansion have changed considerably. New advances and understandings in T cell based immunotherapies have...

  18. Targeted therapies in the treatment of germ cell tumors: the need for new approaches against "orphan" tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Muñoz, Alfonso; Jiménez-Rodríguez, Begoña; Navarro-Pérez, Víctor; Medina-Rodríguez, Laura; Llácer, Casilda; Vicioso, Luis; Machuca, Javier; Alba, Emilio

    2012-09-01

    Germ cell tumors (GCTs) are a heterogeneous group of tumors that are highly clinically relevant to oncologists. GCTs are generally highly sensitive to cisplatin-based chemotherapy and represent a model for curable neoplasms. Cisplatin-based combination therapy followed by surgical resection of the residual tumor is the cornerstone for GCTs treatment. Although the overall cure rate is high for patients with GCTs, patients with a poor prognosis according to International Consensus Criteria or with chemoresistant disease remain a major clinical challenge. Currently, between 15% and 20% of patients with metastatic disease still progress and will die as a consequence of the disease. Therefore, the discovery of new treatment strategies or new drugs based on translational oncology remains a priority for the treatment of patients with cisplatin-refractory disease and those with a poor prognosis. Clinical trials with new targeted therapies are ongoing for the treatment of GCTs. In this article, we review some of the new targeted biologic therapies that act on the most relevant oncogenesis pathways and are in clinical development for the treatment of GCTs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kheng Newick

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias. This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment.

  20. Photodynamic and photothermal tumor therapy using phase-change material nanoparticles containing chlorin e6 and nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Tae-Kyung; Baek, Seung-Woon; Kang, Rae-Hyung; Jeong, Ki-Young; Jun, Dae-Ryong; Choi, Sung-Wook

    2017-12-13

    This paper describes the fabrication and evaluation of phase-change material (PCM) nanoparticles containing chlorin e6 (Ce6) and nanodiamonds (NDs) for photodynamic and photothermal approaches for tumor therapy, respectively. The temperature of the PCM nanoparticles containing NDs (ND/PCM, 0.5mg/mL in water) is increased to 45°C during laser exposure for 5min. The singlet oxygen generation intensity of PCM nanoparticles containing Ce6 and NDs (Ce6/ND/PCM) is gradually increased with respect to the laser exposure time. Also, the release of Ce6 from Ce6/ND/PCM can be controlled in an on-and-off manner using laser. Cell ablation tests reveal that Ce6/ND/PCM greatly ablates KB cells upon laser exposure, which is attributed to both the temperature increase in the media and singlet oxygen generation by the released Ce6. In an animal model, tumor volume is notably reduced over time after the intratumoral injection of Ce6/ND/PCM and subsequent laser exposure with a higher efficiency compared to ND/PCM. The Ce6/ND/PCM can be a promising nanomedicine for tumor therapy. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  1. Photodynamic therapy stimulates anti-tumor immunity in a murine model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Wu, Mei X.; Kung, Andrew L.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2007-02-01

    Cancer is a leading cause of death among modern peoples largely due to metastatic disease. The ideal cancer treatment should target both the primary tumor and the metastases with the minimal toxicity. This is best accomplished by educating the body's immune system to recognize the tumor as foreign so that after the primary tumor is destroyed, distant metastases will also be eradicated. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the IV administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA), and induction of heat-shock proteins. The induction of specific CD8+ T lymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. We here report on PDT of mice bearing tumors that either do or do not express an established TAA. We utilized a BALB/c colon adenocarcinoma cell line termed CT26.CL25 retrovirally transduced to stably express β-galactosidase ( β-gal, a bacterial protein), and its non-β-gal expressing wild-type counterpart termed CT26 WT, as well as the control cell line consisting of CT26 transduced with the empty retroviral vector termed CT26-neo. All cells expressed class I MHC restriction element H-2Ld syngenic to BALB/c mice. Vascular PDT with a regimen of 1mg/kg BPD injected IV, and 120 J/cm2 of 690-nm laser light after 15 minutes successfully cured 100% of CT26.CL25 tumors but 0% of CT26-neo tumors and 0% of CT26 WT tumors. After 90 days tumor free interval the CT26.CL25 cured mice were rechallenged with CT26.CL25 tumor cells and 96% rejected the rechallenge while the CT26.CL25 cured mice did not reject a CT26 WT tumor cell challenge. Experiments with mice bearing two CT26.CL25 tumors (one

  2. Urokinase receptor cleavage correlates with tumor volume in a transgenic mouse model of breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thurison, Tine; Almholt, Kasper; Gårdsvoll, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    are strong prognostic biomarkers in several types of cancer, i.e., high levels of the cleaved uPAR forms indicate poor survival. To better understand the role of uPAR cleavage in cancer, we have designed immunoassays for specific quantification of intact mouse uPAR [muPAR(I-III)] and mouse uPAR domain I [mu......PAR(I)]. The level of muPAR(I) is significantly increased in mammary tumor-bearing mice compared to controls and, notably, there is a strong correlation to tumor volume. In contrast, the tumor volume is only weakly correlated to the level of intact muPAR(I-III), indicating that cleavage of muPAR is a more specific...... marker for cancer than increased expression of muPAR per se. The levels of the muPAR forms are dramatically affected by in vivo challenge with a urokinase -blocking antibody, demonstrating a functional role of uPA in uPAR cleavage. The levels of the muPAR forms are, however, unaffected by u...

  3. Laser thermal therapy: real-time MRI-guided and computer-controlled procedures for metastatic brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpentier, Alexandre; McNichols, Roger J; Stafford, R Jason; Guichard, Jean-Pierre; Reizine, Daniel; Delaloge, Suzette; Vicaut, Eric; Payen, Didier; Gowda, Ashok; George, Bernard

    2011-12-01

    We report the final results of a pilot clinical trial exploring the safety and feasibility of real-time magnetic resonance-guided laser-induced thermal therapy (MRgLITT) for treatment of resistant focal metastatic intracranial tumors. In patients with chemotherapy, whole-brain radiation, and radiosurgery resistant metastatic intracranial tumors, minimally invasive stereotaxic placement of a saline-cooled interstitial fiberoptic laser applicator under local anesthesia was followed by laser irradiation during continuous magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scanning. A computer workstation extracted real-time temperature-sensitive information for feedback control over laser delivery. A total of 15 metastatic tumors were treated in 7 patients. Patients were followed with physical exam and imaging for 30 months. In all cases, the procedure was well tolerated, and patients were discharged home within 24 hours. Follow-up imaging at up to 30 months showed an acute increase in apparent lesion volume followed by a gradual and steady decrease. No tumor recurrence within thermal ablation zones was noted. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that the median survival was 19.8 months. Real-time magnetic resonance (MR) guidance of laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) offers a high level of control. This tool therefore enables a minimally invasive option for destruction and treatment of resistant focal metastatic intracranial tumors. MR-guided LITT appears to provide a safe and potentially effective treatment for recurrent focal metastatic brain disease. A larger phase II and III series would be of interest to quantify potential median survival advantage. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Oncolytic Adenoviruses Armed with Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha and Interleukin-2 Enable Successful Adoptive Cell Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riikka Havunen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive cell therapy holds much promise in the treatment of cancer but results in solid tumors have been modest. The notable exception is tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL therapy of melanoma, but this approach only works with high-dose preconditioning chemotherapy and systemic interleukin (IL-2 postconditioning, both of which are associated with toxicities. To improve and broaden the applicability of adoptive cell transfer, we constructed oncolytic adenoviruses coding for human IL-2 (hIL2, tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α, or both. The viruses showed potent antitumor efficacy against human tumors in immunocompromised severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice. In immunocompetent Syrian hamsters, we combined the viruses with TIL transfer and were able to cure 100% of the animals. Cured animals were protected against tumor re-challenge, indicating a memory response. Arming with IL-2 and TNF-α increased the frequency of both CD4+ and CD8+ TILs in vivo and augmented splenocyte proliferation ex vivo, suggesting that the cytokines were important for T cell persistence and proliferation. Cytokine expression was limited to tumors and treatment-related signs of systemic toxicity were absent, suggesting safety. To conclude, cytokine-armed oncolytic adenoviruses enhanced adoptive cell therapy by favorable alteration of the tumor microenvironment. A clinical trial is in progress to study the utility of Ad5/3-E2F-d24-hTNFa-IRES-hIL2 (TILT-123 in human patients with cancer.

  5. Integration of a real-time tumor monitoring system into gated proton spot-scanning beam therapy: An initial phantom study using patient tumor trajectory data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsuura, Taeko; Miyamoto, Naoki; Takao, Seishin; Nihongi, Hideaki; Toramatsu, Chie; Sutherland, Kenneth; Suzuki, Ryusuke; Ishikawa, Masayori; Maeda, Kenichiro [Department of Medical Physics, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8638 (Japan); Shimizu, Shinichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Umegaki, Kikuo; Shirato, Hiroki [Department of Radiation Medicine, Hokkaido University Graduate School of Medicine, Sapporo, Hokkaido, 060-8648 (Japan); Fujii, Yusuke; Umezawa, Masumi [Hitachi, Ltd., Hitachi Research Laboratory, 7-2-1 Omika-cho, Hitachi-shi, Ibaraki 319-1221 (Japan)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: In spot-scanning proton therapy, the interplay effect between tumor motion and beam delivery leads to deterioration of the dose distribution. To mitigate the impact of tumor motion, gating in combination with repainting is one of the most promising methods that have been proposed. This study focused on a synchrotron-based spot-scanning proton therapy system integrated with real-time tumor monitoring. The authors investigated the effectiveness of gating in terms of both the delivered dose distribution and irradiation time by conducting simulations with patients' motion data. The clinically acceptable range of adjustable irradiation control parameters was explored. Also, the relation between the dose error and the characteristics of tumor motion was investigated.Methods: A simulation study was performed using a water phantom. A gated proton beam was irradiated to a clinical target volume (CTV) of 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 Multiplication-Sign 5 cm{sup 3}, in synchronization with lung cancer patients' tumor trajectory data. With varying parameters of gate width, spot spacing, and delivered dose per spot at one time, both dose uniformity and irradiation time were calculated for 397 tumor trajectory data from 78 patients. In addition, the authors placed an energy absorber upstream of the phantom and varied the thickness to examine the effect of changing the size of the Bragg peak and the number of required energy layers. The parameters with which 95% of the tumor trajectory data fulfill our defined criteria were accepted. Next, correlation coefficients were calculated between the maximum dose error and the tumor motion characteristics that were extracted from the tumor trajectory data.Results: With the assumed CTV, the largest percentage of the data fulfilled the criteria when the gate width was {+-}2 mm. Larger spot spacing was preferred because it increased the number of paintings. With a prescribed dose of 2 Gy, it was difficult to fulfill the

  6. Reproducibility of O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine uptake kinetics in brain tumors and influence of corticoid therapy: an experimental study in rat gliomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stegmayr, Carina; Schoeneck, Michael; Oliveira, Dennis; Willuweit, Antje [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); Filss, Christian; Coenen, Heinz H.; Langen, Karl-Josef [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Galldiks, Norbert [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Cologne, Department of Neurology, Cologne (Germany); Shah, N. Jon [Institute of Neuroscience and Medicine, Research Center Juelich, Juelich (Germany); University of Aachen, Department of Nuclear Medicine and Neurology, Aachen (Germany); Juelich-Aachen Research Alliance (JARA) - Section JARA-Brain, Juelich (Germany)

    2016-06-15

    Positron emission tomography (PET) using O-(2-{sup 18}F-fluoroethyl)-L-tyrosine ({sup 18}F-FET) is a well-established method for the diagnostics of brain tumors. This study investigates reproducibility of {sup 18}F-FET uptake kinetics in rat gliomas and the influence of the frequently used dexamethasone (Dex) therapy. F98 glioma or 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted into the striatum of 31 Fischer rats. After 10-11 days of tumor growth, the animals underwent dynamic PET after injection of {sup 18}F-FET (baseline). Thereafter, animals were divided into a control group and a group receiving Dex injections, and all animals were reinvestigated 2 days later. Tumor-to-brain ratios (TBR) of {sup 18}F-FET uptake (18-61 min p.i.) and the slope of the time-activity-curves (TAC) (18-61 min p.i.) were evaluated using a Volume-of-Interest (VOI) analysis. Data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and reproducibility by the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The slope of the tumor TACs showed high reproducibility with an ICC of 0.93. A systematic increase of the TBR in the repeated scans was noted (3.7 ± 2.8 %; p < 0.01), and appeared to be related to tumor growth as indicated by a significant correlation of TBR and tumor volume (r = 0.77; p < 0.0001). After correction for tumor growth TBR showed high longitudinal stability with an ICC of 0.84. Dex treatment induced a significant decrease of the TBR (-8.2 ± 6.1 %; p < 0.03), but did not influence the slope of the tumor TAC. TBR of {sup 18}F-FET uptake and tracer kinetics in brain tumors showed high longitudinal stability. Dex therapy may induce a minor decrease of the TBR; this needs further investigation. (orig.)

  7. Tumor - host immune interactions in Ewing sarcoma : implications for therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berghuis, Dagmar

    2012-01-01

    In this thesis, we report on various aspects of tumor - host (immune) interactions in Ewing sarcoma patients with the aim to obtain leads for immunotherapeutic or targeted treatment strategies. We demonstrate a key role for interferon gamma (IFNg) in enhancing both Ewing sarcoma immunogenicity and

  8. Long-term gene therapy with Del1 fragment using nonviral vectors in mice with explanted tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kitano H

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Hisataka Kitano,1 Atsushi Mamiya,1 Tomomi Ishikawa,2 Kayo Egoshi,3 Shinichiro Kokubun,2 Chiaki Hidai2 1Division of Dental Surgery, School of Medicine, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan; 2Division of Physiology, Department of Biomedical Science, School of Medicine, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan; 3School of Medicine, Nihon University, Tokyo, Japan Abstract: Cancer gene therapy using nonviral vectors is useful for long periods of treatment because such vectors are both safe and inexpensive, and thus can be used repeatedly. It has been reported that gene therapy with an E3C1 fragment of Del1 in a mouse explanted tumor model improved prognosis. The present study aimed to analyze the long-term effects of repeated nonviral gene transfer of E3C1. Mice with explanted tumors of SCCKN cells, a human squamous carcinoma, were treated with a plasmid encoding E3C1. Plasmids were injected locally every week using a transfection reagent. Control mice treated with mock DNA started to be euthanized on day 18, because the tumors had grown to over 15% of the body weight, and all of them had died by day 43. On the other hand, the tumors in two of ten mice treated with E3C1 had disappeared. The other eight mice started to be euthanized on day 46 and eight of ten mice had been euthanized by day 197. After 18 days of therapy, the tumor volume of control mice was 2,804±829 mm3 and that of the E3C1 mice was 197±159 mm3. Histochemical studies showed enhanced apoptosis in the E3C1-treated tumors, as compared with controls. Changes in cell morphology and decreased polymerized actin induced by E3C1 indicated disturbed cell adhesion to the matrix. In in vitro studies of SCCKN cells, prolonged administration of an E3C1 recombinant protein to cultured cells reduced adhesion-independent growth of cancer cells, as compared with control cells. These data suggest that E3C1 treatment induces anoikis. Keywords: cancer gene therapy, nonviral vector, apoptosis, anoikis, Del1

  9. Connecting the Dots: Therapy-Induced Senescence and a Tumor-Suppressive Immune Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilgelm, Anna E; Johnson, C Andrew; Prasad, Nripesh; Yang, Jinming; Chen, Sheau-Chiann; Ayers, Gregory D; Pawlikowski, Jeff S; Raman, Dayanidhi; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Kelley, Mark; Ecsedy, Jeffrey A; Shyr, Yu; Levy, Shawn E; Richmond, Ann

    2016-06-01

    Tumor cell senescence is a common outcome of anticancer therapy. Here we investigated how therapy-induced senescence (TIS) affects tumor-infiltrating leukocytes (TILs) and the efficacy of immunotherapy in melanoma. Tumor senescence was induced by AURKA or CDK4/6 inhibitors (AURKAi, CDK4/6i). Transcriptomes of six mouse tumors with differential response to AURKAi were analyzed by RNA sequencing, and TILs were characterized by flow cytometry. Chemokine RNA and protein expression were determined by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Therapeutic response was queried in immunodeficient mice, in mice with CCL5-deficient tumors, and in mice cotreated with CD137 agonist to activate TILs. CCL5 expression in reference to TIS and markers of TILs was studied in human melanoma tumors using patient-derived xenografts (n = 3 patients, n = 3 mice each), in AURKAi clinical trial samples (n = 3 patients, before/after therapy), and in The Cancer Genome Atlas (n = 278). All statistical tests were two-sided. AURKAi response was associated with induction of the immune transcriptome (P = 3.5 x 10-29) while resistance inversely correlated with TIL numbers (Spearman r = -0.87, P tumors regressed, P = .01) and in mice bearing CCL5-deficient vs control tumors (P = .61 vs P = .02); however, AURKAi response was greatly enhanced in mice also receiving T-cell-activating immunotherapy (P tumors, CCL5 expression was also induced by AURKAi (P ≤ .02) and CDK4/6i (P = .01) and was associated with increased immune marker expression (P = 1.40 x 10-93). Senescent melanoma cells secret CCL5, which promotes recruitment of TILs. Combining TIS with immunotherapy that enhances tumor cell killing by TILs is a promising novel approach to improve melanoma outcomes. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. The targeting mechanism of DHA ligand and its conjugate with Gemcitabine for the enhanced tumor therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Siwen; Qin, Jingyi; Tian, Caiping; Cao, Jie; Fida, Guissi; Wang, Zhaohui; Chen, Haiyan; Qian, Zhiyu; Chen, Wei R; Gu, Yueqing

    2014-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 C22 natural fatty acid serving as a precursor for metabolic and biochemical pathways, was reported as a targeting ligand of anticancer drugs. However, its tumor targeting ability and mechanism has not been claimed. Here we hypothesized that the uptake of DHA by tumor cells is related to the phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) contents in cell membranes. Thus, in this manuscript, the tumor-targeting ability of DHA was initially demonstrated in vitro and in vivo on different tumor cell lines by labeling DHA with fluorescence dyes. Subsequently, the tumor targeting ability was then correlated with the contents of PE in cell membranes to study the uptake mechanism. Further, DHA was conjugated with anticancer drug gemcitabine (DHA-GEM) for targeted tumor therapy. Our results demonstrated that DHA exhibited high tumor targeting ability and PE is the main mediator, which confirmed our hypothesis. The DHA-GEM displayed enhanced therapeutic efficacy than that of GEM itself, indicating that DHA is a promising ligand for tumor targeted therapy. PMID:25004114

  11. Hypoxia-Inducible Regulation of a Prodrug-Activating Enzyme for Tumor-Specific Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toru Shibata

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have suggested that tumor hypoxia could be exploited for cancer gene therapy. Using hypoxia-responsive elements derived from the human vascular endothelial growth factor gene, we have generated vectors expressing a bacterial nitroreductase. (20NTR gene that can activate the anticancer prodrug CB1954. Stable transfectants of human HT1080 tumor cells with hypoxia-inducible vectors were established with G418 selection. Hypoxic induction of NTR protein correlated with increased sensitivity to in vitro exposure of HT 1080 cells to the prodrug. Growth delay assays were performed with established tumor xenografts derived from the same cells to detect the in vivo efficacy of CB1954 conversion to its cytotoxic form. Significant antitumor effects were achieved with intraperitoneal injections of CB1954 both in tumors that express NTR constitutively or with a hypoxia-inducible promoter. In addition, respiration of 10% O2 increased tumor hypoxia in vivo and enhanced the antitumor effects. Taken together, these results demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible vectors may be useful for tumor-selective gene therapy, although the problem of delivery of the vector to the tumors, particularly to the hypoxic cells in the tumors, is not addressed by these studies.

  12. Whole-brain hippocampal sparing radiation therapy: Volume-modulated arc therapy vs intensity-modulated radiation therapy case study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Katrina, E-mail: Trinabena23@gmail.com; Lenards, Nishele; Holson, Janice

    2016-04-01

    The hippocampus is responsible for memory and cognitive function. An ongoing phase II clinical trial suggests that sparing dose to the hippocampus during whole-brain radiation therapy can help preserve a patient's neurocognitive function. Progressive research and advancements in treatment techniques have made treatment planning more sophisticated but beneficial for patients undergoing treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate and compare hippocampal sparing whole-brain (HS-WB) radiation therapy treatment planning techniques using volume-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). We randomly selected 3 patients to compare different treatment techniques that could be used for reducing dose to the hippocampal region. We created 2 treatment plans, a VMAT and an IMRT, from each patient's data set and planned on the Eclipse 11.0 treatment planning system (TPS). A total of 6 plans (3 IMRT and 3 VMAT) were created and evaluated for this case study. The physician contoured the hippocampus as per the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0933 protocol atlas. The organs at risk (OR) were contoured and evaluated for the plan comparison, which included the spinal cord, optic chiasm, the right and left eyes, lenses, and optic nerves. Both treatment plans produced adequate coverage on the planning target volume (PTV) while significantly reducing dose to the hippocampal region. The VMAT treatment plans produced a more homogenous dose distribution throughout the PTV while decreasing the maximum point dose to the target. However, both treatment techniques demonstrated hippocampal sparing when irradiating the whole brain.

  13. Prognostic Impact of Radiation Therapy to the Primary Tumor in Patients With Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Oligometastasis at Diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose Luis [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Instituto Madrileno de Oncologia/Grupo IMO, Madrid (Spain); Gomez, Daniel, E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang, Yan; Hong, David S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Heymach, John V. [Department of Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Swisher, Stephen G. [Department of Thoracic Surgery, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Lin, Steven H.; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: We investigated prognostic factors associated with survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and oligometastatic disease at diagnosis, particularly the influence of local treatment to the primary site on prognosis. Methods and Materials: From January 2000 through June 2011, 78 consecutive patients with oligometastatic NSCLC (<5 metastases) at diagnosis underwent definitive chemoradiation therapy ({>=}45 Gy) to the primary site. Forty-four of these patients also received definitive local treatment for the oligometastases. Survival outcomes were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method, and risk factors were identified by univariate and multivariate analyses. Results: Univariate Cox proportional hazard analysis revealed better overall survival (OS) for those patients who received at least 63 Gy of radiation to the primary site (P=.002), received definitive local treatment for oligometastasis (P=.041), had a Karnofsky performance status (KPS) score >80 (P=.007), had a gross tumor volume {<=}124 cm{sup 3} (P=.002), had adenocarcinoma histology (P=.002), or had no history of respiratory disease (P=.016). On multivariate analysis, radiation dose, performance status, and tumor volume retained significance (P=.004, P=.006, and P<.001, respectively). The radiation dose also maintained significance when patients with and without brain metastases were analyzed separately. Conclusions: Tumor volume, KPS, and receipt of at least 63 Gy to the primary tumor are associated with improved OS in patients with oligometastatic NSCLC at diagnosis. Our results suggest that a subset of such patients may benefit from definitive local therapy.

  14. Differentiation between vasogenic-edema versus tumor-infiltrative area in patients with glioblastoma during bevacizumab therapy: A longitudinal MRI study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Artzi, Moran, E-mail: artzimy@gmail.com [Functional Brain Center, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Bokstein, Felix, E-mail: felixb@tlvmc.gov.il [Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Blumenthal, Deborah T., E-mail: deborahblumenthal@gmail.com [Neuro-Oncology Service, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Aizenstein, Orna, E-mail: Ornaaizenstein@gmail.com [Functional Brain Center, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Liberman, Gilad, E-mail: giladliberman@gmail.com [Functional Brain Center, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Gonda Multidisciplinary Brain Research Center, Bar Ilan University, Ramat Gan (Israel); Corn, Benjamin W., E-mail: bencorn@tlvmc.gov.il [Functional Brain Center, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Institute of Radiotherapy, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Ben Bashat, Dafna, E-mail: dafnab@tlvmc.gov.il [Functional Brain Center, Tel Aviv Sourasky Medical Center, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel); Sagol School of Neuroscience, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-07-15

    Background: Treatment with bevacizumab is associated with substantial radiologic response in patients with glioblastoma (GB). However, following this initial response, changes in T{sub 2}-weighted MRI signal may develop, suggesting an infiltrative pattern of tumor progression. The aim of this study was to differentiate between vasogenic-edema versus tumor-infiltrative area in GB patients. Methods and materials: Fourteen patients with GB were longitudinally scanned, before and during intravenous bevacizumab therapy (5/10 mg/kg every 2-weeks). A total of 40 MR scans including conventional, diffusion, dynamic susceptibility contrast, dynamic contrast enhancement imaging, and MR-spectroscopy (MRS) were analyzed. Classification of non-enhancing fluid-attenuation-inversion-recovery (FLAIR) area was performed based on mean diffusivity, cerebral blood volume and flow maps, and further characterized using multiple MRI parameters. Results: The non-enhancing FLAIR lesion area was classified into: vasogenic-edema, characterized by reduced perfusion and increased FLAIR values; or tumor-infiltrative area, characterized by increased perfusion. Tumor-infiltrative area demonstrated a higher malignant pattern on MRS compared to areas of vasogenic-edema. Substantial reductions of the enhanced T{sub 1}-weighted (58 ± 10%) and hyperintense FLAIR (53 ± 9%) lesion volumes were detected mainly during the first weeks of therapy, with a shift to an infiltrative pattern of tumor progression thereafter, as detected by an increase in tumor-infiltrative area in the majority of patients, which correlated with progression-free survival (week 8: r = −0.86, p = 0.003, week 16: r = −0.99, p = 0.001). Conclusion: Characterization of non-enhancing hyperintense FLAIR lesion area in GB patients can provide an MR-based biomarker, indicating a shift to an infiltrative progression pattern, and may improve therapy response assessment in patients following bevacizumab therapy.

  15. Robustness of the Voluntary Breath-Hold Approach for the Treatment of Peripheral Lung Tumors Using Hypofractionated Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dueck, Jenny, E-mail: jenny.dueck@psi.ch [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Knopf, Antje-Christin [Joint Department of Physics at the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Lomax, Antony [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Department of Physics, ETH Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Albertini, Francesca [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Persson, Gitte F. [Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Josipovic, Mirjana [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Aznar, Marianne [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Weber, Damien C. [Center for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institut, Villigen PSI (Switzerland); University of Zürich, Zürich (Switzerland); Munck af Rosenschöld, Per [Section of Radiotherapy, Department of Oncology, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen (Denmark); Niels Bohr Institute, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: The safe clinical implementation of pencil beam scanning (PBS) proton therapy for lung tumors is complicated by the delivery uncertainties caused by breathing motion. The purpose of this feasibility study was to investigate whether a voluntary breath-hold technique could limit the delivery uncertainties resulting from interfractional motion. Methods and Materials: Data from 15 patients with peripheral lung tumors previously treated with stereotactic radiation therapy were included in this study. The patients had 1 computed tomographic (CT) scan in voluntary breath-hold acquired before treatment and 3 scans during the treatment course. PBS proton treatment plans with 2 fields (2F) and 3 fields (3F), respectively, were calculated based on the planning CT scan and subsequently recalculated on the 3 repeated CT scans. Recalculated plans were considered robust if the V{sub 95%} (volume receiving ≥95% of the prescribed dose) of the gross target volume (GTV) was within 5% of what was expected from the planning CT data throughout the simulated treatment. Results: A total of 14/15 simulated treatments for both 2F and 3F met the robustness criteria. Reduced V{sub 95%} was associated with baseline shifts (2F, P=.056; 3F, P=.008) and tumor size (2F, P=.025; 3F, P=.025). Smaller tumors with large baseline shifts were also at risk for reduced V{sub 95%} (interaction term baseline/size: 2F, P=.005; 3F, P=.002). Conclusions: The breath-hold approach is a realistic clinical option for treating lung tumors with PBS proton therapy. Potential risk factors for reduced V{sub 95%} are small targets in combination with large baseline shifts. On the basis of these results, the baseline shift of the tumor should be monitored (eg, through image guided therapy), and appropriate measures should be taken accordingly. The intrafractional motion needs to be investigated to confirm that the breath-hold approach is robust.

  16. Targeting Quiescent Cancer Cells to Eliminate Tumor Recurrence After Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    cells in solid tumor biology, much less their clinical relevance. This pilot study seeks to provide a sound mechanistic insight as to how quiescent...we were able to amplify a 1241 bp promoter segment of RBL2 gene. Figure 1. Amplification of RBL2 promoter using nested PCR. Using the...the reporting body REFERENCES Chen, J., Li, Y., Yu, T. S., McKay, R. M., Burns, D. K., Kernie, S. G., & Parada, L. F. (2012) Nature 488, 522-526

  17. Local iontophoretic administration of cytotoxic therapies to solid tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Byrne, James D.; Jajja, Mohammad R. N.; O’Neill, Adrian T.; Bickford, Lissett R.; Keeler, Amanda W.; Hyder, Nabeel; Wagner, Kyle; Deal, Allison; Little, Ryan E.; Moffitt, Richard A.; Stack, Colleen; Nelson, Meredith; Brooks, Christopher R.; Lee, William; Luft, J. Chris

    2015-01-01

    Parenteral and oral routes have been the traditional methods of administering cytotoxic agents to cancer patients. Unfortunately, the maximum potential effect of these cytotoxic agents has been limited because of systemic toxicity and poor tumor perfusion. In an attempt to improve the efficacy of cytotoxic agents while mitigating their side effects, we have developed modalities for the localized iontophoretic delivery of cytotoxic agents. These iontophoretic devices were designed to be implan...

  18. Laser Therapy Inhibits Tumor Growth in Mice by Promoting Immune Surveillance and Vessel Normalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Ottaviani

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Laser therapy, recently renamed as photobiomodulation, stands as a promising supportive treatment for oral mucositis induced by oncological therapies. However, its mechanisms of action and, more importantly, its safety in cancer patients, are still unclear. Here we explored the anti-cancer effect of 3 laser protocols, set at the most commonly used wavelengths, in B16F10 melanoma and oral carcinogenesis mouse models. While laser light increased cell metabolism in cultured cells, the in vivo outcome was reduced tumor progression. This striking, unexpected result, was paralleled by the recruitment of immune cells, in particular T lymphocytes and dendritic cells, which secreted type I interferons. Laser light also reduced the number of highly angiogenic macrophages within the tumor mass and promoted vessel normalization, an emerging strategy to control tumor progression. Collectively, these results set photobiomodulation as a safety procedure in oncological patients and open the way to its innovative use for cancer therapy.

  19. Evaluation of lung tumor motion management in radiation therapy with dynamic MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoun; Farah, Rana; Shea, Steven M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hales, Russell; Lee, Junghoon

    2017-03-01

    Surrogate-based tumor motion estimation and tracing methods are commonly used in radiotherapy despite the lack of continuous real time 3D tumor and surrogate data. In this study, we propose a method to simultaneously track the tumor and external surrogates with dynamic MRI, which allows us to evaluate their reproducible correlation. Four MRIcompatible fiducials are placed on the patient's chest and upper abdomen, and multi-slice 2D cine MRIs are acquired to capture the lung and whole tumor, followed by two-slice 2D cine MRIs to simultaneously track the tumor and fiducials, all in sagittal orientation. A phase-binned 4D-MRI is first reconstructed from multi-slice MR images using body area as a respiratory surrogate and group-wise registration. The 4D-MRI provides 3D template volumes for different breathing phases. 3D tumor position is calculated by 3D-2D template matching in which 3D tumor templates in 4D-MRI reconstruction and the 2D cine MRIs from the two-slice tracking dataset are registered. 3D trajectories of the external surrogates are derived via matching a 3D geometrical model to the fiducial segmentations on the 2D cine MRIs. We tested our method on five lung cancer patients. Internal target volume from 4D-CT showed average sensitivity of 86.5% compared to the actual tumor motion for 5 min. 3D tumor motion correlated with the external surrogate signal, but showed a noticeable phase mismatch. The 3D tumor trajectory showed significant cycle-to-cycle variation, while the external surrogate was not sensitive enough to capture such variations. Additionally, there was significant phase mismatch between surrogate signals obtained from fiducials at different locations.

  20. Metronomic chemotherapy prevents therapy-induced stromal activation and induction of tumor-initiating cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Tze-Sian; Pai, Vincent C.; Tan, Kok-Tong; Yen, Chia-Jui; Hsu, Shu-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Shan, Yan-Shen; Lee, Michael T.; Chu, Jui-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Although traditional chemotherapy kills a fraction of tumor cells, it also activates the stroma and can promote the growth and survival of residual cancer cells to foster tumor recurrence and metastasis. Accordingly, overcoming the host response induced by chemotherapy could substantially improve therapeutic outcome and patient survival. In this study, resistance to treatment and metastasis has been attributed to expansion of stem-like tumor-initiating cells (TICs). Molecular analysis of the tumor stroma in neoadjuvant chemotherapy–treated human desmoplastic cancers and orthotopic tumor xenografts revealed that traditional maximum-tolerated dose chemotherapy, regardless of the agents used, induces persistent STAT-1 and NF-κB activity in carcinoma-associated fibroblasts. This induction results in the expression and secretion of ELR motif–positive (ELR+) chemokines, which signal through CXCR-2 on carcinoma cells to trigger their phenotypic conversion into TICs and promote their invasive behaviors, leading to paradoxical tumor aggression after therapy. In contrast, the same overall dose administered as a low-dose metronomic chemotherapy regimen largely prevented therapy-induced stromal ELR+ chemokine paracrine signaling, thus enhancing treatment response and extending survival of mice carrying desmoplastic cancers. These experiments illustrate the importance of stroma in cancer therapy and how its impact on treatment resistance could be tempered by altering the dosing schedule of systemic chemotherapy. PMID:27881732

  1. Epigenetic Modifications and Head and Neck Cancer: Implications for Tumor Progression and Resistance to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rogerio M. Castilho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck squamous carcinoma (HNSCC is the sixth most prevalent cancer and one of the most aggressive malignancies worldwide. Despite continuous efforts to identify molecular markers for early detection, and to develop efficient treatments, the overall survival and prognosis of HNSCC patients remain poor. Accumulated scientific evidences suggest that epigenetic alterations, including DNA methylation, histone covalent modifications, chromatin remodeling and non-coding RNAs, are frequently involved in oral carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and resistance to therapy. Epigenetic alterations occur in an unsystematic manner or as part of the aberrant transcriptional machinery, which promotes selective advantage to the tumor cells. Epigenetic modifications also contribute to cellular plasticity during tumor progression and to the formation of cancer stem cells (CSCs, a small subset of tumor cells with self-renewal ability. CSCs are involved in the development of intrinsic or acquired therapy resistance, and tumor recurrences or relapse. Therefore, the understanding and characterization of epigenetic modifications associated with head and neck carcinogenesis, and the prospective identification of epigenetic markers associated with CSCs, hold the promise for novel therapeutic strategies to fight tumors. In this review, we focus on the current knowledge on epigenetic modifications observed in HNSCC and emerging Epi-drugs capable of sensitizing HNSCC to therapy.

  2. A cellular automata model for avascular solid tumor growth under the effect of therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, E. A.; Santos, L. B. L.; Pinho, S. T. R.

    2009-04-01

    Tumor growth has long been a target of investigation within the context of mathematical and computer modeling. The objective of this study is to propose and analyze a two-dimensional stochastic cellular automata model to describe avascular solid tumor growth, taking into account both the competition between cancer cells and normal cells for nutrients and/or space and a time-dependent proliferation of cancer cells. Gompertzian growth, characteristic of some tumors, is described and some of the features of the time-spatial pattern of solid tumors, such as compact morphology with irregular borders, are captured. The parameter space is studied in order to analyze the occurrence of necrosis and the response to therapy. Our findings suggest that transitions exist between necrotic and non-necrotic phases (no-therapy cases), and between the states of cure and non-cure (therapy cases). To analyze cure, the control and order parameters are, respectively, the highest probability of cancer cell proliferation and the probability of the therapeutic effect on cancer cells. With respect to patterns, it is possible to observe the inner necrotic core and the effect of the therapy destroying the tumor from its outer borders inwards.

  3. Combining oncolytic virotherapy with p53 tumor suppressor gene therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Bressy, Christian; Hastie, Eric; Grdzelishvili, Valery Z.

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic virus (OV) therapy utilizes replication-competent viruses to kill cancer cells, leaving non-malignant cells unharmed. With the first U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved OV, dozens of clinical trials ongoing, and an abundance of translational research in the field, OV therapy is poised to be one of the leading treatments for cancer. A number of recombinant OVs expressing a transgene for p53 (TP53) or another p53 family member (TP63 or TP73) were engineered with the goal of gen...

  4. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knaup, Courtney; Mavroidis, Panayiotis; Stathakis, Sotirios; Smith, Mark; Swanson, Gregory; Papanikolaou, Niko

    2011-09-01

    This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR) prostate plans to determine the biological effect of dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determined using ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1(®)) to create treatment plans using (103)Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. From the pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP) were determined using the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from -8% to 110%. TCP and the mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreases to the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined that patients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluated using the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volume post-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  5. Automatic segmentation of tumor-laden lung volumes from the LIDC database

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dell, Walter G.

    2012-03-01

    The segmentation of the lung parenchyma is often a critical pre-processing step prior to application of computer-aided detection of lung nodules. Segmentation of the lung volume can dramatically decrease computation time and reduce the number of false positive detections by excluding from consideration extra-pulmonary tissue. However, while many algorithms are capable of adequately segmenting the healthy lung, none have been demonstrated to work reliably well on tumor-laden lungs. Of particular challenge is to preserve tumorous masses attached to the chest wall, mediastinum or major vessels. In this role, lung volume segmentation comprises an important computational step that can adversely affect the performance of the overall CAD algorithm. An automated lung volume segmentation algorithm has been developed with the goals to maximally exclude extra-pulmonary tissue while retaining all true nodules. The algorithm comprises a series of tasks including intensity thresholding, 2-D and 3-D morphological operations, 2-D and 3-D floodfilling, and snake-based clipping of nodules attached to the chest wall. It features the ability to (1) exclude trachea and bowels, (2) snip large attached nodules using snakes, (3) snip small attached nodules using dilation, (4) preserve large masses fully internal to lung volume, (5) account for basal aspects of the lung where in a 2-D slice the lower sections appear to be disconnected from main lung, and (6) achieve separation of the right and left hemi-lungs. The algorithm was developed and trained to on the first 100 datasets of the LIDC image database.

  6. Tumor-Targeting Therapy Using Gene-Engineered Anaerobic-Nonpathogenic Bifidobacterium longum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Shun'ichiro; Shimatani, Yuko; Fujimori, Minoru

    2016-01-01

    Despite great progress in molecular-targeting drugs for cancer treatment, there are problems of disease recurrence due to cancer-cell resistance to those drugs, derived from the heterogeneity of tumors. On one hand, the low-oxygen microenvironment present in malignant tumor tissues has been regarded as a source of resistance of cancer cells against conventional therapie, such as radiation and chemotherapy. To overcome these problems, we have been developing a system to selectively deliver a large amount of anticancer drugs to malignant tumors by making use of the limiting factor, hypoxia, in tumors. Our strategy is to use hypoxia as a selective target. Here, we show methods and protocols using the nonpathogenic obligate anaerobic Bifidobacterium longum as a drug-delivery system (DDS) to target anaerobic tumor tissue.

  7. Fractionated afterloading irradiation as a new therapy method for inoperable cerebral tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ernst, H.; Scheffler, A.; Oppel, F.; Brock, M.; Brust, V.; Bauer, R.; Pannek, H.W.

    1986-07-01

    A method is shown for fractionated afterloading therapy of inoperable cerebral tumors. A 3 mm thick, tube-form applicator of noble metal which is closed at the front side is implanted into the tumor by a stereotaxic technique and firmly screwed together with the osseous calotte. It remains there up to two weeks, giving full mobility to the patient. The afterloading therapy with a moving iridium source is performed one or two times per day with individual doses of 2 Gray. Thus, the chronological and - to a certain extent - also the spatial dose distribution is variable when applying this method.

  8. TIL therapy broadens the tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cell compartment in melanoma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kvistborg, Pia; Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Heemskerk, Bianca

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence that both adoptive T cell transfer and T cell checkpoint blockade can lead to regression of human melanoma. However, little data are available on the effect of these cancer therapies on the tumor-reactive T cell compartment. To address this issue we have profiled therapy......-induced T cell reactivity against a panel of 145 melanoma-associated CD8(+) T cell epitopes. Using this approach, we demonstrate that individual tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte cell products from melanoma patients contain unique patterns of reactivity against shared melanoma-associated antigens...

  9. Potential of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Andoh, Tooru; Sudo, Tamotsu; Fujita, Ikuo; Fukase, Naomasa; Takeuchi, Tamotsu; Sonobe, Hiroshi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Hirose, Tkanori; Sakuma, Toshiko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Sugimoto, Tohru; Kawamoto, Teruya; Fukumori, Yoshinobu; Yamamoto, Satomi; Atagi, Shinji; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Kurosaka, Masahiro; Ono, Koji; Ichikawa, Hideki; Suzuki, Minoru

    2015-12-01

    Malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors (MPNST) are relatively rare neoplasms with poor prognosis. At present there is no effective treatment for MPNST other than surgical resection. Nonetheless, the anti-tumor effect of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) was recently demonstrated in two patients with MPNST. Subsequently, tumor-bearing nude mice subcutaneously transplanted with a human MPNST cell line were injected with p-borono-L-phenylalanine (L-BPA) and subjected to BNCT. Pathological studies then revealed that the MPNST cells were selectively destroyed by BNCT. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulators of Response to Tumor Necrosis-Related Apoptosis-Inducing Ligand (TRAIL) Therapy in Ovarian Cancer

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Behbakht, Kian

    2008-01-01

    .... More effective therapies are urgently needed. One of the most promising therapies in development for ovarian cancer is the use of either the Tumor Necrosis Factor-related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL...

  11. Myxoma virus combined with rapamycin treatment enhances adoptive T cell therapy for murine melanoma brain tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Diana L; Doty, Rosalinda; Tosic, Vesna; Liu, Jia; Kranz, David M; McFadden, Grant; Macneill, Amy L; Roy, Edward J

    2011-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-specific T cells has shown some success for treating metastatic melanoma. We evaluated a novel strategy to improve adoptive therapy by administering both T cells and oncolytic myxoma virus to mice with syngeneic B16.SIY melanoma brain tumors. Adoptive transfer of activated CD8(+) 2C T cells that recognize SIY peptide doubled survival time, but SIY-negative tumors recurred. Myxoma virus killed B16.SIY cells in vitro, and intratumoral injection of virus led to selective and transient infection of the tumor. Virus treatment recruited innate immune cells to the tumor and induced IFNβ production in the brain, resulting in limited oncolytic effects in vivo. To counter this, we evaluated the safety and efficacy of co-administering 2C T cells, myxoma virus, and either rapamycin or neutralizing antibodies against IFNβ. Mice that received either triple combination therapy survived significantly longer with no apparent side effects, but eventually relapsed. Importantly, rapamycin treatment did not impair T cell-mediated tumor destruction, supporting the feasibility of combining adoptive immunotherapy and rapamycin-enhanced virotherapy. Myxoma virus may be a useful vector for transient delivery of therapeutic genes to a tumor to enhance T cell responses.

  12. Nanobody-Based Delivery Systems for Diagnosis and Targeted Tumor Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaozhong Hu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The development of innovative targeted therapeutic approaches are expected to surpass the efficacy of current forms of treatments and cause less damage to healthy cells surrounding the tumor site. Since the first development of targeting agents from hybridoma’s, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been employed to inhibit tumor growth and proliferation directly or to deliver effector molecules to tumor cells. However, the full potential of such a delivery strategy is hampered by the size of mAbs, which will obstruct the targeted delivery system to access the tumor tissue. By serendipity, a new kind of functional homodimeric antibody format was discovered in camelidae, known as heavy-chain antibodies (HCAbs. The cloning of the variable domain of HCAbs produces an attractive minimal-sized alternative for mAbs, referred to as VHH or nanobodies (Nbs. Apart from their dimensions in the single digit nanometer range, the unique characteristics of Nbs combine a high stability and solubility, low immunogenicity and excellent affinity and specificity against all possible targets including tumor markers. This stimulated the development of tumor-targeted therapeutic strategies. Some autonomous Nbs have been shown to act as antagonistic drugs, but more importantly, the targeting capacity of Nbs has been exploited to create drug delivery systems. Obviously, Nb-based targeted cancer therapy is mainly focused toward extracellular tumor markers, since the membrane barrier prevents antibodies to reach the most promising intracellular tumor markers. Potential strategies, such as lentiviral vectors and bacterial type 3 secretion system, are proposed to deliver target-specific Nbs into tumor cells and to block tumor markers intracellularly. Simultaneously, Nbs have also been employed for in vivo molecular imaging to diagnose diseased tissues and to monitor the treatment effects. Here, we review the state of the art and focus on recent developments with Nbs as

  13. Metronomic photodynamic therapy (mPDT): concepts and technical feasibility in brain tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Brian C.; Bisland, Stuart K.; Bogaards, Arjen; Lin, Annie; Moriyama, Eduardo H.; Zhang, Kai; Lilge, Lothar D.

    2003-06-01

    The concept of metronomic photodynamic therapy (mPDT) is presented, in which both the photosensitizer and light are delivered continuously at low rates over extended periods in order to increase selective tumor cell kill through apoptosis. The focus of the present work is on mPDT treatment of malignant brain tumors, in which selectivity between damage to tumor cells versus normal brain tissue is critical. Previous studies have shown that low-dose PDT using aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-induced protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) can induce apoptosis in tumor cells without causing necrosis in either tumor or normal brain tissue or apoptosis in the latter. In order to produce enough tumor cell kill to be an effective therapy, multiple PDT treatments, such as hyperfractionation or metronomic delivery, are likely requried, based on the levels of apoptosis achieved and model calculations of tumor growth rates. mPDT poses two substantial technical challenges: extended delivery of ALA and implantation of interstitial devices for extended light delivery while allowing free movement. In rat models ALA administration via the drinking water has been accomplished at significant doses for up to 10 days, and ex vivo spectrofluorimetry of tumore, normal brain and other tissues post mortem demonstrates a 3-4 increase in the tumor-to-brain concentration of PpIX, without toxicity. Prototype light sources and delivery devices are also shown to be practical, either using a laser diode or light emitting diode (LED) coupled to an implanted optical fiber in the case of the rat model or a directly-implanted LED in rabbits. The combined delivery of both drug and light over an extended period, with survival of the animals, is demonstrated. Preliminary evidence of selective apoptosis of tumor under these conditions is presented.

  14. Legubicin a Tumor-activated Prodrug for Breast Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-01

    reagent. Rabbit anti-legu- main antisera was prepared by immunization with purified human legumain produced in Escherichia coli (8). This antisera...0 5 0 1 0 0 S a li n e D o x L e g - 3 T im e ( D a y s ) Pe rc en t S ur vi va l Figure 4. Efficacy of LEG-3 in 4T1 murine...were purchased from The Scripps Research Institute Rodent Breeding Facility. Tumor induction was performed by s.c. injection of 5 × 105 4T1 cells in

  15. [Study on medical economic evaluation methods for metastatic brain tumors therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takura, Tomoyuki; Hayashi, Motohiro; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Iseki, Hiroshi; Uetsuka, Yoshio

    2010-07-01

    Treatment design for metastatic brain tumors is required to firstly care about the life and function for which the patient hopes because it is terminal care. Therefore, to discuss the value of the therapy, a viewpoint of the QOL and the socioeconomic factors other than the survival rate is important. However, examination that applies these factors to the therapy needs to be carried out more thoroughly. With this in mind, we discuss cost effectiveness of therapy for metastatic brain tumor, through a pilot study on gamma knife therapy. We studied 18 patients (mean age 61.6 years old) undergoing therapy for metastatic brain tumors. The health rate QOL was assessed by the profile-type measure SF-36 (Short-Form 36-Item Ver1.2) and the preference-based measure EQ-5D (EuroQoL-5D), before and six months after gamma knife therapy. Cost-utility-analysis (yen/Qaly) was carried out from quality adjusted life years (Qalys) and medical fee claims. In addition, we made a correlation analysis of the irradiation procedure and the gains attained. The observation by SF-36 for six months was useful for metastatic brain tumor. As a result, the QOL indicators showed increased mental health (MH: p=0.040) and role emotional (RE: p=0.029) with significant difference. In the measurement of EQ-5D, it was added only for one month based on the significant difference (p=0.022) from the pre-therapy QOL. The utilities that were analyzed became 0.052+/-0.175SD (score), and Qalys were 0.135. Because the cost was 721.4+/-5.2SD (thousand yen), the performance of cost-utility-analysis was estimated as 5, 330, 000 (yen/Qaly). In addition, positive correlation (r=0.845/p=0.034) was found between the EQ-5D utility score and the tumor irradiation energy (mJ), etc. We established a new value over and above mere survival rate concerning metastatic brain tumor therapy. The socioeconomics and efficacy of therapy are more difficult to discuss in this disease than in other diseases. We did this by clarifying

  16. A generative model for segmentation of tumor and organs-at-risk for radiation therapy planning of glioblastoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agn, Mikael; Law, Ian; Munck af Rosenschöld, Per; Van Leemput, Koen

    2016-03-01

    We present a fully automated generative method for simultaneous brain tumor and organs-at-risk segmentation in multi-modal magnetic resonance images. The method combines an existing whole-brain segmentation technique with a spatial tumor prior, which uses convolutional restricted Boltzmann machines to model tumor shape. The method is not tuned to any specific imaging protocol and can simultaneously segment the gross tumor volume, peritumoral edema and healthy tissue structures relevant for radiotherapy planning. We validate the method on a manually delineated clinical data set of glioblastoma patients by comparing segmentations of gross tumor volume, brainstem and hippocampus. The preliminary results demonstrate the feasibility of the method.

  17. Transarterial Fiducial Marker Placement for Image-guided Proton Therapy for Malignant Liver Tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohta, Kengo, E-mail: yesterday.is.yesterday@gmail.com; Shimohira, Masashi, E-mail: mshimohira@gmail.com [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Japan); Sasaki, Shigeru, E-mail: ssasaki916@yahoo.co.jp; Iwata, Hiromitsu, E-mail: h-iwa-ncu@nifty.com; Nishikawa, Hiroko, E-mail: piroko1018@gmail.com; Ogino, Hiroyuki, E-mail: oginogio@gmail.com; Hara, Masaki, E-mail: mhara@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Nagoya City West Medical Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, Nagoya Proton Therapy Center (Japan); Hashizume, Takuya, E-mail: tky300@gmail.com; Shibamoto, Yuta, E-mail: yshiba@med.nagoya-cu.ac.jp [Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to analyze the technical and clinical success rates and safety of transarterial fiducial marker placement for image-guided proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.Methods and MaterialsFifty-five patients underwent this procedure as an interventional treatment. Five patients had 2 tumors, and 4 tumors required 2 markers each, so the total number of procedures was 64. The 60 tumors consisted of 46 hepatocellular carcinomas and 14 liver metastases. Five-mm-long straight microcoils of 0.018 inches in diameter were used as fiducial markers and placed in appropriate positions for each tumor. We assessed the technical and clinical success rates of transarterial fiducial marker placement, as well as the complications associated with it. Technical success was defined as the successful delivery and placement of the fiducial coil, and clinical success was defined as the completion of proton therapy.ResultsAll 64 fiducial coils were successfully installed, so the technical success rate was 100 % (64/64). Fifty-four patients underwent proton therapy without coil migration. In one patient, proton therapy was not performed because of obstructive jaundice due to bile duct invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma. Thus, the clinical success rate was 98 % (54/55). Slight bleeding was observed in one case, but it was stopped immediately and then observed. None of the patients developed hepatic infarctions due to fiducial marker migration.ConclusionTransarterial fiducial marker placement appears to be a useful and safe procedure for proton therapy for malignant liver tumors.

  18. Cisplatin and photodynamic therapy exert synergistic inhibitory effects on small-cell lung cancer cell viability and xenograft tumor growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, You-Shuang; Peng, Yin-Bo; Yao, Min; Teng, Ji-Ping; Ni, Da; Zhu, Zhi-Jun; Zhuang, Bu-Feng; Yang, Zhi-Yin

    2017-06-03

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer that shows an overall 5-year survival rate below 10%. Although chemotherapy using cisplatin has been proven effective in SCLC treatment, conventional dose of cisplatin causes adverse side effects. Photodynamic therapy, a form of non-ionizing radiation therapy, is increasingly used alone or in combination with other therapeutics in cancer treatment. Herein, we aimed to address whether low dose cisplatin combination with PDT can effectively induce SCLC cell death by using in vitro cultured human SCLC NCI-H446 cells and in vivo tumor xenograft model. We found that both cisplatin and PDT showed dose-dependent cytotoxic effects in NCI-H446 cells. Importantly, co-treatment with low dose cisplatin (1 μM) and PDT (1.25 J/cm2) synergistically inhibited cell viability and cell migration. We further showed that the combined therapy induced a higher level of intracellular ROS in cultured NCI-H446 cells. Moreover, the synergistic effect by cisplatin and PDT was recapitulated in tumor xenograft as revealed by a more robust increase in the staining of TUNEL (a marker of cell death) and decrease in tumor volume. Taken together, our findings suggest that low dose cisplatin combination with PDT can be an effective therapeutic modality in the treatment of SCLC patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Apelin as a marker for monitoring the tumor vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Takara, Kazuhiro; Yamakawa, Daishi; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Takakura, Nobuyuki

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic agents transiently normalize tumor vessel structure and improve vessel function, thereby providing a window of opportunity for enhancing the efficacy of chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Currently, there are no reliable predictors or markers reflecting this vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Apelin, the expression of which is regulated by hypoxia, and which has well-described roles in tumor progression, is an easily measured secreted protein. Here, we show that apelin can be used as a marker for the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. Mice bearing s.c. tumors resulting from inoculation of the colon adenocarcinoma cell line HT29 were treated with a single injection of bevacizumab, a mAb neutralizing vascular endothelial growth factor. Tumor growth, vessel density, pericyte coverage, tumor hypoxia, and small molecule delivery were determined at four different times after treatment with bevacizumab (days 1, 3, 5, and 8). Tumor growth and vessel density were significantly reduced after bevacizumab treatment, which also significantly increased tumor vessel maturity, and improved tumor hypoxia and small molecule delivery between days 3 and 5. These effects abated by day 8, suggesting that a time window for vessel normalization was opened between days 3 and 5 during bevacizumab treatment in this model. Apelin mRNA expression and plasma apelin levels decreased transiently at day 5 post-treatment, coinciding with vessel normalization. Thus, apelin is a potential indicator of the vessel normalization window during antiangiogenic therapy. © 2015 The Authors. Cancer Science published by Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  20. Total Gross Tumor Volume Is an Independent Prognostic Factor in Patients Treated With Selective Nodal Irradiation for Stage I to III Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reymen, Bart, E-mail: bart.reymen@maastro.nl [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Van Loon, Judith; Baardwijk, Angela van; Wanders, Rinus; Borger, Jacques [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Dingemans, Anne-Marie C. [Department of Pulmonology, GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bootsma, Gerben [Department of Pulmonology, Atrium Medical Centre, Heerlen (Netherlands); Pitz, Cordula [Department of Pulmonology, Laurentius Hospital, Roermond (Netherlands); Lunde, Ragnar [Department of Pulmonology, St Jansgasthuis, Weert (Netherlands); Geraedts, Wiel [Department of Pulmonology, Orbis Medical Centre, Sittard (Netherlands); Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Department of Radiation Oncology (MAASTRO clinic), GROW – School for Oncology and Developmental Biology, Maastricht University Medical Centre, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital Leuven/ KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: In non-small cell lung cancer, gross tumor volume (GTV) influences survival more than other risk factors. This could also apply to small cell lung cancer. Methods and Materials: Analysis of our prospective database with stage I to III SCLC patients referred for concurrent chemo radiation therapy. Standard treatment was 45 Gy in 1.5-Gy fractions twice daily concurrently with carboplatin-etoposide, followed by prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in case of non-progression. Only fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)-positive or pathologically proven nodal sites were included in the target volume. Total GTV consisted of post chemotherapy tumor volume and pre chemotherapy nodal volume. Survival was calculated from diagnosis (Kaplan-Meier ). Results: A total of 119 patients were included between May 2004 and June 2009. Median total GTV was 93 ± 152 cc (7.5-895 cc). Isolated elective nodal failure occurred in 2 patients (1.7%). Median follow-up was 38 months, median overall survival 20 months (95% confidence interval = 17.8-22.1 months), and 2-year survival 38.4%. In multivariate analysis, only total GTV (P=.026) and performance status (P=.016) significantly influenced survival. Conclusions: In this series of stage I to III small cell lung cancer patients treated with FDG-PET-based selective nodal irradiation total GTV is an independent risk factor for survival.

  1. The role of mesothelin in tumor progression and targeted therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Zhewei; Qian, Min; Ho, Mitchell

    2013-01-01

    Mesothelin, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchored cell surface protein, is a potential target for antibody-based cancer therapy due to its high expression in mesothelioma, ovarian cancer, pancreatic cancer, cholangiocarcinoma and other cancers. The SS1P immunotoxin and MORAb-009 (amatuximab), a chimeric monoclonal antibody, are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. In this review, we discuss the role of mesothelin in cancer progression and provide new insights into mesothelin-...

  2. Evaluation of PET/MRI for Tumor Volume Delineation for Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kyle; Mullins, Brandon T; Falchook, Aaron D; Lian, Jun; He, Kelei; Shen, Dinggang; Dance, Michael; Lin, Weili; Sills, Tiffany M; Das, Shiva K; Huang, Benjamin Y; Chera, Bhishamjit S

    2017-01-01

    Computed tomography (CT), combined positron emitted tomography and CT (PET/CT), and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are commonly used in head and neck radiation planning. Hybrid PET/MRI has garnered attention for potential added value in cancer staging and treatment planning. Herein, we compare PET/MRI vs. planning CT for head and neck cancer gross tumor volume (GTV) delineation. We prospectively enrolled patients with head and neck cancer treated with definitive chemoradiation to 60-70 Gy using IMRT. We performed pretreatment contrast-enhanced planning CT and gadolinium-enhanced PET/MRI. Primary and nodal volumes were delineated on planning CT (GTV-CT) prospectively before treatment and PET/MRI (GTV-PET/MRI) retrospectively after treatment. GTV-PET/MRI was compared to GTV-CT using separate rigid registrations for each tumor volume. The Dice similarity coefficient (DSC) metric evaluating spatial overlap and modified Hausdorff distance (mHD) evaluating mean orthogonal distance difference were calculated. Minimum dose to 95% of GTVs (D95) was compared. Eleven patients were evaluable (10 oropharynx, 1 larynx). Nine patients had evaluable primary tumor GTVs and seven patients had evaluable nodal GTVs. Mean primary GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI size were 13.2 and 14.3 cc, with mean intersection 8.7 cc, DSC 0.63, and mHD 1.6 mm. D95 was 65.3 Gy for primary GTV-CT vs. 65.2 Gy for primary GTV-PET/MRI. Mean nodal GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI size were 19.0 and 23.0 cc, with mean intersection 14.4 cc, DSC 0.69, and mHD 2.3 mm. D95 was 62.3 Gy for both nodal GTV-CT and GTV-PET/MRI. In this series of patients with head and neck (primarily oropharynx) cancer, PET/MRI and CT-GTVs had similar volumes (though there were individual cases with larger differences) with overall small discrepancies in spatial overlap, small mean orthogonal distance differences, and similar radiation doses.

  3. Assessment of tumor response to radiation and vascular targeting therapy in mice using quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Kaffas, Ahmed; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Falou, Omar; Tran, William Tyler; Czarnota, Gregory J., E-mail: gregory.czarnota@sunnybrook.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Imaging Research and Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Departments of Medical Biophysics and Radiation Oncology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1L7 (Canada); Zhou, Stephanie; Fernandes, Jason; Giles, Anoja [Imaging Research and Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada); Hashim, Amr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5, Canada and Imaging Research and Physical Sciences, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, Ontario M4N 3M5 (Canada)

    2015-08-15

    Purpose: It is now recognized that the tumor vasculature is in part responsible for regulating tumor responses to radiation therapy. However, the extent to which radiation-based vascular damage contributes to tumor cell death remains unknown. In this work, quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy (QUS) methods were used to investigate the acute responses of tumors to radiation-based vascular treatments. Methods: Tumor xenografts (MDA-MB-231) were treated with single radiation doses of 2 or 8 Gy alone, or in combination with pharmacological agents that modulate vascular radiosensitivity. The midband fit, the slope, and the 0-MHz intercept QUS parameters were obtained from a linear-regression fit to the averaged power spectrum of frequency-dependent ultrasound backscatter and were used to quantify acute tumor responses following treatment administration. Power spectrums were extracted from raw volumetric radio-frequency ultrasound data obtained before and 24 h following treatment administration. These parameters have previously been correlated to tumor cell death. Staining using in situ end labeling, carbonic anhydrase 9 and cluster of differentiation 31 of tumor sections were used to assess cell death, oxygenation, and vasculature distributions, respectively. Results: Results indicate a significant midband fit QUS parameter increases of 3.2 ± 0.3 dBr and 5.4 ± 0.5 dBr for tumors treated with 2 and 8 Gy radiation combined with the antiangiogenic agent Sunitinib, respectively. In contrast, tumors treated with radiation alone demonstrated a significant midband fit increase of 4.4 ± 0.3 dBr at 8 Gy only. Preadministration of basic fibroblast growth factor, an endothelial radioprotector, acted to minimize tumor response following single large doses of radiation. Immunohistochemical analysis was in general agreement with QUS findings; an R{sup 2} of 0.9 was observed when quantified cell death was correlated with changes in midband fit. Conclusions: Results from QUS

  4. A prospective study of cerebral, frontal lobe, and temporal lobe volumes and neuropsychological performance in children with primary brain tumors treated with cranial radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbahiwe, Harold; Rashid, Arif; Horska, Alena; Mahone, E Mark; Lin, Doris; McNutt, Todd; Cohen, Kenneth; Redmond, Kristin; Wharam, Moody; Terezakis, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    Cranial radiation therapy (RT) is an important component in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors. However, it can result in long-term effects on the developing brain. This prospective study assessed the effects of cranial RT on cerebral, frontal lobe, and temporal lobe volumes and their correlation with higher cognitive functioning. Ten pediatric patients with primary brain tumors treated with cranial RT and 14 age- and sex-matched healthy children serving as controls were evaluated. Quantitative magnetic resonance imaging and neuropsychological assessments (language, memory, auditory and visual processing, and vocabulary) were performed at the baseline and 6, 15, and 27 months after RT. The effects of age, the time since RT, and the cerebral RT dose on brain volumes and neuropsychological performance were analyzed with linear mixed effects model analyses. Cerebral volume increased significantly with age in both groups (P = .01); this increase in volume was more pronounced in younger children. Vocabulary performance was found to be significantly associated with a greater cerebral volume (P = .05) and a lower RT dose (P = .003). No relation was observed between the RT dose and the cerebral volume. There was no difference in the corresponding neuropsychological tests between the 2 groups. This prospective study found significant relations among the RT dose, cerebral volumes, and rate of vocabulary development among children receiving RT. The results of this study provide further support for clinical trials aimed at reducing cranial RT doses in the pediatric population. Cancer 2017;161-168. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  5. WE-G-BRE-07: Proton Therapy Enhanced by Tumor-Targeting Gold Nanoparticles: A Pilot in Vivo Experiment at The Proton Therapy Center at MD Anderson Cancer Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfe, T; Grant, J; Wolfe, A; Gillin, M; Krishnan, S [MD Anderson Cancer Ctr., Houston, TX (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Assess tumor-growth delay and survival in a mouse model of prostate cancer treated with tumor-targeting gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) and proton therapy. Methods: We first examined the accumulation of targeting nanoparticles within prostate tumors by imaging AuNPs with ultrasound-guided photoacoustics at 24h after the intravenous administration of goserelin-conjugated AuNPs (gAuNP) in three mice. Nanoparticles were also imaged at the cellular level with TEM in PC3 cells incubated with gAuNP for 24h. Pegylated AuNPs (pAuNP) were also imaged in vivo and in vitro for comparison. PC3 cells were then implanted subcutaneously in nude mice; 51mice with 8–10mm tumors were included. AuNPs were injected intravenously at 0.2%w/w final gold concentration 24h before irradiation. A special jig was designed to facilitate tumor irradiation perpendicular to the proton beam. Proton energy was set to 180MeV, the radiation field was 18×18cm{sup 2}, and 9cm or 13.5cm thick solid-water compensators were used to position the tumors at either the beam entrance (BE) or the SOBP. Physical doses of 5Gy were delivered to all tumors on a patient beam line at MD Anderson's Proton Therapy Center. Results: The photoacoustic experiment reveled that our nanoparticles leak from the tumor-feeding vasculature and accumulate within the tumor volume over time. Additionally, TEM images showed gAuNP are internalized in cancer cells, accumulating within the cytoplasm, whereas pAuNP are not. Tumor-growth was delayed by 11 or 32days in mice receiving gAuNP irradiated at the BE or the SOBP, relative to proton radiation alone. Survival curves (ongoing experiment) reveal that gAuNPs improved survival by 36% or 74% for tumors irradiated at the BE or SOBP. Conclusion: These important, albeit preliminary, in vivo findings reveal nanoparticles to be potent sensitizers to proton therapy. Further, conjugation of AuNPs to tumor-specific antigens that promote enhanced cellular internalization improved

  6. A partial differential equation model and its reduction to an ordinary differential equation model for prostate tumor growth under intermittent hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Youshan; Guo, Qian; Aihara, Kazuyuki

    2014-10-01

    Hormonal therapy with androgen suppression is a common treatment for advanced prostate tumors. The emergence of androgen-independent cells, however, leads to a tumor relapse under a condition of long-term androgen deprivation. Clinical trials suggest that intermittent androgen suppression (IAS) with alternating on- and off-treatment periods can delay the relapse when compared with continuous androgen suppression (CAS). In this paper, we propose a mathematical model for prostate tumor growth under IAS therapy. The model elucidates initial hormone sensitivity, an eventual relapse of a tumor under CAS therapy, and a delay of a relapse under IAS therapy, which are due to the coexistence of androgen-dependent cells, androgen-independent cells resulting from reversible changes by adaptation, and androgen-independent cells resulting from irreversible changes by genetic mutations. The model is formulated as a free boundary problem of partial differential equations that describe the evolution of populations of the abovementioned three types of cells during on-treatment periods and off-treatment periods. Moreover, the model can be transformed into a piecewise linear ordinary differential equation model by introducing three new volume variables, and the study of the resulting model may help to devise optimal IAS schedules.

  7. Retinoblastoma regression patterns following chemoreduction and adjuvant therapy in 557 tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Carol L; Palamar, Melis; Sharma, Pooja; Ramasubramanian, Aparna; Leahey, Ann; Meadows, Anna T; Shields, Jerry A

    2009-03-01

    To evaluate retinoblastoma regression patterns following chemoreduction and adjuvant therapy. A total of 557 retinoblastomas. A retrospective medical record review following 6 cycles of chemoreduction and tumor consolidation (thermotherapy or cryotherapy). Regression patterns included type 0 (no remnant), type 1 (calcified remnant), type 2 (noncalcified remnant), type 3 (partially calcified remnant), and type 4 (flat scar). Regression pattern. Retinoblastoma regressions were type 0 (n = 10), type 1 (n = 75), type 2 (n = 28), type 3 (n = 127), and type 4 (n = 317). Tumors with an initial thickness of 3 mm or less regressed most often to type 4 (92%), those 3 to 8 mm regressed to type 3 (34%) or type 4 (40%), and those thicker than 8 mm regressed to type 1 (40%) or type 3 (49%). Factors predictive of type 1 regression included larger tumor base and closer foveolar proximity. Factors predictive of type 3 included older age, larger tumor base, macular location, closer foveolar proximity, and lack of consolidation. Factors predictive of type 4 included familial hereditary pattern, smaller tumor base, greater foveolar distance, and tumor consolidation. Following chemoreduction, most small retinoblastomas result in a flat scar, intermediate tumors in a flat or partially calcified remnant, and large tumors in a more completely calcified remnant.

  8. Redirecting tumor-associated macrophages to become tumoricidal effectors as a novel strategy for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiang; Turkowski, Kati; Mora, Javier; Brüne, Bernhard; Seeger, Werner; Weigert, Andreas; Savai, Rajkumar

    2017-07-18

    Cancer research in recent decades has highlighted the potential influence of the tumor microenvironment on the progression and metastasis of most known cancer types. Within the established microenvironment, tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) are one of the most abundant and crucial non-neoplastic cell types. The polarization of macrophages into tumor-suppressive M1 or tumor-promoting M2 types is a fundamental event in the establishment of the tumor microenvironment. Although ample evidence indicates that TAMs are primarily M2 polarized, the mechanisms responsible for the regulation and maintenance of M1 and M2 polarization imbalance remain unclear. The manipulation of this critical axis through three main approaches may provide new strategies for cancer therapy - (I) specific interference with M2-like TAM survival or inhibiting their signaling cascades, (II) repression of macrophage recruitment to tumors, and (III) repolarization of tumor-promoting M2-like TAMs to a tumoricidal M1-like phenotype. This review summarizes current strategies for cancer intervention via manipulation of macrophage polarization, with particular focus on composition of the tumor microenvironment and its influence on cancer progression and metastasis. It is clear that additional fundamental and preclinical research is required to confirm the efficacy and practicality of this novel and promising strategy for treating cancer.

  9. Connexin 43 Gene Therapy Delivered by Polymer-Modified Salmonella in Murine Tumor Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Kuang Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The use of preferentially tumor-targeting bacteria as vectors is one of the most innovative approaches for the treatment of cancer. This method is based on the observation that some obligate or facultative anaerobic bacteria are capable of selectively multiplying in tumors and inhibiting their growth. Previously, we found that the tumor-targeting efficiency of Salmonella could be modulated by modifying the immune response to these bacteria by coating them with poly(allylamine hydrochloride (PAH, and these organisms are designated PAH-S.C. (S. choleraesuis. PAH can provide a useful platform for the chemical modification of Salmonella, perhaps by allowing a therapeutic gene to bind to tumor-targeting Salmonella. This study aimed to investigate the benefits of the use of PAH-S.C. for gene delivery. To evaluate this modulation, the invasion activity and gene transfer of DNA-PAH-S.C. were measured in vitro and in vivo. Treatment with PAH-S.C. carrying a tumor suppressor gene (connexin 43 resulted in inhibition of tumor growth, which suggested that tumor-targeted gene therapy using PAH-S.C. carrying a therapeutic gene could exert antitumor activities. This technique represents a promising strategy for the treatment of tumors.

  10. Radio-photothermal therapy mediated by a single compartment nanoplatform depletes tumor initiating cells and reduces lung metastasis in the orthotopic 4T1 breast tumor model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Min; Zhao, Jun; Tian, Mei; Song, Shaoli; Zhang, Rui; Gupta, Sanjay; Tan, Dongfeng; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, Chun

    2015-11-01

    Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress breast tumor metastasis through eradication of TICs. Positron electron tomography (PET) imaging and biodistribution studies showed that more than 90% of [64Cu]CuS NPs was retained in subcutaneously grown BT474 breast tumor 24 h after intratumoral (i.t.) injection, indicating the NPs are suitable for the combination therapy. Combined RT/PTT therapy resulted in significant tumor growth delay in the subcutaneous BT474 breast cancer model. Moreover, RT/PTT treatment significantly prolonged the survival of mice bearing orthotopic 4T1 breast tumors compared to no treatment, RT alone, or PTT alone. The RT/PTT combination therapy significantly reduced the number of tumor nodules in the lung and the formation of tumor mammospheres from treated 4T1 tumors. No obvious side effects of the CuS NPs were noted in the treated mice in a pilot toxicity study. Taken together, our data support the feasibility of a therapeutic approach for the suppression of tumor metastasis through localized RT/PTT therapy.Tumor Initiating Cells (TICs) are resistant to radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and are believed to be responsible for tumor recurrence and metastasis. Combination therapies can overcome the limitation of conventional cancer treatments, and have demonstrated promising application in the clinic. Here, we show that dual modality radiotherapy (RT) and photothermal therapy (PTT) mediated by a single compartment nanosystem copper-64-labeled copper sulfide nanoparticles ([64Cu]CuS NPs) could suppress

  11. Gene therapy for patients with advanced solid tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spanggaard, Iben; Dahlstroem, Karin; Laessoee, Line

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gene electrotrotransfer describes the use of electric pulses to transfer DNA to cells. Particularly skeletal muscle has potential for systemic secretion of therapeutic proteins. Gene electrotransfer to muscle using the integrin inhibitor plasmid AMEP (Antiangiogenic MEtargidin Peptide......) was investigated in a phase I dose escalation study. Primary objective was safety. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Patients with metastatic or locally advanced solid tumors, without further standard treatments available, were treated with once-only gene electrotransfer of plasmid AMEP to the femoral muscle. Safety...... not be detected, which could be due to the limit of detection. No objective responses were seen. CONCLUSIONS: Gene electrotransfer of plasmid AMEP was found to be safe and tolerable. No objective responses were observed but other DNA drugs may be tested in the future using this procedure....

  12. Evaluation of the effect of prostate volume change on tumor control probability in LDR brachytherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Courtney Knaup

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study evaluates low dose-rate brachytherapy (LDR prostate plans to determine the biological effectof dose degradation due to prostate volume changes. Material and methods: In this study, 39 patients were evaluated. Pre-implant prostate volume was determinedusing ultrasound. These images were used with the treatment planning system (Nucletron Spot Pro 3.1® to create treatmentplans using 103Pd seeds. Following the implant, patients were imaged using CT for post-implant dosimetry. Fromthe pre and post-implant DVHs, the biologically equivalent dose and the tumor control probability (TCP were determinedusing the biologically effective uniform dose. The model used RBE = 1.75 and α/β = 2 Gy. Results: The prostate volume changed between pre and post implant image sets ranged from –8% to 110%. TCP andthe mean dose were reduced up to 21% and 56%, respectively. TCP is observed to decrease as the mean dose decreasesto the prostate. The post-implant tumor dose was generally observed to decrease, compared to the planned dose.A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was established. Below this dose, TCP begins to fall-off. It was also determined thatpatients with a small prostates were more likely to suffer TCP decrease. Conclusions: The biological effect of post operative prostate growth due to operative trauma in LDR was evaluatedusing the concept. The post-implant dose was lower than the planned dose due to an increase of prostate volumepost-implant. A critical uniform dose of 130 Gy was determined, below which TCP begun to decline.

  13. Development of ex vivo model for determining temperature distribution in tumor tissue during photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaojie; Doughty, Austin; Mesiya, Sana; Pettitt, Alex; Zhou, Feifan; Chen, Wei R.

    2017-02-01

    Temperature distribution in tissue is a crucial factor in determining the outcome of photothermal therapy in cancer treatment. In order to investigate the temperature distribution in tumor tissue during laser irradiation, we developed a novel ex vivo device to simulate the photothermal therapy on tumors. A 35°C, a thermostatic incubator was used to provide a simulation environment for body temperature of live animals. Different biological tissues (chicken breast and bovine liver) were buried inside a tissue-simulating gel and considered as tumor tissues. An 805-nm laser was used to irradiate the target tissue. A fiber with an interstitial cylindrical diffuser (10 mm) was directly inserted in the center of the tissue, and the needle probes of a thermocouple were inserted into the tissue paralleling the laser fiber at different distances to measure the temperature distribution. All of the procedures were performed in the incubator. Based on the results of this study, the temperature distribution in bovine liver is similar to that of tumor tissue under photothermal therapy with the same doses. Therefore, the developed model using bovine liver for determining temperature distribution can be used during interstitial photothermal therapy.

  14. Does performance status influence the outcome of Nd:YAG laser therapy of proximal esophageal tumors?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alexander, G. L.; Wang, K. K.; Ahlquist, D. A.; Viggiano, T. R.; Gostout, C. J.; Balm, R.

    1994-01-01

    The value of endoscopic palliative therapy for malignant obstruction in the proximal esophagus has been questioned. To assess the importance of pre-treatment performance status on treatment outcome, we reviewed the records of patients with tumors of the proximal esophagus undergoing endoscopic laser

  15. Visual outcome after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of benign anterior skull base tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Wiencke, Anne Katrine; Munck af Rosenschold, Per

    2014-01-01

    To determine visual outcome including the occurrence of radiation induced optic neuropathy (RION) as well as tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT) of benign anterior skull base meningiomas or pituitary adenomas. Thirty-nine patients treated with FSRT for anterior...

  16. A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Ashton, Jeffrey R; Moding, Everett J; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Register, Janna K; Fales, Andrew M; Choi, Jaeyeon; Whitley, Melodi J; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Qi, Yi; Ma, Yan; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R; Kirsch, David G; Badea, Cristian T; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy.

  17. A Plasmonic Gold Nanostar Theranostic Probe for In Vivo Tumor Imaging and Photothermal Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Ashton, Jeffrey R.; Moding, Everett J.; Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Register, Janna K.; Fales, Andrew M.; Choi, Jaeyeon; Whitley, Melodi J.; Zhao, Xiaoguang; Qi, Yi; Ma, Yan; Vaidyanathan, Ganesan; Zalutsky, Michael R.; Kirsch, David G.; Badea, Cristian T.; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2015-01-01

    Nanomedicine has attracted increasing attention in recent years, because it offers great promise to provide personalized diagnostics and therapy with improved treatment efficacy and specificity. In this study, we developed a gold nanostar (GNS) probe for multi-modality theranostics including surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection, x-ray computed tomography (CT), two-photon luminescence (TPL) imaging, and photothermal therapy (PTT). We performed radiolabeling, as well as CT and optical imaging, to investigate the GNS probe's biodistribution and intratumoral uptake at both macroscopic and microscopic scales. We also characterized the performance of the GNS nanoprobe for in vitro photothermal heating and in vivo photothermal ablation of primary sarcomas in mice. The results showed that 30-nm GNS have higher tumor uptake, as well as deeper penetration into tumor interstitial space compared to 60-nm GNS. In addition, we found that a higher injection dose of GNS can increase the percentage of tumor uptake. We also demonstrated the GNS probe's superior photothermal conversion efficiency with a highly concentrated heating effect due to a tip-enhanced plasmonic effect. In vivo photothermal therapy with a near-infrared (NIR) laser under the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) led to ablation of aggressive tumors containing GNS, but had no effect in the absence of GNS. This multifunctional GNS probe has the potential to be used for in vivo biosensing, preoperative CT imaging, intraoperative detection with optical methods (SERS and TPL), as well as image-guided photothermal therapy. PMID:26155311

  18. Quality of life after stereotactic body radiation therapy for primary and metastatic liver tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Romero, Alejandra Mendez; Wunderink, Wouter; van Os, Rob M.; Nowak, Peter J. C. M.; Helimen, Ben J. M.; Nuyttens, Joost J.; Brandwijk, Rene P.; Verhoef, Cornelis; Ijzermans, Jan N. M.; Levendag, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) provides a high local control rate for primary and metastatic liver tumors. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of this treatment on the patient's quality of life. This is the first report of quality of life associated with liver SBRT.

  19. Mobilization of Viable Tumor Cells Into the Circulation During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Olga A. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Anderson, Robin L. [The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Russell, Prudence A. [Department of Anatomical Pathology, St. Vincent Hospital, Fitzroy, VIC (Australia); Ashley Cox, R. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ivashkevich, Alesia [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Laboratory of DNA Repair and Genomics, Centre for Innate Immunity and Infectious Disease, Monash Institute for Medical Research, Monash University, Clayton, VIC (Australia); Swierczak, Agnieszka; Doherty, Judy P. [Metastasis Research Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Jacobs, Daphne H.M. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Smith, Jai [Molecular Radiation Biology Laboratory, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Siva, Shankar; Daly, Patricia E. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Ball, David L. [Division of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The Sir Peter MacCallum Department of Oncology, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); and others

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To determine whether radiation therapy (RT) could mobilize viable tumor cells into the circulation of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients. Methods and Materials: We enumerated circulating tumor cells (CTCs) by fluorescence microscopy of blood samples immunostained with conventional CTC markers. We measured their DNA damage levels using γ-H2AX, a biomarker for radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks, either by fluorescence-activated cell sorting or by immunofluorescence microscopy. Results: Twenty-seven RT-treated NSCLC patients had blood samples analyzed by 1 or more methods. We identified increased CTC numbers after commencement of RT in 7 of 9 patients treated with palliative RT, and in 4 of 8 patients treated with curative-intent RT. Circulating tumor cells were also identified, singly and in clumps in large numbers, during RT by cytopathologic examination (in all 5 cases studied). Elevated γ-H2AX signal in post-RT blood samples signified the presence of CTCs derived from irradiated tumors. Blood taken after the commencement of RT contained tumor cells that proliferated extensively in vitro (in all 6 cases studied). Circulating tumor cells formed γ-H2AX foci in response to ex vivo irradiation, providing further evidence of their viability. Conclusions: Our findings provide a rationale for the development of strategies to reduce the concentration of viable CTCs by modulating RT fractionation or by coadministering systemic therapies.

  20. Synthesis and evaluation of boron compounds for neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soloway, A.H.; Barth, R.F.

    1990-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy offers the potentiality for treating brain tumors currently resistant to treatment. The success of this form of therapy is directly dependent upon the delivery of sufficient numbers of thermal-neutrons to tumor cells which possess high concentrations of B-10. The objective of this project is to develop chemical methodology to synthesize boron-containing compounds with the potential for becoming incorporated into rapidly-dividing malignant brain tumor cells and excluded from normal components of the brain and surrounding tissues, to develope biological methods for assessing the potential of the compound by use of cell culture or intratumoral injection, to develop analytical methodology for measuring boron in cells and tissue using direct current plasma atomic emission spectroscopy (DCP-AES) and alpha track autoradiography, to develop biochemical and HPLC procedures for evaluating compound uptake and tissue half-life, and to develop procedures required to assess both in vitro and vivo efficacy of BNCT with selected compounds.

  1. Relevance of nitric oxide to the response of tumors to photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Shibuya, Hiroshi; Cecic, Ivana

    1998-05-01

    Oxidative stress is the term used for a sudden and intense exposure of living tissue to reactive oxygen radicals. Tumor tissue response to oxidative stress, invoked in the action of photodynamic therapy (PDT) and some other modalities for cancer treatment, at the level of vascular endothelium has important therapeutic implications. Nitric oxide (NO), a transient radical species which is an important bioregulatory molecule involved in a diverse array of physiological events, has important functions in the regulation of progression of cancerous growth. Response to cancer therapies associated with the induction of oxidative stress was suggested to be amenable to NO mediation. Events involved in antitumor effects of PDT that can be markedly affected by changes in NO availability are listed. The correlation between endogenous NO production in tumors and the response of these lesions to PDT is discussed. Results of treatments aimed at modulating NO levels in PDT treated tumors are reviewed and evaluated.

  2. The potential for tumor suppressor gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birkeland, Andrew C; Ludwig, Megan L; Spector, Matthew E; Brenner, J Chad

    2016-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma remains a highly morbid and fatal disease. Importantly, genomic sequencing of head and neck cancers has identified frequent mutations in tumor suppressor genes. While targeted therapeutics increasingly are being investigated in head and neck cancer, the majority of these agents are against overactive/overexpressed oncogenes. Therapy to restore lost tumor suppressor gene function remains a key and under-addressed niche in trials for head and neck cancer. Recent advances in gene editing have captured the interest of both the scientific community and the public. As our technology for gene editing and gene expression modulation improves, addressing lost tumor suppressor gene function in head and neck cancers is becoming a reality. This review will summarize new techniques, challenges to implementation, future directions, and ethical ramifications of gene therapy in head and neck cancer.

  3. Gastroenteropancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors: Standardizing Therapy Monitoring with 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT Using the Example of Somatostatin Receptor Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Luboldt

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to standardize therapy monitoring of hepatic metastases from gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors (GEP-NETs during the course of somatostatin receptor radionuclide therapy (SRRT. In 21 consecutive patients with nonresectable hepatic metastases of GEP-NETs, chromogranin A (CgA and 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT were compared before and after the last SRRT. On 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT, the maximum standard uptake values (SUVmax of normal liver and hepatic metastases were calculated. In addition, the volumes of hepatic metastases (volume of interest [VOI] were measured using four cut-offs to separate normal liver tissue from metastases (SUVmax of the normal liver plus 10% [VOIliver+10%], 20% [VOIliver+20%], 30% [VOIliver+30%] and SUV = 10 [VOI10SUV]. The SUVmaxof the normal liver was below 10 (7.2 ± 1.3 in all patients and without significant changes. Overall therapy changes (Δ per patient (mean [95% CI] were statistically significant with p < .01 for ΔCgA = −43 (−69 to −17, ΔSUVmax = −22 (−29 to −14, and ΔVOI10SUV = −53 (−68 to −38% and significant with p < .05 for ΔVOIliver+10% = −29 (−55 to −3%, ΔVOIliver+20% = −32 (−62 to −2 and ΔVOIliver+30% = −37 (−66 to −8. Correlations were found only between ΔCgA and ΔVOI10SUV (r = .595; p < .01, ΔSUVmax and ΔVOI10SUV (0.629, p < .01, and SUVmax and ΔSUVmax (r = .446; p < .05. 68Ga-DOTATOC PET/CT allows volumetric therapy monitoring via an SUV-based cut-off separating hepatic metastases from normal liver tissue (10 SUV recommended.

  4. Prognostic significance of metabolic tumor volume measured by {sup 18}F FDG PET/CT in operable primary breast cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jahae; Yoo, Su Woong; Kang, Sae Ryung; Cho, Sang Geon; Oh, Jong Ryool; Chong, Ari; Min, Jung Joon; Bom, Hee Seung; Yoon, Jung Han; Song, Ho Chun [Chonnam National Univ. Medical School and Hospital, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-12-15

    We investigated whether PET indices measured by {sup 18}F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) can predict prognosis in patients with operable primary breast cancer. We reviewed 53 patients with operable primary breast cancer who underwent pretreatment FDG PET/CT. PET indices, maximum standardized uptake value (SUV) and metabolic tumor volume (MTV), were measured in the primary breast tumor (P), metastatic lymph nodes (N) and total tumor (T). The cox proportional hazards model was used with age, tumor size, clinical lymph node status, method od of surgery, presence or absence of neoadjuvant chemo therapy, histological type, histological grade, hormone grade, hormone receptors and HER2 status to predict disease free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS). Median follow up period was 50 months (range, 17 73 months), during which 17 patients had recurrent disease and nine of whom died. The univariate analysis showed that high SUV of N (N{sup SUV,} =0.011), MTV of N (N{sup MTV,} =0.011) and MTV of T (T{sup MTV,} =0.045) as well as high histological grade (=0.008), negative estrogen ( =0.045) and negative progesterone ( =0.029) receptor status were associated with shorter DFS. High N{sup SUV(}=0.035) and N{sup MTV(} =0.035) and T{sup MTV(}=0.035)as well as high histological grade (=0.012) and negative estrogen receptor status ( =0.009)were associated with shorted OS. N{sup SUV,} N{sup MTVa}nd T{sup MTw}ere found to be significantly associated with high histological grade ( =0.005). However, those failed to be statistically significant prognostic factors on multivariate analysis PET indices seem to be useful in the preoperative evaluation of prognosis in patients with operable primary breast cancer, N{sup SUV,} N{sup MTVa}nd T{sup MTVm}ight be considerable factors associated with patient outcome in operable breast cancer.

  5. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akino, Yuichi; Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko

    2014-11-01

    Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas-Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV Potential). The concordance between ITV Potential and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV 4DCT) was evaluated using the Dice's similarity coefficient (DSC). The distance between blood vessel positions

  6. Evaluation of potential internal target volume of liver tumors using cine-MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akino, Yuichi, E-mail: akino@radonc.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Osaka 5650871, Japan and Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan); Oh, Ryoong-Jin; Masai, Norihisa; Shiomi, Hiroya; Inoue, Toshihiko [Miyakojima IGRT Clinic, Miyakojima-ku, Osaka 5340021 (Japan)

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: Four-dimensional computed tomography (4DCT) is widely used for evaluating moving tumors, including lung and liver cancers. For patients with unstable respiration, however, the 4DCT may not visualize tumor motion properly. High-speed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences (cine-MRI) permit direct visualization of respiratory motion of liver tumors without considering radiation dose exposure to patients. Here, the authors demonstrated a technique for evaluating internal target volume (ITV) with consideration of respiratory variation using cine-MRI. Methods: The authors retrospectively evaluated six patients who received stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) to hepatocellular carcinoma. Before acquiring planning CT, sagittal and coronal cine-MRI images were acquired for 30 s with a frame rate of 2 frames/s. The patient immobilization was conducted under the same condition as SBRT. Planning CT images were then acquired within 15 min from cine-MRI image acquisitions, followed by a 4DCT scan. To calculate tumor motion, the motion vectors between two continuous frames of cine-MRI images were calculated for each frame using the pyramidal Lucas–Kanade method. The target contour was delineated on one frame, and each vertex of the contour was shifted and copied onto the following frame using neighboring motion vectors. 3D trajectory data were generated with the centroid of the contours on sagittal and coronal images. To evaluate the accuracy of the tracking method, the motion of clearly visible blood vessel was analyzed with the motion tracking and manual detection techniques. The target volume delineated on the 50% (end-exhale) phase of 4DCT was translated with the trajectory data, and the distribution of the occupancy probability of target volume was calculated as potential ITV (ITV {sub Potential}). The concordance between ITV {sub Potential} and ITV estimated with 4DCT (ITV {sub 4DCT}) was evaluated using the Dice’s similarity coefficient (DSC). Results

  7. Complete adrenocorticotropin deficiency after radiation therapy for brain tumor with a normal growth hormone reserve

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakai, Haruna; Yoshioka, Katsunobu; Yamagami, Keiko [Osaka City General Hospital (Japan)] (and others)

    2002-06-01

    A 34-year-old man with neurofibromatosis type 1, who had received radiation therapy after the excision of a brain tumor 5 years earlier, was admitted to our hospital with vomiting and weight loss. Cortisol and adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) were undetectable before and after administration of 100 {mu}g corticotropin releasing hormone. The level of growth hormone without stimulation was 24.7 ng/ml. We diagnosed him to have complete ACTH deficiency attributable to radiation therapy. This is the first known case of a patient with complete ACTH deficiency after radiation therapy and a growth hormone reserve that remained normal. (author)

  8. Pulsed Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Cisplatin Results in Superior Tumor Growth Delay in a Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Murine Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kurt; Krueger, Sarah A.; Kane, Jonathan L.; Wilson, Thomas G.; Hanna, Alaa; Dabjan, Mohamad; Hege, Katie M.; Wilson, George D.; Grills, Inga; Marples, Brian, E-mail: brian.marples@beaumont.edu

    2016-09-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of 3-week schedules of low-dose pulsed radiation treatment (PRT) and standard radiation therapy (SRT), with concurrent cisplatin (CDDP) in a head and neck squamous cell carcinoma xenograft model. Methods and Materials: Subcutaneous UT-SCC-14 tumors were established in athymic NIH III HO female mice. A total of 30 Gy was administered as 2 Gy/d, 5 d/wk for 3 weeks, either by PRT (10 × 0.2 Gy/d, with a 3-minute break between each 0.2-Gy dose) or SRT (2 Gy/d, uninterrupted delivery) in combination with concurrent 2 mg/kg CDDP 3 times per week in the final 2 weeks of radiation therapy. Treatment-induced growth delays were defined from twice-weekly tumor volume measurements. Tumor hypoxia was assessed by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography imaging, and calculated maximum standardized uptake values compared with tumor histology. Tumor vessel density and hypoxia were measured by quantitative immunohistochemistry. Normal tissues effects were evaluated in gut and skin. Results: Untreated tumors grew to 1000 mm{sup 3} in 25.4 days (±1.2), compared with delays of 62.3 days (±3.5) for SRT + CDDP and 80.2 days (±5.0) for PRT + CDDP. Time to reach 2× pretreatment volume ranged from 8.2 days (±1.8) for untreated tumors to 67.1 days (±4.7) after PRT + CDDP. Significant differences in tumor growth delay were observed for SRT versus SRT + CDDP (P=.04), PRT versus PRT + CDDP (P=.035), and SRT + CDDP versus PRT + CDDP (P=.033), and for survival between PRT versus PRT + CDDP (P=.017) and SRT + CDDP versus PRT + CDDP (P=.008). Differences in tumor hypoxia were evident by {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole positron emission tomography imaging between SRT and PRT (P=.025), although not with concurrent CDDP. Tumor vessel density differed between SRT + CDDP and PRT + CDDP (P=.011). No differences in normal tissue parameters were seen. Conclusions: Concurrent CDDP was more effective in combination PRT than SRT at

  9. Estimation of Tumor Volumes by 11C-MeAIB and 18F-FDG PET in an Orthotopic Glioblastoma Rat Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halle, Bo; Thisgaard, Helge; Hvidsten, Svend

    2015-01-01

    - and histology-derived tumor volumes and intra- and interobserver agreement of the PET-derived volumes were evaluated using Bland-Altman plots. RESULTS: By PET, the mean U87MG tumor volume was 35.0 mm3 using 18F-FDG and 34.1 mm3 with 11C-MeAIB, compared with 33.7 mm3 by histology. Corresponding T87 tumor volumes...... to reproduce. On the basis of our results, PET evaluation of highly infiltrating brain tumors should be further developed.......UNLABELLED: Brain tumor volume assessment is a major challenge. Molecular imaging using PET may be a promising option because it reflects the biologically active cells. We compared the agreement between PET- and histology-derived tumor volumes in an orthotopic glioblastoma rat model...

  10. Targeted Therapy of Cancer Using Photodynamic Therapy in Combination with Multi-faceted Anti-Tumor Modalities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malini Olivo

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT has emerged as one of the important therapeutic options in the management of cancer and other diseases. PDT involves a tumor-localized photosensitizer (PS, which when appropriately illuminated by visible light converts oxygen into cytotoxic reactive oxygen species (ROS, that attack key structural entities within the targeted cells, ultimately resulting in necrosis or apoptosis. Though PDT is a selective modality, it can be further enhanced by combining other targeted therapeutic strategies that include the use of synthetic peptides and nanoparticles for selective delivery of photosensitizers. Another potentially promising strategy is the application of targeted therapeutics that exploit a myriad of critical pathways involved in tumorigenesis and metastasis. Vascular disrupting agents that eradicate tumor vasculature during PDT and anti-angiogenic agents that targets specific molecular pathways and prevent the formation of new blood vessels are novel therapeutic approaches that have been shown to improve treatment outcome. In addition to the well-documented mechanisms of direct cell killing and damage to the tumor vasculature, PDT can also activate the body’s immune response against tumors. Numerous pre-clinical studies and clinical observations have demonstrated the immuno-stimulatory capability of PDT. Herein, we aim to integrate the most important findings with regard to the combination of PDT and other novel targeted therapy approaches, detailing its potential in cancer photomedicine.

  11. Tumor therapy with Amanita phalloides (death cap): stabilization of B-cell chronic lymphatic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riede, Isolde

    2010-10-01

    Molecular events that cause tumor formation upregulate a number of HOX genes, called switch genes, coding for RNA polymerase II transcription factors. Thus, in tumor cells, RNA polymerase II is more active than in other somatic cells. Amanita phalloides contains amanitin, inhibiting RNA polymerase II. Partial inhibition with amanitin influences tumor cell--but not normal cell--activity. To widen the treatment spectrum, homeopathic dilutions of Amanita phalloides, containing amanitin, were given to a patient with leukemia. Monitoring the leukemic cell count, different doses of amanitin were given. The former duplication time of leukemic cells was 21 months. Within a period of 21 months, the cell count is stabilized to around 10(5)/μL. No leukemia-associated symptoms, liver damage, or continuous erythrocyte deprivation occur. This new principle of tumor therapy shows high potential to provide a gentle medical treatment.

  12. Targeting the SR-B1 receptor as a gateway for cancer therapy and tumor imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda K Mooberry

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Malignant tumors display remarkable heterogeneity to the extent that even at the same tissue site different types of cells with varying genetic background may be found. In contrast, a relatively consistent marker the scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1 has been found to be consistently over expressed by most tumor cells. In addition, the SR-B1 receptor has been shown to serve as a potential gateway for the delivery of therapeutic agents when reconstituted high density lipoprotein (rHDL nanoparticles are used for their transport to cancer cells and tumors. Opportunities for the development of new technologies, particularly in the areas of cancer therapy and tumor imaging are discussed.

  13. The Functions and Applications of RGD in Tumor Therapy and Tissue Engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fen; Li, Yuanyuan; Shen, Yingqiang; Wang, Anming; Wang, Shuling; Xie, Tian

    2013-01-01

    Arginine-Glycine-Aspartic (RGD), is the specific recognition site of integrins with theirs ligands, and regulates cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. The RGD motif can be combined with integrins overexpressed on the tumor neovasculature and tumor cells with a certain affinity, becoming the new target for imaging agents, and drugs, and gene delivery for tumor treatment. Further, RGD as a biomimetic peptide can also promote cell adherence to the matrix, prevent cell apoptosis and accelerate new tissue regeneration. Functionalizing material surfaces with RGD can improve cell/biomaterial interactions, which facilitates the generation of tissue-engineered constructs. This paper reviews the main functions and advantages of RGD, describes the applications of RGD in imaging agents, drugs, gene delivery for tumor therapy, and highlights the role of RGD in promoting the development of tissue engineering (bone regeneration, cornea repair, artificial neovascularization) in recent years. PMID:23807504

  14. Cell Death Conversion under Hypoxic Condition in Tumor Development and Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Qiu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia, which is common during tumor progression, plays important roles in tumor biology. Failure in cell death in response to hypoxia contributes to progression and metastasis of tumors. On the one hand, the metabolic and oxidative stress following hypoxia could lead to cell death by triggering signal cascades, like LKB1/AMPK, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, and altering the levels of effective components, such as the Bcl-2 family, Atg and p62. On the other hand, hypoxia-induced autophagy can serve as a mechanism to turn over nutrients, so as to mitigate the adverse condition and then avoid cell death potentially. Due to the effective role of hypoxia, this review focuses on the crosstalk in cell death under hypoxia in tumor progression. Additionally, the illumination of cell death in hypoxia could shed light on the clinical applications of cell death targeted therapy.

  15. The morpho-functional assessment of plasmonic photothermal therapy effects on transplanted liver tumor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Bucharskaya

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The antitumor efficiency of gold nanorod plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT was evaluated experimentally. The rat cholangiocarcinoma line PC-1 was used as a tumor model. Exposure of tumors to 808-nm laser radiation was performed, and the noninvasive temperature monitoring of the tumor tissue was carried out using infrared imager. The growth rate kinetics and morphological alterations of transplanted liver tumors, as well as indicators of lipid peroxidation activity and autointoxication in rat serum, were studied. The activation of lipid peroxidation and the development of autointoxication were detected after PPTT. The results not only demonstrate the antitumor efficacy of the proposed therapeutic technology but also reveal the side effects in the presence of peroxidation products in systemic circulation.

  16. Dual antibody therapy to harness the innate anti-tumor immune response to enhance antibody targeting of tumors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chester, Cariad; Marabelle, Aurelien; Houot, Roch; Kohrt, Holbrook E

    2015-04-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is a rapidly evolving field that offers a novel paradigm for cancer treatment: therapies focus on enhancing the immune system's innate and adaptive anti-tumor response. Early immunotherapeutics have achieved impressive clinical outcomes and monoclonal antibodies are now integral to therapeutic strategies in a variety of cancers. However, only recently have antibodies targeting innate immune cells entered clinical development. Innate immune effector cells play important roles in generating and maintaining antitumor immunity. Antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) and antibody-dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) are important innate immune mechanisms for tumor eradication. These cytolytic processes are initiated by the detection of a tumor-targeting antibody and can be augmented by activating co-stimulatory pathways or blocking inhibitory signals on innate immune cells. The combination of FDA-approved monoclonal antibodies with innate effector-targeting antibodies has demonstrated potent preclinical therapeutic synergy and early-phase combinatorial clinical trials are ongoing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Segmentation of tumor ultrasound image in HIFU therapy based on texture and boundary encoding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dong; Xu, Menglong; Quan, Long; Yang, Yan; Qin, Qianqing; Zhu, Wenbin

    2015-02-01

    It is crucial in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy to detect the tumor precisely with less manual intervention for enhancing the therapy efficiency. Ultrasound image segmentation becomes a difficult task due to signal attenuation, speckle effect and shadows. This paper presents an unsupervised approach based on texture and boundary encoding customized for ultrasound image segmentation in HIFU therapy. The approach oversegments the ultrasound image into some small regions, which are merged by using the principle of minimum description length (MDL) afterwards. Small regions belonging to the same tumor are clustered as they preserve similar texture features. The mergence is completed by obtaining the shortest coding length from encoding textures and boundaries of these regions in the clustering process. The tumor region is finally selected from merged regions by a proposed algorithm without manual interaction. The performance of the method is tested on 50 uterine fibroid ultrasound images from HIFU guiding transducers. The segmentations are compared with manual delineations to verify its feasibility. The quantitative evaluation with HIFU images shows that the mean true positive of the approach is 93.53%, the mean false positive is 4.06%, the mean similarity is 89.92%, the mean norm Hausdorff distance is 3.62% and the mean norm maximum average distance is 0.57%. The experiments validate that the proposed method can achieve favorable segmentation without manual initialization and effectively handle the poor quality of the ultrasound guidance image in HIFU therapy, which indicates that the approach is applicable in HIFU therapy.

  18. Stereotactic high dose fraction radiation therapy of extracranial tumors using an accelerator. Clinical experience of the first thirty-one patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blomgren, H. [Dept. of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Lax, I. [Dept. of Hospital Physics, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Naeslund, I. [Dept. of Oncology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden); Svanstroem, R. [Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm (Sweden)

    1995-12-31

    A stereotactic body frame with a fixation device has been developed for stereotactic radiation therapy of extracranial targets, a precision localization and positioning system in analogy with the stereotactic head frames used for intracranial targets. Results of the first 42 treated tumors in 31 patients are presented. Most of the patients had solitary tumors in liver, lung or retroperitoneal space. Clinical target volumes ranged from 2 to 622 cm{sup 3} (mean 78 cm{sup 3}) and minimum doses to the planning target volumes (PTV) of 7.7-30 Gy/fraction (mean 14.2 Gy) were given on 1-4 occasions to a total minimum dose to the PTVs of 7.4-45 Gy (mean 30.2 Gy) to the periphery of the PTV and total mean doses to the PTVs of 8-66 Gy (mean 41 Gy). The central part of the tumor was usually given about 50% higher dose compared to that of the periphery of the PTV by a planned inhomogeneous dose distribution. Some of the patients received stereotactic radiation therapy concomitantly to more than one target, in others new metastases were also treated which appeared during the follow-up period. We observed a local rate of no progressive disease of 80% during a follow-up period of 1.5-38 months. Fifty percent of the tumors decreased in size or disappeared. (orig.).

  19. An Analysis of Plan Robustness for Esophageal Tumors: Comparing Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy Plans and Spot Scanning Proton Planning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warren, Samantha, E-mail: samantha.warren@oncology.ox.ac.uk [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Partridge, Mike [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom); Bolsi, Alessandra; Lomax, Anthony J. [Centre for Proton Therapy, Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Hurt, Chris [Wales Cancer Trials Unit, School of Medicine, Heath Park, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Crosby, Thomas [Velindre Cancer Centre, Velindre Hospital, Cardiff (United Kingdom); Hawkins, Maria A. [Cancer Research UK/Medical Research Council Oxford Institute for Radiation Oncology, Gray Laboratories, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: Planning studies to compare x-ray and proton techniques and to select the most suitable technique for each patient have been hampered by the nonequivalence of several aspects of treatment planning and delivery. A fair comparison should compare similarly advanced delivery techniques from current clinical practice and also assess the robustness of each technique. The present study therefore compared volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) and single-field optimization (SFO) spot scanning proton therapy plans created using a simultaneous integrated boost (SIB) for dose escalation in midesophageal cancer and analyzed the effect of setup and range uncertainties on these plans. Methods and Materials: For 21 patients, SIB plans with a physical dose prescription of 2 Gy or 2.5 Gy/fraction in 25 fractions to planning target volume (PTV){sub 50Gy} or PTV{sub 62.5Gy} (primary tumor with 0.5 cm margins) were created and evaluated for robustness to random setup errors and proton range errors. Dose–volume metrics were compared for the optimal and uncertainty plans, with P<.05 (Wilcoxon) considered significant. Results: SFO reduced the mean lung dose by 51.4% (range 35.1%-76.1%) and the mean heart dose by 40.9% (range 15.0%-57.4%) compared with VMAT. Proton plan robustness to a 3.5% range error was acceptable. For all patients, the clinical target volume D{sub 98} was 95.0% to 100.4% of the prescribed dose and gross tumor volume (GTV) D{sub 98} was 98.8% to 101%. Setup error robustness was patient anatomy dependent, and the potential minimum dose per fraction was always lower with SFO than with VMAT. The clinical target volume D{sub 98} was lower by 0.6% to 7.8% of the prescribed dose, and the GTV D{sub 98} was lower by 0.3% to 2.2% of the prescribed GTV dose. Conclusions: The SFO plans achieved significant sparing of normal tissue compared with the VMAT plans for midesophageal cancer. The target dose coverage in the SIB proton plans was less robust to random setup

  20. Tumor budding predicts response to anti-EGFR therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zlobec, Inti; Molinari, Francesca; Martin, Vittoria; Mazzucchelli, Luca; Saletti, Piercarlo; Trezzi, Rosangela; De Dosso, Sara; Vlajnic, Tatjana; Frattini, Milo; Lugli, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    AIM: To investigate whether the evaluation of tumor budding can complement K-RAS analysis to improve the individualized prediction of response to anti-epidermal growth factor receptor based therapies in metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients. METHODS: Forty-three patients with mCRC treated with cetuximab or panitumumab were entered into this study. According to the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors criteria, 30 patients had stable or progressive disease (non-responsive), while 13 patients had a partial response. Tumor buds were evaluated from whole tissue sections stained for pan-cytokeratin, evaluated in the densest region using a 40 × objective and “high-grade” tumor budding was defined as 15 buds/high-power field. RESULTS: Tumor buds and K-RAS mutation both correctly classified 68% of patients. All patients with K-RAS mutation (n = 7) or high-grade tumor budding (n = 11) were non-responsive, of which 4 patients had both features. All 13 partial responders were K-RAS wild-type with low-grade tumor budding. Combined, the predictive value of K-RAS and tumor budding was 80%. Additionally, high-grade tumor budding was significantly related to worse progression-free survival [HR (95% CI): 2.8 (1.3-6.0, P = 0.008)]. CONCLUSION: If confirmed in larger cohorts, the addition of tumor budding to K-RAS analysis may represent an effective approach for individualized patient management in the metastatic setting. PMID:20939111

  1. Oxygen-generating hybrid nanoparticles to enhance fluorescent/photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging guided tumor photodynamic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shi; Wang, Guohao; Qin, Zainen; Wang, Xiangyu; Zhao, Guoqing; Ma, Qingjie; Zhu, Lei

    2017-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising tumor treatment modality that can convert oxygen into cytotoxic singlet oxygen (SO) via photosensitizer to ablate tumor growth. However, the uncontrolled cancer cell proliferation during tumor development and the oxygen consumption during PDT always result in an insufficient oxygen level in tumors, which can adversely affect the PDT efficiency in turn. We designed an oxygen-generating PDT nanocomplex by encapsulating a manganese dioxide nanoparticle (MnO 2 NP) in an indocyanine green (ICG) modified hyaluronic acid nanoparticle (HANP) to overcome this limitation. Because of the excellent fluorescent and photoacoustic properties, the tumor accumulation of the ICG-HANP/MnO 2 (IHM) nanocomplex was monitored by fluorescent imaging and photoacoustic imaging after intravenous administration into the SCC7 tumor-bearing mouse model. Both high fluorescent and photoacoustic signals were detected and found peak at 6 h post-injection (tumor-muscle ratio: 4.03 ± 0.36 for fluorescent imaging and 2.93 ± 0.13 for photoacoustic imaging). In addition, due to the high reactivity of MnO 2 NP to H 2 O 2 , an unfavorable tumor cell metabolic, the oxygen content in the tumor is elevated 2.25 ± 0.07 times compared to that without IHM treatment as ultrasound imaging confirmed. After laser irradiation, significant tumor growth inhibition was observed in the IHM-treated group compared to the ICG-HANP-treated group, attributed to the beneficial oxygen-generating property of IHM for PDT. It is expected that the design of IHM will provide an alternative way of improving clinical PDT efficacy and will be widely applied in cancer theranostics. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Nanotechnology meets 3D in vitro models: tissue engineered tumors and cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Rocha, E L; Porto, L M; Rambo, C R

    2014-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology are providing to medicine a new dimension. Multifunctional nanomaterials with diagnostics and treatment modalities integrated in one nanoparticle or in cooperative nanosystems are promoting new insights to cancer treatment and diagnosis. The recent convergence between tissue engineering and cancer is gradually moving towards the development of 3D disease models that more closely resemble in vivo characteristics of tumors. However, the current nanomaterials based therapies are accomplished mainly in 2D cell cultures or in complex in vivo models. The development of new platforms to evaluate nano-based therapies in parallel with possible toxic effects will allow the design of nanomaterials for biomedical applications prior to in vivo studies. Therefore, this review focuses on how 3D in vitro models can be applied to study tumor biology, nanotoxicology and to evaluate nanomaterial based therapies. © 2013.

  3. Metastatic melanoma with features of blue nevus and tumoral melanosis identified during pembrolizumab therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew F. Helm, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma may exhibit clinical or histologic features of blue nevus. Pembrolizumab therapy is associated with regression and tumoral melanosis. We report on a man with widespread metastatic melanoma on pembrolizumab therapy in whom a blue-grey papule developed on the left side of his neck that clinically resembled a blue nevus and histologically showed features of both blue nevus and tumoral melanosis. The subtle melanocytic component and prominent changes of regression evident on biopsy suggest that his immunomodulatory therapy may have influenced the histologic findings noted on biopsy. Physicians that treat patients with metastatic melanoma should be aware of the spectrum of histologic findings evident on biopsy not only to allow for early diagnosis but to also better understand the effects of treatment.

  4. A review of immune therapy in cancer and a question: can thermal therapy increase tumor response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, Joan M C

    2017-11-03

    Immune therapy is a successful cancer treatment coming into its own. This is because checkpoint molecules, adoptive specific lymphocyte transfer and chimeric antigen T-cell (CAR-T) therapy are able to induce more durable responses in an increasing number of malignancies compared to chemotherapy. In addition, immune therapies are able to treat bulky disease, whereas standard cytotoxic therapies cannot treat large tumour burdens. Checkpoint inhibitor monoclonal antibodies are becoming widely used in the clinic and although more complex, adoptive lymphocyte transfer and CAR-T therapies show promise. We are learning that there are nuances to predicting the successful use of the checkpoint inhibitors as well as to specific-antigen adoptive and CAR-T therapies. We are also newly aware of a here-to-fore unrealised natural force, the status of the microbiome. However, despite better understanding of mechanisms of action of the new immune therapies, the best responses to the new immune therapies remain 20-30%. Likely the best way to improve this somewhat low response rate for patients is to increase the patient's own immune response. Thermal therapy is a way to do this. All forms of thermal therapy, from fever-range systemic thermal therapy, to high-temperature HIFU and even cryotherapy improve the immune response pre-clinically. It is time to test the immune therapies with thermal therapy in vivo to test for optimal timing of the combinations that will best enhance tumour response and then to begin to test the immune therapies with thermal therapy in the clinic as soon as possible.

  5. SU-E-T-300: Dosimetric Comparision of 4D Radiation Therapy and 3D Radiation Therapy for the Liver Tumor Based On 4D Medical Image

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, C; Yin, Y [Shandong Tumor Hospital, Jinan, Shandong Provice (China)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The purpose of this work was to determine the dosimetric benefit to normal tissues by tracking liver tumor dose in four dimensional radiation therapy (4DRT) on ten phases of four dimensional computer tomagraphy(4DCT) images. Methods: Target tracking each phase with the beam aperture for ten liver cancer patients were converted to cumulative plan and compared to the 3D plan with a merged target volume based on 4DCT image in radiation treatment planning system (TPS). The change in normal tissue dose was evaluated in the plan by using the parameters V5, V10, V15, V20,V25, V30, V35 and V40 (volumes receiving 5, 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35 and 40Gy, respectively) in the dose-volume histogram for the liver; mean dose for the following structures: liver, left kidney and right kidney; and maximum dose for the following structures: bowel, duodenum, esophagus, stomach and heart. Results: There was significant difference between 4D PTV(average 115.71cm3 )and ITV(169.86 cm3). When the planning objective is 95% volume of PTV covered by the prescription dose, the mean dose for the liver, left kidney and right kidney have an average decrease 23.13%, 49.51%, and 54.38%, respectively. The maximum dose for bowel, duodenum,esophagus, stomach and heart have an average decrease 16.77%, 28.07%, 24.28%, 4.89%, and 4.45%, respectively. Compared to 3D RT, radiation volume for the liver V5, V10, V15, V20, V25, V30, V35 and V40 by using the 4D plans have a significant decrease(P≤0.05). Conclusion: The 4D plan method creates plans that permit better sparing of the normal structures than the commonly used ITV method, which delivers the same dosimetric effects to the target.

  6. Efficacy of tumor necrosis factor-alpha and antibiotics in therapy of experimental murine staphylococcal mastitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, M S; Ford, C W; Yancey, R J

    1994-05-01

    The mouse model was used to determine the efficacy of the cytokine, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and antibiotic in treatment of experimentally induced staphylococcal mastitis. Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-alpha alone administered to the mammary glands of lactating mice recruited significantly more polymorphonuclear neutrophils into the gland by 4 h posttreatment than did the untreated control. One hundred times less recombinant mouse tumor necrosis factor-alpha than human tumor necrosis factor-alpha was required to enhance the killing of Staphylococcus aureus within the gland. Human tumor necrosis factor-alpha effectively enhanced the killing of the bacteria when it was administered 4 to 0 h prior to infection, but not 4 h after infection. When mice were first pretreated with tumor necrosis factor-alpha, infected, and then treated with antibiotics (ciprofloxacin and pirlimycin, but not cloxacillin), the combination of antibiotic and cytokine significantly reduced the number of bacteria within the gland compared with that for mice treated with antibiotic alone, cytokine alone, or placebo. Recombinant tumor necrosis factor-alpha may be an effective adjunct to antimicrobial therapy in treatment of staphylococcal mastitis in the bovine.

  7. [State of the art in fluid and volume therapy : A user-friendly staged concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, M; Hulde, N; Kammerer, T; Meidert, A S; Hofmann-Kiefer, K

    2017-03-01

    Adequate fluid therapy is highly important for the perioperative outcome of our patients. Both, hypovolemia and hypervolemia can lead to an increase in perioperative complications and can impair the outcome. Therefore, perioperative infusion therapy should be target-oriented. The main target is to maintain the patient's preoperative normovolemia by using a sophisticated, rational infusion strategy.Perioperative fluid losses should be discriminated from volume losses (surgical blood loss or interstitial volume losses containing protein). Fluid losses as urine or perspiratio insensibilis (0.5-1.0 ml/kg/h) should be replaced by balanced crystalloids in a ratio of 1:1. Volume therapy step 1: Blood loss up to a maximum value of 20% of the patient's blood volume should be replaced by balanced crystalloids in a ratio of 4(-5):1. Volume therapy step 2: Higher blood losses should be treated by using iso-oncotic, preferential balanced colloids in a ratio of 1:1. For this purpose hydroxyethyl starch can also be used perioperatively if there is no respective contraindication, such as sepsis, burn injuries, critically ill patients, renal impairment or renal replacement therapy, and severe coagulopathy. Volume therapy step 3: If there is an indication for red cell concentrates or coagulation factors, a differentiated application of blood and blood products should be performed.

  8. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress T-Cell Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Giao Ly, Nancy Ngoc; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-06-01

    The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcomes compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of preinvasive foci. We investigated the effects of radiation therapy in p48(Cre);LSL-Kras(G12D) (KC) and p48(Cre);LSLKras(G12D);LSL-Trp53(R172H) (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony-stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2 to 12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from radiation treated invasive and preinvasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8(+) T cells than controls, and greater numbers of CD4(+) T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. A neutralizing antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Radiation treatment causes macrophages

  9. The lung volume reduction coil for the treatment of emphysema : a new therapy in development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klooster, Karin; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Slebos, Dirk-Jan

    Lung volume reduction (LVR) coil treatment is a novel therapy for patients with severe emphysema. In this bilateral bronchoscopic treatment, approximately 10 LVR coils per lobe are delivered under fluoroscopic guidance in two sequential procedures. The LVR coil reduces lung volume by compressing the

  10. Assessment of treatment response by total tumor volume and global apparent diffusion coefficient using diffusion-weighted MRI in patients with metastatic bone disease: a feasibility study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Blackledge

    Full Text Available We describe our semi-automatic segmentation of whole-body diffusion-weighted MRI (WBDWI using a Markov random field (MRF model to derive tumor total diffusion volume (tDV and associated global apparent diffusion coefficient (gADC; and demonstrate the feasibility of using these indices for assessing tumor burden and response to treatment in patients with bone metastases. WBDWI was performed on eleven patients diagnosed with bone metastases from breast and prostate cancers before and after anti-cancer therapies. Semi-automatic segmentation incorporating a MRF model was performed in all patients below the C4 vertebra by an experienced radiologist with over eight years of clinical experience in body DWI. Changes in tDV and gADC distributions were compared with overall response determined by all imaging, tumor markers and clinical findings at serial follow up. The segmentation technique was possible in all patients although erroneous volumes of interest were generated in one patient because of poor fat suppression in the pelvis, requiring manual correction. Responding patients showed a larger increase in gADC (median change = +0.18, range = -0.07 to +0.78 × 10(-3 mm2/s after treatment compared to non-responding patients (median change = -0.02, range = -0.10 to +0.05 × 10(-3 mm2/s, p = 0.05, Mann-Whitney test, whereas non-responding patients showed a significantly larger increase in tDV (median change = +26%, range = +3 to +284% compared to responding patients (median change = -50%, range = -85 to +27%, p = 0.02, Mann-Whitney test. Semi-automatic segmentation of WBDWI is feasible for metastatic bone disease in this pilot cohort of 11 patients, and could be used to quantify tumor total diffusion volume and median global ADC for assessing response to treatment.

  11. Decline of Tumor Vascular Function as Assessed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Is Associated With Poor Responses to Radiation Therapy and Chemotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Wang, Chun-Chieh [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Radiation Biology Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University/Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Liu, Ho-Ling [Department of Imaging Physics, Division of Diagnostic Imaging, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Fu, Sheng-Yung [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National TsingHua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Yu, Ching-Fang [Radiation Biology Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University/Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Chang, Chen [Institute of Biomedical Sciences, Academic Sinica, Taipei, Taiwan (China); Chiang, Chi-Shiun [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Environmental Sciences, National TsingHua University, Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Hong, Ji-Hong, E-mail: jihong@adm.cgmh.org.tw [Department of Medical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Radiation Biology Research Center, Institute for Radiological Research, Chang Gung University/Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China); Department of Radiation Oncology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital-LinKou, Taoyuan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate whether changes in the volume transfer coefficient (K{sup trans}) in a growing tumor could be used as a surrogate marker for predicting tumor responses to radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CT). Methods and Materials: Dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) was consecutively performed on tumor-bearing mice, and temporal and spatial changes of K{sup trans} values were measured along with tumor growth. Tumor responses to RT and CT were studied before and after observed changes in K{sup trans} values with time. Results: Dynamic changes with an initial increase and subsequent decline in K{sup trans} values were found to be associated with tumor growth. When each tumor was divided into core and peripheral regions, the K{sup trans} decline was greater in core, although neither vascular structure or necrosis could be linked to this spatial difference. Tumor responses to RT were worse if applied after the decline of K{sup trans}, and there was less drug distribution and cell death in the tumor core after CT. Conclusion: The K{sup trans} value in growing tumors, reflecting the changes of tumor microenvironment and vascular function, is strongly associated with tumor responses to RT and CT and could be a potential surrogate marker for predicting the tumor response to these treatments.

  12. Serological and histological indices of hepatocellular carcinoma and tumor volume doubling time

    Science.gov (United States)

    SHINGAKI, NAOKI; TAMAI, HIDEYUKI; MORI, YOSHIYUKI; MORIBATA, KOSAKU; ENOMOTO, SHOTARO; DEGUCHI, HISANOBU; UEDA, KAZUKI; INOUE, IZUMI; MAEKITA, TAKAO; IGUCHI, MIKITAKA; KATO, JUN; ICHINOSE, MASAO

    2013-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) frequently develops in cirrhotic liver and is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The tumor volume doubling time (TVDT) reflects the natural tumor growth rate and is an indicator of the biological malignant potential of a tumor. The present study aimed to elucidate the association between the serological and histological indices of HCC and TVDT. TVDT was analyzed for 53 HCCs by measuring the enlargement of the tumor diameter on dynamic computed tomography. Differences in TVDT were compared among histological grades of HCC differentiation. The α-fetoprotein (AFP) doubling time (T2AFP) for 44 HCCs with AFP levels >200 ng/ml was calculated and the differences in T2AFP were compared according to the histological grade of HCC differentiation and positivity for Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of α-fetoprotein (AFP-L3). Among these 44 HCCs, the correlation between T2AFP and TVDT was analyzed for the 27 tumors for which TVDT could be calculated. The mean ± standard deviation (SD) TVDT in Edmondson grade 1 (Ed1), Ed2 and Ed3 HCC was 138.3±110.3, 94.9±91.5 and 32.2±20.8 days, respectively (P<0.05). The mean ± SD T2AFP in Ed2 and Ed3 HCC was 121.0±167.5 and 37.3±24.6 days, respectively (P<0.01). TVDT and T2AFP decreased with histological dedifferentiation of HCC. The mean ± SD T2AFP in the AFP-L3-positive and -negative groups was 63.2±101.2 and 191.9±209.9 days, respectively, with a statistically significant difference between the groups (P<0.01). A significant correlation was observed between T2AFP and TVDT (correlation coefficient, 0.70; P<0.01). A significant correlation was also observed among TVDT, serological indices and histological grades of HCC differentiation. A short T2AFP and/or AFP-L3-positivity were shown to reflect a poorly differentiated HCC histopathology and a higher malignant potential. PMID:24649280

  13. Validation that Metabolic Tumor Volume Predicts Outcome in Head-and-Neck Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chad; Murphy, James D.; Khong, Brian; La, Trang H. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Kong, Christina [Department of Pathology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Fischbein, Nancy J. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Colevas, A. Dimitrios [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Iagaru, Andrei H. [Department of Radiology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Graves, Edward E.; Loo, Billy W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu, E-mail: qle@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: We have previously reported that metabolic tumor volume (MTV) obtained from pretreatment {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxydeglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET)/ computed tomography (CT) predicted outcome in patients with head-and-neck cancer (HNC). The purpose of this study was to validate these results on an independent dataset, determine whether the primary tumor or nodal MTV drives this correlation, and explore the interaction with p16{sup INK4a} status as a surrogate marker for human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods and Materials: The validation dataset in this study included 83 patients with squamous cell HNC who had a FDG PET/CT scan before receiving definitive radiotherapy. MTV and maximum standardized uptake value (SUV{sub max}) were calculated for the primary tumor, the involved nodes, and the combination of both. The primary endpoint was to validate that MTV predicted progression-free survival and overall survival. Secondary analyses included determining the prognostic utility of primary tumor vs. nodal MTV. Results: Similarly to our prior findings, an increase in total MTV of 17 cm{sup 3} (difference between the 75th and 25th percentiles) was associated with a 2.1-fold increase in the risk of disease progression (p = 0.0002) and a 2.0-fold increase in the risk of death (p = 0.0048). SUV{sub max} was not associated with either outcome. Primary tumor MTV predicted progression-free (hazard ratio [HR] = 1.94; p < 0.0001) and overall (HR = 1.57; p < 0.0001) survival, whereas nodal MTV did not. In addition, MTV predicted progression-free (HR = 4.23; p < 0.0001) and overall (HR = 3.21; p = 0.0029) survival in patients with p16{sup INK4a}-positive oropharyngeal cancer. Conclusions: This study validates our previous findings that MTV independently predicts outcomes in HNC. MTV should be considered as a potential risk-stratifying biomarker in future studies of HNC.

  14. Semi-automated primary tumor volume measurements by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodder, Wouter L; Gilhuijs, Kenneth G A; Lange, Charlotte A H; Pameijer, Frank A; Balm, Alfons J M; van den Brekel, Michiel W M

    2013-04-01

    Tumor volume is a significant prognostic factor in the treatment of malignant head and neck tumors. Unfortunately, it is not routinely measured because of the workload involved. Twenty-one patients, between 2009 and 2010, were studied. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) at 3.0T was performed. A workstation previously developed for semi-automated segmentation of breast cancers on DCE-MRI was used to segment the head and neck cancers. The Pearson correlation analysis was used to assess the agreement between volumetric measurements and the manually derived gross tumor volume (GTV). In 90.5% of the patients (19 of 21) correlation could be made between DCE-MRI and the manually derived GTV. The Pearson correlation coefficient between the automatically derived tumor volume at DCE-MRI and the manually derived GTVs was R(2) = 0.95 (p < .001). Semi-automated tumor volumes on DCE-MRI were representative of those derived from the manually derived GTV (R(2) = 0.95; p < .001). Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Targeted polydopamine nanoparticles enable photoacoustic imaging guided chemo-photothermal synergistic therapy of tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuanyuan; Jiang, Chunhuan; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Ying; Ren, Xiaoyan; Ai, Kelong; Chen, Xuesi; Lu, Lehui

    2017-01-01

    Near infrared light responsive nanoparticles can transfer the absorbed NIR optical energy into heat, offering a desirable platform for photoacoustic (PA) imaging guided photothermal therapy (PTT) of tumor. However, a key issue in exploiting this platform is to achieve optimal combination of PA imaging and PTT therapy in single nanoparticle. Here, we demonstrate that the biodegradable polydopamine nanoparticles (PDAs) are excellent PA imaging agent and highly efficient for PTT therapy, thus enabling the optimal combination of PA imaging and PTT therapy in single nanoparticle. Upon modification with arginine-glycine-aspartic-cysteine acid (RGDC) peptide, PDA-RGDC can successfully target tumor site. Moreover, PDA-RGDC can load a chemotherapy drug, doxorubicin (DOX), whose release can be triggered by near-infrared (NIR) light and pH dual-stimuli. The in vitro and in vivo experiments show that this platform can deliver anti-cancer drugs to target cells, release them intracellular upon NIR irradiation, and effectively eliminate tumors through chemo-photothermal synergistic therapeutic effect. Our results offer a way to harness PDA-based theranostic agents to achieve PA imaging-guided cancer therapy. NIR-light adsorbed nanoparticles combing the advantage of PAI and PTT (TNP-PAI/PTT) are expected to play a significant role in the dawning era of personalized medicine. However, the reported Au-, Ag-, Cu-, Co-, and other metal based, carbon-based TNP-PAI/PTT suffer from complex multicomponent system and poor biocompatibility and biodegradability. To overcome this limitation, biocompatible polydopamine nanoparticles (PDAs), structurally similar to naturally occurring melanin, were designed as both PA imaging contrast agent and a chemo-thermotherapy therapy agent for tumor. RGDC peptide modified PDAs can improve the PA imaging and PTT efficiency and specific targeted deliver doxorubicin (DOX) to perinuclear region of tumor cells. Our finding may help the development of PDA

  16. Multi-field Optimization Intensity-Modulated Proton Therapy for Head and Neck Tumors – A Translation to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Steven J.; Cox, James D.; Gillin, Michael; Mohan, Radhe; Garden, Adam S.; Rosenthal, David I.; Gunn, G. Brandon; Weber, Randal S.; Kies, Merrill S.; Lewin, Jan S.; Munsell, Mark F.; Palmer, Matthew B.; Sahoo, Narayan; Zhang, Xiaodong; Liu, Wei; Zhu, X. Ronald

    2014-01-01

    patients, and Grade 3 - one patient. Mucositis within the planning target volumes was seen during the treatment of all patients; Grade 1 - one patient, Grade 2 - eight patients, and Grade 3 - six patients. No patient experienced Grade 2 or higher anterior oral mucositis. Conclusions This is the first clinical report of MFO-IMPT for head and neck tumors. Early clinical outcomes are encouraging and warrant further investigation of proton therapy in prospective clinical trials. PMID:24867532

  17. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  18. Crosstalk between immune cell and oncolytic vaccinia therapy enhances tumor trafficking and antitumor effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampath, Padma; Li, Jun; Hou, Weizhou; Chen, Hannah; Bartlett, David L; Thorne, Steve H

    2013-03-01

    The combination of an oncolytic virus, that directly destroys tumor cells and mediates an acute immune response, with an immune cell therapy, capable of further enlisting and enhancing the host immune response, has the potential to create a potent therapeutic effect. We have previously developed several strategies for optimizing the delivery of oncolytic vaccinia virus vectors to their tumor targets, including the use of immune cell-based carrier vehicles and the incorporation of mutations that increase production of the enveloped form of vaccinia (extracellular enveloped viral (EEV)) that is better adapted to spread within a host. Here, we initially combine these approaches to create a novel therapeutic, consisting of an immune cell (cytokine-induced killer, CIK) preloaded with an oncolytic virus that is EEV enhanced. This resulted in direct interaction between the viral and immune cell components with each assisting the other in directing the therapy to the tumor and so enhancing the antitumor effects. This effect could be further improved through CCL5 expression from the virus. The resulting multicomponent therapy displays the ability for synergistic crosstalk between components, so significantly enhancing tumor trafficking and antitumor effects.

  19. Pregnancy and tumor outcomes in infertile women with macroprolactinoma on cabergoline therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastogi, Ashu; Bhadada, Sanjay K; Bhansali, Anil

    2017-04-01

    Hyperprolactinemia and prolactinomas cause infertility in significant number of women. But, pregnancy may lead to post-partum remission of hyperprolactinemia. The data on pregnancy and tumor outcome in women with macroprolactinoma conceiving on Cabergoline (CAB) therapy is increasing but still less than with Bromocriptine. We studied the incidence of fetal malformations, hyperprolactinemia and tumor course after gestation in infertile women harboring macroprolactinoma, who conceived on CAB therapy during the year 2005-2015. The cohort was divided into two groups based on the continuation of CAB therapy during gestation (Group A) or not (Group B). Forty-eight pregnancies in 33 women were recorded. CAB was continued throughout gestation in 25 pregnancies (Group A). The incidence of missed abortion (8.3%), still birth (4.2%) and low birth weight (7.7%) were not different in two groups. Neural tube defects were observed in 3 pregnancies (all in Group A). Post-partum, recurrence of hyperprolactinemia was observed in 64.6% and 60.9% (p = 0.8) of women in group A and B, respectively. Cabergoline was restarted after 60% and 60.9% (p = 0.9) pregnancies in the two groups in view of symptomatic hyperprolactinemia and/or persistence of macroadenoma. Post-partum, recurrence of hyperprolactinemia is common in spite of significant tumor reduction in infertile women with macroprolactinoma. Continuation of CAB during gestation does not influence the post-pregnancy recurrence of hyperprolactinemia or tumor remission.

  20. Intensive care unit renal support therapy volume is not associated with patient outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Yên-Lan; Milbrandt, Eric B; Weissfeld, Lisa A; Kahn, Jeremy M; Chiche, Jean-Daniel; Aegerter, Philippe; Clermont, Gilles; Kellum, John A; Guidet, Bertrand; Angus, Derek C

    2011-11-01

    Evidence suggests that patients requiring high-risk procedures benefit from care at institutions providing a large volume of these procedures. Our objective was to determine whether there is a volume-outcome relationship among intensive care unit patients receiving renal support therapy in two different healthcare systems (France and the United States). Retrospective cohort study. Two multicenter intensive care unit databases: CUB-Réa (France) and Project IMPACT (United States). All nonsurgical adults requiring renal support therapy from 1997 to 2007 were included. None. We assessed association of annual renal support therapy volume with intensive care unit and hospital mortality using multivariable modeling, accounting for clustering and adjusting for age, comorbidities, admitting diagnosis, illness severity, pre-intensive care unit length of stay, admission source, and hospital and intensive care unit characteristics. Our final cohorts were 9,449 patients treated in 32 intensive care units in CUB-Réa and 3,498 patients treated in 76 intensive care units in Project IMPACT. Patient demographics did not differ between cohorts. Renal support therapy delivery varied widely across intensive care units (3-129 patients per year in CUB-Réa, 1-66 in Project IMPACT). Overall intensive care unit and hospital mortality rates were 45% and 49% in CUB-Réa and 34% and 47% in Project IMPACT. After adjustment for patient, intensive care unit, and hospital characteristics, there was no association between renal support therapy volume and intensive care unit or hospital mortality whether we treated volume as a continuous measure or quartiles. Higher renal support therapy volume was associated with shorter length of stay only in CUB-Réa. There is a large variation in annual renal support therapy volume across intensive care units in France and the United States but no association of higher volumes with improved outcomes.

  1. Nanobiotechnology-based delivery strategies: New frontiers in brain tumor targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangraviti, Antonella; Gullotti, David; Tyler, Betty; Brem, Henry

    2016-10-28

    Despite recent technological advancements and promising preclinical experiments, brain tumor patients are still met with limited treatment options. Some of the barriers to clinical improvements include the systemic toxicity of cytotoxic compounds, the impedance of the blood brain barrier (BBB), and the lack of therapeutic agents that can selectively target the intracranial tumor environment. To overcome such barriers, a number of chemotherapeutic agents and nucleic acid-based therapies are rapidly being synthesized and tested as new brain tumor-targeted delivery strategies. Novel carriers include liposomal and polymeric nanoparticles, wafers, microchips, microparticle-based nanoplatforms and cells-based vectors. Strong preclinical results suggest that these nanotechnologies are set to transform the therapeutic paradigm for brain tumor treatment. In addition to new tumoricidal agents, parallel work is also being conducted on the BBB front. Preclinical testing of chemical and physical modulation strategies is yielding improved intracranial concentrations. New diagnostic and therapeutic imaging techniques, such as high-intensity focused ultrasound and MRI-guided focused ultrasound, are being used to modulate the BBB in a more precise and non-invasive manner. This review details some of the tremendous advances that are being explored in current brain tumor targeted therapies, including local implant development, nanobiotechnology-based delivery strategies, and techniques of BBB manipulation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Evaluation of the Photodynamic Therapy effect using a tumor model in Chorioallantoic Membrane with Melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzá, Hilde H.; Pires, Layla; Bagnato, Vanderlei S.; Kurachi, Cristina

    2014-03-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a type of cancer treatment that is based on the interaction of light (with specific wavelength), a photosensitizing agent and molecular oxygen. The photosensitizer (PS) is activated by light and reacts with oxygen resulting in the production of singlet oxygen that is highly reactive and responsible for the cell death. The Chick Chorioallantoic Membrane (CAM) model is a transparent membrane that allows visualization and evaluation of blood vessels and structural changes, where a tumor model was developed. Two induction tumor models were investigated: tumor biopsy or cell culture. It was used a murine melanoma cell B16F10 in culture and a biopsy from a xenograft tumor in hairless mouse. Two PS were tested: Photodithazine® and Photogem®, a chlorine and porphyrin compounds, respectively. Using intravenous administration, the light-drug interval was of 30 minutes, 1 and 3 hours. Illumination was performed at 630 nm and 660 nm, and the vascular and tumor response was monitored and analyzed. The PS distribution was checked with confocal microscopy. This model can be useful to study several parameters of PDT and the effect of this therapy in the cancer treatment since it allows direct visualization of its effects.

  3. Bladder volume variations of cervical cancer patient in radiation therapy using ultrasonography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Jong Ho [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    The bladder volume change was measured using ultrasonography for helping decrease the side effects and other organ variations in the location of radiation therapy for cervical cancer patients. An experiment was performed targeting patients who were treated with radiation therapy at PNUH within the period from September to December 2015. To maintain the bladder volume, each patient was instructed to drink 500 cc water before and after CT simulation, 60 minutes before the dry run. Also, the bladder volume was measured in each patient CT scan, and a 3D conformal therapy plan was designed. The bladder volumes measured before and after the CT simulation, dry run, and radiation treatment planning were compared and analyzed. The average volume and average error of the bladder that were obtained from the measurement based on the CT scan images had the lowest standard deviation in the CT simulation. This means that the values that were obtained before and after the CT simulation were statistically relevant and correlative. Moreover, the bladder volume measured via ultrasonography was larger size, the average volume in the CT scan. But the values that were obtained Dry run and after the CT simulation were not statistically relevant. Drinking a certain amount of water helps a patient maintain his/her bladder volume for a dry run. Even then, it is difficult to maintain the bladder volume for the dry run. Also, whether or not the patients followed the directions for the dry run correctly is important.

  4. The prognostic impact of tumor volume on stage I non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Xiao-Dong; Xie, Hao-Jun; Liu, Qian-Wen; Mo, Yun-Xian; Long, Hao; Rong, Tie-Hua

    2017-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the prognostic impact of tumor volume (TV) on patients with stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) after complete resection. We retrospectively reviewed the clinicopathological characteristics of 274 patients with stage I NSCLC who had received preoperative chest computed tomography (CT) scans and complete resection. TV was semi-automatically measured from chest CT scans by using an imaging software program. The optimal cutoff values of TV were determined by X-tile software. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were compared using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to identify risk factors for DFS and OS. By using 3.046cm3 and 8.078cm3 as two optimal cutoff values of TV, the patients were separated into three groups. The 5-year DFS and OS for patients with TV≤3.046cm3, 3.046-8.078cm3, and>8.078cm3 were 88.0%, 73.6%, and 62.1%, respectively (P<0.001), and 91.4%, 84.5%, and 73.3%, respectively (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis showed that age and TV were independent factors associated with DFS. Sex, age, histology, visceral pleural invasion, and TV were independent factors associated with OS. Stage Ia patients might be separated into three groups on the basis of TV with significantly different DFS and OS. Patients with tumor diameter≤2cm and 2-3cm were also stratified into two groups with significantly different DFS and OS on the basis of TV, respectively. TV is an independent risk factor for DFS and OS for stage I NSCLC after complete resection. TV might provide additional prognostic information over tumor diameter in patients with stage I NSCLC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Supplement: 7 Sessions of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Charles; Scudder, Meleney; Kaminer, Yifrah; Kaden, Ron

    This manual, a supplement to "Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Cannabis Users: 5 Sessions, Cannabis Youth Treatment (CYT) Series, Volume 1", presents a seven-session cognitive behavioral treatment (CBT7) approach designed especially for adolescent cannabis users. It addresses the implementation and…

  6. Molecular Imaging of Gene Expression and Efficacy following Adenoviral-Mediated Brain Tumor Gene Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Cancer gene therapy is an active area of research relying upon the transfer and subsequent expression of a therapeutic transgene into tumor cells in order to provide for therapeutic selectivity. Noninvasive assessment of therapeutic response and correlation of the location, magnitude, and duration of transgene expression in vivo would be particularly useful in the development of cancer gene therapy protocols by facilitating optimization of gene transfer protocols, vector development, and prodrug dosing schedules. In this study, we developed an adenoviral vector containing both the therapeutic transgene yeast cytosine deaminase (yCD along with an optical reporter gene (luciferase. Following intratumoral injection of the vector into orthotopic 9L gliomas, anatomical and diffusion-weighted MR images were obtained over time in order to provide for quantitative assessment of overall therapeutic efficacy and spatial heterogeneity of cell kill, respectively. In addition, bioluminescence images were acquired to assess the duration and magnitude of gene expression. MR images revealed significant reduction in tumor growth rates associated with yCD/5-fluorocytosine (5FC gene therapy. Significant increases in mean tumor diffusion values were also observed during treatment with 5FC. Moreover, spatial heterogeneity in tumor diffusion changes were also observed revealing that diffusion magnetic resonance imaging could detect regional therapeutic effects due to the nonuniform delivery and/or expression of the therapeutic yCD transgene within the tumor mass. In addition, in vivo bioluminescence imaging detected luciferase gene expression, which was found to decrease over time during administration of the prodrug providing a noninvasive surrogate marker for monitoring gene expression. These results demonstrate the efficacy of the yCD/5FC strategy for the treatment of brain tumors and reveal the feasibility of using multimodality molecular and functional imaging

  7. Genotype- or Phenotype-Targeting Anticancer Therapies? Lessons from Tumor Evolutionary Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escargueil, Alexandre E; Prado, Soizic; Dezaire, Ambre; Clairambault, Jean; Larsen, Annette K; Soares, Daniele G

    2016-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of most cancer therapies, drug resistance remains a major problem in the clinic. The eradication of the entire tumor and the cure of the patient by chemotherapy alone are rare, in particular for advanced disease. From an evolutionary perspective, the selective pressure exerted by chemotherapy leads to the emergence of resistant clones where resistance can be associated with many different functional mechanisms at the single cell level or can involve changes in the tumor micro-environment. In the last decade, tumor genomics has contributed to the improvement of our understanding of tumorigenesis and has led to the identification of numerous cellular targets for the development of novel therapies. However, since tumors are by nature extremely heterogeneous, the drug efficacy and economical sustainability of this approach is now debatable. Importantly, tumor cell heterogeneity depends not only on genetic modifications but also on non-genetic processes involving either stochastic events or epigenetic modifications making genetic biomarkers of uncertain utility. In this review, we wish to highlight how evolutionary biology can impact our understanding of carcinogenesis and resistance to therapies. We will discuss new approaches based on applied ecology and evolution dynamics that can be used to convert the cancer into a chronic disease where the drugs would control tumor growth. Finally, we will discuss the way metabolic dysfunction or phenotypic changes can help developing new delivery systems or phenotypetargeted drugs and how exploring new sources of active compounds can conduct to the development of drugs with original mechanisms of action. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  8. Multiparametric Monitoring of Early Response to Antiangiogenic Therapy: A Sequential Perfusion CT and PET/CT Study in a Rabbit VX2 Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Im Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To perform dual analysis of tumor perfusion and glucose metabolism using perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT for the purpose of monitoring the early response to bevacizumab therapy in rabbit VX2 tumor models and to assess added value of FDG-PET to perfusion CT. Methods. Twenty-four VX2 carcinoma tumors implanted in bilateral back muscles of 12 rabbits were evaluated. Serial concurrent perfusion CT and FDG-PET/CT were performed before and 3, 7, and 14 days after bevacizumab therapy (treatment group or saline infusion (control group. Perfusion CT was analyzed to calculate blood flow (BF, blood volume (BV, and permeability surface area product (PS; FDG-PET was analyzed to calculate SUVmax, SUVmean, total lesion glycolysis (TLG, entropy, and homogeneity. The flow-metabolic ratio (FMR was also calculated and immunohistochemical analysis of microvessel density (MVD was performed. Results. On day 14, BF and BV in the treatment group were significantly lower than in the control group. There were no significant differences in all FDG-PET-derived parameters between both groups. In the treatment group, FMR prominently decreased after therapy and was positively correlated with MVD. Conclusions. In VX2 tumors, FMR could provide further insight into the early antiangiogenic effect reflecting a mismatch in intratumor blood flow and metabolism.

  9. Improved delivery of polymer therapeutics to prostate tumors using plasmonic photothermal therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormley, Adam Joseph

    When a patient is presented with locally advanced prostate cancer, it is possible to provide treatment with curative intent. However, once the disease has formed distant metastases, the chances of survival drops precipitously. For this reason, proper management of the disease while it remains localized is of critical importance. Treating these malignant cells with cytotoxic agents is effective at cell killing; however, the nonspecific toxicity profiles of these drugs often limit their use until the disease has progressed and symptom palliation is required. Incorporation of these drugs in nanocarriers such as polymers help target them to tumors with a degree of specificity, though major vascular barriers limit their effective delivery. In this dissertation, it is shown that plasmonic photothermal therapy (PPTT) can be used to help overcome some of these barriers and improve delivery to prostate tumors. First, the concept of using PPTT to improve the delivery of macromolecules to solid tumors was validated. This was done by measuring the tumor uptake of albumin. Next, the concept of targeting gold nanorods (GNRs) directly to the tumor's vasculature to better modulate vascular response to heating was tested. Surface conjugation of cyclic RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) to GNRs improved their binding and uptake to endothelial cells in vitro, but not in vivo. Nontargeted GNRs and PPTT were then utilized to guide the location of polymer therapeutic delivery to prostate tumors. N-(2-hydroxypropyl)methacrylamide (HPMA) copolymers, which were designed to be targeted to cells previously exposed to heat shock, were used in this study. Treatment of tumors with PPTT facilitated a burst accumulation of the copolymers over 4 hours, and heat shock targeting to cells allowed them to be retained for an extended period of time. Finally, the tumor localization of the HPMA copolymers following PPTT was evaluated by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). These results show that PPTT may be a useful tool

  10. Resistance to receptor-blocking therapies primes tumors as targets for HER3-homing nanobiologics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sims, Jessica D; Taguiam, Jan Michael; Alonso-Valenteen, Felix; Markman, Janet; Agadjanian, Hasmik; Chu, David; Lubow, Jay; Abrol, Ravinder; Srinivas, Dustin; Jain, Anjali; Han, Bingchen; Qu, Ying; Mirzadehgan, Parisa; Hwang, Jae-Youn; Rentsendorj, Altan; Chung, Alice; Lester, Jenny; Karlan, Beth Y; Gray, Harry B; Gross, Zeev; Giuliano, Armando; Cui, Xiaojiang; Medina-Kauwe, Lali K

    2018-02-10

    Resistance to anti-tumor therapeutics is an important clinical problem. Tumor-targeted therapies currently used in the clinic are derived from antibodies or small molecules that mitigate growth factor activity. These have improved therapeutic efficacy and safety compared to traditional treatment modalities but resistance arises in the majority of clinical cases. Targeting such resistance could improve tumor abatement and patient survival. A growing number of such tumors are characterized by prominent expression of the human epidermal growth factor receptor 3 (HER3) on the cell surface. This study presents a "Trojan-Horse" approach to combating these tumors by using a receptor-targeted biocarrier that exploits the HER3 cell surface protein as a portal to sneak therapeutics into tumor cells by mimicking an essential ligand. The biocarrier used here combines several functions within a single fusion protein for mediating targeted cell penetration and non-covalent self-assembly with therapeutic cargo, forming HER3-homing nanobiologics. Importantly, we demonstrate here that these nanobiologics are therapeutically effective in several scenarios of resistance to clinically approved targeted inhibitors of the human EGF receptor family. We also show that such inhibitors heighten efficacy of our nanobiologics on naïve tumors by augmenting HER3 expression. This approach takes advantage of a current clinical problem (i.e. resistance to growth factor inhibition) and uses it to make tumors more susceptible to HER3 nanobiologic treatment. Moreover, we demonstrate a novel approach in addressing drug resistance by taking inhibitors against which resistance arises and re-introducing these as adjuvants, sensitizing tumors to the HER3 nanobiologics described here. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Notch signaling pathway targeted therapy suppresses tumor progression and metastatic spread in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabuuchi, Shinichi; Pai, Shweta G; Campbell, Nathaniel R; de Wilde, Roeland F; De Oliveira, Elizabeth; Korangath, Preethi; Streppel, Mirte M; Rasheed, Zeshaan A; Hidalgo, Manuel; Maitra, Anirban; Rajeshkumar, N V

    2013-07-10

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) remains a lethal human malignancy with historically limited success in treatment. The role of aberrant Notch signaling, which requires the constitutive activation of γ-secretase, in the initiation and progression of PDA is well defined and inhibitors of this pathway are currently in clinical trials. Here we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effect of PF-03084014, a selective γ-secretase inhibitor, alone and in combination with gemcitabine in pancreatic cancer xenografts. PF-03084014 treatment inhibited the cleavage of nuclear Notch 1 intracellular domain and Notch targets Hes-1 and Hey-1. Gemcitabine treatment showed good response but not capable of inducing tumor regressions and targeting the tumor-resident cancer stem cells (CD24(+)CD44(+) and ALDH(+) tumor cells). A combination of PF-03084014 and gemcitabine treatment resulted tumor regression in 3 of 4 subcutaneously implanted xenograft models. PF-03084014, and in combination with gemcitabine reduced putative cancer stem cells, indicating that PF-03084014 target the especially dangerous and resilient cancer stem cells within pancreatic tumors. Tumor re-growth curves plotted after drug treatments demonstrated that the effect of the combination therapy was sustainable than that of gemcitabine. Notably, in a highly aggressive orthotopic model, PF-03084014 and gemcitabine combination was effective in inducing apoptosis, inhibition of tumor cell proliferation and angiogenesis, resulting in the attenuation of primary tumor growth as well as controlling metastatic dissemination, compared to gemcitabine treatment. In summary, our preclinical data suggest that PF-03084014 has greater anti-tumor activity in combination with gemcitabine in PDA and provides rationale for further investigation of this combination in PDA. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. [Ozone therapy for radiation reactions and skin lesions after neutron therapy in patients with malignant tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velikaya, V V; Gribova, O V; Musabaeva, L I; Startseva, Zh A; Simonov, K A; Aleinik, A N; Lisin, V A

    2015-01-01

    The article discusses the problem of radiation complications from normal tissues in patients after therapy with fast neutrons of 6.3 MeV. The methods of treatment using ozone technologies in patients with radiation reactions and skin lesions on the areas of irradiation after neutron and neutron-photon therapy have been worked out. Ozone therapy showed its harmlessness and increased efficiency of complex treatment of these patients.

  13. Validation study of a fast, accurate, and precise brain tumor volume measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Mong; Modi, Jayesh; Roberts, Mike; Chan, Christopher; Mitchell, J Ross

    2013-08-01

    Precision and accuracy are sometimes sacrificed to ensure that medical image processing is rapid. To address this, our lab had developed a novel level set segmentation algorithm that is 16× faster and >96% accurate on realistic brain phantoms. This study reports speed, precision and estimated accuracy of our algorithm when measuring MRIs of meningioma brain tumors and compares it to manual tracing and modified MacDonald (MM) ellipsoid criteria. A repeated-measures study allowed us to determine measurement precisions (MPs) - clinically relevant thresholds for statistically significant change. Speed: the level set, MM, and trace methods required 1:20, 1:35, and 9:35 (mm:ss) respectively on average to complete a volume measurement (plesion volumes (p>0.05). Precision: the MM's within-operator and between-operator MPs were significantly higher (worse) than the other methods (p0.05). Our level set is faster on average than MM, yet has accuracy and precision comparable to manual tracing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Radiation Therapy Induces Macrophages to Suppress Immune Responses Against Pancreatic Tumors in Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seifert, Lena; Werba, Gregor; Tiwari, Shaun; Ly, Nancy Ngoc Giao; Nguy, Susanna; Alothman, Sara; Alqunaibit, Dalia; Avanzi, Antonina; Daley, Donnele; Barilla, Rocky; Tippens, Daniel; Torres-Hernandez, Alejandro; Hundeyin, Mautin; Mani, Vishnu R.; Hajdu, Cristina; Pellicciotta, Ilenia; Oh, Philmo; Du, Kevin; Miller, George

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims The role of radiation therapy in the treatment of patients with pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is controversial. Randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of radiation therapy in patients with locally advanced unresectable PDA have reported mixed results, with effects ranging from modest benefit to worse outcome, compared with control therapies. We investigated whether radiation causes inflammatory cells to acquire an immune-suppressive phenotype that limits the therapeutic effects of radiation on invasive PDAs and accelerates progression of pre-invasive foci. Methods We investigated the effects of radiation in p48Cre;LSL-KrasG12D (KC) and p48Cre;LSLKrasG12D;LSL-Trp53R172H (KPC) mice, as well as in C57BL/6 mice with orthotopic tumors grown from FC1242 cells derived from KPC mice. Some mice were given neutralizing antibodies against macrophage colony stimulating factor 1 (CSF1 or MCSF) or F4/80. Pancreata were exposed to doses of radiation ranging from 2–12 Gy and analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Pancreata of KC mice exposed to radiation had a higher frequency of advanced pancreatic intraepithelial lesions and more foci of invasive cancer than pancreata of unexposed mice (controls); radiation reduced survival time by more than 6 months. A greater proportion of macrophages from invasive and pre-invasive pancreatic tumors had an immune-suppressive, M2-like phenotype, compared with control mice. Pancreata from mice exposed to radiation had fewer CD8+ T cells than controls and greater numbers of CD4+ T cells of T-helper 2 and T-regulatory cell phenotypes. Adoptive transfer of T cells from irradiated PDA to tumors of control mice accelerated tumor growth. Radiation induced production of MCSF by PDA cells. An antibody against MCSF prevented radiation from altering the phenotype of macrophages in tumors, increasing the anti-tumor T-cell response and slowing tumor growth. Conclusions Radiation exposure causes macrophages in PDAs

  15. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  16. Tumor volume as an independent predictive factor of worse survival in patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chin Shien; de Oliveira Santos, André Bandiera; Silva, Evandro Lima E; de Matos, Leandro Luongo; Moyses, Raquel Ajub; Kulcsar, Marco Aurélio Vamondes; Pinto, Fábio Roberto; Brandão, Lenine Garcia; Cernea, Claudio Roberto

    2017-05-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the role of tumor volume in the prognosis of patients with oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). One hundred twenty-three patients with T4a oral cavity SCCs underwent surgical treatment. The volumes of the primary cancer were calculated by the multiplication of 3 macroscopic dimensions of the surgical specimen and related to recurrence and death. There were 54 recurrences (43.9%) and 75 deaths (60.9%). The mean tumor volume among the patients living without disease during the follow-up period was 28.2 cc, compared to 88.2 cc for patients living with disease, and to 78.9 cc for patients who died of the disease (p < .001). Multivariate analyses showed that volume and perineural invasion were independent factors for recurrence, whereas volume and lymph node metastasis were independent factors for death. Among patients who already have advanced cancers, tumor volume can significantly impact their prognoses. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 960-964, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Partial volume correction of PET-imaged tumor heterogeneity using expectation maximization with a spatially varying point spread function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbee, David L; Flynn, Ryan T; Holden, James E; Nickles, Robert J; Jeraj, Robert

    2010-01-01

    Tumor heterogeneities observed in positron emission tomography (PET) imaging are frequently compromised of partial volume effects which may affect treatment prognosis, assessment, or future implementations such as biologically optimized treatment planning (dose painting). This paper presents a method for partial volume correction of PET-imaged heterogeneous tumors. A point source was scanned on a GE Discover LS at positions of increasing radii from the scanner’s center to obtain the spatially varying point spread function (PSF). PSF images were fit in three dimensions to Gaussian distributions using least squares optimization. Continuous expressions were devised for each Gaussian width as a function of radial distance, allowing for generation of the system PSF at any position in space. A spatially varying partial volume correction (SV-PVC) technique was developed using expectation maximization (EM) and a stopping criterion based on the method’s correction matrix generated for each iteration. The SV-PVC was validated using a standard tumor phantom and a tumor heterogeneity phantom, and was applied to a heterogeneous patient tumor. SV-PVC results were compared to results obtained from spatially invariant partial volume correction (SINV-PVC), which used directionally uniform three dimensional kernels. SV-PVC of the standard tumor phantom increased the maximum observed sphere activity by 55 and 40% for 10 and 13 mm diameter spheres, respectively. Tumor heterogeneity phantom results demonstrated that as net changes in the EM correction matrix decreased below 35%, further iterations improved overall quantitative accuracy by less than 1%. SV-PVC of clinically observed tumors frequently exhibited changes of ±30% in regions of heterogeneity. The SV-PVC method implemented spatially varying kernel widths and automatically determined the number of iterations for optimal restoration, parameters which are arbitrarily chosen in SINV-PVC. Comparing SV-PVC to SINV

  18. HUMAN NK CELLS: FROM SURFACE RECEPTORS TO THE THERAPY OF LEUKEMIAS AND SOLID TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LORENZO eMORETTA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are major effector cells of the innate immunity. The discovery, over two decades ago, of MHC-class I specific NK receptors and subsequently of activating receptors, recognizing ligands expressed by tumor or virus-infected cells, paved the way to our understanding of the mechanisms of selective recognition and killing of tumor cells. Although NK cells can efficiently kill tumor cells of different histotypes in vitro, their activity may be limited in vivo by their inefficient trafficking to tumor lesions and by the inhibition of their function induced by tumor cells themselves and by the tumor microenvironment. On the other hand, the important role of NK cells has been clearly demonstrated in the therapy of high risk leukemias in the haploidentical hematopoietic cell (HSC transplantation setting. NK cells derived from donor HSC kill leukemic cells residual after the conditioning regimen, thus preventing leukemia relapses. In addition, they also kill residual dendritic cells and T lymphocytes, thus preventing both GvHD and graft rejection.

  19. Theranostic Nanoseeds for Efficacious Internal Radiation Therapy of Unresectable Solid Tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeendarbari, Sina; Tekade, Rakesh; Mulgaonkar, Aditi; Christensen, Preston; Ramezani, Saleh; Hassan, Gedaa; Jiang, Ruiqian; Öz, Orhan K.; Hao, Yaowu; Sun, Xiankai

    2016-02-01

    Malignant tumors are considered “unresectable” if they are adhere to vital structures or the surgery would cause irreversible damages to the patients. Though a variety of cytotoxic drugs and radiation therapies are currently available in clinical practice to treat such tumor masses, these therapeutic modalities are always associated with substantial side effects. Here, we report an injectable nanoparticle-based internal radiation source that potentially offers more efficacious treatment of unresectable solid tumors without significant adverse side effects. Using a highly efficient incorporation procedure, palladium-103, a brachytherapy radioisotope in clinical practice, was coated to monodispersed hollow gold nanoparticles with a diameter about 120 nm, to form 103Pd@Au nanoseeds. The therapeutic efficacy of 103Pd@Au nanoseeds were assessed when intratumorally injected into a prostate cancer xenograft model. Five weeks after a single-dose treatment, a significant tumor burden reduction (>80%) was observed without noticeable side effects on the liver, spleen and other organs. Impressively, >95% nanoseeds were retained inside the tumors as monitored by Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) with the gamma emissions of 103Pd. These findings show that this nanoseed-based brachytherapy has the potential to provide a theranostic solution to unresectable solid tumors.

  20. Automated measurements of metabolic tumor volume and metabolic parameters in lung PET/CT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orologas, F.; Saitis, P.; Kallergi, M.

    2017-11-01

    Patients with lung tumors or inflammatory lung disease could greatly benefit in terms of treatment and follow-up by PET/CT quantitative imaging, namely measurements of metabolic tumor volume (MTV), standardized uptake values (SUVs) and total lesion glycolysis (TLG). The purpose of this study was the development of an unsupervised or partially supervised algorithm using standard image processing tools for measuring MTV, SUV, and TLG from lung PET/CT scans. Automated metabolic lesion volume and metabolic parameter measurements were achieved through a 5 step algorithm: (i) The segmentation of the lung areas on the CT slices, (ii) the registration of the CT segmented lung regions on the PET images to define the anatomical boundaries of the lungs on the functional data, (iii) the segmentation of the regions of interest (ROIs) on the PET images based on adaptive thresholding and clinical criteria, (iv) the estimation of the number of pixels and pixel intensities in the PET slices of the segmented ROIs, (v) the estimation of MTV, SUVs, and TLG from the previous step and DICOM header data. Whole body PET/CT scans of patients with sarcoidosis were used for training and testing the algorithm. Lung area segmentation on the CT slices was better achieved with semi-supervised techniques that reduced false positive detections significantly. Lung segmentation results agreed with the lung volumes published in the literature while the agreement between experts and algorithm in the segmentation of the lesions was around 88%. Segmentation results depended on the image resolution selected for processing. The clinical parameters, SUV (either mean or max or peak) and TLG estimated by the segmented ROIs and DICOM header data provided a way to correlate imaging data to clinical and demographic data. In conclusion, automated MTV, SUV, and TLG measurements offer powerful analysis tools in PET/CT imaging of the lungs. Custom-made algorithms are often a better approach than the manufacturer

  1. Simultaneous tumor and surrogate motion tracking with dynamic MRI for radiation therapy planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyoun; Farah, Rana; Shea, Steven M.; Tryggestad, Erik; Hales, Russell; Lee, Junghoon

    2018-01-01

    Respiration-induced tumor motion is a major obstacle for achieving high-precision radiotherapy of cancers in the thoracic and abdominal regions. Surrogate-based estimation and tracking methods are commonly used in radiotherapy, but with limited understanding of quantified correlation to tumor motion. In this study, we propose a method to simultaneously track the lung tumor and external surrogates to evaluate their spatial correlation in a quantitative way using dynamic MRI, which allows real-time acquisition without ionizing radiation exposure. To capture the lung and whole tumor, four MRI-compatible fiducials are placed on the patient’s chest and upper abdomen. Two different types of acquisitions are performed in the sagittal orientation including multi-slice 2D cine MRIs to reconstruct 4D-MRI and two-slice 2D cine MRIs to simultaneously track the tumor and fiducials. A phase-binned 4D-MRI is first reconstructed from multi-slice MR images using body area as a respiratory surrogate and groupwise registration. The 4D-MRI provides 3D template volumes for different breathing phases. 3D tumor position is calculated by 3D–2D template matching in which 3D tumor templates in the 4D-MRI reconstruction and the 2D cine MRIs from the two-slice tracking dataset are registered. 3D trajectories of the external surrogates are derived via matching a 3D geometrical model of the fiducials to their segmentations on the 2D cine MRIs. We tested our method on ten lung cancer patients. Using a correlation analysis, the 3D tumor trajectory demonstrates a noticeable phase mismatch and significant cycle-to-cycle motion variation, while the external surrogate was not sensitive enough to capture such variations. Additionally, there was significant phase mismatch between surrogate signals obtained from the fiducials at different locations.

  2. A new procedure of percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy under artificial hydrothorax for patients with liver tumors in the hepatic dome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, S; Hirota, M; Beppu, T; Shiomori, K; Marutsuka, T; Matsuo, A; Tanaka, E; Ogawa, M

    2001-01-01

    Percutaneous microwave coagulation therapy (PMCT) has been widely used as an effective minimal invasive therapy for small liver tumors. The occurrence of a sonographic masked space due to the presence of the lung, however, has become a major obstacle to visualizing the whole tumor in the hepatic dome. To facilitate the use of PMCT for liver tumors in the hepatic dome, we developed PMCT in combination with the artificial hydrothorax method (percutaneous transdiaphragmatic MCT: PTD-MCT). Our new approach for PMCT to the hepatic tumors located in Couinaud's segments VIII or VII just under the diaphragm resulted in a successful treatment. The separation of the lung from the diaphragm by the infusion of saline into the pleural cavity enabled us not only to visualize the whole tumor in the hepatic dome to accurately target the tumor, but also helped us to avoid injuring the lung. PTD-MCT is therefore strongly recommended for the treatment of liver tumors in the hepatic dome.

  3. Oncolytic Adenovirus and Tumor-Targeting Immune Modulatory Therapy Improve Autologous Cancer Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Hong; Rivera-Molina, Yisel; Gomez-Manzano, Candelaria; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Bover, Laura; Vence, Luis M; Yuan, Ying; Lang, Frederick F; Toniatti, Carlo; Hossain, Mohammad B; Fueyo, Juan

    2017-07-15

    Oncolytic viruses selectively lyse tumor cells, disrupt immunosuppression within the tumor, and reactivate antitumor immunity, but they have yet to live up to their therapeutic potential. Immune checkpoint modulation has been efficacious in a variety of cancer with an immunogenic microenvironment, but is associated with toxicity due to nonspecific T-cell activation. Therefore, combining these two strategies would likely result in both effective and specific cancer therapy. To test the hypothesis, we first constructed oncolytic adenovirus Delta-24-RGDOX expressing the immune costimulator OX40 ligand (OX40L). Like its predecessor Delta-24-RGD, Delta-24-RGDOX induced immunogenic cell death and recruit lymphocytes to the tumor site. Compared with Delta-24-RGD, Delta-24-RGDOX exhibited superior tumor-specific activation of lymphocytes and proliferation of CD8+ T cells specific to tumor-associated antigens, resulting in cancer-specific immunity. Delta-24-RGDOX mediated more potent antiglioma activity in immunocompetent C57BL/6 but not immunodeficient athymic mice, leading to specific immune memory against the tumor. To further overcome the immune suppression mediated by programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) expression on cancer cells accompanied with virotherapy, intratumoral injection of Delta-24-RGDOX and an anti-PD-L1 antibody showed synergistic inhibition of gliomas and significantly increased survival in mice. Our data demonstrate that combining an oncolytic virus with tumor-targeting immune checkpoint modulators elicits potent in situ autologous cancer vaccination, resulting in an efficacious, tumor-specific, and long-lasting therapeutic effect. Cancer Res; 77(14); 3894-907. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Impact of Plasma Epstein-Barr Virus-DNA and Tumor Volume on Prognosis of Locally Advanced Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective study aims to examine the association of plasma Epstein-Barr virus- (EBV- DNA levels with the tumor volume and prognosis in patients with locally advanced nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC. A total of 165 patients with newly diagnosed locally advanced NPC were identified from September 2011 to July 2012. EBV-DNA was detected using fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR amplification. The tumor volume was calculated by the systematic summation method of computer software. The median copy number of plasma EBV-DNA before treatment was 3790 copies/mL. The median gross tumor volume of the primary nasopharyngeal tumor (GTVnx, the lymph node lesions (GTVnd, and the total GTV before treatment were 72.46, 23.26, and 106.25 cm3, respectively; the EBV-DNA levels were significantly correlated with the GTVnd and the total GTV (P<0.01. The 2-year overall survival (OS rates in patients with positive and negative pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA were 100% and 98.4% (P=1.000, and the disease-free survival (DFS rates were 94.4% and 80.8% (P=0.044, respectively. These results indicate that high pretreatment plasma EBV-DNA levels in patients with locally advanced NPC are associated with the degree of lymph node metastasis, tumor burden, and poor prognosis.

  5. Advances in clinical application of cryoablation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and metastatic liver tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Ke-Qin

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is one of the most common cancers worldwide. Although surgical resection and liver transplantation are the curative treatments, many of HCC patients do not qualify for these curative therapies at the presentation. Thus, ablation therapies are currently important modalities in HCC treatment. Among currently available ablation therapies, cryoablation (ie, cryotherapy) is a novel local therapeutic modality. However, cryoablation has not been widely used as one of ablation therapies for HCC, because of historical concerns about risk of bleeding when cryotherapy is delivered by early generation of the argon-helium device. Nevertheless, with technological advances and increased clinical experience in the past decade, clinical application of cryoablation for HCC management has significantly increased. Accumulating data have demonstrated that cryoablation is highly effective in local tumor control with well-acceptable safety profile, and the overall survival is comparable with that of radiofrequency ablation in patients with tumors advances in clinical application of cryoablation therapy for HCC, including the related mechanisms and technology, clinical indications, efficacy and safety profiles, and future research directions.

  6. Combination Therapy With and Without Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Faurschou, Mikkel

    2015-01-01

    the effects of combination DMARD therapies with and without biologic agents as therapy for patients with RA. METHODS: Eight randomized controlled trials published in 10 articles were selected from a systematic literature search of 1,674 identified studies and integrated in a meta-analysis. These trials...... compared combinations of DMARDs versus a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitor plus methotrexate. Two reviewers independently entered data into standardized extraction forms. The combined effect measures were compared by means of the inverse variance method (continuous data) and the Mantel-Haenszel method...

  7. Comparison study of the partial-breast irradiation techniques: Dosimetric analysis of three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy, electron beam therapy, and helical tomotherapy depending on various tumor locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min-Joo; Park, So-Hyun [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Son, Seok-Hyun; Cheon, Keum-Seong; Choi, Byung-Ock [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Tae-Suk, E-mail: suhsanta@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Research Institute of Biomedical Engineering, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-01

    The partial-breast irradiation (PBI) technique, an alternative to whole-breast irradiation, is a beam delivery method that uses a limited range of treatment volume. The present study was designed to determine the optimal PBI treatment modalities for 8 different tumor locations. Treatment planning was performed on computed tomography (CT) data sets of 6 patients who had received lumpectomy treatments. Tumor locations were classified into 8 subsections according to breast quadrant and depth. Three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (3D-CRT), electron beam therapy (ET), and helical tomotherapy (H-TOMO) were utilized to evaluate the dosimetric effect for each tumor location. Conformation number (CN), radical dose homogeneity index (rDHI), and dose delivered to healthy tissue were estimated. The Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Bonferroni tests were used for statistical analysis. The ET approach showed good sparing effects and acceptable target coverage for the lower inner quadrant—superficial (LIQ-S) and lower inner quadrant—deep (LIQ-D) locations. The H-TOMO method was the least effective technique as no evaluation index achieved superiority for all tumor locations except CN. The ET method is advisable for treating LIQ-S and LIQ-D tumors, as opposed to 3D-CRT or H-TOMO, because of acceptable target coverage and much lower dose applied to surrounding tissue.

  8. Artifacts in conventional computed tomography (CT) and free breathing four-dimensional CT induce uncertainty in gross tumor volume determination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Gitte Fredberg; Nygaard, Ditte Eklund; Af Rosenschöld, Per Munck

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: Artifacts impacting the imaged tumor volume can be seen in conventional three-dimensional CT (3DCT) scans for planning of lung cancer radiotherapy but can be reduced with the use of respiration-correlated imaging, i.e., 4DCT or breathhold CT (BHCT) scans. The aim of this study was to com...

  9. Monte Carlo based dosimetry for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Lilia; Belgaid, Mohamed; Khelifi, Rachid

    2016-11-01

    Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) is a biologically targeted, radiation therapy for cancer which combines neutron irradiation with a tumor targeting agent labeled with a boron10 having a high thermal neutron capture cross section. The tumor area is subjected to the neutron irradiation. After a thermal neutron capture, the excited 11B nucleus fissions into an alpha particle and lithium recoil nucleus. The high Linear Energy Transfer (LET) emitted particles deposit their energy in a range of about 10μm, which is of the same order of cell diameter [1], at the same time other reactions due to neutron activation with body component are produced. In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for BNCT planning validation. Determination of total absorbed dose requires complex calculations which were carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNP code [2].

  10. Monte Carlo based dosimetry for neutron capture therapy of brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaidi Lilia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT is a biologically targeted, radiation therapy for cancer which combines neutron irradiation with a tumor targeting agent labeled with a boron10 having a high thermal neutron capture cross section. The tumor area is subjected to the neutron irradiation. After a thermal neutron capture, the excited 11B nucleus fissions into an alpha particle and lithium recoil nucleus. The high Linear Energy Transfer (LET emitted particles deposit their energy in a range of about 10μm, which is of the same order of cell diameter [1], at the same time other reactions due to neutron activation with body component are produced. In-phantom measurement of physical dose distribution is very important for BNCT planning validation. Determination of total absorbed dose requires complex calculations which were carried out using the Monte Carlo MCNP code [2].

  11. Serum biomarkers for personalization of nanotherapeutics-based therapy in different tumor and organ microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoi, Kenji; Tanei, Tomonori; Godin, Biana; van de Ven, Anne L; Hanibuchi, Masaki; Matsunoki, Aika; Alexander, Jenolyn; Ferrari, Mauro

    2014-04-01

    Enhanced permeation and retention (EPR) effect, the mechanism by which nanotherapeutics accumulate in tumors, varies in patients based on differences in the tumor and organ microenvironment. Surrogate biomarkers for the EPR effect will aid in selecting patients who will accumulate higher amounts of nanotherapeutics and show better therapeutic efficacy. Our data suggest that the differences in the vascular permeability and pegylated liposomal doxorubicin (PLD) accumulation are tumor type as well as organ-specific and significantly correlated with the relative ratio of MMP-9 to TIMP-1 in the circulation, supporting development of these molecules as biomarkers for the personalization of nanoparticle-based therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Visual outcome, endocrine function and tumor control after fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy of craniopharyngiomas in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astradsson, Arnar; Munck Af Rosenschöld, Per; Feldt-Rasmussen, Ulla

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to examine visual outcome, endocrine function and tumor control in a prospective cohort of craniopharyngioma patients, treated with fractionated stereotactic radiation therapy (FSRT). MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixteen adult patients with craniopharyngiomas were...... eligible for analysis. They were treated with linear accelerator-based FSRT during 1999-2015. In all cases, diagnosis was confirmed by histological analysis. The prescription dose to the tumor was 54 Gy (median, range 48-54) in 1.8 or 2.0 Gy per fraction, and the maximum radiation dose to the optic nerves.......7-13.1) for visual outcome, endocrine function, and tumor control, respectively. RESULTS: Visual acuity impairment was present in 10 patients (62.5%) and visual field defects were present in 12 patients (75%) before FSRT. One patient developed radi