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Sample records for therapy response assessment

  1. Multimodal OCT for complex assessment of tumors response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirotkina, Marina A.; Kiseleva, Elena B.; Gubarkova, Ekaterina V.; Matveev, Lev A.; Zaitsev, Vladimir Yu.; Matveyev, Alexander L.; Shirmanova, Marina V.; Sovetsky, Alexander A.; Moiseev, Alexander A.; Zagaynova, Elena V.; Vitkin, Alex; Gladkova, Natalia D.

    2017-07-01

    Multimodal OCT is a promising tool for monitoring of individual tumor response to antitumor therapies. The changes of tumor cells, connective tissue, microcirculation and stiffness can be estimated simultaneously in real time with high resolution.

  2. Molecular Imaging and Precision Medicine: PET/Computed Tomography and Therapy Response Assessment in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Mena, Esther; Pattanayak, Puskar; Taghipour, Mehdi; Solnes, Lilja B; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2017-01-01

    A variety of methods have been developed to assess tumor response to therapy. Standardized qualitative criteria based on 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET/computed tomography have been proposed to evaluate the treatment effectiveness in specific cancers and these allow more accurate therapy response assessment and survival prognostication. Multiple studies have addressed the utility of the volumetric PET biomarkers as prognostic indicators but there is no consensus about the preferred segmentation methodology for these metrics. Heterogeneous intratumoral uptake was proposed as a novel PET metric for therapy response assessment. PET imaging techniques will be used to study the biological behavior of cancers during therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. PET/CT for therapy response assessment in lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Martin; Barrington, Sally F

    2009-01-01

    PET with (18)F-FDG is a standard staging procedure for most lymphoma subtypes. Performed during and after therapy for Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), (18)F-FDG PET results have a high prognostic value and correlate with survival. (18)F-FDG PET has been incorporated...... into revised response criteria for aggressive lymphomas, and several ongoing trials are under way to investigate the value of treatment adaptation based on early (18)F-FDG PET results for HL and aggressive NHL. There is little evidence to support the use of (18)F-FDG PET for monitoring of the treatment...... of indolent lymphomas and for routine use in the surveillance setting. So that trial results can be compared and translated easily into clinical practice, uniform and evidence-based guidelines for the interpretation and reporting of response monitoring scans are warranted. Because it is still not proven...

  4. Assessing the Response to Targeted Therapies in Renal Cell Carcinoma: Technical Insights and Practical Considerations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bex, A.; Fournier, L.; Lassau, N.; Mulders, P.F.A.; Nathan, P.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Powles, T.

    2014-01-01

    CONTEXT: The introduction of targeted agents for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has resulted in new challenges for assessing response to therapy, and conventional response criteria using computed tomography (CT) are limited. It is widely recognised that targeted therapies may lead to

  5. Computed tomography assessment of early response to neoadjuvant therapy in colon cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Claus; Lund-Rasmussen, Vera; Pløen, John

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Using multidetector computed tomography, we aimed to assess the early response of neoadjuvant drug therapy for locally advanced colon cancer. METHODS: Computed tomography with IV contrast was acquired from 67 patients before and after up to three cycles of preoperative treatment. All...

  6. Assessing the response to targeted therapies in renal cell carcinoma: technical insights and practical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bex, Axel; Fournier, Laure; Lassau, Nathalie; Mulders, Peter; Nathan, Paul; Oyen, Wim J G; Powles, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    The introduction of targeted agents for the treatment of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has resulted in new challenges for assessing response to therapy, and conventional response criteria using computed tomography (CT) are limited. It is widely recognised that targeted therapies may lead to significant necrosis without significant reduction in tumour size. In addition, the vascular effects of antiangiogenic therapy may occur long before there is any reduction in tumour size. To perform a systematic review of conventional and novel imaging methods for the assessment of response to targeted agents in RCC and to discuss their use from a clinical perspective. Relevant databases covering the period January 2006 to April 2013 were searched for studies reporting on the use of anatomic and functional imaging techniques to predict response to targeted therapy in RCC. Inclusion criteria were randomised trials, nonrandomised controlled studies, retrospective case series, and cohort studies. Reviews, animal and preclinical studies, case reports, and commentaries were excluded. A narrative synthesis of the evidence is presented. A total of 331 abstracts and 76 full-text articles were assessed; 34 studies met the inclusion criteria. Current methods of response assessment in RCC include anatomic methods--based on various criteria including Choi, size and attenuation CT, and morphology, attenuation, size, and structure--and functional techniques including dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) CT, DCE-magnetic resonance imaging, DCE-ultrasonography, positron emission tomography, and approaches utilising radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies. Functional imaging techniques are promising surrogate biomarkers of response in RCC and may be more appropriate than anatomic CT-based methods. By enabling quantification of tumour vascularisation, functional techniques can directly and rapidly detect the biologic effects of antiangiogenic therapies compared with the indirect detection of belated effects

  7. Intraoperative optical assessment of photodynamic therapy response of superficial oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Rigual, Nestor; Arshad, Hassan; Tracy, Erin C.; Cooper, Michelle T.; Shafirstein, Gal; Wilding, Gregory; Merzianu, Mihai; Baumann, Heinz; Henderson, Barbara W.; Sunar, Ulas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) measurements could assess clinical response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In addition, the correlation between parameters measured with DOS and the crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a molecular marker for PDT-induced photoreaction, was investigated. Thirteen patients with early stage HNSCC received the photosensitizer 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinylpyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) and DOS measurements were performed before and after PDT in the operating room (OR). In addition, biopsies were acquired after PDT to assess the STAT3 crosslinking. Parameters measured with DOS, including blood volume fraction, blood oxygen saturation (StO2), HPPH concentration (cHPPH), HPPH fluorescence, and blood flow index (BFI), were compared to the pathologic response and the STAT3 crosslinking. The best individual predictor of pathological response was a change in cHPPH (sensitivity=60%, specificity=100%), while discrimination analysis using a two-parameter classifier (change in cHPPH and change in StO2) classified pathological response with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. BFI showed the best correlation with the crosslinking of STAT3. These results indicate that DOS-derived parameters can assess the clinical response in the OR, allowing for earlier reintervention if needed.

  8. MO-DE-303-03: Session on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bowen, S.

    2015-01-01

    This session will focus on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy. This is a technically challenging method to translate to practice in radiation therapy. In the new era of precision medicine, however, delivering the right treatment, to the right patient, and at the right time, can positively impact treatment choices and patient outcomes. Quantitative imaging provides the spatial sensitivity required by radiation therapy for precision medicine that is not available by other means. In this Joint ESTRO -AAPM Symposium, three leading-edge investigators will present specific motivations for quantitative imaging biomarkers in radiation therapy of esophageal, head and neck, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Experiences with the use of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion- weighted (DW) MRI, PET/CT, and SPECT/CT will be presented. Issues covered will include: response prediction, dose-painting, timing between therapy and imaging, within-therapy biomarkers, confounding effects, normal tissue sparing, dose-response modeling, and association with clinical biomarkers and outcomes. Current information will be presented from investigational studies and clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Learn motivations for the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of response to radiation therapy Review the potential areas of application in cancer therapy Examine the challenges for translation, including imaging confounds and paucity of evidence to date Compare exemplary examples of the current state of the art in DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging for assessment of response to radiation therapy Van der Heide: Research grants from the Dutch Cancer Society and the European Union (FP7) Bowen: RSNA Scholar grant

  9. MO-DE-303-03: Session on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, S. [University of Washington, School of Medicine: PET/CT and SPECT/CT for Lung and Liver Radiation Therapy Response Assessment of Tumor and Normal Tissue (United States)

    2015-06-15

    This session will focus on quantitative imaging for assessment of tumor response to radiation therapy. This is a technically challenging method to translate to practice in radiation therapy. In the new era of precision medicine, however, delivering the right treatment, to the right patient, and at the right time, can positively impact treatment choices and patient outcomes. Quantitative imaging provides the spatial sensitivity required by radiation therapy for precision medicine that is not available by other means. In this Joint ESTRO -AAPM Symposium, three leading-edge investigators will present specific motivations for quantitative imaging biomarkers in radiation therapy of esophageal, head and neck, locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Experiences with the use of dynamic contrast enhanced (DCE) MRI, diffusion- weighted (DW) MRI, PET/CT, and SPECT/CT will be presented. Issues covered will include: response prediction, dose-painting, timing between therapy and imaging, within-therapy biomarkers, confounding effects, normal tissue sparing, dose-response modeling, and association with clinical biomarkers and outcomes. Current information will be presented from investigational studies and clinical practice. Learning Objectives: Learn motivations for the use of quantitative imaging biomarkers for assessment of response to radiation therapy Review the potential areas of application in cancer therapy Examine the challenges for translation, including imaging confounds and paucity of evidence to date Compare exemplary examples of the current state of the art in DCE-MRI, DW-MRI, PET/CT and SPECT/CT imaging for assessment of response to radiation therapy Van der Heide: Research grants from the Dutch Cancer Society and the European Union (FP7) Bowen: RSNA Scholar grant.

  10. Responsiveness of migraine-ACT and MIDAS questionnaires for assessing migraine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, María Luisa; Baos, Vicente; Láinez, Miguel; Pascual, Julio; López-Gil, Arturo

    2008-10-01

    Migraine is frequently undertreated. The 4-item Migraine Assessment of Current Therapy (Migraine-ACT) questionnaire is a simple and reliable tool to identify patients requiring a change in current acute migraine treatment. To investigate the responsiveness of the Migraine-ACT tool, and compare it with that of the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS) questionnaire, for patients with migraine at 1100 primary care sites in Spain. Patients eligible for this open-label, 2-visit prospective study reported migraine for >1 year and >or=1 migraine attack per month and were new to the clinic or on follow-up care for MIDAS questionnaires were administered, and patient satisfaction with treatment was recorded, at baseline and at 3 months. A total of 3272 patients, 78% female, were enrolled, and 2877 (88%) returned for the 3-month visit. Investigators changed baseline migraine treatment for 72% of returning patients; 85% and 80% of these patients had improved Migraine-ACT and MIDAS scores at 3 months, respectively. Patients who reported being completely or very satisfied with migraine treatment numbered 492 (15%) at baseline and 1406 (49%) at 3 months. Migraine-ACT and MIDAS score agreement for improvement at 3 months was poor (kappa = 0.339). Both the mean MIDAS score and the distribution of Migraine-ACT scores improved over the course of 3 months; however, Migraine-ACT scores were significantly (P MIDAS scores. The area under the curve in the receiver-operating characteristic analysis was significantly (P MIDAS (0.70) questionnaire. These results suggest that the Migraine-ACT questionnaire can be used more reliably than the MIDAS questionnaire for detecting improvements in treatment of new and follow-up patients with migraine.

  11. Assessing response to therapy in idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension: a consensus survey of Canadian pulmonary hypertension physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrie, Adrienne E; Ostrow, David N; Levy, Robert D; Swiston, John R

    2011-01-01

    Many treatment options are now available for patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Data regarding the optimal combination of therapies are lacking, as is consensus on how to assess response to therapy and when to change therapeutic regimens. To gather the opinions of Canadian pulmonary hypertension (PH) experts regarding standard practice in the care of IPAH patients after therapy is initiated. Canadian PH physicians were surveyed using short questionnaires to assess their opinions and practices in the care of IPAH patients. A Delphi forecasting approach was used to gain consensus among Canadian physicians on the most important clinical parameters to consider when assessing patients after the initiation of therapy. Twenty-six of 37 Canadian PH experts who were invited to participate completed the study. All endorsed the use of combination therapy for IPAH patients despite the lack of universal provincial coverage for this approach. By consensus, WHO functional class, 6 min walk distance and hospitalization for right heart failure were the most important clinical parameters. The most highly rated physical examination parameters were jugular venous pressure, peripheral edema, the presence of ascites and body weight. The overall approach to care of IPAH patients is similar across PH centres in Canada. A limited number of clinical and physical examination parameters were considered to be most important to reassess patients after therapy is initiated. These parameters, along with definition of threshold values, will facilitate the development of standard practice guidelines for IPAH patients in Canada.

  12. Anatomic, functional and molecular imaging in lung cancer precision radiation therapy: treatment response assessment and radiation therapy personalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, Sarah; Schimek-Jasch, Tanja; Li, X. Allen; Nestle, Ursula; Kong, Feng-Ming (Spring)

    2017-01-01

    This article reviews key imaging modalities for lung cancer patients treated with radiation therapy (RT) and considers their actual or potential contributions to critical decision-making. An international group of researchers with expertise in imaging in lung cancer patients treated with RT considered the relevant literature on modalities, including computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). These perspectives were coordinated to summarize the current status of imaging in lung cancer and flag developments with future implications. Although there are no useful randomized trials of different imaging modalities in lung cancer, multiple prospective studies indicate that management decisions are frequently impacted by the use of complementary imaging modalities, leading both to more appropriate treatments and better outcomes. This is especially true of 18F-fluoro-deoxyglucose (FDG)-PET/CT which is widely accepted to be the standard imaging modality for staging of lung cancer patients, for selection for potentially curative RT and for treatment planning. PET is also more accurate than CT for predicting survival after RT. PET imaging during RT is also correlated with survival and makes response-adapted therapies possible. PET tracers other than FDG have potential for imaging important biological process in tumors, including hypoxia and proliferation. MRI has superior accuracy in soft tissue imaging and the MRI Linac is a rapidly developing technology with great potential for online monitoring and modification of treatment. The role of imaging in RT-treated lung cancer patients is evolving rapidly and will allow increasing personalization of therapy according to the biology of both the tumor and dose limiting normal tissues. PMID:29218270

  13. Assessment of response to endocrine therapy using FDG PET/CT in metastatic breast cancer: a pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mortazavi-Jehanno, Nina; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Madar, Olivier; Pecking, Alain Paul; Lerebours, Florence; Stanc, Elise Le; Bellet, Dominique; Alberini, Jean-Louis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether outcome in metastatic or recurrent breast cancer patients is related to metabolic response to endocrine therapy determined by 18 F-FDG PET/CT. The study group comprised 22 patients with breast cancer (age 58 ± 11 years, mean ± SD) who were scheduled to receive endocrine therapy. They were systematically assessed by PET/CT at baseline and after a mean of 10 ± 4 weeks for evaluation of response after induction. All patients demonstrated FDG-avid lesions on the baseline PET/CT scan. The metabolic response was assessed according to EORTC criteria and based on the mean difference in SUV max between the two PET/CT scans, and the patients were classified into four groups: complete or partial metabolic response, or stable or progressive metabolic disease (CMR, PMR, SMD and PMD, respectively). All patients were followed in our institution. Metastatic sites were localized in bone (n = 15), lymph nodes (n = 11), chest wall (n = 3), breast (n = 5), lung (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 1) and liver (n = 1). PMR was observed in 11 patients (50%), SMD in 5 (23%) and PMD in 6 (27%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) times were 20, 27 and 6 months in the PMR, SMD and PMD groups, respectively. PFS in the SMD group differed from that in the PMR and SMD groups (p < 0.0001). Metabolic response assessed by FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy is predictive of the patients' PFS. (orig.)

  14. Assessment of response to endocrine therapy using FDG PET/CT in metastatic breast cancer: a pilot study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mortazavi-Jehanno, Nina; Giraudet, Anne-Laure; Champion, Laurence; Edeline, Veronique; Madar, Olivier; Pecking, Alain Paul [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Lerebours, Florence [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service d' Oncologie Medicale, Saint-Cloud (France); Stanc, Elise Le [Hopital Foch, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Suresnes (France); Bellet, Dominique [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Paris Descartes, Pharmacologie Chimique et Genetique and Imagerie, Inserm U1022 CNRS UMR 8151, Faculte des sciences pharmaceutiques et biologiques, Paris (France); Alberini, Jean-Louis [Institut Curie, Hopital Rene Huguenin, Service de Medecine Nucleaire, Saint-Cloud (France); Universite Versailles Saint-Quentin, Faculte de Medecine, Versailles (France)

    2012-03-15

    The purpose of this pilot study was to assess whether outcome in metastatic or recurrent breast cancer patients is related to metabolic response to endocrine therapy determined by {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT. The study group comprised 22 patients with breast cancer (age 58 {+-} 11 years, mean {+-} SD) who were scheduled to receive endocrine therapy. They were systematically assessed by PET/CT at baseline and after a mean of 10 {+-} 4 weeks for evaluation of response after induction. All patients demonstrated FDG-avid lesions on the baseline PET/CT scan. The metabolic response was assessed according to EORTC criteria and based on the mean difference in SUV{sub max} between the two PET/CT scans, and the patients were classified into four groups: complete or partial metabolic response, or stable or progressive metabolic disease (CMR, PMR, SMD and PMD, respectively). All patients were followed in our institution. Metastatic sites were localized in bone (n = 15), lymph nodes (n = 11), chest wall (n = 3), breast (n = 5), lung (n = 3), soft tissue (n = 1) and liver (n = 1). PMR was observed in 11 patients (50%), SMD in 5 (23%) and PMD in 6 (27%). The median progression-free survival (PFS) times were 20, 27 and 6 months in the PMR, SMD and PMD groups, respectively. PFS in the SMD group differed from that in the PMR and SMD groups (p < 0.0001). Metabolic response assessed by FDG PET/CT imaging in patients with metastatic breast cancer treated with endocrine therapy is predictive of the patients' PFS. (orig.)

  15. Dynamic contrast-enhanced micro-CT on mice with mammary carcinoma for the assessment of antiangiogenic therapy response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisa, Fabian [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Graduate School in Advanced Optical Technologies (SAOT), Erlangen (Germany); Brauweiler, Robert; Hupfer, Martin; Nowak, Tristan; Kalender, Willi A. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute of Medical Physics, Erlangen (Germany); Lotz, Laura; Hoffmann, Inge; Dittrich, Ralf; Beckmann, Matthias W. [University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, OB/GYN, University Hospital Erlangen, Erlangen (Germany); Wachter, David [University Hospital Erlangen, Institute of Pathology, Erlangen (Germany); Jost, Gregor; Pietsch, Hubertus [Bayer Pharma AG, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-04-15

    To evaluate the potential of in vivo dynamic contrast-enhanced micro-computed tomography (DCE micro-CT) for the assessment of antiangiogenic drug therapy response of mice with mammary carcinoma. 20 female mice with implanted MCF7 tumours were split into control group and therapy group treated with a known effective antiangiogenic drug. All mice underwent DCE micro-CT for the 3D analysis of functional parameters (relative blood volume [rBV], vascular permeability [K], area under the time-enhancement curve [AUC]) and morphology. All parameters were determined for total, peripheral and central tumour volumes of interest (VOIs). Immunohistochemistry was performed to characterise tumour vascularisation. 3D dose distributions were determined. The mean AUCs were significantly lower in therapy with P values of 0.012, 0.007 and 0.023 for total, peripheral and central tumour VOIs. K and rBV showed significant differences for the peripheral (P{sub per}{sup K} = 0.032, P{sub per}{sup rBV} = 0.029), but not for the total and central tumour VOIs (P{sub total}{sup K} = 0.108, P{sub central}{sup K} = 0.246, P{sub total}{sup rBV} = 0.093, P{sub central}{sup rBV} = 0.136). Mean tumour volume was significantly smaller in therapy (P{sub in} {sub vivo} = 0.001, P{sub ex} {sub vivo} = 0.005). Histology revealed greater vascularisation in the controls and central tumour necrosis. Doses ranged from 150 to 300 mGy. This study indicates the great potential of DCE micro-CT for early in vivo assessment of antiangiogenic drug therapy response. (orig.)

  16. Videofluoroscopic assessment of dysphagia: A questionnaire survey of protocols, roles and responsibilities of radiology and speech and language therapy personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Maxine; Laasch, Hans-Ulrich; Kasthuri, Ram S.; Nicholson, David A.; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2006-01-01

    Videofluoroscopy (VF) is the 'gold standard' assessment for oropharyngeal dysphagia and radiographers are beginning to direct this examination independently, yet little is known about the roles and responsibilities of the core professions of radiology and speech and language therapy and their practice in this examination. Aim: To evaluate VF practice and identify the roles and responsibilities of radiology and speech and language therapy personnel. Materials and methods: A questionnaire was developed and distributed to speech and language therapists (SALT) and radiologists via national special interest networks. Information regarding protocols, test materials, supervision, radiation protection and training was obtained. Results: One hundred and thirteen questionnaires were completed, 83% of respondents had more than 5 years service. Most were carrying out VF on an 'ad hoc' basis with only 32% participating in more than 6 assessments per month. There was no consensus on protocol and 41% chose to thicken barium solutions by adding more barium sulphate powder, potentially predisposing patients to complications. Over 50% of SALTs had received one day post-graduate training in VF, whereas, only one radiologist had specific VF training. Conclusion: Despite its importance in determining the feeding route for patients, VF is carried out infrequently by most clinicians and protocols vary widely. Moreover, intra- and inter-disciplinary training and supervision is minimal. More work is needed to develop standard guidelines, to improve the quality of the examination and its reproducibility

  17. CT in the assessment of early response to neoadjuvant therapy of colon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafaelsen, Søren Rafael; Dam, Claus; Lund-Rasmussen, Vera

    tumour invasion and number and size of enlarged lymph nodes were measured before and after the therapy. Results: Mean tumour length was 7.8 cm (95% CI: 5.3–10.4) at baseline and 4.34 cm (95%, CI: 4.0–4.9) after therapy. Mean extramural tumour invasion was 10.6 mm (95% CI: 9.5–11.8) at baseline and 5.7 mm...

  18. Comparison between CT volume measurement and histopathological assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy in rectal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerri, Fabio, E-mail: fabio.pomerri@unipd.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Department of Medicine, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Pucciarelli, Salvatore, E-mail: puc@unipd.it [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Gennaro, Gisella, E-mail: gisella.gennaro@pd.infn.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Maretto, Isacco, E-mail: isac77@gmail.com [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy); Nitti, Donato, E-mail: donato.nitti@unipd.it [Department of Oncological and Surgical Sciences, University of Padua, via Giustiniani 2, 35128 Padua (Italy); Muzzio, Pier Carlo, E-mail: pcmuzzio@unipd.it [Veneto Institute of Oncology IOV-IRCCS, via Gattamelata 64, 35128 Padua (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to compare volume measurements on computed tomography (CT) images with histopathological assessments of chemoradiotherapy (CRT)-induced tumor regression in locally advanced rectal cancer (RC). Methods: In 25 patients (13 males, 12 females; median age, 63 years; age range, 44–79 years) with locally advanced RC treated with preoperative CRT and surgery, two radiologists measured tumor volume on CT images before and after CRT. CT-based tumor volumetry and the modified response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (mRECISTs) were compared with T and N downstaging after CRT, and with the tumor regression grade (TRG). Results: Tumor volumes were significantly smaller on CT images after CRT. The tumors regressed in 52% (13/25), 36% (9/25) and 40% (10/25) of patients, based on T downstaging, TRG and mRECIST findings, respectively. In terms of T downstaging, the pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes of responders and non-responders to the treatment differed statistically, while their tumor volume reduction rates and volume reductions according to the 65% mRECIST threshold did not. In terms of N downstaging and TRG, the differences between the responders’ and the non-responders’ pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes, tumor volume reduction rates, and mRECIST thresholds were never statistically significant. Conclusion: Measuring tumor size on CT images is of limited value in predicting the histopathological response to preoperative CRT in RC patients, so it may be unwise to select surgical treatment strategies based on CT volumetry.

  19. Assessment in Cognitive Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Gary P.; Clark, David A.

    2015-01-01

    This volume brings together leading experts to explore the state of the art of cognitive clinical assessment and identify cutting-edge approaches of interest to clinicians and researchers. The book highlights fundamental problems concerning the validity of assessments that are widely used in cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT). Key directions for further research and development are identified. Updated cognitive assessment methods are described in detail, with particular attention to transdiag...

  20. TH-E-BRF-10: Interim Esophageal Cancer Response Assessment Via 18FDG-PET Scanning During Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higgins, K [Duke University Medical Physics Graduate Program, Durham, NC (United States); Wu, Q; Perez, B; Czito, B; Palta, M; Willett, C; Das, S [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Local failure occurs in a large proportion of esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. The treatment strategy for non-responders could potentially be modified if they are identified during therapy. This work investigates the utility of an interim 18FDG-PET scan acquired during the course of therapy as a predictor of pathological response post-therapy. Methods: Fifteen patients underwent 18FDG-PET scanning prior to radiation therapy (RT) and once during RT, after delivery of ∼32 Gy. The physician-contoured GTV on the planning CT scan was used to automatically segment a PET-based GTV on the pre-RT PET (GTV-pre-PET) as the volume with >40% of the maximum GTV PET SUV value. The pre- and intra-RT CTs were deformably registered to each other to transfer the GTV-pre-PET to the intra-RT PET (GTV-intra-PET). The fractional decrease in the maximum SUV, mean SUV and the SUV to the highest intensity 10% – 90% volumes from GTV-pre-PET to GTV-intra-PET were compared to pathological response assessed at the time of post-RT surgery. Results: Based on post-treatment pathology of 15 patients, 7 were classified as achieving favorable response (treatment effect grade ≤ 1) and 8 as unfavorable response (treatment effect grade > 1). Neither fractional decrease in maximum SUV nor mean SUV were significant between the favorable and unfavorable groups. However, the fractional decrease in SUV20% (SUV to the highest 20% volume) was significant (p = 0.02), with an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.84. An optimal cutoff value of 0.46 for this metric was able to distinguish between the two groups with 71% sensitivity (favorable) and 88% specificity (unfavorable). Conclusion: The fractional decrease in SUV to the volume with highest 20% intensity from pre- to intra-RT 18FDG-PET imaging may be used to distinguish between favorable and unfavorable responders with high sensitivity and specificity.

  1. TH-E-BRF-10: Interim Esophageal Cancer Response Assessment Via 18FDG-PET Scanning During Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Higgins, K; Wu, Q; Perez, B; Czito, B; Palta, M; Willett, C; Das, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Local failure occurs in a large proportion of esophageal cancer patients treated with chemoradiation. The treatment strategy for non-responders could potentially be modified if they are identified during therapy. This work investigates the utility of an interim 18FDG-PET scan acquired during the course of therapy as a predictor of pathological response post-therapy. Methods: Fifteen patients underwent 18FDG-PET scanning prior to radiation therapy (RT) and once during RT, after delivery of ∼32 Gy. The physician-contoured GTV on the planning CT scan was used to automatically segment a PET-based GTV on the pre-RT PET (GTV-pre-PET) as the volume with >40% of the maximum GTV PET SUV value. The pre- and intra-RT CTs were deformably registered to each other to transfer the GTV-pre-PET to the intra-RT PET (GTV-intra-PET). The fractional decrease in the maximum SUV, mean SUV and the SUV to the highest intensity 10% – 90% volumes from GTV-pre-PET to GTV-intra-PET were compared to pathological response assessed at the time of post-RT surgery. Results: Based on post-treatment pathology of 15 patients, 7 were classified as achieving favorable response (treatment effect grade ≤ 1) and 8 as unfavorable response (treatment effect grade > 1). Neither fractional decrease in maximum SUV nor mean SUV were significant between the favorable and unfavorable groups. However, the fractional decrease in SUV20% (SUV to the highest 20% volume) was significant (p = 0.02), with an area under the Receiver Operating Characteristics (ROC) curve of 0.84. An optimal cutoff value of 0.46 for this metric was able to distinguish between the two groups with 71% sensitivity (favorable) and 88% specificity (unfavorable). Conclusion: The fractional decrease in SUV to the volume with highest 20% intensity from pre- to intra-RT 18FDG-PET imaging may be used to distinguish between favorable and unfavorable responders with high sensitivity and specificity

  2. Music Therapy and Music Therapy Research. Response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Inge Nygaard

    2002-01-01

    This response to Keynote by Prof. Even Ruud (N)"Music Education and Music Therapy seeks to define these two areas with specific focus on tools and methods for analysis of music as these methods are developed in music therapy. This includes that the music therapist, the music and the client create...

  3. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography standardized uptake values in clinical practice and assessing response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinahan, Paul E; Fletcher, James W

    2010-12-01

    The use of standardized uptake values (SUVs) is now common place in clinical 2-deoxy-2-[(18)F] fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) position emission tomography-computed tomography oncology imaging and has a specific role in assessing patient response to cancer therapy. Ideally, the use of SUVs removes variability introduced by differences in patient size and the amount of injected FDG. However, in practice there are several sources of bias and variance that are introduced in the measurement of FDG uptake in tumors and also in the conversion of the image count data to SUVs. In this article the overall imaging process is reviewed and estimates of the magnitude of errors, where known, are given. Recommendations are provided for best practices in improving SUV accuracy. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The Role of Diffusion-Weighted Imaging (DWI in Locoregional Therapy Outcome Prediction and Response Assessment for Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC: The New Era of Functional Imaging Biomarkers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes M. Ludwig

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Reliable response criteria are critical for the evaluation of therapeutic response in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Current response assessment is mainly based on: (1 changes in size, which is at times unreliable and lag behind the result of therapy; and (2 contrast enhancement, which can be difficult to quantify in the presence of benign post-procedural changes and in tumors presenting with a heterogeneous pattern of enhancement. Given these challenges, functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI techniques, such as diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI have been recently investigated, aiding specificity to locoregional therapy response assessment and outcome prediction. Briefly, DWI quantifies diffusion of water occurring naturally at a cellular level (Brownian movement, which is restricted in multiple neoplasms because of high cellularity. Disruption of cellular integrity secondary to therapy results in increased water diffusion across the injured membranes. This review will provide an overview of the current literature on DWI therapy response assessment and outcome prediction in HCC following treatment with locoregional therapies.

  5. SU-F-R-56: Early Assessment of Treatment Response During Radiation Therapy Delivery for Esophageal Cancer Using Quantitative CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, D [Henan Province Tumor Hospital, Zhengzhou, Henan (China); Chen, X; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wu, H [Medical college of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Wang, J [Henan province Tumor hospital, Zhengzhou, Henan (China)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of assessing treatment response using CTs during delivery of radiation therapy (RT) for esophageal cancer. Methods: Daily CTs acquired using a CT-on-Rails during the routine CT-guided RT for 20 patients with stage II to IV esophageal cancers were analyzed. All patients were treated with combined chemotherapy and IMRT of 45–50 Gy in 25 fractions, and were followed up for two years. Contours of GTV, spinal cord, and non-specified tissue (NST) irradiated with low dose were generated on each daily CT. A series of CT-texture metrics including Hounsfield Unit (HU) histogram, mean HU, standard derivation (STD), entropy, and energy were obtained in these contours on each daily CT. The changes of these metrics and GTV volume during RT delivery were calculated and correlated with treatment outcome. Results: Changes in CT texture (e.g., HU histogram) in GTV and spinal cord (but not in NST) were observed during RT delivery and were consistently increased with radiation dose. For the 20 cases studied, the mean HU in GTV was reduced on average by 4.0HU from the first to the last fractions, while 8 patients (responders) had larger reductions in GTV mean HU (average 7.8 HU) with an average GTV reduction of 51% and had increased consistently in GTV STD and entropy with radiation dose. The rest of 12 patients (non-responders) had lower reductions in GTV mean HU (average 1.5HU) and almost no change in STD and entropy. For the 8 responders, 2 experienced complete response, 7 (88%) survived and 1 died. In contrast, for the 12 non-responders, 4 (33%) survived and 8 died. Conclusion: Radiation can induce changes in CT texture in tumor (e.g., mean HU) during the delivery of RT for esophageal cancer. If validated with more data, such changes may be used for early prediction of RT response for esophageal cancer.

  6. Longitudinal assessment of thrombin generation potential in response to alteration of antiplatelet therapy after TIA or ischaemic stroke.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Tobin, W O

    2013-02-01

    The impact of changing antiplatelet therapy on thrombin generation potential in patients with ischaemic cerebrovascular disease (CVD) is unclear. We assessed patients within 4 weeks of TIA or ischaemic stroke (baseline), and then 14 days (14d) and >90 days (90d) after altering antiplatelet therapy. Thrombin generation was assessed in platelet poor plasma. Ninety-one patients were recruited. Twenty-four were initially assessed on no antiplatelet therapy, and then after 14d (N = 23) and 90d (N = 8) on aspirin monotherapy; 52 were assessed on aspirin monotherapy, and after 14 and 90 days on aspirin and dipyridamole combination therapy; 21 patients were assessed on aspirin and after 14 days (N = 21) and 90 days (N = 19) on clopidogrel. Peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at 14 and 90 days (p ≤ 0.04) in the overall cohort. We assessed the impact of individual antiplatelet regimens on thrombin generation parameters to investigate the cause of this effect. Lag time and time-to-peak thrombin generation were unchanged at 14 days, but reduced 90 days after commencing aspirin (p ≤ 0.009). Lag time, peak thrombin generation and endogenous thrombin potential were reduced at both 14 and 90 days after adding dipyridamole to aspirin (p ≤ 0.01). Lag time was reduced 14 days after changing from aspirin to clopidogrel (p = 0.045), but this effect was not maintained at 90 days (p = 0.2). This pilot study did not show any consistent effects of commencing aspirin, or of changing from aspirin to clopidogrel on thrombin generation potential during follow-up. The addition of dipyridamole to aspirin led to a persistent reduction in peak and total thrombin generation ex vivo, and illustrates the diverse, potentially beneficial, newly recognised \\'anti-coagulant\\' effects of dipyridamole in ischaemic CVD.

  7. High-dose-rate stereotactic body radiation therapy for postradiation therapy locally recurrent prostatic carcinoma: Preliminary prostate-specific antigen response, disease-free survival, and toxicity assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Donald B; Wurzer, James; Shirazi, Reza; Bridge, Stephen S; Law, Jonathan; Mardirossian, George

    2015-01-01

    Patients with locally recurrent adenocarcinoma of the prostate following radiation therapy (RT) present a challenging problem. We prospectively evaluated the use of "high-dose-rate-like" prostate stereotactic body RT (SBRT) salvage for this circumstance, evaluating prostate-specific antigen response, disease-free survival, and toxicity. Between February 2009 and March 2014, 29 patients with biopsy-proven recurrent locally prostate cancer >2 years post-RT were treated. Median prior RT dose was 73.8 Gy and median interval to SBRT salvage was 88 months. Median recurrence Gleason score was 7 (79% was ≥7). Pre-existing RT toxicity >grade 1 was a reason for exclusion. Magnetic resonance imaging-defined prostate volume including any suspected extraprostatic extension, comprising the planning target volume. A total of 34 Gy/5 fractions was given, delivering a heterogeneous, high-dose-rate-like dose-escalation pattern. Toxicities were assessed using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0, criteria. Twenty-nine treated patients had a median 24-month follow-up (range, 3-60 months). A median pre-SBRT salvage baseline prostate-specific antigen level of 3.1 ng/mL decreased to 0.65 ng/mL and 0.16 ng/mL at 1 and 2 years, respectively. Actuarial 2-year biochemical disease-free survival measured 82%, with no local failures. Toxicity >grade 1 was limited to the genitourinary domain, with 18% grade 2 or higher and 7% grade 3 or higher. No gastrointestinal toxicity >grade 1 occurred. Two-year disease-free survival is encouraging, and the prostate-specific antigen response kinetic appears comparable with that seen in de novo patients treated with SBRT, albeit still a preliminary finding. Grade ≥2 genitourinary toxicity was occasionally seen with no obvious predictive factor. Noting that our only brachytherapy case was 1 of the 2 cases with ≥grade 3 genitourinary toxicity, caution is recommended treating these patients. SBRT salvage of post-RT local recurrence

  8. Response assessment of bevacizumab therapy in GBM with integrated 11C-MET-PET/MRI: a feasibility study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deuschl, Cornelius; Moenninghoff, Christoph; Goericke, Sophia; Kirchner, Julian; Köppen, Susanne; Binse, Ina; Poeppel, Thorsten D; Quick, Harald H; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale; Herrmann, Ken; Hense, Joerg; Schlamann, Marc

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of integrated 11C-MET PET/MR for response assessment of relapsed glioblastoma (GBM) receiving bevacizumab treatment. Eleven consecutive patients with relapsed GBM were enrolled for an integrated 11C-MET PET/MRI at baseline and at follow-up. Treatment response for MRI was evaluated according to Response Assessment in Neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria and integrated 11C-MET PET was assessed by the T/N ratio. MRI showed no patient with complete response (CR), six of 11 patients with PR, four of 11 patients with SD, and one of 11 patients with progressive disease (PD). PET revealed metabolic response in five of the six patients with partial response (PR) and in two of the four patients with stable disease (SD), whereas metabolic non-response was detected in one of the six patients with PR, in two of the four patients with SD, and in the one patient with PD. Morphological imaging was predictive for PFS and OS when response was defined as CR, PR, SD, and non-response as PD. Metabolic imaging was predictive when using T/N ratio reduction of >25 as discriminator. Based on the morphologic and metabolic findings of this study a proposal for applying integrated PET/MRI for treatment response in relapsed GBM was developed, which was significantly predictive for PFS and OS (P = 0.010 respectively 0,029, log). This study demonstrates the potential of integrated 11C-MET-PET/MRI for response assessment of GBM and the utility of combined assessment of morphologic and metabolic information with the proposal for assessing relapsed GBM.

  9. Response assessment of bevacizumab therapy in GBM with integrated 11C-MET-PET/MRI: a feasibility study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deuschl, Cornelius [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Duisburg (Germany); Moenninghoff, Christoph; Goericke, Sophia; Forsting, Michael; Umutlu, Lale [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); Kirchner, Julian [University Hospital Duesseldorf, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Duesseldorf (Germany); Koeppen, Susanne [University Hospital Essen, Department of Neurology, Essen (Germany); Binse, Ina; Poeppel, Thorsten D.; Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); Quick, Harald H. [University of Duisburg-Essen, Erwin L. Hahn Institute for Magnetic Resonance Imaging, Duisburg (Germany); University Hospital Essen, High Field and Hybrid MR Imaging, Essen (Germany); Hense, Joerg [University Hospital Essen, Department of Medical Oncology, West German Cancer Center, Essen (Germany); Schlamann, Marc [University Hospital Essen, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology and Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany); University Hospital Giessen, Department of Neuroradiology, Essen (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the potential of integrated 11C-MET PET/MR for response assessment of relapsed glioblastoma (GBM) receiving bevacizumab treatment. Eleven consecutive patients with relapsed GBM were enrolled for an integrated 11C-MET PET/MRI at baseline and at follow-up. Treatment response for MRI was evaluated according to Response Assessment in Neuro-oncology (RANO) criteria and integrated 11C-MET PET was assessed by the T/N ratio. MRI showed no patient with complete response (CR), six of 11 patients with PR, four of 11 patients with SD, and one of 11 patients with progressive disease (PD). PET revealed metabolic response in five of the six patients with partial response (PR) and in two of the four patients with stable disease (SD), whereas metabolic non-response was detected in one of the six patients with PR, in two of the four patients with SD, and in the one patient with PD. Morphological imaging was predictive for PFS and OS when response was defined as CR, PR, SD, and non-response as PD. Metabolic imaging was predictive when using T/N ratio reduction of >25 as discriminator. Based on the morphologic and metabolic findings of this study a proposal for applying integrated PET/MRI for treatment response in relapsed GBM was developed, which was significantly predictive for PFS and OS (P = 0.010 respectively 0,029, log). This study demonstrates the potential of integrated 11C-MET-PET/MRI for response assessment of GBM and the utility of combined assessment of morphologic and metabolic information with the proposal for assessing relapsed GBM. (orig.)

  10. Assessment of Early Toxicity and Response in Patients Treated With Proton and Carbon Ion Therapy at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center Using the Raster Scanning Technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieken, Stefan; Habermehl, Daniel; Nikoghosyan, Anna; Jensen, Alexandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Haberer, Thomas [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Jaekel, Oliver [Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center, Heidelberg (Germany); Department of Medical Physics, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Heidelberg (Germany); Muenter, Marc W.; Welzel, Thomas; Debus, Juergen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany); Combs, Stephanie E., E-mail: Stephanie.Combs@med.uni-hedielberg.de [Department of Radiation Oncology, University Hospital of Heidelberg, Heidelberg (Germany)

    2011-12-01

    Puropose: To asses early toxicity and response in 118 patients treated with scanned ion beams to validate the safety of intensity-controlled raster scanning at the Heidelberg Ion Therapy Center. Patients and Methods: Between November 2009 and June 2010, we treated 118 patients with proton and carbon ion radiotherapy (RT) using active beam delivery. The main indications included skull base chordomas and chondrosarcomas, salivary gland tumors, and gliomas. We evaluated early toxicity within 6 weeks after RT and the initial clinical and radiologic response for quality assurance in our new facility. Results: In all 118 patients, few side effects were observed, in particular, no high numbers of severe acute toxicity were found. In general, the patients treated with particle therapy alone showed only a few single side effects, mainly Radiation Therapy Oncology Group/Common Terminology Criteria grade 1. The most frequent side effects and cumulative incidence of single side effects were observed in the head-and-neck patients treated with particle therapy as a boost and photon intensity-modulated RT. The toxicities included common radiation-attributed reactions known from photon RT, including mucositis, dysphagia, and skin erythema. The most predominant imaging responses were observed in patients with high-grade gliomas and those with salivary gland tumors. For skull base tumors, imaging showed a stable tumor outline in most patients. Thirteen patients showed improvement of pre-existing clinical symptoms. Conclusions: Side effects related to particle treatment were rare, and the overall tolerability of the treatment was shown. The initial response was promising. The data have confirmed the safe delivery of carbon ions and protons at the newly opened Heidelberg facility.

  11. The use of Deauville criteria in follow-up assessment of response to therapy in extra-nodal Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manar Hussein Abdel-Sattar

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Our aim was evaluate the role the PET/CT in the assessment of response to therapy in patients with Non-Hodgkin extra-nodal lymphoma: in particular, a five-point scale (Deauville criteria, which can be employed for early- and late-therapeutic response assessment. Methods: Sixty patients with pathologically confirmed Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL were enrolled in this prospective study. All patients underwent the following PET/CT examinations: initial PET/CT for staging, interim PET/CT and end of treatment PET/CT. Response assessment was done using new Cheson’s guidelines and five-point scale (Deauville criteria. Results: All patients were evaluated for response to therapy in the early interim, followed by late interim, as well as end treatment assessment for the overall response. We found good concordance of response assessment according to the Deauville criteria classification with International Harmonization Project (IHP classification. After early interim 48/60 patients had concordant designations (91.7%, 83.3%, 70%, and 33.3% and 12 patients had discordant designations. After late interim, 56/60 patients had concordant designations (100%, 100%, 80%, and 50% and four patients had discordant designations. After end of treatment, 54/60 patients had concordant designations (100%, 100% and 71.4% and six patients has discordant designations. Conclusion: Response assessment according to the Deauville criteria classification showed good concordance with IHP classification. According to our findings, we recommend the use of Deauville criteria in reporting of PET/CT for staging and assessment of response to treatment. Keywords: PET/CT, Extranodal non-hodgkin lymphoma, Deauville criteria, IHP (International Harmonizing Project

  12. Early Assessment of Treatment Responses During Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer Using Quantitative Analysis of Daily Computed Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, Jijo; Yang, Cungeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wu, Hui [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); The Affiliated Cancer Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Tai, An [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Dalah, Entesar [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Department of Medical Diagnostic Imaging, College of Health Science, University of Sharjah (United Arab Emirates); Zheng, Cheng [Biostatistics, Joseph. J. Zilber School of Public Health, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Johnstone, Candice [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Kong, Feng-Ming [Department of Radiation Oncology, Indiana University, Indianapolis, Indiana (United States); Gore, Elizabeth [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Li, X. Allen, E-mail: ali@mcw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate early tumor and normal tissue responses during the course of radiation therapy (RT) for lung cancer using quantitative analysis of daily computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods and Materials: Daily diagnostic-quality CT scans acquired using CT-on-rails during CT-guided RT for 20 lung cancer patients were quantitatively analyzed. On each daily CT set, the contours of the gross tumor volume (GTV) and lungs were generated and the radiation dose delivered was reconstructed. The changes in CT image intensity (Hounsfield unit [HU]) features in the GTV and the multiple normal lung tissue shells around the GTV were extracted from the daily CT scans. The associations between the changes in the mean HUs, GTV, accumulated dose during RT delivery, and patient survival rate were analyzed. Results: During the RT course, radiation can induce substantial changes in the HU histogram features on the daily CT scans, with reductions in the GTV mean HUs (dH) observed in the range of 11 to 48 HU (median 30). The dH is statistically related to the accumulated GTV dose (R{sup 2} > 0.99) and correlates weakly with the change in GTV (R{sup 2} = 0.3481). Statistically significant increases in patient survival rates (P=.038) were observed for patients with a higher dH in the GTV. In the normal lung, the 4 regions proximal to the GTV showed statistically significant (P<.001) HU reductions from the first to last fraction. Conclusion: Quantitative analysis of the daily CT scans indicated that the mean HUs in lung tumor and surrounding normal tissue were reduced during RT delivery. This reduction was observed in the early phase of the treatment, is patient specific, and correlated with the delivered dose. A larger HU reduction in the GTV correlated significantly with greater patient survival. The changes in daily CT features, such as the mean HU, can be used for early assessment of the radiation response during RT delivery for lung cancer.

  13. Ultrasound Assessment of Carotid Plaque Echogenicity Response to Statin Therapy: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahimi, Pranvera; Jashari, Fisnik; Bajraktari, Gani; Wester, Per; Henein, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate in a systematic review and meta-analysis model the effect of statin therapy on carotid plaque echogenicity assessed by ultrasound. Methods: We have systematically searched electronic databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Center Register) up to April, 2015, for studies evaluating the effect of statins on plaque echogenicity. Two researchers independently determined the eligibility of studies evaluating the effect of statin therapy on carotid plaque echogenicity that used ultrasound and grey scale median (GSM) or integrated back scatter (IBS). Results: Nine out of 580 identified studies including 566 patients’ carotid artery data were meta-analyzed for a mean follow up of 7.2 months. A consistent increase in the echogenicity of carotid artery plaques, after statin therapy, was reported. Pooled weighted mean difference % (WMD) on plaque echogenicity after statin therapy was 29% (95% CI 22%–36%), p < 0.001, I2 = 92.1%. In a meta-regression analysis using % mean changes of LDL, HDL and hsCRP as moderators, it was shown that the effects of statins on plaque echogenicity were related to changes in hsCRP, but not to LDL and HDL changes from the baseline. The effect of statins on the plaque was progressive; it showed significance after the first month of treatment, and the echogenicity continued to increase in the following six and 12 months. Conclusions: Statin therapy is associated with a favorable increase of carotid plaque echogenicity. This effect seems to be dependent on the period of treatment and hsCRP change from the baseline, independent of changes in LDL and HDL. PMID:25984600

  14. Posttreatment assessment of response using FDG-PET/CT for patients treated with definitive radiation therapy for head and neck cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Regiane S.; Heron, Dwight E.; Degirmenci, Berna; Filho, Pedro A.A.; Branstetter, Barton F.; Seethala, Raja R.; Ferris, Robert L.; Avril, Norbert

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: The goal of this study was to evaluate coregistered [ 18 F] fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) for the detection of persistent disease after definitive radiation therapy in head and neck cancer. Methods and Materials: Posttreatment FDG-PET/CT was performed in 28 patients on average 8 weeks (range, 4 to 15.7 weeks) after completing definitive radiation therapy. FDG-PET/CT was visually analyzed for the entire patient group and at two time points (4-8 and >8 weeks) after treatment. The contrast-enhanced CT portion of PET/CT was separately analyzed blinded to the results of coregistered FDG-PET/CT and classified as negative or positive for residual locoregional disease. Pathologic findings and clinical follow-up served as the reference standard. Results: Follow-up data were available for all 28 patients (median, 17.6 months). Regarding the detection of residual disease, the overall sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET/CT was 76.9% and 93.3%, respectively, compared with 92.3% and 46.7% for contrast-enhanced CT. The accuracy of FDG-PET/CT was 85.7%, compared with 67.9% for CT alone. All false-negative (n = 3) and false-positive (n = 1) FDG-PET/CT results occurred between 4 and 8 weeks after treatment. At 8 weeks or later after treatment, the specificity of CT was 28%, compared with 100% for FDG-PET/CT. Conclusions: The metabolic-anatomic information from coregistered FDG-PET/CT provided the most accurate assessment for treatment response when performed later than 8 weeks after the conclusion of radiation therapy. FDG-PET/CT excelled by a higher specificity and overall diagnostic performance than CT imaging alone. These results support a potential clinical role of FDG-PET/CT in the early assessment of therapy response after definitive radiation therapy

  15. The Role of 18F-FDG PET/CT in Assessing Therapy Response in Cervix Cancer after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Jiyoun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Lee, Jaehoon; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun

    2014-01-01

    To determine whether persisting cervical fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer can reflect residual malignancy. F-FDG PET/CT was performed before and after CCRT in 136 patients with cervical cancer. The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) were recorded from PET/CT scans performed pre- and post-treatment. SUVs were correlated with treatment response after CCRT. Final treatment response was determined by MRI and further follow-up PET/CT. One hundred four of 136 patients underwent pelvic MRI, and 32 of 136 patients underwent further follow-up PET/CT. Patients were classified into two categories: patients with residual tumor or patients without residual tumor (complete responder). Preand post-treatment serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) levels were also recorded for comparison. The optimal cutoff value of SUVmax for predicting residual cervical tumor was determined using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Of 136 patients, 124 showed complete response on further follow-up studies and 12 were confirmed to have residual tumor. The post-treatment SUVmax and pre-/posttreatment SUVmean of complete responders were significantly lower than those of patients with residual tumor: 2.5±0.8 and 7.2±4.2/1.9±0.7 for complete responders and 5.7±2.6 and 12.8±6.9/3.7±0.7 for patients with residual tumor (p 18 F-FDG PET/CT after CCRT for cervical cancer may be caused by residual tumor or post-therapy inflammation. A higher cutoff SUVmax than conventional criteria for cervical cancer in post-CCRT PET/CT might help to detect residual tumor

  16. [Application of decision curve on evaluation of MRI predictive model for early assessing pathological complete response to neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Y J; Li, X T; Fan, Z Q; Li, Y L; Cao, K; Sun, Y S; Ouyang, T

    2018-01-23

    Objective: To construct a dynamic enhanced MR based predictive model for early assessing pathological complete response (pCR) to neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer, and to evaluate the clinical benefit of the model by using decision curve. Methods: From December 2005 to December 2007, 170 patients with breast cancer treated with neoadjuvant therapy were identified and their MR images before neoadjuvant therapy and at the end of the first cycle of neoadjuvant therapy were collected. Logistic regression model was used to detect independent factors for predicting pCR and construct the predictive model accordingly, then receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and decision curve were used to evaluate the predictive model. Results: ΔArea(max) and Δslope(max) were independent predictive factors for pCR, OR =0.942 (95% CI : 0.918-0.967) and 0.961 (95% CI : 0.940-0.987), respectively. The area under ROC curve (AUC) for the constructed model was 0.886 (95% CI : 0.820-0.951). Decision curve showed that in the range of the threshold probability above 0.4, the predictive model presented increased net benefit as the threshold probability increased. Conclusions: The constructed predictive model for pCR is of potential clinical value, with an AUC>0.85. Meanwhile, decision curve analysis indicates the constructed predictive model has net benefit from 3 to 8 percent in the likely range of probability threshold from 80% to 90%.

  17. The Role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT in Assessing Therapy Response in Cervix Cancer after Concurrent Chemoradiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jiyoun; Kim, Hyun Jeong; Jeong, Yong Hyu; Lee, Jaehoon; Cho, Arthur; Yun, Mijin; Lee, Jong Doo; Kim, Yong Bae; Kim, Young Tae; Kang, Won Jun [Yonsei Univ. College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-06-15

    To determine whether persisting cervical fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) uptake after concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) for cervical cancer can reflect residual malignancy. F-FDG PET/CT was performed before and after CCRT in 136 patients with cervical cancer. The maximum and mean standardized uptake values (SUVmax and SUVmean) were recorded from PET/CT scans performed pre- and post-treatment. SUVs were correlated with treatment response after CCRT. Final treatment response was determined by MRI and further follow-up PET/CT. One hundred four of 136 patients underwent pelvic MRI, and 32 of 136 patients underwent further follow-up PET/CT. Patients were classified into two categories: patients with residual tumor or patients without residual tumor (complete responder). Preand post-treatment serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCC) levels were also recorded for comparison. The optimal cutoff value of SUVmax for predicting residual cervical tumor was determined using receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Of 136 patients, 124 showed complete response on further follow-up studies and 12 were confirmed to have residual tumor. The post-treatment SUVmax and pre-/posttreatment SUVmean of complete responders were significantly lower than those of patients with residual tumor: 2.5±0.8 and 7.2±4.2/1.9±0.7 for complete responders and 5.7±2.6 and 12.8±6.9/3.7±0.7 for patients with residual tumor (p < 0.05). The pre-treatment SUVmax and pre-/post-treatment serum SCC levels of the complete responders tended to be lower than those of patients with residual tumor, but this did not have statistical significance. Using ROC analysis, an optimal cutoff SUVmax of 4.0 on the post-treatment PET/CT yielded a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of 92 %, 94 %, 61 %, and 99 %, respectively (p <0.001). Persistent cervical FDG uptake in {sup 18}F-FDG PET/CT after CCRT for cervical cancer may be caused by residual tumor or post-therapy

  18. Usefulness of 99mTc(V)-dimercaptosuccinic acid scintigraphy in the assessment of response to external radiation therapy in soft tissue sarcoma in Giant Schnauzer dog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, P. R.; Mathe, D.; Balogh, L.; Andocs, G.; Janoki, G. A.

    2005-01-01

    A nine-year-old male black Giant Schnauzer dog was referred for the scintigraphic evaluation with a history of malignant fibrosarcoma with a rapidly growing non painful mass on the left shoulder region quite near to the site of an operation performed four months ago. We carried out oncological scintigraphy using pentavalent 99mT echnetium labelled dimercaptosuccinic acid [ 99mT c(V)-DMSA], a tumour localising radiopharmaceutical agent. The study was performed to assess the margins, vascularity of the tumour and response to the cancer therapy. Uniform intense radiopharmaceutical uptake was observed in the lesion indicating its margins, vascularity and malignant nature. The dog was subjected to external radiation therapy to control the growth of the cancer and to bring the tumour mass to an operable size. The dog was followed up with 99mT c(V)-DMSA scintigraphy pre-irradiation and post-irradiation. Immediately after the post-irradiation scintigraphy, the dog was operated on. During the surgery, resection of the tumour margins was performed carefully using a hand held gamma probe to assure that no tumour tissue was left inside. In conclusion, the authors would like to state that 99mT c(V)-DMSA oncoscintigraphy is valuable in the assessment and evaluation of therapy in canine soft tissue cancer. (author)

  19. Music therapy assessment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wigram, Tony

    2007-01-01

    Når klienter henvises til musikterapi, gennemgår de en assessment-procedure (en klinisk vurdering), som kræver terapeutens ekspertise inden for forskellige områder - med henblik på at stille en en diagnose og identificere klientens behov og potentialer, samt at opstille realistiske forventninger ...

  20. ASSESSMENT OF THE RESPONSE OF PATIENTS WITH CROHN'S DISEASE TO BIOLOGICAL THERAPY USING NEW NON-INVASIVE MARKERS: lactoferrin and calprotectin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Islaine Martins NOGUEIRA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Context The use of fecal markers to monitor Crohn's disease is crucial for assessing the response to treatment. Objective To assess the inflammatory activity of Crohn's disease by comparing fecal markers (calprotectin and lactoferrin, colonoscopy combined with biopsy, and the Crohn's disease activity index (CDAI, as well as serum markers, before treatment with infliximab, after the end of induction, and after the end of maintenance. Methods Seventeen patients were included who had been previously diagnosed with Crohn's disease and were using conventional treatment but required the introduction of biological therapy with infliximab. Each patient underwent a colonoscopy with biopsy, serum, and fecal (calprotectin and lactoferrin tests to assess inflammatory activity, and CDAI assessments before treatment with infliximab, after induction (week 8, and after maintenance (week 32. Results The calprotectin levels exhibited significant reductions (P = 0.04 between the assessment before treatment with infliximab and the end of induction, which did not occur after the end of the maintenance phase. Lactoferrin remained positive throughout the three phases of the study. Regarding the histological assessment, a significant difference was found only between the assessment before treatment and after the end of maintenance (P = 0.036, and 60% of the patients exhibited histological improvements after the completion of the follow-up period. The CDAI exhibited a significant difference between the assessment before treatment with infliximab and after induction, as well as before treatment and after maintenance (P<0.01. Conclusion Calprotectin and lactoferrin are not useful for monitoring inflammatory activity in Crohn's disease patients who are subjected to biological therapy.

  1. Revisiting the relationship between tumour volume and diameter in advanced NSCLC patients: An exercise to maximize the utility of each measure to assess response to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishino, M.; Jackman, D.M.; DiPiro, P.J.; Hatabu, H.; Jänne, P.A.; Johnson, B.E.

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To revisit the presumed relationship between tumour diameter and volume in advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, and determine whether the measured volume using volume-analysis software and its proportional changes during therapy matches with the calculated volume obtained from the presumed relationship and results in concordant response assessment. Materials and methods: Twenty-three patients with stage IIIB/IV NSCLC with a total of 53 measurable lung lesions, treated in a phase II trial of erlotinib, were studied with institutional review board approval. Tumour volume and diameter were measured at baseline and at the first follow-up computed tomography (CT) examination using volume-analysis software. Using the measured diameter (2r) and the equation, calculated volume was obtained as (4/3)πr 3 at baseline and at the follow-up. Percent volume change was obtained by comparing to baseline for measured and calculated volumes, and response assessment was assigned. Results: The measured volume was significantly smaller than the calculated volume at baseline (median 11,488.9 mm 3 versus 17,148.6 mm 3 ; p < 0.0001), with a concordance correlation coefficient (CCC) of 0.7022. At follow-up, the measured volume was once again significantly smaller than the calculated volume (median 6573.5 mm 3 versus 9198.1 mm 3 ; p = 0.0022), with a CCC of 0.7408. Response assessment by calculated versus measured volume changes had only moderate agreement (weighted κ = 0.545), with discordant assessment results in 20% (8/40) of lesions. Conclusion: Calculated volume based on the presumed relationship significantly differed from the measured volume in advanced NSCLC patients, with only moderate concordance in response assessment, indicating the limitations of presumed relationship. - Highlights: • Response assessment by measured vs calculated values has only moderate agreement. • It is important to obtain the actual measured values for tumor response

  2. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

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    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D [M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted.

  3. SU-E-J-212: MR Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Assessment of Tumor and Normal Brain Tissue Responses of Juvenile Pilocytic Astrocytoma Treated by Proton Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hou, P; Park, P; Li, H; Zhu, X; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can measure molecular mobility at the cellular level, quantified by the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC). DTI may also reveal axonal fiber directional information in the white matter, quantified by the fractional anisotropy (FA). Juvenile pilocytic astrocytoma (JPA) is a rare brain tumor that occurs in children and young adults. Proton therapy (PT) is increasingly used in the treatment of pediatric brain tumors including JPA. However, the response of both tumors and normal tissues to PT is currently under investigation. We report tumor and normal brain tissue responses for a pediatric case of JPA treated with PT assessed using DTI. Methods: A ten year old male with JPA of the left thalamus received passive scattered PT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (RBE) in 28 fractions. Post PT, the patient has been followed up in seven years. At each follow up, MRI imaging including DTI was performed to assess response. MR images were registered to the treatment planning CT and the GTV mapped onto each MRI. The GTV contour was then mirrored to the right side of brain through the patient’s middle line to represent normal brain tissue. ADC and FA were measured within the ROIs. Results: Proton therapy can completely spare contra lateral brain while the target volume received full prescribed dose. From a series of MRI ADC images before and after PT at different follow ups, the enhancement corresponding to GTV had nearly disappeared more than 2 years after PT. Both ADC and FA demonstrate that contralateral normal brain tissue were not affect by PT and the tumor volume reverted to normal ADC and FA values. Conclusion: DTI allowed quantitative evaluation of tumor and normal brain tissue responses to PT. Further study in a larger cohort is warranted

  4. Therapeutic response assessment of high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for uterine fibroid: Utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaodong; Ren Xiaolong; Zhang Jun; He Guangbin; Zheng Minjuan; Tian Xue; Li Li; Zhu Ting; Zhang Min; Wang Lei; Luo Wen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (ceUS) in the assessment of the therapeutic response to high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in patients with uterine fibroid. Materials and methods: Sixty-four patients with a total of 64 uterine fibroids (mean: 5.3 ± 1.2 cm; range: 3.2-8.9 cm) treated with HIFU ablation under the ultrasound guidance were evaluated with ceUS after receiving an intravenous bolus injection of a microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue) within 1 week after intervention. We obtained serial ceUS images during the time period from beginning to 5 min after the initiation of the bolus contrast injection. All of the patients underwent a contrast enhanced MRI (ceMRI) and ultrasound guided needle puncture biopsy within 1 week after HIFU ablation. And as a follow-up, all of the patients underwent US at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after HIFU treatment. The volume change was observed and compared to pre- and post-HIFU ablation. The results of the ceUS were compared with those of the ceMRI in terms of the presence or absence of residual unablated tumor and pathologic change in the treated lesions. Results: On ceUS, diagnostic accuracy was 100%, while residual unablated tumors were found in three uterine fibroids (4.7%) and failed treatment was found in eight uterine fibroids (12.5%). All the 11 fibroids were subjected to additional HIFU ablation. Of the 58 ablated fibroids without residual tumors on both the ceUS and ceMRI after the HIFU ablation, the volumes of all the fibroids decreased in different degrees during the 1 year follow-up USs. And histologic examinations confirmed findings of necrotic and viable tumor tissue, respectively. Conclusion: CEUS is potentially useful for evaluating the early therapeutic effect of percutaneous HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids

  5. Spiritual Assessments in Occupational Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Hemphill

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Spirituality is recognized as an important concept in the study and practice of medicine, including occupational therapy. This aligns with occupational therapy’s core value of treating people holistically—mind, body, and spirit. Currently, the Joint Commission for the Accreditation of Hospital Organizations ( JCAHO requires that a spiritual assessment be given to patients on admission. To conduct effective spiritual assessments, occupational therapists must distinguish between religion and spirituality. They also must be aware of their own spiritual beliefs and practices and how those might influence their clinical interactions. This article presents spiritual assessment tools that occupational therapists can use in clinical practice; they range from history taking, to questionnaires, to observation scales. Guidelines are presented for selecting among several spiritual assessments. A case study is presented in which a patient’s faith tradition is being challenged, which could affect the outcome of therapy. Finally, treatment and intervention planning and ethical considerations are discussed.

  6. Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Comprehensive Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayfun Zeren

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is one of the most important discoveries of psychiatric treatments. This article comprehensively assesses historical progress, mechanism of actions, practical methods, indications, side effects, complications, drug interactions of ECT and attitudes towards ECT. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2003; 12(4.000: 340-377

  7. Early survival prediction after intra-arterial therapies: a 3D quantitative MRI assessment of tumour response after TACE or radioembolization of colorectal cancer metastases to the liver

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chapiro, Julius; Savic, Lynn Jeanette [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Charite Universitaetsmedizin, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Duran, Rafael; Schernthaner, Ruediger; Wang, Zhijun; Geschwind, Jean-Francois [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Lin, MingDe [The Johns Hopkins Hospital, Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology, Baltimore, MD (United States); U/S Imaging and Interventions (UII), Philips Research North America, Briarcliff Manor, NY (United States); Lesage, David [Philips Research, Medisys, Suresnes (France)

    2015-07-15

    This study evaluated the predictive role of 1D, 2D and 3D quantitative, enhancement-based MRI regarding overall survival (OS) in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM) following intra-arterial therapies (IAT). This retrospective analysis included 29 patients who underwent transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or radioembolization and received MRI within 6 weeks after therapy. Tumour response was assessed using 1D and 2D criteria (such as European Association for the Study of the Liver guidelines [EASL] and modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [mRECIST]). In addition, a segmentation-based 3D quantification of overall (volumetric [v] RECIST) and enhancing lesion volume (quantitative [q] EASL) was performed on portal venous phase MRI. Accordingly, patients were classified as responders (R) and non-responders (NR). Survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR). Only enhancement-based criteria identified patients as responders. EASL and mRECIST did not predict patient survival (P = 0.27 and P = 0.44, respectively). Using uni- and multivariate analysis, qEASL was identified as the sole predictor of patient survival (9.9 months for R, 6.9 months for NR; P = 0.038; HR 0.4). The ability of qEASL to predict survival early after IAT provides evidence for potential advantages of 3D quantitative tumour analysis. (orig.)

  8. Early survival prediction after intra-arterial therapies: a 3D quantitative MRI assessment of tumour response after TACE or radioembolization of colorectal cancer metastases to the liver

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chapiro, Julius; Savic, Lynn Jeanette; Duran, Rafael; Schernthaner, Ruediger; Wang, Zhijun; Geschwind, Jean-Francois; Lin, MingDe; Lesage, David

    2015-01-01

    This study evaluated the predictive role of 1D, 2D and 3D quantitative, enhancement-based MRI regarding overall survival (OS) in patients with colorectal liver metastases (CLM) following intra-arterial therapies (IAT). This retrospective analysis included 29 patients who underwent transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or radioembolization and received MRI within 6 weeks after therapy. Tumour response was assessed using 1D and 2D criteria (such as European Association for the Study of the Liver guidelines [EASL] and modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors [mRECIST]). In addition, a segmentation-based 3D quantification of overall (volumetric [v] RECIST) and enhancing lesion volume (quantitative [q] EASL) was performed on portal venous phase MRI. Accordingly, patients were classified as responders (R) and non-responders (NR). Survival was evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis and compared using Cox proportional hazard ratios (HR). Only enhancement-based criteria identified patients as responders. EASL and mRECIST did not predict patient survival (P = 0.27 and P = 0.44, respectively). Using uni- and multivariate analysis, qEASL was identified as the sole predictor of patient survival (9.9 months for R, 6.9 months for NR; P = 0.038; HR 0.4). The ability of qEASL to predict survival early after IAT provides evidence for potential advantages of 3D quantitative tumour analysis. (orig.)

  9. Metabolomics of Therapy Response in Preclinical Glioblastoma: A Multi-Slice MRSI-Based Volumetric Analysis for Noninvasive Assessment of Temozolomide Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias-Ramos, Nuria; Ferrer-Font, Laura; Lope-Piedrafita, Silvia; Mocioiu, Victor; Julià-Sapé, Margarida; Pumarola, Martí; Arús, Carles; Candiota, Ana Paula

    2017-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor in adults, with a short survival time even after aggressive therapy. Non-invasive surrogate biomarkers of therapy response may be relevant for improving patient survival. Previous work produced such biomarkers in preclinical GBM using semi-supervised source extraction and single-slice Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI). Nevertheless, GBMs are heterogeneous and single-slice studies could prevent obtaining relevant information. The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a multi-slice MRSI approach, acquiring consecutive grids across the tumor, is feasible for preclinical models and may produce additional insight into therapy response. Nosological images were analyzed pixel-by-pixel and a relative responding volume, the Tumor Responding Index (TRI), was defined to quantify response. Heterogeneous response levels were observed and treated animals were ascribed to three arbitrary predefined groups: high response (HR, n = 2), TRI = 68.2 ± 2.8%, intermediate response (IR, n = 6), TRI = 41.1 ± 4.2% and low response (LR, n = 2), TRI = 13.4 ± 14.3%, producing therapy response categorization which had not been fully registered in single-slice studies. Results agreed with the multi-slice approach being feasible and producing an inverse correlation between TRI and Ki67 immunostaining. Additionally, ca. 7-day oscillations of TRI were observed, suggesting that host immune system activation in response to treatment could contribute to the responding patterns detected. PMID:28524099

  10. Metabolomics of Therapy Response in Preclinical Glioblastoma: A Multi-Slice MRSI-Based Volumetric Analysis for Noninvasive Assessment of Temozolomide Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Arias-Ramos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma (GBM is the most common aggressive primary brain tumor in adults, with a short survival time even after aggressive therapy. Non-invasive surrogate biomarkers of therapy response may be relevant for improving patient survival. Previous work produced such biomarkers in preclinical GBM using semi-supervised source extraction and single-slice Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging (MRSI. Nevertheless, GBMs are heterogeneous and single-slice studies could prevent obtaining relevant information. The purpose of this work was to evaluate whether a multi-slice MRSI approach, acquiring consecutive grids across the tumor, is feasible for preclinical models and may produce additional insight into therapy response. Nosological images were analyzed pixel-by-pixel and a relative responding volume, the Tumor Responding Index (TRI, was defined to quantify response. Heterogeneous response levels were observed and treated animals were ascribed to three arbitrary predefined groups: high response (HR, n = 2, TRI = 68.2 ± 2.8%, intermediate response (IR, n = 6, TRI = 41.1 ± 4.2% and low response (LR, n = 2, TRI = 13.4 ± 14.3%, producing therapy response categorization which had not been fully registered in single-slice studies. Results agreed with the multi-slice approach being feasible and producing an inverse correlation between TRI and Ki67 immunostaining. Additionally, ca. 7-day oscillations of TRI were observed, suggesting that host immune system activation in response to treatment could contribute to the responding patterns detected.

  11. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P.; Smith, Brian J.; Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E.; Buatti, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of

  12. 3-Dimensional Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic Imaging at 3 Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients During External Beam Radiation Therapy

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    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Smith, Brian J. [Department of Biostatistics, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Anderson, Carryn M.; Morris, Ann [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Capizzano, Aristides A.; Magnotta, Vincent [Department of Radiology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); McGuire, Sarah M.; Smith, Mark C.; Bayouth, John E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States); Buatti, John M., E-mail: john-buatti@uiowa.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, Iowa (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials: Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results: After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion: Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of

  13. 3-Dimensional magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging at 3 Tesla for early response assessment of glioblastoma patients during external beam radiation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P; Smith, Brian J; Anderson, Carryn M; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M; Smith, Mark C; Bayouth, John E; Buatti, John M

    2014-09-01

    To evaluate the utility of 3-dimensional magnetic resonance (3D-MR) proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium-enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17 to 20 fractions of radiation therapy. All patients received standard radiation therapy (RT) with concurrent temozolomide followed by adjuvant temozolomide. Imaging for response assessment consisted of MR scans every 2 months. Progression-free survival was defined by the criteria of MacDonald et al. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline/N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel-by-voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of RT. Changes in Cho/NAA between pretherapy and third-week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression-free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. After a median follow-up time of 8.6 months, 50% of patients had experienced progression based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (P<.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the third-week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (P<.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the third-week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval, 1.10-6.71; P=.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥2 volume, where recurrence most often occurred. Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of early progression. The potential impact for risk

  14. Use of regularized principal component analysis to model anatomical changes during head and neck radiation therapy for treatment adaptation and response assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chetvertkov, Mikhail A.; Siddiqui, Farzan; Chetty, Indrin; Kumarasiri, Akila; Liu, Chang; Gordon, J. James; Kim, Jinkoo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To develop standard (SPCA) and regularized (RPCA) principal component analysis models of anatomical changes from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H&N) patients and assess their potential use in adaptive radiation therapy, and for extracting quantitative information for treatment response assessment. Methods: Planning CT images of ten H&N patients were artificially deformed to create “digital phantom” images, which modeled systematic anatomical changes during radiation therapy. Artificial deformations closely mirrored patients’ actual deformations and were interpolated to generate 35 synthetic CBCTs, representing evolving anatomy over 35 fractions. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between pCT and synthetic CBCTs (i.e., digital phantoms) and between pCT and clinical CBCTs. Patient-specific SPCA and RPCA models were built from these synthetic and clinical DVF sets. EigenDVFs (EDVFs) having the largest eigenvalues were hypothesized to capture the major anatomical deformations during treatment. Results: Principal component analysis (PCA) models achieve variable results, depending on the size and location of anatomical change. Random changes prevent or degrade PCA’s ability to detect underlying systematic change. RPCA is able to detect smaller systematic changes against the background of random fraction-to-fraction changes and is therefore more successful than SPCA at capturing systematic changes early in treatment. SPCA models were less successful at modeling systematic changes in clinical patient images, which contain a wider range of random motion than synthetic CBCTs, while the regularized approach was able to extract major modes of motion. Conclusions: Leading EDVFs from the both PCA approaches have the potential to capture systematic anatomical change during H&N radiotherapy when systematic changes are large enough with respect to random fraction-to-fraction changes. In all cases the RPCA approach appears to be more

  15. Use of regularized principal component analysis to model anatomical changes during head and neck radiation therapy for treatment adaptation and response assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetvertkov, Mikhail A., E-mail: chetvertkov@wayne.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine, Detroit, Michigan 48201 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Siddiqui, Farzan; Chetty, Indrin; Kumarasiri, Akila; Liu, Chang; Gordon, J. James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Kim, Jinkoo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stony Brook University Hospital, Stony Brook, New York 11794 (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Purpose: To develop standard (SPCA) and regularized (RPCA) principal component analysis models of anatomical changes from daily cone beam CTs (CBCTs) of head and neck (H&N) patients and assess their potential use in adaptive radiation therapy, and for extracting quantitative information for treatment response assessment. Methods: Planning CT images of ten H&N patients were artificially deformed to create “digital phantom” images, which modeled systematic anatomical changes during radiation therapy. Artificial deformations closely mirrored patients’ actual deformations and were interpolated to generate 35 synthetic CBCTs, representing evolving anatomy over 35 fractions. Deformation vector fields (DVFs) were acquired between pCT and synthetic CBCTs (i.e., digital phantoms) and between pCT and clinical CBCTs. Patient-specific SPCA and RPCA models were built from these synthetic and clinical DVF sets. EigenDVFs (EDVFs) having the largest eigenvalues were hypothesized to capture the major anatomical deformations during treatment. Results: Principal component analysis (PCA) models achieve variable results, depending on the size and location of anatomical change. Random changes prevent or degrade PCA’s ability to detect underlying systematic change. RPCA is able to detect smaller systematic changes against the background of random fraction-to-fraction changes and is therefore more successful than SPCA at capturing systematic changes early in treatment. SPCA models were less successful at modeling systematic changes in clinical patient images, which contain a wider range of random motion than synthetic CBCTs, while the regularized approach was able to extract major modes of motion. Conclusions: Leading EDVFs from the both PCA approaches have the potential to capture systematic anatomical change during H&N radiotherapy when systematic changes are large enough with respect to random fraction-to-fraction changes. In all cases the RPCA approach appears to be more

  16. Radiation dose response of normal lung assessed by Cone Beam CT - A potential tool for biologically adaptive radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertelsen, Anders; Schytte, Tine; Bentzen, Soren M.; Hansen, Olfred; Nielsen, Morten; Brink, Carsten

    2011-01-01

    Background: Density changes of healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy as observed by Cone Beam CT (CBCT) might be an early indicator of patient specific lung toxicity. This study investigates the time course of CBCT density changes and tests for a possible correlation with locally delivered dose. Methods: A total of 665 CBCTs in 65 lung cancer patients treated with IMRT/VMAT to 60 or 66 Gy in 2 Gy fractions were analyzed. For each patient, CBCT lung density changes during the treatment course were related to the locally delivered dose. Results: A dose response is observed for the patient population at the end of the treatment course. However, the observed dose response is highly variable among patients. Density changes at 10th and 20th fraction are clearly correlated to those observed at the end of the treatment course. Conclusions: CBCT density changes in healthy lung tissue during radiotherapy correlate with the locally delivered dose and can be detected relatively early during the treatment. If these density changes are correlated to subsequent clinical toxicity this assay could form the basis for biological adaptive radiotherapy.

  17. Assessment of response to anti-angiogenic targeted therapy in pulmonary metastatic renal cell carcinoma: R2* value as a predictive biomarker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Guangyu; Liu, Guiqin; Suo, Shiteng; Liu, Xiaosheng; Xu, Jianrong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Radiology, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Kong, Wen; Zhang, Jin [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Department of Urinary Surgery, Renji Hospital, School of Medicine, Shanghai (China); Qu, Jianxun [GE Healthcare, Shanghai (China)

    2017-09-15

    To evaluate the utility of MR R2*-mapping and the optimal time-point for assessing the response of pulmonary metastatic renal cell carcinoma (mRCC) to anti-angiogenic targeted therapy (aATT). The exploration-sample group and the validation-sample group consisted of 22 and 16 patients. The parameters of MR R2*-mapping, including the R2* value at each time-point (R2*{sub base}, R2*{sub 1cyc} and R2*{sub 2cyc}) and change between different time-points (R2*{sub (1cyc-base)/base}, R2*{sub (2cyc-base)/base} and R2*{sub (2cyc-1cyc)/1cyc}), were evaluated with a receiver-operating-characteristic analysis, and a cut-off value derived from the clinical outcome was applied to the Kaplan-Meier method to assess the value of R2* mapping and Response-Evaluation-Criteria in Solid Tumours (RECIST) during treatment evaluation. The inter-, intra-observer agreements and inter-scan consistency were excellent (p > 0.80). For the exploration-sample group, the areas under the curve for the parameters of MR R2* mapping were 0.55, 0.60, 0.83, 0.64, 0.88 and 0.83 for R2*{sub base}, R2*{sub 1cyc}, R2*{sub 2cyc}, R2*{sub (1cyc-base)/base}, R2*{sub (2cyc-base)/base} and R2*{sub (2cyc-1cyc)/1cyc.} For the validation-sample, R2*{sub (2cyc-base)/base} better predicted progression-free survival (p = 0.03) than RECIST and other R2* mapping parameters with a lower p value. Assessing aATT outcome based on changes in the R2* value between baseline and second treatment is more accurate than assessment at other time-points and assessment based on the RECIST. (orig.)

  18. SU-F-R-54: CT-Texture Based Early Tumor Treatment Response Assessment During Radiation Therapy Delivery: Small Cell Versus Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul, J; Gore, E; Li, X [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Tumor treatment response may potentially be assessed during radiation therapy (RT) by analyzing changes in CT-textures. We investigated the different early RT-responses between small cell (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) as assessed by CT-texture. Methods: Daily diagnostic-quality CT acquired during routine CT-guided RT using a CT-on-Rails for 13-NSCLC and 5-SCLC patients were analyzed. These patient had ages ranging from 45–78 and 38–63 years, respectively, for NSCLC and SCLC groups, and tumor-stages ranging from T2-T4, and were treated with either RT or chemotherapy and RT with 45–66Gy/ 20–34 fractions. Gross-tumor volume (GTV) contour was generated on each daily CT by populating GTV contour from simulation to daily CTs with manual editing if necessary. CT-texture parameters, such as Hounsfield Unit (HU) histogram, mean HU, skewness, kurtosis, entropy, and short-run high-gray level emphasis (SRHGLE), were calculated in GTV from each daily CT-set using an in house software tool. Difference in changes of these texture parameters during RT between NSCLC and SCLC was analyzed and compared with GTV volume changes. Results: Radiation-induced changes in CT-texture were different between SCLC and NSCLC. Average changes from first to the last fractions for NSCLC and SCLC in GTV were 28±10(12–44) and 30±15(11–47) HU (mean HU reduction), 12.7% and 18.3% (entropy), 50% and 55% (SRHGLE), 19% and 22% (kurtosis), and 5.2% and 22% (skewness), respectively. Good correlation in kurtosis changes and GTV was seen (R{sup 2}=0.8923) for SCLC, but not for NSCLC (R{sup 2}=0.4748). SCLC had better correlations between GTV volume reduction and entropy (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.847; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.6485), skewness (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.935; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.7666), or SRHGLE (SCLC R{sup 2}=0.9619; NSCLC R{sup 2}=0.787). Conclusion: NSCLC and SCLC exhibited different early RT-responses as assessed by CT-texture changes during RT-delivery. The observed larger changes in

  19. Assessment of predictors of response and long-term survival of patients with neuroendocrine tumour treated with peptide receptor chemoradionuclide therapy (PRCRT)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, G.; Thompson, M.; Johnston, V.; Eu, P. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Collins, M.; Herschtal, A. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Department of Biostatistics and Clinical Trials, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Hofman, M.S.; Hicks, Rodney J. [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Centre for Cancer Imaging, East Melbourne, VIC (Australia); The University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Michael, M. [The University of Melbourne, Department of Medicine, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Division of Cancer Medicine, Neuroendocrine Tumour Unit, Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    2014-10-15

    To review the response and outcomes of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-octreotate chemoradionuclide therapy (LuTate PRCRT) in patients with neuroendocrine tumour (NET) expressing high levels of somatostatin receptors with uncontrolled symptoms or disease progression. A total of 68 patients (39 men; 17 - 76 years of age) who had completed an induction course of at least three cycles of LuTate PRCRT between January 2006 and June 2010 were reviewed. Ten patients were treated for uncontrolled symptoms and 58 had disease progression despite conventional treatment. The majority had four induction LuTate cycles (median treatment duration 5 months and cumulative activity 31 GBq), and 63 patients had concomitant 5-FU radiosensitizing infusional chemotherapy. Factors predicting overall survival were assessed using the log-rank test and Cox proportional hazards regression. Of those treated for uncontrolled symptoms, 70 % received benefit maintained for at least 6 months after treatment. Among patients with progressive disease 68 % showed stabilization or regression on CT, 67 % on molecular imaging and 56 % biochemically up to 12 months after treatment; 32 patients died. Overall survival rates at 2 and 5 year were 72.1 % and 52.1 %, respectively. Median overall survival was not estimable at a median follow-up of 60 months (range 5 - 86 months). Nonpancreatic primary sites, dominant liver metastases, lesion size <5 cm and the use of 5-FU chemotherapy were statistically significantly associated with objective response. A disseminated pattern and a high disease burden (whole-body retention index) were associated with an increased risk of death. Objective biochemical, molecular imaging and CT responses were all associated with longer overall survival. A high proportion of patients with progressive NET or uncontrolled symptoms received therapeutic benefit from LuTate with concomitant 5-FU chemotherapy. The achievement of objective biochemical, molecular or CT responses within 12 months was

  20. Response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Versteeg, Henneke; Schiffer, Angélique A; Widdershoven, Jos W

    2009-01-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is a promising treatment for a subgroup of patients with advanced congestive heart failure and a prolonged QRS interval. Despite the majority of patients benefiting from CRT, 10-40% of patients do not respond to this treatment and are labeled as nonresponders...

  1. Ecology, Ethics, and Responsibility in Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maddock, James W.

    1993-01-01

    Notes that working with marital and family problems complicates the concept of therapeutic responsibility. Discusses several societal contributors to ethical dilemmas in contemporary family therapy and summarizes an ecological framework for therapy on the basis of which a profile of the ethical family therapist is derived. (Author/NB)

  2. Non-response to (statin) therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trompet, S; Postmus, I; Slagboom, P E

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: In pharmacogenetic research, genetic variation in non-responders and high responders is compared with the aim to identify the genetic loci responsible for this variation in response. However, an important question is whether the non-responders are truly biologically non-responsive......-responders from the analysis. RESULTS: Non-responders to statin therapy were younger (p = 0.001), more often smoked (p levels (p ... that non-adherence is investigated instead of non-responsiveness....

  3. Assessment of treatment response to splint therapy and evaluation of TMJ function using joint vibration analysis in patients exhibiting TMJ disc displacement with reduction: A clinical study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Devi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Context, Aim, and Objectives: Diagnosis of temporomandibular joint (TMJ disc displacement with reduction (DDR is difficult. Literature combining different subjective parameters of TMJ function with an objective evaluation of TMJ function using joint vibration analysis (JVA is limited. Hence, the study was planned to diagnose temporomandibular disorder accurately, to do a subjective and objective evaluation of TMJ function, and to assess the effectiveness of different types of splint therapy over the conventional anterior repositioning appliance (ARA group. Design: Single-blind, randomized, comparative clinical trial conducted in thirty patients, 18–55 years of age, allocated to three groups, i.e., ARA conventional group, centric stabilization splint (CSS, and Soft splint (SS groups. Subjects and Methods: Preoperative values of comfortable mouth opening (CMO in mm, maximum mouth opening (MMO in mm, TMJ clicking and tenderness (grading 0–3, visual analog scale pain score (0–10 cm, and total energy (TE integral values of both TMJs using JVA were recorded. Postoperative values were taken at the time of delivery of splint at 1st, 2nd, 6th, and 10th week. Statistical Analysis and Results: Intergroup comparison – Kruskal–Wallis test showed no statistically significant difference in CMO, MMO, and TE values of right TMJs among three groups at any point. No significant difference was seen in TMJ clicking and tenderness among groups at any point of time except at 10 weeks and at 2 weeks, respectively, by Chi-square test. Intragroup comparison - Wilcoxon signed-rank test showed the significance of difference (P < 0.05* in postoperative visits for CMO, MMO, pain score, and TE values. Clinical effect size, extent, consistency, and percentage of cases showing improvement were maximum for CSS group. Conclusions: The study concludes that the use of JVA for diagnosis along with history and clinical examination increases the accuracy of the diagnosis of

  4. 3D-MR Spectroscopic Imaging at 3Tesla for Early Response Assessment of Glioblastoma Patients during External Beam Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muruganandham, Manickam; Clerkin, Patrick P; Smith, Brian J; Anderson, Carryn M; Morris, Ann; Capizzano, Aristides A; Magnotta, Vincent; McGuire, Sarah M; Smith, Mark C; Bayouth, John E; Buatti, John M

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the utility of 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging for treatment planning and its implications for early response assessment in glioblastoma multiforme. Methods and Materials Eighteen patients with newly diagnosed, histologically confirmed glioblastoma had 3D-MR proton spectroscopic imaging (MRSI) along with T2 and T1 gadolinium enhanced MR images at simulation and at boost treatment planning after 17-20 fractions of radiotherapy. All patients received standard radiotherapy with temozolomide and follow-up with every two month MR scans. Progression free survival was defined using MacDonald criteria. MRSI images obtained at initial simulation were analyzed for choline / N-acetylaspartate ratios (Cho/NAA) on a voxel by voxel basis with abnormal activity defined as Cho/NAA ≥ 2. These images were compared on anatomically matched MRSI data collected after 3 weeks of radiotherapy. Changes in Cho/NAA between pre-therapy and 3rd week RT scans were tested using Wilcoxon matched-pairs signed rank tests and correlated with progression free survival, radiation dose and location of recurrence using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results After 8.6 months (median follow-up), 50% of patients had progressed based on imaging. Patients with a decreased or stable mean or median Cho/NAA values had less risk of progression (p< 0.01). Patients with an increase in mean or median Cho/NAA values at the 3rd week RT scan had a significantly greater chance of early progression (p <0.01). An increased Cho/NAA at the 3rd week MRSI scan carried a hazard ratio of 2.72 (95% confidence interval 1.10-6.71, p= 0.03). Most patients received the prescription dose of RT to the Cho/NAA ≥ 2 volume, which was where recurrence most often occurred. Conclusion Change in mean and median Cho/NAA detected at 3 weeks was a significant predictor of early progression. The potential impact for risk-adaptive therapy based on early spectroscopic findings is suggested. PMID:24986746

  5. Predicting response to epigenetic therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Treppendahl, Marianne B; Sommer Kristensen, Lasse; Grønbæk, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    of good pretreatment predictors of response is of great value. Many clinical parameters and molecular targets have been tested in preclinical and clinical studies with varying results, leaving room for optimization. Here we provide an overview of markers that may predict the efficacy of FDA- and EMA...

  6. Rectal cancer: assessment of complete response to preoperative combined radiation therapy with chemotherapy--conventional MR volumetry versus diffusion-weighted MR imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curvo-Semedo, Luís; Lambregts, Doenja M J; Maas, Monique; Thywissen, Thomas; Mehsen, Rana T; Lammering, Guido; Beets, Geerard L; Caseiro-Alves, Filipe; Beets-Tan, Regina G H

    2011-09-01

    To determine diagnostic performance of diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging for assessment of complete tumor response (CR) after combined radiation therapy with chemotherapy (CRT) in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer (LARC) by means of volumetric signal intensity measurements and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements and to compare the performance of DW imaging with that of T2-weighted MR volumetry. A retrospective analysis of 50 patients with LARC, for whom clinical and imaging data were retrieved from a previous imaging study approved by the local institutional ethical committee and for which all patients provided informed consent, was conducted. Patients underwent pre- and post-CRT standard T2-weighted MR and DW MR. Two independent readers placed free-hand regions of interest (ROIs) in each tumor-containing section on both data sets to determine pre- and post-CRT tumor volumes and tumor volume reduction rates (volume). ROIs were copied to an ADC map to calculate tumor ADCs. Histopathologic findings were the standard of reference. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were generated to compare performance of T2-weighted and DW MR volumetry and ADC. The intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate interobserver variability and the correlation between T2-weighted and DW MR volumetry. Areas under the ROC curve (AUCs) for identification of a CR that was based on pre-CRT volume, post-CRT volume, and volume, respectively, were 0.57, 0.70, and 0.84 for T2-weighted MR versus 0.63, 0.93, and 0.92 for DW MR volumetry (P = .15, .02, .42). Pre- and post-CRT ADC and ADC AUCs were 0.55, 0.54, and 0.51, respectively. Interobserver agreement was excellent for all pre-CRT measurements (ICC, 0.91-0.96) versus good (ICC, 0.61-0.79) for post-CRT measurements. ICC between T2-weighted and DW MR volumetry was excellent (0.97) for pre-CRT measurements versus fair (0.25) for post-CRT measurements. Post-CRT DW MR

  7. Prospective evaluation of [{sup 11}C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of standardized docetaxel first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced castration refractory prostate cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M.; Krause, Bernd J. [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus [Technical University of Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Kundt, Guenther [Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Biostatistics and Informatics, Rostock (Germany); Retz, Margitta; Treiber, Uwe; Nawroth, Roman; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Thalgott, Mark [Technical University of Munich, Department of Urology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Sakretz, Monique; Kurth, Jens [Rostock University Medical Centre, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rostock (Germany); Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University of Munich, Institute of Radiology, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2016-11-15

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the value of [{sup 11}C] Choline PET/CT in monitoring early and late response to a standardized first-line docetaxel chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Thirty-two patients were referred for [{sup 11}C] Choline PET/CT before the start of docetaxel chemotherapy, after one and ten chemotherapy cycles (or - in case of discontinuation - after the last administered cycle) for therapy response assessment. [{sup 11}C] Choline uptake (SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}), CT derived Houndsfield units (HU{sub max}, HU{sub mean}), and volume of bone, lung, and nodal metastases and local recurrence were measured semi-automatically at these timepoints. Change in SUV{sub max}, SUV{sub mean}, HU{sub max}, HU{sub mean,} and volume was assessed between PET 2 and 1 (early response assessment, ERA) and PET 3 and 1 (late response assessment, LRA) on a patient and lesion basis. Results of PET/CT were compared to clinically used RECIST 1.1 and clinical criteria based therapy response assessment including PSA for defining progressive disease (PD) and non-progressive disease (nPD), respectively. Relationships between changes of SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} (early and late) and changes of PSA{sub early} and PSA{sub late} were evaluated. Prognostic value of initial SUV{sub max} and SUV{sub mean} was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. In the patient-based ERA and LRA there were no statistically significant differences in change of choline uptake, HU, and volume between PD and nPD applying RECIST or clinical response criteria. In the lesion-based ERA, decrease in choline uptake of bone metastases was even higher in PD (applying RECIST criteria), whereas in LRA the decrease was higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There were only significant correlations between change in choline uptake and PSA in ERA in PD, in LRA no significant correlations were discovered. Initial SUV{sub max

  8. Prospective evaluation of [11C]Choline PET/CT in therapy response assessment of standardized docetaxel first-line chemotherapy in patients with advanced castration refractory prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarzenboeck, Sarah M.; Krause, Bernd J.; Eiber, Matthias; Schwaiger, Markus; Kundt, Guenther; Retz, Margitta; Treiber, Uwe; Nawroth, Roman; Gschwend, Juergen E.; Thalgott, Mark; Sakretz, Monique; Kurth, Jens; Rummeny, Ernst J.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the value of [ 11 C] Choline PET/CT in monitoring early and late response to a standardized first-line docetaxel chemotherapy in castration refractory prostate cancer (mCRPC) patients. Thirty-two patients were referred for [ 11 C] Choline PET/CT before the start of docetaxel chemotherapy, after one and ten chemotherapy cycles (or - in case of discontinuation - after the last administered cycle) for therapy response assessment. [ 11 C] Choline uptake (SUV max , SUV mean ), CT derived Houndsfield units (HU max , HU mean ), and volume of bone, lung, and nodal metastases and local recurrence were measured semi-automatically at these timepoints. Change in SUV max , SUV mean , HU max , HU mean, and volume was assessed between PET 2 and 1 (early response assessment, ERA) and PET 3 and 1 (late response assessment, LRA) on a patient and lesion basis. Results of PET/CT were compared to clinically used RECIST 1.1 and clinical criteria based therapy response assessment including PSA for defining progressive disease (PD) and non-progressive disease (nPD), respectively. Relationships between changes of SUV max and SUV mean (early and late) and changes of PSA early and PSA late were evaluated. Prognostic value of initial SUV max and SUV mean was assessed. Statistical analyses were performed using SPSS. In the patient-based ERA and LRA there were no statistically significant differences in change of choline uptake, HU, and volume between PD and nPD applying RECIST or clinical response criteria. In the lesion-based ERA, decrease in choline uptake of bone metastases was even higher in PD (applying RECIST criteria), whereas in LRA the decrease was higher in nPD (applying clinical criteria). There were only significant correlations between change in choline uptake and PSA in ERA in PD, in LRA no significant correlations were discovered. Initial SUV max and SUV mean were statistically significantly higher in nPD (applying clinical

  9. Material interaction in art therapy assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pénzes, I.J.N.J.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Diverse approaches to art therapy assessment agree that art materials should play a central role. However, relatively little research is done on the role of different art materials. This article describes the results of a qualitative study on the use of art materials by art therapists in art therapy

  10. An Assessment of Early Response to Targeted Therapy via Molecular Imaging: A Pilot Study of 3′-deoxy-3′[(18F]-Fluorothymidine Positron Emission Tomography 18F-FLT PET/CT in Prostate Adenocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalevi Kairemo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Fluorothymidine is a thymidine analog labeled with fluorine-18 fluorothymidine for positron emission tomography (18F-FLT-PET imaging. Thymidine is a nucleic acid that is used to build DNA. Fluorine-18 fluorothymidine (18F-FLT utilizes the same metabolic pathway as does thymidine but has a very low incidence of being incorporated into the DNA (<1%. 18F-FLT-PET could have a role in the evaluation of response to targeted therapy. We present here a pilot study where we investigated cellular metabolism and proliferation in patients with prostate cancer before and after targeted therapy. Seven patients with Stage IV prostate adenocarcinoma, candidates for targeted therapy inhibiting the hepatocyte growth factor/tyrosine-protein kinase Met (HGF/C-MET pathway, were included in this study. The HGF/C-MET pathway is implicated in prostate cancer progression, and an evaluation of the inhibition of this pathway could be valuable. 18F-FLT was performed at baseline and within four weeks post-therapy. Tumor response was assessed semi-quantitatively and using visual response criteria. The range of SUVmax for 18F-FLT at baseline in the prostate varied from 2.5 to 4.2. This study demonstrated that 18F-FLT with positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (18F-FLT PET/CT had only limited applications in the early response evaluation of prostate cancer. 18F-FLT PET/CT may have some utility in the assessment of response in lymph node disease. However, 18F-FLT PET/CT was not found to be useful in the evaluation of the prostate bed, metastatic skeletal disease, and liver disease.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of Intratumoral Voxel Heterogeneity as a Potential Response Biomarker: Assessment in a HER2+ Esophageal Adenocarcinoma Xenograft Following Trastuzumab and/or Cisplatin Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Connie Yip

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated magnetic resonance imaging (MRI voxel heterogeneity following trastuzumab and/or cisplatin in a HER2+ esophageal xenograft (OE19 as a potential response biomarker. OE19 xenografts treated with saline (controls, monotherapy, or combined cisplatin and trastuzumab underwent 9.4-T MRI. Tumor MRI parametric maps of T1 relaxation time (pre/post contrast, T2 relaxation time, T2* relaxation rate (R2*, and apparent diffusion coefficient obtained before (TIME0, after 24 hours (TIME1, and after 2 weeks of treatment (TIME2 were analyzed. Voxel histogram and fractal parameters (from the whole tumor, rim and center, and as a ratio of rim‐to‐center were derived. Tumors were stained for immunohistochemical markers of hypoxia (CA-IX, angiogenesis (CD34, and proliferation (Ki-67. Combination therapy reduced xenograft growth rate (relative change, ∆ +0.58 ± 0.43 versus controls, ∆ +4.1 ± 1.0; P = 0.008. More spatially homogeneous voxel distribution between the rim to center was noted after treatment for combination therapy versus controls, respectively, for contrast-enhanced T1 relaxation time (90th percentile: ratio 1.00 versus 0.88, P = 0.009, T2 relaxation time (mean: 1.00 versus 0.92, P = 0.006; median: 0.98 versus 0.91, P = 0.006; 75th percentile: 1.02 versus 0.94, P = 0.007, and R2* (10th percentile: 0.99 versus 1.26, P = 0.003. We found that combination and trastuzumab monotherapy reduced MRI spatial heterogeneity and growth rate compared to the control or cisplatin groups, the former providing adjunctive tumor response information.

  12. Response assessment of stereotactic body radiation therapy using dynamic contrast-enhanced integrated MR-PET in non-small cell lung cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-Sen; Chen, Jenny Ling-Yu; Hsu, Feng-Ming; Huang, Jei-Yie; Ko, Wei-Chun; Chen, Yi-Chang; Jaw, Fu-Shan; Yen, Ruoh-Fang; Chang, Yeun-Chung

    2018-01-01

    To evaluate the response in patients undergoing SBRT using dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) integrated magnetic resonance positron emission tomography (MR-PET). Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) is efficacious as a front-line local treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We prospectively enrolled 19 lung tumors in 17 nonmetastatic NSCLC patients who were receiving SBRT as a primary treatment. They underwent DCE-integrated 3T MR-PET before and 6 weeks after SBRT. The following image parameters were analyzed: tumor size, standardized uptake value (SUV), apparent diffusion coefficient, K trans , k ep , v e , v p , and iAUC 60 . Chest computed tomography (CT) was performed at 3 months after SBRT. SBRT treatment led to tumor changes including significant decreases in the SUV max (-61%, P PET SUV max was correlated with the MR k ep mean (P = 0.002) and k ep SD (P 10 (P = 0.083). In patients with NSCLC who are receiving SBRT, DCE-integrated MR-PET can be used to evaluate the response after SBRT and to predict the local treatment outcome. 2 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2018;47:191-199. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  13. Therapy assessment in multiple myeloma with PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nanni, Cristina [Medicina Nucleare Metropolitana di Bologna, Bologna (Italy); Zamagni, Elena [Bologna University School of Medicine, Seragnoli Institute of Hematology, Bologna (Italy)

    2017-08-15

    Multiple myeloma is a plasma cell dyscrasia producing bone lytic lesions. In recent years, a wide spectrum of therapeutic approaches are available to treat the disease: an accurate therapy assessment has, therefore, become of utmost importance. In this field, imaging is becoming a cornerstone, especially in association with clinical parameters. Among imaging procedures, FDG PET/CT is recognized to provide reliable information, achieved in a very safe and fast procedure. The literature has produced very concordant results from different groups assessing the value of FDG PET/CT as a prognostic factor in general and in therapy assessment, but some issues remain regarding a standardization of image interpretation especially in borderline cases. So far, no data regarding nor other imaging compounds and the use of hybrid tomographs PET/MR are available to define therapy assessment in PET. (orig.)

  14. Alanine EPR dosimeter response in proton therapy beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gall, K.; Serago, C.; Desrosiers, M.; Bensen, D.

    1997-01-01

    We report a series of measurements directed to assess the suitability of alanine as a mailable dosimeter for dosimetry quality assurance of proton radiation therapy beams. These measurements include dose-response of alanine at 140 MeV, and comparison of response vs energy with a parallel plate ionization chamber. All irradiations were made at the Harvard Cyclotron Laboratory, and the dosimeters were read at NIST. The results encourage us that alanine could be expected to serve as a mailable dosimeter with systematic error due to differential energy response no greater than 3% when doses of 25 Gy are used. (Author)

  15. Assessments in outcome evaluation in aphasia therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Isaksen, Jytte; Brouwer, Catherine E.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Outcomes of aphasia therapy in Denmark are documented in evaluation sessions in which both the person with aphasia and the speech-language therapist take part. The participants negotiate agreements on the results of therapy. By means of conversation analysis, we study how such agreements...... on therapy outcome are reached interactionally. The sequential analysis of 34 video recordings focuses on a recurrent method for reaching agreements in these outcome evaluation sessions. In and through a special sequence of conversational assessment it is claimed that the person with aphasia has certain...

  16. Results from functional and cellular studies using an ovine model to assess response to mesenchymal stem cell therapy after induction of myocardial infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bailey, Elizabeth A.; Bailey, Dale L; Roach, Paul J.; Bautovich, George; Hunyor, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Full text: Background: Assessing functional and cellular consequences following myocardial infarction (MI) using large animals has advantages of similarity in size, shape and coronary supply to human heart. Aim: To confirm presence of MI and detect recovery of perfusion and function following implantation of ovine bone-marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) using intra-myocardial (1 M ) and intra-coronary (I C ) methods. Methods: Eighteen ewes (wt: 45-50 k g, LV-EDV: 80-90 m L) included, with 10 completing protocol (3=control, 4= IM , 3= IC ). MlBI MPI SPECT/CT performed at baseline, 5-7 days post induction of Ml and 6 weeks post cellular therapy with male MSCs. At completion, sheep sacrificed and heart slices reviewed microscopically to confirm Ml, assess neovascularisation and correlate with MPI findings. MPI studies reconstructed using OSEM CT-based AC and analysed using QPS/QGS software. Calculation of Recovery Difference (RD%), Recovery Ratio (RR) and relative change to baseline determined for each study and per segment per study. Results: M I confirmed in 10 of 12 studies (I showed no perfusion abnormality, another pre-existing defect), confirmed anatomically by identification of fibrous scar tissue with lymphoid aggregates, histiocytes and calcium deposits. Reduction in perfusion was 14% to 48%. No improvement in perfusion seen in control (RR=0.8, RD=-16.9) and IC (RR=0.9, RD=-7.1) studies. Significant reperfusion seen on 1 M studies, with RR=1.5, RD=1.1 and perfusion recovery 8%, around periphery of infarct zone. Conclusions: Presence of acute Ml identified on MlBl MPI SPECT/CT correlates with anatomical findings. Improvement in perfusion and function at infarct zone seen using 1 M method of MSC implantation, correlating with significant neovascularisation identified microscopically.

  17. Facial Angiofibroma Severity Index (FASI): reliability assessment of a new tool developed to measure severity and responsiveness to therapy in tuberous sclerosis-associated facial angiofibroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salido-Vallejo, R; Ruano, J; Garnacho-Saucedo, G; Godoy-Gijón, E; Llorca, D; Gómez-Fernández, C; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-12-01

    Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal dominant neurocutaneous disorder characterized by the development of multisystem hamartomatous tumours. Topical sirolimus has recently been suggested as a potential treatment for TSC-associated facial angiofibroma (FA). To validate a reproducible scale created for the assessment of clinical severity and treatment response in these patients. We developed a new tool, the Facial Angiofibroma Severity Index (FASI) to evaluate the grade of erythema and the size and extent of FAs. In total, 30 different photographs of patients with TSC were shown to 56 dermatologists at each evaluation. Three evaluations using the same photographs but in a different random order were performed 1 week apart. Test and retest reliability and interobserver reproducibility were determined. There was good agreement between the investigators. Inter-rater reliability showed strong correlations (> 0.98; range 0.97-0.99) with inter-rater correlation coefficients (ICCs) for the FASI. The global estimated kappa coefficient for the degree of intra-rater agreement (test-retest) was 0.94 (range 0.91-0.97). The FASI is a valid and reliable tool for measuring the clinical severity of TSC-associated FAs, which can be applied in clinical practice to evaluate the response to treatment in these patients. © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  18. Molecular response assessed by {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC and survival after {sup 90}Y microsphere therapy in patients with liver metastases from neuroendocrine tumours

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Filippi, Luca; Salvatori, Rita; Bagni, Oreste [Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Latina (Italy); Scopinaro, Francesco [Sant' Andrea Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rome (Italy); Pelle, Giuseppe; Cianni, Roberto [Santa Maria Goretti Hospital, Department of Interventional Radiology, Latina (Italy); Schillaci, Orazio [University Tor Vergata, Department of Biomedicine and Prevention, Rome (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We investigated the prognostic role of {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC in patients affected by hepatic metastases from neuroendocrine tumours (NET) undergoing {sup 90}Y radioembolization ({sup 90}Y-RE). A group of 15 consecutive patients with unresectable NET liver metastases underwent {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET at baseline and 6 weeks after {sup 90}Y-RE. Molecular response was defined as a reduction of >50 % in the tumour-to-spleen ratio (ΔT/S). The patients were divided into two groups (responders with ΔT/S >50 % and nonresponders with ΔT/S <50 %) Patients were followed up by imaging and laboratory tests every 3 months until death or for at least 36 months following {sup 90}Y-RE. Statistical analysis was performed to identify factors predicting overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS). A decrease in T/S ratio was seen in all patients on {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET scans performed after {sup 90}Y-RE. Nine patients were classified as responders and six as nonresponders. The mean OS in all patients was 31.0 months. Responders had a significantly (p < 0.001) longer OS (mean 36.0 ± 2.5 months) and PFS (mean 29.7 ± 3.4 months) than nonresponders. In a multivariate analysis, none of the other examined variables including age, unilobar vs. bilobar locations, bilirubin levels, radiological response or the presence of extrahepatic disease significantly predicted patient outcome. Molecular response assessed with {sup 68}Ga-DOTANOC PET might be a useful predictor of survival in patients affected by NET liver metastases treated with {sup 90}Y-RE. (orig.)

  19. Quantitative therapy response assessment by volumetric iodine-uptake measurement: Initial experience in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma treated with sorafenib

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dai, Xu; Schlemmer, Heinz-Peter; Schmidt, Bernhard; Höh, Karolin; Xu, Ke; Ganten, Tom M.; Ganten, Maria-Katharina

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the volumetric iodine-uptake (VIU) changes by dual-energy CT (DECT) in assessing the response to sorafenib treated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, compared with AASLD (American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases) and Choi criteria. Materials and methods: Fifteen patients with HCC receiving sorafenib, monitored with contrast-enhanced DECT scans at baseline and a minimum of one follow-up (8–12 weeks) were retrospectively evaluated. 30 target lesions in total were analyzed for tumor response according to VIU and adapted Choi criteria and compared with the standard AASLD. Results: According to AASLD criteria, 67% target lesions showed disease control: partial response (PR) in 3% and stable disease (SD) in 63%. 33% lesions progressed (PD). Disease control rate presented by VIU (60%) was similar to AASLD (67%) and Choi (63%) (P > 0.05). For disease control group, change in mean VIU was from 149.5 ± 338.3 mg to 108.5 ± 284.1 mg (decreased 19.1 ± 42.9%); and for progressive disease group, change in mean VIU was from 163.7 ± 346.7 mg to 263.9 ± 537.2 mg (increased 230.5 ± 253.1%). Compared to AASLD (PR, 3%), VIU and Choi presented more PR (33% and 30%, respectively) in disease control group (P < 0.05). VIU has moderate consistency with both AASLD (kappa = 0.714; P < 0.005) and Choi (kappa = 0.648; P < 0.005), while VIU showed a better consistency and correlation with AASLD (kappa = 0.714; P < 0.005; r = 0.666, P < 0.005) than Choi with AASLD (kappa = 0.634, P < 0.005; r = 0.102, P = 0.296). Conclusion: VIU measurements by DECT can evaluate the disease control consistent with the current standard AASLD. Measurements are semi-automatic and therefore easy and robust to apply. As VIU reflects vital tumor burden in HCC, it is likely to be an optimal tumor response biomarker in HCC

  20. Predicting response to incretin-based therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agrawal N

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Sanjay Kalra1, Bharti Kalra2, Rakesh Sahay3, Navneet Agrawal41Department of Endocrinology, 2Department of Diabetology, Bharti Hospital, Karnal, India; 3Department of Endocrinology, Osmania Medical College, Hyderabad, India; 4Department of Medicine, GR Medical College, Gwalior, IndiaAbstract: There are two important incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulin tropic polypeptide (GIP and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1. The biological activities of GLP-1 include stimulation of glucose-dependent insulin secretion and insulin biosynthesis, inhibition of glucagon secretion and gastric emptying, and inhibition of food intake. GLP-1 appears to have a number of additional effects in the gastrointestinal tract and central nervous system. Incretin based therapy includes GLP-1 receptor agonists like human GLP-1 analogs (liraglutide and exendin-4 based molecules (exenatide, as well as DPP-4 inhibitors like sitagliptin, vildagliptin and saxagliptin. Most of the published studies showed a significant reduction in HbA1c using these drugs. A critical analysis of reported data shows that the response rate in terms of target achievers of these drugs is average. One of the first actions identified for GLP-1 was the glucose-dependent stimulation of insulin secretion from islet cell lines. Following the detection of GLP-1 receptors on islet beta cells, a large body of evidence has accumulated illustrating that GLP-1 exerts multiple actions on various signaling pathways and gene products in the ß cell. GLP-1 controls glucose homeostasis through well-defined actions on the islet ß cell via stimulation of insulin secretion and preservation and expansion of ß cell mass. In summary, there are several factors determining the response rate to incretin therapy. Currently minimal clinical data is available to make a conclusion. Key factors appear to be duration of diabetes, obesity, presence of autonomic neuropathy, resting energy expenditure, plasma glucagon levels and

  1. The internal and external responsiveness of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) and Short Form-12 Health Survey version 2 (SF-12 v2) in patients with prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Edmond P H; Wong, Carlos K H; Wan, Eric Y F; Tsu, James H L; Chin, W Y; Kung, Kenny; Yiu, M K

    2016-09-01

    To examine the responsiveness of Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Prostate (FACT-P) and Short Form-12 Health Survey version 2 (SF-12 v2) in prostate cancer patients because there is a lack of evidence to support their responsiveness in this patient population. One hundred sixty-eight subjects with prostate cancer were surveyed at baseline and at 6 months using the SF-12 v2 and FACT-P version 4. Internal responsiveness was assessed using paired t test and generalized estimating equation. External responsiveness was evaluated using receiver operating characteristic curve analysis. The internal responsiveness of the FACT-P and SF-12 v2 to detect positive change was satisfactory. The FACT-P and SF-12 v2 could not detect negative change. The FACT-P and the SF-12 v2 performed the best in distinguishing between improved general health and worsened general health. The FACT-P performed better in distinguishing between unchanged general health and worsened general health. The SF-12 v2 performed better in distinguishing between unchanged general health and improved general health. Positive change detected by these measures should be interpreted with caution as they might be too responsive to detect "noise," which is not clinically significant. The ability of the FACT-P and the SF-12 v2 to detect negative change was disappointing. The internal and external responsiveness of the social well-being of the FACT-P cannot be supported, suggesting that it is not suitable to longitudinally monitor the social component of HRQOL in prostate cancer patients. The study suggested that generic and disease-specific measures should be used together to complement each other.

  2. Histologic Appearance After Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Assessment of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group Response Score

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Hornick, Jason L.; Barysauskas, Constance M.; Raut, Chandrajit P.; Patel, Sagar A.; Royce, Trevor J.; Fletcher, Christopher D.M.; Baldini, Elizabeth H.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazard models. Results: Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Conclusion: Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials.

  3. Histologic Appearance After Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Assessment of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group Response Score

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Hornick, Jason L. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Barysauskas, Constance M. [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Raut, Chandrajit P. [Division of Surgical Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Royce, Trevor J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Fletcher, Christopher D.M. [Department of Pathology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Baldini, Elizabeth H., E-mail: ebaldini@partners.org [Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer–Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazard models. Results: Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Conclusion: Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials.

  4. Histologic Appearance After Preoperative Radiation Therapy for Soft Tissue Sarcoma: Assessment of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group Response Score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Inga-Marie; Hornick, Jason L; Barysauskas, Constance M; Raut, Chandrajit P; Patel, Sagar A; Royce, Trevor J; Fletcher, Christopher D M; Baldini, Elizabeth H

    2017-06-01

    To critically assess the prognostic value of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer-Soft Tissue and Bone Sarcoma Group (EORTC-STBSG) response score and define histologic appearance after preoperative radiation therapy (RT) for soft tissue sarcoma (STS). For a cohort of 100 patients with STS of the extremity/trunk treated at our institution with preoperative RT followed by resection, 2 expert sarcoma pathologists evaluated the resected specimens for percent residual viable cells, necrosis, hyalinization/fibrosis, and infarction. The EORTC response score and other predictors of recurrence-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS) were assessed by Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazard models. Median tumor size was 7.5 cm; 92% were intermediate or high grade. Most common histologies were unclassified sarcoma (34%) and myxofibrosarcoma (25%). Median follow-up was 60 months. The 5-year local recurrence rate was 5%, 5-year RFS was 68%, and 5-year OS was 75%. Distribution of cases according to EORTC response score tiers was as follows: no residual viable tumor for 9 cases (9% pathologic complete response); <1% viable tumor for 0, ≥1% to <10% for 9, ≥10% to <50% for 44, and ≥50% for 38. There was no association between EORTC-STBSG response score and RFS or OS. Conversely, hyalinization/fibrosis was a significant independent favorable predictor for RFS (hazard ratio 0.49, P=.007) and OS (hazard ratio 0.36, P=.02). Histologic evaluation after preoperative RT for STS showed a 9% pathologic complete response rate. The EORTC-STBSG response score and percent viable cells were not prognostic. Hyalinization/fibrosis was associated with favorable outcome, and if validated, may become a valid endpoint for neoadjuvant trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5.  DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling in diagnosis, assessing prognosis and predicting response to therapy in colorectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Kwiatkowski

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available  Colorectal cancer is the most common cancer of the gastrointestinal tract. It is considered as a biological model of a certain type of cancerogenesis process in which progression from an early to late stage adenoma and cancer is accompanied by distinct genetic alterations.Clinical and pathological parameters commonly used in clinical practice are often insufficient to determine groups of patients suitable for personalized treatment. Moreover, reliable molecular markers with high prognostic value have not yet been determined. Molecular studies using DNA-based microarrays have identified numerous genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation during the process of cancerogenesis. Assessment of the genetic profile of colorectal cancer using the microarray technique might be a useful tool in determining the groups of patients with different clinical outcomes who would benefit from additional personalized treatment.The main objective of this study was to present the current state of knowledge on the practical application of gene profiling techniques using microarrays for determining diagnosis, prognosis and response to treatment in colorectal cancer.

  6. Riverland expedited response action assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-06-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) prepare an expedited response action (ERA) for the Riverland Railroad Car Wash Pit (located in the Riverland Rail Yard) and the 600 Area Army Munitions Burial Site (Munitions Cache). This assessment report details the actions taken to complete the Riverland ERA

  7. Diabetic foot ulcers. Pathophysiology, assessment, and therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Bowering, C. K.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review underlying causes of diabetic foot ulceration, provide a practical assessment of patients at risk, and outline an evidence-based approach to therapy for diabetic patients with foot ulcers. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: A MEDLINE search was conducted for the period from 1979 to 1999 for articles relating to diabetic foot ulcers. Most studies found were case series or small controlled trials. MAIN MESSAGE: Foot ulcers in diabetic patients are common and frequently lead to lower limb...

  8. Music therapy assessment in school settings: a preliminary investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, B L; Smith, D S

    2000-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken in response to music therapists working in school settings for information relating to the availability of music therapy assessments and the feasibility of standardizing an assessment instrument for music therapists to use in school settings. Five research questions were identified, and the music therapy literature was surveyed to compile responses to those questions. Three different online data bases (ERIC, PsycINFO, and Article 1st) were used, covering articles published between 1980 and 1997. Individual hand searches were done of the Arts in Psychotherapy, Journal of Music Therapy, Journal of Research in Music Education, Journal of the International Association of Music for the Handicapped, Music Therapy and Music Therapy Perspectives. The questions and responses were as follows: 1. Which music-based assessment tools are being used with children with disabilities? Little commonality in assessment tools being used by music therapists and researchers was discovered. Of the total 41 studies, 20 (49%) reported using a "named" or "titled" assessment tool, and in the remaining 51% of studies, the authors reported using an untitled, and usually experimenter-designed, original assessment tool. 2. Have certain assessments been used in more than one study? Very limited replication of existing assessments was found. Of the 16 "named" assessments, only 3 were found to be used in more than one research study. 3. Are the actual assessments published along with the articles describing their use? Only 3 of the 20 studies using named assessments were published along with the journal article. Of the remaining 21 studies using original, experimenter-designed assessment tools, only 6 (28%) had the assessment instrument published with the article. 4. What is the primary purpose for using the assessment? Six primary purposes emerged from the review of the literature: to compare with data obtained from other assessment measures or from other

  9. Self-assessment of professionalism in physical therapy education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Deborah K; Irwin, Kent E

    2013-01-01

    With the physical therapy (PT) professions' advancement to the clinical doctorate degree and the promotion of autonomous practice, exemplary professional conduct is an expectation of the PT profession. PT education programs are being challenged to develop methods to teach and assess professional behavior. Forty-three PT students (11 male and 32 female, ages 20-28 years) completed the APTA Professionalism in Physical Therapy: Core Values Self-Assessment (PPTCVSA) after their first 3 week clinical experience and again after their final clinical experience. A mixed design ANOVA compared participants' total scores and individual Core Value scores on the Professionalism in Physical Therapy: Core Values Self-Assessment (PPTCVSA) after 3 and 33 weeks of clinical education. The effects of gender, age, and undergraduate area of study on growth in professionalism scores were also investigated. Total PPTCVSA scores and individual Core Value scores on professionalism (accountability, altruism, compassion/caring, excellence, integrity, professional duty, and social responsibility) were higher after 33 weeks compared to scores after 3 weeks of clinical education. Female student's total professionalism scores were higher than male student's scores on both the first and second self-assessments. In addition, female students scored themselves higher than their male peers on accountability, excellence, integrity, and professional duty. Improved scores on the PPTCVSA indicate that physical therapy education is playing an important role in the development of professional behavior, knowledge, and application in practice.

  10. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S J; Pozzi, E C C; Monti Hughes, A; Provenzano, L; Koivunoro, H; Carando, D G; Thorp, S I; Casal, M R; Bortolussi, S; Trivillin, V A; Garabalino, M A; Curotto, P; Heber, E M; Santa Cruz, G A; Kankaanranta, L; Joensuu, H; Schwint, A E

    2017-10-03

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson's correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  11. Photon iso-effective dose for cancer treatment with mixed field radiation based on dose-response assessment from human and an animal model: clinical application to boron neutron capture therapy for head and neck cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, S. J.; Pozzi, E. C. C.; Monti Hughes, A.; Provenzano, L.; Koivunoro, H.; Carando, D. G.; Thorp, S. I.; Casal, M. R.; Bortolussi, S.; Trivillin, V. A.; Garabalino, M. A.; Curotto, P.; Heber, E. M.; Santa Cruz, G. A.; Kankaanranta, L.; Joensuu, H.; Schwint, A. E.

    2017-10-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a treatment modality that combines different radiation qualities. Since the severity of biological damage following irradiation depends on the radiation type, a quantity different from absorbed dose is required to explain the effects observed in the clinical BNCT in terms of outcome compared with conventional photon radiation therapy. A new approach for calculating photon iso-effective doses in BNCT was introduced previously. The present work extends this model to include information from dose-response assessments in animal models and humans. Parameters of the model were determined for tumour and precancerous tissue using dose-response curves obtained from BNCT and photon studies performed in the hamster cheek pouch in vivo models of oral cancer and/or pre-cancer, and from head and neck cancer radiotherapy data with photons. To this end, suitable expressions of the dose-limiting Normal Tissue Complication and Tumour Control Probabilities for the reference radiation and for the mixed field BNCT radiation were developed. Pearson’s correlation coefficients and p-values showed that TCP and NTCP models agreed with experimental data (with r  >  0.87 and p-values  >0.57). The photon iso-effective dose model was applied retrospectively to evaluate the dosimetry in tumours and mucosa for head and neck cancer patients treated with BNCT in Finland. Photon iso-effective doses in tumour were lower than those obtained with the standard RBE-weighted model (between 10% to 45%). The results also suggested that the probabilities of tumour control derived from photon iso-effective doses are more adequate to explain the clinical responses than those obtained with the RBE-weighted values. The dosimetry in the mucosa revealed that the photon iso-effective doses were about 30% to 50% higher than the corresponding RBE-weighted values. While the RBE-weighted doses are unable to predict mucosa toxicity, predictions based on the proposed

  12. Value of diffusion-weighted MR imaging in assessing response of neoadjuvant chemo and radiation therapy in locally advanced rectal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rania A. Marouf

    2015-09-01

    Conclusion: The use of additional DWI yields better diagnostic accuracy than does use of conventional MR imaging alone in the evaluation of complete response to neoadjuvant chemo radiotherapy in patients with locally advanced rectal cancer.

  13. Therapy of chronic hepatitis C: Virologic response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljić-Kapulica Nada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Virological testing is considered to be essential in the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in order to diagnose infection, and, most importantly, as a quide for treatment decisions and assess the virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of a sustained virological response (SVR and various factors associated with response rates in chronic hepatitis C infected patients treated with pegiinterferon alpha (PEGINF and ribavirin (RBV combination therapy. Methods. A total of 34 patients, treated with PEG-IFN and RBV were studied. Serum HCV-RNA was measured before the treatment, 12 weeks following the start of the therapy and 6 weeks after the treatment cessation. SVR was defined as undetectable serum HCV-RNA 6 months of post-treatment follow-up, virologic relapse (VR as relapse of HCV-RNA during the post-treatment follow-up. Serum HCV-RNA was measured with the Cobas Amplicor test. Results. At the end of post-treatment follow-up 19 (55.8% patients demonstrated a SVR. The majority of the patients were genotype 1 (27, and the other were genotype 3 (5 patients and genotype 4 (2 patients. There was VR in 6 patients 6 months after the therapy. In 9 patients HCV-RNA was positive after 12 weeks. Conclusion. We demonstrated that patients with chronic HCV infection can be successfully treated with combination of PEG-INF and RBV. This result emphasizes also that post-treatment follow-up to identify patients with SVR or VR could be important.

  14. De-Escalation Strategies in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor 2 (HER2)-Positive Early Breast Cancer (BC): Final Analysis of the West German Study Group Adjuvant Dynamic Marker-Adjusted Personalized Therapy Trial Optimizing Risk Assessment and Therapy Response Prediction in Early BC HER2- and Hormone Receptor-Positive Phase II Randomized Trial-Efficacy, Safety, and Predictive Markers for 12 Weeks of Neoadjuvant Trastuzumab Emtansine With or Without Endocrine Therapy (ET) Versus Trastuzumab Plus ET.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbeck, Nadia; Gluz, Oleg; Christgen, Matthias; Kates, Ronald Ernest; Braun, Michael; Küemmel, Sherko; Schumacher, Claudia; Potenberg, Jochem; Kraemer, Stefan; Kleine-Tebbe, Anke; Augustin, Doris; Aktas, Bahriye; Forstbauer, Helmut; Tio, Joke; von Schumann, Raquel; Liedtke, Cornelia; Grischke, Eva-Maria; Schumacher, Johannes; Wuerstlein, Rachel; Kreipe, Hans Heinrich; Nitz, Ulrike Anneliese

    2017-09-10

    Purpose Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-positive/hormone receptor (HR)-positive breast cancer is a distinct subgroup associated with lower chemotherapy sensitivity and slightly better outcome than HER2-positive/HR-negative disease. Little is known about the efficacy of the combination of endocrine therapy (ET) with trastuzumab or with the potent antibody-cytotoxic, anti-HER2 compound trastuzumab emtansine (T-DM1) with or without ET for this subgroup. The West German Study Group trial, ADAPT (Adjuvant Dynamic Marker-Adjusted Personalized Therapy Trial Optimizing Risk Assessment and Therapy Response Prediction in Early Breast Cancer) compares pathologic complete response (pCR) rates of T-DM1 versus trastuzumab with ET in early HER2-positive/HR-positive breast cancer. Patients and Methods In this prospective, neoadjuvant, phase II trial, 375 patients with early breast cancer with HER2-positive and HR-positive status (n = 463 screened) were randomly assigned to 12 weeks of T-DM1 with or without ET or to trastuzumab with ET. The primary end point was pCR (ypT0/is/ypN0). Early response was assessed in 3-week post-therapeutic core biopsies (proliferation decrease ≥ 30% Ki-67 or cellularity response). Secondary end points included safety and predictive impact of early response on pCR. Adjuvant therapy followed national standards. Results Baseline characteristics were well balanced among the arms. More than 90% of patients completed the therapy per protocol. pCR was observed in 41.0% of patients treated with T-DM1, 41.5% of patients treated with T-DM1 and ET, and 15.1% with trastuzumab and ET ( P < .001). Early responders (67% of patients with assessable response) achieved pCR in 35.7% compared with 19.8% in nonresponders (odds ratio, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.24 to 4.19). T-DM1 was associated with a significantly higher prevalence of grade 1 to 2 toxicities, especially thrombocytopenia, nausea, and elevation of liver enzymes. Overall toxicity was low; seventeen

  15. Patient predictors of response to cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy for depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Janet D; McIntosh, Virginia Vw; Jordan, Jennifer; Porter, Richard J; Douglas, Katie; Frampton, Christopher M; Joyce, Peter R

    2018-01-01

    Few studies have examined differential predictors of response to psychotherapy for depression. Greater understanding about the factors associated with therapeutic response may better enable therapists to optimise response by targeting therapy for the individual. The aim of the current exploratory study was to examine patient characteristics associated with response to cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy for depression. Participants were 100 outpatients in a clinical trial randomised to either cognitive behaviour therapy or schema therapy. Potential predictors of response examined included demographic, clinical, functioning, cognitive, personality and neuropsychological variables. Individuals with chronic depression and increased levels of pre-treatment negative automatic thoughts had a poorer response to both cognitive behaviour therapy and schema therapy. A treatment type interaction was found for verbal learning and memory. Lower levels of verbal learning and memory impairment markedly impacted on response to schema therapy. This was not the case for cognitive behaviour therapy, which was more impacted if verbal learning and memory was in the moderate range. Study findings are consistent with the Capitalisation Model suggesting that therapy that focuses on the person's strengths is more likely to contribute to a better outcome. Limitations were that participants were outpatients in a randomised controlled trial and may not be representative of other depressed samples. Examination of a variety of potential predictors was exploratory and requires replication.

  16. 18F-FDG PET for assessment of therapy response and preoperative re-evaluation after neoadjuvant radio-chemotherapy in stage III non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eschmann, Susanne M.; Reimold, Matthias; Bares, Roland; Friedel, Godehard; Paulsen, Frank; Hehr, Thomas; Budach, Wilfried; Langen, Heinz-Jakob

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate FDG-PET for assessment of therapy response and for prediction of patient outcome after neo-adjuvant radio-chemotherapy (NARCT) of advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Seventy patients with histologically proven stage III NSCLC underwent FDG-PET investigations before and after NARCT. Changes in FDG uptake and PET findings after completion of NARCT were compared with (1) the histology of tumour samples obtained at surgery or repeat mediastinoscopy, and (2) treatment results in terms of achieved operability and long-term survival. The mean average FDG uptake of the primary tumours in the patient group decreased significantly during NARCT (p = 0.004). Sensitivity, specificity and overall accuracy of FDG-PET were 94.5%, 80% and 91%, respectively, for the detection of residual viable primary tumour, and 77%, 68% and 73%, respectively, for the presence of lymph node metastases. A negative PET scan or a reduction in the standardised uptake value (SUV) of more than 80% was the best predictive factor for a favourable outcome of further treatment. Progressive disease according to PET (new tumour manifestations or increasing SUV) was significantly correlated with an unfavourable outcome (p = 0.005). In this subgroup, survival of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different from survival among those who did not undergo surgery, whereas for the whole patient group, complete tumour resection had a significant influence on outcome. FDG-PET is suitable to assess response to NARCT in patients with stage III NSCLC accurately. It was highly predictive for treatment outcome and patient survival. PET may be helpful in improving restaging after NARCT by allowing reliable assessment of residual tumour viability. (orig.)

  17. Cognitive-behavioral therapy as continuation treatment to sustain response after electroconvulsive therapy in depression: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brakemeier, Eva-Lotta; Merkl, Angela; Wilbertz, Gregor; Quante, Arnim; Regen, Francesca; Bührsch, Nicole; van Hall, Franziska; Kischkel, Eva; Danker-Hopfe, Heidi; Anghelescu, Ion; Heuser, Isabella; Kathmann, Norbert; Bajbouj, Malek

    2014-08-01

    Although electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is the most effective acute antidepressant intervention, sustained response rates are low. It has never been systematically assessed whether psychotherapy, continuation ECT, or antidepressant medication is the most efficacious intervention to maintain initial treatment response. In a prospective, randomized clinical trial, 90 inpatients with major depressive disorder (MDD) were treated with right unilateral ultra-brief acute ECT. Electroconvulsive therapy responders received 6 months guideline-based antidepressant medication (MED) and were randomly assigned to add-on therapy with cognitive-behavioral group therapy (CBT-arm), add-on therapy with ultra-brief pulse continuation electroconvulsive therapy (ECT-arm), or no add-on therapy (MED-arm). After the 6 months of continuation treatment, patients were followed-up for another 6 months. The primary outcome parameter was the proportion of patients who remained well after 12 months. Of 90 MDD patients starting the acute phase, 70% responded and 47% remitted to acute ECT. After 6 months of continuation treatment, significant differences were observed in the three treatment arms with sustained response rates of 77% in the CBT-arm, 40% in the ECT-arm, and 44% in the MED-arm. After 12 months, these differences remained stable with sustained response rates of 65% in the CBT-arm, 28% in the ECT-arm, and 33% in the MED-arm. These results suggest that ultra-brief pulse ECT as a continuation treatment correlates with low sustained response rates. However, the main finding implicates cognitive-behavioral group therapy in combination with antidepressants might be an effective continuation treatment to sustain response after successful ECT in MDD patients. Copyright © 2014 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Early response to therapy and survival in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaar, C G; Kluin-Nelemans, J C; le Cessie, S; Franck, P F H; te Marvelde, M C; Wijermans, P W

    2004-04-01

    Whether the response to chemotherapy is a prognosticator in multiple myeloma (MM) is still not known. Therefore, the relationship between survival and the rate of monoclonal protein (M-protein) decrement during the first cycles of therapy was prospectively assessed in 262 patients with newly diagnosed MM that were included in a phase III trial (HOVON-16). M-proteins were collected monthly during melphalan-prednisone therapy (MP: melphalan 0.25 mg/kg, prednisone 1.0 mg/kg orally for 5 d every 4 weeks). Patients with light chain disease (n = 18), immunoglobulin M (IgM)-MM (n = 1) and no immunotyping (n = 1) were excluded. Of the 242 patients studied, 75% had IgG M-protein and 25% IgA; MM stages: I: 1%, II: 35% and III: 64%. The median M-protein decrease after the first cycle of MP was 21% for IgG and 27% for IgA, and declined to < 5% after four cycles. An obvious survival advantage was seen for patients who had an M-protein decrease of at least 30% after the first MP cycle, which became significant when an M-protein decrease of 40% or more was reached. As established prognostic parameters (Salmon & Durie stage, serum creatinine, and haemoglobin) also remained prognostically significant, we concluded that early response to MP predicts for survival in MM.

  19. Nanoscale theranostics for physical stimulus-responsive cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qian; Ke, Hengte; Dai, Zhifei; Liu, Zhuang

    2015-12-01

    Physical stimulus-responsive therapies often employing multifunctional theranostic agents responsive to external physical stimuli such as light, magnetic field, ultra-sound, radiofrequency, X-ray, etc., have been widely explored as novel cancer therapy strategies, showing encouraging results in many pre-clinical animal experiments. Unlike conventional cancer chemotherapy which often accompanies with severe toxic side effects, physical stimulus-responsive agents usually are non-toxic by themselves and would destruct cancer cells only under specific external stimuli, and thus could offer greatly reduced toxicity and enhanced treatment specificity. In addition, physical stimulus-responsive therapies can also be combined with other traditional therapeutics to achieve synergistic anti-tumor effects via a variety of mechanisms. In this review, we will summarize the latest progress in the development of physical stimulus-responsive therapies, and discuss the important roles of nanoscale theranostic agents involved in those non-conventional therapeutic strategies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. The Music Therapy assessment tool for Advanced Huntington's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Bodak, R.

    2013-01-01

    is limited, is a challenging process. With awareness often masked by perceptual or motor impairments, misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy assessment holds the potential to elicit responses despite damage to verbal or visual processing faculties, although robust empirical studies are lacking...... music conditions (live salient music & improvised music entrained to respiration), recordings of disliked music, white noise and silence. Neurophysiological and behavioral measures were recorded using a 32 channel XLTEK© video EEG system, with a piezoelectric respiratory belt, and analysed using MATLAB......, EEGLAB and BrainVision Analyzer 2 software. One way repeated measures ANOVA analysis of respiration, and power spectra analysis of EEG data indicated a range of significant responses (p≤0.05) across controls corresponding to arousal and attention in response to live music, including concurrent increases...

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of intraventricular dyssynchrony and delayed enhancement as predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure of ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petryka, Joanna; Miśko, Jolanta; Przybylski, Andrzej; Śpiewak, Mateusz; Małek, Łukasz A.; Werys, Konrad; Mazurkiewicz, Łukasz; Gepner, Katarzyna; Croisille, Pierre; Demkow, Marcin; Rużyłło, Witold

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the value of dyssynchrony and myocardial viability assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure (HF) of both ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled for CRT in NYHA class II–IV, left ventricular ejection fraction <35%, QRS ≥ 120 ms were included. Tagged cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were performed. Dyssynchrony was assessed with inTag toolbox and LGE was quantified using cutoff value at half of maximal signal in the scar. Cardiopulmonary exercise test, echocardiography and blood testing for NT-proBNP levels were done at baseline and 6 months after CRT. Results: 52 patients (age 60.3 ± 13 years) were included. 26 patients (50%) met response criteria. The ischaemic etiology of HF was more frequent (69% vs. 31%, p = 0.002), the percent of LGE was higher (7.7% [0–13.5%] vs. 19.0% (0–31.9%], p = 0.013), regional vector of circumferential strain variance (RVV) was lower (0.27 ± 0.08 vs. 0.34 ± 0.09, p = 0.009) and uniformity of radial strain was higher (0.72 ± 0.25 vs. 0.56 ± 0.29, p = 0.046) in non-responders vs. responders. Multivariate logistic regression showed that RVV predicted response to CRT (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.02–5.02, p = 0.0430) independently of LGE and the etiology of heart failure. In the subgroup of patients with ischaemic HF the extend of transmural scar within myocardium was higher in non-responders vs. responders (26.3% vs. 15.0% respectively, p = 0.01) and was a predictor of response to CRT in univariable analysis (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77–0.98, p = 0.025) providing the sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 75% at the cutoff point of 18% in the prediction of poor response to CRT. In patients with non-ischaemic HF QRS was wider (162 ms vs. 140 ms, p = 0.04), regional vector of strain variance (RVV) was higher (0.39 vs. 0.25, p = 0.002) and uniformity of radial

  2. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of intraventricular dyssynchrony and delayed enhancement as predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in patients with heart failure of ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petryka, Joanna, E-mail: joannapetryka@hotmail.com [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Miśko, Jolanta [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Radiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Przybylski, Andrzej [Department of Arrhythmia, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Śpiewak, Mateusz [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Małek, Łukasz A. [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Cardiology and Interventional Angiology, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Werys, Konrad [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Mazurkiewicz, Łukasz [Cardiovascular Magnetic Resonance Unit, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Department of Cardiomyopathy, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Gepner, Katarzyna [Department of Coronary Artery Disease, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Croisille, Pierre [Creatis Laboratory, UMR CNRS 5515, INSERM, U1044, CHU Saint-Etienne, Universite de Lyon (France); Demkow, Marcin [Department of Coronary Artery Disease and Structural Heart Diseases, Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland); Rużyłło, Witold [Institute of Cardiology, Warsaw (Poland)

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: To assess the value of dyssynchrony and myocardial viability assessment by cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR) in prediction of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure (HF) of both ischaemic and non-ischaemic etiologies. Materials and methods: Patients scheduled for CRT in NYHA class II–IV, left ventricular ejection fraction <35%, QRS ≥ 120 ms were included. Tagged cine and late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) images were performed. Dyssynchrony was assessed with inTag toolbox and LGE was quantified using cutoff value at half of maximal signal in the scar. Cardiopulmonary exercise test, echocardiography and blood testing for NT-proBNP levels were done at baseline and 6 months after CRT. Results: 52 patients (age 60.3 ± 13 years) were included. 26 patients (50%) met response criteria. The ischaemic etiology of HF was more frequent (69% vs. 31%, p = 0.002), the percent of LGE was higher (7.7% [0–13.5%] vs. 19.0% (0–31.9%], p = 0.013), regional vector of circumferential strain variance (RVV) was lower (0.27 ± 0.08 vs. 0.34 ± 0.09, p = 0.009) and uniformity of radial strain was higher (0.72 ± 0.25 vs. 0.56 ± 0.29, p = 0.046) in non-responders vs. responders. Multivariate logistic regression showed that RVV predicted response to CRT (HR 2.3, 95% CI 1.02–5.02, p = 0.0430) independently of LGE and the etiology of heart failure. In the subgroup of patients with ischaemic HF the extend of transmural scar within myocardium was higher in non-responders vs. responders (26.3% vs. 15.0% respectively, p = 0.01) and was a predictor of response to CRT in univariable analysis (HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.77–0.98, p = 0.025) providing the sensitivity of 76% and specificity of 75% at the cutoff point of 18% in the prediction of poor response to CRT. In patients with non-ischaemic HF QRS was wider (162 ms vs. 140 ms, p = 0.04), regional vector of strain variance (RVV) was higher (0.39 vs. 0.25, p = 0.002) and uniformity of radial

  3. Response to combination antiretroviral therapy: variation by age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundgren, Jens

    2008-01-01

    -naive individuals starting combination antiretroviral therapy from 1998 to 2006. OUTCOME MEASURES: Time from combination antiretroviral therapy initiation to HIV RNA less than 50 copies/ml (virological response), CD4 increase of more than 100 cells/microl (immunological response) and new AIDS/death were analysed...... response. The probability of virological response was lower in those aged 6-12 (adjusted hazard ratio: 0.87) and 13-17 (0.78) years, but was higher in those aged 50-54 (1.24), 55-59 (1.24) and at least 60 (1.18) years. The probability of immunological response was higher in children and younger adults...... and reduced in those 60 years or older. Those aged 55-59 and 60 years or older had poorer clinical outcomes after adjusting for the latest CD4 cell count. CONCLUSION: Better virological responses but poorer immunological responses in older individuals, together with low precombination antiretroviral therapy...

  4. Feelings of Loss in Response to Divorce: Assessment and Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Charles H.

    1983-01-01

    Presents a cognitively based model, founded on rational emotive therapy, as a basis for assessment and intervention strategies for assisting individuals to cope with feelings of loss in response to divorce. The model is seen as a four-pane window through which persons might see their divorce. (Author/JAC)

  5. The Initial Response To Corticosteroid Therapy in Childhood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Nephrotic syndrome (NS) in African children is associated with poor response to corticosteroids. There is disparity in treatment response on the African continent. The aim of this present study was to describe the initial response to corticosteroid therapy of childhood NS in Côte d'ivoire. Materials and methods: ...

  6. Inadequate Response to Therapy as a Predictor of Suicide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlsgaard, Katherine K.; Beck, Aaron T.; Brown, Gregory K.

    1998-01-01

    The role of response to cognitive therapy as a predictor of suicide was investigated by comparing 17 outpatients with mood disorders who committed suicide with 17 matched patients who did not commit suicide. Significant differences were found on several variables including higher levels of hopelessness at termination of therapy. (Author/EMK)

  7. Pre-treatment amygdala volume predicts electroconvulsive therapy response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Doesschate, Freek; van Eijndhoven, Philip; Tendolkar, Indira; van Wingen, Guido A.; van Waarde, Jeroen A.

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for patients with severe depression. Knowledge on factors predicting therapeutic response may help to identify patients who will benefit most from the intervention. Based on the neuroplasticity hypothesis, volumes of the amygdala and

  8. Asthma: non-responsiveness to conventional therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebuck, A S

    1986-01-01

    Despite regular inhalation of beta-agonists, topical steroids and anticholinergic aerosols and the achievement of therapeutic blood levels of theophylline, some asthmatics have rapidly fluctuating levels of peak flow measurements throughout the day. Often little or no improvement is obtained with larger doses of corticosteroids. Before embarking on more intense drug therapy, attention should be paid to conscientious adherence to the prescribed regimen and avoidance of aspirin and tartrazine, as well as to exposure to allergens such as those associated with household pets. A number of newer therapeutic options are related to the use of air jet or ultrasonic nebulizers, that allow liquid forms of inhalation agents to be taken slowly in the home environment. In this regard, combination therapy with a beta-agonist and the anticholinergic ipratropium has been shown to have bronchodilating properties superior to either agent used alone. Secondly, sodium cromoglycate in its liquid form appears to have bronchodilator properties; taken on a regular basis, four times per day, it appears to have a steroid-sparing effect. Two alternatives are available for increasing the intensity of corticosteroid therapy, other than by prolonged, high-dose prednisone. The first is that of high-dose inhaled beclomethasone (up to 2000 micrograms/day) using the 250 micrograms/puff inhaler. The second is that of intravenous therapy with methylprednisolone, recently shown to have lung permeability superior to that of prednisolone. Office patients can be treated with occasional or even regular 'pulse' doses of methylprednisolone, an approach that is now finding acceptance in the management of the inflammatory alveolitides.

  9. Individualized therapies in colorectal cancer: KRAS as a marker for response to EGFR-targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Kuiyuan

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Individualized therapies that are tailored to a patient's genetic composition will be of tremendous value for treatment of cancer. Recently, Kirsten ras (KRAS status has emerged as a predictor of response to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR targeted therapies. In this article, we will discuss targeted therapies for colorectal cancers (CRC based on EGFR signaling pathway and review published data about the potential usefulness of KRAS as a biological marker for response to these therapies. Results from relevant studies published since 2005 and unpublished results presented at national meetings were retrieved and summarized. These studies reflected response (or lack of response to EGFR-targeted therapies in patients with metastatic CRC as a function of KRAS status. It has become clear that patients with colorectal cancer whose tumor has an activating mutation in KRAS do not respond to monoclonal antibody therapies targeting EGFR. It should now become a standard practice that any patients being considered for EGFR targeted therapies have their tumors tested for KRAS status and only those with wild-type KRAS being offered such therapies.

  10. Evaluation of therapy response in breast and ovarian cancer patients by positron emission tomography (PET)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, R. P.; Przetak, C. [Zentralklinik Bad Berka, Clinic of Nuclear Medicine, Center for PET, Bad Berka (Germany)

    2001-09-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to contribute significantly to treatment planning and to the evaluation of response to therapy in patients with cancer. For disease recurrence PET imaging provides information non-invasively. The final goal is to biologically characterize an individual patients' tumor and to predict the response to treatment at the earliest possible time. Quantitative and/or semi-quantitative PET studies yield valuable information in breast cancer regarding prognosis and response to chemohormontherapy in a timely fashion. In ovarian cancer, up to now only few studies have been performed applying PET techniques for the evaluation of treatment response. These preliminary studies indicate that serial assessment of tumor metabolism by FDG-PET early during effective chemotherapy may predict subsequent response to such therapy. PET studies can be repeated without any side-effects and with low radiation exposure and results can be directly correlated with clinical laboratory data and histology. Therapy monitoring by PET could help to optimize neoadjuvant therapy protocols and to avoid ineffective preoperative therapy in non-responders, but this has to be proven in a larger number of patients and in different neoadjuvant settings such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy or a combination of these.

  11. Evaluation of therapy response in breast and ovarian cancer patients by positron emission tomography (PET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, R. P.; Przetak, C.

    2001-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) has the potential to contribute significantly to treatment planning and to the evaluation of response to therapy in patients with cancer. For disease recurrence PET imaging provides information non-invasively. The final goal is to biologically characterize an individual patients' tumor and to predict the response to treatment at the earliest possible time. Quantitative and/or semi-quantitative PET studies yield valuable information in breast cancer regarding prognosis and response to chemohormontherapy in a timely fashion. In ovarian cancer, up to now only few studies have been performed applying PET techniques for the evaluation of treatment response. These preliminary studies indicate that serial assessment of tumor metabolism by FDG-PET early during effective chemotherapy may predict subsequent response to such therapy. PET studies can be repeated without any side-effects and with low radiation exposure and results can be directly correlated with clinical laboratory data and histology. Therapy monitoring by PET could help to optimize neoadjuvant therapy protocols and to avoid ineffective preoperative therapy in non-responders, but this has to be proven in a larger number of patients and in different neoadjuvant settings such as chemotherapy, radiation therapy, hormone therapy or a combination of these

  12. [An assessment of tinnitus retraining therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Wedel, H; von Wedel, U C

    2000-12-01

    Based on the neurophysiological model of tinnitus developed by Jastreboff and Hazell [39] there have been some important developments in understanding and therapy of tinnitus over the last decade. The clinical applications of this model are known as "tinnitus retraining therapy", which has the objective of reducing both the distress associated with tinnitus and the tinnitus perception itself. As a form of systematic, repeated and skilled counselling over a long period of up to 2 years supported by sound therapy (hearing aid or noise generator) the evidence for their high degree of effectiveness is overwhelming. On the basis of a "German concept" of tinnitus retraining therapy developed and proposed by the ADANO (Arbeitsgemeinschaft deutschsprachiger Audiologen und Neurootologen) the current status of this treatment will be briefly reviewed including some actual studies of Goebel et al. [14] that confirm the world wide critical comments on the recent developments in the management of tinnitus especially with regard to tinnitus retraining therapy [79].

  13. 18F-FDG-PET detects complete response to PD1-therapy in melanoma patients two weeks after therapy start

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seith, Ferdinand; Schmidt, Holger; Pfannenberg, Christina; Gueckel, Brigitte; Schwenzer, Nina [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); Forschner, Andrea; Garbe, Claus [Eberhard Karls University, Department of Dermatology, Tuebingen (Germany); Nikolaou, Konstantin [Eberhard Karls University, Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany); German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); La Fougere, Christian [German Cancer Consortium (DKTK), Heidelberg (Germany); Eberhard Karls University, Nuclear Medicine and Clinical Molecular Imaging, Department of Radiology, Tuebingen (Germany)

    2018-01-15

    The aim of the study was to evaluate if 18F-FDG-PET has the potential to detect complete responders to PD1-therapy in patients with unresectable metastasized melanoma two weeks after therapy initiation. Between September 2014 and May 2016, ten patients (four females; 65 ± 12 y) received a whole-body 18F-FDG-PET/MRI examination at three time points: Before therapy start (t{sub 0}, base-line), two weeks (t{sub 1}, study examination) and three months after treatment initiation (t{sub 2}, reference standard). Therapy response was assessed with PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST). Time to progression and overall survival (OS) were obtained for all patients. Three patients with partial metabolic response in PET at t{sub 1} turned out to have complete response at t{sub 2}. No tumor relapse was observed in those patients so far (observation period: 265, 511 and 728 days, respectively). At t{sub 2}, progressive metabolic disease (PMD) was seen in six patients from whom four showed PMD and two showed stable metabolic disease (SMD) at t{sub 1}. OS in patients with PMD at t{sub 2} varied between 148 and 814 days. SMD at both t{sub 1} and t{sub 2} was seen in one patient, tumor progress was observed after 308 days. Our study indicates that whole-body 18F-FDG-PET might be able to reliably identify complete responders to PD1-therapy as early as two weeks after therapy initiation in stage IV melanoma patients. This might help to shorten therapy regimes and avoid unnecessary side effects in the future. (orig.)

  14. The Effects of Music Therapy on the Physiological Response of Asthmatic Children Receiving Inhalation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roslita, Riau; Nurhaeni, Nani; Wanda, Dessie

    The clinical manifestation of asthma in children can interfere with their daily activities. Music therapy may become one of the alternative approaches to making children feel comfortable during inhalation therapy. The aim of the study was to identify the effects of music therapy on the physiological response of asthmatic preschool and school-age children receiving inhalation therapy. This study used a quasi-experimental, nonequivalent control group with a pre-test-post-test design. The 44 respondents consisted of preschool and school-age children assigned to intervention and control groups. The results showed a significant difference in average oxygen saturation, heart rate, and respiratory rate between the control and intervention groups before and after intervention (p Music therapy can be used as a nursing intervention to improve the physiological response of children with breathing problems.

  15. Sleep spindles may predict response to cognitive-behavioral therapy for chronic insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Hatch, Benjamin; Salimi, Ali; Mograss, Melodee; Boucetta, Soufiane; O'Byrne, Jordan; Brandewinder, Marie; Berthomier, Christian; Gouin, Jean-Philippe

    2017-11-01

    While cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia constitutes the first-line treatment for chronic insomnia, only few reports have investigated how sleep architecture relates to response to this treatment. In this pilot study, we aimed to determine whether pre-treatment sleep spindle density predicts treatment response to cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia. Twenty-four participants with chronic primary insomnia participated in a 6-week cognitive-behavioral therapy for insomnia performed in groups of 4-6 participants. Treatment response was assessed using the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index and the Insomnia Severity Index measured at pre- and post-treatment, and at 3- and 12-months' follow-up assessments. Secondary outcome measures were extracted from sleep diaries over 7 days and overnight polysomnography, obtained at pre- and post-treatment. Spindle density during stage N2-N3 sleep was extracted from polysomnography at pre-treatment. Hierarchical linear modeling analysis assessed whether sleep spindle density predicted response to cognitive-behavioral therapy. After adjusting for age, sex, and education level, lower spindle density at pre-treatment predicted poorer response over the 12-month follow-up, as reflected by a smaller reduction in Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index over time. Reduced spindle density also predicted lower improvements in sleep diary sleep efficiency and wake after sleep onset immediately after treatment. There were no significant associations between spindle density and changes in the Insomnia Severity Index or polysomnography variables over time. These preliminary results suggest that inter-individual differences in sleep spindle density in insomnia may represent an endogenous biomarker predicting responsiveness to cognitive-behavioral therapy. Insomnia with altered spindle activity might constitute an insomnia subtype characterized by a neurophysiological vulnerability to sleep disruption associated with impaired responsiveness to

  16. Progress of assessment and rehabilitation therapy of cognitive impairment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-yuan TAO

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available  Cognitive impairment is one of major disorders after brain injury. With the rapid development of rehabilitation medicine in China, more and more attention was focused on it. The methods of assessment and rehabilitation therapy of cognitive impairment are more widely used in clinic. Based on traditional methods of assessment and rehabilitation therapy, driven by the development of computer, Internet and Internet of Things, more and more new methods emerged. This article intends to review the commonly used assessment and rehabilitation therapy of cognitive impairment and their progress. DOI: 10.3969/j.issn.1672-6731.2017.05.002

  17. The importance of myocardial contractile reserve in predicting response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kloosterman, Mariëlle; Damman, Kevin; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Rienstra, Michiel; Maass, Alexander H

    AimTo perform a meta-analysis and systematic review of published data to assess the relationship between contractile reserve and response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in patients with heart failure. Methods and resultsWe searched MEDLINE/PubMed and Cochrane for all papers published up

  18. Longitudinal Changes in Depressive Circuitry in Response to Neuromodulation Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yagna Pathak

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is a public health problem worldwide. There is increasing interest in using non-invasive therapies such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS to treat MDD. However, the changes induced by rTMS on neural circuits remain poorly characterized. The present study aims to test whether the brain regions previously targeted by deep brain stimulation (DBS in the treatment of MDD respond to rTMS, and whether functional connectivity measures can predict clinical response.Methods: rTMS (20 sessions was administered to five MDD patients at the left-dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (L-DLPFC over 4 weeks. Magnetoencephalography (MEG recordings and Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS assessments were acquired before, during and after treatment. Our primary measures, obtained with MEG source imaging, were changes in power spectral density (PSD and changes in functional connectivity as measured using coherence.Results: Of the five patients, four met the clinical response criterion (40% or greater decrease in MADRS after four weeks of treatment. An increase in gamma power at the L-DLPFC was correlated with improvement in symptoms. We also found that increases in delta band connectivity between L-DLPFC/amygdala and L-DLPFC/pregenual anterior cingulate cortex (pACC, and decreases in gamma band connectivity between L-DLPFC/subgenual anterior cingulate cortex (sACC, were correlated with improvements in depressive symptoms. Conclusions: Our results suggest that non-invasive intervention techniques, such as rTMS, modulate the ongoing activity of depressive circuits targeted for DBS, and that MEG can capture these changes. Gamma oscillations may originate from GABA-mediated inhibition, which increases synchronization of large neuronal populations, possibly leading to increased long-range functional connectivity. We postulate that responses to rTMS could provide valuable insights into early evaluation

  19. Research into the Development of Voice Assessment in Music Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storm, Sanne

    This study was a research into the development of a voice assessment profile (VOIAS). Already a preliminary literature search showed that no such profile within music therapy existed, and only very sparse research within music therapy focusing on and involving the human voice. The development...

  20. Isotretinoin therapy: Any need for laboratory assessment? | Tallab ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Recently studies showed the no need for laboratory follow up of patients on isotretinoin therapy. The aim of this study is to assess this issue. Patients and methods: A retrospective study on 400 patients was performed to analyze the laboratory data before and after isotretinoin therapy of acne vulgaris patients.

  1. Item Response Theory for Peer Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uto, Masaki; Ueno, Maomi

    2016-01-01

    As an assessment method based on a constructivist approach, peer assessment has become popular in recent years. However, in peer assessment, a problem remains that reliability depends on the rater characteristics. For this reason, some item response models that incorporate rater parameters have been proposed. Those models are expected to improve…

  2. Image Guidance and Assessment of Radiation Induced Gene Therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pelizzari, Charles

    2004-01-01

    Image guidance and assessment techniques are being developed for combined radiation/gene therapy, which utilizes a radiation-inducible gene promoter to cause expression of tumor necrosis factor alpha...

  3. Progress of assessment and rehabilitation therapy of cognitive impairment

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan-yuan TAO; Rong SUN; Lu-ping SONG

    2017-01-01

     Cognitive impairment is one of major disorders after brain injury. With the rapid development of rehabilitation medicine in China, more and more attention was focused on it. The methods of assessment and rehabilitation therapy of cognitive impairment are more widely used in clinic. Based on traditional methods of assessment and rehabilitation therapy, driven by the development of computer, Internet and Internet of Things, more and more new methods emerged. This article intends to revie...

  4. Music therapy in the assessment and treatment of autistic spectrum disorder: clinical application and research evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wigram, T; Gold, C

    2006-09-01

    Children and adolescents with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) presenting with significant limitations in conventional forms of verbal and non-verbal communication are found to respond positively to music therapy intervention involving both active, improvizational methods and receptive music therapy approaches. Improvizational musical activity with therapeutic objectives and outcomes has been found to facilitate motivation, communication skills and social interaction, as well as sustaining and developing attention. The structure and predictability found in music assist in reciprocal interaction, from which tolerance, flexibility and social engagement to build relationships emerge, relying on a systematic approach to promote appropriate and meaningful interpersonal responses. Published reports of the value and effectiveness of music therapy as an intervention for children with ASD range from controlled studies to clinical case reports. Further documentation has emphasized the role music therapy plays in diagnostic and clinical assessment. Music therapy assessment can identify limitations and weaknesses in children, as well as strengths and potentials. Research evidence from a systematic review found two randomized controlled trials that examined short-term effects of structured music therapy intervention. Significant effects were found in these studies even with extremely small samples, and the findings are important because they demonstrate the potential of the medium of music for autistic children. Case series studies were identified that examined the effects of improvizational music therapy where communicative behaviour, language development, emotional responsiveness, attention span and behavioural control improved over the course of an intervention of improvizational music therapy.

  5. Application of the cognitive therapy model to initial crisis assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Patricia; Palmer, Christine

    2003-03-01

    This article provides a background to the development of cognitive therapy and cognitive therapeutic skills with a specific focus on the treatment of a depressive episode. It discusses the utility of cognitive therapeutic strategies to the model of crisis theory and initial crisis assessment currently used by the Community Assessment & Treatment Team of Waitemata District Health Board on the North Shore of Auckland, New Zealand. A brief background to cognitive therapy is provided, followed by a comprehensive example of the use of the Socratic questioning method in guiding collaborative assessment and treatment of suicidality by nurses during the initial crisis assessment.

  6. Response to ovarian stimulation in patients facing gonadotoxic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lauren N C; Dillon, Katherine E; Sammel, Mary D; Efymow, Brenda L; Mainigi, Monica A; Dokras, Anuja; Gracia, Clarisa R

    2013-04-01

    Chemotherapy naïve patients undergoing embryo/oocyte banking for fertility preservation (FP) were assessed for response to ovarian stimulation. Fifty FP patients facing gonadotoxic therapy were matched by age, race, cycle number, date of stimulation and fertilization method to patients undergoing IVF for infertility or oocyte donation. There were no differences in baseline FSH, anti-Müllerian hormone, antral follicle count and total gonadotrophin dose. FP patients had more immature oocytes (2.2 versus 1.1; P=0.03) and lower fertilization rates per oocyte retrieved (52% versus 70%; P=0.002). There were no differences in numbers of oocytes retrieved, mature oocytes or fertilized embryos. Subgroup analysis revealed that FP patients taking letrozole required higher gonadotrophin doses (3077IU versus 2259IU; P=0.0477) and had more immature oocytes (3.4 versus 1.2; P=0.03) than matched controls. There were no differences in gonadotrophin dose or oocyte immaturity among FP patients not taking letrozole. Overall, chemotherapy naïve FP patients had similar ovarian reserve, response to stimulation and oocyte and embryo yield compared to controls. Patients who received letrozole required higher gonadotrophin doses and produced more immature oocytes, suggesting that response to ovarian stimulation may be impaired in patients with hormone-sensitive cancers receiving letrozole. With improvement in cancer survival rates, there has been a shift in attention toward management of long-term consequences of cancer therapy, including infertility. Many young women with cancer, particularly those who will be treated with chemotherapy, pursue fertility preservation (FP) strategies for the purpose of banking oocytes or embryos for future use. We examined patients with no prior exposure to chemotherapy who underwent IVF to freeze embryos or oocytes for FP. Fifty FP patients were identified and matched to healthy controls by age, race, cycle number, date of stimulation and fertilization

  7. Development of a music therapy assessment tool for patients in low awareness states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magee, Wendy L

    2007-01-01

    People in low awareness states following profound brain injury typically demonstrate subtle changes in functional behaviors which challenge the sensitivity of measurement tools. Failure to identify and measure changes in functioning can lead to misdiagnosis and withdrawal of treatment with this population. Thus, the development of tools which are sensitive to responsiveness is of central concern. As the auditory modality has been found to be particularly sensitive in identifying responses indicating awareness, a convincing case can be made for music therapy as a treatment medium. However, little has been recommended about protocols for intervention or tools for measuring patient responses within the music therapy setting. This paper presents the rationale for an assessment tool specifically designed to measure responses in the music therapy setting with patients who are diagnosed as minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. Developed over fourteen years as part of interdisciplinary assessment and treatment, the music therapy assessment tool for low awareness states (MATLAS) contains fourteen items which rate behavioral responses across a number of domains. The tool can provide important information for interdisciplinary assessment and treatment particularly in the auditory and communication domains. Recommendations are made for testing its reliability and validity through research.

  8. Response to microneedling treatment in men with androgenetic alopecia who failed to respond to conventional therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachita Dhurat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The efficacy of conventional therapy viz. finasteride and minoxidil in androgenetic alopecia (AGA that is based on both preventing hair loss and promoting new hair growth, varies between 30% and 60%. This has led to a large number of patients unsatisfied who demand for a better cosmetic coverage over the scalp. Microneedling has recently been reported to be promising, effective and a safe treatment modality in the treatment of AGA. This augments the response of conventional therapy. Materials and Methods: Four men with AGA were on finasteride and 5% minoxidil solution since 2 to 5 years. Though there was no worsening in their respective AGA stages with the therapy, they showed no new hair growth. They were subjected to microneedling procedure over a period of 6 months along with their ongoing therapy. Patients were assessed with the use of the standardized 7-point evaluation scale and patients′ subjective hair growth assessment scale. The patients were followed up for 18 months post microneedling procedure to assess the sustainability of the response. Results: All patients showed a response of + 2 to + 3 on standardized 7-point evaluation scale. The response in the form of new hair growth started after 8-10 sessions. The patients′ satisfaction was more than 75% in three patients and more 50% in one patient, on patients′ subjective hair growth assessment scale. The obtained results were sustained post procedure during 18 months follow-up period. Conclusion : Treatment with microneedling showed an accelerated response with addition of microneedling procedure leading to significant scalp density. This is the first case series to report the boosting effect of microneedling with respect to new hair follicle stimulation in patients with androgenetic alopecia who were poor responders to conventional therapy.

  9. Assessment of Mobile Accident Response Capability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-03-01

    This report presents the results of a DOE-sponsored assessment of nuclear accident response resources. It identifies the mobile resources that could be required to respond to different types of nuclear accidents including major ones like TMI-2, identifies the resources currently available and makes recommendations for the design and construction of additional mobile accident response resources to supplement those already in existence. This project is referred to as the Mobile Accident Response Capability (MARC) program

  10. Desmoid fibromatosis: MRI features of response to systemic therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheth, Pooja J.; Subhawong, Ty K. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine/Jackson Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology, Miami, FL (United States); Del Moral, Spencer; Wilky, Breelyn A.; Trent, Jonathan C. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine/Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center, Division of Hematology/Oncology, Department of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); Cohen, Jonathan [Oncology and Radiation Associates, Miami, FL (United States); Rosenberg, Andrew E. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Miami, FL (United States); Temple, H.T. [Center for Orthopedic Innovations, Miami, FL (United States)

    2016-10-15

    Imaging criteria for measuring the response of desmoid fibromatosis to systemic therapy are not well established. We evaluated a series of patients with desmoids who underwent systemic therapy to document magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) features associated with a positive clinical response. This Institutional Review Board-approved retrospective study included 23 patients (mean age 40.5) with 29 extra-abdominal tumors. Therapeutic regimens included cytotoxic chemotherapy (n = 19), targeted therapy (n = 3), and nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDS; n = 1). Clinical effects were categorized as progressive disease, stable, or partial response. Maximum tumor dimension (D{sub max}), approximate tumor volume (V{sub Tumor}), and quantitative tumor T2 hyperintensity and contrast enhancement (relative to muscle) for pre- and post-treatment MRIs were compared. Three lesions progressed, 5 lesions were stable, whereas 21 showed a clinical response. D{sub max} decreased more in responders (mean -11.0 %) than in stable/progressive lesions (mean -3.6 and 0 % respectively, p = 0.28, ANOVA); by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST 1.1) 27 out of 29 lesions were ''stable,'' including the 3 progressive lesions. In responders, V{sub Tumor} change averaged -29.4 %, but -19.2 % and +32.5 % in stable and progressive lesions respectively (p = 0.002, ANOVA); by 3D criteria 14 out of 29 lesions showed a partial response. T2 hyperintensity decreased by 50-54 % in partial response/stable disease, but only by 10 % in progressive lesions (p = 0.049, t test). Changes in contrast enhancement ranged from -23 % to 0 %, but were not statistically significant among response groups (p = 0.37). Change in T2 hyperintensity showed a positive correlation with volumetric change (r = 0.40). Decreases in volume and T2 hyperintensity reflect the positive response of desmoid fibromatosis to systemic therapy; RECIST 1.1 criteria are not sensitive to clinically

  11. Predictive value of early viriological response for sustained viriological response in chronic hepatitis c with conventional interferon therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Awan, A.; Umar, M.; Khaar, H.T.B.; Kulsoom, A.; Minhas, Z.; Ambreen, S.; Habib, N.; Mumtaz, W.; Habib, F.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Hepatitis is a major public health problem in Pakistan due to its strong association with liver failure and hepatocellular carcinoma. In Pakistan, conventional interferon therapy along with Ribavirin is favoured especially in Government funded programs for treatment of Hepatitis C, over the more expensive Pegylated Interferon and Ribavirin combination therapy as recommended by Pakistan society of Gastroenterology and GI endoscopy due to its favourable results observed in genotype 3 which is the dominant genotype of this region. Objective of our study was to assess the viriological responses with standard interferon therapy and to determine the predictive values of early viriological response (EVR) for Sustained Viriological Response (SVR) in chronic hepatitis C patients treated with standard interferon therapy. Methods: A cross sectional study was conducted on patients with chronic hepatitis C having received standard interferon and ribavirin therapy for six months. EVR and SVR were noted for analysis. Positive and negative predictive values of EVR on SVR were calculated. Results: Out of the total sample (N=3075), 1946 (63.3 percentage) patients were tested for EVR. 1386 (71.2 percentage) were positive while 560 (28.8 percentage) were negative while 516 (16.8 percentage) were tested for SVR. Two hundred and eighty-five (55.2 percentage) were positive while 231 (44.8 percentage) were negative. EVR and SVR tested were N=117. Positive predictive value of EVR on SVR was 67.1 percentage and negative predictive value was 65.8 percentage. Statistically significant association between EVR and SVR was determined with Chi square statistic of 11.8 (p-value <0.0001). Conclusion: EVR is a good predictor of response of patients to standard interferon and ribavirin therapy. In the absence of an EVR, it seems imperative to stop further treatment. Virilogical responses with conventional interferon therapy are comparable to those of pegylated interferon therapy so

  12. Implant therapy in the esthetic zone: smile line assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourkouta, Stella

    2011-04-01

    Assessment of the smile or lip line is imperative when implant therapy is carried out in the esthetic zone. The smile is generally defined as high, average, or low. Females are reported to have higher lip lines than males, which means that they are at greater risk when placing and restoring implants in the esthetic zone. Maximum upper lip elevation, usually observed during a strained posed smile, should be assessed. This paper discusses some clinical observations and concepts in relation to smile line assessment for implant therapy in the esthetic zone. (Int J Periodontics Restorative Dent 2011;31:195-201.).

  13. Integrating Occupational Therapy Specific Assessments in Practice: Exploring Practitioner Experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Asaba

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Occupational therapists sometimes find it challenging to integrate client-centered and occupational therapy specific assessments in practice. The aim of this study was to explore the use of occupational therapy specific assessments such as the Assessment of Motor and Process Skills (AMPS among occupational therapists in Sweden and Japan. Methods. Interviews and qualitative thematic analyses were utilized. Findings. Four themes are reported: (1 use it or lose it, (2 simply no space until after hours, (3 biggest barriers can be colleagues, and (4 being more specific: communication. Conclusion. In keeping with previous studies, occupational therapists often find it challenging to implement client-centered and occupation-based assessment tools into practice. However, more work is needed to understand how best practices can be incorporated into a changing occupational therapy daily practice.

  14. Therapy response evaluation with positron emission tomography-computed tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segall, George M

    2010-12-01

    Positron emission tomography-computed tomography with F-18-fluorodeoxyglucose is widely used for evaluation of therapy response in patients with solid tumors but has not been as readily adopted in clinical trials because of the variability of acquisition and processing protocols and the absence of universal response criteria. Criteria proposed for clinical trials are difficult to apply in clinical practice, and gestalt impression is probably accurate in individual patients, especially with respect to the presence of progressive disease and complete response. Semiquantitative methods of determining tissue glucose metabolism, such as standard uptake value, can be a useful descriptor for levels of tissue glucose metabolism and changes in response to therapy if technical quality control measures are carefully maintained. The terms partial response, complete response, and progressive disease are best used in clinical trials in which the terms have specific meanings and precise definitions. In clinical practice, it may be better to use descriptive terminology agreed upon by imaging physicians and clinicians in their own practice. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Mental health consumer participation in undergraduate occupational therapy student assessment: No negative impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Alexandra; Yule, Elisa; Taylor, Michael; Imms, Christine

    2018-05-28

    Australian accreditation standards for occupational therapy courses require consumer participation in the design, delivery and evaluation of programs. This study investigated whether a mental health consumer - as one of two assessors for an oral assessment in a mental health unit - impacted engagement, anxiety states and academic performance of undergraduate occupational therapy students. Students (n = 131 eligible) self-selected into two groups but were blinded to the group differences (assessor panel composition) until shortly prior to the oral assessment. Control group assessors were two occupational therapy educators, while consumer group assessors included an occupational therapy educator and a mental health consumer. Pre- and post-assessment data were successfully matched for 79 students (overall response rate = 73.1%). No evidence was found of significant differences between the two groups for engagement, anxiety or academic performance (all P values >0.05). Including mental health consumers as assessors did not negatively impact student engagement and academic performance, nor increase student anxiety beyond that typically observed in oral assessment tasks. The findings provide support for expanding the role of mental health consumers in the education and assessment of occupational therapy students. Development of methods to determine the efficacy of consumer involvement remains an area for future research. © 2018 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  16. Atypical and Typical Winter Depressive Symptoms and Responsiveness to Light Therapy, Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy, or Combination Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johnson, Leigh G; Rohan, Kelly J

    2005-01-01

    ...), group cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), or combination therapy (CBT+LT). Atypical and typical symptoms were assessed using subscales of the Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression - SAD Version (SIGH-SAD...

  17. [Immune response in therapy with allergens and allergoids].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalveram, C M; Kalveram, K J; Kästner, H; Forck, G

    1986-02-01

    We report on the patterns of specific IgE, IgG, and IgA antibodies during different kinds of hyposensitization. Whereas sIgE antibodies may even be influenced by environmental stimulants, the production of sIgG antibodies depends on the amount of antigens injected for therapy. There is some evidence that patients who do not reveal sIgG response have increased sIgA antibody titers, instead.

  18. Nomograms Predicting Response to Therapy and Outcomes After Bladder-Preserving Trimodality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coen, John J., E-mail: jcoen@harthosp.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Paly, Jonathan J.; Niemierko, Andrzej [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Kaufman, Donald S. [Department of Medical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Heney, Niall M. [Department of Urology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Spiegel, Daphne Y.; Efstathiou, Jason A.; Zietman, Anthony L.; Shipley, William U. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Selective bladder preservation by use of trimodality therapy is an established management strategy for muscle-invasive bladder cancer. Individual disease features have been associated with response to therapy, likelihood of bladder preservation, and disease-free survival. We developed prognostic nomograms to predict the complete response rate, disease-specific survival, and likelihood of remaining free of recurrent bladder cancer or cystectomy. Methods and Materials: From 1986 to 2009, 325 patients were managed with selective bladder preservation at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and had complete data adequate for nomogram development. Treatment consisted of a transurethral resection of bladder tumor followed by split-course chemoradiation. Patients with a complete response at midtreatment cystoscopic assessment completed radiation, whereas those with a lesser response underwent a prompt cystectomy. Prognostic nomograms were constructed predicting complete response (CR), disease-specific survival (DSS), and bladder-intact disease-free survival (BI-DFS). BI-DFS was defined as the absence of local invasive or regional recurrence, distant metastasis, bladder cancer-related death, or radical cystectomy. Results: The final nomograms included information on clinical T stage, presence of hydronephrosis, whether a visibly complete transurethral resection of bladder tumor was performed, age, sex, and tumor grade. The predictive accuracy of these nomograms was assessed. For complete response, the area under the receiving operating characteristic curve was 0.69. The Harrell concordance index was 0.61 for both DSS and BI-DFS. Conclusions: Our nomograms allow individualized estimates of complete response, DSS, and BI-DFS. They may assist patients and clinicians making important treatment decisions.

  19. A model for predicting lung cancer response to therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seibert, Rebecca M.; Ramsey, Chester R.; Hines, J. Wesley; Kupelian, Patrick A.; Langen, Katja M.; Meeks, Sanford L.; Scaperoth, Daniel D.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: Volumetric computed tomography (CT) images acquired by image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) systems can be used to measure tumor response over the course of treatment. Predictive adaptive therapy is a novel treatment technique that uses volumetric IGRT data to actively predict the future tumor response to therapy during the first few weeks of IGRT treatment. The goal of this study was to develop and test a model for predicting lung tumor response during IGRT treatment using serial megavoltage CT (MVCT). Methods and Materials: Tumor responses were measured for 20 lung cancer lesions in 17 patients that were imaged and treated with helical tomotherapy with doses ranging from 2.0 to 2.5 Gy per fraction. Five patients were treated with concurrent chemotherapy, and 1 patient was treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Tumor response to treatment was retrospectively measured by contouring 480 serial MVCT images acquired before treatment. A nonparametric, memory-based locally weight regression (LWR) model was developed for predicting tumor response using the retrospective tumor response data. This model predicts future tumor volumes and the associated confidence intervals based on limited observations during the first 2 weeks of treatment. The predictive accuracy of the model was tested using a leave-one-out cross-validation technique with the measured tumor responses. Results: The predictive algorithm was used to compare predicted verse-measured tumor volume response for all 20 lesions. The average error for the predictions of the final tumor volume was 12%, with the true volumes always bounded by the 95% confidence interval. The greatest model uncertainty occurred near the middle of the course of treatment, in which the tumor response relationships were more complex, the model has less information, and the predictors were more varied. The optimal days for measuring the tumor response on the MVCT images were on elapsed Days 1, 2, 5, 9, 11, 12, 17, and 18 during

  20. 77 FR 71194 - Draft Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-29

    ...] Draft Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy... Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products,'' dated November... Evaluation (CBER), Office of Cellular, Tissue, and Gene Therapies (OCTGT). The product areas covered by this...

  1. STIR: Assessing and Training Response Inhibition Abilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-30

    Learning to stop responding to alcohol cues reduces alcohol intake via reduced affective associations rather than increased response inhibition. Addiction ...requires an abstract application of the core learning principle1,2, and viable examples are often hard to find and/or assess. If exposure to non...inhibition training that expands upon previous successful “near transfer” response inhibition training efforts—such as treating alcohol addictions by

  2. Optimal dose-response relationships in voice therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Nelson

    2012-10-01

    Like other areas of speech-language pathology, the behavioural management of voice disorders lacks precision regarding optimal dose-response relationships. In voice therapy, dosing can presumably vary from no measurable effect (i.e., no observable benefit or adverse effect), to ideal dose (maximum benefit with no adverse effects), to doses that produce toxic or harmful effects on voice production. Practicing specific vocal exercises will inevitably increase vocal load. At ideal doses, these exercises may be non-toxic and beneficial, while at intermediate or high doses, the same exercises may actually be toxic or damaging to vocal fold tissues. In pharmacology, toxicity is a critical concept, yet it is rarely considered in voice therapy, with little known regarding "effective" concentrations of specific voice therapies vs "toxic" concentrations. The potential for vocal fold tissue damage related to overdosing on specific vocal exercises has been under-studied. In this commentary, the issue of dosing will be explored within the context of voice therapy, with particular emphasis placed on possible "overdosing".

  3. Childhood asthma clusters and response to therapy in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Lemanske, Robert F; Mauger, David T; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Page, C David; Jackson, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Childhood asthma clusters, or subclasses, have been developed by computational methods without evaluation of clinical utility. To replicate and determine whether childhood asthma clusters previously identified computationally in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) are associated with treatment responses in Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network clinical trials. A cluster assignment model was determined by using SARP participant data. A total of 611 participants 6 to 18 years old from 3 CARE trials were assigned to SARP pediatric clusters. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by cluster in each trial. CARE participants were assigned to SARP clusters with high accuracy. Baseline characteristics were similar between SARP and CARE children of the same cluster. Treatment response in CARE trials was generally similar across clusters. However, with the caveat of a smaller sample size, children in the early-onset/severe-lung function cluster had best response with fluticasone/salmeterol (64% vs 23% 2.5× fluticasone and 13% fluticasone/montelukast in the Best ADd-on Therapy Giving Effective Responses trial; P = .011) and children in the early-onset/comorbidity cluster had the least clinical efficacy to treatments (eg, -0.076% change in FEV1 in the Characterizing Response to Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist and Inhaled Corticosteroid trial). In this study, we replicated SARP pediatric asthma clusters by using a separate, large clinical trials network. Early-onset/severe-lung function and early-onset/comorbidity clusters were associated with differential and limited response to therapy, respectively. Further prospective study of therapeutic response by cluster could provide new insights into childhood asthma treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Theory and Practice of Positive Feminist Therapy: A Culturally Responsive Approach to Divorce Therapy with Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzou, Jean Yuh-Jin; Kim, Eunha; Waldheim, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Positive Feminist Therapy (PFT) is a strength-based culturally responsive therapy model specifically designed for helping Chinese women facing marital conflicts and divorce, integrating Empowerment Feminist Therapy, systems theory, and positive psychology. To help clients become change agents, PFT uses clients' existing strengths to develop…

  5. Emotional responses to music: towards scientific perspectives on music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Miyuki; Morimoto, Kanehisa; Obata, Akiko; Koizumi, Hideaki; Maki, Atsushi

    2008-01-08

    Neurocognitive research has the potential to identify the relevant effects of music therapy. In this study, we examined the effect of music mode (major vs. minor) on stress reduction using optical topography and an endocrinological stress marker. In salivary cortisol levels, we observed that stressful conditions such as mental fatigue (thinking and creating a response) was reduced more by major mode music than by minor mode music. We suggest that music specifically induces an emotional response similar to a pleasant experience or happiness. Moreover, we demonstrated the typical asymmetrical pattern of stress responses in upper temporal cortex areas, and suggested that happiness/sadness emotional processing might be related to stress reduction by music.

  6. Primary intestinal and thoracic lymphangiectasia: a response to antiplasmin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, Joanna E; Cohen, Eyal; Weinstein, Michael

    2002-06-01

    Lymphangiectasia is a congenital or acquired disorder characterized by abnormal, dilated lymphatics with a variable age of presentation. We describe a case of lymphangiectasia with intestinal and pulmonary involvement in an adolescent female, who presented with many of the classic features including chylous pleural effusions, lymphopenia, hypogammaglobinemia, and a protein-losing enteropathy. She also presented with recurrent lower gastrointestinal bleeding, which is infrequently described. The patient did not improve with bowel rest and a low-fat medium-chain triglyceride diet and had little improvement with octreotide acetate therapy. However, she had a clinical response to antiplasmin therapy, trans-4-aminothylcyclohexamine carboxylic acid (tranexamic acid) in terms of serum albumin and gastrointestinal bleeding. She continues to have exacerbations of her condition, as well as persistent lymphopenia and chronic pleural effusions.

  7. Lymphocytic Colitis: Pathologic predictors of response to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Setia, Namrata; Alpert, Lindsay; van der Sloot, Kimberley Wj; Colussi, Dora; Stewart, Kathleen O; Misdraji, Joseph; Khalili, Hamed; Lauwers, Gregory Y

    2018-02-13

    While the presence of intraepithelial lymphocytosis with surface epithelial damage is a unifying feature of lymphocytic colitis, there are non-classical features that create morphologic heterogeneity between cases. Limited data are available on the significance of these secondary histologic features. Cases of lymphocytic colitis diagnosed between 2002 and 2013 were identified using the Research Patient Data Registry of a tertiary referral center. Diagnostic biopsy slides were reviewed and evaluated for histologic features of lymphocytic colitis. Clinical data including type of therapy and response to treatment were collected. Chi-square (or Fischer's exact test) and logistic regression analysis were used where appropriate. Thirty-two cases of lymphocytic colitis with complete clinical data and slides available for review were identified. The mean age was 56.4 years, and the female-to-male ratio was 3:2. Eleven (11) patients improved with minimal intervention (Group 1), 14 patients responded to steroid therapy (Group 2), and 7 patients responded to mesalamine, bismuth subsalicylate and/or cholestyramine therapy (Group 3). Histologic differences in the characteristics of the subepithelial collagen table (p=0.018), the severity of lamina propria inflammation (p=0.042) and the presence of eosinophil clusters (p=0.016) were seen between groups 2 and 3. Patients in group 1 were more likely to have mild crypt architectural distortion in their biopsies than patients in groups 2 and 3. Lymphocytic colitis is a heterogeneous disease and the evaluation of histologic factors may help identify various subtypes and predict therapy response. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Neurophysiological and behavioural responses to music therapy in vegetative and minimally conscious states

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian eO'Kelly

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Assessment of awareness for those with disorders of consciousness (DOC is a challenging undertaking, due to the complex presentation of the population, where misdiagnosis rates remain high. Music therapy may be effective in the assessment and rehabilitation with this population due to effects of musical stimuli on arousal, attention and emotion, irrespective of verbal or motor deficits, however, an evidence base is lacking. To address this, a neurophysiological and behavioural study was undertaken comparing EEG, heart rate variability, respiration and behavioural responses of 20 healthy subjects with 21 individuals in vegetative or minimally conscious states (VS or MCS. Subjects were presented with live preferred music and improvised music entrained to respiration (i.e., music therapy procedures, recordings of disliked music, white noise and silence. ANOVA tests indicated a range of significant responses (p ≤ 0.05 across healthy subjects corresponding to arousal and attention in response to preferred music including concurrent increases in respiration rate with globally enhanced EEG power spectra responses across frequency bandwidths. Whilst physiological responses were heterogeneous across patients, significant post hoc EEG amplitude increases for stimuli associated with preferred music were found for frontal midline theta in 6 VS and 4 MCS subjects, and frontal alpha in 3 VS and 4 MCS subjects (p = 0.05 - 0.0001. Furthermore, behavioural data showed a significantly increased blink rate for preferred music (p = 0.029 across the VS cohort. Two VS cases are presented with concurrent changes (p ≤ 0.05 across measures indicative of discriminatory responses to both music therapy procedures. A MCS case study highlights how more sensitive selective attention may distinguish MCS from VS. Further investigation is warranted to explore the use of music therapy for prognostic indicators, and its potential to support neuroplasticity in rehabilitation

  9. Assessment of patients' knowledge of their drug therapy in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Patients' knowledge of their medications is an important factor in ensuring adherence. Medication adherence is essential for rational drug use and derivation of optimal therapy. This study was conducted to assess knowledge of outpatients regarding their medications. A well structured questionnaire was administered to 200 ...

  10. Therapeutic responses in systematic targeted alpha therapy trial for melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raja, C.; Rizvi, S.M.A.; Song, E.Y.; Graham, P.; Kearsley, J.H.; Goldsmith, H.; Bosserhoff, A.; Morgenstern, A.; Apostolidis, C.; Reisfeld, R.

    2006-01-01

    Full text: The therapeutic response of melanoma patients after systemic alpha therapy has been investigated in an open-labeled Phase 1 dose escalation study to establish the effective dose of alpha-immunoconjugate 2l3 Bi-cDTPA-9.2.27 mAb (AIC). The tools used to investigate the effects were physical examination; the images of the tumours, pathology comparisons over 12 weeks; CT comparisons and changes in tumour marker over 8 weeks. The physical examination indicated varied tumour responses. One patient showed complete response at 12 weeks post-TAT, with 20 of 21 tumours completely regressing, the last reduced by 80%. The tumour beds were biopsied for staining; S l OO was negative and no viable cells were observed. Most patients showed stable disease at 2 weeks. In one patient the CT comparison of 8 weeks with baseline showed marked reduction in three lung lesions. At least 4/21 patients showed partial response at 4 to 8 weeks and the same number showed stable disease. The disease progressed in 7 patients. The tumour marker melanoma inhibitory activity protein (MIA) showed reductions over 8 weeks, and was consistent with observations in most patients. Complete and partial responses were observed in systemic TAT for stage IV melanoma, but there was no dose-response relationship

  11. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth, E-mail: ganss@waimr.uwa.edu.au [Western Australian Institute for Medical Research, Centre for Medical Research, University of Western Australia, Perth 6000 (Australia)

    2012-03-27

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy.

  12. Remodeling of Tumor Stroma and Response to Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johansson, Anna; Ganss, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Solid tumors are intrinsically resistant to therapy. Cancer progression occurs when tumor cells orchestrate responses from diverse stromal cell types such as blood vessels and their support cells, inflammatory cells, and fibroblasts; these cells collectively form the tumor microenvironment and provide direct support for tumor growth, but also evasion from cytotoxic, immune and radiation therapies. An indirect result of abnormal and leaky blood vessels in solid tumors is high interstitial fluid pressure, which reduces drug penetration, but also creates a hypoxic environment that further augments tumor cell growth and metastatic spread. Importantly however, studies during the last decade have shown that the tumor stroma, including the vasculature, can be modulated, or re-educated, to allow better delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs or enhance the efficiency of active immune therapy. Such remodeling of the tumor stroma using genetic, pharmacological and other therapeutic approaches not only enhances selective access into tumors but also reduces toxic side effects. This review focuses on recent novel concepts to modulate tumor stroma and thus locally increase therapeutic efficacy

  13. Assessment of adherence to visual correction and occlusion therapy in the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn Drews-Botsch

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Occlusion therapy throughout early childhood is believed to be efficacious in treating deprivation amblyopia but has not been rigorously assessed in clinical trials. Further, tools to assess adherence to such therapy over an extended period of time are lacking. Using data from the Infant Aphakia Treatment Study, a randomized clinical trial of treatment for unilateral congenital cataract, we examined the use of quarterly 48-h recall interviews and annual 7-day prospective diaries to assess reported hours of patching in 114 children throughout the first 5 years of life. Consistency of data reported was assessed using correlation coefficients and intraclass correlation coefficients. Both interview and diary data showed excellent consistency with Cronbach’s Alpha’s ranging from 0.69 to 0.88 for hours of patching and 0.60 to 0.73 for hours of sleep. However, caregivers reported somewhat more adherence in prospective diaries than retrospective interviews. Completion rates, on the other hand, were substantially higher for telephone interviews than prospective diaries. For example, four years after surgery response rates to telephone interviews exceeded 75% versus completion rates of only 54% for diaries. In situations where occlusion dose monitors cannot be used for assessing adherence to occlusion therapy, such as in infants or over an extended period of time, quantitative assessments of occlusion therapy can be obtained by parental report, either as a series of prospective diaries or a series of recall interviews.

  14. Orbitofrontal cortex, emotional decision-making and response to cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, Preethi; Fannon, Dominic; Sapara, Adegboyega; Peters, Emmanuelle R; Anilkumar, Anantha P; Simmons, Andrew; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Kumari, Veena

    2015-03-30

    Grey matter volume (GMV) in the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) may relate to better response to cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis (CBTp) because of the region׳s role in emotional decision-making and cognitive flexibility. This study aimed to determine the relation between pre-therapy OFC GMV or asymmetry, emotional decision-making and CBTp responsiveness. Emotional decision-making was measured by the Iowa Gambling task (IGT). Thirty patients received CBTp+standard care (CBTp+SC; 25 completers) for 6-8 months. All patients (before receiving CBTp) and 25 healthy participants underwent structural magnetic resonance imaging. Patients׳ symptoms were assessed before and after therapy. Pre-therapy OFC GMV was measured using a region-of-interest approach, and IGT performance was measured as overall learning, attention to reward, memory for past outcomes and choice consistency. Both these measures, were comparable between patient and healthy groups. In the CBTp+SC group, greater OFC GMV correlated with positive symptom improvement, specifically hallucinations and persecution. Greater rightward OFC asymmetry correlated with improvement in several negative and general psychopathology symptoms. Greater left OFC GMV was associated with lower IGT attention to reward. The findings suggest that greater OFC volume and rightward asymmetry, which maintain the OFC׳s function in emotional decision-making and cognitive flexibility, are beneficial for CBTp responsiveness. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  15. Defibrotide for the treatment of sinusoidal obstruction syndrome: evaluation of response to therapy and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coutsouvelis, John; Avery, Sharon; Dooley, Michael; Kirkpatrick, Carl; Spencer, Andrew

    2018-03-01

    Defibrotide is an agent used to treat sinusoidal obstruction syndrome (SOS/VOD) in patients undergoing haemopoietic stem cell transplantation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of defibrotide used within institutional guidelines for the treatment of SOS/VOD in patients undergoing haemopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Data for 23 patients was retrospectively reviewed to evaluate the effectiveness of defibrotide and the utility of response criteria to direct therapy as specified within institution guidelines. Patients met institutional criteria for a diagnosis of SOS/VOD based on predominantly Baltimore criteria and received defibrotide. Stabilisation or improvement in symptoms and biochemical markers was required for continuation of therapy with defibrotide. Overall, 14 patients responded to therapy. Survival at day 100 post HSCT was 70%. Median serum (total) bilirubin concentrations in all evaluable patients had decreased at days 5 and 10 (p defibrotide, there was a decrease in the proportion of patients exhibiting hepatomegaly (p = 0.02), ascites (p Defibrotide to treat SOS/VOD and continued based on attainment of early response was effective management of this condition. Defibrotide should be considered in any consensus protocol providing guidance on the management of SOS/VOD, with future studies considered to assess appropriate time points for response to therapy during treatment.

  16. Treating Women Drug Abusers: Action Therapy and Trauma Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhler, Ann S.; Parker, Olga V.

    2002-01-01

    The authors suggest that action therapy, a group of techniques including psychodrama, drama therapy, and role training, warrants research attention to determine whether it is well suited to the special characteristics and needs of women clients. In addition, the authors call on researchers to develop a new standardized tool for counselors to use during initial interviews to determine whether women presenting for drug abuse treatment also have significant issues related to trauma. The authors believe the use of unassisted clinical judgment for trauma assessment in first interviews may drive patients away by probing for painful information that clients are not yet ready to confront or divulge. PMID:18567963

  17. Adjuvant endocrine therapy for premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Aju; Davidson, Nancy E

    2015-11-01

    Multiple strategies for endocrine treatment of premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer have been assessed and results have been presented over the last two years. These include tamoxifen for 5-10 years (ATLAS and aTTom), tamoxifen for 5 years followed by aromatase inhibitor (AI) for 5 years for women who have become postmenopausal (MA-17); ovarian ablation (OA) by surgery (EBCTCG overview); ovarian function suppression (OFS) by LHRH agonist (LHRH agonist meta-analysis); or combinations of approaches including OFS plus tamoxifen or AI (SOFT, TEXT, ABCSG 12 and E3193). Many of these trials have taken place in the backdrop of (neo)adjuvant chemotherapy which can confound interpretation because such therapy can suppress ovarian function either transiently or permanently. Nonetheless these trials suggest in aggregate that 10 years of tamoxifen are better than 5 years and that a program of extended adjuvant therapy of tamoxifen for 5 years followed by aromatase inhibitor for 5 years is effective for suitable candidates. The SOFT and E3193 trials do not show a major advantage for use of OFS + tamoxifen compared to tamoxifen alone. The joint SOFT/TEXT analysis and ABCGS12 trials both suggest that outcomes can be excellent with the use of combined endocrine therapy alone in properly selected patients but give conflicting results with regard to potential benefits for OFS + AI compared with OFS + tamoxifen. Further work will be needed to ascertain long-term outcomes, identify factors that predict who will benefit from extended adjuvant endocrine therapy, and assess role of OFS by medical or surgical means. It is clear, however, that endocrine therapy is a critical part of the adjuvant regimen for most premenopausal women with hormone-responsive breast cancer, and a subset of these women with luminal A-type tumors can be safely treated with endocrine therapy alone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Clinical implications of heterogeneity of tumor response to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, H.; Skates, S.; Taghian, A.; Okunieff, P.; Efird, J.T.

    1992-01-01

    Heterogeneity of response of tumor tissue to radiation clearly exists. Major parameters include histopathologic type, size (number of tumor rescue units (TRUs)), hemoglobin concentration, cell proliferation kinetics and immune rejection reaction by host. Further, normal and presumably tumor tissue response is altered in certain genetic diseases, e.g. ataxia telangiectasia. Any assessment of response of tumor tissue to a new treatment method or the testing of a new clinical response predictor is optimally based upon a narrow strata, viz., uniform with respect to known parameters of response, e.g. size, histological type. Even among tumors of such a clinical defined narrow strata, there will be residual heterogeneity with respect to inherent cellular radiation sensitivity, distributions of pO 2 , (SH), cell proliferation, etc. (author). 39 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs

  19. Genetic Predictors of Response to Systemic Therapy in Esophagogastric Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjigian, Yelena Y; Sanchez-Vega, Francisco; Jonsson, Philip; Chatila, Walid K; Hechtman, Jaclyn F; Ku, Geoffrey Y; Riches, Jamie C; Tuvy, Yaelle; Kundra, Ritika; Bouvier, Nancy; Vakiani, Efsevia; Gao, Jianjiong; Heins, Zachary J; Gross, Benjamin E; Kelsen, David P; Zhang, Liying; Strong, Vivian E; Schattner, Mark; Gerdes, Hans; Coit, Daniel G; Bains, Manjit; Stadler, Zsofia K; Rusch, Valerie W; Jones, David R; Molena, Daniela; Shia, Jinru; Robson, Mark E; Capanu, Marinela; Middha, Sumit; Zehir, Ahmet; Hyman, David M; Scaltriti, Maurizio; Ladanyi, Marc; Rosen, Neal; Ilson, David H; Berger, Michael F; Tang, Laura; Taylor, Barry S; Solit, David B; Schultz, Nikolaus

    2018-01-01

    The incidence of esophagogastric cancer is rapidly rising, but only a minority of patients derive durable benefit from current therapies. Chemotherapy as well as anti-HER2 and PD-1 antibodies are standard treatments. To identify predictive biomarkers of drug sensitivity and mechanisms of resistance, we implemented prospective tumor sequencing of patients with metastatic esophagogastric cancer. There was no association between homologous recombination deficiency defects and response to platinum-based chemotherapy. Patients with microsatellite instability-high tumors were intrinsically resistant to chemotherapy but more likely to achieve durable responses to immunotherapy. The single Epstein-Barr virus-positive patient achieved a durable, complete response to immunotherapy. The level of ERBB2 amplification as determined by sequencing was predictive of trastuzumab benefit. Selection for a tumor subclone lacking ERBB2 amplification, deletion of ERBB2 exon 16, and comutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase, RAS, and PI3K pathways were associated with intrinsic and/or acquired trastuzumab resistance. Prospective genomic profiling can identify patients most likely to derive durable benefit to immunotherapy and trastuzumab and guide strategies to overcome drug resistance. Significance: Clinical application of multiplex sequencing can identify biomarkers of treatment response to contemporary systemic therapies in metastatic esophagogastric cancer. This large prospective analysis sheds light on the biological complexity and the dynamic nature of therapeutic resistance in metastatic esophagogastric cancers. Cancer Discov; 8(1); 49-58. ©2017 AACR. See related commentary by Sundar and Tan, p. 14 See related article by Pectasides et al., p. 37 This article is highlighted in the In This Issue feature, p. 1 . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  20. Multisurface Interpersonal Assessment in a Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, Sindes; Pincus, Aaron L

    2016-01-01

    The interpersonal paradigm of personality assessment provides a rich nomological net for describing and assessing constructs of interpersonal functioning. The aim of this article is to demonstrate for clinicians how the use of a multisurface interpersonal assessment (MSIA) battery can augment psychotherapy (e.g., cognitive-behavioral therapy). We present 2 clinical case examples and specify interpretative guidelines for MSIA that integrate multiple circumplex profiles (e.g., problems, traits, sensitivities, strengths, values, and efficacies) for each patient. Subsequently, we demonstrate how this approach provides a context to better understand patient symptoms and difficulties, and discuss how it can inform case conceptualization, treatment planning, and intervention.

  1. Integrative modeling of transcriptional regulation in response to antirheumatic therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiesen Hans-Juergen

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The investigation of gene regulatory networks is an important issue in molecular systems biology and significant progress has been made by combining different types of biological data. The purpose of this study was to characterize the transcriptional program induced by etanercept therapy in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA. Etanercept is known to reduce disease symptoms and progression in RA, but the underlying molecular mechanisms have not been fully elucidated. Results Using a DNA microarray dataset providing genome-wide expression profiles of 19 RA patients within the first week of therapy we identified significant transcriptional changes in 83 genes. Most of these genes are known to control the human body's immune response. A novel algorithm called TILAR was then applied to construct a linear network model of the genes' regulatory interactions. The inference method derives a model from the data based on the Least Angle Regression while incorporating DNA-binding site information. As a result we obtained a scale-free network that exhibits a self-regulating and highly parallel architecture, and reflects the pleiotropic immunological role of the therapeutic target TNF-alpha. Moreover, we could show that our integrative modeling strategy performs much better than algorithms using gene expression data alone. Conclusion We present TILAR, a method to deduce gene regulatory interactions from gene expression data by integrating information on transcription factor binding sites. The inferred network uncovers gene regulatory effects in response to etanercept and thus provides useful hypotheses about the drug's mechanisms of action.

  2. An audit about music therapy assessments and recommendations for adult patients suspected to be in a low awareness state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daveson, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    In neuro-rehabilitation, the role of music therapy is expanding to include assessment of patients with severely-altered states of consciousness. Diagnosis of these conditions is a complex task for all, and cases of misdiagnosis have been reported. Aggregated findings from 33 music therapy assessments of patients suspected of being in a low awareness state are described and discussed here. The Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Low Awareness States (MATLAS) was used during these assessments. All assessments were offered as part of a specialist multidisciplinary assessment package. A brief description of the patient group is supplied, along with details regarding the assessment tool and the recommendations that followed. In summary, a difference in the time it took to assess patients in vegetative state (VS) as compared to those in minimally conscious state (MCS) was found and, on average, the assessment of those in VS took less time to complete than for those in MCS. A greater range in session length was found for patients in VS, as compared to those in MCS. Generally after the assessments, patients in VS were likely to be admitted to a sensory regulation group administered by a music therapy assistant, supervised by a qualified music therapist, to enable the continued collection of behavioral responses to stimuli. Patients in MCS were admitted to a music therapy treatment program offered by a qualified music therapist. Ongoing work is recommended to advance the assessment and treatment of this patient population, and to consolidate the role of music therapy with this population.

  3. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  4. Development of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Advanced Huntington's Disease: A Pilot Validation Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Kelly, Julian; Bodak, Rebeka

    2016-01-01

    Case studies of people with Huntington's disease (HD) report that music therapy provides a range of benefits that may improve quality of life; however, no robust music therapy assessment tools exist for this population. Develop and conduct preliminary psychometric testing of a music therapy assessment tool for patients with advanced HD. First, we established content and face validity of the Music Therapy Assessment Tool for Advanced HD (MATA-HD) through focus groups and field testing. Second, we examined psychometric properties of the resulting MATA-HD in terms of its construct validity, internal consistency, and inter-rater and intra-rater reliability over 10 group music therapy sessions with 19 patients. The resulting MATA-HD included a total of 15 items across six subscales (Arousal/Attention, Physical Presentation, Communication, Musical, Cognition, and Psychological/Behavioral). We found good construct validity (r ≥ 0.7) for Mood, Communication Level, Communication Effectiveness, Choice, Social Behavior, Arousal, and Attention items. Cronbach's α of 0.825 indicated good internal consistency across 11 items with a common focus of engagement in therapy. The inter-rater reliability (IRR) Intra-Class Coefficient (ICC) scores averaged 0.65, and a mean intra-rater ICC reliability of 0.68 was obtained. Further training and retesting provided a mean of IRR ICC of 0.7. Preliminary data indicate that the MATA-HD is a promising tool for measuring patient responses to music therapy interventions across psychological, physical, social, and communication domains of functioning in patients with advanced HD. © the American Music Therapy Association 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Therapy assessment in prostate cancer using choline and PSMA PET/CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceci, Francesco; Castellucci, Paolo; Fanti, Stefano [University of Bologna, Nuclear Medicine Unit, S. Orsola-Malpighi University Hospital, Bologna (Italy); Herrmann, Ken [University Hospital Essen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Essen (Germany); University of California Los Angeles, Department of Molecular and Medical Pharmacology, David Geffen School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Hadaschik, Boris [University Hospital Essen, Department of Urology, Essen (Germany)

    2017-08-15

    While PET with non-FDG tracers (mainly choline and Ga-PSMA) has commonly been used for restaging in men with biochemically recurrent prostate cancer, as well as for primary staging, it is only recently that a few preliminary studies have addressed the possible use of PET for monitoring the response to systemic therapy of metastatic disease, especially innovative treatments such as abiraterone and enzalutamide. This article aims to evaluate the role of PET imaging with different non-FDG radiotracers for assessment of therapy in advanced prostate cancer patients. (orig.)

  6. Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-08-01

    SUBJECT TERMS Cancer therapy by localized immune response, Magneto -rehological Fluids 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT...Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cahit Evrensel...2008 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy utilizing

  7. Difference of protein 53 expression based on radiation therapy response in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasaribu, H. P.; Lubis, L. I.; Dina, S.; Simanjuntak, R. Y.; Siregar, H. S.; Rivany, R.

    2018-03-01

    Cervical cancer is one of most common gynecological cancer in women and the leading cause of death in developing countries. An analytic study with the case-control design was conducted to determine the difference of p53 expression based on radiation therapy response in cervical cancer. The study was performed in Obstetric and Gynecology Department and Pathology Department of Adam Malik General Hospital Medan from January to February 2017. 15 paraffin blocks of acervical cancer patient with incomplete response were obtained as study samples, and 15 paraffin blocks of acervical cancer patient with complete response were obtained as control samples, The samples were collected by consecutive sampling, andan immunohistochemical assessment of p53 expression was done to assessapoptosis count and radiation response. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis with confidence interval 83.5% and pcervical cancer.

  8. Stage of readiness of patients with behavioral dysphonia in pre and post-group voice therapy assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Bianca Oliveira Ismael da; Silva, Priscila Oliveira Costa; Pinheiro, Renata Serrano de Andrade; Silva, Hêmmylly Farias da; Almeida, Anna Alice Figueirêdo de

    2017-08-10

    To verify the efficacy of group voice therapy in the stage of readiness and identify which items of the URICA-Voice range are more sensitive to post-therapy change in patients with behavioral dysphonia. An intervention study was conducted on 49 patients with behavioral dysphonia. An eclectic approach to group therapy was implemented over eight sessions, the first and last sessions consisting of assessments. The URICA-Voice range was used to evaluate the stage of readiness at pre- and post-therapy assessments. A descriptive and inferential statistical analysis was implemented for the results. Most participants were female, did not make professional use of voice, and had membranous vocal fold lesions. Most of them were in the Contemplation stage at in both moments, pre- and post-therapy. There was no significant change in the comparison of pre- and post-therapy scores. The majority of patients showed a reduction in the stage of readiness and some advanced to a higher stage. In the comparison of URICA-V range items, seven questions had equal or inferior responses in the post-therapy assessment. There was no statistical difference when comparing the pre- and post-therapy total average score of the URICA-Voice range. There were significant changes in the stage of readiness of patients in pre- and post-group speech therapy assessments.

  9. Response to pediatric physical therapy in infants with positional preference and skull deformation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, R.M. van; Pelsma, M.; Groothuis-Oudshoorn, C.G.; IJzerman, M.J.; Vlimmeren, L.A. van; Boere-Boonekamp, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pediatric physical therapy seems to reduce skull deformation in infants with positional preference. However, not all infants show improvement. OBJECTIVE: The study objective was to determine which infant and parent characteristics were related to responses to pediatric physical therapy

  10. Esophageal mucosal breaks in gastroesophageal reflux disease partially responsive to proton pump inhibitor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Nicholas J; Denison, Hans; Björck, Karin; Silberg, Debra G

    2013-04-01

    Approximately 20-30% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) do not experience complete symptom resolution during proton pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of esophageal mucosal breaks among patients who have a partial response to PPI therapy. This was an analysis of data from a phase 2b clinical trial carried out to assess the efficacy and safety of a reflux inhibitor, lesogaberan (AZD3355), as an add-on to PPI therapy in this patient population (clinicaltrials.gov reference: NCT01005251). A total of 661 patients with persistent GERD symptoms who had received a minimum of 4 weeks of PPI therapy were included in the study. The prevalence of esophageal mucosal breaks was assessed according to (i) the most recent endoscopy results from within the previous 24 months, if available ("historical" endoscopies), and (ii) the results of endoscopies performed at study baseline ("baseline" endoscopies). Baseline endoscopies were not carried out in patients who had a historical endoscopy showing an absence of esophageal mucosal breaks. Historical endoscopy results were available for 244 patients, of whom 48 (19.7%) had esophageal mucosal breaks. Baseline endoscopies were carried out in 465 patients, of whom 146 (31.4%) had esophageal mucosal breaks. Sensitivity analyses showed a prevalence of esophageal mucosal breaks of 20-30%. In both the historical and baseline endoscopies, most esophageal mucosal breaks were Los Angeles grades A or B. In patients with GERD symptoms partially responsive to PPI therapy, mild-to-moderate severity esophageal mucosal breaks are common (prevalence 20-30%), and may contribute to symptom etiology.

  11. Stimulation of dendritic cells enhances immune response after photodynamic therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mroz, Pawel; Castano, Ana P.; Hamblin, Michael R.

    2009-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) involves the administration of photosensitizers followed by illumination of the primary tumor with red light producing reactive oxygen species that cause vascular shutdown and tumor cell necrosis and apoptosis. Anti-tumor immunity is stimulated after PDT due to the acute inflammatory response, priming of the immune system to recognize tumor-associated antigens (TAA). The induction of specific CD8+ Tlymphocyte cells that recognize major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) restricted epitopes of TAAs is a highly desirable goal in cancer therapy. The PDT killed tumor cells may be phagocytosed by dendritic cells (DC) that then migrate to draining lymph nodes and prime naÃve T-cells that recognize TAA epitopes. This process is however, often sub-optimal, in part due to tumor-induced DC dysfunction. Instead of DC that can become mature and activated and have a potent antigen-presenting and immune stimulating phenotype, immature dendritic cells (iDC) are often found in tumors and are part of an immunosuppressive milieu including regulatory T-cells and immunosuppressive cytokines such as TGF-beta and IL10. We here report on the use of a potent DC activating agent, an oligonucleotide (ODN) that contains a non-methylated CpG motif and acts as an agonist of toll like receptor (TLR) 9. TLR activation is a danger signal to notify the immune system of the presence of invading pathogens. CpG-ODN (but not scrambled non-CpG ODN) increased bone-marrow DC activation after exposure to PDT-killed tumor cells, and significantly increased tumor response to PDT and mouse survival after peri-tumoral administration. CpG may be a valuable immunoadjuvant to PDT especially for tumors that produce DC dysfunction.

  12. Development and validation of the functional assessment of cancer therapy-antiangiogenesis subscale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Karen; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Webster, Kimberly; Yount, Susan E; Wagner, Lynne I; Kuzel, Timothy M; Cella, David

    2015-05-01

    The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy (FACT)-Antiangiogenesis (AntiA) Subscale was developed and validated to enhance treatment decision-making and side effect management for patients receiving anti-angiogenesis therapies. Side effects related to anti-angiogenesis therapies were identified from the literature, clinician input, and patient input. Fifty-nine possible patient expressions of side effects were generated. Patient and clinician ratings of the importance of these expressions led us to develop a 24-item questionnaire with clinical and research potential. To assess the scale's reliability and validity, 167 patients completed the AntiA Subscale, the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-general (FACT-G), the FACT-Kidney Symptom Index (FKSI), the FACIT-Fatigue Subscale, the Global Rating of Change Scale (GRC), and the PROMIS Global Health Scale. Patient responses to the AntiA were analyzed for internal consistency, test-retest reliability, convergent and discriminant validity, and responsiveness to change in clinical status. All tested scales were found to have good internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha 0.70-0.92). Test-retest reliability was also good (0.72-0.88) for total and subscale scores and lower for individual items. The total score, subscale scores, and all single items (except nosebleeds) significantly differentiated between groups defined by level of side effect bother. Evaluation of responsiveness to change in this study was not conclusive, suggesting an area for further research. The AntiA is a reliable and valid measure of side effects from anti-angiogenesis therapy. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Socioeconomic status and response to antiretroviral therapy in high-income countries: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Lisa S; Smith, Colette J; Phillips, Andrew N; Johnson, Margaret A; Lampe, Fiona C

    2016-05-15

    It has been shown that socioeconomic factors are associated with the prognosis of several chronic diseases; however, there is no recent systematic review of their effect on HIV treatment outcomes. We aimed to review the evidence regarding the existence of an association of socioeconomic status with virological and immunological response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). We systematically searched the current literature using the database PubMed. We identified and summarized original research studies in high-income countries that assessed the association between socioeconomic factors (education, employment, income/financial status, housing, health insurance, and neighbourhood-level socioeconomic factors) and virological response, immunological response, and ART nonadherence among people with HIV-prescribed ART. A total of 48 studies met the inclusion criteria (26 from the United States, six Canadian, 13 European, and one Australian), of which 14, six, and 35 analysed virological, immunological, and ART nonadherence outcomes, respectively. Ten (71%), four (67%), and 23 (66%) of these studies found a significant association between lower socioeconomic status and poorer response, and none found a significant association with improved response. Several studies showed that adjustment for nonadherence attenuated the association between socioeconomic status and ART response. Our review provides strong support that socioeconomic disadvantage is associated with poorer response to ART. However, most studies have been conducted in settings such as the United States without universal free healthcare access. Further study in settings with free access to ART could help assess the impact of socioeconomic status on ART outcomes and the mechanisms by which it operates.

  14. Proton therapy radiation pneumonitis local dose–response in esophagus cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Echeverria, Alfredo E.; McCurdy, Matthew; Castillo, Richard; Bernard, Vincent; Ramos, Natalia Velez; Buckley, William; Castillo, Edward; Liu, Ping; Martinez, Josue; Guerrero, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study quantifies pulmonary radiation toxicity in patients who received proton therapy for esophagus cancer. Materials/methods: We retrospectively studied 100 esophagus cancer patients treated with proton therapy. The linearity of the enhanced FDG uptake vs. proton dose was evaluated using the Akaike Information Criterion (AIC). Pneumonitis symptoms (RP) were assessed using the Common Toxicity Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv4). The interaction of the imaging response with dosimetric parameters and symptoms was evaluated. Results: The RP scores were: 0 grade 4/5, 7 grade 3, 20 grade 2, 37 grade 1, and 36 grade 0. Each dosimetric parameter was significantly higher for the symptomatic group. The AIC winning models were 30 linear, 52 linear quadratic, and 18 linear logarithmic. There was no significant difference in the linear coefficient between models. The slope of the FDG vs. proton dose response was 0.022 for the symptomatic and 0.012 for the asymptomatic (p = 0.014). Combining dosimetric parameters with the slope did not improve the sensitivity or accuracy in identifying symptomatic cases. Conclusions: The proton radiation dose response on FDG PET/CT imaging exhibited a predominantly linear dose response on modeling. Symptomatic patients had a higher dose response slope

  15. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  16. Predictors and Moderators of Response to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and Medication for the Treatment of Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grilo, Carlos M.; Masheb, Robin M.; Crosby, Ross D.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine predictors and moderators of response to cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and medication treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED). Method: 108 BED patients in a randomized double-blind placebo-controlled trial testing CBT and fluoxetine treatments were assessed prior, throughout, and posttreatment. Demographic factors,…

  17. [Partial response of solar urticaria to omalizumab therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalzick, L; Thiel, W; C Bielfeld; Ziegler, H; Eickenscheidt, L

    2017-06-01

    The treatment of solar urticaria is regarded as difficult. In some cases good responses to the anti-IgE antibody omalizumab (Xolair®), approved for treatment of chronic spontaneous urticaria, have been reported. We report on a 50-year-old Caucasian woman who for the last 5 years has developed localized itching and stinging erythemas following exposure to sunlight accompanied sometimes by anaphylactic reactions. Oral antihistamines in three- to four-fold doses and a topical sun screen had been only partially effective in long-term use. Positive immediate-type reactions with whealing appeared in phototesting with low doses of UVB and UVA. Three weeks after s. c. injection of 300 mg omalizumab, the minimal urticarial dose (MUD) for UVB was increased at least 20-fold (from omalizumab administration to 14 points in weeks two and three. Overall, a partial response of solar urticaria to omalizumab therapy could be observed in the present case.

  18. Correlating HIV tropism with immunological response under combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bader, J; Schöni-Affolter, F; Böni, J; Gorgievski-Hrisoho, M; Martinetti, G; Battegay, M; Klimkait, T

    2016-09-01

    A significant percentage of patients infected with HIV-1 experience only suboptimal CD4 cell recovery while treated with combination therapy (cART). It is still unclear whether viral properties such as cell tropism play a major role in this incomplete immune response. This study therefore intended to follow the tropism evolution of the HIV-1 envelope during periods of suppressive cART. Viruses from two distinct patient groups, one with good and another one with poor CD4 recovery after 5 years of suppressive cART, were genotypically analysed for viral tropism at baseline and at the end of the study period. Patients with CCR5-tropic CC-motif chemokine receptor 5 viruses at baseline tended to maintain this tropism to the study end. Patients who had a CXCR4-tropic CXC-motif chemokine receptor 4 virus at baseline were overrepresented in the poor CD4 recovery group. Overall, however, the majority of patients presented with CCR5-tropic viruses at follow-up. Our data lend support to the hypothesis that tropism determination can be used as a parameter for disease progression even if analysed long before the establishment of a poorer immune response. Moreover, the lasting predominating CCR5-tropism during periods of full viral control suggests the involvement of cellular mechanisms that preferentially reduce CXCR4-tropic viruses during cART. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  19. A pilot validation of a modified Illness Perceptions Questionnaire designed to predict response to cognitive therapy for psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Elena; Garety, Philippa; Weinman, John; Emsley, Richard; Dunn, Graham; Bebbington, Paul; Freeman, Daniel; Kuipers, Elizabeth; Fowler, David; Hardy, Amy; Waller, Helen; Jolley, Suzanne

    2014-12-01

    Clinical responsiveness to cognitive behavioural therapy for psychosis (CBTp) varies. Recent research has demonstrated that illness perceptions predict active engagement in therapy, and, thereby, better outcomes. In this study, we aimed to investigate the psychometric properties of a modification of the Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (M-IPQ) designed to predict response following CBTp. Fifty-six participants with persistent, distressing delusions completed the M-IPQ; forty before a brief CBT intervention targeting persecutory ideation and sixteen before and after a control condition. Additional predictors of outcome (delusional conviction, symptom severity and belief inflexibility) were assessed at baseline. Outcomes were assessed at baseline and at follow-up four to eight weeks later. The M-IPQ comprised two factors measuring problem duration and therapy-specific perceptions of Cure/Control. Associated subscales, formed by summing the relevant items for each factor, were reliable in their structure. The Cure/Control subscale was also reliable over time; showed convergent validity with other predictors of outcome; predicted therapy outcomes; and differentially predicted treatment effects. We measured outcome without an associated measure of engagement, in a small sample. Findings are consistent with hypothesis and existing research, but require replication in a larger, purposively recruited sample. The Cure/Control subscale of the M-IPQ shows promise as a predictor of response to therapy. Specifically targeting these illness perceptions in the early stages of cognitive behavioural therapy may improve engagement and, consequently, outcomes. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Provider-patient in-office discussions of response to hepatitis C antiviral therapy and impact on patient comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Heidi E; Nelson, Meaghan; Martin, Paul; Cotler, Scott J

    2006-04-01

    Providers need to communicate projected response rates effectively to enable patients with hepatitis C virus to make informed decisions about therapy. This study used interactional sociolinguistics (1) to evaluate how gastroenterologists and allied health professionals communicate information regarding response rates to antiviral therapy, (2) to determine how these discussions relate to where the patient is in the continuum of evaluation and treatment, (3) to assess whether patients were aligned with providers in their perceptions of response rates after office visits, and (4) to identify factors that improve provider-patient alignment. Gastroenterologists, allied health professionals, and patients with hepatitis C virus were videotaped and audiotaped during regularly scheduled visits. Postvisit interviews were conducted separately with patients and providers. Visits and postvisits were transcribed and analyzed using validated sociolinguistic techniques. The phase of hepatitis C virus treatment shaped the benchmarks of response talk, although across the treatment continuum providers overwhelmingly made strategic use of positive statistics, providing motivation. In postvisit interviews, 55% of providers and patients were aligned on response rates. Patients with a favorable outcome and patients who asked response-related questions in the visit were more likely to be aligned with providers. Areas identified for improvement included the tendency to discuss response rates before an individualized assessment could be made, balancing motivation and accuracy, and assessing the patient's perspective before delivering any bad news, if necessary. Sociolinguistic analysis provides a powerful tool to evaluate provider-patient interactions and to identify ways to improve in-office communication regarding antiviral therapy.

  1. Vectorization of ultrasound-responsive nanoparticles in placental mesenchymal stem cells for cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paris, Juan L; de la Torre, Paz; Victoria Cabañas, M; Manzano, Miguel; Grau, Montserrat; Flores, Ana I; Vallet-Regí, María

    2017-05-04

    A new platform constituted by engineered responsive nanoparticles transported by human mesenchymal stem cells is here presented as a proof of concept. Ultrasound-responsive mesoporous silica nanoparticles are coated with polyethylenimine to favor their effective uptake by decidua-derived mesenchymal stem cells. The responsive-release ability of the designed nanoparticles is confirmed, both in vial and in vivo. In addition, this capability is maintained inside the cells used as carriers. The migration capacity of the nanoparticle-cell platform towards mammary tumors is assessed in vitro. The efficacy of this platform for anticancer therapy is shown against mammary tumor cells by inducing the release of doxorubicin only when the cell vehicles are exposed to ultrasound.

  2. Chelation therapy after the Trial to Assess Chelation Therapy: results of a unique trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Maria D.; Escolar, Esteban; Lamas, Gervasio A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose of review EDTA chelation therapy has been in off-label use for the treatment of atherosclerosis. We review the results of the first large-scale randomized trial of this treatment. Recent findings The trial to assess chelation therapy was a $30 million National Institutes of Health-funded study of the safety and efficacy of EDTA-based chelation infusions in 1708 post-myocardial infarction (MI) patients. The trial to assess chelation therapy demonstrated a significant (P = 0.035) 18% reduction in a combined primary endpoint of death, MI, stroke, coronary revascularization, or hospitalization for angina. In diabetic patients the benefit was more extreme, with a 41% relative reduction in risk (P = 0.0002) and a 43% reduction in total mortality (P = 0.011). Safety data were favorable. A reduction of oxidative stress by chelation of toxic metals has been proposed as a possible mechanism of action. Summary Recent research suggests that EDTA chelation may be a well-tolerated and effective treatment for post-MI patients. Future replication and mechanistic studies are important prior to implementation in all post-MI patients. PMID:25023079

  3. Approach of combined cancer gene therapy and radiation: response of promoters to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anstett, A.

    2005-09-01

    Gene therapy is an emerging cancer treatment modality. We are interested in developing a radiation-inducible gene therapy system to sensitize the tumor vasculature to the effects of ionizing radiation (IR) treatment. An expression system based on irradiation-inducible promoters will drive the expression of anti-tumor genes in the tumor vasculature. Solid tumors are dependent on angio genesis, a process in which new blood vessels are formed from the pre-existing vasculature. Vascular endothelial cells are un transformed and genetically stable, thus avoiding the problem of resistance to the treatments. Vascular endothelial cells may therefore represent a suitable target for this therapeutic gene therapy strategy.The identification of IR-inducible promoters native to endothelial cells was performed by gene expression profiling using cDNA micro array technology. We describe the genes modified by clinically relevant doses of IR. The extension to high doses aimed at studying the effects of total radiation delivery to the tumor. The radio-inductiveness of the genes selected for promoter study was confirmed by RT-PCR. Analysis of the activity of promoters in response to IR was also assessed in a reporter plasmid. We found that authentic promoters cloned onto a plasmid are not suitable for cancer gene therapy due to their low induction after IR. In contrast, synthetic promoters containing repeated sequence-specific binding sites for IR-activated transcription factors such as NF-κB are potential candidates for gene therapy. The activity of five tandemly repeated TGGGGACTTTCCGC elements for NF-κB binding in a luciferase reporter was increased in a dose-dependent manner. Interestingly, the response to fractionated low doses was improved in comparison to the total single dose. Thus, we put present evidence that a synthetic promoter for NF-κB specific binding may have application in the radio-therapeutic treatment of cancer. (author)

  4. Radionuclide assessment of the effects of chest physical therapy on ventilation in cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeCesare, J.A.; Babchyck, B.M.; Colten, H.R.; Treves, S.

    1982-01-01

    This study assesses the use of /sup 81m/Kr scintigraphy as a measurement tool in evaluating the effectiveness of bronchial drainage with percussion and vibration on peripheral ventilation in patients with cystic fibrosis. Ten patients with cystic fibrosis participated. Each patient underwent a /sup 81m/Kr ventilation study and traditional pulmonary function tests. Forty-five minutes later, these studies were repeated before and after a chest physical therapy treatment. Each patient acted as his own control. All /sup 81m/Kr scintiscans were recorded and analyzed visually and numerically using a digital computer to assess distribution of ventilation. Visual analysis of the scintiscans indicated individual variation in treatment response: in some patients ventilation improved with therapy; in others, no change was noted; still others had changes independent of treatment. Numerical data derived from the scintiscans and pulmonary function tests showed no important differences among the three studies of each patient. Airway abnormalities characteristic of cystic fibrosis, progression of the disease, sputum production, or a combination of these factors may account for the individual variation in response to treatment. /sup 81m/Kr scintigraphy is a reliable measure of regional ventilation and should be useful for assessing the efficacy of chest physical therapy because of the consistent, high quality visual data retrieved

  5. Assessing Patients’ Cognitive Therapy Skills: Initial Evaluation of the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunk, Daniel R.; Hollars, Shannon N.; Adler, Abby D.; Goldstein, Lizabeth A.; Braun, Justin D.

    2014-01-01

    In Cognitive Therapy (CT), therapists work to help patients develop skills to cope with negative affect. Most current methods of assessing patients’ skills are cumbersome and impractical for clinical use. To address this issue, we developed and conducted an initial psychometric evaluation of self and therapist reported versions of a new measure of CT skills: the Competencies of Cognitive Therapy Scale (CCTS). We evaluated the CCTS at intake and post-treatment in a sample of 67 patients participating in CT. The CCTS correlated with a preexisting measure of CT skills (the Ways of Responding Questionnaire) and was also related to concurrent depressive symptoms. Across CT, self-reported improvements in CT competencies were associated with greater changes in depressive symptoms. These findings offer initial evidence for the validity of the CCTS. We discuss the CCTS in comparison with other measures of CT skills and suggest future research directions. PMID:25408560

  6. Quality of life assessment in radionuclide therapy: a feasibility study of the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire in palliative 131I-lipiodol therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brans, B.; Lambert, B.; De Beule, E.; De Winter, F.; Dierckx, R.A.; Van Belle, S.; Van Vlierberghe, H.; De Hemptinne, B.

    2002-01-01

    The good tolerance of radionuclide therapy has frequently been proposed as a major advantage. This study explored the feasibility of using the EORTC QLQ-C30 questionnaire in palliative iodine-131 lipiodol therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma. Questionnaires were completed during interviews in which all symptoms, co-morbidity and medication were assessed at baseline within 1 week before 131 I-lipiodol therapy, and subsequently after 1 and 3 months, in 20 patients treated with locoregional, intra-arterial 131 I-lipiodol therapy with or without cisplatin. Principal observations were that (1) a number of important scales, i.e. overall quality of life, physical functioning and pain, worsened between 0 and 3 months after 131 I-lipiodol therapy, irrespective of tumour response, and (2) the occurrence of clinical side-effects was associated with a negative impact on quality of life and physical functioning 1 and 3 months after 131 I-lipiodol. The QLQ-C30 can be regarded as a feasible method for quality of life assessment in 131 I-lipiodol therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma and possibly in other radionuclide therapies. These observations should be related to the impact of other treatment modalities on quality of life. (orig.)

  7. Effectiveness, response, and dropout of dialectical behavior therapy for borderline personality disorder in an inpatient setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kröger, Christoph; Harbeck, Susanne; Armbrust, Michael; Kliem, Sören

    2013-08-01

    To examine the effectiveness of dialectical behavior therapy for inpatients with borderline personality disorder (BPD), small sample sizes and, predominantly, tests of statistical significance have been used so far. We studied 1423 consecutively admitted individuals with BPD, who were seeking a 3-month inpatient treatment. They completed the Borderline Symptom List (BSL) as the main outcome measure, and other self-rating measures at pre- and post-treatment. Therapy outcome was defined in three ways: effect size (ES), response based on the reliable change index, and remission compared to the general population symptom level. Non-parametric conditional inference trees were used to predict dropouts. In the pre-post comparison of the BSL, the ES was 0.54 (95% CI: 0.49-0.59). The response rate was 45%; 31% remained unchanged, and 11% deteriorated. Approximately 15% showed a symptom level equivalent to that of the general population. A further 10% of participants dropped out. A predictive impact on dropout was demonstrated by substance use disorders and a younger age at pre-treatment. In future research, follow-up assessments should be conducted to investigate the extent to which response and remission rates at post-treatment remain stable over time. A consistent definition of response appears to be essential for cross-study and cross-methodological comparisons. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Computer-assisted detection (CAD) methodology for early detection of response to pharmaceutical therapy in tuberculosis patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Robert; Kwong, Heston; Liu, Brent; Huang, H. K.

    2009-02-01

    The chest x-ray radiological features of tuberculosis patients are well documented, and the radiological features that change in response to successful pharmaceutical therapy can be followed with longitudinal studies over time. The patients can also be classified as either responsive or resistant to pharmaceutical therapy based on clinical improvement. We have retrospectively collected time series chest x-ray images of 200 patients diagnosed with tuberculosis receiving the standard pharmaceutical treatment. Computer algorithms can be created to utilize image texture features to assess the temporal changes in the chest x-rays of the tuberculosis patients. This methodology provides a framework for a computer-assisted detection (CAD) system that may provide physicians with the ability to detect poor treatment response earlier in pharmaceutical therapy. Early detection allows physicians to respond with more timely treatment alternatives and improved outcomes. Such a system has the potential to increase treatment efficacy for millions of patients each year.

  9. The reverse remodeling response to sacubitril/valsartan therapy in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Pieter; Beliën, Hanne; Dupont, Matthias; Vandervoort, Pieter; Mullens, Wilfried

    2018-05-17

    Major classes of medical therapy for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) induce reverse remodeling. The revere remodeling response to sacubitril/valsartan remains unstudied. We performed a single-center, prospective assessor-blinded study to determine the reverse remodeling response of sacubitril/valsartan therapy in HFrEF patients with a class I indication (New York heart Association [NYHA]-class II-IV, Left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] sacubitril/valsartan were optimized to individual tolerance. Echocardiographic images were assessed offline by 2 investigators blinded to both the clinical data and timing of echocardiograms. One-hundred-twenty-five HFrEF patients (66 ± 10 years) were prospectively included. The amount of RAS-blocker before and after switch to sacubitril/valsartan was similar(P = .290), indicating individual optimal dosing of sacubitril/valsartan. Over a median(IQR) follow-up of 118(77-160) days after initiation of sacubitril/valsartan, LVEF improved (29.6 ± 6% vs 34.8 ± 6%; P sacubitril/valsartan leading to more reverse remodeling. Switching therapy in eligible HFrEF patients from a RAS-blocker to sacubitril/valsartan induces beneficial reverse remodeling of both metrics of systolic as diastolic function. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. First- and Second-Line Targeted Systemic Therapy in Hepatocellular Carcinoma—An Update on Patient Selection and Response Evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johann von Felden

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC with vascular invasion and/or extrahepatic spread and preserved liver function, according to stage C of the Barcelona Clinic Liver Cancer (BCLC classification, has a dismal prognosis. The multi-targeted tyrosine-kinase receptor inhibitor (TKI sorafenib is the only proven active substance in systemic HCC therapy for first-line treatment. In this review, we summarize current aspects in patient selection and management of side effects, and provide an update on response evaluation during first-line sorafenib therapy. Since second-line treatment options have been improved with the successful completion of the RESORCE trial, demonstrating a survival benefit for second-line treatment with the TKI regorafenib, response monitoring during first-line therapy will be critical to deliver optimal systemic therapy in HCC. To this regard, specific side effects, in particular worsening of arterial hypertension and diarrhea, might suggest treatment response during first-line sorafenib therapy; however, clear predictive clinical markers, as well as laboratory test or serum markers, are not established. Assessment of radiologic response according to the modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (mRECIST is helpful to identify patients who do not benefit from sorafenib treatment.

  11. Supporting the Loewenstein occupational therapy cognitive assessment using distributed user interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tesoriero, Ricardo; Gallud Lazaro, Jose A; Altalhi, Abdulrahman H

    2017-02-01

    Improve the quantity and quality of information obtained from traditional Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment Battery systems to monitor the evolution of patients' rehabilitation process as well as to compare different rehabilitation therapies. The system replaces traditional artefacts with virtual versions of them to take advantage of cutting edge interaction technology. The system is defined as a Distributed User Interface (DUI) supported by a display ecosystem, including mobile devices as well as multi-touch surfaces. Due to the heterogeneity of the devices involved in the system, the software technology is based on a client-server architecture using the Web as the software platform. The system provides therapists with information that is not available (or it is very difficult to gather) using traditional technologies (i.e. response time measurements, object tracking, information storage and retrieval facilities, etc.). The use of DUIs allows therapists to gather information that is unavailable using traditional assessment methods as well as adapt the system to patients' profile to increase the range of patients that are able to take this assessment. Implications for Rehabilitation Using a Distributed User Interface environment to carry out LOTCAs improves the quality of the information gathered during the rehabilitation assessment. This system captures physical data regarding patient's interaction during the assessment to improve the rehabilitation process analysis. Allows professionals to adapt the assessment procedure to create different versions according to patients' profile. Improves the availability of patients' profile information to therapists to adapt the assessment procedure.

  12. PIRATE: pediatric imaging response assessment and targeting environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Russell; Zhang, Yong; Krasin, Matthew; Hua, Chiaho

    2010-02-01

    By combining the strengths of various imaging modalities, the multimodality imaging approach has potential to improve tumor staging, delineation of tumor boundaries, chemo-radiotherapy regime design, and treatment response assessment in cancer management. To address the urgent needs for efficient tools to analyze large-scale clinical trial data, we have developed an integrated multimodality, functional and anatomical imaging analysis software package for target definition and therapy response assessment in pediatric radiotherapy (RT) patients. Our software provides quantitative tools for automated image segmentation, region-of-interest (ROI) histogram analysis, spatial volume-of-interest (VOI) analysis, and voxel-wise correlation across modalities. To demonstrate the clinical applicability of this software, histogram analyses were performed on baseline and follow-up 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) PET images of nine patients with rhabdomyosarcoma enrolled in an institutional clinical trial at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital. In addition, we combined 18F-FDG PET, dynamic-contrast-enhanced (DCE) MR, and anatomical MR data to visualize the heterogeneity in tumor pathophysiology with the ultimate goal of adaptive targeting of regions with high tumor burden. Our software is able to simultaneously analyze multimodality images across multiple time points, which could greatly speed up the analysis of large-scale clinical trial data and validation of potential imaging biomarkers.

  13. 177Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: safety, efficacy, and quality of life assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, Madhav Prasad; Ballal, Sanjana; Tripathi, Madhavi; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Bal, Chandrasekhar; Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar; Seth, Amlesh

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel theranostic agent, 177 Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Thirty-one mCRPC patients with progressive disease despite second-line hormonal therapy and/or docetaxel chemotherapy were recruited for the study. All patients underwent diagnostic 68 Ga-PSMA-HBED-CCPET/CT, prior to inclusion for therapy. Included patients then underwent quarterly 177 Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy. Hematological, kidney function, liver function tests, and serum PSA levels were recorded before and after therapy at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 3 month intervals. Biochemical response was assessed with trend in serum PSA levels. Metabolic response was assessed by PERCIST 1 criteria. Clinical response was assessed by visual analogue score (VASmax) analgesic score (AS), Karanofsky performance status (KPS), and toxicity and response criteria of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) criteria. The mean age of patients was 65.93 ± 9.77 years (range: 38-81 years). The mean activity administered in the 31 patients was 5069 ± 1845 MBq ranging from one to four cycles. There was a decline in the mean serum PSA levels from the baseline (baseline: 275 ng/mL, post 1st cycle therapy: 141.75 ng/mL). Based on biochemical response criteria 2/31, 20/31, 3/31, and 6/31 had complete response (CR), partial response(PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD), respectively. Metabolic response revealed 2/6 patients with CR, and the remaining 3/6 patients with PR and 1/6 patients with SD. The mean VASmax score decreased from 7.5 to 3. The mean analgesic score decreased from 2.5 to 1.8 after therapy. The mean KPS score improved from 50.32 to 65.42 after therapies. The mean ECOG performance status improved from 2.54 to 1.78 after therapy. Two patients experienced grade I and grade II hemoglobin toxicity each. None of the patients experienced nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity. 177 Lu

  14. Importance of Heart Rate During Exercise for Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maass, Alexander H.; Buck, Sandra; Nieuwland, Wybe; Bruegemann, Johan; Van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Van Gelder, Isabelle C.

    Background: Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established therapy for patients with severe heart failure and mechanical dyssynchrony. Response is only achieved in 60-70% of patients. Objectives: To study exercise-related factors predicting response to CRT. Methods: We retrospectively

  15. Neurocysticercosis as an important differential of paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy in HIV-negative patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rivonirina Andry Rakotoarivelo

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Neurocysticercosis can simulate a paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy with neurological ailments. We report the case of a 31 year-old-man, treated for tuberculous meningitis who developed neurological deficit after nine weeks of early antituberculous therapy. The diagnosis of neurocysticercosis was confirmed by CT scan and cerebrospinal fluid analysis. Neurocysticercosis should be sought as an important differential of paradoxical response during antituberculosis therapy.

  16. Influence of Immune Responses in Gene/Stem Cell Therapies for Muscular Dystrophies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of diseases, caused by mutations in different components of sarcolemma, extracellular matrix, or enzymes. Inflammation and innate or adaptive immune response activation are prominent features of MDs. Various therapies under development are directed toward rescuing the dystrophic muscle damage using gene transfer or cell therapy. Here we discussed current knowledge about involvement of immune system responses to experimental therapies in MDs.

  17. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  18. 78 FR 70307 - Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-25

    ...] Guidance for Industry: Preclinical Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products... Assessment of Investigational Cellular and Gene Therapy Products'' dated November 2013. The guidance document... products reviewed by the Office of Cellular, Tissue and Gene Therapies (OCTGT). The product areas covered...

  19. Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment to Evaluate People with Addictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedrero-Pérez, Eduardo J.; Ruiz-Sánchez de León, José M.; León-Frade, Irene; Aldea-Poyo, Patricia; Alonso-Rodríguez, Marina; Pedrero-Aguilar, Jara; Morales-Alonso, Sara

    2017-01-01

    Background The LOTCA (Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment) battery is a cognitive screening test which is widely used in occupational health. However, no work has been found that explores its use in addiction treatment. Objectives of Study To explore the convergent validity of LOTCA with neuropsychological tests that assess related cerebral functional areas. Methods The LOTCA, along with a battery of neuropsychological tests, was administered to a sample of 48 subjects who start a treatment by substance or gambling addictions. Findings A correlational pattern was observed of a considerable magnitude between the effects of the LOTCA scales and those of some neuropsychological tests, but not with others. There is barely any convergence in measures with memory and executive function tests. Relevance to Clinical Practice There is a lack of research applying test of occupational assessment to populations of patients treated by addictive behaviors. The LOTCA seems to be a reliable and valid test for preliminary screening of function in certain cognitive areas, easy, and quick to use (around 30 minutes). However, it must be supplemented with other tests for a full and ecological assessment of patients. Limitations An incident, small-size sample. Recommendations for Further Research New studies are needed to explore the applicability, diagnostic validity, and whole psychometric quality of the test in addiction-related treatment. PMID:29097963

  20. Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment to Evaluate People with Addictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gloria Rojo-Mota

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The LOTCA (Loewenstein Occupational Therapy Cognitive Assessment battery is a cognitive screening test which is widely used in occupational health. However, no work has been found that explores its use in addiction treatment. Objectives of Study. To explore the convergent validity of LOTCA with neuropsychological tests that assess related cerebral functional areas. Methods. The LOTCA, along with a battery of neuropsychological tests, was administered to a sample of 48 subjects who start a treatment by substance or gambling addictions. Findings. A correlational pattern was observed of a considerable magnitude between the effects of the LOTCA scales and those of some neuropsychological tests, but not with others. There is barely any convergence in measures with memory and executive function tests. Relevance to Clinical Practice. There is a lack of research applying test of occupational assessment to populations of patients treated by addictive behaviors. The LOTCA seems to be a reliable and valid test for preliminary screening of function in certain cognitive areas, easy, and quick to use (around 30 minutes. However, it must be supplemented with other tests for a full and ecological assessment of patients. Limitations. An incident, small-size sample. Recommendations for Further Research. New studies are needed to explore the applicability, diagnostic validity, and whole psychometric quality of the test in addiction-related treatment.

  1. Predictive Factors of Clinical Response of Infliximab Therapy in Active Nonradiographic Axial Spondyloarthritis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiming Lin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To evaluate the efficiency and the predictive factors of clinical response of infliximab in active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis patients. Methods. Active nonradiographic patients fulfilling ESSG criteria for SpA but not fulfilling modified New York criteria were included. All patients received infliximab treatment for 24 weeks. The primary endpoint was ASAS20 response at weeks 12 and 24. The abilities of baseline parameters and response at week 2 to predict ASAS20 response at weeks 12 and 24 were assessed using ROC curve and logistic regression analysis, respectively. Results. Of 70 axial SpA patients included, the proportions of patients achieving an ASAS20 response at weeks 2, 6, 12, and 24 were 85.7%, 88.6%, 87.1%, and 84.3%, respectively. Baseline MRI sacroiliitis score (AUC = 0.791; P=0.005, CRP (AUC = 0.75; P=0.017, and ASDAS (AUC = 0.778, P=0.007 significantly predicted ASAS20 response at week 12. However, only ASDAS (AUC = 0.696, P=0.040 significantly predicted ASAS20 response at week 24. Achievement of ASAS20 response after the first infliximab infusion was a significant predictor of subsequent ASAS20 response at weeks 12 and 24 (wald χ2=6.87, P=0.009, and wald χ2=5.171, P=0.023. Conclusions. Infliximab shows efficiency in active nonradiographic axial spondyloarthritis patients. ASDAS score and first-dose response could help predicting clinical efficacy of infliximab therapy in these patients.

  2. Metformin use and improved response to therapy in rectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skinner, Heath D.; Crane, Christopher H.; Garrett, Christopher R.; Eng, Cathy; Chang, George J.; Skibber, John M.; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A.; Kelly, Patrick; Sandulache, Vlad C.; Delclos, Marc E.; Krishnan, Sunil; Das, Prajnan

    2013-01-01

    Locally advanced rectal cancer is commonly treated with chemoradiation prior to total mesorectal excision (TME). Studies suggest that metformin may be an effective chemopreventive agent in this disease as well as a possible adjunct to current therapy. In this study, we examined the effect of metformin use on pathologic complete response (pCR) rates and outcomes in rectal cancer. The charts of 482 patients with locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma treated from 1996 to 2009 with chemoradiation and TME were reviewed. Median radiation dose was 50.4 Gy (range 19.8–63). Nearly, all patients were treated with concurrent 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy (98%) followed by adjuvant chemotherapy (81.3%). Patients were categorized as nondiabetic (422), diabetic not taking metformin (40), or diabetic taking metformin (20). No significant differences between groups were found in clinical tumor classification, nodal classification, tumor distance from the anal verge or circumferential extent, pretreatment carcinoembryonic antigen level, or pathologic differentiation. pCR rates were 16.6% for nondiabetics, 7.5% for diabetics not using metformin, and 35% for diabetics taking metformin, with metformin users having significantly higher pCR rates than either nondiabetics (P = 0.03) or diabetics not using metformin (P = 0.007). Metformin use was significantly associated with pCR rate on univariate (P = 0.05) and multivariate (P = 0.01) analyses. Furthermore, patients taking metformin had significantly increased disease-free (P = 0.013) and overall survival (P = 0.008) compared with other diabetic patients. Metformin use is associated with significantly higher pCR rates as well as improved survival. These promising data warrant further prospective study

  3. Neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy and pathological complete response in rectal cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Linda; Fichera, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    The management of rectal cancer has evolved significantly in the last few decades. Significant improvements in local disease control were achieved in the 1990s, with the introduction of total mesorectal excision and neoadjuvant radiotherapy. Level 1 evidence has shown that, with neoadjuvant chemoradiation therapy (CRT) the rates of local recurrence can be lower than 6% and, as a result, neoadjuvant CRT currently represents the accepted standard of care. This approach has led to reliable tumor down-staging, with 15–27% patients with a pathological complete response (pCR)—defined as no residual cancer found on histological examination of the specimen. Patients who achieve pCR after CRT have better long-term outcomes, less risk of developing local or distal recurrence and improved survival. For all these reasons, sphincter-preserving procedures or organ-preserving options have been suggested, such as local excision of residual tumor or the omission of surgery altogether. Although local recurrence rate has been stable at 5–6% with this multidisciplinary management method, distal recurrence rates for locally-advanced rectal cancers remain in excess of 25% and represent the main cause of death in these patients. For this reason, more recent trials have been looking at the administration of full-dose systemic chemotherapy in the neoadjuvant setting (in order to offer early treatment of disseminated micrometastases, thus improving control of systemic disease) and selective use of radiotherapy only in non-responders or for low rectal tumors smaller than 5 cm. PMID:26290512

  4. Sodium dichromate expedited response action assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1993-09-01

    The US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and Washington Department of Ecology (Ecology) recommended that the US Department of Energy (DOE) perform an expedited response action (ERA) for the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill. The ERA lead regulatory agency is Ecology and EPA is the support agency. The ERA was categorized as non-time-critical, which required preparation of an engineering evaluation and cost analysis (EE/CA). The EE/CA was included in the ERA proposal. The EE/CA is a rapid, focused evaluation of available technologies using specific screening factors to assess feasibility, appropriateness, and cost. The ERA goal is to reduce the potential for any contaminant migration from the landfill to the soil column, groundwater, and Columbia River. Since the Sodium Dichromate Barrel Disposal Landfill is the only waste site within the operable unit, the removal action may be the final remediation of the 100-IU-4 Operable Unit. This ERA process started in March 1992. The ERA proposal went through a parallel review process with Westinghouse Hanford Company (WHC), DOE Richland Operations (RL), EPA, Ecology, and a 30-day public comment period. Ecology and EPA issued an Action Agreement Memorandum in March 1993 (Appendix A). The memorandum directed excavation of all anomalies and disposal of the collected materials at the Hanford Site Central Landfill. Primary field activities were completed by the end of April 1993. Final waste disposal of a minor quantity of hazardous waste was completed in July 1993

  5. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer in Monitoring Glioblastoma (GBM) Response to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Sahgal, Arjun; Stanisz, Greg J

    2018-02-06

    Quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) was used as a biomarker to monitor glioblastoma (GBM) response to chemo-radiation and identify the earliest time-point qMT could differentiate progressors from non-progressors. Nineteen GBM patients were recruited and MRI-scanned before (Day 0 ), two weeks (Day 14 ), and four weeks (Day 28 ) into the treatment, and one month after the end of the treatment (Day 70 ). Comprehensive qMT data was acquired, and a two-pool MT model was fit to the data. Response was determined at 3-8 months following the end of chemo-radiation. The amount of magnetization transfer ([Formula: see text]) was significantly lower in GBM compared to normal appearing white matter (p GBM are more sensitive to treatment effects compared to clinically used metrics. qMT could assess tumor aggressiveness and identify early progressors even before the treatment. Changes in qMT parameters within the first 14 days of the treatment were capable of separating early progressors from non-progressors, making qMT a promising biomarker to guide adaptive radiotherapy for GBM.

  6. Assessment of the effects of massage therapy on premenstrual syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leily Ghaedi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Premenstrual syndrome is characterized by the cyclic occurrence physical, psychological and behavioral symptoms during the luteal phase of the menstruation cycle and will be disappear within a few days of the onset of menstruation. The aim of this research was to assess the effect of massage therapy on premenstrual syndrome. Materials and Method: A randomized clinical trial was carried out on 30 volunteer students of Tehran University with PMS diagnosis. After surveying two menstruation cycles and confirming PMS existence, subjects were randomly assigned into massage and control group. Massage protocol was performed for eight weeks. Volunteers completed Daily Symptom Rating (DSR during 2 cycles before and 2 cycles after intervention. Data collected via data gathering form, criteria for PMS (DSM- IV, DSR and Beck test. Data were analyzed by descriptive and analytic statistics (χ2, Fischer's exact test, paired and independent t tests.Results: In comparison between before and after intervention, massage group showed significant decrease averagely in mean of somatic (56.7%, psychological (64.8% (p<0.001.This is while, in control group only mean of somatic symptoms (averagely 21.2% relieved obviously (p=0.02. comparing two groups often intervention, we did not found any significant difference in mean of somatic symptoms while psychological (p=0.01 and total symptoms (p=0.03 in massage group was significantly less than controls.Conclusion: The authors concluded that massage therapy is an effective method for relieving symptoms of premenstrual syndrome

  7. Response of melanoma to heat and radiation therapy--a review of the literature and experience from The Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mameghan, H; Knittel, T

    1988-11-07

    Our review of the literature indicates that radiotherapy and/or heat therapy can provide local control of recurrent or metastatic melanoma in a large proportion of patients. This has undoubted value in the local palliation of symptoms and, in the absence of disseminated disease, can be curative. At The Prince of Wales Hospital, Sydney, we have studied the response of melanoma lesions to heat and radiation therapy and have assessed the reaction in the adjacent normal skin. Thirty-two melanoma lesions that were measurable in 12 patients received radiotherapy and heat therapy in different combinations and dose schedules (15 lesions received radiotherapy alone, six lesions received heat therapy alone, and 11 lesions received combined radiation and heat therapy). The acute normal skin reaction was compared between lesions that received single modality radiation or heat therapy and those that received the combination of heat and radiation therapy. A moderate or severe reaction developed at six of the 21 sites that were treated by a single modality, and at four of the 11 sites that received combined heat and radiation therapy (P = 0.7), and all healed within a few days. Evaluation of the melanoma response to therapy was possible only in 26 of the 32 lesions that were treated because two patients died soon after therapy and the response of their six lesions was not evaluable. A complete response occurred in 14 (54%) of 26 lesions and a partial response occurred in 10 (38%) of 26 lesions. The objective response by treatment modality was 10 of 15 lesions for radiotherapy, six of six lesions for heat therapy and eight of 11 lesions for both therapies combined. We conclude that radiotherapy and heat therapy, separately or combined, produce acceptably-low damage to normal tissue and highly-satisfactory local control of melanoma.

  8. A novel approach to assess the treatment response using Gaussian random field in PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Mengdie [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084, China and Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Science, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Guo, Ning [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Science, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 (United States); Hu, Guangshu; Zhang, Hui, E-mail: hzhang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: li.quanzheng@mgh.harvard.edu [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); El Fakhri, Georges; Li, Quanzheng, E-mail: hzhang@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn, E-mail: li.quanzheng@mgh.harvard.edu [Center for Advanced Medical Imaging Science, Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02114 and Department of Radiology, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: The assessment of early therapeutic response to anticancer therapy is vital for treatment planning and patient management in clinic. With the development of personal treatment plan, the early treatment response, especially before any anatomically apparent changes after treatment, becomes urgent need in clinic. Positron emission tomography (PET) imaging serves an important role in clinical oncology for tumor detection, staging, and therapy response assessment. Many studies on therapy response involve interpretation of differences between two PET images, usually in terms of standardized uptake values (SUVs). However, the quantitative accuracy of this measurement is limited. This work proposes a statistically robust approach for therapy response assessment based on Gaussian random field (GRF) to provide a statistically more meaningful scale to evaluate therapy effects. Methods: The authors propose a new criterion for therapeutic assessment by incorporating image noise into traditional SUV method. An analytical method based on the approximate expressions of the Fisher information matrix was applied to model the variance of individual pixels in reconstructed images. A zero mean unit variance GRF under the null hypothesis (no response to therapy) was obtained by normalizing each pixel of the post-therapy image with the mean and standard deviation of the pretherapy image. The performance of the proposed method was evaluated by Monte Carlo simulation, where XCAT phantoms (128{sup 2} pixels) with lesions of various diameters (2–6 mm), multiple tumor-to-background contrasts (3–10), and different changes in intensity (6.25%–30%) were used. The receiver operating characteristic curves and the corresponding areas under the curve were computed for both the proposed method and the traditional methods whose figure of merit is the percentage change of SUVs. The formula for the false positive rate (FPR) estimation was developed for the proposed therapy response

  9. Perfusion MDCT enables early detection of therapeutic response to antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabir, Adeel; Schor-Bardach, Rachel; Wilcox, Carol J; Rahmanuddin, Syed; Atkins, Michael B; Kruskal, Jonathan B; Signoretti, Sabina; Raptopoulos, Vassilios D; Goldberg, S Nahum

    2008-07-01

    The objective of our study was to determine whether perfusion CT can be used to detect early changes in therapeutic response to antiangiogenic therapy in an animal tumor model. Twenty-five rats implanted with R3230 mammary adenocarcinoma (diameter, 1.2-2.0 cm) randomly received 7.5 or 30 mg/kg of an antiangiogenic agent, sorafenib, by daily gavage for 4 (n = 4), 9 (n = 9), or 14 (n = 5) days. Seven untreated animals served as a control group. Perfusion MDCT was performed at days 0, 4, 9, and 14 with 0.4 mL of ioversol (350 mg/mL) and included four 5-mm slices covering the entire tumor volume. Changes in tumor growth were determined by volumetric analysis of CT data. Serial changes in tumor volume and blood flow were assessed and correlated with pathology findings. All control tumors grew larger (from 2.0 +/- 0.7 cm(3) at day 0 to 5.9 +/- 1.0 cm(3) at day 14), whereas all treated tumors shrank (from 2.5 +/- 1.1 to 2.1 +/- 1.0 cm(3)), with a statistically significant rate of growth or shrinkage in both groups (p histopathologic viability despite the fact that these tumors were shrinking in size from day 4 onward (day 4, 2.18 +/- 0.8 cm(3); day 9, 1.98 +/- 0.8 cm(3)). Perfusion MDCT can detect focal blood flow changes even when the tumor is shrinking, possibly indicating early reversal of tumor responsiveness to antiangiogenic therapy. Given that changes in tumor volume after antiangiogenic therapy do not necessarily correlate with true treatment response, physiologic imaging of tumor perfusion may be necessary.

  10. Anti-angiogenic treatment (Bevacizumab) improves the responsiveness of photodynamic therapy in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng-Liang; Lin, Hua-Ching; Chiang, Wei-Lun; Shih, Ying-Hsia; Chiang, Ping-Fang; Luo, Tsai-Yueh; Cheng, Chun-Chia; Shieh, Ming-Jium

    2018-06-09

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a new treatment utilizing the combined action of photosensitizers and light for the treatment of various cancers. The mechanisms for tumor destruction after PDT include direct tumor cell kill by singlet oxygen species (OS), indirect cell kill via vascular damage, and an elicited immune response. However, it has been reported that many cellular activators, including vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), are produced by tumor cells after PDT. In this study, we demonstrate that meta-tetra(hydroxyphenyl) chlorin (mTHPC)-based photodynamic therapy combined with bevacizumab (Avastin™), an anti-VEGF neutralizing monoclonal antibody that blocks the binding of VEGF to its receptor, can enhance the effectiveness of each treatment modality. We evaluated the efficacy of bevacizumab-based anti-angiogenesis in combination with PDT as well as the resulting VEGF levels in a mouse model of human colon cancer. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) were performed to assess VEGF concentrations in the various treatment groups, and confocal imaging and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analyses were used to measure the distribution and concentration of mTHPC in tumors. Our results demonstrate that combination of PDT followed by bevacizumab significantly elicits a greater tumor response whereas bevacizumab treatment prior to PDT led to a reduced tumor response. Immunostaining and ELISA analyses revealed a lower expression of VEGF in tumors treated with combination therapy of PDT followed by bevacizumab. However, bevacizumab treatment decreased the accumulation of mTHPC in tumors 24 h after administration, which complemented the results of decreased anti-tumor efficacy of bevacizumab followed by PDT. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Objective assessment of image quality VI: imaging in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrett, Harrison H; Kupinski, Matthew A; Müeller, Stefan; Halpern, Howard J; Morris, John C III; Dwyer, Roisin

    2013-01-01

    Earlier work on objective assessment of image quality (OAIQ) focused largely on estimation or classification tasks in which the desired outcome of imaging is accurate diagnosis. This paper develops a general framework for assessing imaging quality on the basis of therapeutic outcomes rather than diagnostic performance. By analogy to receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and their variants as used in diagnostic OAIQ, the method proposed here utilizes the therapy operating characteristic or TOC curves, which are plots of the probability of tumor control versus the probability of normal-tissue complications as the overall dose level of a radiotherapy treatment is varied. The proposed figure of merit is the area under the TOC curve, denoted AUTOC. This paper reviews an earlier exposition of the theory of TOC and AUTOC, which was specific to the assessment of image-segmentation algorithms, and extends it to other applications of imaging in external-beam radiation treatment as well as in treatment with internal radioactive sources. For each application, a methodology for computing the TOC is presented. A key difference between ROC and TOC is that the latter can be defined for a single patient rather than a population of patients. (paper)

  12. Functional response to cholinesterase inhibitor therapy in a naturalistic Alzheimer’s disease cohort

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wattmo Carina

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Activities of daily living (ADL are an essential part of the diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD. A decline in ADL affects independent living and has a strong negative impact on caregiver burden. Functional response to cholinesterase inhibitor (ChEI treatment and factors that might influence this response in naturalistic AD patients need investigating. The aim of this study was to identify the socio-demographic and clinical factors that affect the functional response after 6 months of ChEI therapy. Methods This prospective, non-randomised, multicentre study in a routine clinical setting included 784 AD patients treated with donepezil, rivastigmine or galantamine. At baseline and after 6 months of treatment, patients were assessed using several rating scales, including the Instrumental Activities of Daily Living (IADL scale, Physical Self-Maintenance Scale (PSMS and Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE. Demographic and clinical characteristics were investigated at baseline. The functional response and the relationships of potential predictors were analysed using general linear models. Results After 6 months of ChEI treatment, 49% and 74% of patients showed improvement/no change in IADL and in PSMS score, respectively. The improved/unchanged patients exhibited better cognitive status at baseline; regarding improved/unchanged PSMS, patients were younger and used fewer anti-depressants. A more positive functional response to ChEI was observed in younger individuals or among those having the interaction effect of better preserved cognition and lower ADL ability. Patients with fewer concomitant medications or those using NSAIDs/acetylsalicylic acid showed a better PSMS response. Conclusions Critical characteristics that may influence the functional response to ChEI in AD were identified. Some predictors differed from those previously shown to affect cognitive response, e.g., lower cognitive ability and older age

  13. Idiopathic lymphocytic pleuritis: radiographic and high-resolution CT appearances and changes in response to therapy in two adults.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O' Donnell, David H

    2012-02-01

    Inflammatory conditions of the pleura characterized by a predominantly lymphocytic infiltrate are described in several disorders. The commonest underlying aetiologies include tuberculous infection, autoimmune disorders (particularly Sjogren\\'s syndrome), and post coronary artery bypass graft surgery. Idiopathic lymphocytic pleuritis (ILP) is a rare form of diffuse pleural inflammation characterized by extensive lymphocytic infiltration for which no cause is found. Radiological descriptions of ILP are limited. We describe the radiographic and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) imaging features and response to corticosteroid therapy of ILP in two adults. Both patients presented with bilateral diffuse pleural thickening of >10 mm thickness extending >10 cm craniocaudally with small focal areas of atelectasis. Both cases demonstrated marked improvement in the degree and extent of pleural thickening and rounded atelectasis following corticosteroid therapy. HRCT provided a useful noninvasive method of assessing disease response to therapy.

  14. Dermatomyositis Leading to Necrotizing Vasculitis: A Perfect Response to Applied Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbaryan, Mahmood; Darabi, Farideh; Soltani, Zahra

    2016-12-01

    Dermatomyositis is an idiopathic inflammatory myopathy that cause skin and muscle complications. The ethiology is not understood well yet. Released cytokines including interferon and interleukins are suggested to make inflammatory responses in the skin or muscle. Muscle weakness and skin lesions including heliotrope rash, shawl sign and Gottron's papules are the most common symptoms. A biopsy (muscle or skin) is always the most reliable method for diagnosis. Corticosteroids in association with immunosuppressive agents are used as standard treatment. The patient was a 30 years old woman who got involved with dermatomyositis for 10 years. She has been under therapy with Methotrexate, Prednisolon and Azathioprine until she came to us suffering from progressive skin lesions. Experiments and examinations were normal except the lesions and detected lipoatrophy. Because of immune cells infiltration and observations necrotizing vasculitis was diagnosed. After three month of high dose prednisolon and intravenous cyclophosphamide therapy the lesions vanished remarkable. True and immediate diagnosis gives physicians the chance not only to assess the best treatment but have adequate time to apply the procedure. However shortening the therapy and diminishing morbidity of the disease need more investigations and efforts.

  15. Unidentified angular recurrent ulceration responsive to antiviral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmi Amtha

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Recurrent ulcer on angular area is usually called stomatitis angularis. It is caused by many factors such as vertical dimension reduce, vitamin B12, and immune system deficiency, C. albicans and staphylococcus involvement. Clinically is characterized by painful fissure with erythematous base without fever. Purpose: to describe an unidentified angular ulcer proceeded by recurrent ulcers with no response of topical therapy. Case: An 18-years old male came to Oral Medicine clinic in RSCM who complained of angular recurrent ulcers since 3 years ago which developed on skin and bleed easily on mouth opening. Patient had fever before the onset of ulcers. Large, painful, irregular ulcers covered by red crustae on angular area bilaterally. Patient has been treated with various drugs without improvement and lead to mouth opening limitation. Intra oral shows herpetiformtype of ulcer and swollen of gingival. Case management: Provisional diagnosis was established as viral infection thus acyclovir 200 mg five times daily for two weeks and topical anti inflammation gel were administered. Blood test for IgG/IgM of HSV1 and HSV2 were non reactive, however ulceration showed a remarkable improvement. The ulcers healed completely after next 2 weeks with acyclovir. Conclusion: The angular ulceration on above patient failed to fulfill the criteria of stomatitis angularis or herpes labialis lesion. However it showed a good response to antiviral. Therefore, unidentified angular ulceration was appointed, as the lesion might be triggered by other type of human herpes virus or types of virus that response to acyclovir.Latar belakang: ulser rekuren pada sudut mulut biasanya disebut stomatitis angularis. Kelainan ini disebabkan oleh banyak faktor seperti berkurangnya dimensi vertikal, defisiensi vitamin B12 dan sistem kekebalan tubuh, infeksi C. albicans serta staphylococcus. Secara klinis kelainan ini ditandai dengan fisur sakit pada sudut mulut dengan dasar

  16. CT halo sign as an imaging marker for response to adoptive cell therapy in metastatic melanoma with pulmonary metastases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shrot, Shai; Apter, Sara [Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Sheba Medical Center, Tel-Hashomer (Israel); Schachter, Jacob; Shapira-Frommer, Ronnie [Sheba Medical Center, The Ella Institute for Melanoma Research and Treatment, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Besser, Michal J. [Sheba Medical Center, The Ella Institute for Melanoma Research and Treatment, Tel Hashomer (Israel); Sackler School of Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Department of Clinical Microbiology and Immunology, Tel Aviv (Israel)

    2014-06-15

    The halo sign refers to a zone of ground-glass attenuation surrounding a pulmonary nodule. Pulmonary metastatic nodules exhibiting a halo sign are seen mainly in hypervascular tumours. We describe the appearance of a halo sign following treatment of adoptive transfer of autologous tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) to melanoma patients with lung metastases. The study included 29 melanoma patients with pulmonary metastases who received TIL therapy. Pre- and post-treatment chest CTs were retrospectively reviewed for the presence of a halo sign and its correlation with therapeutic response. A pulmonary halo sign was not seen in any pre-treatment CT. It was observed in four of 12 patients who responded to the therapy but not in those who failed to respond. Significant differences were found between response ratio in patients in whom post-TIL halo sign appeared compared with those without the halo sign (p = 0.02). The appearance of a CT halo sign in melanoma with lung metastases following TIL therapy may indicate antitumoral effect and a good response to therapy. Our findings emphasize the importance of applying new assessment criteria for immunological anticancer therapies. (orig.)

  17. Music Therapy Assessment and Development of Parental Competences in Families Where Children Have Experienced Emotional Neglect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    2012-01-01

    In trying to aid difficulties within social services of assessing families at risk, the thesis sat out to strengthen, further develop, and test a music therapy assessment tool, Assessment of Parenting Competencies (APC). The study also aimed to examine the effect of music therapy on parenting...

  18. Molecular genetics of Turner syndrome: correlation with clinical phenotype and response to growth hormone therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsezou, A; Hadjiathanasiou, C; Gourgiotis, D; Galla, A; Kavazarakis, E; Pasparaki, A; Kapsetaki, M; Sismani, C; Theodoridis, C; Patsalis, P C; Moschonas, N; Kitsiou, S

    1999-12-01

    To correlate the origin of the retained X in Turner syndrome with phenotype, pre-treatment height and response to recombinant human growth hormone (rhGH) therapy, systematic clinical assessment and molecular studies were carried out in 33 Greek children with Turner syndrome and their parents including 18 children with 45,X and 15 with X-mosaicism. Microsatellite markers on X chromosomes (DXS101 and DXS337) revealed that the intact X was paternal (Xp) in 15/30 and maternal (Xm) in 15/30 children, while 3/33 families were non-informative. No significant relationship was found between parental origin of the retained X and birth weight/length/gestational age, blepharoptosis, pterygium colli, webbed neck, low hairline, abnormal ears, lymphoedema, short 4th metacarpal, shield chest, widely spaced nipples, cubitus valgus, pigmented naevi, streak gonads, and cardiovascular/renal anomalies. With regard to the children's pre-treatment height, there was a significant correlation with maternal height and target height in both Xm and Xp groups. No differences were found between Xm and Xp groups and the improvement of growth velocity (GV) during the first and second year of rhGH administration, while for both groups GV significantly improved with rhGH by the end of the first and the second year. To our knowledge, this is the first attempt to correlate the parental origin of Turner syndrome with the response to rhGH therapy.

  19. Multi-modality imaging of tumor phenotype and response to therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyflot, Matthew J.

    2011-12-01

    Imaging and radiation oncology have historically been closely linked. However, the vast majority of techniques used in the clinic involve anatomical imaging. Biological imaging offers the potential for innovation in the areas of cancer diagnosis and staging, radiotherapy target definition, and treatment response assessment. Some relevant imaging techniques are FDG PET (for imaging cellular metabolism), FLT PET (proliferation), CuATSM PET (hypoxia), and contrast-enhanced CT (vasculature and perfusion). Here, a technique for quantitative spatial correlation of tumor phenotype is presented for FDG PET, FLT PET, and CuATSM PET images. Additionally, multimodality imaging of treatment response with FLT PET, CuATSM, and dynamic contrast-enhanced CT is presented, in a trial of patients receiving an antiangiogenic agent (Avastin) combined with cisplatin and radiotherapy. Results are also presented for translational applications in animal models, including quantitative assessment of proliferative response to cetuximab with FLT PET and quantification of vascular volume with a blood-pool contrast agent (Fenestra). These techniques have clear applications to radiobiological research and optimized treatment strategies, and may eventually be used for personalized therapy for patients.

  20. Interferon alpha therapy for hepatitis C: treatment completion and response rates among patients with substance use disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loftis Jennifer M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Individuals with substance use disorders (SUDs are at increased risk for hepatitis C viral infection (HCV, and few studies have explored their treatment responses empirically. The objective of this study was to assess interferon alpha therapy (IFN completion and response rates among patients with HCV who had a history of comorbid SUDs. More data is needed to inform treatment strategies and guidelines for these patients. Using a medical record database, information was retrospectively collected on 307,437 veterans seen in the Veterans Integrated Service Network 20 (VISN 20 of the Veterans Healthcare Administration (VHA between 1998 and 2003. For patients treated with any type of IFN (including regular or pegylated IFN or combination therapy (IFN and ribavirin who had a known HCV genotype, IFN completion and response rates were compared among patients with a history of SUD (SUD+ Group and patients without a history of SUD (SUD- Group. Results Odds ratio analyses revealed that compared with the SUD- Group, the SUD+ Group was equally likely to complete IFN therapy if they had genotypes 2 and 3 (73.1% vs. 68.0%, and if they had genotypes 1 and 4 (39.5% vs. 39.9%. Within the sample of all patients who began IFN therapy, the SUD- and SUD+ groups were similarly likely to achieve an end of treatment response (genotypes 2 and 3, 52.8% vs. 54.3%; genotypes 1 and 4, 24.5% vs. 24.8% and a sustained viral response (genotypes 2 and 3, 42.6% vs. 41.1%; genotypes 1 and 4: 16.0% vs. 22.3%. Conclusion Individuals with and without a history of SUD responded to antiviral therapy for HCV at similar rates. Collectively, these findings suggest that patients who have co-morbid SUD and HCV diagnoses can successfully complete a course of antiviral therapy.

  1. Assessment of therapeutic response and treatment planning for brain tumors using metabolic and physiological MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah J

    2011-07-01

    MRI is routinely used for diagnosis, treatment planning and assessment of response to therapy for patients with glioma. Gliomas are spatially heterogeneous and infiltrative lesions that are quite variable in terms of their response to therapy. Patients classified as having low-grade histology have a median overall survival of 7 years or more, but need to be monitored carefully to make sure that their tumor does not upgrade to a more malignant phenotype. Patients with the most aggressive grade IV histology have a median overall survival of 12-15 months and often undergo multiple surgeries and adjuvant therapies in an attempt to control their disease. Despite improvements in the spatial resolution and sensitivity of anatomic images, there remain considerable ambiguities in the interpretation of changes in the size of the gadolinium-enhancing lesion on T(1) -weighted images as a measure of treatment response, and in differentiating between treatment effects and infiltrating tumor within the larger T(2) lesion. The planning of focal therapies, such as surgery, radiation and targeted drug delivery, as well as a more reliable assessment of the response to therapy, would benefit considerably from the integration of metabolic and physiological imaging techniques into routine clinical MR examinations. Advanced methods that have been shown to provide valuable data for patients with glioma are diffusion, perfusion and spectroscopic imaging. Multiparametric examinations that include the acquisition of such data are able to assess tumor cellularity, hypoxia, disruption of normal tissue architecture, changes in vascular density and vessel permeability, in addition to the standard measures of changes in the volume of enhancing and nonenhancing anatomic lesions. This is particularly critical for the interpretation of the results of Phase I and Phase II clinical trials of novel therapies, which are increasingly including agents that are designed to have anti-angiogenic and anti

  2. Assessments for high dose radionuclide therapy treatment planning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, D.R.

    2003-01-01

    Advances in the biotechnology of cell specific targeting of cancer and the increased number of clinical trials involving treatment of cancer patients with radiolabelled antibodies, peptides, and similar delivery vehicles have led to an increase in the number of high dose radionuclide therapy procedures. Optimised radionuclide therapy for cancer treatment is based on the concept of absorbed dose to the dose limiting normal organ or tissue. The limiting normal tissue is often the red marrow, but it may sometimes be the lungs, liver, intestinal tract, or kidneys. Appropriate treatment planning requires assessment of radiation dose to several internal organs and tissues, and usually involves biodistribution studies in the patient using a tracer amount of radionuclide bound to the targeting agent and imaged at sequential timepoints using a planar gamma camera. Time-activity curves are developed from the imaging data for the major organ tissues of concern, for the whole body and sometimes for selected tumours. Patient specific factors often require that dose estimates be customised for each patient. In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration regulates the experimental use of investigational new drugs and requires 'reasonable calculation of radiation absorbed dose to the whole body and to critical organs' using the methods prescribed by the Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) Committee of the Society of Nuclear Medicine. Review of high dose studies shows that some are conducted with minimal dosimetry, that the marrow dose is difficult to establish and is subject to large uncertainties. Despite the general availability of software, internal dosimetry methods often seem to be inconsistent from one clinical centre to another. (author)

  3. Responsible chain management: a capability assessment framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, F.G.A.; Nijhof, A.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, increased attention has been paid to issues of responsibility across the entire product lifecyle. Responsible behaviour of organizations in the product chain is dependent on the actions of other parties such as suppliers and customers. Only through co-operation and close interaction

  4. Responsible chain management: A capability assessment framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bakker, F.G.A.; Nijhof, A.H.J.

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, increased attention has been paid to issues of responsibility across the entire product lifecycle. Responsible behaviour of organizations in the product chain is dependent on the actions of other parties such as suppliers and customers. Only through co-operation and close

  5. Methodological approaches to the assessment level of social responsibility

    OpenAIRE

    Vorona, E.

    2010-01-01

    A study of current approaches to assessing the level of social responsibility. Proposed methodological approach to evaluating the performance of the social responsibility of railway transport. Conceptual Basis of social reporting in rail transport.

  6. High cortisol awakening response is associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus Per Juul; Lunde, Marianne Anita; Undén, M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the predictive validity of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in patients with non-seasonal major depression. METHOD: Patients were treated with sertraline in combination with bright or dim light therapy for a 5-week period. Saliva cortisol levels were measured in 63...... patients, as an awakening profile, before medication and light therapy started. The CAR was calculated by using three time-points: awakening and 20 and 60 min after awakening. RESULTS: Patients with low CAR had a very substantial effect of bright light therapy compared with dim light therapy, whereas...... patients with a high CAR had no effect of bright light therapy compared with dim light therapy. CONCLUSION: High CAR was associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy. This result raises the question of whether bright light acts through a mechanism different from...

  7. Sialadenitis after radioiodine therapy. Analysis of factors that influence the response to medical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geres, Alejandra E; Mereshian, Paula Szafryk; Fernández, Silvia; Rey Caro, Daniel Gonzalo; Castro, Ricardo; Podio, Ricardo; Ojeda, Silvia

    2015-12-01

    To assess the incidence of 131I-induced sialadenitis (SD) in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer (DTC), to analyze clinical and other factors related to metabolic radiotherapy that may predict the lack of response to conventional medical therapy (CMT), and to determine the effectiveness of intraductal steroid instillation in patients failing CMT. Fifty-two patients with DTC, 45 females (86.5%) and 7 males (13.5%) with a mean age of 44.21±13.3 years (r=17-74) who received ablation therapy with 131I after total thyroidectomy. Patients with diseases and/or medication causing xerostomia were excluded. Patients underwent salivary gland scintigraphy with 99Tc (10mCi). Eighteen patients (34.62%) had SD and received antibiotics, antispasmodics, and oral steroids for 15 days. They were divided into two groups: responders to medical therapy (n=12, age 44.3±14.4 years, 2 men [17%], 10 women [83%], cumulative dose 225±167.1 mCi) and non-responders to medical treatment, who underwent steroid instillation into the Stensen's duct (n=6 [33%], 2 men [33%], 4 women [67%], age 50±13.8 years, cumulative dose 138.3±61.7 mCi). Scintigraphy showed damage to the parotid and submaxillary glands. Incidence of 131I-induced sialadenitis was similar to that reported by other authors. Age, mean cumulative dose of 131I, and involvement of parotid and submaxillary glands did not condition response to CMT; however, male sex was a conditioning factor. Symptom persistence for more than 15 days makes instillation into the Stensen's duct advisable. This is an effective and safe method to avoid surgical excision of salivary glands. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. Factors influencing response to ingenol mebutate therapy for actinic keratosis of face and scalp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skroza, Nevena; Proietti, Ilaria; Bernardini, Nicoletta; Balduzzi, Veronica; Mambrin, Alessandra; Marchesiello, Anna; Tolino, Ersilia; Zuber, Sara; La Torre, Giuseppe; Potenza, Concetta

    2017-01-01

    AIM To determine factors independently influencing response to ingenol mebutate therapy and assess efficacy on clinical setting of non-hypertrophic non-hyperkeratotic actinic keratosis (AK). METHODS Consecutive patients affected by non-hypertrophic non-hyperkeratotic AKs of the face or scalp were enrolled to receive ingenol mebutate 0.015% gel on a selected skin area of 25 cm2 for 3 consecutive days. Local skin reactions were calculated at each follow up visit using a validated composite score. Efficacy was evaluated by the comparison of clinical and dermoscopic pictures before the treatment and at day 57, and classified as complete, partial and poor response. RESULTS A number of 130 patients were enrolled, of which 101 (77.7%) were treated on the face, while 29 (22.3%) on the scalp. The great majority of our study population (n = 119, 91.5%) reached at least a 75% clearance of AKs and, in particular, 58 patients (44.6%) achieved a complete response while 61 (46.9%) a partial one. Logistic backward multivariate analysis showed that facial localization, level of local skin reaction (LSR) at day 2, the highest LSR values and level of crusts at day 8 were factors independently associated with the achievement of a complete response. CONCLUSION Ingenol mebutate 0.015% gel, when properly applied, is more effective on the face than on the scalp and efficacy is directly associated to LSR score. PMID:29067277

  9. A Commentary on the Social Responsibility of Occupational Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakellariou, Dikaios; Pollard, Nick

    2013-01-01

    As one of the allied health professions, occupational therapy has adopted a primarily clinical focus on human occupation (or the process of daily life) and this is reflected in education, which has until recently tended to overlook contextual social factors such as poverty, marginalisation, exclusion, unemployment, incarceration and immigration.…

  10. Dimentions of Counselee Responses over Several Therapy Sessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, Jules M.; And Others

    1972-01-01

    The results of the current study, as well as the Zimmer and Cowles (1972) study using quite different procedures, involved a comparison of client-centered, gestalt, and rational therapies and do not support the conclusion that therapeutic relationships tend to be characteristically the same. Theoretical orientation as operationalized by…

  11. Stimuli-responsive biodegradable polymeric micelles for targeted cancer therapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Talelli, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Thermosensitive and biodegradable polymeric micelles based on mPEG-b-pHPMAmLacn have shown very promising results during the past years. The results presented in this thesis illustrate the high potential of these micelles for anticancer therapy and imaging and fully justify further pharmaceutical

  12. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, N., E-mail: Nicolai.schramm@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Englhart, E., E-mail: Elisabeth.Englhart@gmx.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Schlemmer, M., E-mail: Marcus.Schlemmer@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Medicine III, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Hittinger, M., E-mail: Markus.Hittinger@uksh.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Übleis, C., E-mail: Christopher.Uebleis@med.uni-muenchen.de [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Becker, C.R., E-mail: Christoph.becker@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Reiser, M.F., E-mail: Maximilian.Reiser@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany); Berger, F., E-mail: Frank.Berger@med.uni-muenchen.de [Institute for Clinical Radiology, Ludwig-Maximilians-University Hospital Munich, Marchioninistrasse 15, 81377 Munich (Germany)

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated.

  13. Tumor response and clinical outcome in metastatic gastrointestinal stromal tumors under sunitinib therapy: Comparison of RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schramm, N.; Englhart, E.; Schlemmer, M.; Hittinger, M.; Übleis, C.; Becker, C.R.; Reiser, M.F.; Berger, F.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of the study was to compare radiological treatment response according to RECIST, Choi and volumetry in GIST-patients under 2nd-line-sunitinib-therapy and to correlate the results of treatment response assessment with disease-specific survival (DSS). Patients and methods: 20 patients (mean: 60.7 years; 12 male/8 female) with histologically proven GIST underwent baseline-CT of the abdomen under imatinib and follow-up-CTs 3 months and 1 year after change to sunitinib. 68 target lesions (50 hepatic, 18 extrahepatic) were investigated. Therapy response (partial response (PR), stable disease (SD), progressive disease (PD)) was evaluated according to RECIST, Choi and volumetric criteria. Response according to the different assessment systems was compared and correlated to the DSS of the patients utilizing Kaplan–Meier statistics. Results: The mean DSS (in months) of the response groups 3 months after therapy change was: RECIST: PR (0/20); SD (17/20): 30.4 (months); PD (3/20) 11.6. Choi: PR (10/20) 28.6; SD (8/20) 28.1; PD (2/20) 13.5. Volumetry: PR (4/20) 29.6; SD (11/20) 29.7; PD (5/20) 17.2. Response groups after 1 year of sunitinib showed the following mean DSS: RECIST: PR (3/20) 33.6; SD (9/20) 29.7; PD (8/20) 20.3. Choi: PR (10/20) 21.5; SD (4/20) 42.9; PD (6/20) 23.9. Volumetry: PR (6/20) 27.3; SD (5/20) 38.5; PD (9/20) 19.3. Conclusion: One year after modification of therapy, only partial response according to RECIST indicated favorable survival in patients with GIST. The value of alternate response assessment strategies like Choi criteria for prediction of survival in molecular therapy still has to be demonstrated

  14. Gender Differences in the Maintenance of Response to Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felmingham, Kim L.; Bryant, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine potential differential responses in men and women to cognitive behavior therapy for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Method: Fifty-two men and 56 women diagnosed with PTSD participated in randomized controlled trials of cognitive behavior therapy for PTSD. Participants were randomly allocated to either (a) exposure-only…

  15. Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids. Addendum

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible Magnetic Fluids PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Cahit A. Evrensel...AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Immune Response Augmentation in Metastasized Breast Cancer by Localized Therapy Utilizing Biocompatible... Magneto -rheological Fluid (MRF) iron nano-particles were synthesized using the reverse micelle technique and coated with poly(NIPAAm). The size

  16. Influence of radiation therapy on oral Candida albicans colonization: a quantitative assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rossie, K.M.; Taylor, J.; Beck, F.M.; Hodgson, S.E.; Blozis, G.G.

    1987-01-01

    An increase in quantity of oral Candida albicans was documented in patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy during and after therapy, as assessed by an oral-rinse culturing technique. The amount of the increase was greater in denture wearers and directly related to increasing radiation dose and increasing volume of parotid gland included in the radiation portal. A significant number of patients who did not carry C. albicans prior to radiation therapy developed positive cultures by 1 month after radiation therapy. The percentage of patients receiving head and neck radiation therapy who carried C. albicans prior to radiation therapy did not differ significantly from matched dental patient controls

  17. Emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness of children with autism in improvisational music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Through behavioural analysis, this study investigated the social-motivational aspects of musical interaction between the child and the therapist in improvisational music therapy by measuring emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness in children with autism during joint attention ep...

  18. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, A. L.; Ploen, J.; Vogelius, I. R.

    2013-01-01

    estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination...... of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect...... of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D-50,D-i, and the normalized dose-response gradient, gamma(50,i). Results: A highly...

  19. Is response-guided therapy being applied in the clinical setting? The hepatitis C example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Jennifer B; Ward, Melea A; Schwab, Phil

    2015-02-01

    Response-guided therapy (RGT) is a treatment model that bases adjustments to therapeutic regimens on individualized patient physiologic response. This approach is applied to patients with chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection who are treated with a triple therapy regimen of boceprevir or telaprevir in combination with pegylated interferon and ribavirin. As RGT expands in other pharmacologic regimens, including the treatment of breast cancer and acute myeloid leukemia, a measurement of how this approach is applied in clinical practice is important to determine whether the benefits of RGT are being optimized. To measure adherence to the RGT guidelines and to the treatment futility rules based on the drug labeling information for boceprevir and for telaprevir in the treatment of patients with chronic HCV infection. A retrospective observational cohort study was conducted using the large Humana research database, which includes pharmacy, medical, and laboratory claims, as well as enrollment data for more than 1.5 million fully insured commercial members, 1.9 million Medicare Advantage members, and 2.4 million Medicare Part D members from all 50 states. The study population included patients aged ≥18 years to <90 years who were fully insured with commercial or Medicare Advantage coverage. A pharmacy claim for boceprevir or telaprevir was used to identify patients receiving triple therapy for HCV infection. Medical, pharmacy, and laboratory claims were reviewed from the date of the first boceprevir or telaprevir pharmacy claim between May 2011 and February 2012 through a 32-week follow-up period, during which patients were required to have continuous health plan enrollment eligibility. This time period allowed for the occurrences of required HCV RNA laboratory monitoring and the assessment of treatment patterns. The use of RGT for boceprevir and telaprevir includes the monitoring of HCV RNA levels at routine intervals to determine how to proceed with therapy

  20. Process for massage therapy practice and essential assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann Blair; Cambron, Jerrilyn A; Sharpe, Patricia A; Travillian, Ravensara S; Saunders, Ruth P

    2016-07-01

    Little evidence exists about processes in massage therapy practice. Investigating current frameworks is warranted. This qualitative study is a secondary data analysis using grounded theory to understand how massage therapy experts describe massage therapy practice. 31 massage therapy experts were invited to a 2-day symposium to discuss best practices for the profession. Through qualitative analysis, memoing, and discussion, the data were summarized into themes. Three themes were identified around massage therapy practice: 1) client centered, 2) structure for practice, and 3) influencing factors. Each theme is clarified and expanded. Conceptual models were developed for research and clinical practice and a definition for massage therapy practice was identified. Challenges and limitations are discussed. The goal of providing these models is to give massage therapists tools to deliver the best possible care. The models need testing to see if they help advance the profession. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  1. Aerosol scintigraphy in the assessment of therapy for cystic fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuni, C.C.; Regelmann, W.E.; Budd, J.R.; Cret, R.P. du; Boudreau, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper evaluates respiration therapy, counselling, and antibiotic therapy in the treatment of exacerbations of cystic fibrosis. Thirteen patients with cystic fibrosis, aged 11-32 years, who were hospitalized for exacerbation and who had sputum cultures positive for Pseudomonas were treated initially for 3 days with respiration therapy and counselling followed by 14 days of therapy with antibiotics (n = 7) or placebo (n = 6). Tc-99m-DTPA aerosol scintigraphy was performed on days, 1, 4, and 17. Scintigrams were evaluated for change in number of nonventilated segments, change in number of bronchial deposits of aerosol, and subjective overall change

  2. Taming the green-eyed monster: temporal responsivity to cognitive behavioural and cognitive analytic therapy for morbid jealousy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellett, Stephen; Totterdell, Peter

    2013-03-01

    Credible evaluations of the psychological treatment of morbid jealousy are rare. The aim of this study was to evaluate temporal responsivity to cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) and cognitive analytic therapy (CAT) for morbid jealousy. The methodology involved matched A/B single-case experimental designs (SCED) with extended follow-up, in which two patients and their partners completed daily jealousy target symptom items across the phases of the study. Patients also completed traditional psychometric outcome measures at assessment, post-therapy, and at final follow-up. Both patients received the same number of assessment (n = 3), treatment (n = 13), and follow-up (n = 1) sessions.  Autoregressive Integrated Moving Average (ARIMA) models of the patients' daily target symptom jealousy SCED data indicate the effectiveness of the CAT intervention and the ineffectiveness of the CBT intervention, but both therapies produced large effect sizes. The partner of the CBT patient felt less controlled following therapy, whilst the partner of CAT patient did not perceive any change to his partner. The discussion calls for a stronger evidence base for the psychological treatment of morbid jealousy to be constructed and debates the routine measurement of outcomes for partners of morbidly jealous patients. Measuring outcomes for partners of jealous patients is indicated.   CAT shows promise as an intervention for morbid jealousy. The evidence base for the treatment of morbid jealousy requires further development. © 2011 The British Psychological Society.

  3. Early pneumothorax as a feature of response to crizotinib therapy in a patient with ALK rearranged lung adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gennatas, Spyridon; Stanway, Susana J; Thomas, Robert; Min, Toon; Shah, Riyaz; O’Brien, Mary ER; Popat, Sanjay

    2013-01-01

    Single arm phase 1 and 2 studies on Crizotinib in ALK-positive patients so far have shown rapid and durable responses. Spontaneous pneumothoraces as a result of response to anti-cancer therapy are rare in oncology but have been documented in a number of tumour types including lung cancer. This includes cytotoxic chemotherapy as well as molecular targeted agents such as gefitinib and Bevacizumab. These often require chest drain insertion or surgical intervention with associated morbidity and mortality. They have also been associated with response to treatment. This is the first report we are aware of documenting pneumothorax as response to crizotinib therapy. A 48-year-old Caucasian male presented with a Stage IV, TTF1 positive, EGFR wild-type adenocarcinoma of the lung. He received first line chemotherapy with three cycles of cisplatin-pemetrexed chemotherapy with a differential response, and then second-line erlotinib for two months before further radiological evidence of disease progression. Further analysis of his diagnostic specimen identified an ALK rearrangement by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). He was commenced on crizotinib therapy 250 mg orally twice daily. At his 4-week assessment he had a chest radiograph that identified a large left-sided pneumothorax with disease response evident on the right. Chest CT confirmed a 50% left-sided pneumothorax on a background of overall disease response. A chest tube was inserted with complete resolution of the pneumothorax that did not recur following its removal. Our case demonstrates this potential complication of crizotinib therapy and we therefore recommend that pneumothorax be considered in patients on crizotinib presenting with high lung metastatic burden and with worsening dyspnoea

  4. Quantitative Multi-Parametric Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Tumor Response to Photodynamic Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J L Schreurs

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to characterize response to photodynamic therapy (PDT in a mouse cancer model using a multi-parametric quantitative MRI protocol and to identify MR parameters as potential biomarkers for early assessment of treatment outcome.CT26.WT colon carcinoma tumors were grown subcutaneously in the hind limb of BALB/c mice. Therapy consisted of intravenous injection of the photosensitizer Bremachlorin, followed by 10 min laser illumination (200 mW/cm2 of the tumor 6 h post injection. MRI at 7 T was performed at baseline, directly after PDT, as well as at 24 h, and 72 h. Tumor relaxation time constants (T1 and T2 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC were quantified at each time point. Additionally, Gd-DOTA dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE MRI was performed to estimate transfer constants (Ktrans and volume fractions of the extravascular extracellular space (ve using standard Tofts-Kermode tracer kinetic modeling. At the end of the experiment, tumor viability was characterized by histology using NADH-diaphorase staining.The therapy induced extensive cell death in the tumor and resulted in significant reduction in tumor growth, as compared to untreated controls. Tumor T1 and T2 relaxation times remained unchanged up to 24 h, but decreased at 72 h after treatment. Tumor ADC values significantly increased at 24 h and 72 h. DCE-MRI derived tracer kinetic parameters displayed an early response to the treatment. Directly after PDT complete vascular shutdown was observed in large parts of the tumors and reduced uptake (decreased Ktrans in remaining tumor tissue. At 24 h, contrast uptake in most tumors was essentially absent. Out of 5 animals that were monitored for 2 weeks after treatment, 3 had tumor recurrence, in locations that showed strong contrast uptake at 72 h.DCE-MRI is an effective tool for visualization of vascular effects directly after PDT. Endogenous contrast parameters T1, T2, and ADC, measured at 24 to 72 h after PDT, are

  5. Ethnographic assessment of pain coping responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R.

    1990-01-01

    of these Ss. ((c) 1997 APA/PsycINFO, all rights reserved). Medline: A sample consisting of 54 patients and 31 dentists of Chinese, Anglo-American, and Scandinavian ethnic origin were interviewed about their ways of coping with pain. Instruments designed to assess pain coping were constructed from...

  6. Rapid response of breast cancer to neoadjuvant intramammary testosterone-anastrozole therapy: neoadjuvant hormone therapy in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaser, Rebecca L; Dimitrakakis, Constantine

    2014-06-01

    Experimental and clinical data support the inhibitory effect of testosterone on breast tissue and breast cancer. However, testosterone is aromatized to estradiol, which exerts the opposite effect. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of testosterone, combined with the aromatase inhibitor anastrozole, on a hormone receptor positive, infiltrating ductal carcinoma in the neoadjuvant setting. To determine clinical response, we obtained serial ultrasonic measurements and mammograms before and after therapy. Three combination implants-each containing 60 mg of testosterone and 4 mg of anastrozole-were placed anterior, superior, and inferior to a 2.4-cm tumor in the left breast. Three additional testosterone-anastrozole implants were again placed peritumorally 48 days later. By day 46, there was a sevenfold reduction in tumor volume, as measured on ultrasound. By week 13, we documented a 12-fold reduction in tumor volume, demonstrating a rapid logarithmic response to intramammary testosterone-anastrozole implant therapy, equating to a daily response rate of 2.78% and a tumor half-life of 23 days. Therapeutic systemic levels of testosterone were achieved without elevation of estradiol, further demonstrating the efficacy of anastrozole combined with testosterone. This novel therapy, delivered in the neoadjuvant setting, has the potential to identify early responders and to evaluate the effectiveness of therapy in vivo. This may prove to be a new approach to both local and systemic therapies for breast cancer in subgroups of patients. In addition, it can be used to reduce tumor volume, allowing for less surgical intervention and better cosmetic oncoplastic results.

  7. Writing, Evaluating and Assessing Data Response Items in Economics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trotman-Dickenson, D. I.

    1989-01-01

    Describes some of the problems in writing data response items in economics for use by A Level and General Certificate of Secondary Education (GCSE) students. Examines the experience of two series of workshops on writing items, evaluating them and assessing responses from schools. Offers suggestions for producing packages of data response items as…

  8. WE-H-202-02: Biomechanical Modeling of Anatomical Response Over the Course of Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brock, K. [University of Michigan (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Deformable image registration has now been commercially available for several years, with solid performance in a number of sites and for several applications including contour and dose mapping. However, more complex applications have arisen, such as assessing response to radiation therapy over time, registering images pre- and post-surgery, and auto-segmentation from atlases. These applications require innovative registration algorithms to achieve accurate alignment. The goal of this session is to highlight emerging registration technology and these new applications. The state of the art in image registration will be presented from an engineering perspective. Translational clinical applications will also be discussed to tie these new registration approaches together with imaging and radiation therapy applications in specific diseases such as cervical and lung cancers. Learning Objectives: To understand developing techniques and algorithms in deformable image registration that are likely to translate into clinical tools in the near future. To understand emerging imaging and radiation therapy clinical applications that require such new registration algorithms. Research supported in part by the National Institutes of Health under award numbers P01CA059827, R01CA166119, and R01CA166703. Disclosures: Phillips Medical systems (Hugo), Roger Koch (Christensen) support, Varian Medical Systems (Brock), licensing agreements from Raysearch (Brock) and Varian (Hugo).; K. Brock, Licensing Agreement - RaySearch Laboratories. Research Funding - Varian Medical Systems; G. Hugo, Research grant from National Institutes of Health, award number R01CA166119.; G. Christensen, Research support from NIH grants CA166119 and CA166703 and a gift from Roger Koch. There are no conflicts of interest.

  9. Trauma-Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Assessing the Evidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez de Arellano, Michael A.; Jobe-Shields, Lisa; George, Preethy; Dougherty, Richard H.; Daniels, Allen S.; Ghose, Sushmita Shoma; Huang, Larke; Delphin-Rittmon, Miriam E.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Trauma-Focused Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT) is a conjoint parent-child treatment developed by Cohen, Mannarino, and Deblinger that uses cognitive-behavioral principles and exposure techniques to prevent and treat posttraumatic stress, depression, and behavioral problems. This review defined TF-CBT, differentiated it from other models, and assessed the evidence base. Methods Authors reviewed meta-analyses, reviews, and individual studies (1995 to 2013). Databases surveyed were PubMed, PsycINFO, Applied Social Sciences Index and Abstracts, Sociological Abstracts, Social Services Abstracts, PILOTS, the ERIC, and the CINAHL. They chose from three levels of research evidence (high, moderate, and low) on the basis of benchmarks for number of studies and quality of their methodology. They also described the evidence of effectiveness. Results The level of evidence for TF-CBT was rated as high on the basis of ten RCTs, three of which were conducted independently (not by TF-CBT developers). TF-CBT has demonstrated positive outcomes in reducing symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder, although it is less clear whether TF-CBT is effective in reducing behavior problems or symptoms of depression. Limitations of the studies include concerns about investigator bias and exclusion of vulnerable populations. Conclusions TF-CBT is a viable treatment for reducing trauma-related symptoms among some children who have experienced trauma and their nonoffending caregivers. Based on this evidence, TF-CBT should be available as a covered service in health plans. Ongoing research is needed to further identify best practices for TF-CBT in various settings and with individuals from various racial and ethnic backgrounds and with varied trauma histories, symptoms, and stages of intellectual, social, and emotional development. PMID:24638076

  10. Health technology assessment of magnet therapy for relieving pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arabloo, Jalal; Hamouzadeh, Pejman; Eftekharizadeh, Fereshteh; Mobinizadeh, Mohammadreza; Olyaeemanesh, Alireza; Nejati, Mina; Doaee, Shila

    2017-01-01

    Background: Magnet therapy has been used increasingly as a new method to alleviate pain. Magnetic products are marketed with claims of effectiveness for reducing pain of various origins. However, there are inconsistent results from a limited number of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) testing the analgesic efficacy of magnet therapy. This study aimed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of magnet therapy on reliving various types of pain. Methods: A systematic search of two main medical databases (Cochrane Library and Ovid Medline) was conducted from 1946 to May 2014. Only English systematic reviews that compared magnet therapy with other conventional treatments in patients with local pain in terms of pain relieving measures were included. The results of the included studies were thematically synthesized. Results: Eight studies were included. Magnet therapy could be used to alleviate pain of various origins including pain in various organs, arthritis, myofascial muscle pain, lower limb muscle cramps, carpal tunnel syndrome and pelvic pain. Results showed that the effectiveness of magnetic therapy was only approved in muscle pains, but its effectiveness in other indications and its application as a complementary treatment have not been established. Conclusion: According to the results, it seems that magnet therapy could not be an effective treatment for relieving different types of pain. Our results highlighted the need for further investigations to be done in order to support any recommendations about this technology.

  11. Assessment of the Evolution of Cancer Treatment Therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arruebo, Manuel; Vilaboa, Nuria; Sáez-Gutierrez, Berta; Lambea, Julio; Tres, Alejandro; Valladares, Mónica; González-Fernández, África

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapy has been characterized throughout history by ups and downs, not only due to the ineffectiveness of treatments and side effects, but also by hope and the reality of complete remission and cure in many cases. Within the therapeutic arsenal, alongside surgery in the case of solid tumors, are the antitumor drugs and radiation that have been the treatment of choice in some instances. In recent years, immunotherapy has become an important therapeutic alternative, and is now the first choice in many cases. Nanotechnology has recently arrived on the scene, offering nanostructures as new therapeutic alternatives for controlled drug delivery, for combining imaging and treatment, applying hyperthermia, and providing directed target therapy, among others. These therapies can be applied either alone or in combination with other components (antibodies, peptides, folic acid, etc.). In addition, gene therapy is also offering promising new methods for treatment. Here, we present a review of the evolution of cancer treatments, starting with chemotherapy, surgery, radiation and immunotherapy, and moving on to the most promising cutting-edge therapies (gene therapy and nanomedicine). We offer an historical point of view that covers the arrival of these therapies to clinical practice and the market, and the promises and challenges they present

  12. Assessment of the Evolution of Cancer Treatment Therapies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arruebo, Manuel [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Mariano Esquillor, Edif. I+D, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Vilaboa, Nuria [CIBER de Bioingeniería, Biomateriales y Nanomedicina (CIBER-BBN), Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Hospital Universitario La Paz-IdiPAZ, Paseo de la Castellana 261, Madrid 28046 (Spain); Sáez-Gutierrez, Berta; Lambea, Julio; Tres, Alejandro [Instituto de Nanociencia de Aragón (INA), Mariano Esquillor, Edif. I+D, University of Zaragoza, Zaragoza 50018 (Spain); Servicio de Oncología Médica, Hospital Clínico Universitario Lozano Blesa, Avda. San Juan Bosco 50009, Zaragoza (Spain); Instituto Aragonés de Ciencias de la Salud (I-CS), Avda. Gómez Laguna, 25, Zaragoza 50009 (Spain); Valladares, Mónica [Lonza Biologics Porriño, A relva s/n, Porriño (Pontevedra) 36410 (Spain); González-Fernández, África, E-mail: africa@uvigo.es [Immunology Department, Biomedical Research Center (CINBIO), University of Vigo, Campus Lagoas Marcosende, Vigo (Pontevedra) 36310 (Spain)

    2011-08-12

    Cancer therapy has been characterized throughout history by ups and downs, not only due to the ineffectiveness of treatments and side effects, but also by hope and the reality of complete remission and cure in many cases. Within the therapeutic arsenal, alongside surgery in the case of solid tumors, are the antitumor drugs and radiation that have been the treatment of choice in some instances. In recent years, immunotherapy has become an important therapeutic alternative, and is now the first choice in many cases. Nanotechnology has recently arrived on the scene, offering nanostructures as new therapeutic alternatives for controlled drug delivery, for combining imaging and treatment, applying hyperthermia, and providing directed target therapy, among others. These therapies can be applied either alone or in combination with other components (antibodies, peptides, folic acid, etc.). In addition, gene therapy is also offering promising new methods for treatment. Here, we present a review of the evolution of cancer treatments, starting with chemotherapy, surgery, radiation and immunotherapy, and moving on to the most promising cutting-edge therapies (gene therapy and nanomedicine). We offer an historical point of view that covers the arrival of these therapies to clinical practice and the market, and the promises and challenges they present.

  13. Assessment of the Evolution of Cancer Treatment Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruebo, Manuel; Vilaboa, Nuria; Sáez-Gutierrez, Berta; Lambea, Julio; Tres, Alejandro; Valladares, Mónica; González-Fernández, África

    2011-01-01

    Cancer therapy has been characterized throughout history by ups and downs, not only due to the ineffectiveness of treatments and side effects, but also by hope and the reality of complete remission and cure in many cases. Within the therapeutic arsenal, alongside surgery in the case of solid tumors, are the antitumor drugs and radiation that have been the treatment of choice in some instances. In recent years, immunotherapy has become an important therapeutic alternative, and is now the first choice in many cases. Nanotechnology has recently arrived on the scene, offering nanostructures as new therapeutic alternatives for controlled drug delivery, for combining imaging and treatment, applying hyperthermia, and providing directed target therapy, among others. These therapies can be applied either alone or in combination with other components (antibodies, peptides, folic acid, etc.). In addition, gene therapy is also offering promising new methods for treatment. Here, we present a review of the evolution of cancer treatments, starting with chemotherapy, surgery, radiation and immunotherapy, and moving on to the most promising cutting-edge therapies (gene therapy and nanomedicine). We offer an historical point of view that covers the arrival of these therapies to clinical practice and the market, and the promises and challenges they present. PMID:24212956

  14. Assessment of the Evolution of Cancer Treatment Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Valladares

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Cancer therapy has been characterized throughout history by ups and downs, not only due to the ineffectiveness of treatments and side effects, but also by hope and the reality of complete remission and cure in many cases. Within the therapeutic arsenal, alongside surgery in the case of solid tumors, are the antitumor drugs and radiation that have been the treatment of choice in some instances. In recent years, immunotherapy has become an important therapeutic alternative, and is now the first choice in many cases. Nanotechnology has recently arrived on the scene, offering nanostructures as new therapeutic alternatives for controlled drug delivery, for combining imaging and treatment, applying hyperthermia, and providing directed target therapy, among others. These therapies can be applied either alone or in combination with other components (antibodies, peptides, folic acid, etc.. In addition, gene therapy is also offering promising new methods for treatment. Here, we present a review of the evolution of cancer treatments, starting with chemotherapy, surgery, radiation and immunotherapy, and moving on to the most promising cutting-edge therapies (gene therapy and nanomedicine. We offer an historical point of view that covers the arrival of these therapies to clinical practice and the market, and the promises and challenges they present.

  15. Impact of hepatitis B virus infection on HIV response to antiretroviral therapy in a Chinese antiretroviral therapy center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rongrong Yang

    2014-11-01

    Conclusions: HBV co-infection can affect late immunological and virological responses to ART and increase the risk of hepatotoxicity. Mortality due to liver disease was high among HIV/HBV co-infected individuals in this study, despite HBV-active ART. As long as HIV/HBV co-infected persons need anti-HBV therapy, they should be recommended ART that includes agents with activity against both HIV and HBV, regardless of the CD4 cell count level.

  16. Tumor Radiation Therapy Creates Therapeutic Vaccine Responses to the Colorectal Cancer Antigen GUCY2C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witek, Matthew [Department of Radiation Oncology, Kimmel Cancer Center, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Blomain, Erik S.; Magee, Michael S.; Xiang, Bo; Waldman, Scott A. [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Snook, Adam E., E-mail: adam.snook@jefferson.edu [Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: Radiation therapy (RT) is thought to produce clinical responses in cancer patients, not only through direct toxicity to cancer cells and supporting tumor stroma cells, but also through activation of immunologic effectors. More recently, RT has potentiated the local and systemic effects of cancer immunotherapy (IT). However, combination regimens that maximize immunologic and clinical efficacy remain undefined. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the impact of local RT on adenoviral-mediated vaccination against the colorectal cancer antigen GUCY2C (Ad5-GUCY2C) in a murine subcutaneous tumor model using mouse CT26 colon cancer cells (CT26-GUCY2C). Immune responses were assessed by ELISpot, and clinical responses were assessed by tumor size and incidence. Results: The specific sequence of tumor-directed RT preceding Ad5-GUCY2C IT transformed inactive therapeutic Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination into a curative vaccine. GUCY2C-specific T cell responses were amplified (P<.05), tumor eradication was maximized (P<.01), and tumor volumes were minimized (P<.001) in mice whose tumors were irradiated before, compared with after, Ad5-GUCY2C vaccination. The immunologic and antitumor efficacy of Ad5-GUCY2C was amplified comparably by unfractionated (8 Gy × 1), or biologically equivalent doses of fractionated (3.5 Gy × 3), RT. The antitumor effects of sequential RT and IT (RT-IT) depended on expression of GUCY2C by tumor cells and the adenoviral vaccine vector, and tumor volumes were inversely related to the magnitude of GUCY2C-specific T cell responses. Moreover, mice cured of CT26-GUCY2C tumors by RT-IT showed long-lasting antigen-dependent protection, resisting tumors formed by GUCY2C-expressing 4T1 breast cancer cells inoculated 50 days after CT26 cells. Conclusions: Optimal sequencing of RT and IT amplifies antigen-specific local and systemic immune responses, revealing novel acute and long-term therapeutic antitumor protection. These observations underscore the importance

  17. Important predictors of response determined by surgical staging prior to triple modality therapy for esophageal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suntharalingam, M.; Vines, E.; Slawson, R.; Doyle, A.; Schuetz, J.; Greenwald, B.; Sonnet, J.; Krasna, M.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Since 1992, the University of Maryland has routinely performed preoperative surgical staging including thoracoscopy and laparoscopy on patients undergoing concurrent chemoradiation followed by surgical resection for esophageal carcinoma. We have performed an analysis of the pathologic pretreatment data in an attempt to identify possible predictors of response and outcome. Materials: Patients underwent thoracoscopy and laparoscopy in order to determine resectability of the primary lesion and pathologic nodal status prior to therapy. To date, 32 patients have completed triple modality therapy (28 men, 4 women, median age 59). Patients received 50.4 Gy in 1.8 Gy fractions in conjunction with two cycles of 5-FU (1 gm/m2) and Cisplatin (100 mg/m2) on days 1 and 28. Radiotherapy fields were determined by the extent of disease discovered at time of surgical staging. Ivor Lewis esophagectomy was performed 4 to 6 weeks after completion of chemo/RT. The median follow up is 24.8 months (range 4-49 mo.) Sixteen patients had squamous cell ca and 16 had adenocarcinoma. Univariate and multivariate analysis was performed in order to determine the influence of age, KPS, T stage, Lymph Nodes status and histology, on the likelihood of achieving a pathologic complete response and disease free survival. Results: Twenty-eight have undergone preoperative staging (2 refused, 2 medical contraindications.) All 32 patients are valuable for response to therapy and are included in the analysis. The three year cause specific and disease free survival is 46% and 41% respectively with a median CSS of 23 months and DFS of 19 months. The overall complete response rate assessed by histologic and immunohistologic evaluation at the time of esophagectomy is 31%. The DFS at 32 months is 72% (median not reached) for these patients versus 24% for those with residual disease at the time of surgery. The most significant predictor for the likelihood of achieving a pathologic CR was the

  18. Site response assessment using borehole seismic records

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Donghee; Chang, Chunjoong; Choi, Weonhack [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. The Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and the Korea Institute of Geology and Mining (KIGAM) have installed and are operating borehole seismometers at a depth of 70∼100 meters for the precise determination of epicenters. Also, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has installed and is operating 2 borehole seismic stations near Weolseong area to observe at a depth of 140 meters seismic activities connected to fault activity. KHNP plans to operate in the second half of 2014 a borehole seismic station for depths less than 300 and 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep strata. As a basic study for analyzing ground motion response characteristics at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in connection with the deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, the present study examined the background noise response characteristics of the borehole seismic station operated by KHNP. In order to analyze the depth-dependent impact of seismic waves at deeper depths than in Korea, seismic data collected by Japan's KIK-net seismic stations were used and the seismic wave characteristics analyzed by size and depth. In order to analyze the borehole seismic observation data from the seismic station operated by KHNP, this study analyzed the background noise characteristics by using a probability density function.

  19. Site response assessment using borehole seismic records

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Donghee; Chang, Chunjoong; Choi, Weonhack

    2014-01-01

    In regions with high seismic activity, such as Japan, the Western United States and Taiwan, borehole seismometers installed deep underground are used to monitor seismic activity during the course of seismic wave propagation at various depths and to study the stress changes due to earthquakes and analyze the connection to fault movements. The Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA) and the Korea Institute of Geology and Mining (KIGAM) have installed and are operating borehole seismometers at a depth of 70∼100 meters for the precise determination of epicenters. Also, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., Ltd. (KHNP) has installed and is operating 2 borehole seismic stations near Weolseong area to observe at a depth of 140 meters seismic activities connected to fault activity. KHNP plans to operate in the second half of 2014 a borehole seismic station for depths less than 300 and 600 meters in order to study the seismic response characteristics in deep strata. As a basic study for analyzing ground motion response characteristics at depths of about 300 to 600 meters in connection with the deep geological disposal of spent nuclear fuel, the present study examined the background noise response characteristics of the borehole seismic station operated by KHNP. In order to analyze the depth-dependent impact of seismic waves at deeper depths than in Korea, seismic data collected by Japan's KIK-net seismic stations were used and the seismic wave characteristics analyzed by size and depth. In order to analyze the borehole seismic observation data from the seismic station operated by KHNP, this study analyzed the background noise characteristics by using a probability density function

  20. Assessing BEPS: Origins, Standards, and Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Shay, Stephen E.; Christians, Allison

    2017-01-01

    The G20/OECD’s multi-year campaign to combat base erosion and profit shifting (BEPS) marks a critical step in the evolution of the international tax regime and the roles of institutions that guide it. This General Report for Subject 1, IFA Congress 2017, provides a snapshot of the outcomes of the BEPS project by comparing national responses to key mandates, recommendations and best practices through the end of October, 2016 based on National Reports representing the perspectives of 48 countri...

  1. Histologic response of soft tissue sarcoma to radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, C.G.; Schiller, A.L.; Suit, H.D.; Mankin, H.J.; Rosenberg, A.

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-seven patients with soft tissue sarcoma had preoperative radiotherapy, limb-sparing marginal surgical resection and whole-mount tumor histologic analysis. Incisional biopsy specimens before radiotherapy were reviewed for tumor type, grade, and extent of necrosis. Preoperative radiotherapy was given in either of two regimens: 13 patients received a mean total dose of 5250 cGy in one daily 180 to 200 cGy fractions and 14 patients a mean total dose of 4770 cGy in two daily fractions of 180 to 200 cGy separated by 4 hours. Twenty-one specimens had at least 80% necrosis or severely altered cells, a 3+ to 4+ response. Grade and size of the tumor appeared to be indicators of response to treatment rather than histologic type. Three of five patients (60%) with Grade 1, eight of 11 patients (73%) with Grade 2 lesions, and ten of 11 patients (91%) with Grade 3 tumors had 80% or greater necrosis or severely altered cells. For tumors 10 cm or less in greatest diameter, the 3+ to 4+ histologic response was seen in 12 of 14 patients (86%) whereas for lesions greater than 10 cm, this response was observed in nine of 13 patients (69%). For patients with Grade 2 or 3 soft tissue sarcoma, 13 of 14 patients (93%) treated with two fractions per day and two of four patients (50%) receiving one fraction per day exhibited significant response. All six patients treated twice daily for lesions greater than 10 cm had 3+ to 4+ histologic response compared to three of seven (43%) patients treated once per day. Therefore, grade and size of soft tissue sarcoma are important predictors of response to radiotherapy and preoperative twice daily radiotherapy may more likely permit the conservative surgical excision of sarcomas of borderline resectability

  2. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E.; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-01-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome

  3. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voloshin, Tali [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Rappaport Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 1 Efron Street, Bat Galim, Haifa 31096 (Israel); Voest, Emile E. [Department of Medical Oncology, University Medical Center Utrecht, Utrecht (Netherlands); Shaked, Yuval, E-mail: yshaked@tx.technion.ac.il [Department of Molecular Pharmacology, Rappaport Faculty of Medicine and the Rappaport Institute, Technion—Israel Institute of Technology, 1 Efron Street, Bat Galim, Haifa 31096 (Israel)

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction—both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. -- Highlights: • Cancer therapy induces host molecular and cellular pro-tumorigenic effects. • Host effects in response to therapy may promote tumor relapse and metastasis. • The reactive host consists of immunological mediators promoting tumor re-growth. • Blocking therapy-induced host mediators may improve outcome.

  4. Prediction of electroconvulsive therapy response and remission in major depression: Meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Diermen, L. (Linda); Van Den Ameele, S. (Seline); A.M. Kamperman (Astrid); Sabbe, B.C.G. (Bernard C.G.); Vermeulen, T. (Tom); Schrijvers, D. (Didier); T.K. Birkenhäger (Tom)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractElectroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be the most effective treatment in severe major depression. The identification of reliable predictors of ECT response could contribute to a more targeted patient selection and consequently increased ECT response rates. Aims To investigate

  5. Effect of cobalt-60 radiation on response to endodontic therapy in monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matson, J.E.; Patterson, S.S.; Kafrawy, A.H.; Hornback, N.B.; Shidnia, H.

    1978-01-01

    Response of teeth that had received therapeutic doses of Cobalt-60 radiation to endodontic therapy were investigated in three monkeys. The results indicated no appreciable effect of the irradiation on the response to root canal treatment aside from reduction in osteoblastic activity

  6. Prediction of Response to Medication and Cognitive Therapy in the Treatment of Moderate to Severe Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fournier, Jay C.; DeRubeis, Robert J.; Shelton, Richard C.; Hollon, Steven D.; Amsterdam, Jay D.; Gallop, Robert

    2009-01-01

    A recent randomized controlled trial found nearly equivalent response rates for antidepressant medications and cognitive therapy in a sample of moderate to severely depressed outpatients. In this article, the authors seek to identify the variables that were associated with response across both treatments as well as variables that predicted…

  7. Counter-responses as organizers in adolescent analysis and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, M Barrie

    2004-01-01

    The author introduces Counter-response as a phenomological term to replace theory-burdened terms like counter-transference, counter-identification, and counter-resistance. He discusses the analyst's use of self (drawing on the comparison with Winnicott's use of the object) in processing the expectable destabilizing counter-reactions that occur in working therapeutically with disturbed adolescents and their parents. Further; he discusses the counter-reaction to the patient's narrative, acting-out, and how re-enactments can serve as an organizer for understanding the patient's inner life when the analyst formulates his/her counter-response. Emphasis is placed on the therapist forming his or her own narrative with the adolescent that takes into account the evoked counter-reaction. For this purpose, the author recommends the use of a combined counter-response and metaphor-orienting perspective to acknowledge and work with the denial, illusions, reversal of perspective, and catastrophic anxieties experienced with these adolescents. The counter-response perspective permits the emergence of the disturbed adolescent's novel narrative; however, since these experiences can be destabilizing or disruptive, the author also recommends the use of a personal metaphor to anticipate the reluctance to examining, processing, and formulating the analyst's dysphoric counter-reaction. With the use of the counter-response, the analyst's therapeutic ideal is to achieve a more optimal balance between using accepted narrative theories and exploring novel enactment experiences. His swimming metaphor stratagem is designed to keep the analyst in these difficult encounters.

  8. Prediction of Individual Response to Electroconvulsive Therapy via Machine Learning on Structural Magnetic Resonance Imaging Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redlich, Ronny; Opel, Nils; Grotegerd, Dominik; Dohm, Katharina; Zaremba, Dario; Bürger, Christian; Münker, Sandra; Mühlmann, Lisa; Wahl, Patricia; Heindel, Walter; Arolt, Volker; Alferink, Judith; Zwanzger, Peter; Zavorotnyy, Maxim; Kugel, Harald; Dannlowski, Udo

    2016-06-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is one of the most effective treatments for severe depression. However, biomarkers that accurately predict a response to ECT remain unidentified. To investigate whether certain factors identified by structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques are able to predict ECT response. In this nonrandomized prospective study, gray matter structure was assessed twice at approximately 6 weeks apart using 3-T MRI and voxel-based morphometry. Patients were recruited through the inpatient service of the Department of Psychiatry, University of Muenster, from March 11, 2010, to March 27, 2015. Two patient groups with acute major depressive disorder were included. One group received an ECT series in addition to antidepressants (n = 24); a comparison sample was treated solely with antidepressants (n = 23). Both groups were compared with a sample of healthy control participants (n = 21). Binary pattern classification was used to predict ECT response by structural MRI that was performed before treatment. In addition, univariate analysis was conducted to predict reduction of the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score by pretreatment gray matter volumes and to investigate ECT-related structural changes. One participant in the ECT sample was excluded from the analysis, leaving 67 participants (27 men and 40 women; mean [SD] age, 43.7 [10.6] years). The binary pattern classification yielded a successful prediction of ECT response, with accuracy rates of 78.3% (18 of 23 patients in the ECT sample) and sensitivity rates of 100% (13 of 13 who responded to ECT). Furthermore, a support vector regression yielded a significant prediction of relative reduction in the Hamilton Depression Rating Scale score. The principal findings of the univariate model indicated a positive association between pretreatment subgenual cingulate volume and individual ECT response (Montreal Neurological Institute [MNI] coordinates x = 8, y = 21, z = -18

  9. Modifiers of radiation response in tumor therapy: strategies and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The administration of two (or more) cytotoxic agents to widen the differential between the responses of tumor and normal tissues depends upon the biological properties of the agents in the cells and tissues, their interactive potential, and the strategy employed in their administration. Assuming that one agent is ionizing radiation, and considering response modification in broad terms, the qualitative features of various strategies are developed for physical as well as chemical modifies. The heterogeneity of human tumor cells and the compensatory mechanisms of normal tissues following injury are identified as topical areas requiring sustained research effort. Finally, estimates are developed for the degree of improvement required from a response modifier to effect significant improvements in tumor cure rates

  10. Modifiers of radiation response in tumor therapy: strategies and expectations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1982-01-01

    The administration of two (or more) cytotoxic agents to widen the differential between the responses of tumor and normal tissues depends upon the biological properties of the agents in the cells and tissues, their interactive potential, and the strategy employed in their administration. Assuming that one agent is ionizing radiation, and considering response modification in broad terms, the qualitative features of various strategies are developed for physical as well as chemical modifiers. The heterogeneity of human tumor cells and the compensatory mechanisms of normal tissues following injury are identified as topical areas requiring sustained research effort. Finally, estimates are developed for the degree of improvement from a response modifier to effect significant improvements in tumor cure rates

  11. Survival in Response to Multimodal Therapy in Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasongsook, Naiyarat; Kumar, Aditi; Chintakuntlawar, Ashish V; Foote, Robert L; Kasperbauer, Jan; Molina, Julian; Garces, Yolanda; Ma, Daniel; Wittich, Michelle A Neben; Rubin, Joseph; Richardson, Ronald; Morris, John; Hay, Ian; Fatourechi, Vahab; McIver, Bryan; Ryder, Mabel; Thompson, Geoffrey; Grant, Clive; Richards, Melanie; Sebo, Thomas J; Rivera, Michael; Suman, Vera; Jenkins, Sarah M; Smallridge, Robert C; Bible, Keith C

    2017-12-01

    Historical outcomes in anaplastic thyroid cancer (ATC) have been dismal. To determine whether an initial intensive multimodal therapy (MMT) is associated with improved ATC survival. MMT was offered to all patients with newly diagnosed ATC treated at the Mayo Clinic from 2003 through 2015; MMT vs care with palliative intent (PI) was individualized considering clinical status and patient preferences. Outcomes were retrospectively analyzed by American Joint Committee on Cancer stage and treatments compared with patient cohort data from 1949 through 1999. Forty-eight patients (60% male; median age, 62 years); 18 treated with PI, 30 with MMT. Overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival determined by Kaplan-Meier method. Median OS and 1-year survival for the later cohort were 9 months [95% confidence interval (CI), 4 to 22 months] and 42% (95% CI, 28% to 56%) vs 3 months and 10% for the earlier cohort. Median OS was 21 months compared with 3.9 months in the pooled MMT vs PI groups for the later cohort [hazard ratio (HR), 0.32; P = 0.0006]. Among only patients in the later cohort who had stage IVB disease, median OS was 22.4 vs 4 months (HR, 0.12; 95% CI, 0.03 to 0.44; P = 0.0001), with 68% vs 0% alive at 1 year (MMT vs PI). Among patients with stage IVC cancer, OS did not differ by therapy. MMT appears to convey longer survival in ATC among patients with stage IVA/B disease. Copyright © 2017 Endocrine Society

  12. Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-05-01

    The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State's economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ''low probability, high consequence'' aspect of the transportation risk

  13. Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-05-01

    The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State`s economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ``low probability, high consequence`` aspect of the transportation risk.

  14. Gap Assessment in the Emergency Response Community

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barr, Jonathan L.; Burtner, Edwin R.; Pike, William A.; Peddicord, Annie M Boe; Minsk, Brian S.

    2010-09-27

    This report describes a gap analysis of the emergency response and management (EM) community, performed during the fall of 2009. Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) undertook this effort to identify potential improvements to the functional domains in EM that could be provided by the application of current or future technology. To perform this domain-based gap analysis, PNNL personnel interviewed subject matter experts (SMEs) across the EM domain; to make certain that the analyses reflected a representative view of the community, the SMEs were from a variety of geographic areas and from various sized communities (urban, suburban, and rural). PNNL personnel also examined recent and relevant after-action reports and U.S. Government Accountability Office reports.

  15. Pretreatment with betamethasone of patients with Graves' disease given radioiodine therapy: thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamstedt, A.; Karlsson, A.

    1991-01-01

    The effects of betamethasone on thyroid autoantibody responses and outcome of radioiodine therapy were determined over a period of 1 yr in a prospective randomized study of 40 patients with Graves' disease. Twenty patients were given placebo tablets, and 20 patients were treated with betamethasone from 3 weeks before until 4 weeks after 131 I therapy. At the time of inclusion in the study, the mean serum concentrations of TSH receptor antibodies, thyroid peroxidase antibodies, and thyroglobulin antibodies (TgAb) were increased in both groups. Three weeks of treatment with betamethasone reduced the thyroid peroxidase antibody and TgAb titers as well as the serum concentrations of thyroid hormones. A decrease in the TSH receptor antibody level was not statistically significant. After radioiodine therapy, transient increases in thyroid autoantibody levels were observed. The titers of the different antibodies generally changed in parallel. In some patients a detectable level of a given antibody was found only after the radioiodine treatment, and in two cases, TgAb did not appear at all, although the two other antibodies increased temporarily. Betamethasone delayed, but did not abolish, the 131 I-induced antibody peaks. Betamethasone also caused a reduction in the total serum immunoglobulin G, a reduction which persisted throughout the study period. When the study ended, 17 patients given placebo and 9 patients given betamethasone were receiving replacement therapy due to the development of hypothyroidism. These patients at this point in time had lower antibody levels than those not requiring T4. The results of this study demonstrate that betamethasone reduces and modifies the thyroid autoantibody responses as well as the outcome of radioiodine therapy in patients with Graves' disease

  16. Response of the oral mucosa to porphyrin mediated boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morris, G.M.

    2003-01-01

    Pre-clinical studies are now in progress to develop boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) modalities for the treatment of head and neck carcinomas. BNCT is a bimodal therapy which involves the administration of a boron-10 enriched compound, that accumulates preferentially in tumours, prior to irradiation with low energy neutrons. These neutrons are captured by boron-10 atoms to produce a highly localised radiation exposure. More recently, it has been demonstrated that various boronated porphyrins can target a variety of tumours. Of the porphyrins evaluated to date, copper tetracarboranylphenyl porphyrin (CuTCPH) is a strong candidate for potential clinical evaluation. It has extremely high specificity for a variety of tumour models. Therapeutic efficacy of CuTCPH mediated BNCT has been demonstrated in pre-clinical studies using the murine EMT-6 carcinoma model. In the present investigation the response of the oral mucosa to CuTCPH mediated boron neutron capture (BNC) irradiation was assessed using a standard rat model (ventral tongue). Single exposure irradiation was carried out on the thermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor, at 3 days after the final injection of the boronated porphyrin. The impact of CuTCPH mediated BNC irradiation on oral mucosa at therapeutically effective exposure times, assessed using the ventral tongue model, was minimal. This was primarily due to the fact that blood boron levels (from CuTCPH) were very low at the time of irradiation. Analysis of the dose-effect data for CuTCPH gave a compound biological effectiveness (CBE) factor of 2.5. It can be concluded that, although, the CBE factor (calculated using blood boron concentrations) was relatively high, CuTCPH mediated BNC irradiation should not cause significant damage at clinically relevant radiation doses. This is because blood boron levels would be very low at the time of irradiation

  17. Power and Responsibility in Therapy: Integrating Feminism and Multiculturalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Elizabeth Nutt; Barber, Jill S.

    2004-01-01

    The integration of feminist and multicultural approaches to psychotherapy, called for many times, has not yet materialized. This article reviews possible reasons this integration has not taken place and offers an approach to integration based on the guiding principles of power and responsibility, which builds on previous theories and approaches.

  18. Early Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Patients Infected With Leishmania braziliensis Express Increased Inflammatory Responses After Antimony Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Rúbia S; Carvalho, Lucas P; Campos, Taís M; Magalhães, Andréa S; Passos, Sara T; Schriefer, Albert; Silva, Juliana A; Lago, Ednaldo; Paixão, Camilla S; Machado, Paulo; Scott, Phillip; Carvalho, Edgar M

    2018-02-14

    Early cutaneous leishmaniasis (ECL) is characterized by a nonulcerated papular lesion and illness duration less than 30 days. Approximately 4 weeks later, the cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) ulcers appear. We were surprised to find that failure after antimony therapy (Sb5) is higher in ECL than CL. We hypothesize that the inflammatory response in ECL patients may increase during Sb5 therapy, which leads to treatment failure. A cohort of 44 ECL patients infected by Leishmania braziliensis was established to evaluate the response to Sb5 and to compare immunologic responses in ECL patients with CL and healthy subjects. A hierarchical clustering based on cytokine levels showed a weak positive correlation between proinflammatory cytokine levels and those patients that failed Sb5 treatment. Although Sb5 therapy decreased interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor levels in CL patients, we were surprised to find that an increase in these cytokines was observed in ECL patients. Moreover, interleukin (IL)-10 was less able to down-modulate immune responses in ECL. The enhanced production of proinflammatory cytokines, due in part to the decreased ability of IL-10 to down-modulate immune response during therapy in ECL, promotes the development and persistence of leishmania ulcer despite antimony therapy. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Personality and Differential Treatment Response in Major Depression: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Cognitive-Behavioural Therapy and Pharmacotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagby, R Michael; Quilty, Lena C; Segal, Zindel V; McBride, Carolina C; Kennedy, Sidney H; Costa, Paul T

    2008-01-01

    Objective Effective treatments for major depressive disorder exist, yet some patients fail to respond, or achieve only partial response. One approach to optimizing treatment success is to identify which patients are more likely to respond best to which treatments. The objective of this investigation was to determine if patient personality characteristics are predictive of response to either cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) or pharmacotherapy (PHT). Method Depressed patients completed the Revised NEO Personality Inventory, which measures the higher-order domain and lower-order facet traits of the Five-Factor Model of Personality, and were randomized to receive either CBT or PHT. Result Four personality traits—the higher-order domain neuroticism and 3 lower-order facet traits: trust, straightforwardness, and tendermindedness—were able to distinguish a differential response rate to CBT, compared with PHT. Conclusion The assessment of patient dimensional personality traits can assist in the selection and optimization of treatment response for depressed patients. PMID:18616856

  20. Microanalysis on selected video clips with focus on communicative response in music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ridder, Hanne Mette Ochsner

    2007-01-01

    This chapter describes a five-step procedure for video analysis where the topic of investigation is the communicative response of clients in music therapy. In this microanalysis procedure only very short video clips are used, and in order to select these clips an overview of each music therapy...... session is obtained with the help of a session-graph that is a systematic way of collecting video observations from one music therapy session and combining the data in one figure. The systematic procedures do not demand sophisticated computer equipment; only standard programmes such as Excel and a media...... player. They are based on individual music therapy work with a population who are difficult to engage in joint activities and who show little response (e.g. persons suffering from severe dementia). The video analysis tools might be relevant to other groups of clients where it is important to form a clear...

  1. Viral Response to Specifically Targeted Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C and the Implications for Treatment Success

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Curtis L Cooper

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently, hepatitis C virus (HCV antiviral therapy is characterized by long duration, a multitude of side effects, difficult administration and suboptimal success; clearly, alternatives are needed. Collectively, specifically targeted antiviral therapy for HCV (STAT-C molecules achieve rapid viral suppression and very high rapid virological response rates, and improve sustained virological response rates. The attrition rate of agents within this class has been high due to various toxicities. Regardless, several STAT-C molecules are poised to become the standard of care for HCV treatment in the foreseeable future. Optimism must be tempered with concerns related to the rapid development of drug resistance with resulting HCV rebound. Strategies including induction dosing with interferon and ribavirin, use of combination high-potency STAT-C molecules and an intensive emphasis on adherence to HCV antiviral therapy will be critical to the success of this promising advance in HCV therapy.

  2. Predictors of Total Mortality and Echocardiographic Response for Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy: A Cohort Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Ferreira Gazzoni

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background: Clinical studies demonstrate that up to 40% of patients do not respond to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT, thus, appropriate patient selection is critical to the success of CRT in heart failure. Objective: Evaluation of mortality predictors and response to CRT in the Brazilian scenario. Methods: Retrospective cohort study including patients submitted to CRT in a tertiary hospital in southern Brazil from 2008 to 2014. Survival was assessed through a database of the State Department of Health (RS. Predictors of echocardiographic response were evaluated using Poisson regression. Survival analysis was performed by Cox regression and Kaplan Meyer curves. A two-tailed p value less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: A total of 170 patients with an average follow-up of 1011 ± 632 days were included. The total mortality was 30%. The independent predictors of mortality were age (hazard ratio [HR] of 1.05, p = 0.027, previous acute myocardial infarction (AMI (HR of 2.17, p = 0.049 and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (HR of 3.13, p = 0.015. The percentage of biventricular stimulation at 6 months was identified as protective factor of mortality ([HR] 0.97, p = 0.048. The independent predictors associated with the echocardiographic response were absence of mitral insufficiency, presence of left bundle branch block and percentage of biventricular stimulation. Conclusion: Mortality in patients submitted to CRT in a tertiary hospital was independently associated with age, presence of COPD and previous AMI. The percentage of biventricular pacing evaluated 6 months after resynchronizer implantation was independently associated with improved survival and echocardiographic response.

  3. Therapy evaluation and diagnostic accuracy in neuroendocrine tumours: assessment of radiological methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvin, A.

    1993-01-01

    The diagnostic accuracy of ultrasonically guided biopsy-gun biopsies was assessed in a group of 47 patients with suspected pancreatic carcinoma. A correct diagnosis was obtained in 44 of the 47 patients (94%). Biopsy-gun biopsy of the pancreas is considered a useful, reliable and non-traumatic method for the diagnosis of pancreatic malignancy. Twenty-five patients with known neuroendocrine tumour disease were biopsied with 1.2 mm and 0.9 mm biopsy-gun needles. The influence of treatment-related fibrosis was also evaluated. The overall diagnostic accuracy with the 0.9 mm needle was 69% as compared to 92% with the 1.2 mm needle. In order to assess the diagnostic accuracy rate for radiologists with different experience of biopsy procedures 175 cases of renal biopsy-gun biopsies were evaluated. No statistical significant difference was found between the different operators. The role of duplex Doppler ultrasound in monitoring interferon treatment-related changes in carcinoid metastases was evaluated. It present duplex Doppler ultrasound does not seem to play a role in the evaluation of tumour therapy in carcinoid patients. Therapy response evaluation was performed with MR imaging in a group of 17 patients with neuroendocrine liver metastases. A significant difference was found between patients responding to and patients with failure of treatment in terms of tumour T1, contrast enhancement and signal intensity ratio. This indicates that MR investigation may be used in therapy monitoring of patients with neuroendocrine metastases. The neuroendocrine-differentiated colonic carcinoma cell line (LCC-18) was transplanted to 29 mice to establish a tumour/animal model that would allow the monitoring of changes with MR imaging induced by interferon therapy and to evaluate whether the therapeutic response could be modulated by different interferon dosages. Interferon does not seem to have any prolonged anti-proliferative effect on the LCC-18 tumour cell line when transplanted to

  4. Imaging response during therapy with radium-223 for castration-resistant prostate cancer with bone metastases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keizman, D; Fosboel, M O; Reichegger, H

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The imaging response to radium-223 therapy is at present poorly described. We aimed to describe the imaging response to radium-223 treatment. METHODS: We retrospectively evaluated the computed tomography (CT) and bone scintigraphy response of metastatic castration-resistant prostate c....../or radiological) may be noted during the first 3 months, and should not be confused with progression. Imaging by CT scan should be considered after three and six doses of radium-223 to rule out extraskeletal disease progression....

  5. Prediction of electroconvulsive therapy response and remission in major depression : meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Diermen, van, Linda; Ameele, van den, Seline; Kamperman, Astrid M.; Sabbe, Bernard G.C.; Vermeulen, Tom; Schrijvers, Didier; Birkenhager, Tom K.

    2018-01-01

    Abstract: Background Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is considered to be the most effective treatment in severe major depression. The identification of reliable predictors of ECT response could contribute to a more targeted patient selection and consequently increased ECT response rates. Aims To investigate the predictive value of age, depression severity, psychotic and melancholic features for ECT response and remission in major depression. Method A meta-analysis was conducted according to t...

  6. Non-specific vaginitis: diagnostic features and response to imidazole therapy (metronidazole, ornidazole).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meech, R J; Loutit, J

    1985-05-22

    Detailed quantitative aerobic, anaerobic, fungal and mycoplasma flora was obtained for 43 women presenting with complaints of vaginal discharge and malodour. Clinical response was associated with eradication of the abnormal anaerobic flora, despite persistence of G vaginalis in nine (26%). Topical imidazole therapy appeared to have some advantage over oral therapy. Gram stains of vaginal swabs were found to be the most useful laboratory investigation.

  7. Tumour therapy with radionuclides: assessment of progress and problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlsson, Joergen; Forssell Aronsson, Eva; Hietala, Sven-Ola; Stigbrand, Torgny; Tennvall, Jan

    2003-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is a promising modality for treatment of tumours of haematopoietic origin while the success for treatment of solid tumours so far has been limited. The authors consider radionuclide therapy mainly as a method to eradicate disseminated tumour cells and small metastases while bulky tumours and large metastases have to be treated surgically or by external radiation therapy. The promising therapeutic results for haematological tumours give hope that radionuclide therapy will have a breakthrough also for treatment of disseminated cells from solid tumours. New knowledge related to this is continuously emerging since new molecular target structures are being characterised and the knowledge on pharmacokinetics and cellular processing of different types of targeting agents increases. There is also improved understanding of the factors of importance for the choice of appropriate radionuclides with respect to their decay properties and the therapeutic applications. Furthermore, new methods to modify the uptake of radionuclides in tumour cells and normal tissues are emerging. However, we still need improvements regarding dosimetry and treatment planning as well as an increased knowledge about the tolerance doses for normal tissues and the radiobiological effects on tumour cells. This is especially important in targeted radionuclide therapy where the dose rates often are lower than 1 Gy/h

  8. A responsive evaluation of mental health treatment in Cambodia: Intentionally addressing poverty to increase cultural responsiveness in therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seponski, Desiree M; Lewis, Denise C; Megginson, Maegan C

    2014-01-01

    Mental health issues are significant contributors to the global burden of disease with the highest incidence in resource poor countries; 90% of those in need of mental health treatment reside in low resource countries but receive only 10% of the world's resources. Cambodia, the eighth least developed country in the world, serves as one example of the need to address mental health concerns in low-income, resource poor countries. The current study utilises responsive evaluation methodology to explore how poverty-stricken Cambodian clients, therapists and supervisors experience Western models of therapy as culturally responsive to their unique needs. Quantitative and qualitative data were triangulated across multiple stakeholders using numerous methods including a focus group, interviews, surveys, case illustrations and live supervision observation and analysed using constant comparative analysis. Emerging findings suggest that poverty, material needs, therapy location and financial situations greatly impact the daily lives and mental health conditions of Cambodians and hinder clients' therapeutic progress. The local community needs and context of poverty greatly hinder clients' therapeutic progress in therapy treatment and when therapy does not directly address the culture of poverty, clients did not experience therapy as valuable despite some temporary decreases in mental health symptoms.

  9. A virtual clinical trial comparing static versus dynamic PET imaging in measuring response to breast cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; Mankoff, David A.; E Kinahan, Paul

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method to evaluate variations in the PET imaging process in order to characterize the relative ability of static and dynamic metrics to measure breast cancer response to therapy in a clinical trial setting. We performed a virtual clinical trial by generating 540 independent and identically distributed PET imaging study realizations for each of 22 original dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) breast cancer patient studies pre- and post-therapy. Each noise realization accounted for known sources of uncertainty in the imaging process, such as biological variability and SUV uptake time. Four definitions of SUV were analyzed, which were SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and SUV50%. We performed a ROC analysis on the resulting SUV and kinetic parameter uncertainty distributions to assess the impact of the variability on the measurement capabilities of each metric. The kinetic macro parameter, K i , showed more variability than SUV (mean CV K i   =  17%, SUV  =  13%), but K i pre- and post-therapy distributions also showed increased separation compared to the SUV pre- and post-therapy distributions (mean normalized difference K i   =  0.54, SUV  =  0.27). For the patients who did not show perfect separation between the pre- and post-therapy parameter uncertainty distributions (ROC AUC  dynamic imaging outperformed SUV in distinguishing metabolic change in response to therapy, ranging from 12 to 14 of 16 patients over all SUV definitions and uptake time scenarios (p  PET imaging.

  10. Moderators and predictors of response to behavior therapy for tics in Tourette syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhodolsky, Denis G; Woods, Douglas W; Piacentini, John; Wilhelm, Sabine; Peterson, Alan L; Katsovich, Lily; Dziura, James; Walkup, John T; Scahill, Lawrence

    2017-03-14

    To examine moderators and predictors of response to behavior therapy for tics in children and adults with Tourette syndrome and chronic tic disorders. Data from 2 10-week, multisite studies (1 in children and 1 in adults; total n = 248) comparing comprehensive behavioral intervention for tics (CBIT) to psychoeducation and supportive therapy (PST) were combined for moderator analyses. Participants (177 male, 71 female) had a mean age of 21.5 ± 13.9 years (range 9-69). Demographic and clinical characteristics, baseline tic-suppressing medication, and co-occurring psychiatric disorders were tested as potential moderators for CBIT vs PST or predictors of outcome regardless of treatment assignment. Main outcomes measures were the Yale Global Tic Severity Scale Total Tic score and the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement score assessed by masked evaluators. The presence of tic medication significantly moderated response to CBIT vs PST ( p = 0.01). Participants showed tic reduction after CBIT regardless of tic medication status, but only participants receiving tic medication showed reduction of tics after PST. Co-occurring psychiatric disorders, age, sex, family functioning, tic characteristics, and treatment expectancy did not moderate response. Across both treatments, greater tic severity ( p = 0.005) and positive participant expectancy ( p = 0.01) predicted greater tic improvement. Anxiety disorders ( p = 0.042) and premonitory urge severity ( p = 0.005) predicted lower tic reduction. Presence of co-occurring attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, or anxiety disorders did not moderate response to CBIT. Although participants on tic medication showed improvement after CBIT, the difference between CBIT and PST was greater for participants who were not on tic-suppressing medication. The child and adult CBIT studies are listed on clinical trials.gov (NCT00218777 and NCT00231985, respectively). This study provides Class I evidence that

  11. Antibody production in response to staphylococcal MS-1 phage cocktail in patients undergoing phage therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maciej Żaczek

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties towards applied phages (K rate. Among 20 examined patients receiving the MS-1 phage cocktail orally and/or locally, the majority did not show a noticeably higher level of antiphage antibodies in their sera during phage administration. Even in those individual cases with an increased immune response, mostly by induction of IgG and IgM, the presence of antiphage antibodies did not translate into unsatisfactory clinical results of phage therapy. On the other hand, a negative outcome of the treatment occurred in some patients who showed relatively weak production of antiphage antibodies before and during treatment. This may imply that possible induction of antiphage antibodies is not an obstacle to the implementation of phage therapy and support our assumption that the outcome of the phage treatment does not primarily depend on the appearance of antiphage antibodies in sera of patients during therapy. These conclusions are in line with our previous findings. The confirmation of this thesis is of great interest as regards the efficacy of phage therapy in humans.

  12. Antibody Production in Response to Staphylococcal MS-1 Phage Cocktail in Patients Undergoing Phage Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żaczek, Maciej; Łusiak-Szelachowska, Marzanna; Jończyk-Matysiak, Ewa; Weber-Dąbrowska, Beata; Międzybrodzki, Ryszard; Owczarek, Barbara; Kopciuch, Agnieszka; Fortuna, Wojciech; Rogóż, Paweł; Górski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the humoral immune response (through the release of IgG, IgA, and IgM antiphage antibodies) to a staphylococcal phage cocktail in patients undergoing experimental phage therapy at the Phage Therapy Unit, Medical Center of the Ludwik Hirszfeld Institute of Immunology and Experimental Therapy in Wrocław, Poland. We also evaluated whether occurring antiphage antibodies had neutralizing properties toward applied phages (K rate). Among 20 examined patients receiving the MS-1 phage cocktail orally and/or locally, the majority did not show a noticeably higher level of antiphage antibodies in their sera during phage administration. Even in those individual cases with an increased immune response, mostly by induction of IgG and IgM, the presence of antiphage antibodies did not translate into unsatisfactory clinical results of phage therapy. On the other hand, a negative outcome of the treatment occurred in some patients who showed relatively weak production of antiphage antibodies before and during treatment. This may imply that possible induction of antiphage antibodies is not an obstacle to the implementation of phage therapy and support our assumption that the outcome of the phage treatment does not primarily depend on the appearance of antiphage antibodies in sera of patients during therapy. These conclusions are in line with our previous findings. The confirmation of this thesis is of great interest as regards the efficacy of phage therapy in humans.

  13. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Lambert, R.; Tighe, R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions

  14. Predictors of response to cardiac resynchronization therapy in chronic heart failure patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Loutfi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT is established in the management patients with moderate to severe symptoms due to left ventricular systolic dysfunction who present with signs of electrical dyssynchrony. There is wide variability in the clinical response and improvement in LVEF with CRT. Prediction of response to CRT is an important goal in order to tailor this therapy to patients most apt to derive benefit. Aim: The aim of the study was to assess and identify the best predictors of CRT response. Patients and methods: The study included 170 consecutive heart failure (HF patients in New York Heart Association (NYHA functional class III or IV and LVEF ⩽ 35%. Routine device and clinical follow-up, as well as CRT optimization, were performed at baseline and at 3-month intervals. Responders were defined as having an absolute reduction in left ventricular end-systolic diameter >15% and an improvement in LVEF >10%. Results: 170 patients were included [71.1% men; mean age 68.8 ± 9.7 years; 159 patients NYHA class III, 11 patients ambulatory NYHA class IV; 91 patients had non-ischemic cardiomyopathy (ICM – 79 patients had ICM; 55.3% of patients had LBBB; mean QRS duration 145 ± 25 ms; left ventricular ejection fraction 28.38 ± 7.2]. CRT-P was implanted in 65 patients and CRT-D was implanted in 105 patients. CRT response was achieved in 114 patients (67.1%. Mean LVEF improved from 28.38 ± 7.2% to 35.46 ± 9.3% (p = 0.001, mean LV end-diastolic diameter reduced from 67.91 ± 8.7 to 64.95 ± 8.9 mm (p 150 ms, non-ICM, TAPSE >15 mm, sinus rhythm, the absence of COPD and the absence of renal disease were the independent predictors of CRT response. We generated a new CRT score to predict responders to CRT. The score consists of maximum 9 points. The CRT response rate has been markedly different according to the CRT score: CRT response rate was 97.5% patients with CRT score >6 vs 40.7% if CRT score <6, p < 0

  15. Changes in stimulus and response AC/A ratio with vision therapy in Convergence Insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Neeraj Kumar; Mani, Revathy; Hussaindeen, Jameel Rizwana

    To evaluate the changes in the stimulus and response Accommodative Convergence to Accommodation (AC/A) ratio following vision therapy (VT) in Convergence Insufficiency (CI). Stimulus and response AC/A ratio were measured on twenty five CI participants, pre and post 10 sessions of VT. Stimulus AC/A ratio was measured using the gradient method and response AC/A ratio was calculated using modified Thorington technique with accommodative responses measured using WAM-5500 open-field autorefractor. The gradient stimulus and response AC/A cross-link ratios were compared with thirty age matched controls. Mean age of the CI and control participants were 23.3±5.2 years and 22.7±4.2 years, respectively. The mean stimulus and response AC/A ratio for CI pre therapy was 2.2±0.72 and 6.3±2.0 PD/D that changed to 4.2±0.9 and 8.28±3.31 PD/D respectively post vision therapy and these changes were statistically significant (paired t-test; paccommodation parameters in subjects with convergence insufficiency. This represents the plasticity of the AC/A crosslink ratios that could be achieved with vision therapy in CI. Copyright © 2016 Spanish General Council of Optometry. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Dynamic microbubble contrast-enhanced US to measure tumor response to targeted therapy: a proposed clinical protocol with results from renal cell carcinoma patients receiving antiangiogenic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ross; Hudson, John M; Lloyd, Brendan A; Sureshkumar, Ahthavan R; Lueck, Gordon; Milot, Laurent; Atri, Mostafa; Bjarnason, Georg A; Burns, Peter N

    2011-08-01

    To develop and implement an evidence-based protocol for characterizing vascular response of renal cell carcinoma (RCC) to targeted therapy by using dynamic contrast material-enhanced (DCE) ultrasonography (US). The study was approved by the institutional research ethics board; written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Seventeen patients (four women; median age, 58 years; range, 42-72 years; 13 men, median age, 62 years; range, 45-81 years) with metastatic RCC were examined by using DCE US before and after 2 weeks of treatment with sunitinib (May 2007 to October 2009). Two contrast agent techniques--bolus injection and disruption-replenishment infusion of microbubbles--were compared. Changes in tumor blood velocity and fractional blood volume were measured with both methods, together with reproducibility and effect of compensation for respiratory motion. Tumor changes were assessed with computed tomography, by using the best response with the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) and progression-free survival (PFS). Follow-up RECIST measurements were performed at 6-week intervals until progressive disease was detected. In response to treatment, median tumor fractional blood volume measured with the disruption-replenishment infusion method decreased by 73.2% (interquartile range, 46%-87%) (P protocol is a flexible method suitable for many tumor types, but further studies are needed to assess whether this protocol may be predictive of patient outcome. © RSNA, 2011.

  17. Towards personalized therapy for multiple sclerosis: prediction of individual treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalincik, Tomas; Manouchehrinia, Ali; Sobisek, Lukas; Jokubaitis, Vilija; Spelman, Tim; Horakova, Dana; Havrdova, Eva; Trojano, Maria; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Girard, Marc; Prat, Alexandre; Duquette, Pierre; Grammond, Pierre; Sola, Patrizia; Hupperts, Raymond; Grand'Maison, Francois; Pucci, Eugenio; Boz, Cavit; Alroughani, Raed; Van Pesch, Vincent; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Terzi, Murat; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Iuliano, Gerardo; Granella, Franco; Spitaleri, Daniele; Shaygannejad, Vahid; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Slee, Mark; Ampapa, Radek; Verheul, Freek; McCombe, Pamela; Olascoaga, Javier; Amato, Maria Pia; Vucic, Steve; Hodgkinson, Suzanne; Ramo-Tello, Cristina; Flechter, Shlomo; Cristiano, Edgardo; Rozsa, Csilla; Moore, Fraser; Luis Sanchez-Menoyo, Jose; Laura Saladino, Maria; Barnett, Michael; Hillert, Jan; Butzkueven, Helmut

    2017-09-01

    Timely initiation of effective therapy is crucial for preventing disability in multiple sclerosis; however, treatment response varies greatly among patients. Comprehensive predictive models of individual treatment response are lacking. Our aims were: (i) to develop predictive algorithms for individual treatment response using demographic, clinical and paraclinical predictors in patients with multiple sclerosis; and (ii) to evaluate accuracy, and internal and external validity of these algorithms. This study evaluated 27 demographic, clinical and paraclinical predictors of individual response to seven disease-modifying therapies in MSBase, a large global cohort study. Treatment response was analysed separately for disability progression, disability regression, relapse frequency, conversion to secondary progressive disease, change in the cumulative disease burden, and the probability of treatment discontinuation. Multivariable survival and generalized linear models were used, together with the principal component analysis to reduce model dimensionality and prevent overparameterization. Accuracy of the individual prediction was tested and its internal validity was evaluated in a separate, non-overlapping cohort. External validity was evaluated in a geographically distinct cohort, the Swedish Multiple Sclerosis Registry. In the training cohort (n = 8513), the most prominent modifiers of treatment response comprised age, disease duration, disease course, previous relapse activity, disability, predominant relapse phenotype and previous therapy. Importantly, the magnitude and direction of the associations varied among therapies and disease outcomes. Higher probability of disability progression during treatment with injectable therapies was predominantly associated with a greater disability at treatment start and the previous therapy. For fingolimod, natalizumab or mitoxantrone, it was mainly associated with lower pretreatment relapse activity. The probability of

  18. Metabolic response to glatiramer acetate therapy in multiple sclerosis patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lidia De Riccardis

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone is a random copolymer of glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine used for the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS. Its mechanism of action has not been already fully elucidated, but it seems that GA has an immune-modulatory effect and neuro-protective properties. Lymphocyte mitochondrial dysfunction underlines the onset of several autoimmune disorders. In MS first diagnosis patients, CD4+, the main T cell subset involved in the pathogenesis of MS, undergo a metabolic reprogramming that consist in the up-regulation of glycolysis and in the down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. Currently, no works exist about CD4+ T cell metabolism in response to GA treatment. In order to provide novel insight into the potential use of GA in MS treatment, blood samples were collected from 20 healthy controls (HCs and from 20 RR MS patients prior and every 6 months during the 12 months of GA administration. GA treated patients' CD4+ T cells were compared with those from HCs analysing their mitochondrial activity through polarographic and enzymatic methods in association with their antioxidant status, through the analysis of SOD, GPx and CAT activities. Altogether, our findings suggest that GA is able to reduce CD4+ T lymphocytes' dysfunctions by increasing mitochondrial activity and their response to oxidative stress.

  19. Metabolic response to glatiramer acetate therapy in multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riccardis, Lidia; Ferramosca, Alessandra; Danieli, Antonio; Trianni, Giorgio; Zara, Vincenzo; De Robertis, Francesca; Maffia, Michele

    2016-12-01

    Glatiramer acetate (GA; Copaxone) is a random copolymer of glutamic acid, lysine, alanine, and tyrosine used for the treatment of patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Its mechanism of action has not been already fully elucidated, but it seems that GA has an immune-modulatory effect and neuro-protective properties. Lymphocyte mitochondrial dysfunction underlines the onset of several autoimmune disorders. In MS first diagnosis patients, CD4 + , the main T cell subset involved in the pathogenesis of MS, undergo a metabolic reprogramming that consist in the up-regulation of glycolysis and in the down-regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. Currently, no works exist about CD4 + T cell metabolism in response to GA treatment. In order to provide novel insight into the potential use of GA in MS treatment, blood samples were collected from 20 healthy controls (HCs) and from 20 RR MS patients prior and every 6 months during the 12 months of GA administration. GA treated patients' CD4 + T cells were compared with those from HCs analysing their mitochondrial activity through polarographic and enzymatic methods in association with their antioxidant status, through the analysis of SOD, GPx and CAT activities. Altogether, our findings suggest that GA is able to reduce CD4 + T lymphocytes' dysfunctions by increasing mitochondrial activity and their response to oxidative stress.

  20. Therapy response evaluation of malignant lymphoma in a multicenter study. Comparison of manual and semiautomatic measurements in CT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wessling, J.; Schuelke, C.; Koch, R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Comparison of manual one-/bi-dimensional measurements versus semi-automatically derived one-/bi-dimensional and volumetric measurements for therapy response evaluation of malignant lymphoma during CT follow-up examinations in a multicenter setting. Materials and Methods: MSCT data sets of patients with malignant lymphoma were evaluated before (baseline) and after two cycles of chemotherapy (follow-up) at radiological centers of five university hospitals. The long axis diameter (LAD), the short axis diameter (SAD) and the bi-dimensional WHO of 307 target lymph nodes were measured manually and semi-automatically using dedicated software. Lymph node volumetry was performed semi-automatically only. The therapeutic response was evaluated according to lymphoma-adapted RECIST. Results: Based on a single lymph node, semi-automatically derived multidimensional parameters allowed for significantly more accurate therapy response classification than the manual or the semi-automatic unidimensional parameters. Incorrect classifications were reduced by up to 9.6%. Compared to the manual approach, the influence of the study center on correct therapy classification is significantly less relevant when using semi-automatic measurements. Conclusion: Semi-automatic volumetry and bi-dimensional WHO significantly reduce the number of incorrectly classified lymphoma patients by approximately 9.6% in the multicenter setting in comparison to linear parameters. Semi-automatic quantitative software tools may help to significantly reduce wrong classifications that are associated with the manual assessment approach. (orig.)

  1. Therapy response evaluation of malignant lymphoma in a multicenter study. Comparison of manual and semiautomatic measurements in CT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessling, J.; Schuelke, C. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Clinical Radiology; Koch, R. [Muenster Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Medical Informatics and Biomathematics; and others

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: Comparison of manual one-/bi-dimensional measurements versus semi-automatically derived one-/bi-dimensional and volumetric measurements for therapy response evaluation of malignant lymphoma during CT follow-up examinations in a multicenter setting. Materials and Methods: MSCT data sets of patients with malignant lymphoma were evaluated before (baseline) and after two cycles of chemotherapy (follow-up) at radiological centers of five university hospitals. The long axis diameter (LAD), the short axis diameter (SAD) and the bi-dimensional WHO of 307 target lymph nodes were measured manually and semi-automatically using dedicated software. Lymph node volumetry was performed semi-automatically only. The therapeutic response was evaluated according to lymphoma-adapted RECIST. Results: Based on a single lymph node, semi-automatically derived multidimensional parameters allowed for significantly more accurate therapy response classification than the manual or the semi-automatic unidimensional parameters. Incorrect classifications were reduced by up to 9.6%. Compared to the manual approach, the influence of the study center on correct therapy classification is significantly less relevant when using semi-automatic measurements. Conclusion: Semi-automatic volumetry and bi-dimensional WHO significantly reduce the number of incorrectly classified lymphoma patients by approximately 9.6% in the multicenter setting in comparison to linear parameters. Semi-automatic quantitative software tools may help to significantly reduce wrong classifications that are associated with the manual assessment approach. (orig.)

  2. Tumor Response and Survival Predicted by Post-Therapy FDG-PET/CT in Anal Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwarz, Julie K.; Siegel, Barry A.; Dehdashti, Farrokh; Myerson, Robert J.; Fleshman, James W.; Grigsby, Perry W.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response to therapy for anal carcinoma using post-therapy imaging with positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography and F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) and to compare the metabolic response with patient outcome. Patients and Methods: This was a prospective cohort study of 53 consecutive patients with anal cancer. All patients underwent pre- and post-treatment whole-body FDG-PET/computed tomography. Patients had been treated with external beam radiotherapy and concurrent chemotherapy. Whole-body FDG-PET was performed 0.9-5.4 months (mean, 2.1) after therapy completion. Results: The post-therapy PET scan did not show any abnormal FDG uptake (complete metabolic response) in 44 patients. Persistent abnormal FDG uptake (partial metabolic response) was found in the anal tumor in 9 patients. The 2-year cause-specific survival rate was 94% for patients with a complete vs. 39% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p = 0.0008). The 2-year progression-free survival rate was 95% for patients with a complete vs. 22% for patients with a partial metabolic response in the anal tumor (p < 0.0001). A Cox proportional hazards model of survival outcome indicated that a complete metabolic response was the most significant predictor of progression-free survival in our patient population (p = 0.0003). Conclusions: A partial metabolic response in the anal tumor as determined by post-therapy FDG-PET is predictive of significantly decreased progression-free and cause-specific survival after chemoradiotherapy for anal cancer

  3. Material interaction and art product in art therapy assessment in adult mental health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pénzes, I.J.N.J.; Hooren, S. van; Dokter, D.; Smeijsters, H.; Hutschemaekers, G.J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Art materials have a central role in art therapy. The way a client interacts with art materials - material interaction - is an important source of information in art therapy assessment in adult mental health. The aim of this study was to develop the categories of material interaction and

  4. A music therapy tool for assessing parent-child interaction in cases of emotional neglect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl; H. McKinney, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    Using a music therapy approach to assess emotional communication and parent–child interaction is new to the field of child protection. However, musical improvisations in music therapy has long been known as an analogue to affect attunement and early non-verbal communication between parent and inf...

  5. Assessment of Wind Turbine Structural Integrity using Response Surface Methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toft, Henrik Stensgaard; Svenningsen, Lasse; Moser, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights •A new approach to assessment of site specific wind turbine loads is proposed. •The approach can be applied in both fatigue and ultimate limit state. •Two different response surface methodologies have been investigated. •The model uncertainty introduced by the response surfaces...

  6. Proton therapy of hormone-secreting hypophyseal adenomas: gluconeogenesis assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konnova, L.A.; Konnov, B.A.; Mel'nikov, L.A.; Lebedeva, N.A.

    1993-01-01

    Analysis of blood plasma aminograms of patients with hormone secreting hypophyseal adenomas (somatotropinomas and prolactinomas), that were obtained before and after a course of proton therapy, has confirmed the gluconeogenic effect of hypophyseal hormones and evidenced the relationship between this effect and dismetabolism of some amino acids

  7. Prospective assessment of pituitary size and shape on MR imaging after suppressive hormonal therapy in central precocious puberty

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beek, J.T. van; Sharafuddin, M.J.A.; Kao, S.C.S. [Department of Radiology-JPP 3889, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52246 (United States); Luisiri, A. [Cardinal Glennon Children' s Hospital, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Garibaldi, L.R. [Children' s Hospital of New Jersey, Newark Beth Israel Medical Center, Newark, New Jersey (United States); St. Barnabas Medical Center, Livingston, New Jersey (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Objective. The diagnostic significance of an enlarged pituitary gland regarding both shape and size parameters on MR imaging has previously been demonstrated in children with central precocious puberty. This study was designed to assess changes in these parameters following successful suppressive therapy of central precocious puberty with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Materials and methods. Twelve girls (mean age 7.3 years) with central precocious puberty were prospectively enrolled in our study protocol. Sagittal and coronal MR images of the pituitary region were obtained in all patients before treatment and after at least 6 months of GnRH analogue therapy (mean 18.0 months). Parameters measured included pituitary gland height, length, width, sagittal cross-sectional area, and volume. Results. All patients had excellent clinical response to treatment with arrest of secondary sexual development, normalization of serum estradiol levels, and complete obliteration of the LH response to diagnostic GnRH stimulation. No significant change occurred in any pituitary size or shape parameter following GnRH analogue therapy. Conclusion. Favorable clinical response to GnRH analogue therapy in central precocious puberty is not accompanied by significant a change in pituitary gland size and shape. (orig.)

  8. Prospective assessment of pituitary size and shape on MR imaging after suppressive hormonal therapy in central precocious puberty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beek, J.T. van; Sharafuddin, M.J.A.; Kao, S.C.S.; Luisiri, A.; Garibaldi, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    Objective. The diagnostic significance of an enlarged pituitary gland regarding both shape and size parameters on MR imaging has previously been demonstrated in children with central precocious puberty. This study was designed to assess changes in these parameters following successful suppressive therapy of central precocious puberty with the gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) analogue. Materials and methods. Twelve girls (mean age 7.3 years) with central precocious puberty were prospectively enrolled in our study protocol. Sagittal and coronal MR images of the pituitary region were obtained in all patients before treatment and after at least 6 months of GnRH analogue therapy (mean 18.0 months). Parameters measured included pituitary gland height, length, width, sagittal cross-sectional area, and volume. Results. All patients had excellent clinical response to treatment with arrest of secondary sexual development, normalization of serum estradiol levels, and complete obliteration of the LH response to diagnostic GnRH stimulation. No significant change occurred in any pituitary size or shape parameter following GnRH analogue therapy. Conclusion. Favorable clinical response to GnRH analogue therapy in central precocious puberty is not accompanied by significant a change in pituitary gland size and shape. (orig.)

  9. Acetylcholine muscarinic receptors and response to anti-cholinesterase therapy in patients with Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, Derek; Chisholm, Jennifer A.; Patterson, Jim; Wyper, David; Owens, Jonathan; Pimlott, Sally

    2003-01-01

    An acetylcholine deficit remains the most consistent neurotransmitter abnormality found in Alzheimer's disease and various therapeutic agents have been targeted at this. In this study we investigated the action of Donepezil, a cholinesterase inhibitor that has few side-effects. In particular we set out to investigate whether muscarinic acetylcholine receptor (mAChR) availability influences the response to this therapy. We used the novel single-photon emission tomography (SPET) tracer (R,R)[ 123 I]I-quinuclidinyl benzilate (R,R[ 123 I]I-QNB), which has high affinity for the M1 subtype of mAChR. Regional cerebral perfusion was also assessed using technetium-99m hexamethylpropylene amine oxime. We investigated 20 patients on Donepezil treatment and ten age-matched controls. The results showed a reduction in (R,R)[ 123 I]I-QNB binding in the caudal anterior cingulate in patients compared with controls and relatively high binding in the putamen and rostral anterior cingulate, suggesting a relative sparing of mAChR in these regions. The main finding of the study was that mAChR availability as assessed by (R,R)[ 123 I]I-QNB binding did not distinguish responders from non-responders. Interestingly, we found that the extent of cognitive improvement showed no positive correlation with (R,R)[ 123 I]I-QNB binding in any brain region but was inversely related to binding in the insular cortex. This suggests that, within the advised cognitive performance band for use of Donepezil, response is greater in those patients with evidence of a more marked cholinergic deficit. A larger study should investigate this. (orig.)

  10. Interpersonal Subtypes and Therapy Response in Patients Treated for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    König, Julia; Onnen, Margarete; Karl, Regina; Rosner, Rita; Butollo, Willi

    2016-01-01

    Interpersonal traits may influence psychotherapy success. One way of conceptualizing such traits is the interpersonal circumplex model. In this study, we analyse interpersonal circumplex data, assessed with the Inventory of Interpersonal Problems (Horowitz, Strauß, & Kordy, 1994) from a randomized study with 138 patients suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder after trauma in adulthood. The study compared cognitive processing therapy and dialogical exposure therapy, a Gestalt-based intervention. We divided the interpersonally heterogeneous sample according to the quadrants of the interpersonal circumplex. The division into quadrants yielded subgroups that did not differ in their general psychological distress, but the cold-submissive quadrant tended to exhibit higher posttraumatic stress disorder symptom severity and interpersonal distress than the other three. There was also a trend for patients in different quadrants to be affected differently by the treatments. Correlation analyses supported these results: in cognitive processing therapy, more dominant patients had more successful therapies, while in dialogical exposure therapy, success was not correlated with interpersonal style. Results indicate that especially patients with cold interpersonal styles profited differentially from the two treatments offered. Dividing samples according to the interpersonal circumplex quadrants seems promising. Interpersonal traits may contribute to psychotherapy outcome. Dividing the sample according to the quadrants of the interpersonal circumplex, as opposed to cluster analysis, yielded promising results. Patients higher in dominance fared better with cognitive processing therapy, while interpersonal style had no correlations with therapy success in dialogical exposure therapy. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Prediction of response to interferon therapy in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sellebjerg, F; Søndergaard, Helle Bach; Koch-Henriksen, N

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes encoding interferon response factor (IRF)-5, IRF-8 and glypican-5 (GPC5) have been associated with disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients treated with interferon (IFN)-β. We analysed whether SNPs in the IRF5, IRF8 and GPC5...... genes are associated with clinical disease activity in MS patients beginning de novo treatment with IFN-β. METHODS: The SNPs rs2004640, rs3807306 and rs4728142 in IRF5, rs13333054 and rs17445836 in IRF8 and rs10492503 in GPC5 were genotyped in 575 patients with relapsing-remitting MS followed...... prospectively after the initiation of their first treatment with IFN-β. RESULTS: 62% of patients experienced relapses during the first 2 years of treatment, and 32% had disability progression during the first 5 years of treatment. Patients with a pretreatment annualized relapse rate >1 had an increased risk...

  12. Partial agonist therapy in schizophrenia: relevance to diminished criminal responsibility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaudan, Gilles; Magalon, David; Cohen, Julien; Lançon, Christophe; Léonetti, Georges; Pélissier-Alicot, Anne-Laure

    2010-11-01

    Pathological gambling (PG), classified in the DSM-IV among impulse control disorders, is defined as inappropriate, persistent gaming for money with serious personal, family, and social consequences. Offenses are frequently committed to obtain money for gambling. Pathological gambling, a planned and structured behavioral disorder, has often been described as a complication of dopamine agonist treatment in patients with Parkinson's disease. It has never been described in patients with schizophrenia receiving dopamine agonists. We present two patients with schizophrenia, previously treated with antipsychotic drugs without any suggestion of PG, who a short time after starting aripiprazole, a dopamine partial agonist, developed PG and criminal behavior, which totally resolved when aripiprazole was discontinued. Based on recent advances in research on PG and adverse drug reactions to dopamine agonists in Parkinson's disease, we postulate a link between aripiprazole and PG in both our patients with schizophrenia and raise the question of criminal responsibility. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  13. Relationship between serum TSH and the responsiveness of toxic solitary autonomous thyroid nodules to radioiodine therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen-Bjergaard, U; Kirkegaard, B C

    1998-01-01

    hypothyroidism both had detectable serum TSH at the time of 131I treatment. No other clinical parameter seemed to influence the outcome. CONCLUSION: There is no clinically significant effect of circulating TSH on the response of toxic solitary autonomous thyroid nodules to 131I therapy. However, keeping...... the patients subclinically hyperthyroid when receiving 131I treatment may possibly result in a reduced frequency of hypothyroidism.......) were euthyroid, three (8%) had responded insufficiently and required further antithyroid therapy, and two (5%) had developed hypothyroidism. No significant difference in the response pattern between patients with suppressed or detectable serum TSH could be demonstrated. The two patients who developed...

  14. 34 CFR 200.2 - State responsibilities for assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... responsibilities for assessment. (a)(1) Each State, in consultation with its LEAs, must implement a system of high... multiple up-to-date measures of student academic achievement, including measures that assess higher-order thinking skills and understanding of challenging content, as defined by the State. These measures may...

  15. A Systemic Approach to Culturally Responsive Assessment Practices and Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slee, June

    2010-01-01

    In an earlier paper, Slee and Keenan demonstrated that it was possible for tertiary education institutions to design culturally responsive assessment procedures that complied with standardised assessment policy. The authors' paper described "Growing Our Own," an initiative between Charles Darwin University and Northern Territory Catholic…

  16. Chemotherapy and radiation therapy elicits tumor specific T cell responses in a breast cancer patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernal-Estévez, David; Sánchez, Ramiro; Tejada, Rafael E.; Parra-López, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical studies in breast cancer suggest that some anti-tumor therapy regimens generate stimulation of the immune system that accounts for tumor clinical responses, however, demonstration of the immunostimulatory power of these therapies on cancer patients continues to be a formidable challenge. Here we present experimental evidence from a breast cancer patient with complete clinical response after 7 years, associated with responsiveness of tumor specific T cells. T cells were obtained before and after anti-tumor therapy from peripheral blood of a 63-years old woman diagnosed with ductal breast cancer (HER2/neu+++, ER-, PR-, HLA-A*02:01) treated with surgery, followed by paclitaxel, trastuzumab (suspended due to cardiac toxicity), and radiotherapy. We obtained a leukapheresis before surgery and after 8 months of treatment. Using in vitro cell cultures stimulated with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that produce high levels of IL-12, we characterize by flow cytometry the phenotype of tumor associated antigens (TAAs) HER2/neu and NY-ESO 1 specific T cells. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes (TILs) were performed in order to correlate both repertoires prior and after therapy. We evidence a functional recovery of T cell responsiveness to polyclonal stimuli and expansion of TAAs specific CD8+ T cells using peptide pulsed DCs, with an increase of CTLA-4 and memory effector phenotype after anti-tumor therapy. The ex vivo analysis of the TCR-Vβ repertoire of TAA specific T cells in blood and TILs showed that whereas the TCR-Vβ04-02 clonotype is highly expressed in TILs the HER2/neu specific T cells are expressed mainly in blood after therapy, suggesting that this particular TCR was selectively enriched in blood after anti-tumor therapy. Our results show the benefits of anti-tumor therapy in a breast cancer patient with clinical complete response in

  17. Prediction of response to preoperative chemoradiotherapy and establishment of individualized therapy in advanced rectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Toshihiro; Iwata, Takashi; Hotchi, Masanori; Yoshikawa, Kozo; Higashijima, Jun; Nishi, Masaaki; Takasu, Chie; Eto, Shohei; Teraoku, Hiroki; Shimada, Mitsuo

    2015-10-01

    Preoperative chemoradiotherapy (CRT) has become the standard treatment for patients with locally advanced rectal cancer. However, no specific biomarker has been identified to predict a response to preoperative CRT. The aim of the present study was to assess the gene expression patterns of patients with advanced rectal cancer to predict their responses to preoperative CRT. Fifty-nine rectal cancer patients were subjected to preoperative CRT. Patients were randomly assigned to receive CRT with tegafur/gimeracil/oteracil (S-1 group, n=30) or tegafur-uracil (UFT group, n=29). Gene expression changes were studied with cDNA and miRNA microarray. The association between gene expression and response to CRT was evaluated. cDNA microarray showed that 184 genes were significantly differentially expressed between the responders and the non‑responders in the S-1 group. Comparatively, 193 genes were significantly differentially expressed in the responders in the UFT group. TBX18 upregulation was common to both groups whereas BTNL8, LOC375010, ADH1B, HRASLS2, LOC284232, GCNT3 and ALDH1A2 were significantly differentially lower in both groups when compared with the non-responders. Using miRNA microarray, we found that 7 and 16 genes were significantly differentially expressed between the responders and non-responders in the S-1 and UFT groups, respectively. miR-223 was significantly higher in the responders in the S-1 group and tended to be higher in the responders in the UFT group. The present study identified several genes likely to be useful for establishing individualized therapies for patients with rectal cancer.

  18. Effect of bevacizumab combined with boron neutron capture therapy on local tumor response and lung metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    MASUNAGA, SHIN-ICHIRO; SAKURAI, YOSHINORI; TANO, KEIZO; TANAKA, HIROKI; SUZUKI, MINORU; KONDO, NATSUKO; NARABAYASHI, MASARU; WATANABE, TSUBASA; NAKAGAWA, YOSUKE; MARUHASHI, AKIRA; ONO, KOJI

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of bevacizumab on local tumor response and lung metastatic potential during boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) and in particular, the response of intratumor quiescent (Q) cells. B16-BL6 melanoma tumor-bearing C57BL/6 mice were continuously administered bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) to label all proliferating (P) tumor cells. The tumors were irradiated with thermal neutron beams following the administration of a 10B-carrier [L-para-boronophenylalanine-10B (BPA) or sodium mercaptoundecahydrododecaborate-10B (BSH)], with or without the administration of bevacizumab. This was further combined with an acute hypoxia-releasing agent (nicotinamide) or mild temperature hyperthermia (MTH, 40°C for 60 min). Immediately following the irradiation, cells from certain tumors were isolated and incubated with a cytokinesis blocker. The responses of the Q cells and the total (P+Q) cell populations were assessed based on the frequency of micronuclei using immunofluorescence staining for BrdU. In other tumor-bearing mice, 17 days following irradiation, lung metastases were enumerated. Three days following bevacizumab administration, the sensitivity of the total tumor cell population following BPA-BNCT had increased more than that following BSH-BNCT. The combination with MTH, but not with nicotinamide, further enhanced total tumor cell population sensitivity. Regardless of the presence of a 10B-carrier, MTH enhanced the sensitivity of the Q cell population. Regardless of irradiation, the administration of bevacizumab, as well as nicotinamide treatment, demonstrated certain potential in reducing the number of lung metastases especially in BPA-BNCT compared with BSH-BNCT. Thus, the current study revealed that BNCT combined with bevacizumab has the potential to sensitize total tumor cells and cause a reduction in the number of lung metastases to a similar level as nicotinamide. PMID:24944637

  19. Vascular responses to radiotherapy and androgendeprivation therapy in experimental prostate cancer

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    2012-05-23

    AbstractBackgroundRadiotherapy (RT) and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) are standard treatments for advanced prostate cancer (PC). Tumor vascularization is recognized as an important physiological feature likely to impact on both RT and ADT response, and this study therefore aimed to characterize the vascular responses to RT and ADT in experimental PC.MethodsUsing mice implanted with CWR22 PC xenografts, vascular responses to RT and ADT by castration were visualized in vivo by DCE MRI, before contrast-enhancement curves were analyzed both semi-quantitatively and by pharmacokinetic modeling. Extracted image parameters were correlated to the results from ex vivo quantitative fluorescent immunohistochemical analysis (qIHC) of tumor vascularization (9 F1), perfusion (Hoechst 33342), and hypoxia (pimonidazole), performed on tissue sections made from tumors excised directly after DCE MRI.ResultsCompared to untreated (Ctrl) tumors, an improved and highly functional vascularization was detected in androgen-deprived (AD) tumors, reflected by increases in DCE MRI parameters and by increased number of vessels (VN), vessel density ( VD), and vessel area fraction ( VF) from qIHC. Although total hypoxic fractions ( HF) did not change, estimated acute hypoxia scores ( AHS) – the proportion of hypoxia staining within 50 μm from perfusion staining – were increased in AD tumors compared to in Ctrl tumors. Five to six months after ADT renewed castration-resistant (CR) tumor growth appeared with an even further enhanced tumor vascularization. Compared to the large vascular changes induced by ADT, RT induced minor vascular changes. Correlating DCE MRI and qIHC parameters unveiled the semi-quantitative parameters area under curve ( AUC) from initial time-points to strongly correlate with VD and VF, whereas estimation of vessel size ( VS) by DCE MRI required pharmacokinetic modeling. HF was not correlated to any DCE MRI parameter, however, AHS may be estimated after

  20. Vascular responses to radiotherapy and androgen-deprivation therapy in experimental prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Røe, Kathrine; Mikalsen, Lars TG; Kogel, Albert J van der; Bussink, Johan; Lyng, Heidi; Ree, Anne H; Marignol, Laure; Olsen, Dag R

    2012-01-01

    Radiotherapy (RT) and androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) are standard treatments for advanced prostate cancer (PC). Tumor vascularization is recognized as an important physiological feature likely to impact on both RT and ADT response, and this study therefore aimed to characterize the vascular responses to RT and ADT in experimental PC. Using mice implanted with CWR22 PC xenografts, vascular responses to RT and ADT by castration were visualized in vivo by DCE MRI, before contrast-enhancement curves were analyzed both semi-quantitatively and by pharmacokinetic modeling. Extracted image parameters were correlated to the results from ex vivo quantitative fluorescent immunohistochemical analysis (qIHC) of tumor vascularization (9 F1), perfusion (Hoechst 33342), and hypoxia (pimonidazole), performed on tissue sections made from tumors excised directly after DCE MRI. Compared to untreated (Ctrl) tumors, an improved and highly functional vascularization was detected in androgen-deprived (AD) tumors, reflected by increases in DCE MRI parameters and by increased number of vessels (VN), vessel density (VD), and vessel area fraction (VF) from qIHC. Although total hypoxic fractions (HF) did not change, estimated acute hypoxia scores (AHS) – the proportion of hypoxia staining within 50 μm from perfusion staining – were increased in AD tumors compared to in Ctrl tumors. Five to six months after ADT renewed castration-resistant (CR) tumor growth appeared with an even further enhanced tumor vascularization. Compared to the large vascular changes induced by ADT, RT induced minor vascular changes. Correlating DCE MRI and qIHC parameters unveiled the semi-quantitative parameters area under curve (AUC) from initial time-points to strongly correlate with VD and VF, whereas estimation of vessel size (VS) by DCE MRI required pharmacokinetic modeling. HF was not correlated to any DCE MRI parameter, however, AHS may be estimated after pharmacokinetic modeling. Interestingly, such

  1. How does race/ethnicity influence pharmacological response to asthma therapies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cazzola, Mario; Calzetta, Luigino; Matera, Maria Gabriella; Hanania, Nicola A; Rogliani, Paola

    2018-04-01

    Our understanding of whether and/or how ethnicity influences pharmacological response to asthma therapies is still very scarce. A possible explanation for the increased asthma treatment failures observed in ethnic and racial minorities receiving asthma therapies is that some of these groups may have a pharmacogenomic predisposition to either nonresponse or to adverse response with a specific class of drugs. However, the effects of ethnicity on pharmacological response to asthma therapies are also, and mainly, determined by socioeconomic and environmental factors to a varying extent, depending on the ethnic groups. Areas covered: Genetic, socioeconomic and environmental factors that can affect the pharmacotherapeutic responses to asthma medications and their link(s) to race/ethnicity have been examined and critically discussed. Expert opinion: Differences in genetic ancestry are definitely non-modifiable factors, but socioeconomic and environmental disadvantages are all factors that can be modified. It is likely that improved outcomes may be achieved when tailored and multifaceted approaches that include home, school, and clinician-based interventions are implemented. Consequently, it is critical to determine if a clinical intervention programme combined with implementation strategies that attempt to reduce inequalities can reduce asthma disparities, including the influence of ethnicity and race on pharmacological response to asthma therapies.

  2. Quantitative Assessment of Dance Therapy Infulence on the Parkinson’s Disease Patients’ Lower Limb Biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donatas Lukšys

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease – progressive neurologic disorder that damages a variety of motor function and reduces the quality of life. Patients with PD are subject to various physical therapy exercises, but recently is applied more often the dance – music therapy. This study aims assessing the therapeutic effect of the modified Lindy Hop dance therapy on lower extremity biomechanics. The experimental study was performed using inertial sensors that registered lower extremity biomechanical parameters during gait. Several spatio-temporal parameters of lower limb were calculated and were found statistically significant between groups, which allows quantifying the influence of dance therapy.

  3. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Phased Response Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.A.; Bowman, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to the Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or state request when a major radiological emergency is anticipated of has occurred. The FRMAC becomes a coalition of federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities to assist the LFA, state(s), local, and tribal authorities. State, local, and tribal authorities are invited to co-locate and prioritize monitoring and assessment efforts in the FRMAC. The Department of Energy is tasked by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate the FRMAC

  4. Enhanced tumor responses through therapies combining CCNU, MISO and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siemann, D.W.; Hill, S.A.

    1984-01-01

    Studies were performed to determine whether the radiation sensitizer misonidazole (MISO) could enhance the tumor control probability in a treatment strategy combining radiation and the nitrosourea 1-(2-chloroethyl)-3-cyclohexyl-1-nitrosourea (CCNU). In initial experiments KHT sarcoma-bearing mice were injected with 1.0 mg/g of MISO simultaneously with a 20 mg/kg dose of CCNU 30-40 min prior to irradiation (1500 rad). With this treatment protocol approximately 60% of the mice were found to be tumor-free 100 days post treatment. By comparison all 2 agent combinations led to 0% cures. To evaluate the relative importance of chemopotentiation versus radiosensitization in the 3 agent protocol, tumors were treated with MISO plus one anti-tumor agent (either radiation of CCNU) and then at times ranging from 0 to 24 hr later exposed to the other agent. When the time between treatments was 0 to 6 hr, a 60 to 80% tumor control rate was achieved for both MISO plus radiation followed by CCNU and MISO plus CCNU followed by radiation. However if the time interval was increased to 18 or 24 hr, the cure rate in the former treatment regimen dropped to 10% while that of the latter remained high at 40%. The data therefore indicate that (1) improved tumor responses may be achieved when MISO is added to a radiation-chemotherapy combination and (2) MISO may be more effective in such a protocol when utilized as a chemopotentiator

  5. Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria and telomere length predicts response to immunosuppressive therapy in pediatric aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narita, Atsushi; Muramatsu, Hideki; Sekiya, Yuko; Okuno, Yusuke; Sakaguchi, Hirotoshi; Nishio, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Nao; Wang, Xinan; Xu, Yinyan; Kawashima, Nozomu; Doisaki, Sayoko; Hama, Asahito; Takahashi, Yoshiyuki; Kudo, Kazuko; Moritake, Hiroshi; Kobayashi, Masao; Kobayashi, Ryoji; Ito, Etsuro; Yabe, Hiromasa; Ohga, Shouichi; Ohara, Akira; Kojima, Seiji

    2015-12-01

    Acquired aplastic anemia is an immune-mediated disease characterized by severe defects in stem cell number resulting in hypocellular marrow and peripheral blood cytopenias. Minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and a short telomere length were identified as predictive biomarkers of immunosuppressive therapy responsiveness in aplastic anemia. We enrolled 113 aplastic anemia patients (63 boys and 50 girls) in this study to evaluate their response to immunosuppressive therapy. The paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria populations and telomere length were detected by flow cytometry. Forty-seven patients (42%) carried a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population. The median telomere length of aplastic anemia patients was -0.99 standard deviation (SD) (range -4.01-+3.01 SD). Overall, 60 patients (53%) responded to immunosuppressive therapy after six months. Multivariate logistic regression analysis identified the absence of a paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a shorter telomere length as independent unfavorable predictors of immunosuppressive therapy response at six months. The cohort was stratified into a group of poor prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria negative and shorter telomere length; 37 patients) and good prognosis (paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria positive and/or longer telomere length; 76 patients), respectively. The response rates of the poor prognosis and good prognosis groups at six months were 19% and 70%, respectively (P<0.001). The combined absence of a minor paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria population and a short telomere length is an efficient predictor of poor immunosuppressive therapy response, which should be considered while deciding treatment options: immunosuppressive therapy or first-line hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The trial was registered in www.umin.ac.jp with number UMIN000017972. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  6. Interim assessment of the experience of fast neutron therapy in Edinburgh

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Arnott, S.J.

    1982-01-01

    Clinical studies of fast neutron therapy were started in Edinburgh in March 1977. The treatment facility has an isocentric machine and a fixed horizontal beam. The neutron beam is produced by 15 MeV deuterons on a thick beryllium target. Six hundred and forty-one patients have been included in these studies in the four-year period to March 1981. Randomly controlled trials have been conducted since May 1977 and 376 patients have been recruited in this period. The local tumor response rates and morbidity observed is given for trials of patients with cerebral gliomass, squamous carcinoma of the head and neck region, transitional cell carcinoma of the bladder and adenocarcinoma of the rectum. This interim evaluation does not demonstrate any advantage of fast neutron radiotherapy as compared with photon therapy. However, greater numbers of patients require to be studied and followed-up for longer intervals. A definitive assessment of the randomly controlled clinical trials in Edinburgh should be possible at the end of 1982

  7. Assessing responsiveness of a volatile and seasonal supply chain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Chee Yew; Arlbjørn, Jan Stentoft; Hvolby, Hans Henrik

    2006-01-01

    ‘‘market responsive’’ and ‘‘physically efficient’’ supply chains constitutes the backbone of this assessment. Four risk-influencing determinants—forecast uncertainty, demand variability, contribution margin, and time window of delivery are found suitable to assess the responsiveness of the toy supply chain......This paper describes a structural approach to assess the responsiveness of a volatile and seasonal supply chain. It is based on a case study in an international toy company. Fisher’s (Harvard Bus. Rev. 75(2) (1997) 105–117) Model of ‘‘innovative’’ and ‘‘functional’’ products and the corresponding...... with volatility, and to design for a responsive supply chain. These findings have also enabled the extension of Fisher’s Model to volatile supply chains. This new product differentiation model adds a physically responsive supply chain for ‘‘intermediate’’ products into the Fisher’s Model....

  8. Oral beta-glucan adjuvant therapy converts nonprotective Th2 response to protective Th1 cell-mediated immune response in mammary tumor-bearing mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon D Ross

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Beta (1-3-D-glucans were identified almost 40 years ago as biological response modifiers that stimulated tumor rejection. In vitro studies have shown that beta-glucans bind to a lectin domain within complement receptor type 3 (CR3, or to, more recently described dectin-1 a beta-glucan specific receptor, acting mainly on phagocytic cells. In this study, we assessed the intracellular cytokine profiles of peripheral blood lymphocytes from mice bearing mammary tumors receiving i.v. anti-tumor mAbs combined or not with whole glucan particle suspension given orally (WGP, 400 microg every 24 hours. The proportions of T cells producing IL-4 and IFNgamma were determined by flow cytometry. The proportion of T cells producing IL-4 was significantly higher in tumor-bearing mice not receiving beta-glucan-enhanced therapy. Conversely, T cells from mice undergoing beta-glucan-enhanced therapy showed increased production of the Th1 cytokine IFNgamma. The switch from a Th2 to a Th1 response after WGP therapy was possibly mediated by intestinal mucosal macrophages releasing IL-12.

  9. Efficacy of multiple anticancer therapies may depend on host immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritika Karri

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The host immune system is a key player in anticancer therapy response and resistance. Although the impact of host immune response in the ‘war against cancer’ has been studied and it has been the basis for immunotherapy, understanding of its role in attenuating the action of conventional anticancer therapies is an area that has not been fully explored. In spite of advances in systemic therapy, the 5-year survival rate for adenocarcinoma is still a mere 13% and the primary reason for treatment failure is believed to be due to acquired resistance to therapy. Hence, there is a need for identifying reliable biomarkers for guided treatment of lung and colon adenocarcinoma and to better predict the outcomes of specific anticancer therapies. In this work, gene expression data were analyzed using public resources and this study shows how host immune competence underscores the efficacy of various anticancer therapies. Additionally, the result provides insight on the regulation of certain biochemical pathways relating to the immune system, and suggests that smart chemotherapeutic intervention strategies could be based on a patient’s immune profile.

  10. Factors affecting responses of infants with respiratory distress syndrome to exogenous surfactant therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, N K

    1993-02-01

    Approximately 20% to 30% of infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) do not respond to surfactant replacement therapy. Unfortunately there is no uniform definition of 'response' or 'non-response' to surfactant therapy. Response was based on improvement in a/A PO2 and/or mean airway pressure (MAP) by some and on improvement in FIO2 and/or MAP by others. Even the point of time at which evaluation of response was done is different in various reports. There is an urgent need to adopt an uniform definition. Most premature babies are surfactant deficient which is the aetiological factor of RDS. Generally good antenatal care and perinatal management are essential in avoidance of premature birth. Babies with lung hypoplasia and who are extremely premature (less than 24 weeks of gestation) do not respond well to exogenous surfactant replacement because of structural immaturity. Prompt management of asphyxiated birth and shock are necessary as there may be negative response to surfactant replacement. Foetal exposure to glucocorticoids improves responsiveness to postnatal administration of surfactant. Antenatal steroid therapy has become an important part of management of RDS with surfactant replacement. The premature lungs with high alveolar permeability tend to develop pulmonary oedema. With the presence of plasma-derived surfactant inhibitors, the response to exogenous surfactant may be affected. These inhibitors may also be released following ventilator barotrauma. The standard of neonatal intensive care such as ventilatory techniques has an important bearing on the outcome of the RDS babies.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Anti-HIV Antibody Responses and the HIV Reservoir Size during Antiretroviral Therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulggi A Lee

    Full Text Available A major challenge to HIV eradication strategies is the lack of an accurate measurement of the total burden of replication-competent HIV (the "reservoir". We assessed the association of anti-HIV antibody responses and the estimated size of the reservoir during antiretroviral therapy (ART.We evaluated anti-HIV antibody profiles using luciferase immunoprecipitation systems (LIPS assay in relation to several blood-based HIV reservoir measures: total and 2-LTR DNA (rtPCR or droplet digital PCR; integrated DNA (Alu PCR; unspliced RNA (rtPCR, multiply-spliced RNA (TILDA, residual plasma HIV RNA (single copy PCR, and replication-competent virus (outgrowth assay. We also assessed total HIV DNA and RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (rtPCR. Spearman correlations and linear regressions were performed using log-transformed blood- or tissue-based reservoir measurements as predictors and log-transformed antibody levels as outcome variables.Among 51 chronically HIV-infected ART-suppressed participants (median age = 57, nadir CD4+ count = 196 cells/mm3, ART duration = 9 years, the most statistically significant associations were between antibody responses to integrase and HIV RNA in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (1.17 fold-increase per two-fold RNA increase, P = 0.004 and between antibody responses to matrix and integrated HIV DNA in resting CD4+ T cells (0.35 fold-decrease per two-fold DNA increase, P = 0.003. However, these associations were not statistically significant after a stringent Bonferroni-adjustment of P<0.00045. Multivariate models including age and duration of ART did not markedly alter results.Our findings suggest that anti-HIV antibody responses may reflect the size of the HIV reservoir during chronic treated HIV disease, possibly via antigen recognition in reservoir sites. Larger, prospective studies are needed to validate the utility of antibody levels as a measure of the total body burden of HIV during treatment.

  12. Stimuli-Responsive NO Release for On-Demand Gas-Sensitized Synergistic Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wenpei; Yung, Bryant C; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2018-03-08

    Featuring high biocompatibility, the emerging field of gas therapy has attracted extensive attention in the medical and scientific communities. Currently, considerable research has focused on the gasotransmitter nitric oxide (NO) owing to its unparalleled dual roles in directly killing cancer cells at high concentrations and cooperatively sensitizing cancer cells to other treatments for synergistic therapy. Of particular note, recent state-of-the-art studies have turned our attention to the chemical design of various endogenous/exogenous stimuli-responsive NO-releasing nanomedicines and their biomedical applications for on-demand NO-sensitized synergistic cancer therapy, which are discussed in this Minireview. Moreover, the potential challenges regarding NO gas therapy are also described, aiming to advance the development of NO nanomedicines as well as usher in new frontiers in this fertile research area. © 2018 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Relative and Absolute Reliability of the Professionalism in Physical Therapy Core Values Self-Assessment Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furgal, Karen E; Norris, Elizabeth S; Young, Sonia N; Wallmann, Harvey W

    2018-01-01

    Development of professional behaviors in Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) students is an important part of professional education. The American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) has developed the Professionalism in Physical Therapy Core Values Self-Assessment (PPTCV-SA) tool to increase awareness of personal values in practice. The PPTCV-SA has been used to measure growth in professionalism following a clinical or educational experience. There are few studies reporting psychometric properties of the PPTCV-SA. The purpose of this study was to establish properties of relative reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient, iCC) and absolute reliability (standard error of measurement, SEM; minimal detectable change, MDC) of the PPTCV-SA. in this project, 29 first-year students in a DPT program were administered the PPTCVA-SA on two occasions, 2 weeks apart. Paired t-tests were used to examine stability in PPTCV-SA scores on the two occasions. iCCs were calculated as a measure of relative reliability and for use in the calculation of the absolute reliability measures of SEM and MDC. Results of paired t-tests indicated differences in the subscale scores between times 1 and 2 were non-significant, except for three subscales: Altruism (p=0.01), Excellence (p=0.05), and Social Responsibility (p=0.02). iCCs for test-retest reliability were moderate-to-good for all subscales, with SEMs ranging from 0.30 to 0.62, and MDC95 ranging from 0.83 to 1.71. These results can guide educators and researchers when determining the likelihood of true change in professionalism following a professional development activity.

  14. Malignant gliomas: current perspectives in diagnosis, treatment, and early response assessment using advanced quantitative imaging methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed R

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Rafay Ahmed,1 Matthew J Oborski,2 Misun Hwang,1 Frank S Lieberman,3 James M Mountz11Department of Radiology, 2Department of Bioengineering, University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 3Department of Neurology and Department of Medicine, Division of Hematology/Oncology, University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: Malignant gliomas consist of glioblastomas, anaplastic astrocytomas, anaplastic oligodendrogliomas and anaplastic oligoastrocytomas, and some less common tumors such as anaplastic ependymomas and anaplastic gangliogliomas. Malignant gliomas have high morbidity and mortality. Even with optimal treatment, median survival is only 12–15 months for glioblastomas and 2–5 years for anaplastic gliomas. However, recent advances in imaging and quantitative analysis of image data have led to earlier diagnosis of tumors and tumor response to therapy, providing oncologists with a greater time window for therapy management. In addition, improved understanding of tumor biology, genetics, and resistance mechanisms has enhanced surgical techniques, chemotherapy methods, and radiotherapy administration. After proper diagnosis and institution of appropriate therapy, there is now a vital need for quantitative methods that can sensitively detect malignant glioma response to therapy at early follow-up times, when changes in management of nonresponders can have its greatest effect. Currently, response is largely evaluated by measuring magnetic resonance contrast and size change, but this approach does not take into account the key biologic steps that precede tumor size reduction. Molecular imaging is ideally suited to measuring early response by quantifying cellular metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis, activities altered early in treatment. We expect that successful integration of quantitative imaging biomarker assessment into the early phase of clinical trials could provide a novel approach for testing new therapies

  15. [Changes in prostatic circulation in response to laser therapy and magnetic therapy in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    The results of preoperative preparation were analysed in 59 patients with prostatic benign hyperplasia (PBH) subjected to TUR. Treatment outcomes were assessed by transrectal ultrasound (color Doppler mapping) in two groups of patients. Group 1 received combined therapy including transrectal laser radiation of the prostate, group 2--transrectal magnetotherapy. The analysis showed that laser radiation reduced insignificantly the size of the prostate and adenomatous node, improved microcirculation and circulation in the prostate. This resulted in relief of inflammation and reduction of the number of postoperative inflammatory complications. Transrectal magnetotherapy has a positive effect on vascularization and hemodynamics of the prostate, local immunity, contamination of the tissues with pathogenic flora.

  16. Immune Profiles to Predict Response to Desensitization Therapy in Highly HLA-Sensitized Kidney Transplant Candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yabu, Julie M; Siebert, Janet C; Maecker, Holden T

    2016-01-01

    Kidney transplantation is the most effective treatment for end-stage kidney disease. Sensitization, the formation of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) antibodies, remains a major barrier to successful kidney transplantation. Despite the implementation of desensitization strategies, many candidates fail to respond. Current progress is hindered by the lack of biomarkers to predict response and to guide therapy. Our objective was to determine whether differences in immune and gene profiles may help identify which candidates will respond to desensitization therapy. Single-cell mass cytometry by time-of-flight (CyTOF) phenotyping, gene arrays, and phosphoepitope flow cytometry were performed in a study of 20 highly sensitized kidney transplant candidates undergoing desensitization therapy. Responders to desensitization therapy were defined as 5% or greater decrease in cumulative calculated panel reactive antibody (cPRA) levels, and non-responders had 0% decrease in cPRA. Using a decision tree analysis, we found that a combination of transitional B cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) frequencies at baseline before initiation of desensitization therapy could distinguish responders from non-responders. Using a support vector machine (SVM) and longitudinal data, TRAF3IP3 transcripts and HLA-DR-CD38+CD4+ T cells could also distinguish responders from non-responders. Combining all assays in a multivariate analysis and elastic net regression model with 72 analytes, we identified seven that were highly interrelated and eleven that predicted response to desensitization therapy. Measuring baseline and longitudinal immune and gene profiles could provide a useful strategy to distinguish responders from non-responders to desensitization therapy. This study presents the integration of novel translational studies including CyTOF immunophenotyping in a multivariate analysis model that has potential applications to predict response to desensitization, select candidates, and personalize

  17. Use of molecular markers for predicting therapy response in cancer patients.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Duffy, Michael J

    2012-02-01

    Predictive markers are factors that are associated with upfront response or resistance to a particular therapy. Predictive markers are important in oncology as tumors of the same tissue of origin vary widely in their response to most available systemic therapies. Currently recommended oncological predictive markers include both estrogen and progesterone receptors for identifying patients with breast cancers likely to benefit from hormone therapy, HER-2 for the identification of breast cancer patients likely to benefit from trastuzumab, specific K-RAS mutations for the identification of patients with advanced colorectal cancer unlikely to benefit from either cetuximab or panitumumab and specific EGFR mutations for selecting patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer for treatment with tyrosine kinase inhibitors such as gefitinib and erlotinib. The availability of predictive markers should increase drug efficacy and decrease toxicity, thus leading to a more personalized approach to cancer treatment.

  18. em>In vivoem> biological response to extracorporeal shockwave therapy in human tendinopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Waugh, C. M.; Morrissey, D.; Jones, E.

    2015-01-01

    Extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT) is a non-invasive treatment for chronic tendinopathies, however little is known about the in-vivo biological mechanisms of ESWT. Using microdialysis, we examined the real-time biological response of healthy and pathological tendons to ESWT. A single session...

  19. Regional changes over time in initial virologic response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, Wendy P; Kirk, Ole; Gatell, Jose M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS: Vi...... rates Udgivelsesdato: 2006/6...

  20. Study on the effectiveness of Responsive Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteder, L.M.; Kuijpers, N.; Stams, G.J.J.M.; van Horn, J.E.; Hendriks, J.; Wissink, I.B.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of Responsive Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART), a Dutch intervention for 16- to 21-year-old juveniles. Re-ART aims to decrease severe aggressive behavior using a cognitive behavioral approach combined

  1. Study on the Effectiveness of Responsive Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogsteder, L.; Kuijpers, N N; Stams, G.J.J.M.; van Horn, J.; Hendriks, J.; Wissink, I.B.

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a pre-test/post-test quasi-experimental study of the effectiveness of Responsive Aggression Regulation Therapy (Re-ART), a Dutch intervention for 16- to 21-year-old juveniles. Re-ART aims to decrease severe aggressive behavior using a cognitive behavioral approach combined

  2. Childhood maltreatment and the response to cognitive behavior therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heins, M.J.; Knoop, H.; Lobbestael, J.; Bleijenberg, G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To examine the relationship between a history of childhood maltreatment and the treatment response to cognitive behavior therapy for chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS). Methods: A cohort study in a tertiary care clinic with a referred sample of 216 adult patients meeting the Centers for

  3. Changes in stimulus and response AC/A ratio with vision therapy in Convergence Insufficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeraj Kumar Singh

    2017-07-01

    Conclusions: Stimulus and response AC/A ratio increased following VT, accompanied by clinically significant changes in vergence and accommodation parameters in subjects with convergence insufficiency. This represents the plasticity of the AC/A crosslink ratios that could be achieved with vision therapy in CI.

  4. Emotional, Motivational and Interpersonal Responsiveness of Children with Autism in Improvisational Music Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jinah; Wigram, Tony; Gold, Christian

    2009-01-01

    Through behavioural analysis, this study investigated the social-motivational aspects of musical interaction between the child and the therapist in improvisational music therapy by measuring emotional, motivational and interpersonal responsiveness in children with autism during joint engagement episodes. The randomized controlled study (n = 10)…

  5. High cortisol awakening response is associated with an impairment of the effect of bright light therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martiny, Klaus Per Juul; Lunde, Marianne Anita; Undén, M

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We investigated the predictive validity of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) in patients with non-seasonal major depression. METHOD: Patients were treated with sertraline in combination with bright or dim light therapy for a 5-week period. Saliva cortisol levels were measured in 63...

  6. Quality of Life in Relation to Pain Response to Radiation Therapy for Painful Bone Metastases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westhoff, Paulien G.; De Graeff, Alexander; Monninkhof, Evelyn M.; Pomp, Jacqueline; Van Vulpen, Marco; Leer, Jan Willem H; Marijnen, Corrie A M; Van Der Linden, Yvette M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study quality of life (QoL) in responders and nonresponders after radiation therapy for painful bone metastases; and to identify factors predictive for a pain response. Patients and Methods: The prospectively collected data of 956 patients with breast, prostate, and lung cancer within

  7. Genetic predictors for the response to therapy in colorectal cancer cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruijn, M.T.

    2011-01-01

    The general goal of this thesis is to create a better insight into the genes and signaling proteins that influence the response of colorectal cancer cells to MEK-targeted therapy and chemotherapy (5-FU and oxaliplatin). In chapter 2 of this thesis we set out to explore the mechanisms of resistance

  8. Predictors of Treatment Response to Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Depression in Parkinson's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Roseanne D.; Rubino, Jade Tiu; Allen, Lesley A.; Friedman, Jill; Gara, Michael A.; Mark, Margery H.; Menza, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to examine predictors of treatment response to cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for depression in Parkinson's disease (PD). Method: The sample comprised 80 depressed ("DSM-IV" criteria) adults with PD (60% male) and their caregivers who participated in an National Institutes of Health-sponsored…

  9. Travel and biologic therapy: travel-related infection risk, vaccine response and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Victoria; Johnson, Douglas; Torresi, Joseph

    2018-01-01

    Biologic therapy has revolutionized the management of refractory chronic autoimmune and auto-inflammatory disease, as well as several malignancies, providing rapid symptomatic relief and/or disease remission. Patients receiving biologic therapies have an improved quality of life, facilitating travel to exotic destinations and potentially placing them at risk of a range of infections. For each biologic agent, we review associated travel-related infection risk and expected travel vaccine response and effectiveness. A PUBMED search [vaccination OR vaccine] AND/OR ['specific vaccine'] AND/OR [immunology OR immune response OR response] AND [biologic OR biological OR biologic agent] was performed. A review of the literature was performed in order to develop recommendations on vaccination for patients in receipt of biologic therapy travelling to high-risk travel destinations. There is a paucity of literature in this area, however, it is apparent that travel-related infection risk is increased in patients on biologic therapy and when illness occurs they are at a higher risk of complication and hospitalization. Patients in receipt of biologic agents are deemed as having a high level of immunosuppression-live vaccines, including the yellow fever vaccine, are contraindicated. Inactivated vaccines are considered safe; however, vaccine response can be attenuated by the patient's biologic therapy, thereby resulting in reduced vaccine effectiveness and protection. Best practice requires a collaborative approach between the patient's primary healthcare physician, relevant specialist and travel medicine expert, who should all be familiar with the immunosuppressive and immunomodulatory effects resulting from the biologic therapies. Timing of vaccines should be carefully planned, and if possible, vaccination provided well before established immunosuppression.

  10. Molecular Imaging to Predict Response to Targeted Therapies in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Leguerney

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular magnetic resonance imaging targeted to an endothelial integrin involved in neoangiogenesis was compared to DCE-US and immunochemistry to assess the early response of three different therapeutic agents in renal cell carcinoma. Human A498 renal cells carcinoma was subcutaneously inoculated into 24 nude mice. Mice received either phosphate-buffered saline solution, sunitinib, everolimus, or bevacizumab during 4 days. DCE-US and molecular MRI targeting αvβ3 were performed at baseline and 4 days after treatment initiation. PI, AUC, relaxation rate variations ΔR2⁎, and percentage of vessels area quantified on CD31-stained microvessels were compared. Significant decreases were observed for PI and AUC parameters measured by DCE-US for bevacizumab group as early as 4 days, whereas molecular αvβ3-targeted MRI was able to detect significant changes in both bevacizumab and everolimus groups. Percentage of CD31-stained microvessels was significantly correlated with DCE-US parameters, PI (R=0.87, p=0.0003 and AUC (R=0.81, p=0.0013. The percentage of vessel tissue area was significantly reduced (p<0.01 in both sunitinib and bevacizumab groups. We report an early detection of neoangiogenesis modification after induction of targeted therapies, using DCE-US or αvβ3-targeted MRI. We consider these outcomes should encourage clinical trial developments to further evaluate the potential of this molecular MRI technique.

  11. Is mechanical dyssynchrony still a major determinant for responses after cardiac resynchronization therapy?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Qing; Yu Cheuk Man

    2011-01-01

    The assessment of mechanical dyssynchrony by advanced echocardiographic technologies and its importance in selecting more appropriate candidates for cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) have been disputed, after the announcement of the Predictors of Response to CRT (PROSPECT) trial, as the first evidence derived from a multicenter study. However, attempts in this field have never been stopped, as it appears that the fundamental mechanism of CRT is the correction of dyssynchrony where the detection of baseline dyssynchrony is of particular significance. The QRS width provides simple but very limited information. On the other hand, non-invasive imaging tools such as echocardiography have the capacity for more detailed analysis of mechanical dyssynchrony. We reviewed a number of clinical studies published in the post-PROSPECT era, designed to figure out a predictive algorithm where dyssynchrony measure is included, for identifying the most suitable patients before device implantation. From the analysis, mechanical dyssynchrony remains to be a major determinant for clinical outcomes after CRT, although discrepancies have arisen with respect to the single-center nature, echocardiographic methodologies, and relative merit when compared with other predicting factors. (author)

  12. Assessing The Impact Of Cancer Therapies On Ovarian Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gracia, Clarisa R.; Sammel, Mary D.; Freeman, Ellen; Prewitt, Maureen; Carlson, Claire; Ray, Anushree; Vance, Ashley; Ginsberg, Jill P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To determine whether measures of ovarian reserve differ between females exposed to cancer therapies in a dose-dependent manner as compared to healthy controls of similar age and late-reproductive age. Design Cross-sectional analysis of data from a prospective cohort study Setting University Medical Center Patients 71 cancer survivors age 15-39; 67 healthy, similarly aged unexposed subjects; 69 regularly menstruating women of late-reproductive age (40-52 years). Interventions: None Main Outcome measures Early follicular phase hormones (FSH, Estradiol, Inhibin B, AMH) and ovarian ultrasound measurements (ovarian volume and Antral Follicle Counts) were compared using multivariable linear regression. Results In adjusted models, FSH, AMH and AFC differed between exposed vs. unexposed (FSH 11.12mIU/ml vs. 7.25mIU/ml, p=0.001; AMH 0.81ng/ml vs. 2.85ng/ml, pscore was associated with increased levels of FSH (p= 0.016) and decreased levels of AMH (p=0.003). Exposure to pelvic radiation was associated with impairment in FSH, AMH, AFC and ovarian volume. AMH was similar in women previously exposed to high-dose cancer therapy and 40-42 year old controls. Conclusions Measures of ovarian reserve are impaired in a dose-dependent manner among cancer survivors compared to unexposed females of similar age. Reproductive hormone levels in menstruating survivors exposed to high-dose therapy are similar to late-reproductive women. The predictive value of measures for pregnancy and menopause must be studied. PMID:22137491

  13. Proteomic approaches in cancer risk and response assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petricoin, Emanuel F; Liotta, Lance A

    2004-02-01

    Proteomics is more than just a list-generating exercise where increases or decreases in protein expression are identified. Proteomic technologies will ultimately characterize information-flow through the protein circuitry that interconnects the extracellular microenvironment to the serum or plasma macroenvironment through intracellular signaling systems and their control of gene transcription. The nature of this information can be a cause or a consequence of disease processes and how patients respond to therapy. Analysis of human cancer as a model for how proteomics can have an impact at the bedside can take advantage of several promising new proteomic technologies. These technologies are being developed for early detection and risk assessment, therapeutic targeting and patient-tailored therapy.

  14. In vivo assessment of antiretroviral therapy-associated side effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Milton Ramos-Sanchez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Antiretroviral therapy has been associated with side effects, either from the drug itself or in conjunction with the effects of human immunodeficiency virus infection. Here, we evaluated the side effects of the protease inhibitor (PI indinavir in hamsters consuming a normal or high-fat diet. Indinavir treatment increased the hamster death rate and resulted in an increase in triglyceride, cholesterol and glucose serum levels and a reduction in anti-oxLDL auto-antibodies. The treatment led to histopathological alterations of the kidney and the heart. These results suggest that hamsters are an interesting model for the study of the side effects of antiretroviral drugs, such as PIs.

  15. Assessment of patients for treatment with tinnitus retraining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, James A; Jastreboff, Margaret M; Jastreboff, Pawel J; Schechter, Martin A; Fausti, Stephen A

    2002-01-01

    Clinical management for patients complaining of severe tinnitus has improved dramatically in the last 25 years. During that period of time, various methods of treatment have been introduced and are being used with varying degrees of success. One method that has received considerable attention is tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT). This method is being practiced by hundreds of clinicians worldwide, and retrospective clinical data indicate that TRT has been effective for the majority of patients. This article provides a guide for clinicians to evaluate their patients for treatment with TRT. Included in this guide is the expanded version of the TRT initial interview and specific instructions for the clinician administering the interview.

  16. Nuclear Imaging for Assessment of Prostate Cancer Gene Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    thymidine kinase transfected EL4 cells . Further exploration of Tc-99m conjugated potential HSV1-TK substrates is still undergoing in our laboratory...prostate cancer cells , has been demonstrated the utility for tissue-specific toxic gene therapy for prostate cancer[10, 11]. Therefore, an adenovirus...BJ5183 together with pAdeasy-1, the viral DNA plasmid. The pAdeasy-1 is E1 and E3 deleted, its E1 function can be complemented in 293A cells . The

  17. In vitro evaluation of photodynamic therapy using redox-responsive nanoparticles carrying PpIX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza Leite, Ilaiáli; Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.; Lyles, Zachary; Salvador Bagnato, Vanderlei; Mayumi Inada, Natalia

    2018-02-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a technique that combines light's interaction with a photoactive substance to promote cellular death and that has been used to treat a wide range of maladies. Cancer is among the leading causes of death worldwide and has been a central issue assessed by PDT research and clinical trials over the last 35 years, but its efficiency has been hampered by photosensitizer buildup at treatment site. Nanotechnology has been addressing drug delivery problems by the development of distinct nanostructured platforms capable of increasing pharmacological properties of molecules. The association of nanotechnology's potential to enhance photosensitizer delivery to target tissues with PDT's oxidative damage to induce cell death has been rising as a prospect to optimize cancer treatment. In this study, we aim to verify and compare the efficiency of PDT using redox-responsive silica-based nanoparticles carrying protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) in vitro, in both tumor and healthy cells. Dose-response experiments revealed the higher susceptibility of murine melanoma cells (B16-F10 cell line) to PDT (630 nm, 50 J/cm2) when compared to human dermal fibroblasts (HDFn): after 24 h of incubation with 50 μg/mL nanoparticles solutions, approximately 80 % of B16- F10 cells were killed, while similar results were obtained in HDFn cultures when solutions over 150 μg/mL were used. Uptake and ROS generation assays suggest increased nanoparticle internalization in the tumor cell line, in comparison with the healthy cells, and greater ROS levels were observed in B16-F10 cells.

  18. Concomitant nitrates enhance clopidogrel response during dual anti-platelet therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Moo Hyun; Guo, Long Zhe; De Jin, Cai; Cho, Young Rak; Park, Kyungil; Park, Jong Sung; Park, Tae-Ho; Serebruany, Victor

    2016-01-15

    Despite advances in modern anti-platelet strategies, clopidogrel still remains the cornerstone of dual anti-platelet therapy (DAPT) in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). There is some inconclusive evidence that response after clopidogrel may be impacted by concomitant medications, potentially affecting clinical outcomes. Sustained released nitrates (SRN) are commonly used together with clopidogrel in post-PCI setting for mild vasodilatation and nitric oxide-induced platelet inhibition. We prospectively enrolled 458 patients (64.5 ± 9.6 years old, and 73.4% males) following PCI undergoing DAPT with clopidogrel and aspirin. Platelet reactivity was assessed by the VerifyNow™ P2Y12 assay at the maintenance outpatient setting. Concomitant SRN (n=266) significantly (p=0.008) enhanced platelet inhibition after DAPT (251.6 ± 80.9PRU) when compared (232.1 ± 73.5PRU) to the SRN-free (n=192) patients. Multivariate logistic regression analysis with the cut-off value of 253 PRU for defining heightened platelet reactivity confirmed independent correlation of more potent platelet inhibition during DAPT and use of SRN (Relative risk=1.675; Odds ratio [1.059-2.648]; p=0.027). In contrast, statins, calcium-channel blockers, beta blockers, angiotensin receptor blockers, ACE-inhibitors, diuretics, and anti-diabetic agents did not significantly impact platelet inhibition following DAPT. The synergic ability of SRN to enhance response during DAPT may have important clinical implications with regard to better cardiovascular protection, but extra bleeding risks, requiring further confirmation in a large randomized study. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Generic procedures for assessment and response during a radiological emergency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-08-01

    One of the most important aspects of managing a radiological emergency is the ability to promptly and adequately determine and take actions to protect members of the public and emergency workers. Radiological accident assessment must take account of all critical information available at any time and must be an iterative and dynamic process aimed at reviewing the response as more detailed and complete information becomes available. This manual provides the tools, generic procedures and data needed for an initial response to a non-reactor radiological accident. This manual is one out of a set of IAEA publications on emergency preparedness and response, including Method for the Development of Emergency Response Preparedness for Nuclear or Radiological Accidents (IAEA-TECDOC-953), Generic Assessment Procedures for Determining Protective Actions During a Reactor Accident (IAEA-TECDOC-955) and Intervention Criteria in a Nuclear or Radiation Emergency (Safety Series No. 109)

  20. Noninferior response in BRAF{sup V600E} mutant nonmetastatic papillary thyroid carcinoma to radioiodine therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jiao; Zhao, Teng; Lin, Yansong [Peking Union Medical College Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Beijing (China); Liang, Jun [Peking University International Hospital, Department of Oncology, Beijing (China)

    2016-06-15

    As the most frequent and specific genetic alteration in papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC), BRAF{sup V600E} has an intimate relationship with more invasive tumour and higher postoperative recurrence risk in PTC patients. We investigate the effect of radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy on the clinical outcome in PTC patients with the BRAF{sup V600E} mutation without distant metastases. This retrospective study included PTC 228 patients without distant metastases who underwent total or near-total thyroidectomy and RAI treatment in our hospital from January 2011 to July 2014. The BRAF{sup V600E} status of the primary lesions was determined and the patients were divided into two groups according to the presence of the mutation. Serological and imaging data were collected at a median follow-up of 2.34 years after RAI administration. Suppressed and stimulated thyroglobulin (Tg), Tg antibody, diagnostic whole-body scintigraphy, and other imaging examinations were used to assess clinical outcome, which was defined as excellent response, indeterminate response, biochemical incomplete response and structural incomplete response. The BRAF{sup V600E} mutation was observed in 153 of the 228 patients (67.1 %). The clinicopathological features did not differ between the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation and wild-type groups except age at diagnosis (P = 0.000), tumour size (P = 0.023) and TNM stage (P = 0.003). Older age and more advanced TNM stage were prevalent in the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation group, whereas tumours were slightly larger in the BRAF{sup V600E} wild-type group. The response to RAI therapy was evaluated in both the entire series and the patients with a high recurrence risk, and no significant difference in response was found between the BRAF{sup V600E} mutatation and the wild-type groups (P = 0.881 and P = 0.851, respectively). The clinical response to timely postsurgical RAI therapy is not inferior in BRAF{sup V600E} mutation PTC patients without distant metastases, which

  1. Elevation in inflammatory serum biomarkers predicts response to trastuzumab-containing therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A Alkhateeb

    Full Text Available Approximately half of all HER2/neu-overexpressing breast cancer patients do not respond to trastuzumab-containing therapy. Therefore, there remains an urgent and unmet clinical need for the development of predictive biomarkers for trastuzumab response. Recently, several lines of evidence have demonstrated that the inflammatory tumor microenvironment is a major contributor to therapy resistance in breast cancer. In order to explore the predictive value of inflammation in breast cancer patients, we measured the inflammatory biomarkers serum ferritin and C-reactive protein (CRP in 66 patients immediately before undergoing trastuzumab-containing therapy and evaluated their progression-free and overall survival. The elevation in pre-treatment serum ferritin (>250 ng/ml or CRP (>7.25 mg/l was a significant predictor of reduced progression-free survival and shorter overall survival. When patients were stratified based on their serum ferritin and CRP levels, patients with elevation in both inflammatory biomarkers had a markedly poorer response to trastuzumab-containing therapy. Therefore, the elevation in inflammatory serum biomarkers may reflect a pathological state that decreases the clinical efficacy of this therapy. Anti-inflammatory drugs and life-style changes to decrease inflammation in cancer patients should be explored as possible strategies to sensitize patients to anti-cancer therapeutics.

  2. Assessment of the psychopathological effects of a horticultural therapy program in patients with schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yun-Ah; Park, Sin-Ae; Ahn, Byung-Eun

    2018-02-01

    This study assessed the psychopathological effects of participation in a 10-session horticultural therapy program in patients with schizophrenia. The study design was pre and post test design of experimental and control groups. Twenty-eight Korean patients with schizophrenia, recruited from a mental health clinic and two mental health rehabilitation centers in Suwon, South Korea, were voluntarily assigned to either a control group (average age: 33.4±9.4years) or a horticultural therapy group (average age: 42.1±13.0years). The participants in the horticultural therapy group participated in a 10-session horticultural therapy program designed around various plant cultivating activities. The horticultural therapy program involved sessions once a week from April 2017 to June 2017. A psychiatrist evaluated the psychopathological symptoms of schizophrenic patients in both groups. To assess the clinical psychopathological effects, the Korean version of the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS) and Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale (BPRS) were used. The horticultural therapy group significantly improved in terms of positive, negative, and general symptoms on the PANSS after the 10-session horticultural therapy program. Moreover, the horticultural therapy group significantly improved in terms of clinical symptoms of schizophrenia in BPRS after the 10-session horticultural therapy program. However, there was no change in the PANSS and BPRS scores in the control group. This study showed the potential of horticultural therapy in improving psychopathological symptoms in psychiatric patients. Future studies should investigate the effects of long-term horticultural therapy program on the chronic symptoms of patients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer: safety, efficacy, and quality of life assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yadav, Madhav Prasad; Ballal, Sanjana; Tripathi, Madhavi; Damle, Nishikant Avinash; Bal, Chandrasekhar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ansari Nagar, New Delhi (India); Sahoo, Ranjit Kumar [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Medical Oncology, BR Ambedkar Rotary Cancer Hospital, New Delhi (India); Seth, Amlesh [All India Institute of Medical Sciences, Department of Urology, New Delhi (India)

    2017-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of a novel theranostic agent, {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy in metastatic castration resistant prostate cancer (mCRPC). Thirty-one mCRPC patients with progressive disease despite second-line hormonal therapy and/or docetaxel chemotherapy were recruited for the study. All patients underwent diagnostic{sup 68}Ga-PSMA-HBED-CCPET/CT, prior to inclusion for therapy. Included patients then underwent quarterly {sup 177}Lu-DKFZ-PSMA-617 therapy. Hematological, kidney function, liver function tests, and serum PSA levels were recorded before and after therapy at 2 weeks, 4 weeks, and 3 month intervals. Biochemical response was assessed with trend in serum PSA levels. Metabolic response was assessed by PERCIST 1 criteria. Clinical response was assessed by visual analogue score (VASmax) analgesic score (AS), Karanofsky performance status (KPS), and toxicity and response criteria of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) criteria. The mean age of patients was 65.93 ± 9.77 years (range: 38-81 years). The mean activity administered in the 31 patients was 5069 ± 1845 MBq ranging from one to four cycles. There was a decline in the mean serum PSA levels from the baseline (baseline: 275 ng/mL, post 1st cycle therapy: 141.75 ng/mL). Based on biochemical response criteria 2/31, 20/31, 3/31, and 6/31 had complete response (CR), partial response(PR), stable disease (SD), and progressive disease (PD), respectively. Metabolic response revealed 2/6 patients with CR, and the remaining 3/6 patients with PR and 1/6 patients with SD. The mean VASmax score decreased from 7.5 to 3. The mean analgesic score decreased from 2.5 to 1.8 after therapy. The mean KPS score improved from 50.32 to 65.42 after therapies. The mean ECOG performance status improved from 2.54 to 1.78 after therapy. Two patients experienced grade I and grade II hemoglobin toxicity each. None of the patients experienced nephrotoxicity or hepatotoxicity

  4. Impact of Ejection Fraction on the Clinical Response to Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy in Mild Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linde, Cecilia; Daubert, Claude; Abraham, William T

    2013-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) in mild heart failure (HF) patients with QRS prolongation and ejection fraction (EF) ≤30%. To assess the effect of CRT in less severe systolic dysfunction, outcomes in the REsynchronization reVErses Remodeling in Systolic left v...

  5. Multimodality multiparametric imaging of early tumor response to a novel antiangiogenic therapy based on anticalins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reinhard Meier

    Full Text Available Anticalins are a novel class of targeted protein therapeutics. The PEGylated Anticalin Angiocal (PRS-050-PEG40 is directed against VEGF-A. The purpose of our study was to compare the performance of diffusion weighted imaging (DWI, dynamic contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI and positron emission tomography with the tracer [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG-PET for monitoring early response to antiangiogenic therapy with PRS-050-PEG40. 31 mice were implanted subcutaneously with A673 rhabdomyosarcoma xenografts and underwent DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET before and 2 days after i.p. injection of PRS-050-PEG40 (n = 13, Avastin (n = 6 or PBS (n = 12. Tumor size was measured manually with a caliper. Imaging results were correlated with histopathology. In the results, the tumor size was not significantly different in the treatment groups when compared to the control group on day 2 after therapy onset (P = 0.09. In contrast the imaging modalities DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET showed significant differences between the therapeutic compared to the control group as early as 2 days after therapy onset (P<0.001. There was a strong correlation of the early changes in DWI, DCE-MRI and FDG-PET at day 2 after therapy onset and the change in tumor size at the end of therapy (r = -0.58, 0.71 and 0.67 respectively. The imaging results were confirmed by histopathology, showing early necrosis and necroptosis in the tumors. Thus multimodality multiparametric imaging was able to predict therapeutic success of PRS-050-PEG40 and Avastin as early as 2 days after onset of therapy and thus promising for monitoring early response of antiangiogenic therapy.

  6. Our Journal Unites Us: Global Responsibilities and Possibilities for Pediatric Physical Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Sant, Ann F

    2018-04-01

    This article was designed to describe personal and social responsibilities for strengthening the science of pediatric physical therapy and effective international research collaboration and communication. Common flaws in research design and analysis are reviewed with recommendations for developing research students' design and analytical skills. Our social responsibility to be informed by global knowledge is highlighted. Barriers to scientific collaboration and communication including international disparities in scientific development and language barriers are presented. Suggestions to reduce these barriers are outlined. The importance of free access to scientific literature in developing countries is reviewed. The journal should assume a leadership role in building a strong science of pediatric physical therapy through encouraging personal and social responsibility in research and serving as a model of international collaboration and communication. Treatment for children with movement disorders will be improved by stronger science, international collaboration, and communication.

  7. Neurophysiological and behavioral responses to music therapy in vegetative and minimally conscious states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    O'Kelly, Julian; James, L.; Palaniappan, R.

    2013-01-01

    for preferred music (p = 0.029) across the VS cohort. Two VS cases are presented with concurrent changes (p ≤ 0.05) across measures indicative of discriminatory responses to both music therapy procedures. A MCS case study highlights how more sensitive selective attention may distinguish MCS from VS. Further...... of musical stimuli on arousal, attention and emotion, irrespective of verbal or motor deficits, however, an evidence base is lacking. To address this, a neurophysiological and behavioural study was undertaken comparing EEG, heart rate variability, respiration and behavioural responses of 20 healthy subjects...... responses (p ≤ 0.05) across healthy subjects corresponding to arousal and attention in response to preferred music including concurrent increases in respiration rate with globally enhanced EEG power spectra responses across frequency bandwidths. Whilst physiological responses were heterogeneous across...

  8. Radiation Dose-Response Model for Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer After Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appelt, Ane L.; Pløen, John; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Bentzen, Søren M.; Jakobsen, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Preoperative chemoradiation therapy (CRT) is part of the standard treatment of locally advanced rectal cancers. Tumor regression at the time of operation is desirable, but not much is known about the relationship between radiation dose and tumor regression. In the present study we estimated radiation dose-response curves for various grades of tumor regression after preoperative CRT. Methods and Materials: A total of 222 patients, treated with consistent chemotherapy and radiation therapy techniques, were considered for the analysis. Radiation therapy consisted of a combination of external-beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy. Response at the time of operation was evaluated from the histopathologic specimen and graded on a 5-point scale (TRG1-5). The probability of achieving complete, major, and partial response was analyzed by ordinal logistic regression, and the effect of including clinical parameters in the model was examined. The radiation dose-response relationship for a specific grade of histopathologic tumor regression was parameterized in terms of the dose required for 50% response, D 50,i , and the normalized dose-response gradient, γ 50,i . Results: A highly significant dose-response relationship was found (P=.002). For complete response (TRG1), the dose-response parameters were D 50,TRG1 = 92.0 Gy (95% confidence interval [CI] 79.3-144.9 Gy), γ 50,TRG1 = 0.982 (CI 0.533-1.429), and for major response (TRG1-2) D 50,TRG1 and 2 = 72.1 Gy (CI 65.3-94.0 Gy), γ 50,TRG1 and 2 = 0.770 (CI 0.338-1.201). Tumor size and N category both had a significant effect on the dose-response relationships. Conclusions: This study demonstrated a significant dose-response relationship for tumor regression after preoperative CRT for locally advanced rectal cancer for tumor dose levels in the range of 50.4-70 Gy, which is higher than the dose range usually considered.

  9. Rapid and Quantitative Assessment of Cancer Treatment Response Using In Vivo Bioluminescence Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alnawaz Rehemtulla

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Current assessment of orthotopic tumor models in animals utilizes survival as the primary therapeutic end point. In vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI is a sensitive imaging modality that is rapid and accessible, and may comprise an ideal tool for evaluating antineoplastic therapies [1 ]. Using human tumor cell lines constitutively expressing luciferase, the kinetics of tumor growth and response to therapy have been assessed in intraperitoneal [2], subcutaneous, and intravascular [3] cancer models. However, use of this approach for evaluating orthotopic tumor models has not been demonstrated. In this report, the ability of BLI to noninvasively quantitate the growth and therapeuticinduced cell kill of orthotopic rat brain tumors derived from 9L gliosarcoma cells genetically engineered to stably express firefly luciferase (9LLuc was investigated. Intracerebral tumor burden was monitored over time by quantitation of photon emission and tumor volume using a cryogenically cooled CCD camera and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI, respectively. There was excellent correlation (r=0.91 between detected photons and tumor volume. A quantitative comparison of tumor cell kill determined from serial MRI volume measurements and BLI photon counts following 1,3-bis(2-chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea (BCNU treatment revealed that both imaging modalities yielded statistically similar cell kill values (P=.951. These results provide direct validation of BLI imaging as a powerful and quantitative tool for the assessment of antineoplastic therapies in living animals.

  10. A Virtual Clinical Trial of FDG-PET Imaging of Breast Cancer: Effect of Variability on Response Assessment1

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, Robert L; Elston, Brian F; Doot, Robert K; Lewellen, Thomas K; Mankoff, David A; Kinahan, Paul E

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: There is growing interest in using positron emission tomography (PET) standardized uptake values (SUVs) to assess tumor response to therapy. However, many error sources compromise the ability to detect SUV changes. We explore relationships between these errors and overall SUV variability. METHODS: We used simulations in a virtual clinical trial framework to study impacts of error sources from scanning and analysis effects on assessment of SUV changes. We varied tumor diameter, s...

  11. Construction of an Occupational Therapy Screenings Assessment for elderly medical patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holsbæk, Jonas

    there for demands a validated Occupational Therapy Screening Assessment, that fast and easy can tell if more Occupational Therapy is needed. Aim: The aim of the study is to develop a Screening Assessment which can be used in the Occupational Therapist practice screening Hospitalized Elderly medical inpatients...... by means of the Content Validity Index (CVI) – Questionaire. Result: The result was a Screening Assessment and a Manual, which was built up using ICF and the ADL-Taxonomy as References. The Screening Instrument should be a support for the working Occupational Therapist in their Clinical Reasoning. CVI...

  12. Longitudinal Liver Stiffness Assessment in Patients with Chronic Hepatitis C Undergoing Antiviral Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Stella M.; Foucher, Juliette; Combis, Jean-Marc; Métivier, Sophie; Brunetto, Maurizia; Capron, Dominique; Bourlière, Marc; Bronowicki, Jean-Pierre; Dao, Thong; Maynard-Muet, Marianne; Lucidarme, Damien; Merrouche, Wassil; Forns, Xavier; de Lédinghen, Victor

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aims Liver stiffness (LS) measurement by means of transient elastography (TE) is accurate to predict fibrosis stage. The effect of antiviral treatment and virologic response on LS was assessed and compared with untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC). Methods TE was performed at baseline, and at weeks 24, 48, and 72 in 515 patients with CHC. Results 323 treated (62.7%) and 192 untreated patients (37.3%) were assessed. LS experienced a significant decline in treated patients and remained stable in untreated patients at the end of study (P<0.0001). The decline was significant for patients with baseline LS ≥ 7.1 kPa (P<0.0001 and P 0.03, for LS ≥9.5 and ≥7.1 kPa vs lower values, respectively). Sustained virological responders and relapsers had a significant LS improvement whereas a trend was observed in nonresponders (mean percent change −16%, −10% and −2%, for SVR, RR and NR, respectively, P 0.03 for SVR vs NR). In multivariate analysis, high baseline LS (P<0.0001) and ALT levels, antiviral therapy and non-1 genotype were independent predictors of LS improvement. Conclusions LS decreases during and after antiviral treatment in patients with CHC. The decrease is significant in sustained responders and relapsers (particularly in those with high baseline LS) and suggests an improvement in liver damage. PMID:23082200

  13. Longitudinal liver stiffness assessment in patients with chronic hepatitis C undergoing antiviral therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella M Martinez

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIMS: Liver stiffness (LS measurement by means of transient elastography (TE is accurate to predict fibrosis stage. The effect of antiviral treatment and virologic response on LS was assessed and compared with untreated patients with chronic hepatitis C (CHC. METHODS: TE was performed at baseline, and at weeks 24, 48, and 72 in 515 patients with CHC. RESULTS: 323 treated (62.7% and 192 untreated patients (37.3% were assessed. LS experienced a significant decline in treated patients and remained stable in untreated patients at the end of study (P<0.0001. The decline was significant for patients with baseline LS ≥ 7.1 kPa (P<0.0001 and P 0.03, for LS ≥ 9.5 and ≥ 7.1 kPa vs lower values, respectively. Sustained virological responders and relapsers had a significant LS improvement whereas a trend was observed in nonresponders (mean percent change -16%, -10% and -2%, for SVR, RR and NR, respectively, P 0.03 for SVR vs NR. In multivariate analysis, high baseline LS (P<0.0001 and ALT levels, antiviral therapy and non-1 genotype were independent predictors of LS improvement. CONCLUSIONS: LS decreases during and after antiviral treatment in patients with CHC. The decrease is significant in sustained responders and relapsers (particularly in those with high baseline LS and suggests an improvement in liver damage.

  14. Pelvic floor muscle assessment outcomes in women with and without provoked vestibulodynia and the impact of a physical therapy program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentilcore-Saulnier, Evelyne; McLean, Linda; Goldfinger, Corrie; Pukall, Caroline F; Chamberlain, Susan

    2010-02-01

    Physical therapy (PT) may reduce the pain associated with provoked vestibulodynia (PVD) based on previous findings that pelvic floor muscle dysfunction (PFMD) is associated with PVD symptoms. The goals of this study were: (i) to determine whether women with and without PVD differ on measures of pelvic floor muscle (PFM) behavior; and (ii) to assess the impact of PT treatment for women with PVD on these measures. Eleven women with PVD and 11 control women completed an assessment evaluating PFM behavior using surface electromyography (SEMG) recordings and a digital intravaginal assessment. Women with PVD repeated the assessment after they had undergone eight PT treatment sessions of manual therapy, biofeedback, electrical stimulation, dilator insertions, and home exercises. Superficial and deep PFM SEMG tonic activity and phasic activity in response to a painful pressure stimulus, PFM digital assessment variables (tone, flexibility, relaxation capacity, and strength). At pretreatment, women with PVD had higher tonic SEMG activity in their superficial PFMs compared with the control group, whereas no differences were found in the deep PFMs. Both groups demonstrated contractile responses to the painful pressure stimulus that were significantly higher in the superficial as compared with the deep PFMs, with the responses in the PVD group being higher than those in control women. Women with PVD had higher PFM tone, decreased PFM flexibility and lower PFM relaxation capacity compared with control women. Posttreatment improvements included less PFM responsiveness to pain, less PFM tone, improved vaginal flexibility, and improved PFM relaxation capacity, such that women with PVD no longer differed from controls on these measures. Women with PVD demonstrated altered PFM behavior when compared with controls, providing empirical evidence of PFMD, especially at the superficial layer. A PT rehabilitation program specifically targeting PFMD normalized PFM behavior in women with PVD.

  15. Immune response to Taenia solium cysticerci after anti-parasitic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aloukick K; Singh, Satyendra K; Singh, Amrita; Gupta, Kamlesh K; Khatoon, Jahanarah; Prasad, Amit; Rai, Ravi P; Gupta, Rakesh K; Tripathi, Mukesh; Husain, Nuzhat; Prasad, Kashi N

    2015-10-01

    Albendazole is the drug of choice for Taenia solium infection. Concomitant administration of steroid has been advocated to avoid adverse reactions to albendazole therapy in neurocysticercosis. Some T. solium cysticerci (larvae) respond to albendazole therapy while others do not and the reasons remain unexplained. We hypothesise that the immune response differs between treatment responder and non-responder cysticerci and this may determine the outcome. Twenty swine naturally infected with T. solium were purchased from the market and the infection was confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Swine were divided into two groups; swine in group 1 were treated with albendazole and those in group 2 were treated with albendazole plus steroid (prednisolone). All the animals underwent follow-up MRIs at 6 and 12 weeks after start of therapy and were then sacrificed. Tissues surrounding the cysticerci were collected and studied for the expression of different cytokines by reverse transcriptase PCR and ELISA. Albendazole therapy was found to be more effective in parasite killing than albendazole plus steroid (94.11% versus 70.96%, P=0.011). Albendazole therapy provoked a pro-inflammatory, Th1 (IFN-γ) and pleiotropic (IL-6) cytokine response around the dead cysticerci. Despite a heavy parasite burden in the brain, all the pigs treated with albendazole plus steroid survived. In this group of animals, a mixed pro-inflammatory Th1, Th2 (IL-4) and regulatory cytokine (IL-10) response was associated with responder cysticerci. Further, Th2 and regulatory cytokine responses were associated with non-responder cysticerci. Copyright © 2015 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. A case study of occupational therapy managers in NSW: Roles, responsibilities and work satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamble, Jane E; Lincoln, Michelle; Adamson, Barbara

    2009-04-01

    Job satisfaction has been shown to affect levels of staff retention and productivity, but few studies have been conducted on the work of occupational therapy managers and their job satisfaction. This study explores the roles and responsibilities of occupational therapy managers who are clinician-managers or manager-administrators, and sources of their work satisfaction. A collective case study involved telephone interviews with 16 occupational therapy managers. Semistructured interview questions were based on an earlier discussion with a separate group of occupational therapy managers. Interview transcripts were analysed for emerging themes. There were no clear differences in the roles and responsibilities of the two types of managers (manager-administrators and clinician-managers); however, manager-administrators tended to be responsible for larger numbers of staff. Managers reported that taking a clinical caseload is often at their own discretion. A common challenge for managers is the balancing of priorities as a clinician and a manager. Managing people was a common source of joy and sometimes a source of frustration. Mediating between staff and senior management and the need for budget control and efficiencies was an important aspect of managers' work, as was their autonomy to make decisions. Occupational therapy managers assume responsibilities consistent with clinician managers across disciplines. The main sources of work satisfaction related to people management particularly when staff were working effectively as a team and there was respect from senior management. Further research will confirm whether there are no obvious differences between clinician-manager and manager-administrators, and whether there are clear differences in work-related frustration across sectors.

  17. Interstitial brachytherapy for liver metastases and assessment of response by positron emission tomography: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goura Kishor Rath

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available For liver metastases (LM, image guided percutaneous ablative procedures such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA, laser induced thermal therapy (LITT and trans-arterial chemo-embolisation (TACE are increasingly being used because they are relatively safer, less invasive and equally effective. CT scan guided interstitial brachytherapy (IBT with a single large dose of radiation by high dose rate (HDR brachytherapy is a novel technique of treating LM and has shown good results. Positron emission tomography (PET scan may provide better information for assessing the response toIBT procedures. We hereby report a case of LM that was treated by HDR IBT and PET scan was done in addition to CT scan for assessing the response.

  18. Dysphonia in preterm children: assessing incidence and response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Victoria; Meldrum, Suzanne; Simmer, Karen; Vijayasekaran, Shyan; French, Noel P

    2014-03-01

    Mild dysphonia in childhood is surprisingly common, yet moderate to severe dysphonia is rare. The latter has been associated with complex medical conditions and congenital abnormalities. Intubation injury has also been documented as a cause of childhood dysphonia. Children born very preterm may be intubated as part of the intensive care administered in the perinatal and neonatal periods, yet there are few studies investigating dysphonia in this population. This study will be the first to: use an objective acoustic voice assessment in a paediatric study, document the incidence of dysphonia in very preterm children at school age, and conduct a controlled trial of behavioural voice therapy in this population. This study will consist of three phases: assessment of voice quality and its impact on quality of life in up to 200 children born at less than 32 weeks' gestation: assessment of the nature and extent of laryngeal pathology in children with moderate to severe dysphonia; and a non-blinded, randomised controlled trial of behavioural voice therapy in children with moderate to severe dysphonia. This study will be the first to use clinical assessment to examine the voice quality of very preterm children, and to use fibre optic endoscopic evaluation of laryngeal function to determine the nature and extent of any laryngeal pathology in such children. Those participants with significant voice difficulties will be randomised to receive treatment immediately or after the eight week assessment. This study is registered on the Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12613001015730/ACTRN12613001012763). Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Human cervical cancer: therapeutic response assessment by innovative molecular strategies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagarajan, Bala

    2016-01-01

    In Asia-Pacific region, the incidence of cancer of uterine cervix is high. Cancer is a multiple disease of multiple etiologies that has bearing on gene alteration that end result in abnormal cell dysfunction. We address the process interfacing infection, inflammation and oxidative damage that would lead to identify markers - to help improve patient management and bench to bedside. Radiation causes cell damage through production of reactive oxygen species. Radiation-induced DNA strand break is the primary mode of cell death. However, a secondary form of damage includes base modification or DNA adducts that are lethal on accumulation at higher levels. We analyzed polar and lipophilic adducts and found that the levels of adducts formed were independent of severity of disease status. 8 oxodG could be used as a marker to reflect patients potential to fix the lesion and response to radiation therapy. There was an increase in adduct levels in post treatment samples when compared to pre-RT, indicating radiation-induced DNA damage. Patients divided into two groups, high and low adduct formers, tend to show interindividual differences to fix the lesion that could be used to delineate radio-resistant or non-responding tumors. We have also looked at inflammatory cytokines, both by immunocytochemistry and m-RNA by RT-PCR through therapy, and generated definitive data that augur well with treatment response. The bottom line approach is prognostication and stratification. (author)

  20. Dyslipidemia therapy update: the importance of full lipid profile assessment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Menown, I B A

    2009-07-01

    Lipid guidelines typically focus on total cholesterol +\\/- low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels with less emphasis on high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) or triglyceride assessment, thus potentially underestimating cardiovascular (CV) risk and the need for lifestyle or treatment optimization. In this article, we highlight how reliance on isolated total cholesterol assessment may miss prognostically relevant lipid abnormalities; we describe from the European Systematic COronary Risk Evaluation (SCORE) data set how incorporation of HDL-C may improve estimation of CV risk; and, finally, we critically evaluate the evidence base surrounding triglycerides and CV risk.

  1. Assessing Underreporting Response Bias on the MMPI-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagby, R. Michael; Marshall, Margarita B.

    2004-01-01

    The authors assess the replicability of the two-factor model of underreporting response style. They then examine the relative performance of scales measuring these styles in analog (ARD) and differential prevalence group (DPG) designs. Principal components analysis produced a two-factor structure corresponding to self-deceptive (SD) and impression…

  2. Institutionalizing Emerging Technology Assessment Process into National Incident Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    mechanical methods, devices, and products, including oil sensors, booms, skimmers, decontamination , and waste minimization technologies...handling). • Alternative Oil Spill Response Technologies (in situ burning , dispersants, etc.). • Oil Spill Damage Assessment and Restoration. The TETs...deaths of eleven crewmembers and a subsequent uncontrolled oil spill that tested the government’s ability to respond to a spill of this magnitude as

  3. Goodness-of-Fit Assessment of Item Response Theory Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    The article provides an overview of goodness-of-fit assessment methods for item response theory (IRT) models. It is now possible to obtain accurate "p"-values of the overall fit of the model if bivariate information statistics are used. Several alternative approaches are described. As the validity of inferences drawn on the fitted model…

  4. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  5. Assessment of hepatitis B immunization status after antineoplastic therapy in children with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Karaman, Serap; Vural, Sema; Yildirmak, Yildiz; Urganci, Nafiye; Usta, Merve

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Hepatitis B is a disease that is preventable with vaccination. Antibody levels after vaccination may be affected by suppression of the immune system due to cancer therapy. Children with cancer have a high risk of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. We aimed to assess the pretreatment immunization status against HBV infection and the rate of continuity of immunization after therapy in children with cancer. DESIGN AND SETTING: Retrospective case review of patients trea...

  6. Association between brain natriuretic peptide, markers of inflammation and the objective and subjective response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brouwers, Corline; Versteeg, Henneke; Meine, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Studies suggest that cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) can induce a decrease in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and systemic inflammation, which may be associated with CRT-response. However, the evidence is inconclusive. We examined levels of BNP and inflammatory markers from...... ventricular end systolic volume; subjective CRT-response was defined as an improvement of ⩾10 points in patient-reported health status assessed with the Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire. Plasma BNP and markers of inflammation (CRP, IL-6, TNFα, sTNFr1 and sTNFr2) were measured at three time points...... is not automatically related to a stronger overall decrease in inflammation. Large-scale studies are warranted that further examine the relation between the clinical effects of CRT on inflammatory markers, as the latter have been associated with poor prognosis in heart failure....

  7. HBV Genotype B/C and Response to Lamivudine Therapy: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu-Li Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of nucleoside analogues such as lamivudine (LAM, actually used for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B, can suppress HBV DNA replication, improve transaminase level and liver histology, and enhance the rate of hepatitis B e antigen (HBeAg clearance. The responses to LAM therapy involve HBeAg clearance and HBV DNA conversion of negative. However, the associations between HBV genotype B/C and response to LAM therapy remain ambiguous. The aim of this meta-analysis is to determine more precise estimations of the relationship. All the publications on the associations between HBV genotype B/C and response to LAM (HBeAg clearance and HBV DNA conversion of negative through June 2013 were collected. Relative risk (RR with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI was calculated in fixed or random model, was calculated to examine heterogeneity, and funnel plots were plotted to examine small study effects with Stata 11 software. Overall, for HBeAg clearance and genotype B/C, the RR (95% CI was 1.27 (0.94–1.71, while for HBV DNA conversion of negative and genotype B/C, the RR (95% CI was 1.07 (0.98–1.17. HBV genotype B/C shows no significance associations with response to lamivudine therapy (HBeAg clearance and HBV DNA conversion of negative.

  8. Sustained long-term immune responses after in situ gene therapy combined with radiotherapy and hormonal therapy in prostate cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujita, Tetsuo; Teh, Bin S.; Timme, Terry L.; Mai, W.-Y.; Satoh, Takefumi; Kusaka, Nobuyuki; Naruishi, Koji; Fattah, Elmoataz Abdel; Aguilar-Cordova, Estuardo; Butler, E. Brian; Thompson, Timothy C.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To explore long-term immune responses after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy. Methods and Materials: Thirty-three patients with prostate specific antigen 10 or higher or Gleason score of 7 or higher or clinical stage T2b to T3 were treated with gene therapy that consisted of 3 separate intraprostatic injections of AdHSV-tk on Days 0, 56, and 70. Each injection was followed by 2 weeks of valacyclovir. Intensity-modulated radiation therapy was delivered 2 days after the second AdHSV-tk injection for 7 weeks. Hormonal therapy was initiated on Day 0 and continued for 4 months or 2.3 years. Blood samples were taken before, during, and after treatment. Lymphocytes were analyzed by fluorescent antibody cell sorting (FACS). Results: Median follow-up was 26 months (range, 4-48 months). The mean percentages of DR + CD8 + T cells were increased at all timepoints up to 8 months. The mean percentages of DR + CD4 + T cells were increased later and sustained longer until 12 months. Long-term (2.3 years) use of hormonal therapy did not affect the percentage of any lymphocyte population. Conclusions: Sustained long-term (up to 8 to 12 months) systemic T-cell responses were noted after combined radio-gene-hormonal therapy for prostate cancer. Prolonged use of hormonal therapy does not suppress this response. These results suggest the potential for sustained activation of cell-mediated immune responses against cancer

  9. [Assessment of individual clinical outcomes: regarding an electroconvulsive therapy case].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iraurgi, Ioseba; Gorbeña, Susana; Martínez-Cubillos, Miren-Itxaso; Escribano, Margarita; Gómez-de-Maintenant, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Evaluation of therapeutic results and of the efficacy and effectiveness of treatments is an area of interest both for clinicians and researchers. In general, randomized controlled trial designs have been used as the methodology of choice in which intergroup comparisons are made having a minimum of participants in each arm of treatment. However, these procedures are seldom used in daily clinical practice. Despite this fact, the evaluation of treatment results for a specific patient is important for the clinician in order to address if therapeutic goals have been accomplished both in terms of statistical significance and clinical meaningfulness. The methodology based on the reliable change index (Jacobson y Truax)1 provides an estimate of these two criteria. The goal of this article is to propose a procedure to apply the methodology with a single case study of a woman diagnosed with major depression and treated with electroconvulsive therapy. Copyright © 2014 SEP y SEPB. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  10. MDT-MB therapy in paucibacillary leprosy: A clinicopathological assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad P

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization recommends treatment regimens for paucibacillary (PB and multibacillary (MB leprosy, which differ in their duration and components. Hence accurate classification of the disease is required. To overcome difficulties in classification Uniform Multi Drug Therapy (U-MDT has been recommended. AIM : To evaluate the benefit of adding clofazimine to paucibacillary regimens in leprosy patients by measuring clinical and histological resolution. METHODS: Forty-four paucibacillary patients were included in the study. Twenty-two patients were given MDT-PB regimen and the remaining MDT-MB regimen for six months . Skin biopsies were done before the commencement and at the end of treatment. Clinical and histological resolutions were measured according to the standard criteria a laid down. The results were analyzed using Fishers′ test and Crammers′ V test. RESULTS: Clinical improvement was observed in 90.9% in the MB group as compared to 27.3% in the PB group. Regression in the nerve swelling was observed in 70% in the MB group and in 37.5% in the PB group while histological resolution was observed in 72.8% and 54.5% respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Addition of clofazimine helps to resolve leprosy lesions both clinically and histologically, thus justifying the concept of Uniform MDT regimen for all patients.

  11. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, D; Peeters, W; Nickel, K; Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R; Van Der Kogel, A; Kissick, M

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response

  12. SU-C-303-02: Correlating Metabolic Response to Radiation Therapy with HIF-1alpha Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, D [University of Wisconsin Madison, Madison, WI (United States); Peeters, W [Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, GA (United States); Nickel, K [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Eliceiri, K; Kimple, R; Van Der Kogel, A; Kissick, M [University of Wisconsin, Madison, Wisconsin (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To understand radiation induced alterations in cellular metabolism which could be used to assess treatment or normal tissue response to aid in patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. This work aims to compare the metabolic response of two head and neck cell lines, one malignant (UM-SCC-22B) and one benign (Normal Oral Keratinocyte), to ionizing radiation. Responses are compared to alterations in HIF-1alpha expression. These dynamics can potentially serve as biomarkers in assessing treatment response allowing for patient-specific adaptive radiotherapy. Methods: Measurements of metabolism and HIF-1alpha expression were taken before and X minutes after a 10 Gy dose of radiation delivered via an orthovoltage x-ray source. In vitro changes in metabolic activity were measured via fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) to assess the mean lifetime of NADH autofluorescence following a dose of 10 Gy. HIF-1alpha expression was measured via immunohistochemical staining of in vitro treated cells and expression was quantified using the FIJI software package. Results: FLIM demonstrated a decrease in the mean fluorescence lifetime of NADH by 100 ps following 10 Gy indicating a shift towards glycolytic pathways for malignant cells; whereas this benign cell line showed little change in metabolic signature. Immunohistochemical analysis showed significant changes in HIF-1alpha expression in response to 10 Gy of radiation that correlate to metabolic profiles. Conclusion: Radiation induces significant changes in metabolic activity and HIF-1alpha expression. These alterations occur on time scales approximating the duration of common radiation treatments (approximately tens of minutes). Further understanding these dynamics has important implications with regard to improvement of therapy and biomarkers of treatment response.

  13. Response assessment in metronomic chemotherapy: RECIST or PERCIST?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agrawal, Archi; Purandare, Nilendu; Shah, Sneha; Puranik, Ameya; Banavali, Shripad; Rangarajan, Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Metronomic chemotherapy (MC) is a novel therapeutic variation for resistant cancers, wherein chemotherapeutic drugs are administrated in low doses with no prolonged drug-free break. It lessens the level of toxicity, is better tolerated and enhances the quality of life. This retrospective analysis was undertaken to evaluate whether anatomical (computed tomography [CT]) or functional (positron emission tomography [PET]) imaging be used for response assessment in patients on MC. A total of 16 males and 27 females with age range of 12-83 years on MC who underwent PET/CT were assessed by new response evaluation criteria in solid tumors (RECIST 1.1) and PET response criteria in solid tumors (PERCIST 1.0). Concordance between RECIST 1.1 and PERCIST was seen in 32 (75%) patients. There was discordance in 11 (25%) patients. In patients with discordance, the results were confirmed by follow-up imaging. PET upstaged the disease in 81% of patients (9/11) and down-staged the disease in 19% of patients (2/11). Metabolic response accurately identified the disease status as assessed by clinical or imaging follow-up. Alteration in morphology takes time to manifest, which is demonstrated by CT or magnetic resonance; whereas in MC which brings about tumor dormancy, assessing metabolic response by PET would be more appropriate. MC is usually given in palliative setting but in few cases complete metabolic response was demonstrated in our study. In such a scenario this form of treatment has the potential to become an adjunct mode of treatment in some tumors. This needs to be evaluated with larger, homogenous patient population in a prospective mode

  14. Physiological responses of preterm newborn infants submitted to classical music therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Camila Mendes; Cação, Jessica Marcelle R; Silva, Karin Cristina dos S; Marques, Cassia Fernandes; Merey, Leila Simone F

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the physiological effects of music therapy on hospitalized preterm newborns. A noncontrolled clinical trial including 12 newborn infants with gestational age classical music therapy twice a day (morning and afternoon) for three consecutive days. The variables: heart and respiratory rates, oxygen saturation, diastolic and systolic arterial pressures, and body temperature were analyzed before and immediately after each music therapy session. There was a decrease in the heart rate after the second session of music therapy (paired t-test; p=0.002), and an increase at the end of the third session (paired t-test; p=0.005). Respiratory rate decreased during the fourth and fifth sessions (paired t-test; p=0.01 and 0.03, respectively). Regarding oxygen saturation, there was an increase after the fifth session (p=0.008). Comparison of physiological parameters among sessions, for the six studied sessions, showed only that the gain in oxygen saturation during the fifth session was significantly higher than during the sixth one (Tukey's test after variance analysis; p=0.04). Music therapy may modify short-term physiological responses of hospitalized preterm newborn infants.

  15. The host immunological response to cancer therapy: An emerging concept in tumor biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voloshin, Tali; Voest, Emile E; Shaked, Yuval

    2013-07-01

    Almost any type of anti-cancer treatment including chemotherapy, radiation, surgery and targeted drugs can induce host molecular and cellular immunological effects which, in turn, can lead to tumor outgrowth and relapse despite an initial successful therapy outcome. Tumor relapse due to host immunological effects is attributed to angiogenesis, tumor cell dissemination from the primary tumors and seeding at metastatic sites. This short review will describe the types of host cells that participate in this process, the types of factors secreted from the host following therapy that can promote tumor re-growth, and the possible implications of this unique and yet only partially-known process. It is postulated that blocking these specific immunological effects in the reactive host in response to cancer therapy may aid in identifying new host-dependent targets for cancer, which in combination with conventional treatments can prolong therapy efficacy and extend survival. Additional studies investigating this specific research direction-both in preclinical models and in the clinical setting are essential in order to advance our understanding of how tumors relapse and evade therapy. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Achieving deeper molecular response is associated with a better clinical outcome in chronic myeloid leukemia patients on imatinib front-line therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etienne, Gabriel; Dulucq, Stéphanie; Nicolini, Franck-Emmanuel; Morisset, Stéphane; Fort, Marie-Pierre; Schmitt, Anna; Etienne, Madeleine; Hayette, Sandrine; Lippert, Eric; Bureau, Caroline; Tigaud, Isabelle; Adiko, Didier; Marit, Gérald; Reiffers, Josy; Mahon, François-Xavier

    2014-01-01

    Sustained imatinib treatment in chronic myeloid leukemia patients can result in complete molecular response allowing discontinuation without relapse. We set out to evaluate the frequency of complete molecular response in imatinib de novo chronic phase chronic myeloid leukemia patients, to identify base-line and under-treatment predictive factors of complete molecular response in patients achieving complete cytogenetic response, and to assess if complete molecular response is associated with a better outcome. A random selection of patients on front-line imatinib therapy (n=266) were considered for inclusion. Complete molecular response was confirmed and defined as MR 4.5 with undetectable BCR-ABL transcript levels. Median follow up was 4.43 years (range 0.79–10.8 years). Sixty-five patients (24%) achieved complete molecular response within a median time of 32.7 months. Absence of spleen enlargement at diagnosis, achieving complete cytogenetic response before 12 months of therapy, and major molecular response during the year following complete cytogenetic response was predictive of achieving further complete molecular response. Patients who achieved complete molecular response had better event-free and failure-free survivals than those with complete cytogenetic response irrespective of major molecular response status (95.2% vs. 64.7% vs. 27.7%, P=0.00124; 98.4% vs. 82.3% vs. 56%, P=0.0335), respectively. Overall survival was identical in the 3 groups. In addition to complete cytogenetic response and major molecular response, further deeper molecular response is associated with better event-free and failure-free survivals, and complete molecular response confers the best outcome. PMID:24362549

  17. Simple regional strain pattern analysis to predict response to cardiac resynchronization therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risum, Niels; Jons, Christian; Olsen, Niels T

    2012-01-01

    A classical strain pattern of early contraction in one wall and prestretching of the opposing wall followed by late contraction has previously been associated with left bundle branch block (LBBB) activation and short-term response to cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT). Aims of this study were...... to establish the long-term predictive value of an LBBB-related strain pattern and to identify changes in contraction patterns during short-term and long-term CRT....

  18. Asthma: Effect of Genotype on Response to Therapy in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henderson, Sean

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We examined the effect of two β2-adrenoreceptor (β2AR polymorphisms (A46G and C79G in asthmatics presenting to the Emergency Department (ED in relation to their response to standard therapy measured by change in Forced Expiratory Volume at one second (FEV1. Our hypothesis was that the polymorphisms in the β2AR gene would predict clinical response to therapy with 46G and 79C displaying decreased response to inhaled therapy. Methods: This was a pilot feasibility study of a convenience sample of patients seen in the ED for acute exacerbation of asthma. Baseline data collected included: age, gender, ethnicity, vital signs, baseline FEV1, body mass index (BMI, smoking history and medications taken prior to arrival to the ED. Patients received standard ED care and FEV1 was measured after each treatment. Blood was taken and genotyped. Results: Fifty-three patients were enrolled over a three-month period. Using mean improvement in FEV1 from baseline to the first treatment as the primary outcome of interest, we performed multivariable linear regression analyses, with the FEV1 change as the dependent variable. When modeled as an ordinal covariate representing the number of G alleles present, there was a significant positive trend for the C79G locus (p=0.035. Those who were GG homozygotes had a 0.284 L/min improvement in FEV1 (31% after their initial albuterol treatment compared to 0.123 L/min (12% in those who were CC homozygotes. This represents a 2.5 times relative difference and a 19% actual difference. Genotypes at the A46G locus were not associated with FEV1 change. Conclusion: In this pilot study of ED patients with acute asthma exacerbation, there was a significant effect of genotype on response to therapy.

  19. Beyond dopamine: functional MRI predictors of responsiveness to cognitive behaviour therapy for psychosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veena Kumari

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE X-NONE MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:Table Normal; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin-top:0in; mso-para-margin-right:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:10.0pt; mso-para-margin-left:0in; line-height:115%; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:Calibri,sans-serif; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:Times New Roman; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Times New Roman; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Despite the favourable effects of antipsychotics on positive symptoms of schizophrenia, many patients continue to suffer from distressing symptoms. Additional benefi ts of cognitive behavior therapy for psychosis (CBTp have been reported for approximately 50% of such patients. Given the role of left hemisphere-based language processes in responsiveness to CBT for depression, and language pathway abnormalities in psychosis, this study examined whether pre-therapy brain activity during a verbal monitoring task predicts CBTp responsiveness in schizophrenia. Fifty-two outpatients, stable on antipsychotics with at least one persistent distressing positive symptom and wishing to receive CBTp adjunctive to their treatment-as-usual, and 20 healthy participants underwent fMRI during monitoring of self- and externally-generated (normal and distorted speech. Subsequently, 26 patients received CBTp for 6-8 months adjunctive to their treatment-as-usual (CBTp + TAU, 20 completers, and 26 continued with their treatment-as-usual (TAU-alone, 18 completers. Symptoms were assessed (blindly at entry and follow-up. The CBTp + TAU and TAU-alone groups had comparable

  20. Predicting fitness-to-drive following stroke using the Occupational Therapy - Driver Off Road Assessment Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsworth, Carolyn A; Baker, Anne; Lannin, Natasha; Harries, Priscilla; Strahan, Janene; Browne, Matthew

    2018-02-28

    It is difficult to determine if, or when, individuals with stroke are ready to undergo on-road fitness-to-drive assessment. The Occupational Therapy - Driver Off Road Assessment Battery was developed to determine client suitability to resume driving. The predictive validity of the Battery needs to be verified for people with stroke. Examine the predictive validity of the Occupational Therapy - Driver Off Road Assessment Battery for on-road performance among people with stroke. Off-road data were collected from 148 people post stroke on the Battery and the outcome of their on-road assessment was recorded as: fit-to-drive or not fit-to-drive. The majority of participants (76%) were able to resume driving. A classification and regression tree (CART) analysis using four subtests (three cognitive and one physical) from the Battery demonstrated an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.8311. Using a threshold of 0.5, the model correctly predicted 98/112 fit-to-drive (87.5%) and 26/36 people not fit-to-drive (72.2%). The three cognitive subtests from the Occupational Therapy - Driver Off Road Assessment Battery and potentially one of the physical tests have good predictive validity for client fitness-to-drive. These tests can be used to screen client suitability for proceeding to an on-road test following stroke. Implications for Rehabilitation: Following stroke, drivers should be counseled (including consideration of local legislation) concerning return to driving. The Occupational Therapy - Driver Off Road Assessment Battery can be used in the clinic to screen people for suitability to undertake on road assessment. Scores on four of the Occupational Therapy - Driver Off Road Assessment Battery subtests are predictive of resumption of driving following stroke.

  1. Rates and Durability of Response to Salvage Radiation Therapy Among Patients With Refractory or Relapsed Aggressive Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tseng, Yolanda D.; Chen, Yu-Hui; Catalano, Paul J.; Ng, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the response rate (RR) and time to local recurrence (TTLR) among patients who received salvage radiation therapy for relapsed or refractory aggressive non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and investigate whether RR and TTLR differed according to disease characteristics. Methods and Materials: A retrospective review was performed for all patients who completed a course of salvage radiation therapy between January 2001 and May 2011 at Brigham and Women's Hospital/Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Separate analyses were conducted for patients treated with palliative and curative intent. Predictors of RR for each subgroup were assessed using a generalized estimating equation model. For patients treated with curative intent, local control (LC) and progression-free survival were estimated with the Kaplan-Meier method; predictors for TTLR were evaluated using a Cox proportional hazards regression model. Results: Salvage radiation therapy was used to treat 110 patients to 121 sites (76 curative, 45 palliative). Salvage radiation therapy was given as part of consolidation in 18% of patients treated with curative intent. Median dose was 37.8 Gy, with 58% and 36% of curative and palliative patients, respectively, receiving 39.6 Gy or higher. The RR was high (86% curative, 84% palliative). With a median follow-up of 4.8 years among living patients, 5-year LC and progression-free survival for curative patients were 66% and 34%, respectively. Refractory disease (hazard ratio 3.3; P=.024) and lack of response to initial chemotherapy (hazard ratio 4.3; P=.007) but not dose (P=.93) were associated with shorter TTLR. Despite doses of 39.6 Gy or higher, 2-year LC was only 61% for definitive patients with refractory disease or disease that did not respond to initial chemotherapy. Conclusions: Relapsed or refractory aggressive NHL is responsive to salvage radiation therapy, and durable LC can be achieved in some cases. However, refractory disease is associated with a

  2. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne, E-mail: mkoritzi@uhnresearch.ca

    2015-10-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers.

  3. Metformin: A Novel Biological Modifier of Tumor Response to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koritzinsky, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decade, evidence has emerged to support a role for the antidiabetic drug metformin in the prevention and treatment of cancer. In particular, recent studies demonstrate that metformin enhances tumor response to radiation in experimental models, and retrospective analyses have shown that diabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy have improved outcomes if they take metformin to control their diabetes. Metformin may therefore be of utility for nondiabetic cancer patients treated with radiation therapy. The purpose of this review is to examine the data pertaining to an interaction between metformin and radiation, highlighting the essential steps needed to advance our current knowledge. There is also a focus on key biomarkers that should accompany prospective clinical trials in which metformin is being examined as a modifying agent with radiation therapy. Existing evidence supports that the mechanism underlying the ability of metformin to enhance radiation response is multifaceted, and includes direct radiosensitization as well as a reduction in tumor stem cell fraction, proliferation, and tumor hypoxia. Interestingly, metformin may enhance radiation response specifically in certain genetic backgrounds, such as in cells with loss of the tumor suppressors p53 and LKB1, giving rise to a therapeutic ratio and potential predictive biomarkers

  4. Gallium-67 scintigraphy for monitoring therapy response and follow-up of paracoccidioidomycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaga, L.Y.; Watanabe, T.; Hironaka, F.; Buchpiguel, C.; Cerri, G.; Benard, G.; Shikanai-Yasuda, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The current tools to evaluate patients' therapy response in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) are based on clinical, immunological and radiological data. However, these criteria may be of limited value in the follow-up of asymptomatic lesions, negative pre-treatment serological tests and in severe pulmonary involvement whose chest radiography usually doesn't differentiate active from fibrotic lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of Ga imaging for monitoring therapy response and follow-up of PCM patients. Methods: We studied 45 patients with confirmed PCM. Each patient underwent 2 to 7 Ga scintigraphies (total:147 scans) during a follow-up period of 4 months to 8,5 years. The Ga findings were compared to the clinical outcome and serum specific antibody levels. Results: Most patients showed improvement in the sequential Ga scans during the treatment with progressive decrease in number and intensity of sites with active infectious process. Ga scan was performed in nine patients with clinical cure and negative or persistently low levels of serum antibody following prolonged treatment. The scintigraphy confirmed the absence of inflammatory disease in all of these cases. Three patients with clinically suspected recurrence after irregular treatment showed positive Ga scans, confirming disease reactivation. Conclusion: Ga imaging is helpful in monitoring therapy response of PCM patients. Moreover, this method may be used to evaluate disease activity by confirming apparent cure and clinical recurrence

  5. Subjective and objective assessment of patients' compression therapy skills as a predicator of ulcer recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mościcka, Paulina; Szewczyk, Maria T; Jawień, Arkadiusz; Cierzniakowska, Katarzyna; Cwajda-Białasik, Justyna

    2016-07-01

    To verify whether the subjectively and objectively assessed patient's skills in applying compression therapy constitute a predicting factor of venous ulcer recurrence. Systematic implementation of compression therapy by the patient is a core of prophylaxis for recurrent ulcers. Therefore, patient education constitutes a significant element of care. However, controversies remain if all individuals benefit equally from education. A retrospective analysis. The study included medical records of patients with venous ulcers (n = 351) treated between 2001 and 2011 at the Clinic for Chronic Wounds at Bydgoszcz Clinical Hospital. We compared two groups of patients, (1) with at least one episode of recurrent ulcer during the five-year observation period, and (2) without recurrences throughout the analysed period in terms of their theoretical skills and knowledge on compression therapy recorded at baseline and after one month. Very good self-assessment of a patient's compression therapy skills and weak assessment of these skills by a nurse proved significant risk factors for recurrence of the ulcers on univariate analysis. The significance of these variables as independent risk factors for recurrent ulcers has been also confirmed on multivariate analysis, which also took into account other clinical parameters. Building up proper compression therapy skills among the patients should be the key element of a properly construed nurse-based prophylactic program, as it is the most significant modifiable risk factor for recurrent ulcers. Although the development of compression skills is undeniably important, also other factors should be considered, e.g. surgical correction of superficial reflux. Instruction on compression therapy should be conducted by properly trained nursing personnel - the nurses should have received both content and psychological training. The compression therapy training should contain practical instruction with guided exercises and in-depth objective

  6. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center. The analytical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local governments, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. Emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations are discussed. (author)

  7. Assessment of health surveys: fitting a multidimensional graded response model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depaoli, Sarah; Tiemensma, Jitske; Felt, John M

    The multidimensional graded response model, an item response theory (IRT) model, can be used to improve the assessment of surveys, even when sample sizes are restricted. Typically, health-based survey development utilizes classical statistical techniques (e.g. reliability and factor analysis). In a review of four prominent journals within the field of Health Psychology, we found that IRT-based models were used in less than 10% of the studies examining scale development or assessment. However, implementing IRT-based methods can provide more details about individual survey items, which is useful when determining the final item content of surveys. An example using a quality of life survey for Cushing's syndrome (CushingQoL) highlights the main components for implementing the multidimensional graded response model. Patients with Cushing's syndrome (n = 397) completed the CushingQoL. Results from the multidimensional graded response model supported a 2-subscale scoring process for the survey. All items were deemed as worthy contributors to the survey. The graded response model can accommodate unidimensional or multidimensional scales, be used with relatively lower sample sizes, and is implemented in free software (example code provided in online Appendix). Use of this model can help to improve the quality of health-based scales being developed within the Health Sciences.

  8. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FR-MAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FR-MAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant FR-om the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FR-MAC operations

  9. Preclinical imaging methods for assessing the safety and efficacy of regenerative medicine therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarfe, Lauren; Brillant, Nathalie; Kumar, J. Dinesh; Ali, Noura; Alrumayh, Ahmed; Amali, Mohammed; Barbellion, Stephane; Jones, Vendula; Niemeijer, Marije; Potdevin, Sophie; Roussignol, Gautier; Vaganov, Anatoly; Barbaric, Ivana; Barrow, Michael; Burton, Neal C.; Connell, John; Dazzi, Francesco; Edsbagge, Josefina; French, Neil S.; Holder, Julie; Hutchinson, Claire; Jones, David R.; Kalber, Tammy; Lovatt, Cerys; Lythgoe, Mark F.; Patel, Sara; Patrick, P. Stephen; Piner, Jacqueline; Reinhardt, Jens; Ricci, Emanuelle; Sidaway, James; Stacey, Glyn N.; Starkey Lewis, Philip J.; Sullivan, Gareth; Taylor, Arthur; Wilm, Bettina; Poptani, Harish; Murray, Patricia; Goldring, Chris E. P.; Park, B. Kevin

    2017-10-01

    Regenerative medicine therapies hold enormous potential for a variety of currently incurable conditions with high unmet clinical need. Most progress in this field to date has been achieved with cell-based regenerative medicine therapies, with over a thousand clinical trials performed up to 2015. However, lack of adequate safety and efficacy data is currently limiting wider uptake of these therapies. To facilitate clinical translation, non-invasive in vivo imaging technologies that enable careful evaluation and characterisation of the administered cells and their effects on host tissues are critically required to evaluate their safety and efficacy in relevant preclinical models. This article reviews the most common imaging technologies available and how they can be applied to regenerative medicine research. We cover details of how each technology works, which cell labels are most appropriate for different applications, and the value of multi-modal imaging approaches to gain a comprehensive understanding of the responses to cell therapy in vivo.

  10. CCR 20th Anniversary Commentary: Divide and Conquer-Breast Cancer Subtypes and Response to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusztai, Lajos; Rouzier, Roman; Symmans, W Fraser

    2015-08-15

    The article by Rouzier and colleagues, published in the August 15, 2005, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, demonstrated that different molecular subtypes of breast cancer have different degrees of sensitivity to chemotherapy, but the extent of response to neoadjuvant therapy has a different meaning by subtype. Several molecular subtype-specific clinical trials are under way to maximize pathologic complete response rates in triple-negative breast cancer and HER2-positive cancers, and to provide adjuvant treatment options for patients with residual invasive disease. See related article by Rouzier et al., Clin Cancer Res 2005;11(16) Aug 15, 2005;5678-85. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  11. Regional changes over time in initial virological response rates to combination antiretroviral therapy across Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bannister, W; Kirk, O; Gatell, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Changes in virologic response to initial combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) over calendar time may indicate improvements in cART or emergence of primary resistance. Regional variations may identify differences in available antiretroviral drugs or patient management. METHODS.......026) and time (P changes were observed (south, P = 0.061; central west, P ....001; north: P = 0.070; east, P = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: There was some evidence of regional differences in initial virologic response to cART. Improvements over time were observed, suggesting that so far, the effect of primary resistance has not been of sufficient magnitude to prevent increasing suppression...

  12. Genome-wide association study of response to cognitive–behavioural therapy in children with anxiety disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Jonathan R. I.; Lester, Kathryn J.; Keers, Robert; Roberts, Susanna; Curtis, Charles; Arendt, Kristian; Bögels, Susan; Cooper, Peter; Creswell, Cathy; Dalgleish, Tim; Hartman, Catharina A.; Heiervang, Einar R.; Hötzel, Katrin; Hudson, Jennifer L.; In-Albon, Tina; Lavallee, Kristen; Lyneham, Heidi J.; Marin, Carla E.; Meiser-Stedman, Richard; Morris, Talia; Nauta, Maaike H.; Rapee, Ronald M.; Schneider, Silvia; Schneider, Sophie C.; Silverman, Wendy K.; Thastum, Mikael; Thirlwall, Kerstin; Waite, Polly; Wergeland, Gro Janne; Breen, Gerome; Eley, Thalia C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Anxiety disorders are common, and cognitive–behavioural therapy (CBT) is a first-line treatment. Candidate gene studies have suggested a genetic basis to treatment response, but findings have been inconsistent. Aims To perform the first genome-wide association study (GWAS) of psychological treatment response in children with anxiety disorders (n = 980). Method Presence and severity of anxiety was assessed using semi-structured interview at baseline, on completion of treatment (post-treatment), and 3 to 12 months after treatment completion (follow-up). DNA was genotyped using the Illumina Human Core Exome-12v1.0 array. Linear mixed models were used to test associations between genetic variants and response (change in symptom severity) immediately post-treatment and at 6-month follow-up. Results No variants passed a genome-wide significance threshold (P = 5 × 10−8) in either analysis. Four variants met criteria for suggestive significance (P<5 × 10−6) in association with response post-treatment, and three variants in the 6-month follow-up analysis. Conclusions This is the first genome-wide therapygenetic study. It suggests no common variants of very high effect underlie response to CBT. Future investigations should maximise power to detect single-variant and polygenic effects by using larger, more homogeneous cohorts. PMID:26989097

  13. Immunological Response of Hiv-Infected Children to Highly Active Antiretoviral Therapy at Gondar University Hospital, North-Western Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokeb, Mehretie; Degu, Getu

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in children has not been well studied specially in developing countries where the burden of HIV is high. This study was aimed to assess the immunologic response of HIV-infected children to HAART at Pediatric ART Clinic Gondar University Hospital. Institution based cross-sectional study was conducted at the Pediatric ART Clinic Gondar University Hospital from March 01-April 30, 2014. The study included 283 HIV-infected children who were on HAART for 6 months and above. Medical records of HIV-infected children were reviewed using pre-tested questionnaire. CD4 count/percent was collected every 6 months retrospectively. For all statistical significance tests, the cut-off value was pimmunological response. The study revealed that there was good Immunological response to ART, and that the maximum response was in the 1(st) 6 months of ART. Low CD4 count at initiation, undisclosed HIV status and lack of good adherence were found to cause low immunological response to HAART.

  14. Aligning Objectives and Assessment in Responsible Conduct of Research Instruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antes, Alison L.; DuBois, James M.

    2014-01-01

    Efforts to advance research integrity in light of concerns about misbehavior in research rely heavily on education in the responsible conduct of research (RCR). However, there is limited evidence for the effectiveness of RCR instruction as a remedy. Assessment is essential in RCR education if the research community wishes to expend the effort of instructors, students, and trainees wisely. This article presents key considerations that instructors and course directors must consider in aligning learning objectives with instructional methods and assessment measures, and it provides illustrative examples. Above all, in order for RCR educators to assess outcomes more effectively, they must align assessment to their learning objectives and attend to the validity of the measures used. PMID:25574258

  15. Targeted Proteomics to Assess the Response to Anti-Angiogenic Treatment in Human Glioblastoma (GBM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeure, Kevin; Fack, Fred; Duriez, Elodie; Tiemann, Katja; Bernard, Amandine; Golebiewska, Anna; Bougnaud, Sébastien; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Domon, Bruno; Niclou, Simone P

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive primary brain tumor with dismal outcome for affected patients. Because of the significant neo-angiogenesis exhibited by GBMs, anti-angiogenic therapies have been intensively evaluated during the past years. Recent clinical studies were however disappointing, although a subpopulation of patients may benefit from such treatment. We have previously shown that anti-angiogenic targeting in GBM increases hypoxia and leads to a metabolic adaptation toward glycolysis, suggesting that combination treatments also targeting the glycolytic phenotype may be effective in GBM patients. The aim of this study was to identify marker proteins that are altered by treatment and may serve as a short term readout of anti-angiogenic therapy. Ultimately such proteins could be tested as markers of efficacy able to identify patient subpopulations responsive to the treatment. We applied a proteomics approach based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to precisely quantify targeted protein candidates, selected from pathways related to metabolism, apoptosis and angiogenesis. The workflow was developed in the context of patient-derived intracranial GBM xenografts developed in rodents and ensured the specific identification of human tumor versus rodent stroma-derived proteins. Quality control experiments were applied to assess sample heterogeneity and reproducibility of SRM assays at different levels. The data demonstrate that tumor specific proteins can be precisely quantified within complex biological samples, reliably identifying small concentration differences induced by the treatment. In line with previous work, we identified decreased levels of TCA cycle enzymes, including isocitrate dehydrogenase, whereas malectin, calnexin, and lactate dehydrogenase A were augmented after treatment. We propose the most responsive proteins of our subset as potential novel biomarkers to assess treatment response after anti-angiogenic therapy that warrant future

  16. Early response in cognitive-behavior therapy for syndromes of medically unexplained symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinstäuber, Maria; Lambert, Michael J; Hiller, Wolfgang

    2017-05-25

    Early dramatic treatment response suggests a subset of patients who respond to treatment before most of it has been offered. These early responders tend to be over represented among those who are well at termination and at follow-up. Early response patterns in psychotherapy have been investigated only for a few of mental disorders so far. The main aim of the current study was to examine early response after five therapy-preparing sessions of a cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) for syndromes of medically unexplained symptoms (MUS). In the context of a randomized, waiting-list controlled trial 48 patients who suffered from ≥3 MUS over ≥6 months received 5 therapy-preparing sessions and 20 sessions of CBT for somatoform disorders. They completed self-report scales of somatic symptom severity (SOMS-7 T), depression (BDI-II), anxiety (BSI), illness anxiety and behavior (IAS) at pre-treatment, after 5 therapy-preparing sessions (FU-5P) and at therapy termination (FU-20 T). The current analyses are based on data from the treatment arm only. Repeated measure ANOVAs revealed a significant decrease of depression (d = 0.34), anxiety (d = 0.60), illness anxiety (d = 0.38) and illness behavior (d = 0.42), but no change of somatic symptom severity (d = -0.03) between pre-treatment and FU-5P. Hierarchical linear multiple regression analyses showed that symptom improvements between pre-treatment and FU-5P predict a better outcome at therapy termination for depression and illness anxiety, after controlling for pre-treatment scores. Mixed-effect ANOVAs revealed significant group*time interaction effects indicating differences in the course of symptom improvement over the therapy between patients who fulfilled a reliable change (i.e., early response) during the 5 therapy-preparing sessions and patients who did not reach an early reliable change. Demographic or clinical variables at pre-treatment were not significantly correlated with differential scores between pre

  17. A Combined Pharmacokinetic and Radiologic Assessment of Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Predicts Response to Chemoradiation in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Semple, Scott; Harry, Vanessa N. MRCOG.; Parkin, David E.; Gilbert, Fiona J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the combination of pharmacokinetic and radiologic assessment of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as an early response indicator in women receiving chemoradiation for advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Twenty women with locally advanced cervical cancer were included in a prospective cohort study. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI was carried out before chemoradiation, after 2 weeks of therapy, and at the conclusion of therapy using a 1.5-T MRI scanner. Radiologic assessment of uptake parameters was obtained from resultant intensity curves. Pharmacokinetic analysis using a multicompartment model was also performed. General linear modeling was used to combine radiologic and pharmacokinetic parameters and correlated with eventual response as determined by change in MRI tumor size and conventional clinical response. A subgroup of 11 women underwent repeat pretherapy MRI to test pharmacokinetic reproducibility. Results: Pretherapy radiologic parameters and pharmacokinetic K trans correlated with response (p < 0.01). General linear modeling demonstrated that a combination of radiologic and pharmacokinetic assessments before therapy was able to predict more than 88% of variance of response. Reproducibility of pharmacokinetic modeling was confirmed. Conclusions: A combination of radiologic assessment with pharmacokinetic modeling applied to dynamic MRI before the start of chemoradiation improves the predictive power of either by more than 20%. The potential improvements in therapy response prediction using this type of combined analysis of dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may aid in the development of more individualized, effective therapy regimens for this patient group.

  18. Intervention quality is not routinely assessed in Cochrane systematic reviews of radiation therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Rahim, Mohamad R; James, Melissa L; Hickey, Brigid E

    2017-10-01

    The aim of this study was to maximise the benefits from clinical trials involving technological interventions such as radiation therapy. High compliance to the quality assurance protocols is crucial. We assessed whether the quality of radiation therapy intervention was evaluated in Cochrane systematic reviews. We searched 416 published Cochrane systematic reviews and identified 67 Cochrane systematic reviews that investigated radiation therapy or radiotherapy as an intervention. For each systematic review, either quality assurance or quality control for the intervention was identified by a description of such processes in the published systematic reviews. Of the 67 Cochrane systematic reviews studied, only two mentioned quality assurance or quality control. Our findings revealed that 65 of 67 (97%) Cochrane systematic reviews of radiation therapy interventions failed to consider the quality of the intervention. We suggest that advice about the evaluation of intervention quality be added to author support materials. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  19. Development of a quantitative tool to assess the content of physical therapy for infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blauw-Hospers, Cornill H; Dirks, Tineke; Hulshof, Lily J; Hadders-Algra, Mijna

    2010-01-01

    The study aim was to describe and quantify physical therapy interventions for infants at high risk for developmental disorders. An observation protocol was developed based on knowledge about infant physical therapy and analysis of directly observable physiotherapeutic (PT) actions. The protocol's psychometric quality was assessed. Videos of 42 infant physical therapy sessions at 4 or 6 months of corrected age were analyzed. The observation protocol classified PT actions into 8 mutually exclusive categories. Virtually all PT actions during treatment could be classified. Inter- and intrarater agreements were satisfactory (intraclass correlations, 0.68-1.00). Approximately 40% of treatment time was spent challenging the infant to produce motor behavior by themselves, whereas approximately 30% of time facilitation techniques were applied. Tradition-based sessions could be differentiated from function-oriented ones. It is possible to document PT actions during physical therapy treatment of infants at high risk for cerebral palsy in a systematic, standardized, and reliable way.

  20. Re-validation and shortening of the Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribaudo, J M; Cella, D; Hahn, E A; Lloyd, S R; Tchekmedyian, N S; Von Roenn, J; Leslie, W T

    2000-01-01

    The original Functional Assessment of Anorexia/Cachexia Therapy (FAACT) was designed to measure general aspects of quality of life (QOL) as well as specific anorexia/cachexia-related concerns. Our primary purpose was to reduce the number of anorexia/cachexia subscale items in a manner that either retains or improves reliability, validity and precision. The FAACT was administered using an interactive computer program that allowed immediate entry of the data. A total of 213 patients were recruited. A combined empirical and conceptual approach led to the reduction of the anorexia/cachexia subscale (A/CS) from 18 to 12 items. A 26-item trial outcome index (TOI) combining physical well-being (PWB), functional well-being (FWB), and the A/CS-12 was highly reliable and sensitive to change in performance status rating (PSR). We found that PWB, FWB, and A/CS-12 subscales performed differently. Specifically, PWB and FWB scores decreased in patients whose (PSR) worsened. However, although A/CS-12 scores were responsive to change in PSR over time, average A/CS-12 scores of all patients, even those whose PSR worsened, improved over the course of treatment. Elimination of six items from the anorexia/cachexia subscale of the FAACT was accomplished without loss of internal consistency or sensitivity to change in performance status. The A/CS-12 subscale provides unique, important information not captured by a generic chronic illness questionnaire.

  1. Methodology for Assessment of Inertial Response from Wind Power Plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Altin, Müfit; Teodorescu, Remus; Bak-Jensen, Birgitte

    2012-01-01

    High wind power penetration levels result in additional requirements from wind power in order to improve frequency stability. Replacement of conventional power plants with wind power plants reduces the power system inertia due to the wind turbine technology. Consequently, the rate of change...... of frequency and the maximum frequency deviation increase after a disturbance such as generation loss, load increase, etc. Having no inherent inertial response, wind power plants need additional control concepts in order to provide an additional active power following a disturbance. Several control concepts...... have been implemented in the literature, but the assessment of these control concepts with respect to power system requirements has not been specified. In this paper, a methodology to assess the inertial response from wind power plants is proposed. Accordingly, the proposed methodology is applied...

  2. Using Response Times to Assess Learning Progress: A Joint Model for Responses and Response Times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyu; Zhang, Susu; Douglas, Jeff; Culpepper, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Analyzing students' growth remains an important topic in educational research. Most recently, Diagnostic Classification Models (DCMs) have been used to track skill acquisition in a longitudinal fashion, with the purpose to provide an estimate of students' learning trajectories in terms of the change of fine-grained skills overtime. Response time…

  3. Life Cycle Assessment in Management of Socially Responsible Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tkaczyk Stanisław

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The following paper presents dangerous and evident phenomenon of communicational chaos in the field of environment protection and sustainable development in a turbulent external environment. It is pointed that this phenomenon gives organizations an opportunity to take pretended pro-environmental actions, such as socially critical greenwashing. As a counterbalance to those practices, a concept of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR is presented, underlining the possibility of developing honest environmental marketing basing on methods such as Life Cycle Assessment.

  4. Modeling Composite Assessment Data Using Item Response Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueckert, Sebastian

    2018-01-01

    Composite assessments aim to combine different aspects of a disease in a single score and are utilized in a variety of therapeutic areas. The data arising from these evaluations are inherently discrete with distinct statistical properties. This tutorial presents the framework of the item response theory (IRT) for the analysis of this data type in a pharmacometric context. The article considers both conceptual (terms and assumptions) and practical questions (modeling software, data requirements, and model building). PMID:29493119

  5. Clinical outcomes and response of patients applying topical therapy for pyoderma gangrenosum: A prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Kim S; Ormerod, Anthony D; Craig, Fiona E; Greenlaw, Nicola; Norrie, John; Mitchell, Eleanor; Mason, James M; Johnston, Graham A; Wahie, Shyamal; Williams, Hywel C

    2016-11-01

    Pyoderma gangrenosum (PG) is an uncommon dermatosis with a limited evidence base for treatment. We sought to estimate the effectiveness of topical therapies in the treatment of patients with PG. This was a prospective cohort study of UK secondary care patients with a clinical diagnosis of PG that was suitable for topical treatment (recruited between July 2009 and June 2012). Participants received topical therapy after normal clinical practice (primarily topical corticosteroids [classes I-III] and tacrolimus 0.03% or 0.1%). The primary outcome was speed of healing at 6 weeks. Secondary outcomes included the following: proportion healed by 6 months; time to healing; global assessment; inflammation; pain; quality of life; treatment failure; and recurrence. Sixty-six patients (22-85 years of age) were enrolled. Clobetasol propionate 0.05% was the most commonly prescribed therapy. Overall, 28 of 66 (43.8%) ulcers healed by 6 months. The median time to healing was 145 days (95% confidence interval, 96 days to ∞). Initial ulcer size was a significant predictor of time to healing (hazard ratio, 0.94 [95% confidence interval, 0.88-1.00); P = .043). Four patients (15%) had a recurrence. Our study did not include a randomized comparator. Topical therapy is potentially an effective first-line treatment for PG that avoids the possible side effects associated with systemic therapy. It remains unclear whether more severe disease will respond adequately to topical therapy alone. Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Computer Security Incident Response Team Effectiveness: A Needs Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Kleij, Rick; Kleinhuis, Geert; Young, Heather

    2017-01-01

    Computer security incident response teams (CSIRTs) respond to a computer security incident when the need arises. Failure of these teams can have far-reaching effects for the economy and national security. CSIRTs often have to work on an ad hoc basis, in close cooperation with other teams, and in time constrained environments. It could be argued that under these working conditions CSIRTs would be likely to encounter problems. A needs assessment was done to see to which extent this argument holds true. We constructed an incident response needs model to assist in identifying areas that require improvement. We envisioned a model consisting of four assessment categories: Organization, Team, Individual and Instrumental. Central to this is the idea that both problems and needs can have an organizational, team, individual, or technical origin or a combination of these levels. To gather data we conducted a literature review. This resulted in a comprehensive list of challenges and needs that could hinder or improve, respectively, the performance of CSIRTs. Then, semi-structured in depth interviews were held with team coordinators and team members of five public and private sector Dutch CSIRTs to ground these findings in practice and to identify gaps between current and desired incident handling practices. This paper presents the findings of our needs assessment and ends with a discussion of potential solutions to problems with performance in incident response.

  7. Computer Security Incident Response Team Effectiveness: A Needs Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rick Van der Kleij

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer security incident response teams (CSIRTs respond to a computer security incident when the need arises. Failure of these teams can have far-reaching effects for the economy and national security. CSIRTs often have to work on an ad hoc basis, in close cooperation with other teams, and in time constrained environments. It could be argued that under these working conditions CSIRTs would be likely to encounter problems. A needs assessment was done to see to which extent this argument holds true. We constructed an incident response needs model to assist in identifying areas that require improvement. We envisioned a model consisting of four assessment categories: Organization, Team, Individual and Instrumental. Central to this is the idea that both problems and needs can have an organizational, team, individual, or technical origin or a combination of these levels. To gather data we conducted a literature review. This resulted in a comprehensive list of challenges and needs that could hinder or improve, respectively, the performance of CSIRTs. Then, semi-structured in depth interviews were held with team coordinators and team members of five public and private sector Dutch CSIRTs to ground these findings in practice and to identify gaps between current and desired incident handling practices. This paper presents the findings of our needs assessment and ends with a discussion of potential solutions to problems with performance in incident response.

  8. Assessment of seismic design response factors of concrete wall buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mwafy, Aman

    2011-03-01

    To verify the seismic design response factors of high-rise buildings, five reference structures, varying in height from 20- to 60-stories, were selected and designed according to modern design codes to represent a wide range of concrete wall structures. Verified fiber-based analytical models for inelastic simulation were developed, considering the geometric nonlinearity and material inelasticity of the structural members. The ground motion uncertainty was accounted for by employing 20 earthquake records representing two seismic scenarios, consistent with the latest understanding of the tectonic setting and seismicity of the selected reference region (UAE). A large number of Inelastic Pushover Analyses (IPAs) and Incremental Dynamic Collapse Analyses (IDCAs) were deployed for the reference structures to estimate the seismic design response factors. It is concluded that the factors adopted by the design code are adequately conservative. The results of this systematic assessment of seismic design response factors apply to a wide variety of contemporary concrete wall buildings with various characteristics.

  9. Cortisol as a predictor of psychological therapy response in depressive disorders: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Susanne; Strawbridge, Rebecca; Vives, Andres Herane; Cleare, Anthony J

    2017-02-01

    Many patients with depressive disorders demonstrate resistance to psychological therapy. A frequent finding is hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis alterations. As cortisol is known to modulate cognitive processes, those patients may be less likely to profit from psychological therapy. To conduct a systematic review and meta-analysis on cortisol as a predictor of psychological therapy response. The Cochrane Library, EMBASE, MEDLINE and PsycINFO databases were searched. Records were included if they looked at patients with any depressive disorder engaging in psychological therapy, with a pre-treatment cortisol and a post-treatment symptom measure. Eight articles satisfied our selection criteria. The higher the cortisol levels before starting psychological therapy, the more symptoms patients with depression experienced at the end of treatment and/or the smaller their symptom change. Our findings suggest that patients with depression with elevated HPA functioning are less responsive to psychological therapy. © The Royal College of Psychiatrists 2017.

  10. Riboflavin-responsive trimethylaminuria in a patient with homocystinuria on betaine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Nigel J; Allen, Elizabeth K; Kirk, Richard J; Sharrard, Mark J; Smith, Edwin J

    2012-01-01

    A 17-year-old female patient with pyridoxine non-responsive homocystinuria, treated with 20 g of betaine per day, developed a strong body odour, which was described as fish-like. Urinary trimethylamine (TMA) was measured and found to be markedly increased. DNA mutation analysis revealed homozygosity for a common allelic variant in the gene coding for the TMA oxidising enzyme FMO3. Without changing diet or betaine therapy, riboflavin was given at a dose of 200 mg per day. An immediate improvement in her odour was noticed by her friends and family and urinary TMA was noted to be greatly reduced, although still above the normal range.Gradual further reductions in TMA (and odour) have followed whilst receiving riboflavin. Throughout this period, betaine compliance has been demonstrated by the measurement of dimethylglycine (DMG) excretion, which has been consistently increased. Marked excretions of DMG when the odour had subsided also demonstrate that DMG was not the source of the odour.This patient study raises the possibility that betaine may be converted to TMA by intestinal flora to some degree, resulting in a significant fish odour when oxidation of TMA is compromised by FMO3 variants. The possibility exists that the body odour occasionally associated with betaine therapy for homocystinuria may not be related to increased circulating betaine or DMG, but due to a common FMO3 mutation resulting in TMAU. Benefits of riboflavin therapy for TMAU for such patients would allow the maintenance of betaine therapy without problematic body odour.

  11. Importance of heart rate during exercise for response to cardiac resynchronization therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maass, Alexander H; Buck, Sandra; Nieuwland, Wybe; Brügemann, Johan; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2009-07-01

    Cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT) is an established therapy for patients with severe heart failure and mechanical dyssynchrony. Response is only achieved in 60-70% of patients. To study exercise-related factors predicting response to CRT. We retrospectively examined consecutive patients in whom a CRT device was implanted. All underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing prior to implantation and after 6 months. The occurrence of chronotropic incompetence and heart rates exceeding the upper rate of the device, thereby compromising biventricular stimulation, was studied. Response was defined as a decrease in LVESV of 10% or more after 6 months. We included 144 patients. After 6 months 86 (60%) patients were responders. Peak VO2 significantly increased in responders. Chronotropic incompetence was more frequently seen in nonresponders (21 [36%] vs 9 [10%], P = 0.03), mostly in patients in SR. At moderate exercise, defined as 25% of the maximal exercise tolerance, that is, comparable to daily life exercise, nonresponders more frequently went above the upper rate of the device (13 [22%] vs 2 [3%], P exercise (OR 15.8 [3.3-76.5], P = 0.001) and nonischemic cardiomyopathy (OR 2.4 [1.0-5.7], P = 0.04) as predictive for response. Heart rate exceeding the upper rate during moderate exercise is an independent predictor for nonresponse to CRT in patients with AF, whereas chronotropic incompetence is a predictor for patients in SR.

  12. Music therapy for the Assessment of Parental Competencies for Children in need of Care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Stine; Wigram, Tony

    2007-01-01

    The assessment for parenting competencies for parents of children potentially in need of care involves an evaluation of their relationship with their child, and the interaction that underpins that relationship. The "Assessment of Parenting Competences" (APC) music therapy assessment provides...... a structured series of interactional exercises that allow the therapist to explore the nature of the relationship both as a tool in every day clinical work and as a research method. The method of the assessment involves free improvisation, turn-taking exercises, and following leading exercises and is evaluated...

  13. Effect of Pregnancy on Response to Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Infected African Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtis, Athena P; Wiener, Jeffrey; King, Caroline C; Heffron, Renee; Mugo, Nelly R; Nanda, Kavita; Pyra, Maria; Donnell, Deborah; Celum, Connie; Lingappa, Jairam R; Baeten, Jared M

    2017-01-01

    While most recent evidence does not support a role for pregnancy in accelerating HIV disease progression, very little information is available on the effects of incident pregnancy in response to antiretroviral therapy (ART). Hormonal, immune, and behavioral changes during pregnancy may influence response to ART. We sought to explore the effects of incident pregnancy (after ART initiation) on virologic, immunologic, and clinical response to ART. Data were collected from HIV-infected women participating in 3 prospective studies (Partners in Prevention Herpes simplex virus/HIV Transmission Study, Couples Observational Study, and Partners Preexposure Prophylaxis Study) from 7 countries in Africa from 2004 to 2012. Women were included in this analysis if they were ≤45 years of age, were started on ART during the study and were not pregnant at ART initiation. Pregnancy was treated as a time-dependent exposure variable covering the duration of pregnancy, including all pregnancies occurring after ART initiation. Virologic failure was defined as a viral load (VL) greater than 400 copies per milliliter ≥6 months after ART initiation and viral suppression was defined as VL ≤400 copies per milliliter. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between pregnancy and time to viral suppression, virologic failure, World Health Organization clinical stage III/IV, and death. Linear mixed-effects models were used to assess the association between pregnancy and CD4 count and VL. All analyses were adjusted for confounders, including pre-ART CD4 count and plasma VL. A total of 1041 women were followed, contributing 1196.1 person-years of follow-up. Median CD4 count before ART initiation was 276 cells per cubic millimeter (interquartile range, 209-375); median pre-ART VL was 17,511 copies per milliliter (interquartile range, 2480-69,286). One hundred ten women became pregnant after ART initiation. Pregnancy was not associated with time to

  14. Histopathologic and Radiologic Assessment of Chemotherapeutic Response in Ewing's Sarcoma: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Castellano, José M; Atallah Yordi, Nagib; Reyes, Carolina; Healey, John H

    2012-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma is a highly malignant tumor that metastasizes rapidly and is thus associated with a low survival rate. The intensification of chemotherapy has been shown to improve the overall survival of patients with Ewing's sarcoma. However, intensified chemotherapy can lead to increased toxicity or even the development of secondary malignancies. The stratification of patients with Ewing's sarcoma into "good" and "poor" responders may help guide the administration of progressively more intensified chemotherapy. Thus, an accurate assessment of the chemotherapeutic response, as well as the extent of chemotherapy-induced tumor necrosis, is critical for avoiding potential treatment-related complications in these patients. This paper reviews the methods currently used to evaluate chemotherapeutic response in Ewing's sarcoma, focusing specifically on histopathologic and imaging analyses, and discusses novel therapies and imaging methods that may help improve the overall survival of these patients.

  15. Histopathologic and Radiologic Assessment of Chemotherapeutic Response in Ewing's Sarcoma: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. García-Castellano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Ewing’s sarcoma is a highly malignant tumor that metastasizes rapidly and is thus associated with a low survival rate. The intensification of chemotherapy has been shown to improve the overall survival of patients with Ewing’s sarcoma. However, intensified chemotherapy can lead to increased toxicity or even the development of secondary malignancies. The stratification of patients with Ewing’s sarcoma into “good” and “poor” responders may help guide the administration of progressively more intensified chemotherapy. Thus, an accurate assessment of the chemotherapeutic response, as well as the extent of chemotherapy-induced tumor necrosis, is critical for avoiding potential treatment-related complications in these patients. This paper reviews the methods currently used to evaluate chemotherapeutic response in Ewing’s sarcoma, focusing specifically on histopathologic and imaging analyses, and discusses novel therapies and imaging methods that may help improve the overall survival of these patients.

  16. A VALIDATION STUDY OF THE FACIAL-ORAL TRACT THERAPY SWALLOWING ASSESSMENT OF SALIVA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jesper; Jensen, Ditte; Kjærsgaard, Annette

    Introduction Facial-Oral Tract Therapy (F.O.T.T.) (1) is an approach that provides both clinical assessment and treatment of oropharyngeal dysphagia. In the F.O.T.T. approach, a prerequisite for the initiation of oral intake is safe swallowing of saliva. A recent randomized controlled trial (2...

  17. An automatic framework for assessing breast cancer risk due to various hormone replacement therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    It is well known that menopausal hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998), J.M. Boone(...

  18. Assessment of dose load of personnel in intratissue gamma beam therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavitskij, R.V.; Zamyatin, O.A.; Varennikov, O.I.; Astakhova, I.V.

    1995-01-01

    Suggest a method for retrospective assessment of levels of irradiation of small groups of personnel exposed to radiation sources. Presents estimated values of cumulative and local doses obtained by personnel during intratissue gamma beam therapy carried out by manual consecutive injections of intrastats and irradiation sources. 3 refs.; 5 tabs

  19. An Automatic Framework for Assessing Breast Cancer Risk Due to Various Hormone Replacement Therapies (HRT)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karemore, Gopal Raghunath; Brandt, Sami; Nielsen, Mads

    Background: It is well known that Menopausal Hormone therapy increases mammographic density. Increase in breast density may relate to breast cancer risk. Several computer assisted automatic methods for assessing mammographic density have been suggested by J.W. Byng (1996), N. Karssemeijer (1998),...

  20. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G M; Staal, J Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2017-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  1. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D.; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G.M.; Staal, J. Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    2018-01-01

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  2. Clinical Practice Guideline for Physical Therapy Assessment and Treatment in Patients With Nonspecific Neck Pain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bier, Jasper D.; Scholten-Peeters, Wendy G. M.; Staal, J. Bart; Pool, Jan; van Tulder, Maurits W.; Beekman, Emmylou; Knoop, Jesper; Meerhoff, Guus; Verhagen, Arianne P.

    The Royal Dutch Society for Physical Therapy (KNGF) issued a clinical practice guideline for physical therapists that addresses the assessment and treatment of patients with nonspecific neck pain, including cervical radiculopathy, in Dutch primary care. Recommendations were based on a review of

  3. In vitro assessment of the efficacy of thermal therapy in human benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bhowmick, P.; Coad, J. E.; Bhowmick, S.; Pryor, J. L.; Larson, T.; de la Rosette, J.; Bischof, J. C.

    2004-01-01

    The successful management of BPH with minimally invasive thermal therapies requires a firm understanding of the temperature-time relationship for tissue destruction. In order to accomplish this objective, the present in vitro study assesses the cellular viability of human BPH tissue subjected to an

  4. Electromyography in the assessment and therapy of lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krhut, Jan; Zachoval, Roman; Rosier, Peter F W M

    2018-01-01

    AIM: To present the teaching module "Electromyography in the assessment and therapy of lower urinary tract dysfunction in adults." This teaching module embodies a presentation, in combination with this manuscript. This manuscript serves as a scientific background review; the evidence base made...

  5. Development and validation of the functional assessment of chronic illness therapy treatment satisfaction (FACIT TS) measures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peipert, John D; Beaumont, Jennifer L; Bode, Rita; Cella, Dave; Garcia, Sofia F; Hahn, Elizabeth A

    2014-04-01

    To develop and validate a new functional assessment of chronic illness therapy (FACIT) measure of satisfaction with treatment for chronic illnesses such as cancer and HIV/AIDS. To define domains and generate items, a literature review informed creation of semi-structured interview guides for patients and an international expert panel of clinicians and researchers. Patients and experts also rated 15 areas of satisfaction for relevance. The final list of items underwent further refinement by the original expert panel and a new group of clinical experts. Items were tested in four studies (primarily lung cancer) and data were pooled for analysis. Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), and item response theory modeling were conducted to evaluate dimensionality. Internal consistency reliability and test-retest reliability were both evaluated. Validity was evaluated by correlating the FACIT subscale scores and measures of comparable concepts and by testing the scales' ability to distinguish people according to their overall treatment satisfaction. Two instruments were created: the FACIT TS-general (G), an overall evaluation of current treatment, and the FACIT TS-patient satisfaction (PS), a measure of patient satisfaction. CFA results were not optimal for a five-factor solution for PS. Internal consistency reliability met psychometric standards (≥0.70) for all PS subscales. Construct validity was established for the PS subscales: Physician Communication, Treatment Staff Communication, Technical Competence, Confidence and Trust, and Nurse Communication. The two instruments generated here offer a new way to assess several key dimensions of patient satisfaction with treatment, especially for people with lung cancer.

  6. HElmet therapy Assessment in infants with Deformed Skulls (HEADS: protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van Wijk Renske M

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In The Netherlands, helmet therapy is a commonly used treatment in infants with skull deformation (deformational plagiocephaly or deformational brachycephaly. However, evidence of the effectiveness of this treatment remains lacking. The HEADS study (HElmet therapy Assessment in Deformed Skulls aims to determine the effects and costs of helmet therapy compared to no helmet therapy in infants with moderate to severe skull deformation. Methods/design Pragmatic randomised controlled trial (RCT nested in a cohort study. The cohort study included infants with a positional preference and/or skull deformation at two to four months (first assessment. At 5 months of age, all children were assessed again and infants meeting the criteria for helmet therapy were asked to participate in the RCT. Participants were randomly allocated to either helmet therapy or no helmet therapy. Parents of eligible infants that do not agree with enrolment in the RCT were invited to stay enrolled for follow up in a non-randomisedrandomised controlled trial (nRCT; they were then free to make the decision to start helmet therapy or not. Follow-up assessments took place at 8, 12 and 24 months of age. The main outcome will be head shape at 24 months that is measured using plagiocephalometry. Secondary outcomes will be satisfaction of parents and professionals with the appearance of the child, parental concerns about the future, anxiety level and satisfaction with the treatment, motor development and quality of life of the infant. Finally, compliance and costs will also be determined. Discussion HEADS will be the first study presenting data from an RCT on the effectiveness of helmet therapy. Outcomes will be important for affected children and their parents, health care professionals and future treatment policies. Our findings are likely to influence the reimbursement policies of health insurance companies. Besides these health outcomes, we will be able to

  7. Simplified response monitoring criteria for multiple myeloma in patients undergoing therapy with novel agents using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabel, Christoph; Horger, Marius; Kum, Sara [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Weisel, Katja [Department of Internal Medicine II – Hematology & Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Otfried-Müller-Str. 5, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Fritz, Jan [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St., Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Ioanoviciu, Sorin D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Municipal Hospital Timisoara, Gheorghe Dima Str. 5, 300079 Timisoara (Romania); Bier, Georg, E-mail: georg.bier@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A simplified method for response monitoring of multiple myeloma is proposed. • Medullary bone lesions of all limbs were included and analysed. • Diameters of ≥2 medullary bone lesions are sufficient for therapy monitoring. - Abstract: Introduction: Multiple myeloma is a malignant hematological disorder of the mature B-cell lymphocytes originating in the bone marrow. While therapy monitoring is still mainly based on laboratory biomarkers, the additional use of imaging has been advocated due to inaccuracies of serological biomarkers or in a-secretory myelomas. Non-enhanced CT and MRI have similar sensitivities for lesions in yellow marrow-rich bone marrow cavities with a favourable risk and cost-effectiveness profile of CT. Nevertheless, these methods are still limited by frequently high numbers of medullary lesions and its time consumption for proper evaluation. Objective: To establish simplified response criteria by correlating size and CT attenuation changes of medullary multiple myeloma lesions in the appendicular skeleton with the course of lytic bone lesions in the entire skeleton. Furthermore to evaluate these criteria with respect to established hematological myeloma-specific parameters for the prediction of treatment response to bortezomib or lenalidomide. Materials and methods: Non-enhanced reduced-dose whole-body CT examinations of 78 consecutive patients (43 male, 35 female, mean age 63.69 ± 9.2 years) with stage III multiple myeloma were retrospectively re-evaluated. On per patient basis, size and mean CT attenuation of 2–4 representative lesions in the limbs were measured at baseline and at a follow-up after a mean of 8 months. Results were compared with the course of lytical bone lesions as well with that of specific hematological biomarkers. Myeloma response was assessed according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) uniform response criteria. Testing for correlation between response of medullary lesions (Resp

  8. Evaluation of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Responsiveness in Active Psoriatic Arthritis at Multiple Timepoints during the First 12 Weeks of Antitumor Necrosis Factor Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feletar, Marie; Hall, Stephen; Bird, Paul

    2016-01-01

    To assess the responsiveness of high- and low-field extremity magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) variables at multiple timepoints in the first 12 weeks post-antitumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) therapy initiation in patients with psoriatic arthritis (PsA) and active dactylitis. Twelve patients with active PsA and clinical evidence of dactylitis involving at least 1 digit were recruited. Patients underwent sequential high-field conventional (1.5 Tesla) and extremity low-field MRI (0.2 Tesla) of the affected hand or foot, pre- and postgadolinium at baseline (pre-TNF), 2 weeks (post-TNF), 6 weeks, and 12 weeks. A blinded observer scored all images on 2 occasions using the PsA MRI scoring system. Eleven patients completed the study, but only 6 patients completed all high-field and low-field MRI assessments. MRI scores demonstrated rapid response to TNF inhibition with score reduction in tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis at 2 weeks. Intraobserver reliability was good to excellent for all variables. High-field MRI demonstrated greater sensitivity to tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis and greater responsiveness to change posttreatment. Treatment responses were maintained to 12 weeks. This study demonstrates the use of MRI in detecting early response to biologic therapy. MRI variables of tenosynovitis, synovitis, and osteitis demonstrated responsiveness posttherapy with high-field scores more responsive to change than low-field scores.

  9. Contrast-Enhanced Spectral Mammography is Comparable to MRI in the Assessment of Residual Breast Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Bhavika K; Hilal, Talal; Covington, Matthew; Zhang, Nan; Kosiorek, Heidi E; Lobbes, Marc; Northfelt, Donald W; Pockaj, Barbara A

    2018-05-01

    To evaluate the performance of contrast-enhanced spectral mammography (CESM) compared to MRI in the assessment of tumor response in breast cancer patients undergoing neoadjuvant systemic therapy (NST). The institutional review board approved this study. From September 2014 to June 2017, we identified patients with pathologically confirmed invasive breast cancer who underwent NST. All patients had both CESM and MRI performed pre- and post-NST with pathological assessment after surgical management. Size of residual malignancy on post-NST CESM and MRI was compared with surgical pathology. Lin concordance and Pearson correlation coefficient were used to assess agreement. Bland-Altman plots were used to visualize the differences between tumor size on imaging and pathology. Sixty-five patients were identified. Mean age was 52.7 (range 30-76) years. Type of NST included chemotherapy in 53 (82%) and endocrine therapy in 12 (18%). Mean tumor size after NST was 14.6 (range 0-105) mm for CESM and 14.2 mm (range 0-75 mm) for MRI compared with 19.6 (range 0-100) mm on final surgical pathology. Equivalence tests demonstrated that mean tumor size measured by CESM (p = 0.009) or by MRI (p = 0.01) was equivalent to the mean tumor size measured by pathology within - 1 and 1-cm range. Comparing CESM versus MRI for assessment of complete response, the sensitivity was 95% versus 95%, specificity 66.7% versus 68.9%, positive predictive value 55.9% versus 57.6%, and negative predictive value 96.7% versus 96.9% respectively. CESM was comparable to MRI in assessing residual malignancy after completion of NST.

  10. Immunotherapy Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (iRANO): A Report of the RANO Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R.; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F.; Brandes, Alba A.; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B.; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy represents a promising area of therapy among neuro-oncology patients. However, early phase studies reveal unique challenges associated with assessment of radiological changes reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumor regression, can still occur following initial apparent progression or appearance of new lesions. Refinement of response assessment criteria for neuro-oncology patients undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. A multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describes immunotherapy response assessment for neuro-oncology (iRANO) criteria that are based on guidance for determination of tumor progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria (irRC) and the response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease (PD) within six months of initiating immunotherapy including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for use of corticosteroids. The role of advanced imaging techniques and measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurologic and immunologic functions are reviewed. The iRANO guidelines put forth herein will evolve successively to improve their utility as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. PMID:26545842

  11. What is the role of the bystander response in radionuclide therapies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darren eBrady

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Radionuclide therapy for cancer is undergoing a renaissance, with a wide range of radionuclide and clinical delivery systems currently under investigation. Dosimetry at the cellular and subcellular level is complex with inhomogeneity and incomplete targeting of all cells such that some tumour cells will receive little or no direct radiation energy. There is now sufficient preclinical evidence of a bystander response which can modulate the biology of these unirradiated cells with current research demonstrating both protective and inhibitory responses. Dependence upon fraction of irradiated cells has also been found has and the presence of functional gap junctions appears to be import for several bystander responses. The selection of either high or low LET radionuclides may be critical. While low LET radionuclides appear to have a bystander response proportional to dose, the dose-response from high LET radionuclides are more complex. In media transfer experiments a U shaped response curve has been demonstrated for high LET treatments. However this U shaped response has not been seen with co-culture experiments and its relevance remains uncertain. For high LET treatments there is a suggestion that dose rate effects may also be important with inhibitory effects noted with 125I labelling study and a stimulatory seen with 123I labelling in one study.

  12. Treatment dose-response in amblyopia therapy: the Monitored Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia Study (MOTAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Catherine E; Moseley, Merrick J; Stephens, David A; Fielder, Alistair R

    2004-09-01

    Amblyopia is the commonest visual disorder of childhood. Yet the contributions of the two principal treatments (spectacle wear and occlusion) to outcome are unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the dose-response relationship of amblyopia therapy. The study comprised three distinct phases: baseline, in which repeat measures of visual function were undertaken to confirm the initial visual deficit; refractive adaptation: an 18-week period of spectacle wear with six weekly measurements of logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) visual acuity; occlusion: in which participants were prescribed 6 hours of "patching" per day. In the latter phase, occlusion was objectively monitored and logMAR visual acuity recorded at 2-week intervals until any observed gains had ceased. Data were obtained from 94 participants (mean age, 5.1 +/- 1.4 years) with amblyopia associated with strabismus (n = 34), anisometropia (n = 23), and both anisometropia and strabismus (n = 37). Eighty-six underwent refractive adaptation. Average concordance with patching was 48%. The relationship between logMAR visual acuity gain and total occlusion dose was monotonic and linear. Increasing dose rate beyond 2 h/d hastened the response but did not improve outcome. More than 80% of the improvement during occlusion occurred within 6 weeks. Treatment outcome was significantly better for children younger than 4 years (n = 17) than in those older than 6 years (n = 24; P = 0.0014). Continuous objective monitoring of the amount of patching therapy received has provided insight into the dose-response relationship of occlusion therapy for amblyopia. Patching is most effective within the first few weeks of treatment, even for those in receipt of a relatively small dose. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural basis for the dose-response functions. Copyright Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

  13. FDG PET/CT in initial staging and early response to chemotherapy assessment of paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eugene, T.; Ansquer, C.; Oudoux, A.; Carlier, T.; Kraeber-Bodere, T.; Bodet-Milin, C.; Corradini, N.; Thomas, C.; Dupas, B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to retrospectively evaluate the impact of positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) using fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG), in comparison with conventional imaging modalities (CIM), for initial staging and early therapy assessment in paediatric rhabdomyosarcoma. Patients and methods: Prior to treatment, 18 patients (age range, 9 months to 18 years) with histologically proven rhabdomyosarcoma underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to CIM (magnetic resonance imaging of primary site, whole body CT and bone scintigraphy). After three courses of chemotherapy, 12 patients underwent FDG PET/CT in addition to CIM. RECIST criteria and visual analysis of FDG uptake were used for assessment of response. The standard of reference was determined by an interdisciplinary tumor board based on imaging material, histopathology and follow-up data (median = 5 years). Results: PET/CT sensitivity was superior to CIM's concerning lymph node involvement (100% versus 83%, respectively) and metastases detection (100% versus 50%, respectively). PET/CT results changed therapeutic management in 11% of cases. After three courses of chemotherapy, the rate of complete response was 66% with PET/CT versus 8% with CIM. Five percent of patients relapsed during follow-up (median = 5 years). Conclusion: This study confirms that PET/CT depicts important additional information in initial staging of paediatric rhabdomyosarcomas and suggests a superior prognostic value of PET/CT in early response to chemotherapy assessment. (authors)

  14. Tics as signs of catatonia: electroconvulsive therapy response in 2 men.

    Science.gov (U