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Sample records for therapy oncology group

  1. Pelvic Normal Tissue Contouring Guidelines for Radiation Therapy: A Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Consensus Panel Atlas

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    Gay, Hiram A., E-mail: hgay@radonc.wustl.edu [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Barthold, H. Joseph [Commonwealth Hematology and Oncology, Weymouth, MA (United States); Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, Boston, MA (Israel); O' Meara, Elizabeth [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Bosch, Walter R. [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); El Naqa, Issam [Department of Radiation Oncology, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Al-Lozi, Rawan [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Rosenthal, Seth A. [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); Lawton, Colleen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lee, W. Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Sandler, Howard [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Zietman, Anthony [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University School of Medicine, St Louis, MO (United States); Dawson, Laura A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Willett, Christopher [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Kachnic, Lisa A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Boston Medical Center, Boston University School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States); Jhingran, Anuja [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, FL (United States); Ryu, Janice [Radiation Oncology Centers, Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, CA (United States); and others

    2012-07-01

    Purpose: To define a male and female pelvic normal tissue contouring atlas for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) trials. Methods and Materials: One male pelvis computed tomography (CT) data set and one female pelvis CT data set were shared via the Image-Guided Therapy QA Center. A total of 16 radiation oncologists participated. The following organs at risk were contoured in both CT sets: anus, anorectum, rectum (gastrointestinal and genitourinary definitions), bowel NOS (not otherwise specified), small bowel, large bowel, and proximal femurs. The following were contoured in the male set only: bladder, prostate, seminal vesicles, and penile bulb. The following were contoured in the female set only: uterus, cervix, and ovaries. A computer program used the binomial distribution to generate 95% group consensus contours. These contours and definitions were then reviewed by the group and modified. Results: The panel achieved consensus definitions for pelvic normal tissue contouring in RTOG trials with these standardized names: Rectum, AnoRectum, SmallBowel, Colon, BowelBag, Bladder, UteroCervix, Adnexa{sub R}, Adnexa{sub L}, Prostate, SeminalVesc, PenileBulb, Femur{sub R}, and Femur{sub L}. Two additional normal structures whose purpose is to serve as targets in anal and rectal cancer were defined: AnoRectumSig and Mesorectum. Detailed target volume contouring guidelines and images are discussed. Conclusions: Consensus guidelines for pelvic normal tissue contouring were reached and are available as a CT image atlas on the RTOG Web site. This will allow uniformity in defining normal tissues for clinical trials delivering pelvic radiation and will facilitate future normal tissue complication research.

  2. The effects of group music therapy on mood states and cohesiveness in adult oncology patients.

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    Waldon, E G

    2001-01-01

    The purpose of the current investigation was to examine the efficacy of a music therapy protocol on mood states and levels of group cohesiveness in adult oncology patients. Eleven oncology patients in 2 groups (ages 30 to 84 years) took part in the study over a 10-week period of time (10 participants completed the study). During that period, participants took part in 8 music therapy sessions consisting of 2 types of interventions: (a) 4 "music making" sessions (where the mechanism for change included the process of making music) and (b) 4 "music responding" sessions (where the mechanism included the process of responding to music). The two types of music therapy sessions and their effectiveness on improving mood states and group cohesiveness were examined. The Profile of Mood States-Short Form (POMS-SF) was used to assess changes in participants' mood states. A content analysis, attendance records, and a questionnaire were used to assess levels of group cohesiveness. Results showed significant improvement in mood state scores (from presession levels to postsessions levels) after involvement in all music therapy sessions. Similar significant findings were found within each of the "music making" and "music responding" conditions but no differences were found when comparisons were made between those conditions. No statistically significant effects were found with respect to group cohesiveness measures. Study implications and future research directions are discussed.

  3. Pretreatment quality of life predicts for locoregional control in head and neck cancer patients : A radiation therapy oncology group analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Pajak, Thomas F.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Konski, Andre A.; Coyne, James C.; Gwede, Clement K.; Garden, Adam S.; Spencer, Sharon A.; Jones, Christopher; Movsas, Benjamin

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the prospectively collected health-related quality-of-life (HRQOL) data from patients enrolled in two Radiation Therapy Oncology Group randomized Phase III head and neck cancer trials (90-03 and 91-11) to assess their value as an independent prognostic factor for locoregional

  4. Accreditation and quality assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group: Multicenter clinical trials using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmerman, Robert; Galvin, James; Michalski, Jeff; Straube, William; Ibbott, Geoffrey; Martin, Elizabeth; Abdulrahman, Ramzi; Swann, Suzanne; Fowler, Jack; Choy, Hak

    2006-01-01

    Starting in 2002, the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group in North America began the process of developing multicenter prospective trials in lung cancer using Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy (SBRT). Much of the work was based on the prospective single institution trials from Indiana University that had been presented and published. In late 2004, RTOG 0236 using SBRT for medically inoperable patients with clinical stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was activated for accrual. Prior to activation, representatives from the Lung, Image-Guided Therapy, Physics, and Radiobiology Committees met on regular occasions to design the multicenter study and quality assurance measures. SBRT is not a black box, and the essence of the therapy had to be distilled via guidelines. Issues related to patient selection, method of dosimetry construction, equipment requirements, motion assessments and control, site accreditation, data exchange, and follow-up policies were worked out by compromise and consensus. RTOG 0236 has nearly completed its accrual. The Lung Committee has initiated the development of several other trials, each building on the last, to investigate the therapy in central tumors, in combinations with systemic therapy, in operable patients, and in lung metastases patients. The guidelines developed for RTOG 0236 will be refined to take advantage of more modern innovations including heterogeneity corrections and intensity modulation when appropriate. The development of RTOG 0618 using SBRT in operable patients with early stage NSCLC is a testament to both the enthusiasm from already published works and prospective multicenter clinical testing using SBRT techniques.

  5. Modern Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

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    Specht, Lena, E-mail: lena.specht@regionh.dk [Departments of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Dabaja, Bouthaina [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Primary cutaneous lymphomas are a heterogeneous group of diseases. They often remain localized, and they generally have a more indolent course and a better prognosis than lymphomas in other locations. They are highly radiosensitive, and radiation therapy is an important part of the treatment, either as the sole treatment or as part of a multimodality approach. Radiation therapy of primary cutaneous lymphomas requires the use of special techniques that form the focus of these guidelines. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group steering committee on the use of radiation therapy in primary cutaneous lymphomas in the modern era.

  6. Reliability and accuracy assessment of radiation therapy oncology group-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus contouring

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    Velde, Joris van de [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium); Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Vercauteren, Tom; Gersem, Werner de; Vandecasteele, Katrien; Vuye, Philippe; Vanpachtenbeke, Frank; Neve, Wilfried de [Ghent University, Department of Radiotherapy, Ghent (Belgium); Wouters, Johan; Herde, Katharina d' ; Kerckaert, Ingrid; Hoof, Tom van [Ghent University, Department of Anatomy, Ghent (Belgium)

    2014-07-15

    The goal of this work was to validate the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG)-endorsed guidelines for brachial plexus (BP) contouring by determining the intra- and interobserver agreement. Accuracy of the delineation process was determined using anatomically validated imaging datasets as a gold standard. Five observers delineated the right BP on three cadaver computed tomography (CT) datasets. To assess intraobserver variation, every observer repeated each delineation three times with a time interval of 2 weeks. The BP contours were divided into four regions for detailed analysis. Inter- and intraobserver variation was verified using the Computerized Environment for Radiation Research (CERR) software. Accuracy was measured using anatomically validated fused CT-magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets by measuring the BP inclusion of the delineations. The overall kappa (κ) values were rather low (mean interobserver overall κ: 0.29, mean intraobserver overall κ: 0.45), indicating poor inter- and intraobserver reliability. In general, the κ coefficient decreased gradually from the medial to lateral BP regions. The total agreement volume (TAV) was much smaller than the union volume (UV) for all delineations, resulting in a low Jaccard index (JI; interobserver agreement 0-0.124; intraobserver agreement 0.004-0.636). The overall accuracy was poor, with an average total BP inclusion of 38 %. Inclusions were insufficient for the most lateral regions (region 3: 21.5 %; region 4: 12.6 %). The inter- and intraobserver reliability of the RTOG-endorsed BP contouring guidelines was poor. BP inclusion worsened from the medial to lateral regions. Accuracy assessment of the contours showed an average BP inclusion of 38 %. For the first time, this was assessed using the original anatomically validated BP volume. The RTOG-endorsed BP guidelines have insufficient accuracy and reliability, especially for the lateral head-and-neck regions. (orig.) [German] Ziel der Studie war

  7. Dosimetric analysis of radiation therapy oncology group 0321: the importance of urethral dose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, I-Chow; Hunt, Daniel; Straube, William; Pouliot, Jean; Cunha, Adam; Krishnamurthy, Devan; Sandler, Howard

    2014-01-01

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0321 is the first multi-institutional cooperative group high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy trial with complete digital brachytherapy dosimetry data. This is a descriptive report of the data and an analysis of toxicity. Patients are treated with external beam radiation therapy at 45 Gy and 1 HDR implant with 19 Gy in 2 fractions. Implants are done with transrectal ultrasound guidance, and computed tomography (CT)-compatible nonmetallic catheters. HDR planning is done on ≤3-mm-thick CT slices. The "mean DVH" (dose-volume histogram) of the planning target volume (PTV), implanted volume (IP), and organs at risk are calculated. This includes the mean and standard deviation (SD) of the volume at 10-percentage-point intervals from 10% to 200% of the prescribed dose. The conformal index (COIN), homogeneity index (HI), catheters per implant, and patients per institution are calculated. Multivariate analysis and hazard ratios calculation of all the variables against reported grade ≥2 (G2+) genitourinary (GU) adverse events (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3) are performed. Dosimetry data are based on 122 eligible patients from 14 institutions. The mean of PTV, IP, catheters per implant, and patients per institution are 54 cc, 63 cc, 19 and 9, respectively. The mean of %V100PTV, V80Bladder, V80Rectum, and V120Urethra were 94%, 0.40 cc, 0.15 cc, and 0.25 cc, respectively. There are too few G2+ gastrointestinal adverse event (GI AE) for correlative analysis; thus, the analysis has been performed on the more common G2+ GU AE. There are positive correlations noted between both acute and late G2+ GU AE and urethral dose at multiple levels. Positive correlations with late AE are seen with PTV and IP at high-dose levels. A negative correlation is seen between HI and acute AE. A higher patient accrual rate is associated with a lower rate of G2+ acute and late AE. Higher urethral dose, larger high-dose volumes, and

  8. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

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    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  9. The association between timing of initiation of adjuvant therapy and the survival of early stage ovarian cancer patients - An analysis of NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, John K; Java, James J; Fuh, Katherine; Monk, Bradley J; Kapp, Daniel S; Herzog, Thomas; Bell, Jeffrey; Young, Robert

    2016-12-01

    To determine the association between timing of adjuvant therapy initiation and survival of early stage ovarian cancer patients. Data were obtained from women who underwent primary surgical staging followed by adjuvant therapy from two Gynecologic Oncology Group trials (protocols # 95 and 157). Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox proportional hazards model adjusted for covariates were used for analyses. Of 497 stage I-II epithelial ovarian cancer patients, the median time between surgery and initiation of adjuvant therapy was 23days (25th-75th%: 12-33days). The time interval from surgery to initiation of adjuvant therapy was categorized into three groups: 4weeks. The corresponding 5-year recurrence-free survival rates were 72.8%, 73.9%, and 79.5% (p=0.62). The 5-year overall survival rates were 79.4%, 81.9%, and 82.8%, respectively (p=0.51; p=0.33 - global test). As compared to 4weeks. Age, stage, grade, and cytology were important prognostic factors. Timing of adjuvant therapy initiation was not associated with survival in early stage epithelial ovarian cancer patients. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modern Radiation Therapy for Extranodal Lymphomas: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

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    Yahalom, Joachim, E-mail: yahalomj@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California (United States); Li, Ye-Xiong [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cancer Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing (China); Tsang, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Wirth, Andrew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St. Andrews Place, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2015-05-01

    Extranodal lymphomas (ENLs) comprise about a third of all non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL). Radiation therapy (RT) is frequently used as either primary therapy (particularly for indolent ENL), consolidation after systemic therapy, salvage treatment, or palliation. The wide range of presentations of ENL, involving any organ in the body and the spectrum of histological sub-types, poses a challenge both for routine clinical care and for the conduct of prospective and retrospective studies. This has led to uncertainty and lack of consistency in RT approaches between centers and clinicians. Thus far there is a lack of guidelines for the use of RT in the management of ENL. This report presents an effort by the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) to harmonize and standardize the principles of treatment of ENL, and to address the technical challenges of simulation, volume definition and treatment planning for the most frequently involved organs. Specifically, detailed recommendations for RT volumes are provided. We have applied the same modern principles of involved site radiation therapy as previously developed and published as guidelines for Hodgkin lymphoma and nodal NHL. We have adopted RT volume definitions based on the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU), as has been widely adopted by the field of radiation oncology for solid tumors. Organ-specific recommendations take into account histological subtype, anatomy, the treatment intent, and other treatment modalities that may be have been used before RT.

  11. Epigenomic characterization of locally advanced anal cancer: a radiation therapy oncology group 98-11 specimen study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Erin M; Eschrich, Steven; Winter, Kathryn; Riggs, Bridget; Berglund, Anders; Ajidahun, Abidemi; Simko, Jeff; Moughan, Jennifer; Ajani, Jaffer; Magliocco, Anthony; Elahi, Abul; Hoffe, Sarah; Shibata, David

    2014-08-01

    The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-11 clinical trial demonstrated the superiority of standard 5-fluorouracil/mitomycin-C over 5-fluorouracil/cisplatin in combination with radiation in the treatment of anal squamous cell cancer. Tumor size (>5 cm) and lymph node metastases are associated with disease progression. There may be key molecular differences (eg, DNA methylation changes) in tumors at high risk for progression. The objectives of this study were to determine whether there are differences in DNA methylation at individual CpG sites and within genes among locally advanced anal cancers, with large tumor size and/or nodal involvement, compared with those that are less advanced. This was a case-case study among 121 patients defined as high risk (tumor size >5 cm and/or nodal involvement; n = 59) or low risk (≤5 cm, node negative; n = 62) within the mitomycin-C arm of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 98-11 trial. DNA methylation was measured using the Illumina HumanMethylation450 Array. The study was conducted in a tertiary care cancer center in collaboration with a national clinical trials cooperative group. The patients consisted of 74 women and 47 men with a median age of 54 years (range, 25-79 years). DNA methylation differences at individual CpG sites and within genes between low- and high-risk patients were compared using the Mann-Whitney test (p Epigenetic events likely play a significant role in the progression of anal cancer and may serve as potential biomarkers.

  12. Fast Neutron Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer. Final Report of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Clinical Trial.

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    Laramore, G. E. [Washington U.; Krall, J. M. [Unlisted, US, PA; Thomas, F. J. [Unlisted, US, OH; Russell, K. J. [Washington U.; Maor, M. H. [Unlisted, US, TX; Hendrickson, F. R. [Fermilab; Martz, K. L. [Unlisted, US, PA; Griffin, T. W. [Washington U.

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1977 and April 1983 the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) sponsored a Phase III randomized trial investigating the use of fast neutron radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced (Stages C and D1) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional photon radiation or fast neutron radiation used in a mixed-beam (neutron/photon) treatment schedule. A total of 91 analyzable patients were entered into the study, and the two patient groups were balanced with respect to the major prognostic variables. Actuarial curves are presented for local/regional control and "overall" survival. Ten-year results for clinically assessed local control are 70% for the mixed-beam group versus 58% for the photon group (p = 0.03) and for survival are 46% for the mixed-beam group versus 29% for the photon group (p = 0.04). This study suggests that a regional method of treatment can influence both local tumor control and survival in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland.

  13. Modern Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma: Field and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG)

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    Specht, Lena, E-mail: lena.specht@regionh.dk [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Illidge, Tim [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, Christie Hospital NHS Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology and PET Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Pediatrics, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Eich, Hans Theodor [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Münster (Germany); Girinsky, Theodore [Department of Radiation Oncology, Institut Gustave-Roussy, Villejuif (France); Hoppe, Richard T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California (United States); Mauch, Peter [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Mikhaeel, N. George [Department of Clinical Oncology and Radiotherapy, Guy' s and St Thomas' NHS Foundation Trust, London (United Kingdom); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2014-07-15

    use of ISRT has not yet been validated in a formal study, it is more conservative than INRT, accounting for suboptimal information and appropriately designed for safe local disease control. The goal of modern smaller field radiation therapy is to reduce both treatment volume and treatment dose while maintaining efficacy and minimizing acute and late sequelae. This review is a consensus of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) Steering Committee regarding the modern approach to RT in the treatment of HL, outlining a new concept of ISRT in which reduced treatment volumes are planned for the effective control of involved sites of HL. Nodal and extranodal non-Hodgkin lymphomas (NHL) are covered separately by ILROG guidelines.

  14. Radiation Therapy for Primary Cutaneous Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma: An International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group Multi-institutional Experience

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    Million, Lynn, E-mail: lmillion@stanford.edu [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Yi, Esther J.; Wu, Frank; Von Eyben, Rie [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Campbell, Belinda A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Cancer Imaging, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne (Australia); Dabaja, Bouthaina [The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Tsang, Richard W. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Department of Therapeutic Radiology/Radiation Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, Yale Cancer Center, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Turin, Turin (Italy); Kirova, Youlia [Institut Curie, Paris (France); Hoppe, Richard T. [Stanford Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: To collect response rates of primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma, a rare cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, to radiation therapy (RT), and to determine potential prognostic factors predictive of outcome. Methods and Materials: The study was a retrospective analysis of patients with primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma who received RT as primary therapy or after surgical excision. Data collected include initial stage of disease, RT modality (electron/photon), total dose, fractionation, response to treatment, and local recurrence. Radiation therapy was delivered at 8 participating International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group institutions worldwide. Results: Fifty-six patients met the eligibility criteria, and 63 tumors were treated: head and neck (27%), trunk (14%), upper extremities (27%), and lower extremities (32%). Median tumor size was 2.25 cm (range, 0.6-12 cm). T classification included T1, 40 patients (71%); T2, 12 patients (21%); and T3, 4 patients (7%). The median radiation dose was 35 Gy (range, 6-45 Gy). Complete clinical response (CCR) was achieved in 60 of 63 tumors (95%) and partial response in 3 tumors (5%). After CCR, 1 tumor recurred locally (1.7%) after 36 Gy and 7 months after RT. This was the only patient to die of disease. Conclusions: Primary cutaneous anaplastic large cell lymphoma is a rare, indolent cutaneous lymphoma with a low death rate. This analysis, which was restricted to patients selected for treatment with radiation, indicates that achieving CCR was independent of radiation dose. Because there were too few failures (<2%) for statistical analysis on dose response, 30 Gy seems to be adequate for local control, and even lower doses may suffice.

  15. Radiation Therapy Planning for Early-Stage Hodgkin Lymphoma: Experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

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    Maraldo, Maja V., E-mail: dra.maraldo@gmail.com [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Dabaja, Bouthaina S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Filippi, Andrea R. [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Illidge, Tim [Department of Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Tsang, Richard [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ricardi, Umberto [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Petersen, Peter M.; Schut, Deborah A. [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark); Garcia, John [Department of Radiation Oncology, MD Anderson Cancer Center, Texas (United States); Headley, Jayne [Department of Oncology, Christie Hospital, Manchester (United Kingdom); Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Ragona, Riccardo [Department of Oncology, University of Torino School of Medicine, Torino (Italy); Specht, Lena [Departments of Clinical Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Methods: Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Results: Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. Conclusions: RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs.

  16. Radiation therapy planning for early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma: experience of the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maraldo, Maja V; Dabaja, Bouthaina S; Filippi, Andrea R; Illidge, Tim; Tsang, Richard; Ricardi, Umberto; Petersen, Peter M; Schut, Deborah A; Garcia, John; Headley, Jayne; Parent, Amy; Guibord, Benoit; Ragona, Riccardo; Specht, Lena

    2015-05-01

    Early-stage Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) is a rare disease, and the location of lymphoma varies considerably between patients. Here, we evaluate the variability of radiation therapy (RT) plans among 5 International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) centers with regard to beam arrangements, planning parameters, and estimated doses to the critical organs at risk (OARs). Ten patients with stage I-II classic HL with masses of different sizes and locations were selected. On the basis of the clinical information, 5 ILROG centers were asked to create RT plans to a prescribed dose of 30.6 Gy. A postchemotherapy computed tomography scan with precontoured clinical target volume (CTV) and OARs was provided for each patient. The treatment technique and planning methods were chosen according to each center's best practice in 2013. Seven patients had mediastinal disease, 2 had axillary disease, and 1 had disease in the neck only. The median age at diagnosis was 34 years (range, 21-74 years), and 5 patients were male. Of the resulting 50 treatment plans, 15 were planned with volumetric modulated arc therapy (1-4 arcs), 16 with intensity modulated RT (3-9 fields), and 19 with 3-dimensional conformal RT (2-4 fields). The variations in CTV-to-planning target volume margins (5-15 mm), maximum tolerated dose (31.4-40 Gy), and plan conformity (conformity index 0-3.6) were significant. However, estimated doses to OARs were comparable between centers for each patient. RT planning for HL is challenging because of the heterogeneity in size and location of disease and, additionally, to the variation in choice of treatment techniques and field arrangements. Adopting ILROG guidelines and implementing universal dose objectives could further standardize treatment techniques and contribute to lowering the dose to the surrounding OARs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Effect of obesity on prostate-specific antigen recurrence after radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer as measured by the 2006 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology (RTOG-ASTRO) Phoenix consensus definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroup, Sean P; Cullen, Jennifer; Auge, Brian K; L'Esperance, James O; Kang, Song K

    2007-09-01

    Given the limited data regarding the impact of obesity on treatment outcomes after external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) for the definitive treatment of prostate cancer, the authors sought to evaluate the effect of obesity as measured by body mass index (BMI) on biochemical disease recurrence (BCR) using the most current 2006 Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology (RTOG-ASTRO) Phoenix consensus definition (prostate-specific antigen [PSA] nadir + 2 ng/mL). A retrospective cohort study identified men who underwent primary EBRT for localized prostate cancer between 1989 and 2003 using the Center for Prostate Disease Research (CPDR) Multi-center National Database. BMI was calculated (in kg/m(2)) and the data were analyzed. Univariate and multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to determine whether BMI significantly predicted BCR. Of the 1868 eligible patients, 399 (21%) were obese. The median age of the patients and pretreatment PSA level were 70.2 years and 8.2 ng/mL, respectively. Of 1320 patients for whom data were available with which to calculate PSA recurrence (PSA nadir + 2 ng/mL), a total of 554 men (42.0%) experienced BCR. On univariate analysis, BMI was found to be an independent predictor of PSA recurrence (P = .02), as was race, pretreatment PSA level, EBRT dose, clinical T classification, Gleason score, PSA nadir, and the use of androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT). On multivariate analysis, BMI remained a significant predictor of BCR (P = .008). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first study to report the association between obesity and BCR after EBRT for localized prostate cancer as measured by the updated 2006 RTOG-ASTRO definition. A higher BMI is associated with greater odds of BCR after undergoing definitive EBRT.

  18. Intensity-Modulated Radiation Therapy With or Without Chemotherapy for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase II Trial 0225

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nancy; Harris, Jonathan; Garden, Adam S.; Straube, William; Glisson, Bonnie; Xia, Ping; Bosch, Walter; Morrison, William H.; Quivey, Jeanne; Thorstad, Wade; Jones, Christopher; Ang, K. Kian

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the feasibility of intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with or without chemotherapy, and to assess toxicities, failure patterns, and survivals in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Patients and Methods Radiation consisted of 70 Gy given to the planning target volumes of primary tumor plus any N+ disease and 59.4 Gy given to subclinical disease, delivered over 33 treatment days. Patients with stage T2b or greater or with N+ disease also received concurrent cisplatin (100 mg/m2) on days 1, 22, and 43 followed by adjuvant cisplatin (80 mg/m2) on day 1; fluorouracil (1,000 mg/m2/d) on days 1 through 4 administered every 4 weeks for three cycles. Tumor, clinical status, and acute/late toxicities were assessed. The primary objective was to test the transportability of IMRT to a multi-institutional setting. Results Between February 2003 and November 2005, 68 patients with stages I through IVB NPC (of which 93.8% were WHO types 2 and 3) were enrolled. Prescribed IMRT (target delineation) was given to 83.8%, whereas 64.9% received chemotherapy per protocol. The estimated 2-year local progression-free (PF), regional PF, locoregional PF, and distant metastasis–free rates were 92.6%, 90.8%, 89.3%, and 84.7%, respectively. The estimated 2-year PF and overall survivals were 72.7% and 80.2%, respectively. Acute grade 4 mucositis occurred in 4.4%, and the worst late grade 3 toxicities were as follows: esophagus, 4.7%; mucous membranes, 3.1%; and xerostomia, 3.1%. The rate of grade 2 xerostomia at 1 year from start of IMRT was 13.5%. Only two patients complained of grade 3 xerostomia, and none had grade 4 xerostomia. Conclusion It was feasible to transport IMRT with or without chemotherapy in the treatment of NPC to a multi-institutional setting with 90% LRPF rate reproducing excellent reports from single institutions. Minimal grade 3 and lack of grade 4 xerostomia were encouraging. PMID:19564532

  19. Phase 2 Study of Temozolomide-Based Chemoradiation Therapy for High-Risk Low-Grade Gliomas: Preliminary Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0424

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fisher, Barbara J., E-mail: barbara.fisher@lhsc.on.ca [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Hu, Chen [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group-Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Macdonald, David R. [London Regional Cancer Program, London, Ontario (Canada); Lesser, Glenn J. [Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Coons, Stephen W. [Barrow Neurological Institute, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Brachman, David G. [Arizona Oncology Services Foundation, Phoenix, Arizona (United States); Ryu, Samuel [Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Liu, Junfeng [GCE Solutions, Inc., Bloomington, Illinois (United States); Chakravarti, Arnab [The Ohio State University, The James, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Mehta, Minesh [University of Maryland Medical Systems, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 0424 was a phase 2 study of a high-risk low-grade glioma (LGG) population who were treated with temozolomide (TMZ) and radiation therapy (RT), and outcomes were compared to those of historical controls. This study was designed to detect a 43% increase in median survival time (MST) from 40.5 to 57.9 months and a 20% improvement in 3-year overall survival (OS) rate from 54% to 65% at a 10% significance level (1-sided) and 96% power. Methods and Materials: Patients with LGGs with 3 or more risk factors for recurrence (age ≥40 years, astrocytoma histology, bihemispherical tumor, preoperative tumor diameter of ≥6 cm, or a preoperative neurological function status of >1) were treated with RT (54 Gy in 30 fractions) and concurrent and adjuvant TMZ. Results: From 2005 to 2009, 129 evaluable patients (75 males and 54 females) were accrued. Median age was 49 years; 91% had a Zubrod score of 0 or 1; and 69%, 25%, and 6% of patients had 3, 4, and 5 risk factors, respectively. Patients had median and minimum follow-up examinations of 4.1 years and 3 years, respectively. The 3-year OS rate was 73.1% (95% confidence interval: 65.3%-80.8%), which was significantly improved compared to that of prespecified historical control values (P<.001). Median survival time has not yet been reached. Three-year progression-free survival was 59.2%. Grades 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 43% and 10% of patients, respectively. One patient died of herpes encephalitis. Conclusions: The 3-year OS rate of 73.1% for RTOG 0424 high-risk LGG patients is higher than that reported for historical controls (P<.001) and the study-hypothesized rate of 65%.

  20. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Illidge, Tim; Specht, Lena; Yahalom, Joachim

    2014-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning...... tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles...... of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT...

  1. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenthal, Seth A; Hunt, Daniel; Sartor, A Oliver; Pienta, Kenneth J; Gomella, Leonard; Grignon, David; Rajan, Raghu; Kerlin, Kevin J; Jones, Christopher U; Dobelbower, Michael; Shipley, William U; Zeitzer, Kenneth; Hamstra, Daniel A; Donavanik, Viroon; Rotman, Marvin; Hartford, Alan C; Michalski, Jeffrey; Seider, Michael; Kim, Harold; Kuban, Deborah A; Moughan, Jennifer; Sandler, Howard

    2015-10-01

    Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥ 7 or clinical stage ≥ T2 and GS ≥ 8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for the feasibility of clinical trial accrual and tolerability using CT for PCa

  2. Role of music therapy in integrative oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magill, Lucanne

    2006-01-01

    Music therapy is an evidence-based complementary therapy that enhances quality of life in cancer patients and their caregivers. The role of music therapy in integrative oncology encompassed care and treatment of patients and family members , ongoing collaboration with the health care team, and the provision of music therapy services that may benefit the cancer center community. Clinical work includes ongoing assessment and the implementation of specific music therapy techniques aimed at reducing challenging symptoms and enhancing overall well-being and quality of life. This article outlines music therapy methods and the role that the music therapist has in integrative oncology programs.

  3. Guidelines for the use of long-term central venous catheter in children with hemato-oncological disorders. On behalf of supportive therapy working group of Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology (AIEOP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carraro, F; Cicalese, M P; Cesaro, S; De Santis, R; Zanazzo, G; Tornesello, A; Giordano, P; Bergadano, A; Giacchino, M

    2013-10-01

    In the last 30 years, the use of long-term central venous catheters (CVC) is increased especially for children with hemato-oncological disorders. However, the use of CVC is associated to complications, as mechanical accidents, thrombosis, and infections that can determine a prolongation of hospital stay, an increase of costs, and sometimes life-threatening conditions that require urgent systemic treatment or CVC removal. CVC removal may be troublesome especially in neonates, infants, or any other "highly needed CVC patients"; in these selected cases, the prevention and treatment of CVC-related complications play a pivotal role and specific surveillance programs are crucial. While extensive literature is focused on CVC management in adults, no guidelines are available for children. To this aim, the first recommendations for the management of CVC infectious complication in pediatric age have been written after pediatric and adult literature review and collegial discussion among members of Supportive Therapy working group of Italian Association of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology. Compared to the adult age, the necessity of peripheral vein cultures for the diagnosis of CVC-related infection remains controversial in children because of the poorer venous asset and a conservative, pharmacologically focused management through CVC remains mandatory, with CVC removal to be performed only in selected cases.

  4. Modern Radiation Therapy for Nodal Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma—Target Definition and Dose Guidelines From the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Illidge, Tim, E-mail: Tim.Illidge@ics.manchester.ac.uk [Institute of Cancer Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester Academic Health Sciences Centre, The Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Specht, Lena [Department of Oncology and Hematology, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Yahalom, Joachim [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Aleman, Berthe [Department of Radiotherapy, The Netherlands Cancer Institute, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Berthelsen, Anne Kiil [Department of Radiation Oncology and PET Centre, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen (Denmark); Constine, Louis [Departments of Radiation Oncology and Pediatrics, James P. Wilmot Cancer Center, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Dabaja, Bouthaina [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Dharmarajan, Kavita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Ng, Andrea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women' s Hospital and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard University, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Ricardi, Umberto [Radiation Oncology Unit, Department of Oncology, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Wirth, Andrew [Division of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Institute, St. Andrews Place, East Melbourne (Australia)

    2014-05-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) is the most effective single modality for local control of non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and is an important component of therapy for many patients. Many of the historic concepts of dose and volume have recently been challenged by the advent of modern imaging and RT planning tools. The International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG) has developed these guidelines after multinational meetings and analysis of available evidence. The guidelines represent an agreed consensus view of the ILROG steering committee on the use of RT in NHL in the modern era. The roles of reduced volume and reduced doses are addressed, integrating modern imaging with 3-dimensional planning and advanced techniques of RT delivery. In the modern era, in which combined-modality treatment with systemic therapy is appropriate, the previously applied extended-field and involved-field RT techniques that targeted nodal regions have now been replaced by limiting the RT to smaller volumes based solely on detectable nodal involvement at presentation. A new concept, involved-site RT, defines the clinical target volume. For indolent NHL, often treated with RT alone, larger fields should be considered. Newer treatment techniques, including intensity modulated RT, breath holding, image guided RT, and 4-dimensional imaging, should be implemented, and their use is expected to decrease significantly the risk for normal tissue damage while still achieving the primary goal of local tumor control.

  5. Insufficiency Fractures After Pelvic Radiation Therapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer: An Analysis of Subjects in a Prospective Multi-institutional Trial, and Cooperative Study of the Japan Radiation Oncology Group (JAROG) and Japanese Radiation Oncology Study Group (JROSG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokumaru, Sunao, E-mail: tokumaru@cc.saga-u.ac.jp [Department of Heavy Particle Therapy and Radiation Oncology, Saga University, Saga (Japan); Toita, Takafumi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, University of the Ryukyus, Okinawa (Japan); Oguchi, Masahiko [Radiation Oncology Department, Cancer Institute Hospital, Japanese Foundation for Cancer Research, Tokyo (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kato, Shingo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Niibe, Yuzuru [Department of Radiology, School of Medicine, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Kazumoto, Tomoko [Department of Radiology, Saitama Cancer Center, Saitama (Japan); Kodaira, Takeshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Aichi Cancer Center, Nagoya (Japan); Kataoka, Masaaki [Department of Radiology, National Shikoku Cancer Center, Matsuyama (Japan); Shikama, Naoto [Department of Radiation Oncology, Saitama Medical University, International Medical Center, Saitama (Japan); Kenjo, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamauchi, Chikako [Department of Radiation Oncology, Shiga Medical Center for Adults, Moriyama (Japan); Suzuki, Osamu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka Medical Center for Cancer, Osaka (Japan); Sakurai, Hideyuki [Proton Medical Research Center and Tsukuba University, Tuskuba (Japan); Teshima, Teruki [Department of Medical Physics and Engineering, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, Suita (Japan); Kagami, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiology, Showa University School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gunma University, Graduate School of Medicine, Maebashi (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Graduate School of Medicine, Kyoto (Japan); and others

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To investigate pelvic insufficiency fractures (IF) after definitive pelvic radiation therapy for early-stage uterine cervical cancer, by analyzing subjects of a prospective, multi-institutional study. Materials and Methods: Between September 2004 and July 2007, 59 eligible patients were analyzed. The median age was 73 years (range, 37-84 years). The International Federation of Gynecologic Oncology and Obstetrics stages were Ib1 in 35, IIa in 12, and IIb in 12 patients. Patients were treated with the constant method, which consisted of whole-pelvic external-beam radiation therapy of 50 Gy/25 fractions and high-dose-rate intracavitary brachytherapy of 24 Gy/4 fractions without chemotherapy. After radiation therapy the patients were evaluated by both pelvic CT and pelvic MRI at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. Diagnosis of IF was made when the patients had both CT and MRI findings, neither recurrent tumor lesions nor traumatic histories. The CT findings of IF were defined as fracture lines or sclerotic linear changes in the bones, and MRI findings of IF were defined as signal intensity changes in the bones, both on T1- and T2-weighted images. Results: The median follow-up was 24 months. The 2-year pelvic IF cumulative occurrence rate was 36.9% (21 patients). Using Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0, grade 1, 2, and 3 IF were seen in 12 (21%), 6 (10%), and 3 patients (5%), respectively. Sixteen patients had multiple fractures, so IF were identified at 44 sites. The pelvic IF were frequently seen at the sacroileal joints (32 sites, 72%). Nine patients complained of pain. All patients' pains were palliated by rest or non-narcotic analgesic drugs. Higher age (>70 years) and low body weight (<50 kg) were thought to be risk factors for pelvic IF (P=.007 and P=.013, Cox hazard test). Conclusions: Cervical cancer patients with higher age and low body weight may be at some risk for the development of pelvic IF after pelvic radiation therapy.

  6. Prevalence of systemic anticancer therapy for patients within the last 30 days of life: experience in a private hospital oncology group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wein, L; Rowe, C; Brady, B; Handolias, D; Lipton, L; Pook, D; Stanley, R; Haines, I

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, there has been a significant increase in the number of cancer treatments that have become available. However, it has remained difficult to choose the most appropriate time to cease active therapy in individual patients. To determine the proportion of patients being treated with palliative intent who received systemic anticancer treatment in the last 30 days of life. This is a retrospective cohort study conducted within the Melbourne Oncology Group at Cabrini Hospital. Patients managed with palliative intent who died between 1 January 2014 and 30 June 2014 were included. Outcomes measured were the percentage of patients who received systemic anticancer treatment in the last 30 days of life, palliative care referral status, Emergency Department presentations, hospital admissions and place of death. A total of 80 patients was included in the study. Of these patients, 21 (26%) received systemic anticancer treatment in the last 30 days of life. There was no statistically significant difference between patients who received treatment in the last month of life and those who did not in terms of the number of patients who were referred to palliative care, presented to an Emergency Department, were admitted to hospital or died in an acute ward. Although over a quarter of patients dying from advanced cancer received anticancer treatment in the last month of life, these patients did not present acutely to hospital more often and had the same extent of palliative care team involvement. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  7. Predictive Factor Analysis of Response-Adapted Radiation Therapy for Chemotherapy-Sensitive Pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma: Analysis of the Children's Oncology Group AHOD 0031 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charpentier, Anne-Marie [Department of Radiation Oncology, Centre hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Friedman, Debra L. [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Wolden, Suzanne [Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Schwartz, Cindy [Division of Pediatrics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gill, Bethany; Sykes, Jenna; Albert-Green, Alisha [Biostatistics, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University Health Network, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Kelly, Kara M. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Women & Children' s Hospital of Buffalo, Buffalo, New York (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, New York (United States); Constine, Louis S. [Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, University of Toronto, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate whether clinical risk factors could further distinguish children with intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) with rapid early and complete anatomic response (RER/CR) who benefit significantly from involved-field RT (IFRT) from those who do not, and thereby aid refinement of treatment selection. Methods and Materials: Children with intermediate-risk HL treated on the Children's Oncology Group AHOD 0031 trial who achieved RER/CR with 4 cycles of chemotherapy, and who were randomized to 21-Gy IFRT or no additional therapy (n=716) were the subject of this study. Recursive partitioning analysis was used to identify factors associated with clinically and statistically significant improvement in event-free survival (EFS) after randomization to IFRT. Bootstrap sampling was used to evaluate the robustness of the findings. Result: Although most RER/CR patients did not benefit significantly from IFRT, those with a combination of anemia and bulky limited-stage disease (n=190) had significantly better 4-year EFS with the addition of IFRT (89.3% vs 77.9% without IFRT; P=.019); this benefit was consistently reproduced in bootstrap analyses and after adjusting for other prognostic factors. Conclusion: Although most patients achieving RER/CR had favorable outcomes with 4 cycles of chemotherapy alone, those children with initial bulky stage I/II disease and anemia had significantly better EFS with the addition of IFRT as part of combined-modality therapy. Further work evaluating the interaction of clinical and biologic factors and imaging response is needed to further optimize and refine treatment selection.

  8. Ki-67 Is an Independent Predictor of Metastasis and Cause-Specific Mortality for Prostate Cancer Patients Treated on Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verhoven, Bret [University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Yan, Yan [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ritter, Mark, E-mail: ritter@humonc.wisc.edu [University of Wisconsin Carbone Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Khor, Li-Yan [Case Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hammond, Elizabeth [LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jones, Christopher [Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Amin, Mahul [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Bahary, Jean-Paul [Centre Hospitalier de l' Université de Montréal-Notre Dame, Montreal, Ontario (Canada); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Pollack, Alan [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States)

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: The association of Ki-67 staining index (Ki67-SI) with overall survival (OS), disease-specific mortality (DSM), distant metastasis (DM), and biochemical failure (BF) was examined in men with favorable- to intermediate-risk prostate cancer receiving radiation therapy (RT) alone or with short-term androgen deprivation (ADT) in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) 94-08. Methods and Materials: 468 patients (23.6%) on RTOG 94-08 had sufficient tissue for Ki67-SI analysis. The median follow-up time was 7.9 years. Ki67-SI was determined by immunohistochemistry and quantified manually and by image analysis. Correlative analysis versus clinical outcome was performed using the third quartile (≥Q3) cutpoint. A proportional hazards multivariable analysis (MVA) dichotomized covariates in accordance with trial stratification and randomization criteria. Results: In MVAs adjusted for all treatment covariates, high Ki67-SI (≥Q3) was correlated with increased DSM (hazard ratio [HR] 2.48, P=.03), DM (HR 3.5, P=.002), and BF (HR 3.55, P<.0001). MVA revealed similar Ki67-associated hazard ratios in each separate treatment arm for DSM, DM, and BF; these reached significance only for DM in the RT-alone arm and for BF in both arms. Ki67-SI was not a significant predictor of intraprostatic recurrence assessed by repeated biopsy 2 years after treatment. Patients with a high or low Ki67-SI seemed to experience a similar relative benefit from the addition of ADT to radiation. Conclusions: High Ki67-SI independently predicts for increased DSM, DM, and protocol BF in primarily intermediate-risk prostate cancer patients treated with RT with or without ADT on RTOG 94-08 but does not predict for local recurrence or for increased relative benefit from ADT. This and prior studies lend support for the use of Ki67-SI as a stratification factor in future trials.

  9. Family life events in the first year of acute lymphoblastic leukemia therapy: a children's oncology group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Samantha; Lu, Xiaomin; Balsamo, Lyn; Devidas, Meenakshi; Winick, Naomi; Hunger, Stephen P; Carroll, William; Stork, Linda; Maloney, Kelly; Kadan-Lottick, Nina

    2014-12-01

    Despite higher cure rates, childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) may continue to result in considerable family strain. We sought to (i) measure incidence of divorce, reduced career opportunities, changes to work hours, home relocation, and changes to family planning at one year after ALL diagnosis; and (ii) Identify family and patient factors associated with these events. We conducted a prospective cohort study of 159 children with average risk-ALL enrolled and treated on COG protocol AALL0331 at 31 selected sites. Eligibility criteria included age ≥2 years and English or Spanish comprehension. Parents completed surveys at three time points during the first 12 months of therapy. Parents were at significantly increased risk of loss of employment (46% vs. 9.1%, P ≤ 0.001) than peers nationally. 13% divorced/separated, 27% relocated homes, 22% decided not to have more children, 51% declined occupational opportunities, and 68% decreased work hours. In adjusted analyses, relocation correlated with less maternal education (OR: 4.27 [95% CI: 1.43-12.82]). Declining parental opportunities associated with family income children correlated with smaller family size 2-3 versus 4-5 (OR: 3.62 [95% CI: 1.10-11.96]). Families experience a high incidence of major life changes in the first year of ALL treatment. Understanding these burdens helps health care providers to provide appropriate anticipatory guidance and support. No unifying factor was associated with the different family events. Ongoing follow-up is planned to measure long-term outcomes. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. RECQ1 A159C Polymorphism Is Associated With Overall Survival of Patients With Resected Pancreatic Cancer: A Replication Study in NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Donghui, E-mail: dli@mdanderson.org [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Crane, Christopher [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Hoffman, John P. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Abrams, Ross A. [Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, Illinois (United States); Safran, Howard [Brown University Oncology Group, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Liu, Chang; Chang, Ping [Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Freedman, Gary M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Winter, Kathryn A. [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Guha, Chandan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Abbruzzese, James L. [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2016-03-01

    Purpose: To confirm whether a previously observed association between RECQ1 A159C variant and clinical outcome of resectable pancreatic cancer patients treated with preoperative chemoradiation is reproducible in another patient population prospectively treated with postoperative chemoradiation. Methods and Materials: Patients were selected, according to tissue availability, from eligible patients with resected pancreatic cancer who were enrolled on the NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9704 trial of 5-fluorouacil (5-FU)-based chemoradiation preceded and followed by 5-FU or gemcitabine. Deoxyribonucleic acid was extracted from paraffin-embedded tissue sections, and genotype was determined using the Taqman method. The correlation between genotype and overall survival was analyzed using a Kaplan-Meier plot, log-rank test, and multivariate Cox proportional hazards models. Results: In the 154 of the study's 451 eligible patients with evaluable tissue, genotype distribution followed Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium (ie, 37% had genotype AA, 43% AC, and 20% CC). The RECQ1 variant AC/CC genotype carriers were associated with being node positive compared with the AA carrier (P=.03). The median survival times (95% confidence interval [CI]) for AA, AC, and CC carriers were 20.6 (16.3-26.1), 18.8 (14.2-21.6), and 14.2 (10.3-21.0) months, respectively. On multivariate analysis, patients with the AC/CC genotypes were associated with worse survival than patients with the AA genotype (hazard ratio [HR] 1.54, 95% CI 1.07-2.23, P=.022). This result seemed slightly stronger for patients on the 5-FU arm (n=82) (HR 1.64, 95% CI 0.99-2.70, P=.055) than for patients on the gemcitabine arm (n=72, HR 1.46, 95% CI 0.81-2.63, P=.21). Conclusions: Results of this study suggest that the RECQ1 A159C genotype may be a prognostic or predictive factor for resectable pancreatic cancer patients who are treated with adjuvant 5-FU before and after 5-FU-based chemoradiation. Further study is

  11. Metabolic Tumor Volume as a Prognostic Imaging-Based Biomarker for Head-and-Neck Cancer: Pilot Results From Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0522

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    Schwartz, David L., E-mail: david.schwartz@utsw.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern School of Medicine, Dallas, Texas (United States); Harris, Jonathan [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Yao, Min [Department of Radiation Oncology, Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Rosenthal, David I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Opanowski, Adam; Levering, Anthony [American College of Radiology Imaging Network, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ang, K. Kian [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Trotti, Andy M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Garden, Adam S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Sutter Medical Group, Sacramento, California (United States); Harari, Paul [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Foote, Robert [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Holland, John [Department of Radiation Medicine, Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); Zhang, Qiang [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Palo Alto, California (United States)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate candidate fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG-PET/CT) imaging biomarkers for head-and-neck chemoradiotherapy outcomes in the cooperative group trial setting. Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0522 patients consenting to a secondary FDG-PET/CT substudy were serially imaged at baseline and 8 weeks after radiation. Maximum standardized uptake value (SUVmax), SUV peak (mean SUV within a 1-cm sphere centered on SUVmax), and metabolic tumor volume (MTV) using 40% of SUVmax as threshold were obtained from primary tumor and involved nodes. Results: Of 940 patients entered onto RTOG 0522, 74 were analyzable for this substudy. Neither high baseline SUVmax nor SUVpeak from primary or nodal disease were associated with poor treatment outcomes. However, primary tumor MTV above the cohort median was associated with worse local-regional control (hazard ratio 4.01, 95% confidence interval 1.28-12.52, P=.02) and progression-free survival (hazard ratio 2.34, 95% confidence interval 1.02-5.37, P=.05). Although MTV and T stage seemed to correlate (mean MTV 6.4, 13.2, and 26.8 for T2, T3, and T4 tumors, respectively), MTV remained a strong independent prognostic factor for progression-free survival in bivariate analysis that included T stage. Primary MTV remained prognostic in p16-associated oropharyngeal cancer cases, although sample size was limited. Conclusion: High baseline primary tumor MTV was associated with worse treatment outcomes in this limited patient subset of RTOG 0522. Additional confirmatory work will be required to validate primary tumor MTV as a prognostic imaging biomarker for patient stratification in future trials.

  12. [Genetic therapy in oncology: ethical aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucci, L M; Fazio, V M

    2001-01-01

    The more advanced oncologic therapies are directing toward new frontiers, on account of the remarkable undesirable effects of chemio- and radio-therapies. This new therapeutic experiences are of type biological (vaccines), or genic (substitution again genes with shutters meaning-tumoral). This therapies involve, to be effected, some ethical shrewdnesses: choice of the patient, the engineering modality of the genes, the transfer of the genes in cells of the exclusively somatic line, the elimination of the pathogenic risk of the vector virus, the obligatory use of sterile rooms, the attention to the administration of the drug, a legal issue of the judgment of notoriety.

  13. Prospective clinical study of R-CMD therapy for indolent B cell lymphoma and mantle cell lymphoma from the Hokuriku Hematology Oncology Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Tomoyuki; Masaki, Yasufumi; Otsuki, Nozomi; Sakamaki, Ippei; Kishi, Shinji; Miyazono, Takayoshi; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Murakami, Jun; Satoh, Tomomi; Nakamura, Takuji; Iwao, Haruka; Nakajima, Akio; Kawanami, Takafumi; Miki, Miyuki; Fujita, Yoshimasa; Tanaka, Masao; Fukushima, Toshihiro; Okazaki, Toshiro; Ueda, Takanori

    2015-09-01

    Standardized treatments for indolent B cell lymphoma primarily consisting of follicular lymphoma (FL) and for mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) have yet to be established. Here the Hokuriku Hematology Oncology Study Group conducted a multicenter prospective study to investigate the efficacy and safety of a combination regimen of rituximab, cladribine, mitoxantrone, and dexamethasone (R-CMD) in indolent B cell lymphoma and MCL. A total of 33 CD20-positive patients who received care between January 2008 and August 2011 were investigated. These patients' illnesses were FL (n = 21), nodal marginal zone B cell lymphoma (NMZB, n = 3), MCL (n = 3), splenic marginal zone B cell lymphoma (n = 2), hairy cell leukemia (n = 1), Waldenstrom macroglobulinemia (WM, n = 1), and lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma (LPL, n = 2). Patients received four 21-day cycles of rituximab 375 mg/m(2) (day 1), cladribine 0.10 mg/kg (days 1-3), mitoxantrone 8 mg/m(2) (day 1), and dexamethasone 8 mg/body (days 1-3), with four additional rituximab doses at 4-week intervals. Of the 33 patients, 26 achieved complete response/unconfirmed complete response, and six achieved a partial response (4 with FL, 1 with NMZB, 1 with WM). One had progressive disease (FL), and four relapsed after remission (1 with FL, 2 with MCL, 1 with LPL). R-CMD therapy was relatively convenient and effective in indolent B cell lymphoma and MCL. Nonetheless, to suppress the number and function of both B cells and T cells, comprehensive infection prevention and follow-up are necessary in the future.

  14. The Impact of Gender, Partner Status, and Race on Locoregional Failure and Overall Survival in Head and Neck Cancer Patients in Three Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilling, Thomas J.; Bae, Kyounghwa; Paulus, Rebecca; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Garden, Adam S.; Forastiere, Arlene; Ang, K. Kian; Movsas, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE We investigated the impact of race, in conjunction with gender and partner status, on both locoregional control (LRC) and overall survival (OS) in three head and neck trials conducted by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). METHODS AND MATERIALS Patients from RTOG 9003, 9111, and 9703 were included. Patients were stratified by treatment arms. Covariates of interest were partner status (partnered/non-partnered), race (white/non-white), and sex (female/male). Chi-square testing demonstrated homogeneity across treatment arms. Hazards ratio (HR) was used to estimate time to event outcome. Unadjusted and adjusted HRs were calculated for all covariates with associated 95% confidence intervals (CIs) and p-values. RESULTS 1736 patients were analyzed. Unpartnered males had inferior OS to partnered females (adjusted HR=1.22, 95% CI=(1.09, 1.36)), partnered males (adjusted HR=1.20, 95% CI=(1.09, 1.28)), and unpartnered females (adjusted HR=1.20, 95% CI=(1.09, 1.32)). White females had superior OS compared with white males, non-white females, and non-white males. Non-white males had inferior OS compared to white males. Partnered whites had improved OS relative to partnered non-white, unpartnered white, and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered males had inferior LRC than partnered males (adjusted HR=1.26, 95% CI=(1.09, 1.46)) and unpartnered females (adjusted HR=1.30, 95% CI=(1.05, 1.62)). White females had superior LRC to non-white males and females. White males had improved LRC than non-white males. Partnered whites had improved LRC than partnered and unpartnered non-white patients. Unpartnered whites had improved LRC than unpartnered non-whites. CONCLUSIONS Race, gender, and partner status impacted on both overall survival and locoregional failure, both singly and in combination. PMID:21549515

  15. NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0822: A Phase 2 Study of Preoperative Chemoradiation Therapy Using Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy in Combination With Capecitabine and Oxaliplatin for Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Theodore S., E-mail: tshong1@mgh.harvard.edu [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Garofalo, Michael C. [University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bendell, Johanna [Sarah Cannon Research Institute, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Berger, Adam C. [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Oldenburg, Nicklas B.E. [North Main Radiation Oncology, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Perera, Francisco [London Regional Cancer Program/Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Lee, R. Jeffrey [Intermountain Medical Center, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Jabbour, Salma K. [Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, New Brunswick, New Jersey (United States); Nowlan, Adam [Piedmont Hospital, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); DeNittis, Albert [Main Line Community Clinical Oncology Program, Wynnewood, Pennsylvania (United States); Crane, Christopher [University of Texas-MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the rate of gastrointestinal (GI) toxicity of neoadjuvant chemoradiation with capecitabine, oxaliplatin, and intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) in cT3-4 rectal cancer. Methods and Materials: Patients with localized, nonmetastatic T3 or T4 rectal cancer <12 cm from the anal verge were enrolled in a prospective, multi-institutional, single-arm study of preoperative chemoradiation. Patients received 45 Gy with IMRT in 25 fractions, followed by a 3-dimensional conformal boost of 5.4 Gy in 3 fractions with concurrent capecitabine/oxaliplatin (CAPOX). Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. Patients were recommended to receive FOLFOX chemotherapy after surgery. The primary endpoint of the study was acute grade 2 to 5 GI toxicity. Seventy-one patients provided 80% probability to detect at least a 12% reduction in the specified GI toxicity with the treatment of CAPOX and IMRT, at a significance level of .10 (1-sided). Results: Seventy-nine patients were accrued, of whom 68 were evaluable. Sixty-one patients (89.7%) had cT3 disease, and 37 (54.4%) had cN (+) disease. Postoperative chemotherapy was given to 42 of 68 patients. Fifty-eight patients had target contours drawn per protocol, 5 patients with acceptable variation, and 5 patients with unacceptable variations. Thirty-five patients (51.5%) experienced grade ≥2 GI toxicity, 12 patients (17.6%) experienced grade 3 or 4 diarrhea, and pCR was achieved in 10 patients (14.7%). With a median follow-up time of 3.98 years, the 4-year rate of locoregional failure was 7.4% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.0%-13.7%). The 4-year rates of OS and DFS were 82.9% (95% CI: 70.1%-90.6%) and 60.6% (95% CI: 47.5%-71.4%), respectively. Conclusion: The use of IMRT in neoadjuvant chemoradiation for rectal cancer did not reduce the rate of GI toxicity.

  16. Phase II Study of Accelerated High-Dose Radiotherapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy for Patients With Limited Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 0239

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komaki, Ritsuko, E-mail: rkomaki@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Ettinger, David S. [Department of Oncology, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Videtic, Gregory M.M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Glisson, Bonnie S. [Department of Thoracic/Head and Neck Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Langer, Corey J. [Thoracic Oncology, Abramson Cancer Center, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sause, William T. [Radiation Center, LDS Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Curran, Walter J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Choy, Hak [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center at Dallas, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate whether high-dose thoracic radiation given twice daily during cisplatin-etoposide chemotherapy for limited small-cell lung cancer (LSCLC) improves survival, acute esophagitis, and local control rates relative to findings from Intergroup trial 0096 (47%, 27%, and 64%). Patients and Methods: Patients were accrued over a 3-year period from 22 US and Canadian institutions. Patients with LSCLC and good performance status were given thoracic radiation to 61.2 Gy over 5 weeks (daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 1-22, then twice-daily 1.8-Gy fractions on days 23-33). Cisplatin (60 mg/m{sup 2} IV) was given on day 1 and etoposide (120 mg/m{sup 2} IV) on days 1-3 and days 22-24, followed by 2 cycles of cisplatin plus etoposide alone. Patients who achieved complete response were offered prophylactic cranial irradiation. Endpoints included overall and progression-free survival; severe esophagitis (Common Toxicity Criteria v 2.0) and treatment-related fatalities; response (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors); and local control. Results: Seventy-two patients were accrued from June 2003 through May 2006; 71 were evaluable (median age 63 years; 52% female; 58% Zubrod 0). Median survival time was 19 months; at 2 years, the overall survival rate was 36.6% (95% confidence interval [CI] 25.6%-47.7%), and progression-free survival 19.7% (95% CI 11.4%-29.6%). Thirteen patients (18%) experienced severe acute esophagitis, and 2 (3%) died of treatment-related causes; 41% achieved complete response, 39% partial response, 10% stable disease, and 6% progressive disease. The local control rate was 73%. Forty-three patients (61%) received prophylactic cranial irradiation. Conclusions: The overall survival rate did not reach the projected goal; however, rates of esophagitis were lower, and local control higher, than projected. This treatment strategy is now one of three arms of a prospective trial of chemoradiation for LSCLC (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 0538

  17. [Geriatric assessment prior to oncological therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedding, U

    2013-06-01

    Ageing is the single most important risk factor for cancer. This is also true for most cancer diseases of the genitourinary tract. In combination with the demographic changes in Germany and most other countries, the consequence is a substantial increase in the number of elderly patients with cancer. Most therapies in oncology have a high risk for toxic side effects. Ageing is a very heterogeneous process. The chronological age of a patient insufficiently reflects the individual resources, deficits and risk factors but this can be assessed by a structured geriatric assessment. Integration of geriatric assessment into oncological treatment decisions is still low and is one of the major tasks in cancer care in the future.

  18. A Phase II Study of Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy to the Pelvis for Postoperative Patients With Endometrial Carcinoma: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Trial 0418

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jhingran, Anuja, E-mail: ajhingra@mdanderson.org [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Winter, Kathryn [RTOG Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Portelance, Lorraine [University of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Miller, Brigitte [Carolinas Medical Center North East, Concord, North Carolina (United States); Salehpour, Mohammad [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gaur, Rakesh [St. Luke' s Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Small, William [Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University, Chicago, Illionis (United States); Berk, Lawrence [H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, Florida (United States); Gaffney, David [Huntsman Cancer Hospital, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States)

    2012-09-01

    Purpose: To determine the feasibility of pelvic intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for patients with endometrial cancer in a multi-institutional setting and to determine whether this treatment is associated with fewer short-term bowel adverse events than standard radiation therapy. Methods: Patients with adenocarcinoma of the endometrium treated with pelvic radiation therapy alone were eligible. Guidelines for target definition and delineation, dose prescription, and dose-volume constraints for the targets and critical normal structures were detailed in the study protocol and a web-based atlas. Results: Fifty-eight patients were accrued by 25 institutions; 43 were eligible for analysis. Forty-two patients (98%) had an acceptable IMRT plan; 1 had an unacceptable variation from the prescribed dose to the nodal planning target volume. The proportions of cases in which doses to critical normal structures exceeded protocol criteria were as follows: bladder, 67%; rectum, 76%; bowel, 17%; and femoral heads, 33%. Twelve patients (28%) developed grade {>=}2 short-term bowel adverse events. Conclusions: Pelvic IMRT for endometrial cancer is feasible across multiple institutions with use of a detailed protocol and centralized quality assurance (QA). For future trials, contouring of vaginal and nodal tissue will need continued monitoring with good QA and better definitions will be needed for organs at risk.

  19. Music therapy: a valuable adjunct in the oncology setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahon, Emily M; Mahon, Suzanne M

    2011-08-01

    Music therapy is the supervised and therapeutic use of music by a credentialed therapist to promote positive clinical outcomes. It can be a valuable form of complementary medicine in the oncology setting to decrease patient stress and anxiety, relieve pain and nausea, provide distraction, alleviate depression, and promote the expression of feelings. The music therapist assesses the patient and consults other members of the multidisciplinary team to create a therapeutic treatment plan. Music therapists design music sessions based on patients' needs and their intended therapeutic goals. Patients can participate actively or passively in individual or group sessions. Only a credentialed music therapist can provide safe and beneficial music therapy interventions.

  20. Interstitial photodynamic laser therapy in interventional oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogl, Thomas J.; Eichler, Katrin; Mack, Martin G.; Zangos, Stephan; Herzog, Christopher; Thalhammer, Axel; Engelmann, Kerstin [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, University of Frankfurt, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, 63590, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2004-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a well-investigated locoregional cancer treatment in which a systemically administered photosensitizer is activated locally by illuminating the diseased tissue with light of a suitable wavelength. PDT offers various treatment strategies in oncology, especially palliative ones. This article focuses on the development and evaluation of interstitial PDT for the treatment of solid tumors, particularly liver tumors. The PDT is mostly used for superficial and endoluminal lesions like skin or bladder malignancies and also more frequently applied for the treatment of lung, esophageal, and head and neck cancer. With the help of specially designed application systems, PDT is now becoming a practicable option for solid lesions, including those in parenchymal organs such as the liver. After intravenous treatment with the photosensitizer followed by interstitial light activation, contrast-enhanced computed tomography shows the development of therapy-induced necrosis around the light-guiding device. With the use of multiple devices, ablation of liver tumors seems to be possible, and no severe side effects or toxicities related to the treatment are reported. PDT can become a clinically relevant adjunct in the locoregional therapy strategies. (orig.)

  1. Photodynamic therapy: a promising alternative in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelius, Thomas; de Riese, Werner T. W.; Filleur, Stephanie

    2004-07-01

    Photodynamic Therapy (PDT) is a treatment modality that is based on the administration of a photosensitizer and the following application of light in a wavelength range matching the absorption spectrum of the photosensitizer. Ideally the photosensitizer retains in the tumor tissue more than in normal tissue and thus allows targeted destruction of cancerous tissue. The use of PDT is slowly being accepted as a standard treatment for certain types of cancer. This includes mainly treatment strategies with only palliative intentions (obstructive esophageal cancer and advanced lung cancer) while for certain malignant conditions new applications exists that are already intended for cure (e.g. early stage of lung cancer). The main advantage of PDT is that the treatment can be repeated multiple times safely without major side effects. PDT can be safely combined with already established treatment options like surgery, chemotherapy or radiotherapy. A disadvantage of PDT is the only localized effect of the therapy, which usually cannot significantly alter the outcome of a systemic disease. In this paper we review the history of PDT as well as current clinical applications in oncology and future directions.

  2. Age at cancer diagnosis, non-O blood group and asparaginase therapy are independently associated with deep venous thrombosis in pediatric oncology patients: A risk model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spavor, Maria; Halton, Jacqueline; Dietrich, Kevin; Israels, Sara; Shereck, Evan; Yong, Jian; Yasui, Yutaka; Mitchell, Lesley Gayle

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric oncology patients are at increased risk for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Determining the sub-population of children at increased DVT risk is critical for optimum clinical management. Therefore, the aim of the current study was to identify clinical risk factors for DVT which are easily identifiable at cancer diagnosis. A Canadian multicenter case control study in survivors of childhood cancer. Survivors who had DVT (Cases) while being treated for pediatric cancer where matched by center with a minimum of two survivors who did not experience DVT (Controls). Clinical information including age at diagnosis, type of cancer and chemotherapy were collected. Genotyping of blood group was done by single nucleotide polymorphisms analysis. 218 subjects were recruited at 4 Canadian pediatric centers. Multivariable analysis demonstrated 3 significant variables (reported as Odds Ratio (OR), (95% CI), p value): age at diagnosis p2-≤7years, >7≤10years, >10years. A significant association with DVT were seen in children 0-≤2years (OR 3.1 (1.1-8.3) p=0.026) and >10years (OR 3.8, 1.7-8.5 p=0.001). Significant associations with DVT remained for non-O blood group, OR 2.2 (1.2-4.4) p=0.016 and asparaginase treatment, OR 2.1 (1.1-4.0) p=0.027. The value for the clinical risk model receiver operating characteristics curve was 0.67. We have shown 3 independent risk factors for DVT in childhood cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. [Dance/movement therapy in oncological rehabilitation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Elana G; Helmes, Almut; Weis, Joachim

    2013-01-01

    Dance/movement therapy may be defined as a psychosocial and body-oriented art therapy, which uses dance for the expression of emotional and cognitive issues. Dance/movement therapy is an important intervention for cancer patients to enhance coping strategies. There are only few studies investigating dance therapy with cancer patients. The present study investigates effects of dance/movement therapy (n = 115) in the setting of inpatient rehabilitation based on a pre-post design with a control group as well as a follow-up 3 months later. Standardized questionnaires measuring quality of life, anxiety and depression, and self-concept (EORTC QLQ-C30, HADS, FSKN) were used. In addition, at the end of the inpatient rehabilitation program subjective expectations of the dance/movement therapy and the patients' subjective evaluation of the benefits of the intervention were measured by a new developed questionnaire. As process factors of dance/movement therapy, expression of emotions, enhancement of self-esteem, development of the personality, vitality, getting inner balance, and getting in touch with the body have been identified. In terms of quality of life and psychological well-being, the results showed significant improvements with medium to large effect sizes. Even though those effects may not be attributed to the intervention alone, the analysis of the data and the patients' subjective statements help to reveal therapeutic factors and process characteristics of dance/movement therapy within inpatient rehabilitation. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  4. American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Group 263: Standardizing Nomenclatures in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayo, Charles S; Moran, Jean M; Bosch, Walter; Xiao, Ying; McNutt, Todd; Popple, Richard; Michalski, Jeff; Feng, Mary; Marks, Lawrence B; Fuller, Clifton D; Yorke, Ellen; Palta, Jatinder; Gabriel, Peter E; Molineu, Andrea; Matuszak, Martha M; Covington, Elizabeth; Masi, Kathryn; Richardson, Susan L; Ritter, Timothy; Morgas, Tomasz; Flampouri, Stella; Santanam, Lakshmi; Moore, Joseph A; Purdie, Thomas G; Miller, Robert C; Hurkmans, Coen; Adams, Judy; Jackie Wu, Qing-Rong; Fox, Colleen J; Siochi, Ramon Alfredo; Brown, Norman L; Verbakel, Wilko; Archambault, Yves; Chmura, Steven J; Dekker, Andre L; Eagle, Don G; Fitzgerald, Thomas J; Hong, Theodore; Kapoor, Rishabh; Lansing, Beth; Jolly, Shruti; Napolitano, Mary E; Percy, James; Rose, Mark S; Siddiqui, Salim; Schadt, Christof; Simon, William E; Straube, William L; St James, Sara T; Ulin, Kenneth; Yom, Sue S; Yock, Torunn I

    2018-03-15

    A substantial barrier to the single- and multi-institutional aggregation of data to supporting clinical trials, practice quality improvement efforts, and development of big data analytics resource systems is the lack of standardized nomenclatures for expressing dosimetric data. To address this issue, the American Association of Physicists in Medicine (AAPM) Task Group 263 was charged with providing nomenclature guidelines and values in radiation oncology for use in clinical trials, data-pooling initiatives, population-based studies, and routine clinical care by standardizing: (1) structure names across image processing and treatment planning system platforms; (2) nomenclature for dosimetric data (eg, dose-volume histogram [DVH]-based metrics); (3) templates for clinical trial groups and users of an initial subset of software platforms to facilitate adoption of the standards; (4) formalism for nomenclature schema, which can accommodate the addition of other structures defined in the future. A multisociety, multidisciplinary, multinational group of 57 members representing stake holders ranging from large academic centers to community clinics and vendors was assembled, including physicists, physicians, dosimetrists, and vendors. The stakeholder groups represented in the membership included the AAPM, American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), NRG Oncology, European Society for Radiation Oncology (ESTRO), Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG), Children's Oncology Group (COG), Integrating Healthcare Enterprise in Radiation Oncology (IHE-RO), and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine working group (DICOM WG); A nomenclature system for target and organ at risk volumes and DVH nomenclature was developed and piloted to demonstrate viability across a range of clinics and within the framework of clinical trials. The final report was approved by AAPM in October 2017. The approval process included review by 8 AAPM committees, with additional review by ASTRO

  5. [Music therapy in oncology--concepts and review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jens-Peter; Brandt, Kerstin; Weis, Joachim

    2004-12-01

    The following article is addresses the applications and functions of music therapy in the acute and rehabilitative phases of treatment of adult cancer patients. It is based on a literature review with a focus on the state of empirical research in the oncology sector of music therapy and consequences for the concepts of music therapy. First the basic aspects of music therapy treatment are explained to clarify the different research methods and to examine the special demands of oncology patients. Furthermore, a brief summary of the approaches of music therapy research in the most renowned educational institutions in Germany are outlined. The results of the studies and case histories are summarized and evaluated and provide the basis for the conclusions and recommendations for the music therapeutic practice in oncology.

  6. A Phase 3 Trial of 2 Years of Androgen Suppression and Radiation Therapy With or Without Adjuvant Chemotherapy for High-Risk Prostate Cancer: Final Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Phase 3 Randomized Trial NRG Oncology RTOG 9902

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosenthal, Seth A., E-mail: rosents@sutterhealth.org [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Hunt, Daniel [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sartor, A. Oliver [Tulane University Medical Center, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Pienta, Kenneth J. [Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gomella, Leonard [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grignon, David [Indiana University, Bloomington, Indiana (United States); Rajan, Raghu [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Kerlin, Kevin J. [Community Clinical Oncology Program, Southeast Cancer Control Consortium, Inc, Winston-Salem, North Carolina (United States); Jones, Christopher U. [Radiation Oncology, Sutter Cancer Centers, Roseville, California (United States); Radiological Associates of Sacramento, Sacramento, California (United States); Dobelbower, Michael [University of Alabama at Birmingham Medical Center, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Zeitzer, Kenneth [Albert Einstein Medical Center, Bronx, New York (United States); Hamstra, Daniel A. [University of Michigan Medical Center, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Donavanik, Viroon [Christiana Care Health Services, Inc, Wilmington, Delaware (United States); Rotman, Marvin [State University of New York Health Science Center–Brooklyn, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Hartford, Alan C. [Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center, Lebanon, New Hampshire (United States); Michalski, Jeffrey [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Seider, Michael [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Kim, Harold [Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan (United States); and others

    2015-10-01

    Purpose: Long-term (LT) androgen suppression (AS) with radiation therapy (RT) is a standard treatment of high-risk, localized prostate cancer (PCa). Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9902 was a randomized trial testing the hypothesis that adjuvant combination chemotherapy (CT) with paclitaxel, estramustine, and oral etoposide plus LT AS plus RT would improve overall survival (OS). Methods and Materials: Patients with high-risk PCa (prostate-specific antigen 20-100 ng/mL and Gleason score [GS] ≥7 or clinical stage ≥T2 and GS ≥8) were randomized to RT and AS (AS + RT) alone or with adjuvant CT (AS + RT + CT). CT was given as four 21-day cycles, delivered beginning 28 days after 70.2 Gy of RT. AS was given as luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone for 24 months, beginning 2 months before RT plus an oral antiandrogen for 4 months before and during RT. The study was designed based on a 6% improvement in OS from 79% to 85% at 5 years, with 90% power and a 2-sided alpha of 0.05. Results: A total of 397 patients (380 eligible) were randomized. The patients had high-risk PCa, 68% with GS 8 to 10 and 34% T3 to T4 tumors, and median prostate-specific antigen of 22.6 ng/mL. The median follow-up period was 9.2 years. The trial closed early because of excess thromboembolic toxicity in the CT arm. The 10-year results for all randomized patients revealed no significant difference between the AS + RT and AS + RT + CT arms in OS (65% vs 63%; P=.81), biochemical failure (58% vs 54%; P=.82), local progression (11% vs 7%; P=.09), distant metastases (16% vs 14%; P=.42), or disease-free survival (22% vs 26%; P=.61). Conclusions: NRG Oncology RTOG 9902 showed no significant differences in OS, biochemical failure, local progression, distant metastases, or disease-free survival with the addition of adjuvant CT to LT AS + RT. The trial results provide valuable data regarding the natural history of high-risk PCa treated with LT AS + RT and have implications for

  7. Periodontium destruction associated with oncology therapy. Five case reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wright, W.E.

    1987-08-01

    Radiation treatment to the head and neck and cytotoxic chemotherapy can produce deleterious side effects to the periodontium that are generally transient in nature, reversible, and do not result in permanently visible defects. However, combinations of the malignant disease itself, the direct and indirect effects of medical therapy and associated oral infections, along with local trauma can lead to periodontal tissue destruction with resulting permanent architectural defects. Five case reports illustrate destructive alterations of the periodontium that were associated with oncology therapy. Proposed guidelines for periodontal treatment of compromised individuals undergoing oncology therapies are suggested.

  8. A Phase 2 Trial of Radiation Therapy With Concurrent Paclitaxel Chemotherapy After Surgery in Patients With High-Risk Endometrial Cancer: A Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hanbyoul [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Women' s Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Byung-Ho [Cancer Biostatistics Branch, Research Institute for National Cancer Control and Evaluation, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seok Mo [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chonnam National University School of Medicine, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chi-Heum [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung Gie [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Hee-Sug [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Soon Beom [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Konkuk University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae-Hoon, E-mail: jaehoonkim@yuhs.ac [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Women' s Life Medical Science, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: A phase 2 study was completed by the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group to evaluate the efficacy and toxicity of concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel in patients with high-risk endometrial cancer. Methods and Materials: Pathologic requirements included endometrial endometrioid adenocarcinoma stages III and IV. Radiation therapy consisted of a total dose of 4500 to 5040 cGy in 5 fractions per week for 6 weeks. Paclitaxel 60 mg/m{sup 2} was administered once weekly for 5 weeks during radiation therapy. Results: Fifty-seven patients were enrolled between January 2006 and March 2008. The median follow-up time was 60.0 months (95% confidence interval [CI], 51.0-58.2). All grade 3/4 toxicities were hematologic and usually self-limited. There was no life-threatening toxicity. The cumulative incidence of intrapelvic recurrence sites was 1.9% (1/52), and the cumulative incidence of extrapelvic recurrence sites was 34.6% (18/52). The estimated 5-year disease-free and overall survival rates were 63.5% (95% CI, 50.4-76.5) and 82.7% (95% CI, 72.4-92.9), respectively. Conclusions: Concurrent chemoradiation with weekly paclitaxel is well tolerated and seems to be effective for high-risk endometrioid endometrial cancers. This approach appears reasonable to be tested for efficacy in a prospective, randomized controlled study.

  9. Immunotherapy response assessment in neuro-oncology: a report of the RANO working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F; Brandes, Alba A; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A

    2015-11-01

    Immunotherapy is a promising area of therapy in patients with neuro-oncological malignancies. However, early-phase studies show unique challenges associated with the assessment of radiological changes in response to immunotherapy reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumour regression, can still occur after initial disease progression or after the appearance of new lesions. Refinement of the response assessment criteria for patients with neuro-oncological malignancies undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. Herein, a multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describe immunotherapy Response Assessment for Neuro-Oncology (iRANO) criteria based on guidance for the determination of tumour progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria and the RANO working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease within 6 months of initiating immunotherapy, including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for the use of corticosteroids. We review the role of advanced imaging techniques and the role of measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurological and immunological functions. The iRANO guidelines put forth in this Review will evolve successively to improve their usefulness as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Motexafin-Gadolinium and Involved Field Radiation Therapy for Intrinsic Pontine Glioma of Childhood: A Children's Oncology Group Phase 2 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, Kristin A., E-mail: bradley@humonc.wisc.edu [Department of Human Oncology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Zhou Tianni [Department of Preventive Medicine, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California (United States); McNall-Knapp, Rene Y. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Jakacki, Regina I. [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Levy, Adam S. [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, Children' s Hospital at Montefiore, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Vezina, Gilbert [Department of Radiology, Children' s National Medical Center, George Washington University School of Medicine, Washington, DC (United States); Pollack, Ian F. [Department of Neurosurgery, Children' s Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the effects on 1-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of combining motexafin and gadolinium (MGd), a potent radiosensitizer, with daily fractionated radiation therapy in children with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas. Methods and Materials: Patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine glioma were treated with MGd daily for 5 consecutive days each week, for a total of 30 doses. Patients received a 5- to 10-min intravenous bolus of MGd, 4.4 mg/kg/day, given 2 to 5 h prior to standard dose irradiation. Radiation therapy was administered at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy for 30 treatments over 6 weeks. The total dose was 54 Gy. Results: Sixty eligible children received MGd daily, concurrent with 6 weeks of radiation therapy. The estimated 1-year EFS was 18% {+-} 5%, and the estimated 1-year OS was 53% {+-} 6.5%. The most common grade 3 to 4 toxicities were lymphopenia, transient elevation of liver transaminases, and hypertension. Conclusions: Compared to historical controls, the addition of MGd to a standard 6-week course of radiation did not improve the survival of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas.

  11. Management of hypocalcemic effects of WR2721 administered on a daily times five schedule with cisplatin and radiation therapy. The New York Gynecologic Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadler, S; Haynes, H; Beitler, J J; Goldberg, G; Holland, J F; Hochster, H; Bruckner, H; Mandeli, J; Smith, H; Runowicz, C

    1993-08-01

    To determine the effects of the chemoprotective agent, WR2721, administered on a daily x 5 schedule with cisplatin and radiation therapy, on calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH) levels. Twenty women with cervical cancer were enrolled in a clinical trial to determine the maximal safe dose of WR2721 plus radiation therapy and cisplatin on a novel daily x 5 schedule. Detailed studies of the effects of WR2721 on calcium and PTH levels were initiated after a patient developed symptomatic hypocalcemia. Treatment with WR2721 resulted in a rapid decline in serum PTH levels within 4 hours, which fell below the lower limits of normal at 24 hours, then returned to within normal limits at 48 hours. In contrast, serum levels of ionized calcium were not affected acutely, and declined by only 7% within 24 hours. However, this small decrease persisted for the 5 days of treatment. Hypocalcemic effects were successfully managed with oral calcium carbonate and calcitriol supplements. In one patient, particularly sensitive to the effects of WR2721, serum levels of ionized calcium decreased to less than 3.0 mg/dL despite oral calcium supplements. The effects of WR2721 on serum ionized calcium levels are mediated by direct inhibition of PTH activity; other effects such as inhibition of renal tubular calcium reabsorption cannot be excluded. We recommend that patients treated with WR2721, cisplatin, and radiation therapy receive routine oral calcium and calcitriol supplementation and that serum ionized calcium levels be monitored frequently.

  12. Net clinical benefit analysis of radiation therapy oncology group 0525: a phase III trial comparing conventional adjuvant temozolomide with dose-intensive temozolomide in patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Terri S; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Wang, Meihua; Gilbert, Mark R; Won, Minhee; Bottomley, Andrew; Mendoza, Tito R; Coens, Corneel; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Brachman, David G; Choucair, Ali K; Mehta, Minesh

    2013-11-10

    Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trial 0525 tested whether dose-intensifying temozolomide versus standard chemoradiotherapy improves overall survival (OS) or progression-free survival (PFS) in newly diagnosed glioblastoma. Tests of neurocognitive function (NCF) and symptoms (using the MD Anderson Symptom Inventory-Brain Tumor module; MDASI-BT) and of quality of life (European Organisation for the Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire [EORTC QLQ] -C30/BN20) examined the net clinical benefit (NCB) of therapy. NCF tests (Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised, Trail Making Test, and Controlled Oral Word Association), MDASI-BT, and EORTC QLQ-C30/BN20 were completed in a subset of patients. Multivariate Cox proportional hazard regression modeling determined the prognostic value of baseline and early change from baseline to cycle 1 for OS and PFS. Two-sample proportional test statistic was used to evaluate differences between treatments (dose-dense v standard-dose) on NCB measures from baseline to cycle 4 in stable patients. Overall, 182 patients participated in the study. Baseline NCF tests and the physical functioning quality of life scale were associated with OS and PFS. Baseline to cycle 1 in all NCB components were associated with OS and PFS. There was greater deterioration in the dose-dense arm from baseline to cycle 4 in the Global Health and Motor Function subscales (EORTC QLQ-C30/BN20) as well as in overall symptom burden, overall symptom interference, and activity-related symptom interference subscales (MDASI-BT). There were no between-arm differences in NCF. Longitudinal collection of NCB measures is feasible in cooperative group studies and provides an added dimension to standard outcome measures. Greater adverse symptom burden and functional interference, as well as decreased global health and motor function were observed in patients randomly assigned to the dose-dense arm. Baseline and early change in NCB measures were associated with

  13. Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in High-Risk Cervical Cancer: Re-evaluating the Findings of Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 109 in a Large, Population-Based Cohort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Swisher-McClure, Samuel [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Showalter, Timothy N. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Hegarty, Sarah E. [Division of Biostatistics, Department of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, Sidney Kimmel Medical College at Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Grover, Surbhi, E-mail: Surbhi.grover@uphs.upenn.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To review the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to evaluate postoperative high-risk cervical cancer patients for factors associated with a benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT) over external beam radiation therapy alone (EBRT). Methods and Materials: The National Cancer Database was queried for women with cervical cancer treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant EBRT from 2002 to 2012. Only patients with pathologic lymph node involvement (LN+), positive surgical margins, and/or parametrial invasion were included in our analysis (on the basis of Peter's criteria). Univariable and multivariable analyses (MVA) were performed, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to investigate for factors associated with of CRT utilization and overall survival (OS). Results: A total of 3053 patients met inclusion criteria, and 2479 received adjuvant CRT (81%), whereas 574 (19%) received EBRT alone. Factors associated with increased CRT utilization on MVA included age <69 years, year of diagnosis ≥2008, non-adenocarcinoma histology, and LN+. Use of CRT improved OS among the entire cohort on MVA (HR 0.76, CI 0.601-0.962; P=.022). On MVA, CRT improved OS in patients with LN+ as their sole Peter's criteria (HR 0.58, CI 0.413-0.814; P=.002). Chemoradiation therapy did not improve OS in patients with only positive margins (P=.73), only parametrial invasion (P=.95), or any combination of these 2 factors without LN+ (P=.63). Conclusions: The use of adjuvant CRT after hysterectomy improves OS in patients with high-risk cervical cancer compared with EBRT alone, but this benefit seems to be restricted to patients with LN+. The benefits of adjuvant CRT over EBRT alone in patients with parametrial invasion and/or positive margins (without nodal involvement) are unknown.

  14. A Randomized Trial (Irish Clinical Oncology Research Group 97-01) Comparing Short Versus Protracted Neoadjuvant Hormonal Therapy Before Radiotherapy for Localized Prostate Cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Armstrong, John G

    2010-08-24

    PURPOSE: To examine the long-term outcomes of a randomized trial comparing short (4 months; Arm 1) and long (8 months; Arm 2) neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Between 1997 and 2001, 276 patients were enrolled and the data from 261 were analyzed. The stratification risk factors were prostate-specific antigen level >20 ng\\/mL, Gleason score >\\/=7, and Stage T3 or more. The intermediate-risk stratum had one factor and the high-risk stratum had two or more. Staging was done from the bone scan and computed tomography findings. The primary endpoint was biochemical failure-free survival. RESULTS: The median follow-up was 102 months. The overall survival, biochemical failure-free survival. and prostate cancer-specific survival did not differ significantly between the two treatment arms, overall or at 5 years. The cumulative probability of overall survival at 5 years was 90% (range, 87-92%) in Arm 1 and 83% (range, 80-86%) in Arm 2. The biochemical failure-free survival rate at 5 years was 66% (range, 62-71%) in Arm 1 and 63% (range, 58-67%) in Arm 2. CONCLUSION: No statistically significant difference was found in biochemical failure-free survival between 4 months and 8 months of neoadjuvant hormonal therapy before radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer.

  15. Postoperative Chemoradiation Therapy in High-Risk Cervical Cancer: Re-evaluating the Findings of Gynecologic Oncology Group Study 109 in a Large, Population-Based Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trifiletti, Daniel M; Swisher-McClure, Samuel; Showalter, Timothy N; Hegarty, Sarah E; Grover, Surbhi

    2015-12-01

    To review the National Cancer Database (NCDB) to evaluate postoperative high-risk cervical cancer patients for factors associated with a benefit from chemoradiation therapy (CRT) over external beam radiation therapy alone (EBRT). The National Cancer Database was queried for women with cervical cancer treated with hysterectomy and adjuvant EBRT from 2002 to 2012. Only patients with pathologic lymph node involvement (LN+), positive surgical margins, and/or parametrial invasion were included in our analysis (on the basis of Peter's criteria). Univariable and multivariable analyses (MVA) were performed, and hazard ratios (HRs) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to investigate for factors associated with of CRT utilization and overall survival (OS). A total of 3053 patients met inclusion criteria, and 2479 received adjuvant CRT (81%), whereas 574 (19%) received EBRT alone. Factors associated with increased CRT utilization on MVA included age cervical cancer compared with EBRT alone, but this benefit seems to be restricted to patients with LN+. The benefits of adjuvant CRT over EBRT alone in patients with parametrial invasion and/or positive margins (without nodal involvement) are unknown. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Music therapy in pediatric oncology: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilliard, Russell E

    2006-01-01

    The review of literature provides an overview of both qualitative and quantitative research studies in the area of pediatric oncology music therapy. A total of 12 studies were reviewed. Eight used qualitative and four used quantitative research methods. All articles were published in peer-reviewed journals. This review summarizes the use of music therapy in treating the physical, emotional , social, and developmental needs of children undergoing curative and palliative treatment for cancer.

  17. Motexafin-Gadolinium and Involved Field Radiation Therapy for Intrinsic Pontine Glioma of Childhood: A Children’s Oncology Group Phase II Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Kristin A.; Zhou, Tianni; McNall-Knapp, Rene Y.; Jakacki, Regina I.; Levy, Adam S.; Vezina, Gilbert; Pollack, Ian F.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Local progression is the predominant failure pattern for pediatric intrinsic pontine gliomas. Overall outcome in this tumor is poor with reported median survivals of 8–12 months with localized radiation. In this phase II study, Motexafin-Gadolinium (MGd), a radiosensitizing agent that localizes in tumors with greater affinity than in normal tissues, was administered prior to daily radiation in attempt to improve the outcome in this disease. Purpose To evaluate the effect on one-year event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) of combining Motexafin-Gadolinium (MGd), a potent radiosensitizer, with daily fractionated radiotherapy in children with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas. Patients and Methods Patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine glioma were treated with MGd daily for 5 consecutive days each week, for a total of 30 doses. Patients received a 5–10 minute intravenous bolus of MGd, 4.4 mg/kg/day, given 2–5 hours prior to standard dose irradiation. Radiation therapy was administered at a daily dose of 1.8 Gy for 30 treatments over 6 weeks. The total dose was 54 Gy. Results Sixty eligible children received MGd daily, concurrent with 6 weeks of radiation therapy. The estimated one-year EFS was 18% ± 5% and the estimated one-year OS was 53% ± 6.5%. The most common grade 3–4 toxicities were lymphopenia, transient elevation of liver transaminases, and hypertension. Conclusion Compared to historical controls, the addition of Motexafin-Gadolinium to a standard 6-week course of radiation did not improve the survival of pediatric patients with newly diagnosed intrinsic pontine gliomas. PMID:23092726

  18. Prospective Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Both Operable and Inoperable T1N0M0 Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer: Japan Clinical Oncology Group Study JCOG0403

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, Yasushi, E-mail: nagat@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Hiroshima (Japan); Hiraoka, Masahiro [Department of Radiation Oncology and Image-Applied Therapy, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Shibata, Taro [Japan Clinical Oncology Group Data Center, Center for Research Administration and Support, National Cancer Center, Tokyo (Japan); Onishi, Hiroshi [Department of Radiology, University of Yamanashi, Chuo (Japan); Kokubo, Masaki [Department of Image-Based Medicine, Institute of Biomedical Research and Innovation, Kobe (Japan); Karasawa, Katsuyuki [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Metropolitan Komagome Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Department of Clinical Radiology, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Onimaru, Rikiya [Department of Radiology, Hokkaido University, Sapporo (Japan); Kozuka, Takuyo [Department of Radiation Oncology, The Cancer Institute Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Kunieda, Etsuo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Keio University, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Tsutomu [Department of Radiology, Nihon University Itabashi Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, The University of Tokyo Hospital, Tokyo (Japan); Hareyama, Masato [Department of Radiology, Sapporo Medical University, Sapporo (Japan); Takai, Yoshihiro [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Hayakawa, Kazushige [Department of Radiology and Radiation Oncology, Kitasato University, Sagamihara (Japan); Mitsuhashi, Norio [Department of Radiation Oncology, Tokyo Women' s Medical University, Tokyo (Japan); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiology, Koshigaya Municipal Hospital, Koshigaya (Japan)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To evaluate, in Japan Clinical Oncology Group study 0403, the safety and efficacy of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) in patients with T1N0M0 non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Eligibility criteria included histologically or cytologically proven NSCLC, clinical T1N0M0. Prescribed dose was 48 Gy at the isocenter in 4 fractions. The primary endpoint was the percent (%) 3-year overall survival. The threshold % 3-year survival to be rejected was set at 35% for inoperable patients, whereas the expected % 3-year survival was 80% for operable patients. Results: Between July 2004 and November 2008, 169 patients from 15 institutions were registered. One hundred inoperable and 64 operable patients (total 164) were eligible. Patients' characteristics were 122 male, 47 female; median age 78 years (range, 50-91 years); adenocarcinomas, 90; squamous cell carcinomas, 61; others, 18. Of the 100 inoperable patients, the % 3-year OS was 59.9% (95% confidence interval 49.6%-68.8%). Grade 3 and 4 toxicities were observed in 10 and 2 patients, respectively. No grade 5 toxicity was observed. Of the 64 operable patients, the % 3-year OS was 76.5% (95% confidence interval 64.0%-85.1%). Grade 3 toxicities were observed in 5 patients. No grade 4 and 5 toxicities were observed. Conclusions: Stereotactic body radiation therapy for stage I NSCLC is effective, with low incidences of severe toxicity. This treatment can be considered a standard treatment for inoperable stage I NSCLC. This treatment is promising as an alternative to surgery for operable stage I NSCLC.

  19. Individualized Prediction of Overall Survival After Postoperative Radiation Therapy in Patients With Early-Stage Cervical Cancer: A Korean Radiation Oncology Group Study (KROG 13-03)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyun Jin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seungbong [Department of Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Young Seok, E-mail: ysk@amc.seoul.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Nam, Joo-Hyun [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hak Jae [Department of Radiation Oncology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jae Weon [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byoung-Gie [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Soon Do [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Juree [Department of Radiation Oncology, Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Ki-Heon [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Cheil General Hospital and Women' s Healthcare Center, Kwandong University, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Mee Sun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Hwasun Hospital, Chonnam National University Medical School, Jeollanam-do (Korea, Republic of); and others

    2013-11-15

    Purpose: A nomogram is a predictive statistical model that generates the continuous probability of a clinical event such as death or recurrence. The aim of the study was to construct a nomogram to predict 5-year overall survival after postoperative radiation therapy for stage IB to IIA cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The clinical data from 1702 patients with early-stage cervical cancer, treated at 10 participating hospitals from 1990 to 2011, were reviewed to develop a prediction nomogram based on the Cox proportional hazards model. Demographic, clinical, and pathologic variables were included and analyzed to formulate the nomogram. The discrimination and calibration power of the model was measured using a concordance index (c-index) and calibration curve. Results: The median follow-up period for surviving patients was 75.6 months, and the 5-year overall survival probability was 87.1%. The final model was constructed using the following variables: age, number of positive pelvic lymph nodes, parametrial invasion, lymphovascular invasion, and the use of concurrent chemotherapy. The nomogram predicted the 5-year overall survival with a c-index of 0.69, which was superior to the predictive power of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) staging system (c-index of 0.54). Conclusions: A survival-predicting nomogram that offers an accurate level of prediction and discrimination was developed based on a large multi-center study. The model may be more useful than the FIGO staging system for counseling individual patients regarding prognosis.

  20. Reinventing Diagnostics for Personalized Therapy in Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banerjee, Diponkar [Centre for Translational and Applied Genomics (CTAG), Provincial Health Services Authority (PHSA) Laboratories, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Department of Pathology, British Columbia Cancer Agency (BCCA), 600 West 10th Avenue, Vancouver, British Columbia, V5Z4E6 (Canada)

    2010-06-02

    Human cancers are still diagnosed and classified using the light microscope. The criteria are based upon morphologic observations by pathologists and tend to be subject to interobserver variation. In preoperative biopsies of non-small cell lung cancers, the diagnostic concordance, even amongst experienced pulmonary pathologists, is no better than a coin-toss. Only 25% of cancer patients, on average, benefit from therapy as most therapies do not account for individual factors that influence response or outcome. Unsuccessful first line therapy costs Canada CAN $1.2 billion for the top 14 cancer types, and this extrapolates to $90 billion globally. The availability of accurate drug selection for personalized therapy could better allocate these precious resources to the right therapies. This wasteful situation is beginning to change with the completion of the human genome sequencing project and with the increasing availability of targeted therapies. Both factors are giving rise to attempts to correlate tumor characteristics and response to specific adjuvant and neoadjuvant therapies. Static cancer classification and grading systems need to be replaced by functional classification systems that not only account for intra- and inter- tumor heterogeneity, but which also allow for the selection of the correct chemotherapeutic compounds for the individual patient. In this review, the examples of lung and breast cancer are used to illustrate the issues to be addressed in the coming years, as well as the emerging technologies that have great promise in enabling personalized therapy.

  1. Successful Implementation of Image-Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance in the Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 08.01 PROFIT Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Middleton, Mark, E-mail: mark.middleton@roq.net.au [Radiation Oncology Queensland, St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Frantzis, Jim; Healy, Brendan; Jones, Mark; Murry, Rebecca [Radiation Oncology Queensland, St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Kron, Tomas [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne (Australia); Plank, Ashley [Toowoomba Cancer Research Centre, St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Catton, Charles [Department of Radiation Oncology, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto (Canada); Martin, Jarad [Radiation Oncology Queensland, St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia)

    2011-12-01

    Purpose: The quality assurance (QA) of image-guided radiation therapy (IGRT) within clinical trials is in its infancy, but its importance will continue to grow as IGRT becomes the standard of care. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the feasibility of IGRT QA as part of the credentialing process for a clinical trial. Methods and Materials: As part of the accreditation process for a randomized trial in prostate cancer hypofraction, IGRT benchmarking across multiple sites was incorporated. Each participating site underwent IGRT credentialing via a site visit. In all centers, intraprostatic fiducials were used. A real-time assessment of analysis of IGRT was performed using Varian's Offline Review image analysis package. Two-dimensional (2D) kV and MV electronic portal imaging prostate patient datasets were used, consisting of 39 treatment verification images for 2D/2D comparison with the digitally reconstructed radiograph derived from the planning scan. The influence of differing sites, image modality, and observer experience on IGRT was then assessed. Results: Statistical analysis of the mean mismatch errors showed that IGRT analysis was performed uniformly regardless of institution, therapist seniority, or imaging modality across the three orthogonal planes. Conclusions: The IGRT component of clinical trials that include sophisticated planning and treatment protocols must undergo stringent QA. The IGRT technique of intraprostatic fiducials has been shown in the context of this trial to be undertaken in a uniform manner across Australia. Extending this concept to many sites with different equipment and IGRT experience will require a robust remote credentialing process.

  2. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Protocol 02-29: A Phase II Trial of Neoadjuvant Therapy With Concurrent Chemotherapy and Full-Dose Radiation Therapy Followed by Surgical Resection and Consolidative Therapy for Locally Advanced Non-small Cell Carcinoma of the Lung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suntharalingam, Mohan, E-mail: msuntha@umm.edu [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Edelman, Martin J. [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Krasna, Mark [Cancer Center at St. Joseph Medical Center, Towson, Maryland (United States); Burrows, Whitney [Marlene and Stewart Greenebaum Cancer Center, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Gore, Elizabeth [Dept of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wilson, Lynn D. [Dept of Radiation Oncology, Yale School of Medicine, New Haven, Connecticut (United States); Choy, Hak [Dept of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern, Dallas, Texas (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To evaluate mediastinal nodal clearance (MNC) rates after induction chemotherapy and concurrent, full-dose radiation therapy (RT) in a phase II trimodality trial (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocol 0229). Patients and Methods: Patients (n=57) with stage III non-small cell lung cancer (pathologically proven N2 or N3) were eligible. Induction chemotherapy consisted of weekly carboplatin (AUC = 2.0) and paclitaxel 50 mg/m{sup 2}. Concurrent RT was prescribed, with 50.4 Gy to the mediastinum and primary tumor and a boost of 10.8 Gy to all gross disease. The mediastinum was pathologically reassessed after completion of chemoradiation. The primary endpoint of the study was MNC, with secondary endpoints of 2-year overall survival and postoperative morbidity/mortality. Results: The grade 3/4 toxicities included hematologic 35%, gastrointestinal 14%, and pulmonary 23%. Forty-three patients (75%) were evaluable for the primary endpoint. Twenty-seven patients achieved the primary endpoint of MNC (63%). Thirty-seven patients underwent resection. There was a 14% incidence of grade 3 postoperative pulmonary complications and 1 30-day, postoperative grade 5 toxicity (3%). With a median follow-up of 24 months for all patients, the 2-year overall survival rate was 54%, and the 2-year progression-free survival rate was 33%. The 2-year overall survival rate was 75% for those who achieved nodal clearance, 52% for those with residual nodal disease, and 23% for those who were not evaluable for the primary endpoint (P=.0002). Conclusions: This multi-institutional trial confirms the ability of neoadjuvant concurrent chemoradiation with full-dose RT to sterilize known mediastinal nodal disease.

  3. Group therapy for adolescents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nada Hribar

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The group included adolescents from secondary school and some students. The group had weekly sessions or twice on mounth. The adolescents had varied simptoms: depressive, anxiety, psychosomatic disorders, learning difficulties, cunduct problems. All of adolescents were common on many problems in social interactions. The goal of therapeutic work were: to increase assertiveness skills and to reduce the anxious in social situations. The adolescents in group raised a self-esteem and developed some assertiveness skills: eye contact" and effective communication skills, persistence, refusing and requesting, giving and receiving critism, etc. The methods of work and techniques were based on principles of cognitive-behaviour therapy.

  4. RTOG Sarcoma Radiation Oncologists Reach Consensus on Gross Tumor Volume and Clinical Target Volume on Computed Tomographic Images for Preoperative Radiotherapy of Primary Soft Tissue Sarcoma of Extremity in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Dian, E-mail: dwang@mcw.edu [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Bosch, Walter [Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Roberge, David [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Finkelstein, Steven E. [Moffitt Cancer Center, Tampa, FL (United States); Petersen, Ivy; Haddock, Michael [Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN (United States); Chen, Yen-Lin E.; Saito, Naoyuki G. [Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY (United States); Kirsch, David G. [Duke University, Durham, NC (United States); Hitchcock, Ying J. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Wolfson, Aaron H. [University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, FL (United States); DeLaney, Thomas F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Objective: To develop a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) atlas delineating gross tumor volume (GTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) to be used for preoperative radiotherapy of primary extremity soft tissue sarcoma (STS). Methods and Materials: A consensus meeting was held during the RTOG meeting in January 2010 to reach agreement about GTV and CTV delineation on computed tomography (CT) images for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS. Data were presented to address the local extension of STS. Extensive discussion ensued to develop optimal criteria for GTV and CTV delineation on CT images. Results: A consensus was reached on appropriate CT-based GTV and CTV. The GTV is gross tumor defined by T1 contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance images. Fusion of magnetic resonance and images is recommended to delineate the GTV. The CTV for high-grade large STS typically includes the GTV plus 3-cm margins in the longitudinal directions. If this causes the field to extend beyond the compartment, the field can be shortened to include the end of a compartment. The radial margin from the lesion should be 1.5 cm, including any portion of the tumor not confined by an intact fascial barrier, bone, or skin surface. Conclusion: The consensus on GTV and CTV for preoperative radiotherapy of high-grade large extremity STS is available as web-based images and in a descriptive format through the RTOG. This is expected to improve target volume consistency and allow for rigorous evaluation of the benefits and risks of such treatment.

  5. Multicenter Study of Carbon-Ion Radiation Therapy for Mucosal Melanoma of the Head and Neck: Subanalysis of the Japan Carbon-Ion Radiation Oncology Study Group (J-CROS) Study (1402 HN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koto, Masashi, E-mail: koto.masashi@qst.go.jp [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Demizu, Yusuke [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno (Japan); Saitoh, Jun-ichi [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Suefuji, Hiroaki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA-HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Tsuji, Hiroshi [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Okimoto, Tomoaki [Department of Radiology, Hyogo Ion Beam Medical Center, Tatsuno (Japan); Ohno, Tatsuya [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Shioyama, Yoshiyuki [Ion Beam Therapy Center, SAGA-HIMAT Foundation, Tosu (Japan); Takagi, Ryo [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan); Nemoto, Kenji [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yamagata University Faculty of Medicine, Yamagata (Japan); Nakano, Takashi [Gunma University Heavy Ion Medical Center, Maebashi (Japan); Kamada, Tadashi [Hospital of the National Institute of Radiological Sciences, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Sciences and Technology, Chiba (Japan)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of carbon-ion radiation therapy (RT) for mucosal melanoma of the head and neck (MMHN) in the Japan Carbon-Ion Radiation Oncology Study Group study. Methods and Materials: Patients with MMHN with N0-1M0 status who were treated with carbon-ion RT at 4 institutions in Japan between November 2003 and December 2014 were analyzed retrospectively. Two hundred sixty patients (male, 111; female, 149; median age, 68 years) with histologically proven MMHN were enrolled. Results: Primary sites included the nasal cavity in 178 patients, paranasal sinuses in 43, oral cavity in 27, and pharynx in 12. Eighty-six patients had T3 tumors, 147 had T4a tumors, and 27 had T4b tumors. Two hundred fifty-one patients were diagnosed with N0 disease, and 9 with N1 disease. The median total dose and number of fractions were 57.6 Gy RBE (relative biological effectiveness) and 16, respectively. Chemotherapy including dimethyl traizeno imidazole carboxamide was used concurrently in 129 patients. The median follow-up duration was 22 months (range, 1-132 months). The 2-year overall survival and local control rates were 69.4% and 83.9%, respectively. Multivariate analysis showed that gross tumor volume and concurrent chemotherapy were significant prognostic factors for overall survival. Grade 3 and grade 4 late morbidities were observed in 27 and 7 patients (5 developed ipsilateral blindness, 1 mucosal ulcer, and 1 second malignant disease in the irradiated volume), respectively. No patients developed grade 5 late morbidities. Conclusion: Carbon-ion RT is a promising treatment option for MMHN.

  6. A Comparative Evaluation of Normal Tissue Doses for Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy for Hodgkin Lymphoma on the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study and Recent Children's Oncology Group Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Rachel; Ng, Angela [Department of Radiation Therapy, Princess Margaret Cancer Centre, Toronto, Ontario (Canada); Constine, Louis S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York (United States); Stovall, Marilyn [Division of Radiation Oncology, Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Armstrong, Gregory T. [Epidemiology/Cancer Control Department, St. Jude Children' s Research Hospital, Memphis, Tennessee (United States); Neglia, Joseph P. [Department of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota (United States); Friedman, Debra L. [Department of Pediatrics, Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Kelly, Kara [Division of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Stem Cell Transplant, Department of Pediatrics, Columbia University Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); FitzGerald, Thomas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Hodgson, David C., E-mail: David.hodgson@rmp.uhn.on.ca [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Toronto, and Radiation Medicine Program, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, Ontario (Canada)

    2016-06-01

    Purpose: Survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) are recognized to have an increased risk of delayed adverse health outcomes related to radiation therapy (RT). However, the necessary latency required to observe these late effects means that the estimated risks apply to outdated treatments. We sought to compare the normal tissue dose received by children treated for HL and enrolled in the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) (diagnosed 1970-1986) with that of patients treated in recent Children's Oncology Group (COG) trials (enrolled 2002-2012). Methods and Materials: RT planning data were obtained for 50 HL survivors randomly sampled from the CCSS cohort and applied to computed tomography planning data sets to reconstruct the normal tissue dosimetry. For comparison, the normal tissue dosimetry data were obtained for all 191 patients with full computed tomography–based volumetric RT planning on COG protocols AHOD0031 and AHOD0831. Results: For early-stage patients, the mean female breast dose in the COG patients was on average 83.5% lower than that for CCSS patients, with an absolute reduction of 15.5 Gy. For advanced-stage patients, the mean breast dose was decreased on average by 70% (11.6 Gy average absolute dose reduction). The mean heart dose decreased on average by 22.9 Gy (68.6%) and 17.6 Gy (56.8%) for early- and advanced-stage patients, respectively. All dose comparisons for breast, heart, lung, and thyroid were significantly lower for patients in the COG trials than for the CCSS participants. Reductions in the prescribed dose were a major contributor to these dose reductions. Conclusions: These are the first data quantifying the significant reduction in the normal tissue dose using actual, rather than hypothetical, treatment plans for children with HL. These findings provide useful information when counseling families regarding the risks of contemporary RT.

  7. Epigenetic therapies for non-oncology indications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Best, Jonathan D; Carey, Nessa

    2010-12-01

    Chronic and degenerative disorders are a major, and growing, human health burden, and current treatments are in many cases inadequate or very expensive. Epigenetic therapies are attractive options for treating such disorders because they manipulate the processes that maintain cells in an abnormal transcriptional state. The challenges lie in identifying the most appropriate diseases and the enzymes that should be targeted. This review describes the different approaches that can be used to address this problem, focusing particularly on CNS disorders (especially mental retardation, neurodegenerative disease, psychiatric disorders and drug addiction), diabetes and diabetic complications, and autoimmunity and inflammatory diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. [Smoking cessation therapy in thoracic oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruppert, A-M; Amrioui, F; Gounant, V; Wislez, M; Bouvier, F; Cadranel, J

    2013-10-01

    In France, the number of tobacco-related deaths is estimated at 73,000 per year, including 44,000 from cancer and more than 20,000 from lung cancer (LC). Smoking cessation is the most effective measure to reduce the epidemic of LC, but it is also important in the management of patients with LC regardless on stage. In localized cancers, continuing to smoke is associated with decreased survival by increasing the risk of recurrence and of developing a second cancer. During the perioperative period, smoking cessation reduces infectious complications and length of hospitalization. At all stages of the cancer, smoking cessation improves dyspnoea and appetite, and reduces fatigue, leading to improved quality of life. Tobacco addiction causes a strong physical, psychological and behavioral dependence, explaining the high rate of recurrence at 1year of approximately 80%. Nicotine replacement therapy is indicated in cases of physical addiction to nicotine. Cognitive behavioral therapy helps the smoker to get rid of the smoking habit and is important in preventing relapse. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Decline in Tested and Self-Reported Cognitive Functioning After Prophylactic Cranial Irradiation for Lung Cancer: Pooled Secondary Analysis of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Trials 0212 and 0214

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gondi, Vinai, E-mail: vgondi@chicagocancer.org [Central Dupage Hospital Cancer Center, Warrenville, Illinois (United States); University of Wisconsin Comprehensive Cancer Center, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Paulus, Rebecca [Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Statistical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bruner, Deborah W. [Nell Hodgson Woodfull School of Nursing, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Meyers, Christina A. [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Gore, Elizabeth M. [Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Wolfson, Aaron [University of Miami School of Medicine, Miami, Florida (United States); Werner-Wasik, Maria [Thomas Jefferson University Hospital, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Sun, Alexander Y. [Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Choy, Hak [University of Texas Southwestern Moncreif Cancer Center, Fort Worth, Texas (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, Michigan (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: To assess the impact of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) on self-reported cognitive functioning (SRCF), a functional scale on the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Core Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30). Methods and Materials: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) protocol 0214 randomized patients with locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer to PCI or observation; RTOG 0212 randomized patients with limited-disease small cell lung cancer to high- or standard-dose PCI. In both trials, Hopkins Verbal Learning Test (HVLT)-Recall and -Delayed Recall and SRCF were assessed at baseline (after locoregional therapy but before PCI or observation) and at 6 and 12 months. Patients developing brain relapse before follow-up evaluation were excluded. Decline was defined using the reliable change index method and correlated with receipt of PCI versus observation using logistic regression modeling. Fisher's exact test correlated decline in SRCF with HVLT decline. Results: Of the eligible patients pooled from RTOG 0212 and RTOG 0214, 410 (93%) receiving PCI and 173 (96%) undergoing observation completed baseline HVLT or EORTC QLQ-C30 testing and were included in this analysis. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was associated with a higher risk of decline in SRCF at 6 months (odds ratio 3.60, 95% confidence interval 2.34-6.37, P<.0001) and 12 months (odds ratio 3.44, 95% confidence interval 1.84-6.44, P<.0001). Decline on HVLT-Recall at 6 and 12 months was also associated with PCI (P=.002 and P=.002, respectively) but was not closely correlated with decline in SRCF at the same time points (P=.05 and P=.86, respectively). Conclusions: In lung cancer patients who do not develop brain relapse, PCI is associated with decline in HVLT-tested and self-reported cognitive functioning. Decline in HVLT and decline in SRCF are not closely correlated, suggesting that they may represent distinct elements of the cognitive spectrum.

  10. Oncology providers’ perspectives on endocrine therapy prescribing and management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wheeler SB

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Stephanie B Wheeler,1,2 Megan C Roberts,1 Diane Bloom,1 Katherine E Reeder-Hayes,2,3 Maya Espada,1 Jeffrey Peppercorn,4 Carol E Golin,5,6 Jo Anne Earp2,5 1Department of Health Policy and Management, 2Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center, 3Division of Hematology and Oncology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, 4Division of Hematology/Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, 5Department of Health Behavior, 6Department of Medicine, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, NC, USA Purpose: Adjuvant endocrine therapy (ET can reduce the risk of recurrence among females with hormone receptor-positive breast cancer. Overall, initiation and adherence to ET are suboptimal, though reasons are not well described. The study’s objective was to better understand ET decision making, prescribing, and patient management from oncology providers’ perspectives.Methods: Using purposive sampling, we recruited oncology providers who saw five or more breast cancer patients per week (n=20. We conducted 30–45-minute telephone interviews, using a semistructured guide to elicit perspectives on ET use. We used thematic content analysis to systematically identify categories of meaning and double-coded transcripts using Atlas.ti.Results: Providers recommend ET to all eligible patients except those with contraindications or other risk factors. Providers base their ET prescribing decisions on the patient’s menopausal status, side effects, and comorbidities. ET is typically discussed multiple times: at the onset of breast cancer treatment and in more detail after other treatment completion. Providers felt that the associated recurrence risk reduction is the most compelling argument for patients during ET decision making. While providers rarely perceived noninitiation as a problem, nonadherence was prevalent, often due to unresolvable side effects.Conclusion: From the clinicians’ perspectives, side effects from

  11. Long-term results of Dutch Childhood Oncology Group studies for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia from 1984 to 2004

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, W. A.; van der Pal-de Bruin, K. M.; Veerman, A. J. P.; Fiocco, M.; Bierings, M.; Pieters, R.

    The Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) has used two treatment strategies for children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) based on Pinkel's St Jude Total Therapy or the Berlin-Frankfurt-Munster (BFM) backbone. In four successive protocols, 1734 children were treated. Studies ALL-6 and ALL-9

  12. Immunotherapy Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology (iRANO): A Report of the RANO Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Hideho; Weller, Michael; Huang, Raymond; Finocchiaro, Gaetano; Gilbert, Mark R.; Wick, Wolfgang; Ellingson, Benjamin M.; Hashimoto, Naoya; Pollack, Ian F.; Brandes, Alba A.; Franceschi, Enrico; Herold-Mende, Christel; Nayak, Lakshmi; Panigrahy, Ashok; Pope, Whitney B.; Prins, Robert; Sampson, John H.; Wen, Patrick Y.; Reardon, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy represents a promising area of therapy among neuro-oncology patients. However, early phase studies reveal unique challenges associated with assessment of radiological changes reflecting delayed responses or therapy-induced inflammation. Clinical benefit, including long-term survival and tumor regression, can still occur following initial apparent progression or appearance of new lesions. Refinement of response assessment criteria for neuro-oncology patients undergoing immunotherapy is therefore warranted. A multinational and multidisciplinary panel of neuro-oncology immunotherapy experts describes immunotherapy response assessment for neuro-oncology (iRANO) criteria that are based on guidance for determination of tumor progression outlined by the immune-related response criteria (irRC) and the response assessment in neuro-oncology (RANO) working group. Among patients who demonstrate imaging findings meeting RANO criteria for progressive disease (PD) within six months of initiating immunotherapy including the development of new lesions, confirmation of radiographic progression on follow-up imaging is recommended provided that the patient is not significantly worse clinically. The proposed criteria also include guidelines for use of corticosteroids. The role of advanced imaging techniques and measurement of clinical benefit endpoints including neurologic and immunologic functions are reviewed. The iRANO guidelines put forth herein will evolve successively to improve their utility as further experience from immunotherapy trials in neuro-oncology accumulate. PMID:26545842

  13. Informed consent in oncology clinical trials: A Brown University Oncology Research Group prospective cross-sectional pilot study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Schumacher

    Full Text Available Informed consent forms (ICFs for oncology clinical trials have grown increasingly longer and more complex. We evaluated objective understanding of critical components of informed consent among patients enrolling in contemporary trials of conventional or novel biologic/targeted therapies.We evaluated ICFs for cancer clinical trials for length and readability, and patients registered on those studies were asked to complete a validated 14-question survey assessing their understanding of key characteristics of the trial. Mean scores were compared in groups defined by trial and patient characteristics.Fifty patients, of whom half participated in trials of immunotherapy or biologic/targeted agents and half in trials of conventional therapy, completed the survey. On average, ICFs for industry-originated trials (N = 9 trials were significantly longer (P < .0001 and had lower Flesch ease-of-reading scores (P = .003 than investigator-initiated trials (N = 11. At least 80% of patients incorrectly responded to three key questions which addressed the experimental nature of their trial therapy, its purported efficacy and potential risks relative to alternative treatments. The mean objective understanding score was 76.9±8.8, but it was statistically significantly lower for patients who had not completed high school (P = .011. The scores did not differ significantly by type of cancer therapy (P = .12 or trial sponsor (P = .38.Many participants enrolled on cancer trials had poor understanding of essential elements of their trial. In order to ensure true informed consent, innovative approaches, such as expanded in-person counseling adapted to the patient's education level or cultural characteristics should be evaluated across socio-demographic groups.Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01772511.

  14. Oral and dental late effects in survivors of childhood cancer: a Children's Oncology Group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Karen E; Migliorati, Cesar A; Hudson, Melissa M; McMullen, Kevin P; Kaste, Sue C; Ruble, Kathy; Guilcher, Gregory M T; Shah, Ami J; Castellino, Sharon M

    2014-07-01

    Multi-modality therapy has resulted in improved survival for childhood malignancies. The Children's Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancers provide practitioners with exposure- and risk-based recommendations for the surveillance and management of asymptomatic survivors who are at least 2 years from completion of therapy. This review outlines the pathophysiology and risks for oral and dental late effects in pediatric cancer survivors and the rationale for oral and dental screening recommended by the Children's Oncology Group. An English literature search for oral and dental complications of childhood cancer treatment was undertaken via MEDLINE and encompassed January 1975 to January 2013. Proposed guideline content based on the literature review was approved by a multi-disciplinary panel of survivorship experts and scored according to a modified version of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network "Categories of Consensus" system. The Children's Oncology Group oral-dental panel selected 85 relevant citations. Childhood cancer therapy may impact tooth development, salivary function, craniofacial development, and temporomandibular joint function placing some childhood cancer survivors at an increased risk for poor oral and dental health. Additionally, head and neck radiation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation increase the risk of subsequent malignant neoplasms in the oral cavity. Survivors require routine dental care to evaluate for potential side effects and initiate early treatment. Certain childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk for poor oral and dental health. Early identification of oral and dental morbidity and early interventions can optimize health and quality of life.

  15. Music therapy in relief of pain in oncology patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Franco

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate the perception of oncology patients with chronic pain as to the effects of music in alleviating pain, to identify if there are changes in the vital signs of these patients before and after the musicotherapy session, and to identify whether the intensity of pain is diminished after the music session as per an analogic scale of pain. Methods: This level II, descriptive-exploratory and cross-sectional study used a quantitative and qualitative approach. The sample consisted of ten oncology patients with chronic pain. Rresults: There was a reduction in vital signs and in intensity of pain in ten patients of the sample; after the music sessions, the patients reported a sensation of relief of pain, relaxation, and a belief in the power of music as a supplementary therapy. Cconclusions: Music showed an influence in reducing vital signs and pain intensity, and the patients perceived a reduction of pain and anxiety, and began to believe in music as a form of therapy.

  16. Pet therapy effects on oncological day hospital patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, Massimo; Trangeled, Karina; Mambrini, Andrea; Tagliani, Mauro; Ferrarini, Ada; Zanetti, Liana; Tartarini, Roberta; Pacetti, Paola; Cantore, Maurizio

    2007-01-01

    Pet therapy is utilised to improve the quality of life of patients with chronic diseases. The impact of AAA (animal-assisted activities), a kind of pet therapy, on oncological patients submitted to chemotherapy was evaluated. Two groups of patients receiving chemotherapy with (experimental group) or without AAA (control group) were compared. The 2 participating dogs have been trained by a cynophilist behaviourist and examined by a veterinarian. Before and after chemotherapy both groups of patients were asked to fill out a A.De.Ss.O. test questionnaire, a simplified Italian version of Kellner's Symptom Questionnaire. Arterial blood pressure, heart rate and arterial oxygen saturation were recorded. Depression improved only in the AAA group (p=0.01). Arterial oxygen saturation increased in the experimental group (p=0.004), while it decreased in the controls. AAA during chemotherapy reduces depression of patients and increases their arterial oxygen saturation.

  17. Phase 2 trial design in neuro-oncology revisited: a report from the RANO group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galanis, Evanthia; Wu, Wenting; Cloughesy, Timothy; Lamborn, Kathleen; Mann, Bhupinder; Wen, Patrick Y; Reardon, David A; Wick, Wolfgang; Macdonald, David; Armstrong, Terri S; Weller, Michael; Vogelbaum, Michael; Colman, Howard; Sargent, Daniel J; van den Bent, Martin J; Gilbert, Mark; Chang, Susan

    2012-05-01

    Advances in the management of gliomas, including the approval of agents such as temozolomide and bevacizumab, have created an evolving therapeutic landscape in glioma treatment, thus affecting our ability to reliably use historical controls to comparatively assess the activity of new therapies. Furthermore, the increasing availability of novel, targeted agents--which are competing for a small patient population, in view of the low incidence of primary brain tumours--draws attention to the need to improve the efficiency of phase 2 clinical testing in neuro-oncology to expeditiously transition the most promising of these drugs or combinations to potentially practice-changing phase 3 trials. In this report from the Response Assessment in Neurooncology (RANO) group, we review phase 2 trial designs that can address these challenges and capitalise on scientific and clinical advances in brain tumour treatment in neuro-oncology to accelerate and optimise the selection of drugs deserving further testing in phase 3 trials. Although there is still a small role for single-arm and non-comparative phase 2 designs, emphasis is placed on the potential role that comparative randomised phase 2 designs--such as screening designs, selection designs, discontinuation designs, and adaptive designs, including seamless phase 2/3 designs--can have. The rational incorporation of these designs, as determined by the specific clinical setting and the trial's endpoints or goals, has the potential to substantially advance new drug development in neuro-oncology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Funding oncology clinical trials: are cooperative group trials sustainable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seow, Hsien-Yeang; Whelan, Patrick; Levine, Mark N; Cowan, Kathryn; Lysakowski, Barbara; Kowaleski, Brenda; Snider, Anne; Xu, Rebecca Y; Arnold, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    Many oncology clinical trials departments (CTDs) are in serious fiscal deficit and their sustainability is in jeopardy. This study investigates whether the payment models used to fund industry versus cooperative group trials contribute to the fiscal deficit of a CTD. We examined the lifetime costs of all cooperative group and industry trials activated in the CTD of a cancer center between 2007 and 2011. A trial's lifetime is defined as being from the date the first patient was accrued until the last patient's actual or projected final follow-up visit. For each trial, we calculated the lifetime monthly net income, which was defined as monthly revenue minus monthly costs. Data sources included study protocols, trial budgets, and accrual data. Of the 97 trials analyzed, 64 (66%) were cooperative group trials. The pattern of lifetime net income for cooperative group trials has a positive peak during patient accrual followed by a negative trough during follow-up. In contrast, the pattern for industry trials resembled an "l" shape. The patterns reflect the differing payment models: upfront lump-sum payments (cooperative group) versus milestone payments (industry). The negative trough in the lifetime net income of a cooperative group trial occurs because follow-up costs are typically not funded or are underfunded. CTDs accrue more patients in new trials to offset that deficit. The CTD uses revenue from accrual to existing trials to cross-subsidize past trials in follow-up. As the number of patients on follow-up increases, the fiscal deficit grows larger each year, perpetuating the cycle.

  19. Recommendations from the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group for the treatment of metastatic renal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellmunt, Joaquim; Calvo, Emiliano; Castellano, Daniel; Climent, Miguel Angel; Esteban, Emilio; García del Muro, Xavier; González-Larriba, José Luis; Maroto, Pablo; Trigo, José Manuel

    2009-03-01

    For almost the last two decades, interleukin-2 and interferon-alpha have been the only systemic treatment options available for metastatic renal cell carcinoma. However, in recent years, five new targeted therapies namely sunitinib, sorafenib, temsirolimus, everolimus and bevacizumab have demonstrated clinical activity in these patients. With the availability of new targeted agents that are active in this disease, there is a need to continuously update the treatment algorithm of the disease. Due to the important advances obtained, the Spanish Oncology Genitourinary Group (SOGUG) has considered it would be useful to review the current status of the disease, including the genetic and molecular biology factors involved, the current predicting models for development of metastases as well as the role of surgery, radiotherapy and systemic therapies in the early- or late management of the disease. Based on this previous work, a treatment algorithm was developed.

  20. Gynecologic oncology group strategies to improve timeliness of publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bialy, Sally; Blessing, John A; Stehman, Frederick B; Reardon, Anne M; Blaser, Kim M

    2013-08-01

    The Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) is a multi-institution cooperative group funded by the National Cancer Institute to conduct clinical trials encompassing clinical and basic scientific research in gynecologic malignancies. These results are disseminated via publication in peer-reviewed journals. This process requires collaboration of numerous investigators located in diverse cancer research centers. Coordination of manuscript development is positioned within the Statistical and Data Center (SDC), thus allowing the SDC personnel to manage the process and refine strategies to promote earlier dissemination of results. A major initiative to improve timeliness utilizing the assignment, monitoring, and enforcement of deadlines for each phase of manuscript development is the focus of this investigation. Document improvement in timeliness via comparison of deadline compliance and time to journal submission due to expanded administrative and technologic initiatives implemented in 2006. Major steps in the publication process include generation of first draft by the First Author and submission to SDC, Co-author review, editorial review by Publications Subcommittee, response to journal critique, and revision. Associated with each step are responsibilities of First Author to write or revise, collaborating Biostatistician to perform analysis and interpretation, and assigned SDC Clinical Trials Editorial Associate to format/revise according to journal requirements. Upon the initiation of each step, a deadline for completion is assigned. In order to improve efficiency, a publications database was developed to track potential steps in manuscript development that enables the SDC Director of Administration and the Publications Subcommittee Chair to assign, monitor, and enforce deadlines. They, in turn, report progress to Group Leadership through the Operations Committee. The success of the strategies utilized to improve the GOG publication process was assessed by comparing the

  1. Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group: Development of the Assessment of New Radiation Oncology Technology and Treatments (ANROTAT) Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duchesne, Gillian M; Grand, Mel; Kron, Tomas; Haworth, Annette; Corry, June; Jackson, Michael; Ng, Michael; Besuijen, Deidre; Carter, Hannah E; Martin, Andrew; Schofield, Deborah; Gebski, Val; Torony, Joan; Kovacev, Olga; Amin, Rowena; Burmeister, Bryan

    2015-06-01

    The study aim was to develop a generic framework to derive the parameters to populate health-economic models for the rapid evaluation of new techniques and technologies in radiation oncology. A draft framework was developed through horizon scanning for relevant technologies, literature review to identify framework models, and a workshop program with radiation oncology professionals, biostatisticians, health economists and consumers to establish the Framework's structure. It was tested using four clinical protocols, comparing intensity modulated with 3D conformal therapy (post-prostatectomy, anal canal and nasopharynx) and image-guided radiation therapy techniques with off-line review of portal imaging (in the intact prostate). The draft generic research framework consisted of five sequential stages, each with a number of components, and was assessed as to its suitability for deriving the evidence needed to populate the decision-analytic models required for the health-economic evaluations. A final Framework was established from this experience for use by future researchers to provide evidence of clinical efficacy and cost-utility for other novel techniques. The four clinical treatment sites tested during the project were considered suitable to use in future evaluations. Development of a generic research framework to predict early and long-term clinical outcomes, combined with health-economic data, produced a generally applicable method for the rapid evaluation of new techniques and technologies in radiation oncology. Its application to further health technology assessments in the radiation oncology sector will allow further refinement and support its generalisability. © 2014 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  2. Oncolytic VSV Primes Differential Responses to Immuno-oncology Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durham, Nicholas M; Mulgrew, Kathy; McGlinchey, Kelly; Monks, Noel R; Ji, Hong; Herbst, Ronald; Suzich, JoAnn; Hammond, Scott A; Kelly, Elizabeth J

    2017-08-02

    Vesicular stomatitis virus encoding the IFNβ transgene (VSV-IFNβ) is a mediator of potent oncolytic activity and is undergoing clinical evaluation for the treatment of solid tumors. Emerging preclinical and clinical data suggest treatment of tumors with oncolytic viruses may sensitize tumors to checkpoint inhibitors and increase the anti-tumor immune response. New generations of immuno-oncology molecules including T cell agonists are entering clinical development and could be hypothesized to enhance the activity of oncolytic viruses, including VSV-IFNβ. Here, we show that VSV-IFNβ exhibits multiple mechanisms of action, including direct cell killing, stimulation of an innate immune response, recruitment of CD8 T cells, and depletion of T regulatory cells. Moreover, VSV-IFNβ promotes the establishment of a CD8 T cell response to endogenous tumor antigens. Our data demonstrate a significant enhancement of anti-tumor function for VSV-IFNβ when combined with checkpoint inhibitors, but not OX40 agonists. While the addition of checkpoint inhibitors to VSV-IFNβ generated robust tumor growth inhibition, it resulted in no increase in viral replication, transgene expression, or immunophenotypic changes beyond treatment with VSV-IFNβ alone. We hypothesize that tumor-specific T cells generated by VSV-IFNβ retain activity due to a lack of immune exhaustion when checkpoint inhibitors were used. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Music therapy services in pediatric oncology: a national clinical practice review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucquet, Belinda; Leung, Maggie

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results of a national clinical practice review conducted in Australia of music therapy services in pediatric oncology hospitals. Literature specifically related to music therapy and symptom management in pediatric oncology is reviewed. The results from a national benchmarking survey distributed to all music therapists working with children with cancer in Australian pediatric hospitals are discussed. Patient and family feedback provided from a quality improvement activity conducted at a major pediatric tertiary hospital is summarized, and considerations for future growth as a profession and further research is proposed. © 2014 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  4. [Ablative therapy in kidney cancer: Oncological, functional, perioperative outcomes and cost].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouracade, P; Tricard, T; Gangi, A; Cathelineau, X; Lang, H

    2017-11-01

    The incidence of kidney cancer has increased significantly over the past few decades presumably due to the increased use of imaging. The aim of this article is to describe contemporary outcomes of ablative therapy and to compare them to other therapeutic options in terms of oncological, functional, perioperative outcomes and cost. We searched MEDLINE ® , Embase ® , using (MeSH) words; from January 2005 through May 2017, and we looked for all the studies. Investigators graded the strength of evidence in terms of methodology, language and relevance. Ninety-one articles were analyzed. We described the outcomes of ablative therapy in relation to the energy used and the approach, and compared these outcomes to the other therapeutic options in terms of oncological, functional and perioperative outcomes. We analyzed these studies in order to search for predictive factors influencing the results of ablative therapy. We also analyzed the economic burden of small renal tumor management. The strength of evidence is based almost entirely on retrospective studies and is susceptible to the inherent limitations of this study design. Although, the evidence was low among studies, our revue showed that, in elderly patients treated with ablative therapy for cT1a tumors, the cancer-specific survival was comparable to partial nephrectomy with differences in overall survival that are explained by competing risks of death in the old population. Considering the functional results, the renal function preservation seems to be comparable between the 2 groups while the perioperative morbidity is higher in the partial nephrectomy group. The evidence base medicine at this time cannot support the extension of the indications of ablative therapy beyond the actual implementations. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Clinicopathologic Significance of Mismatch Repair Defects in Endometrial Cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMeekin, D Scott; Tritchler, David L; Cohn, David E; Mutch, David G; Lankes, Heather A; Geller, Melissa A; Powell, Matthew A; Backes, Floor J; Landrum, Lisa M; Zaino, Richard; Broaddus, Russell D; Ramirez, Nilsa; Gao, Feng; Ali, Shamshad; Darcy, Kathleen M; Pearl, Michael L; DiSilvestro, Paul A; Lele, Shashikant B; Goodfellow, Paul J

    2016-09-01

    The clinicopathologic significance of mismatch repair (MMR) defects in endometrioid endometrial cancer (EEC) has not been definitively established. We undertook tumor typing to classify MMR defects to determine if MMR status is prognostic or predictive. Primary EECs from NRG/GOG0210 patients were assessed for microsatellite instability (MSI), MLH1 methylation, and MMR protein expression. Each tumor was assigned to one of four MMR classes: normal, epigenetic defect, probable mutation (MMR defect not attributable to MLH1 methylation), or MSI-low. The relationships between MMR classes and clinicopathologic variables were assessed using contingency table tests and Cox proportional hazard models. A total of 1,024 tumors were assigned to MMR classes. Epigenetic and probable mutations in MMR were significantly associated with higher grade and more frequent lymphovascular space invasion. Epigenetic defects were more common in patients with higher International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage. Overall, there were no differences in outcomes. Progression-free survival was, however, worse for women whose tumors had epigenetic MMR defects compared with the MMR normal group (hazard ratio, 1.37; P < .05; 95% CI, 1.00 to 1.86). An exploratory analysis of interaction between MMR status and adjuvant therapy showed a trend toward improved progression-free survival for probable MMR mutation cases. MMR defects in EECs are associated with a number of well-established poor prognostic indicators. Women with tumors that had MMR defects were likely to have higher-grade cancers and more frequent lymphovascular space invasion. Surprisingly, outcomes in these patients were similar to patients with MMR normal tumors, suggesting that MMR defects may counteract the effects of negative prognostic factors. Altered immune surveillance of MMR-deficient tumors, and other host/tumor interactions, is likely to determine outcomes for patients with MMR-deficient tumors. © 2016 by American

  6. Group Music Therapy for Prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Xu, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of psychological problems is high in prisons. Many prisoners have unmet needs for appropriate treatments. Although previous studies have suggested music therapy to be a successful treatment modality for prisoners, more rigorous evidence is needed. This parallel randomised controlled...... study aims to investigate the effectiveness of group music therapy to reduce anxiety and depression, and raise self-esteem in prisoners. One hundred and ninety two inmates from a Chinese prison will be allocated to two groups through randomisation. The experimental group will participate in biweekly...... group music therapy for 10 weeks (20 sessions) while the control group will be placed on a waitlist. Anxiety, depression and self-esteem will be measured by self-report scales three times: before, at the middle, and at the end of the intervention. Logs by the participants and their daily routine...

  7. Palliative care and palliative radiation therapy education in radiation oncology: A survey of US radiation oncology program directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Randy L; Colbert, Lauren E; Jones, Joshua; Racsa, Margarita; Kane, Gabrielle; Lutz, Steve; Vapiwala, Neha; Dharmarajan, Kavita V

    The purpose of this study was to assess the state of palliative and supportive care (PSC) and palliative radiation therapy (RT) educational curricula in radiation oncology residency programs in the United States. We surveyed 87 program directors of radiation oncology residency programs in the United States between September 2015 and November 2015. An electronic survey on PSC and palliative RT education during residency was sent to all program directors. The survey consisted of questions on (1) perceived relevance of PSC and palliative RT to radiation oncology training, (2) formal didactic sessions on domains of PSC and palliative RT, (3) effective teaching formats for PSC and palliative RT education, and (4) perceived barriers for integrating PSC and palliative RT into the residency curriculum. A total of 57 responses (63%) was received. Most program directors agreed or strongly agreed that PSC (93%) and palliative radiation therapy (99%) are important competencies for radiation oncology residents and fellows; however, only 67% of residency programs had formal educational activities in principles and practice of PSC. Most programs had 1 or more hours of formal didactics on management of pain (67%), management of neuropathic pain (65%), and management of nausea and vomiting (63%); however, only 35%, 33%, and 30% had dedicated lectures on initial management of fatigue, assessing role of spirituality, and discussing advance care directives, respectively. Last, 85% of programs reported having a formal curriculum on palliative RT. Programs were most likely to have education on palliative radiation to brain, bone, and spine, but less likely on visceral, or skin, metastasis. Residency program directors believe that PSC and palliative RT are important competencies for their trainees and support increasing education in these 2 educational domains. Many residency programs have structured curricula on PSC and palliative radiation education, but room for improvement exists in

  8. Immuno-oncology: A changing paradigm in cancer therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omar Abdel-Rahman

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Immune checkpoint inhibitors are undeniably among the most important advances made in the field of cancer therapy in the past decade[1]. By releasing the immune system brakes that limit the activation of T-cells, they boost self-response against foreign antigens including cancer cells[2]. In the past three years, a number of checkpoint inhibitors have been approved for use in routine clinical settings. Ipilimumab was among the first to be approved for the management of melanoma in both adjuvant and metastatic settings[3-5].Meanwhile, nivolumab and pembrolizumab are two programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1-targeted monoclonal antibodies that have been approved for the treatment of advanced melanoma and advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC[6-11]. Moreover, nivolumab has also been approved for previously treated metastatic renal cell carcinoma and previously treated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma[9,12]. In addition to the aforementioned compounds, atezolizumab is a novel anti programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1 monoclonal antibody that has shown impressive activity for advanced urothelial carcinoma and previously treated NSCLC[13,14]. A number of other checkpoint inhibitors including avelumab, durvalumab, and tremelimumab are currently undergoing evaluation at different preclinical and clinical phases[15].However, the use of these agents presents a number of challenges to the treating physicians, most notably being the response evaluation criteria, the role of biomarkers, and the detection and management of peculiar toxicities associated with these agents. Given the peculiar response patterns observed with these agents, specific immune-related response evaluation criteria have been suggested and they are now widely used in different clinical settings[16]. Moreover, a number of biomarkers have been proposed as response predictors of these agents, particularly the PD-L1 status in association with anti-PD-L1 treatment[17,18]. Nonetheless

  9. Toward a Broader Role for Occupational Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duker, Leah I. Stein

    2016-01-01

    Supportive care in oncology helps people cope with cancer and its psychological, physical, and emotional side effects. However, cancer survivors report dissatisfaction with supportive care and a need for more psychosocial and self-management services. Occupational therapy practitioners represent an integral part of the supportive care team because their scope of practice emphasizes function. Through a focus on function, practitioners address the full spectrum of physical and psychosocial care. Currently, conceptualizations of occupational therapy for cancer survivors often focus solely on physical interventions and, therefore, do not represent the unique involvement of the profession in supportive oncology care. We advocate for a focused framework for occupational therapy practitioners in oncology as experts in function and providers of both physical and psychosocial treatments. Barriers to a focus on function are identified, and strategies are suggested for expanding involvement for the profession in supportive oncology care. PMID:27295001

  10. Music therapy in relief of pain in oncology patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mariana Franco; Andrea Bezerra Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the perception of oncology patients with chronic pain as to the effects of music in alleviating pain, to identify if there are changes in the vital signs of these patients before...

  11. Challenges with defining response to antitumor agents in pediatric neuro-oncology: a report from the response assessment in pediatric neuro-oncology (RAPNO) working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Katherine E; Poussaint, Tina Y; Vezina, Gilbert; Hargrave, Darren; Packer, Roger J; Goldman, Stewart; Wen, Patrick Y; Pollack, Ian F; Zurakowski, David; Kun, Larry E; Prados, Michael D; Rutkowski, Stefan; Kieran, Mark W

    2013-09-01

    Criteria for new drug approval include demonstration of efficacy. In neuro-oncology, this is determined radiographically utilizing tumor measurements on MRI scans. Limitations of this method have been identified where drug activity is not reflected in decreased tumor size. The RANO (Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology) working group was established to address limitations in defining endpoints for clinical trials in adult neuro-oncology and to develop standardized response criteria. RAPNO was subsequently established to address unique issues in pediatric neuro-oncology. The aim of this paper is to delineate response criteria issues in pediatric clinical trials as a basis for subsequent recommendations. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Response evaluation criteria for solid tumours in dogs (v1.0): a Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) consensus document.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, S M; Thamm, D H; Vail, D M; London, C A

    2015-09-01

    In veterinary medical oncology, there is currently no standardized protocol for assessing response to therapy in solid tumours. The lack of such a formalized guideline makes it challenging to critically compare outcome measures across various treatment protocols. The Veterinary Cooperative Oncology Group (VCOG) membership consensus document presented here is based on the recommendations of a subcommittee of American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine (ACVIM) board-certified veterinary oncologists. This consensus paper has used the human response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST v1.1) as a framework to establish standard procedures for response assessment in canine solid tumours that is meant to be easy to use, repeatable and applicable across a variety of clinical trial structures in veterinary oncology. It is hoped that this new canine RECIST (cRECIST v1.0) will be adopted within the veterinary oncology community and thereby facilitate the comparison of current and future treatment protocols used for companion animals with cancer. © 2013 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  13. Patterns of Relapse From a Phase 3 Study of Response-Based Therapy for Intermediate-Risk Hodgkin Lymphoma (AHOD0031): A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Friedman, Debra L. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Schwartz, Cindy L. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Chen, Lu [Children' s Oncology Group, Arcadia, California (United States); FitzGerald, T.J. [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); McCarten, Kathleen M. [Rhode Island Hospital/Warren Alpert Medical School at Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Kessel, Sandy K.; Iandoli, Matt [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Constine, Louis S. [University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: The study was designed to determine whether response-based therapy improves outcomes in intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma. We examined patterns of first relapse in the study. Patients and Methods: From September 2002 to July 2010, 1712 patients <22 years old with stage I-IIA with bulk, I-IIAE, I-IIB, and IIIA-IVA with or without doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide were enrolled. Patients were categorized as rapid (RER) or slow early responders (SER) after 2 cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, etoposide, prednisone, and cyclophosphamide (ABVE-PC). The SER patients were randomized to 2 additional ABVE-PC cycles or augmented chemotherapy with 21 Gy involved field radiation therapy (IFRT). RER patients were stipulated to undergo 2 additional ABVE-PC cycles and were then randomized to 21 Gy IFRT or no further treatment if complete response (CR) was achieved. RER without CR patients were non-randomly assigned to 21 Gy IFRT. Relapses were characterized without respect to site (initial, new, or both; and initial bulk or initial nonbulk), and involved field radiation therapy field (in-field, out-of-field, or both). Patients were grouped by treatment assignment (SER; RER/no CR; RER/CR/IFRT; and RER/CR/no IFRT). Summary statistics were reported. Results: At 4-year median follow-up, 244 patients had experienced relapse, 198 of whom were fully evaluable for review. Those who progressed during treatment (n=30) or lacked relapse imaging (n=16) were excluded. The median time to relapse was 12.8 months. Of the 198 evaluable patients, 30% were RER/no CR, 26% were SER, 26% were RER/CR/no IFRT, 16% were RER/CR/IFRT, and 2% remained uncategorized. The 74% and 75% relapses involved initially bulky and nonbulky sites, respectively. First relapses rarely occurred at exclusively new or out-of-field sites. By contrast, relapses usually occurred at nodal sites of initial bulky and nonbulky disease. Conclusion: Although

  14. Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Evidence-Based Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Larissa A; Bohlke, Kari; Powell, Matthew A; Fader, Amanda N; Franklin, Gregg E; Lee, Larissa J; Matei, Daniela; Coallier, Lourie; Wright, Alexi A

    2015-09-10

    To provide guidance on the role of adjuvant radiation therapy in the treatment of endometrial cancer. "The Role of Postoperative Radiation Therapy for Endometrial Cancer: An ASTRO Evidence-Based Guideline" by Klopp et al, published in 2014 in Practical Radiation Oncology, was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) guideline content and recommendations were further reviewed by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Endorsement Panel. The ASCO Endorsement Panel determined that the recommendations from the ASTRO guideline are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the ASTRO guideline with several qualifying statements. Surveillance without adjuvant radiation therapy is a reasonable option for women without residual disease in the hysterectomy specimen and for women with grade 1 or 2 cancer and Endorsement Panel added qualifying statements to the ASTRO recommendations to provide stronger statements in favor of chemotherapy (with or without radiation therapy). © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  15. Molecular targeted therapy in modern oncology: Imaging assessment of treatment response and toxicities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krajewski, Katherine M.; Braschi-Amirfarzan, Marta; DiPiro, Pamela J.; Jagannathan, Jyothi P.; Shinagare, Atul B. [Dept. of of Imaging, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Oncology is a rapidly evolving field with a shift toward personalized cancer treatment. The use of therapies targeted to the molecular features of individual tumors and the tumor microenvironment has become much more common. In this review, anti-angiogenic and other molecular targeted therapies are discussed, with a focus on typical and atypical response patterns and imaging manifestations of drug toxicities.

  16. A critical appraisal of the clinical utility of proton therapy in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang D

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Dongxu WangDepartment of Radiation Oncology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA, USAAbstract: Proton therapy is an emerging technology for providing radiation therapy to cancer patients. The depth dose distribution of a proton beam makes it a preferable radiation modality as it reduces radiation to the healthy tissue outside the tumor, compared with conventional photon therapy. While theoretically beneficial, its clinical values are still being demonstrated from the increasing number of patients treated with proton therapy, from several dozen proton therapy centers around the world. High equipment and facility costs are often the major obstacle for its wider adoption. Because of the high cost and lack of definite clinical evidence of its superiority, proton therapy treatment faces criticism on its cost-effectiveness. Technological development is causing a gradual lowering of costs, and research and clinical studies are providing further evidence on its clinical utility.Keywords: proton therapy, radiation, cancer, oncology

  17. Use of alternative therapy among pediatric oncology patients in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, C H; Tsai, J L; Li, W; Chen, H M; Lee, S C; Lin, C F; Yang, C P

    2000-01-01

    Both alternative medicine and western medicine have been commonly used to treat pediatric cancer patients in Taiwan. Each has its own intrinsic strengths and weaknesses and they can be complementary. Little is known about medical help-seeking behaviors of parents of pediatric cancer patients, especially those related to alternative therapies. This study investigated the extent and parental expectations on use of alternative therapies. All primary caregivers of 63 eligible patients were interviewed. Use of alternative therapies, regardless of education level or social status of their families, is prevalent (n = 46, 73%) in Taiwan. Commonly used alternative therapies included, in order of popularity, formulated functional food (n = 22, 48%), temple worship/shamanism (n = 19, 40%), traditional Chinese medicine (n = 9, 20%), secret recipes/herbs (n = 13, 28%), and diet supplements (n = 9, 19%). Such practices generally occur without medical guidance from oncologists, largely because of poor interactions between parents and oncologists. Future efforts should be made to encourage both parents and oncologists to discuss this issue. Nurses may serve as mediators by developing mutual trust and a sharing relationship between these groups.

  18. The Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group: past activities, current status and future direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagawa, Kazuo; Watanabe, Shun-Ichi; Kunitoh, Hideo; Asamura, Hisao

    2017-03-01

    The Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group of the Japan Clinical Oncology Group was organized in 1986. Initially, 26 collaborative institutions participated. In the early period, the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group focused on combined modality therapies and conducted nine trials, including JCOG9101: adjuvant chemotherapy for resected small-cell lung cancer, and JCOG9806: induction chemoradiotherapy followed by surgery for superior sulcus tumor, which greatly impacted the treatment strategies for some special kinds of lung cancer. Since the 2000s, the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group has defined radiologically noninvasive adenocarcinoma: JCOG0201 and investigated adequate modes of surgical resection for small-sized non-small cell lung cancer: JCOG0802, JCOG0804 and JCOG1211. The accrual of these trials is now complete and we are waiting for the maturation of follow-up data. In addition, two adjuvant trials have been conducted: JCOG0707; a Phase III study of adjuvant chemotherapy for resected pathological stage I (T1 > 2 cm) non-small cell lung cancer, and JCOG1205; a Phase III study of adjuvant chemotherapy for completely resected pulmonary high-grade neuroendocrine tumor. The accrual of JCOG0707 is complete and we are waiting for the maturation of follow-up data. At present, 44 institutions are active members of the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group. In addition to thoracic surgeons, medical oncologists, pathologists and radiotherapists are participating in the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group. The Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group continues to conduct various clinical trials in an effort to improve survival in patients with lung cancer. In this review, we provide an overview of the past 30 years, as well as the present status and future direction of the Lung Cancer Surgical Study Group. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A Gynecologic Oncology Group Randomized Phase III Trial of Whole Abdominal Irradiation (WAI) vs Cisplatin-Ifosfamide and Mesna (CIM) as Post-Surgical Therapy in Stage I-IV Carcinosarcoma (CS) of the Uterus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfson, Aaron H.; Brady, Mark F.; Rocereto, Thomas; Mannel, Robert S.; Lee, Yi-Chun; Futoran, Robert J.; Cohn, David E.; Ioffe, Olga B.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE After initial surgery, there has been no established consensus regarding adjunctive therapy for patients with uterine carcinosarcoma (CS). This study was designed to compare patient outcome following treatment with adjuvant whole abdominal irradiation (WAI) versus (vs) chemotherapy for patients with this rare group of female pelvic malignancies. PATIENTS AND METHODS Eligible, consenting women with stage I-IV uterine CS, no more than 1 cm postsurgical residuum and/or no extra-abdominal spread had their treatments randomly assigned as either WAI or three cycles of cisplatin (C), ifosfamide (I), and mesna (M). RESULTS 232 patients were enrolled, of whom 206 (WAI=105; CIM=101) were deemed eligible. Patient demographics and characteristics were similar between arms. FIGO stage (both arms) was: I=64 (31%); II=26 (13%); III=92 (45%); IV=24 (12%). The estimated crude probability of recurring within 5 years was 58% (WAI) and 52% (CIM). Adjusting for stage and age, the recurrence rate was 21% lower for CIM patients than for WAI patients, (relative hazard [RH] = 0.789, 95% confidence interval [CI]: (0.530 –1.176), p = 0.245, 2-tail test). The estimated death rate was 29% lower among the CIM group (RH = 0.712, 95% CI: 0.484 – 1.048, p = 0.085, 2-tail test). CONCLUSION We did not find a statistically significant advantage in recurrence rate or survival for adjuvant CIM over WAI in patients with uterine CS. However, the observed differences favor the use of combination chemotherapy in future trials. PMID:17822748

  20. Oral and dental late effects in survivors of childhood cancer: a Children’s Oncology Group report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliorati, Cesar A.; Hudson, Melissa M.; McMullen, Kevin P.; Kaste, Sue C.; Ruble, Kathy; Guilcher, Gregory M. T.; Shah, Ami J.; Castellino, Sharon M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Multi-modality therapy has resulted in improved survival for childhood malignancies. The Children’s Oncology Group Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines for Survivors of Childhood, Adolescent, and Young Adult Cancers provide practitioners with exposure- and risk-based recommendations for the surveillance and management of asymptomatic survivors who are at least 2 years from completion of therapy. This review outlines the pathophysiology and risks for oral and dental late effects in pediatric cancer survivors and the rationale for oral and dental screening recommended by the Children’s Oncology Group. Methods An English literature search for oral and dental complications of childhood cancer treatment was undertaken via MEDLINE and encompassed January 1975 to January 2013. Proposed guideline content based on the literature review was approved by a multi-disciplinary panel of survivorship experts and scored according to a modified version of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network “Categories of Consensus” system. Results The Children’s Oncology Group oral-dental pan el selected 85 relevant citations. Childhood cancer therapy may impact tooth development, salivary function, craniofacial development, and temporomandibular joint function placing some childhood cancer survivors at an increased risk for poor oral and dental health. Addition ally, head and neck radiation and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation increase the risk of subsequent ma lignant neoplasms in the oral cavity. Survivors require routine dental care to evaluate for potential side effects and initiate early treatment. Conclusions Certain childhood cancer survivors are at an increased risk for poor oral and dental health. Early identification of oral and dental morbidity and early interventions can optimize health and quality of life. PMID:24781353

  1. Integrative Therapy Use for Management of Side Effects and Toxicities Experienced by Pediatric Oncology Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shana S Jacobs

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Integrative Therapies (IT, otherwise known as Complementary and Alternative Medicine, are widely used among pediatric oncology patients, despite a paucity of available evidence. This review summarizes surveys that describe the prevalence of IT use by pediatric oncology patients, both during therapy and in survivorship, as well as the modalities being used. Additionally, the evidence that exists for specific treatments that appear to be efficacious in controlling specific symptoms is described. Finally, there are recommendations for practitioners on how to best counsel patients about IT use.

  2. Special aspects of social support: Qualitative analysis of oncologic rehabilitation through a belly dancing peer support group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalai, M; Szirmai, A; Füge, K; Makai, A; Erdélyi, G; Prémusz, V; Bódis, J

    2017-11-01

    Tumour-related peer support groups (PSGs) show long-term development in quality of life and coping, and decrease distress in cancer care. To clarify channels of social support in oncologic rehabilitation by combined exercise and psychosocial therapy, individual semi-structured interviews were conducted after 1 year additional belly dance rehabilitation in a closed PSG among 51 patients with malignant tumour diagnosis in Budapest, Hungary. Interview data were transcribed and analysed using qualitative content analysis (ATLAS.ti 6 Win). Results suggest that group experience provides emotional-, practical- and informational support. We could point out specific social effects of "role model" function and extend the coping model. The group dispose all the features of effective suggestion and may be effectively applied as additional therapy for patients with malignancies. The extended coping model and the introduction of "role model" function could be useful for PSGs' efficacy assessment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. [Diagnosis and therapy of pain in pediatric oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pothmann, R; Göbel, U

    1986-01-01

    Pain in pediatric oncology must be taken care of after years of neglection. On an average of 62% of tumours pain is of therapeutic relevance. In cancer relapse and final states incidence of pain increases up to 90%. Treatment of acute pain is not difficult, chronic pain however affords a special procedure: individual dosage with optimal suppression of pain whole day long, often combination of different methods, will give sufficient longtime results. Around 4/5 of pediatric cancer pain can be treated by pharmacological regime using central and antiphlogistic analgesics. Additional methods are local anesthesia, transcutaneous nerve stimulation, physiotherapy, psychotherapy and seldom neurosurgical intervention. The optimal treatment of cancer pain is part of a consequent oncological procedure. Some more effort is necessary to reach the most possible quality of life in these children.

  4. Music therapy in relief of pain in oncology patients

    OpenAIRE

    Mariana Franco; Andrea Bezerra Rodrigues

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the perception of oncology patients with chronic pain as to the effects of music in alleviating pain, to identify if there are changes in the vital signs of these patients before and after the musicotherapy session, and to identify whether the intensity of pain is diminished after the music session as per an analogic scale of pain. Methods: This level II, descriptive-exploratory and cross-sectional study used a quantitative and qualitative approach. The sample consisted...

  5. Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and American College of Radiology Imaging Network Randomized Phase 2 Trial of Neoadjuvant Preoperative Paclitaxel/Cisplatin/Radiation Therapy (RT) or Irinotecan/Cisplatin/RT in Esophageal Adenocarcinoma: Long-Term Outcome and Implications for Trial Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleinberg, Lawrence R., E-mail: kleinla@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Catalano, Paul J. [Department of Biostatistics and Computational Biology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, and Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Forastiere, Arlene A. [Department of Oncology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Keller, Steven M. [Department of Cardiovascular and Thoracic Surgery, Montefiore Medical Center, Bronx, NY (United States); Mitchel, Edith P. [Department of Medical Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Anne, Pramila Rani [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Benson, Al B. [Department of Medicine-Hematology/Oncology, Lurie Cancer Center, Northwestern University, Chicago, Illinois (United States)

    2016-03-15

    Purpose: Toxicity, pathologic complete response, and long-term outcomes are reported for the neoadjuvant therapies assessed in a randomized phase 2 Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group and American College of Radiology Imaging Network trial for operable esophageal adenocarcinoma, staged as II-IVa by endoscopy/ultrasonography (EUS). Methods and Materials: A total of 86 eligible patients began treatment. For arm A, preoperative chemotherapy was cisplatin, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and irinotecan, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, on day 1, 8, 22, 29 during 45 Gy radiation therapy (RT), 1.8 Gy per day over 5 weeks. Adjuvant therapy was cisplatin, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and irinotecan, 65 mg/m{sup 2} day 1, 8 every 21 days for 3 cycles. Arm B therapy was cisplatin, 30 mg/m{sup 2}, and paclitaxel, 50 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 with RT, followed by adjuvant cisplatin, 75 mg/m{sup 2}, and paclitaxel, 175 mg/m{sup 2}, day 1 every 21 days for 3 cycles. Stratification included EUS stage and performance status. Results: In arm A, median overall survival was 35 months, and 5-, 6-, and 7-year survival rates were 46%, 39%, and 35%, respectively, whereas for arm B, they were 21 months and 27%, 27%, and 23%, respectively. Median progression- or recurrence-free survival (PFS) was 39.8 months with a 3-year PFS of 50% for arm A and 12.4 months (P=.046) with 3-year PFS of 28% for arm B. Eighty percent of the observed incidents of progression occurred within 19 months. Survival did not differ significantly by EUS and performance status strata. Conclusions: Long-term survival was similar for both arms and did not appear superior to results achieved with other standard regimens.

  6. Mirror Therapy for Phantom Limb Pain at a Pediatric Oncology Institution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghelescu, Doralina L.; Kelly, Cassandra N.; Steen, Brenda D.; Wu, Jianrong; Wu, Huiyun; DeFeo, Brian M.; Scobey, Kristin; Burgoyne, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose/Objective Mirror therapy has not been reported for phantom limb pain (PLP) in pediatric oncology. Our aims are to describe the incidence and duration of PLP post-amputation, the duration of follow-up, pain scores and pain medications, and the differences between a group that received mirror therapy (MT) in addition to the standard treatment and a group that received only the standard treatment (non-MT). Methods A retrospective review of patients’ medical records from June 2009 to March 2015 was completed. The demographic characteristics, diagnoses and types of surgery were collected. The incidence and duration of PLP, duration of pain service follow-up, pain medications and pain scores were collected and analyzed using the Wilcoxon rank sum test. Results Of 21 patients who underwent amputations (median age 13 years, range, 8–24 years), most common primary diagnosis osteosarcoma), 18 (85.7%) experienced PLP; 38.9% of them experienced PLP at 1 year post-amputation (11.1% of the MT group and 66.7% of the non-MT group). The MT group and non-MT groups experienced PLP for a mean (± SD) of 246 (± 200) days, and 541 (± 363) days, respectively (p=0.08). The mean (SD) opioid doses (mg/kg/day) in the MT and non-MT groups were 0.81 (± 0.99) and 0.33 (± 0.31), respectively; the mean (SD) gabapentin doses (mg/kg/day) were 40.1 (± 21) for the MT group and 30.5 (± 11.5) for the non-MT group. Conclusion MT in children with cancer-related amputations is associated with lower incidence of PLP at 1 year and shorter duration of PLP. PMID:28163987

  7. A checklist for ascertaining study cohorts in oncology health services research using secondary data: report of the ISPOR oncology good outcomes research practices working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Kathy L; Berenson, Karina; Tina Shih, Ya-Chen; Foley, Kathleen A; Ganguli, Arijit; de Souza, Jonas; Yaghmour, Nicholas A; Shteynshlyuger, Alex

    2013-06-01

    The ISPOR Oncology Special Interest Group formed a working group at the end of 2010 to develop standards for conducting oncology health services research using secondary data. The first mission of the group was to develop a checklist focused on issues specific to selection of a sample of oncology patients using a secondary data source. A systematic review of the published literature from 2006 to 2010 was conducted to characterize the use of secondary data sources in oncology and inform the leadership of the working group prior to the construction of the checklist. A draft checklist was subsequently presented to the ISPOR membership in 2011 with subsequent feedback from the larger Oncology Special Interest Group also incorporated into the final checklist. The checklist includes six elements: identification of the cancer to be studied, selection of an appropriate data source, evaluation of the applicability of published algorithms, development of custom algorithms (if needed), validation of the custom algorithm, and reporting and discussions of the ascertainment criteria. The checklist was intended to be applicable to various types of secondary data sources, including cancer registries, claims databases, electronic medical records, and others. This checklist makes two important contributions to oncology health services research. First, it can assist decision makers and reviewers in evaluating the quality of studies using secondary data. Second, it highlights methodological issues to be considered when researchers are constructing a study cohort from a secondary data source. Copyright © 2013 International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. HER-2 expression is not prognostic in osteosarcoma; a Children's Oncology Group prospective biology study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorlick, Sarah; Barkauskas, Donald A; Krailo, Mark; Piperdi, Sajida; Sowers, Rebecca; Gill, Jonathan; Geller, David; Randall, R Lor; Janeway, Katherine; Schwartz, Cindy; Grier, Holcombe; Meyers, Paul A; Gorlick, Richard; Bernstein, Mark; Marina, Neyssa

    2014-09-01

    Since the initial reports of human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) expression as being prognostic in osteosarcoma, numerous small studies varying in the interpretation of the immunohistochemical (IHC) staining patterns have produced conflicting results. The Children's Oncology Group therefore embarked on a prospective biology study in a larger sample of patients to define in osteosarcoma the prognostic value of HER-2 expression using the methodology employed in the initial North American study describing an association between HER-2 expression and outcome. The analytic patient population was comprised of 149 patients with newly diagnosed osteosarcoma, 135 with localized disease and 14 with metastatic disease, all of whom had follow up clinical data. Paraffin embedded material from the diagnostic biopsy was stained with CB11 antibody and scored by two independent observers. Correlation of HER-2 IHC score and demographic variables was analyzed using a Fisher's exact test and correlation with survival using a Kaplan-Meier analysis. No association was found with HER-2 status and any of the demographic variables tested including the presence or absence of metastatic disease at diagnosis. No association was found between HER-2 status and either event free survival or overall survival in the patients with localized disease. HER-2 expression is not prognostic in osteosarcoma in the context of this large prospective study. HER-2 expression cannot be used as a basis for stratification of therapy. Identification of potential prognostic factors should occur in the context of large multi-institutional biology studies. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cardio-Oncology: How New Targeted Cancer Therapies and Precision Medicine Can Inform Cardiovascular Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellinger, Andrew M; Arteaga, Carlos L; Force, Thomas; Humphreys, Benjamin D; Demetri, George D; Druker, Brian J; Moslehi, Javid J

    2015-12-08

    Cardio-oncology (the cardiovascular care of cancer patients) has developed as a new translational and clinical field based on the expanding repertoire of mechanism-based cancer therapies. Although these therapies have changed the natural course of many cancers, several may also lead to cardiovascular complications. Many new anticancer drugs approved over the past decade are "targeted" kinase inhibitors that interfere with intracellular signaling contributing to tumor progression. Unexpected cardiovascular and cardiometabolic effects of patient treatment with these inhibitors have provided unique insights into the role of kinases in human cardiovascular biology. Today, an ever-expanding number of cancer therapies targeting novel kinases and other specific cellular and metabolic pathways are being developed and tested in oncology clinical trials. Some of these drugs may affect the cardiovascular system in detrimental ways and others perhaps in beneficial ways. We propose that the numerous ongoing oncology clinical trials are an opportunity for closer collaboration between cardiologists and oncologists to study the cardiovascular and cardiometabolic changes caused by the modulation of these pathways in patients. In this regard, cardio-oncology represents an opportunity and a novel platform for basic and translational investigation and can serve as a potential avenue for optimization of anticancer therapies and for cardiovascular research and drug discovery. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  10. Herpes simplex virus detection in oral mucosa lesions in patients undergoing oncologic therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sepúlveda Tebache, Ester; Brethauer Meier, Ursula; Jiménez Moraga, Marco; Morales Figueroa, Rocío; Rojas Castro, Jaime; Le Fort Canales, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The presence of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) has been a frequent detection in gingivitis and ulcerations of oral mucosa in patients undergoing oncologic therapy. In these patients, lesions tend to show atypical clinical patterns, leading to misdiagnosis. To detect HSV, using an ELISA test, in oral lesions of patients under oncologic therapy, to determine localization of these lesions in the oral cavity, to relate their presence with the general diagnosis of the patient and to compare the test results with the previous clinical diagnosis of the lesions. Thirty lesions where examined in nineteen pediatric patients under oncologic therapy. Direct samples of all lesions were taken and an ELISA test for HSV type I and II was applied to them. General diagnosis of the patients was consigned, as well as localization of the lesions in the oral cavity and clinical diagnosis of them. A database was elaborated with all the information. 33% of lesions were positive to the test, most of them in patients with acute myeloid leukemia. Localization of lesions was not restricted to areas of mucosa attached to periosteum, but also in areas like the dorsum of the tongue. Positive predictivity of clinical diagnosis was 56,25% and negative predictive index was 92,86%. Sensitivity of the test was 90% and specificity was 65%. It is very important to corroborate clinical diagnosis of gingivitis and ulcerative lesions of the oral cavity of patients under oncologic therapy with laboratory tests, because of the atypical clinical presentation that can lead to misdiagnosis.

  11. Multicenter phase II study of capecitabine plus cisplatin as first-line therapy for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-negative advanced gastric cancer: Yokohama Clinical Oncology Group Study YCOG1107.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kei; Kunisaki, Chikara; Kosaka, Takashi; Takagawa, Ryo; Takahashi, Masazumi; Izumisawa, Yusuke; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Sato, Sho; Tanaka, Yusaku; Yamaguchi, Naotaka; Kimura, Jun; Ono, Hidetaka A; Makino, Hirochika; Akiyama, Hirotoshi; Endo, Itaru

    2017-11-01

    S-1 plus cisplatin therapy is the recommended standard first-line regimen for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2)-negative advanced unresectable or recurrent gastric cancer (AGC) in the Japanese Gastric Cancer Treatment Guidelines. By contrast, capecitabine plus cisplatin (XP) therapy has been second-line therapy for these patients. This prospective study aimed to evaluate the efficacy and safety of XP as a first-line regimen for HER2-negative patients with AGC. In this multicenter, open-label, phase II study, patients received cisplatin (80 mg/m2 i.v. day 1) plus capecitabine (1000 mg/m2 orally, twice daily, days 1-14) at 3 week intervals until disease progression or non-continuation for various reasons. The primary endpoint was overall response rate; secondary endpoints included progression-free survival (PFS), overall survival (OS), and toxicity profiles. Thirty-six patients with HER2-negative AGC were enrolled in this study. Of these, 16 patients with evaluable lesions were assessable for efficacy and 36 were assessable for toxicity. One patient achieved a complete response and five partial responses. The overall response rate was 37.5% [95% confidence interval (CI) 13.7-61.2%] calculated on an intention-to-treat basis. The median PFS and median OS were 5.2 months (95% CI 4.2-6.2 months) and 16.9 months (95% CI 5.8-27.9 months), respectively. Treatment-related adverse events were generally mild; the most common grade 3/4 adverse event was neutropenia (27.8%), followed by anorexia (19.4%), leucopenia (16.7%), anemia (16.7%), and nausea (13.9%). XP as first-line therapy is effective and well tolerated by patients with HER2-negative AGC.

  12. Associations between etiologic factors and mortality after endometrial cancer diagnosis: the NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group 210 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Ashley S; Scott McMeekin, D; Mutch, David; Walker, Joan L; Creasman, William T; Cohn, David E; Ali, Shamshad; Moore, Richard G; Downs, Levi S; Ioffe, Olga B; Park, Kay J; Sherman, Mark E; Brinton, Louise A

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have analyzed relationships between risk factors for endometrial cancer, especially with regard to aggressive (non-endometrioid) histologic subtypes, and prognosis. We examined these relationships in the prospective NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group 210 trial. Prior to surgery, participants completed a questionnaire assessing risk factors for gynecologic cancers. Pathology data were derived from clinical reports and central review. We used the Fine and Gray subdistribution hazards model to estimate subhazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between etiologic factors and cause-specific subhazards in the presence of competing risks. These models were stratified by tumor subtype and adjusted for stage and socioeconomic status indicators. Median follow-up was 60months after enrollment (range: 1day-118months). Among 4609 participants, a total of 854 deaths occurred, of which, 582 deaths were attributed to endometrial carcinoma. Among low-grade endometrioid cases, endometrial carcinoma-specific subhazards were significantly associated with age at diagnosis (HR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01-1.06 per year, P-trend) and BMI (class II obesity vs. normal BMI: HR=2.29, 95% CI=1.06-4.98, P-trend=0.01). Among high-grade endometrioid cases, endometrial carcinoma-specific subhazards were associated with age at diagnosis (HR=1.05, 95% CI=1.02-1.07 per year, P-trendendometrial carcinoma-specific subhazards were associated with parity relative to nulliparity among serous (HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.36-0.82) and carcinosarcoma cases (HR=2.01, 95% CI=1.00-4.05). Several endometrial carcinoma risk factors are associated with prognosis, which occurs in a tumor-subtype specific context. If confirmed, these results would suggest that factors beyond histopathologic features and stage are related to prognosis. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT00340808. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology. Report on a WHO Working Group (The Hague, The Netherlands, December 6-8, 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    The 1978 report of the Working Group of Postgraduate Training in Clinical Oncology, convened by the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Europe in collaboration with the government of The Netherlands, is presented. The groups analyzed models of postgraduate training in clinical oncology and evaluated their suitability in relation to…

  14. Control group design, contamination and drop-out in exercise oncology trials: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steins Bisschop, Charlotte N; Courneya, Kerry S; Velthuis, Miranda J; Monninkhof, Evelyn M; Jones, Lee W; Friedenreich, Christine; van der Wall, Elsken; Peeters, Petra H M; May, Anne M

    2015-01-01

    Important considerations for exercise trials in cancer patients are contamination and differential drop-out among the control group members that might jeopardize the internal validity. This systematic review provides an overview of different control groups design characteristics of exercise-oncology trials and explores the association with contamination and drop-out rates. Randomized controlled exercise-oncology trials from two Cochrane reviews were included. Additionally, a computer-aided search using Medline (Pubmed), Embase and CINAHL was conducted after completion date of the Cochrane reviews. Eligible studies were classified according to three control group design characteristics: the exercise instruction given to controls before start of the study (exercise allowed or not); and the intervention the control group was offered during (any (e.g., education sessions or telephone contacts) or none) or after (any (e.g., cross-over or exercise instruction) or none) the intervention period. Contamination (yes or no) and excess drop-out rates (i.e., drop-out rate of the control group minus the drop-out rate exercise group) were described according to the three design characteristics of the control group and according to the combinations of these three characteristics; so we additionally made subgroups based on combinations of type and timing of instructions received. 40 exercise-oncology trials were included based on pre-specified eligibility criteria. The lowest contamination (7.1% of studies) and low drop-out rates (excess drop-out rate -4.7±9.2) were found in control groups offered an intervention after the intervention period. When control groups were offered an intervention both during and after the intervention period, contamination (0%) and excess drop-out rates (-10.0±12.8%) were even lower. Control groups receiving an intervention during and after the study intervention period have lower contamination and drop-out rates. The present findings can be

  15. Radiolabeled peptides in the diagnosis and therapy of oncological diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiner, Ronald E. E-mail: weiner@adp.uchc.edu; Thakur, Mathew L

    2002-11-01

    There has been an exponential growth in the development of radiolabeled peptides for diagnostic and therapeutic applications in oncology. Peptides have fast clearance, rapid tissue penetration, low antigenicity and can be produced easily and inexpensively. However, peptides have problems with in vivo catabolism, unwanted physiological effects, and chelate attachment. The approved {sup 111}In-DTPA-OctreoScan, a somatostatin receptor binder, is well established for diagnosis of neuroendocrine tumors. NeoTect, an approved, {sup 99m}Tc-labeled, somatostatin-receptor-binding analogue has good specificity for lung cancer detection. The receptors for Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide, Cholecystokinin-B/gastrin, Bombesin, Epidermal Growth Factor, and Alpha Melanocyte Stimulating Hormone and the Integrin, {alpha}{sub v}{beta}{sub 3}, are under active investigation as targets. Octreotide and its analogues labeled with {sup 111}In, {sup 90}Y, {sup 64}Cu or {sup 177}Lu are under study for the treatment of patients with promising results.

  16. Karyometry in atypical endometrial hyperplasia: A Gynecologic Oncology Group study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartels, Peter H; Garcia, Francisco AR; Trimble, Cornelia L; Kauderer, James; Curtin, John; Lim, Peter C; Hess, Lisa M; Silverberg, Steven; Zaino, Richard J; Yozwiak, Michael; Bartels, Hubert G; Alberts, David S

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Treatment for atypical endometrial hyperplasia (AEH) is based on pathologic diagnosis. About 40% of AEH is found to be carcinoma at surgery. This study's objective is to derive an objective characterization of nuclei from cases diagnosed as AEH or superficially invasive endometrial cancer (SIEC). Methods Cases from GOG study 167A were classified by a central pathology committee as AEH (n=39) or SIEC (n=39). High resolution digitized images of cell nuclei were recorded. Features of the nuclear chromatin pattern were computed. Classification rules were derived by discriminant analysis. Results Nuclei from cases of AEH and SIEC occupy the same range on a progression curve for endometrial lesions. Cases of AEH and SIEC both comprise nuclei of two phenotypes: hyperplastic characteristics and premalignant/neoplastic characteristics. The principal difference between AEH and SIEC is percentage of premalignant/neoplastic nuclei. When this percentage approaches 50-60% superficial invasion is likely. SIEC may develop already from lesions at the low end of the progression curve. Conclusions AEH comprises cases which may constitute a low risk group involving 40 % of nuclei of preneoplastic phenotype. Nuclei of the preneoplastic phenotype in AEH lesions are almost indistinguishable from nuclei in SIEC, where this percentage exceeds 60%. The percentage of nuclei of the preneoplastic phenotype in AEH lesions might serve as criterion for assessment of risk for the development of invasive disease. PMID:22155796

  17. Group therapy integrated with CAT: interactive Group therapy integrated with cognitive analytic therapy, understandings and tools

    OpenAIRE

    Ruppert, Margaret

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated bringing Cognitive Analytic Therapy (CAT) tools and understandings (Ryle & Kerr, 2002) into a time-limited (16 sessions) interactive, here-and-now, group therapy (Yalom,1985). Group members were not exposed to CAT or individual work with the two facilitators prior to the group. The study investigated the group members’ experience, particularly in respect of the CAT tools; the facilitators’ experience of integrating CAT tools and understandings into the grou...

  18. Patient satisfaction with inpatient care provided by the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Arora

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Vivek Arora, Shannon Philp, Kathryn Nattress, Selvan Pather, Christopher Dalrymple, Kenneth Atkinson, Sofia Smirnova, Stephen Cotterell, Jonathan CarterSydney Gynecological Oncology Group, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, University of Sydney, Sydney, AustraliaPurpose: Patient satisfaction with the provision of hospital oncology services can have a significant impact on their overall treatment experience.Aims: To assess patient satisfaction with the inpatient hospital services in the gynecological oncology setting using the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire developed by the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC.Methods: A modified version of the IN-PATSAT32 questionnaire with additional 16 items was administered to 52 adult surgical inpatients admitted with the Sydney Gynecological Oncology Group. All participants were provided with an information leaflet regarding the survey and written consent obtained.Results: A high response rate (100% from patients with varied social, ethnic, and educational backgrounds confirmed the acceptability of the survey. Standard of medical care provided, frequency of doctors’ visits, exchange of information with doctors, friendliness of the staff, and state of the room ranked highly (>95% on the patient satisfaction scales. Problems were identified with ease of access to and within the hospital, quality of food, and exchange of information with other hospital staff.Conclusions: Overall the satisfaction with inpatient care was rated very highly in most areas. Deficiencies in certain elements of provision of medical care to the patients were identified and steps have been taken to improve upon these shortcomings.Keywords: patient satisfaction, EORTC, IN-PATSAT32, gynecological oncology, survey

  19. Phase 3 Trial of Domiciliary Humidification to Mitigate Acute Mucosal Toxicity During Radiation Therapy for Head-and-Neck Cancer: First Report of Trans Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 07.03 RadioHUM Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macann, Andrew, E-mail: amacann@adhb.govt.nz [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Fua, Tsien [Department of Radiation Oncology, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, East Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Milross, Chris G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Camperdown, New South Wales (Australia); Porceddu, Sandro V. [Oncology Services, Princess Alexandra Hospital, Woolloongabba, Queensland (Australia); Penniment, Michael [Radiation Oncology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia (Australia); Wratten, Chris [Radiation Oncology, Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Krawitz, Hedley [Department of Radiation Oncology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Poulsen, Michael [Department of Radiation Oncology, Radiation Oncology Mater Centre, South Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tang, Colin I. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Morton, Randall P. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Middlemore Hospital, Otahuhu, Auckland (New Zealand); Hay, K. David [Department of Oral Health, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Thomson, Vicki [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Bell, Melanie L.; King, Madeleine T. [Psycho-oncology Cooperative Research Group, Univerity of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales (Australia); Fraser-Browne, Carol L. [Adult Oncology Research Centre, Auckland City Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Hockey, Hans-Ulrich P. [Biometrics Matters Ltd, Hamilton (New Zealand)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: To assess the impact of domicile-based humidification on symptom burden during radiation therapy (RT) for head-and-neck (H and N) cancer. Methods and Materials: From June 2007 through June 2011, 210 patients with H and N cancer receiving RT were randomized to either a control arm or to receive humidification using the Fisher and Paykel Healthcare MR880 humidifier. Humidification commenced on day 1 of RT and continued until Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE), version 3.0, clinical mucositis (CMuc) grade ≤1 occurred. Forty-three patients (42%) met a defined benchmark for humidification compliance and contributed to per protocol (PP) analysis. Acute toxicities, hospitalizations, and feeding tube events were recorded prospectively. The McMaster University Head and Neck Radiotherapy Questionnaire (HNRQ) was used for patient-reported outcomes. The primary endpoint was area under the curve (AUC) for CMuc grade ≥2. Results: There were no significant differences in AUC for CMuc ≥2 between the 2 arms. Humidification patients had significantly fewer days in hospital (P=.017). In compliant PP patients, the AUC for CTCAE functional mucositis score (FMuc) ≥2 was significantly reduced (P=.009), and the proportion who never required a feeding tube was significantly greater (P=.04). HNRQ PP analysis estimates also in the direction favoring humidification with less symptom severity, although differences at most time points did not reach significance. Conclusions: TROG 07.03 has provided efficacy signals consistent with a role for humidification in reducing symptom burden from mucositis, but the influence of humidification compliance on the results moderates recommendations regarding its practical utility.

  20. Energy Therapies in Advanced Practice Oncology: An Evidence-Informed Practice Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potter, Pamela J.

    2013-01-01

    Advanced practitioners in oncology want patients to receive state-of-the-art care and support for their healing process. Evidence-informed practice (EIP), an approach to evaluating evidence for clinical practice, considers the varieties of evidence in the context of patient preference and condition as well as practitioner knowledge and experience. This article offers an EIP approach to energy therapies, namely, Therapeutic Touch (TT), Healing Touch (HT), and Reiki, as supportive interventions in cancer care; a description of the author’s professional experience with TT, HT, and Reiki in practice and research; an overview of the three energy healing modalities; a review of nine clinical studies related to oncology; and recommendations for EIP. These studies demonstrate a response to previous research design critiques. Findings indicate a positive benefit for oncology patients in the realms of pain, quality of life, fatigue, health function, and mood. Directionality of healing in immune response and cell line studies affirms the usual explanation that these therapies bring harmony and balance to the system in the direction of health. Foremost, the research literature demonstrates the safety of these therapies. In order to consider the varieties of evidence for TT, HT, and Reiki, EIP requires a qualitative examination of patient experiences with these modalities, exploration of where these modalities have been integrated into cancer care and how the practice works in the oncology setting, and discovery of the impact of implementation on provider practice and self-care. Next steps toward EIP require fleshing out the experience of these modalities by patients and health-care providers in the oncology care setting. PMID:25031994

  1. [Side Effects of Occupational Group Therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flöge, B; Fay, D; Jöbges, M; Linden, M; Muschalla, B

    2016-12-01

    Background: Occupational therapy is an important co-therapy in psychiatric therapy. It is a common belief that no risks are associated with occupational therapy. Negative effects caused by group therapy, especially occupational therapy, have not been in the focus of research yet. In this study we want to illustrate possible types and intensities of group side effects through occupational therapy. Patients and Methods: Patients of an inpatient rehabilitation facility filled out the Adverse Treatment Reaction Group Checklist. The checklist contains 47 items divided in six dimensions: group size, content, group participants, group outcome and global. The self-rating used a 5-point likert scale (0 = not at all; 4 = very much, extremely stressful) and gives information about types and intensities of the side effects. Results: 88.9 % of 45 patients reported negative effects of occupational group therapy. 28.9 % of the patients rated the side effect as at least severe. Discussion: Occupational therapy is associated with side effects as every other group therapy. Possible side effects caused by group therapy should be considered while planning and implementing occupational therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Online exclusive: functional integration of nursing research into a pediatric oncology cooperative group: finding common ground.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, Pamela S; Baggott, Christina; DeSwarte-Wallace, Joetta; Dodd, Marilyn; Haase, Joan; Hockenberry, Marilyn; Hooke, Casey; McGuire Cullen, Patsy; Moore, Ida; Roll, Lona; Ruccione, Kathy

    2003-01-01

    To provide a brief description of the historic role of nursing and nursing research in the culture of previous pediatric oncology cooperative groups and compare the research language used in cooperative groups with the language used in nursing research. Published empirical, clinical, and methodologic reports. The culture and language of nursing research differ from those of medical research and the pediatric oncology cooperative group, the Children's Oncology Group (COG). Different approaches exist to integrate nursing research priorities into the priorities of COG, including freestanding protocols, companion protocols, and research objectives included in therapeutic protocols. Full integration of nursing research into COG is feasible but dependent on recognition of cultural and language differences among researchers. Integration will be demonstrated by the number of concepts and protocols contributed to or developed by active nurses in COG. Significant advances exist for nurses conducting research in COG. These research efforts are facilitated by a familiarity with the science language used by other disciplines in COG and an understanding of COG's research processes. Increased interdisciplinary scientific collaborations involving nurses in COG particularly benefit pediatric patients with cancer.

  3. Associations between etiologic factors and mortality after endometrial cancer diagnosis: The NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group 210 Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felix, Ashley S; McMeekin, D Scott; Mutch, David; Walker, Joan L; Creasman, William T; Cohn, David E; Ali, Shamshad; Moore, Richard G; Downs, Levi S; Ioffe, Olga B; Park, Kay J; Sherman, Mark E; Brinton, Louise A

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have analyzed relationships between risk factors for endometrial cancer, especially with regard to aggressive (non-endometrioid) histologic subtypes, and prognosis. We examined these relationships in the prospective NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group 210 trial. Methods Prior to surgery, participants completed a questionnaire assessing risk factors for gynecologic cancers. Pathology data were derived from clinical reports and central review. We used the Fine and Gray subdistribution hazards model to estimate subhazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for associations between etiologic factors and cause-specific subhazards in the presence of competing risks. These models were stratified by tumor subtype and adjusted for stage and socioeconomic status indicators. Results Median follow-up was 60 months after enrollment (range: 1 day – 118 months). Among 4,609 participants, a total of 854 deaths occurred, of which, 582 deaths were attributed to endometrial carcinoma. Among low-grade endometrioid cases, endometrial carcinoma-specific subhazards were significantly associated with age at diagnosis (HR=1.04, 95% CI=1.01–1.06 per year, P-trend) and BMI (class II obesity vs. normal BMI: HR=2.29, 95% CI=1.06–4.98, P-trend=0.01). Among high-grade endometrioid cases, endometrial carcinoma-specific subhazards were associated with age at diagnosis (HR=1.05, 95% CI=1.02–1.07 per year, P-trend<0.001). Among non-endometrioid cases, endometrial carcinoma-specific subhazards were associated with parity relative to nulliparity among serous (HR=0.55, 95% CI=0.36–0.82) and carcinosarcoma cases (HR=2.01, 95% CI=1.00–4.05). Discussion Several endometrial carcinoma risk factors are associated with prognosis, which occurs in a tumor-subtype specific context. If confirmed, these results would suggest that factors beyond histopathologic features and stage are related to prognosis. PMID:26341710

  4. A Decade in Banking Ewing Sarcoma: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borinstein, Scott C.; Beeler, Natalie; Block, John J.; Gorlick, Richard; Grohar, Patrick; Jedlicka, Paul; Krailo, Mark; Morris, Carol; Phillips, Sharon; Siegal, Gene P.; Lawlor, Elizabeth R.; Lessnick, Stephen L.

    2013-01-01

    Outcomes for patients with metastatic and recurrent Ewing sarcoma remain poor and a better understanding of the biology of this malignancy is critical to the development of prognostic biomarkers and novel therapies. Therefore, the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) has created tissue banking protocols designed to collect high quality, clinically annotated, tumor specimens that can be distributed to researchers to perform basic science and correlative investigation. Data from the COG Ewing sarcoma tissue banking protocols AEWS02B1 and its successor study AEWS07B1 were reviewed in this study. Six-hundred and thirty five patients were enrolled on AEWS02B1 and 396 patients have had tissue submitted to AEWS07B1. The average age of participation was 13.2 years. About 86% were less than 19 years old and only 6% were greater than 21 years of age at diagnosis. When compared to SEER data, approximately 18% of all cases and only 8% of all patients >20 years old diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma annually in the United States have had tumor banked. The majority of participants submitted formalin fixed, paraffin embedded, primary tumor and blood samples. In total, fresh frozen tissue was submitted for only 29% of cases. Only seven metastatic tumor samples have been collected. Although the COG has been successful in collecting tumor samples from patients newly diagnosed with Ewing sarcoma, fresh frozen tumor specimens from primary and metastatic disease are critically needed, especially from young adult patients, in order to conduct high quality basic science and translational research investigation with a goal of developing better treatments. PMID:23519678

  5. Cardio-oncology: cardiovascular complications of cancer therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henning, Robert J; Harbison, Raymond D

    2017-07-01

    This paper focuses on three classes of commonly used anticancer drugs, which can cause cardiotoxicity: anthracyclines, monoclonal antibodies exemplified by trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Anthracyclines can induce cardiomyocyte necrosis and fibrosis. Trastuzumab can cause cardiac stunning. The tyrosine kinase inhibitors can increase systemic arterial pressure and impair myocyte contractility. In addition, radiation therapy to the mediastinum or left chest can exacerbate the cardiotoxicity of these anticancer drugs and can also cause accelerated atherosclerosis, myocardial infarction, heart failure and arrhythmias. Left ventricular ejection fraction measurements are most commonly used to assess cardiac function in patients who receive chemo- or radiation-therapy. However, echocardiographic determinations of global longitudinal strain are more sensitive for detection of early left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Information on patient-risk stratification and monitoring is presented and guidelines for the medical treatment of cardiac dysfunction due to cancer therapies are summarized.

  6. Meropenem versus piperacillin-tazobactam as empiric therapy for febrile neutropenia in pediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sezgin, Gulay; Acipayam, Can; Ozkan, Ayse; Bayram, Ibrahim; Tanyeli, Atila

    2014-01-01

    Infection is a serious cause of mortality in febrile neutropenia of pediatric cancer patients. Recently, monotherapy has replaced the combination therapy in empirical treatment of febrile neutropenia. Since there has been no reported trial comparing the efficacy of meropenem and piperacillin-tazobactam (PIP/ TAZ) monotherapies, the present retrospective study was conducted to compare safety and efficacy in febrile neutropenic children with cancer. Charts of febrile, neutropenic children hospitalized at our center between March 2008 and April 2011 for hemato-oncological malignancies were reviewed. Patients received PIP/TAZ 360 mg/kg/day or meropenem 60 mg/kg/day intravenously in three divided doses. Duration of fever and neutropenia, absolute neutrophil count, modification, and success rate were compared between the two groups. Resolution of fever without antibiotic change was defined as success and resolution of fever with antibiotic change or death of a patient was defined as failure. Modification was defined as changing the empirical antimicrobial agent during a febrile episode. Two hundred eighty four febrile neutropenic episodes were documented in 136 patients with a median age of 5 years. In 198 episodes meropenem and in 86 episodes PIP/ TAZ were used. Duration of fever and neutropenia, neutrophil count, sex, and primary disease were not different between two groups. Success rates and modification rate between two groups showed no significant differences (p>0.05). Overall success rate in the meropenem and PIP/TAZ groups were 92.4% and 91.9% respectively. No serious adverse effects occurred in either of the groups. Meropenem and PIP/TAZ monotherapy are equally safe and effective in the initial treatment of febrile neutropenia in children with cancer.

  7. Nurse-Led Programs to Facilitate Enrollment to Children's Oncology Group Cancer Control Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haugen, Maureen; Kelly, Katherine Patterson; Leonard, Marcia; Mills, Denise; Sung, Lillian; Mowbray, Catriona; Landier, Wendy

    2016-09-01

    The progress made over the past 50 years in disease-directed clinical trials has significantly increased cure rates for children and adolescents with cancer. The Children's Oncology Group (COG) is now conducting more studies that emphasize improving quality of life for young people with cancer. These types of clinical trials are classified as cancer control (CCL) studies by the National Cancer Institute and require different resources and approaches to facilitate adequate accrual and implementation at COG institutions. Several COG institutions that had previously experienced problems with low accruals to CCL trials have successfully implemented local nursing leadership for these types of studies. Successful models of nurses as institutional leaders and "champions" of CCL trials are described. © 2015 by Association of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Nurses.

  8. Surgical manual of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group: classification of hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Maria; Choi, Chel Hun; Chun, Yi Kyeong; Kim, Yun Hwan; Lee, Kwang Beom; Lee, Shin Wha; Shim, Seung Hyuk; Song, Yong Jung; Roh, Ju Won; Chang, Suk Joon; Lee, Jong Min

    2017-01-01

    The Surgery Treatment Modality Committee of the Korean Gynecologic Oncologic Group (KGOG) has determined to develop a surgical manual to facilitate clinical trials and to improve communication between investigators by standardizing and precisely describing operating procedures. The literature on anatomic terminology, identification of surgical components, and surgical techniques were reviewed and discussed in depth to develop a surgical manual for gynecologic oncology. The surgical procedures provided here represent the minimum requirements for participating in a clinical trial. These procedures should be described in the operation record form, and the pathologic findings obtained from the procedures should be recorded in the pathologic report form. Here, we focused on radical hysterectomy and lymphadenectomy, and we developed a KGOG classification for those conditions.

  9. Surgical manual of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group: ovarian, tubal, and peritoneal cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Seob; Lee, Sung Jong; Lim, Myong Cheol; Song, Taejong; Bae, Jaeman; Kim, Kidong; Lee, Jung Yun; Kim, Sang Wun; Chang, Suk Joon; Lee, Jong Min

    2017-01-01

    The Surgery Treatment Modality Committee of the Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group has determined to develop a surgical manual to facilitate clinical trials and to improve communication between investigators by standardizing and precisely describing operating procedures. The literature on anatomic terminology, identification of surgical components, and surgical techniques were reviewed and discussed in depth to develop a surgical manual for gynecologic oncology. The surgical procedures provided here represent the minimum requirements for participating in a clinical trial. These procedures should be described in the operation record form, and the pathologic findings obtained from the procedures should be recorded in the pathologic report form. Here, we describe surgical procedure for ovarian, fallopian tubal, and peritoneal cancers.

  10. Merging Children's Oncology Group Data with an External Administrative Database Using Indirect Patient Identifiers: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yimei Li

    Full Text Available Clinical trials data from National Cancer Institute (NCI-funded cooperative oncology group trials could be enhanced by merging with external data sources. Merging without direct patient identifiers would provide additional patient privacy protections. We sought to develop and validate a matching algorithm that uses only indirect patient identifiers.We merged the data from two Phase III Children's Oncology Group (COG trials for de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML with the Pediatric Health Information Systems (PHIS. We developed a stepwise matching algorithm that used indirect identifiers including treatment site, gender, birth year, birth month, enrollment year and enrollment month. Results from the stepwise algorithm were compared against the direct merge method that used date of birth, treatment site, and gender. The indirect merge algorithm was developed on AAML0531 and validated on AAML1031.Of 415 patients enrolled on the AAML0531 trial at PHIS centers, we successfully matched 378 (91.1% patients using the indirect stepwise algorithm. Comparison to the direct merge result suggested that 362 (95.7% matches identified by the indirect merge algorithm were concordant with the direct merge result. When validating the indirect stepwise algorithm using the AAML1031 trial, we successfully matched 157 out of 165 patients (95.2% and 150 (95.5% of the indirectly merged matches were concordant with the directly merged matches.These data demonstrate that patients enrolled on COG clinical trials can be successfully merged with PHIS administrative data using a stepwise algorithm based on indirect patient identifiers. The merged data sets can be used as a platform for comparative effectiveness and cost effectiveness studies.

  11. Effect of Preoperative Risk Group Stratification on Oncologic Outcomes of Patients with Adverse Pathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Won Sik Jang

    Full Text Available Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy based only on adverse pathologic findings (APFs, irrespective of preoperative risk group. We assessed whether a model incorporating both the preoperative risk group and APFs could predict long-term oncologic outcomes better than a model based on APFs alone.We retrospectively reviewed 4,404 men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP at our institution between 1992 and 2014. After excluding patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy or with incomplete pathological or follow-up data, 3,092 men were included in the final analysis. APFs were defined as extraprostatic extension (EPE, seminal vesicle invasion (SVI, or a positive surgical margin (PSM. The adequacy of model fit to the data was compared using the likelihood-ratio test between the models with and without risk groups, and model discrimination was compared with the concordance index (c-index for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM. We performed multivariate Cox proportional hazard model and competing risk regression analyses to identify predictors of BCR and PCSM in the total patient group and each of the risk groups.Adding risk groups to the model containing only APFs significantly improved the fit to the data (likelihood-ratio test, p <0.001 and the c-index increased from 0.693 to 0.732 for BCR and from 0.707 to 0.747 for PCSM. A RP Gleason score (GS ≥8 and a PSM were independently associated with BCR in the total patient group and also each risk group. However, only a GS ≥8 and SVI were associated with PCSM in the total patient group (GS ≥8: hazard ratio [HR] 5.39 and SVI: HR 3.36 and the high-risk group (GS ≥8: HR 6.31 and SVI: HR 4.05.The postoperative estimation of oncologic outcomes in men with APFs at RP was improved by considering preoperative risk group stratification. Although a PSM was an independent predictor for BCR, only a RP

  12. Effect of Preoperative Risk Group Stratification on Oncologic Outcomes of Patients with Adverse Pathologic Findings at Radical Prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Won Sik; Kim, Lawrence H C; Yoon, Cheol Yong; Rha, Koon Ho; Choi, Young Deuk; Hong, Sung Joon; Ham, Won Sik

    2016-01-01

    Current National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines recommend postoperative radiation therapy based only on adverse pathologic findings (APFs), irrespective of preoperative risk group. We assessed whether a model incorporating both the preoperative risk group and APFs could predict long-term oncologic outcomes better than a model based on APFs alone. We retrospectively reviewed 4,404 men who underwent radical prostatectomy (RP) at our institution between 1992 and 2014. After excluding patients receiving neoadjuvant therapy or with incomplete pathological or follow-up data, 3,092 men were included in the final analysis. APFs were defined as extraprostatic extension (EPE), seminal vesicle invasion (SVI), or a positive surgical margin (PSM). The adequacy of model fit to the data was compared using the likelihood-ratio test between the models with and without risk groups, and model discrimination was compared with the concordance index (c-index) for predicting biochemical recurrence (BCR) and prostate cancer-specific mortality (PCSM). We performed multivariate Cox proportional hazard model and competing risk regression analyses to identify predictors of BCR and PCSM in the total patient group and each of the risk groups. Adding risk groups to the model containing only APFs significantly improved the fit to the data (likelihood-ratio test, p <0.001) and the c-index increased from 0.693 to 0.732 for BCR and from 0.707 to 0.747 for PCSM. A RP Gleason score (GS) ≥8 and a PSM were independently associated with BCR in the total patient group and also each risk group. However, only a GS ≥8 and SVI were associated with PCSM in the total patient group (GS ≥8: hazard ratio [HR] 5.39 and SVI: HR 3.36) and the high-risk group (GS ≥8: HR 6.31 and SVI: HR 4.05). The postoperative estimation of oncologic outcomes in men with APFs at RP was improved by considering preoperative risk group stratification. Although a PSM was an independent predictor for BCR, only a RP GS

  13. Eva between anxiety and hope: integrating anthroposophic music therapy in supportive oncology care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eran Ben-Arye

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Music therapy is a significant modality in the treatment of patients with cancer, who suffer emotional and spiritual distress as well as chemotherapy side effects that impair their quality of life. In this article, we present a case study of a patient challenged with recurrent ovarian cancer who received, concomitant with chemotherapy, a special form of music therapy based on anthroposophic medicine (AM aimed at alleviating anxiety and improving her general well-being. AM-centered music therapy goals are discussed in regard to two modes of treatment: receptive listening and clinical composition. Next, these two treatment modes are discussed in a broader context by reviewing conventional music therapy interventions during chemotherapy on two axes: a. standardized vs. individualized treatment; b. patient’s involvement on a passive to active continuum. In conclusion, psycho-oncology care can be enriched by adding anthroposophic medicine-oriented music therapy integrated within patients’ supportive care.

  14. Eva Between Anxiety and Hope: Integrating Anthroposophic Music Therapy in Supportive Oncology Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Arye, Eran; Ben-Arye, Yotam; Barak, Yael

    2015-11-30

    Music therapy is a significant modality in the treatment of patients with cancer, who suffer emotional and spiritual distress as well as chemotherapy side effects that impair their quality of life. In this article, we present a case study of a patient challenged with recurrent ovarian cancer who received, concomitant with chemotherapy, a special form of music therapy based on anthroposophic medicine (AM) aimed at alleviating anxiety and improving her general well-being. AM-centered music therapy goals are discussed in regard to two modes of treatment: receptive listening and clinical composition. Next, these two treatment modes are discussed in a broader context by reviewing conventional music therapy interventions during chemotherapy on two axes: a. standardized vs. individualized treatment; b. patient's involvement on a passive to active continuum. In conclusion, psycho-oncology care can be enriched by adding anthroposophic medicine-oriented music therapy integrated within patients' supportive care.

  15. Effect of music therapy on oncologic staff bystanders: a substantive grounded theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Callaghan, Clare; Magill, Lucanne

    2009-06-01

    Oncologic work can be satisfying but also stressful, as staff support patients and families through harsh treatment effects, uncertain illness trajectories, and occasional death. Although formal support programs are available, no research on the effects of staff witnessing patients' supportive therapies exists. This research examines staff responses to witnessing patient-focused music therapy (MT) programs in two comprehensive cancer centers. In Study 1, staff were invited to anonymously complete an open-ended questionnaire asking about the relevance of a music therapy program for patients and visitors (what it does; whether it helps). In Study 2, staff were theoretically sampled and interviewed regarding the personal effects of witnessing patient-centered music therapy. Data from each study were comparatively analyzed according to grounded theory procedures. Positive and negative cases were evident and data saturation arguably achieved. In Study 1, 38 staff unexpectedly described personally helpful emotional, cognitive, and team effects and consequent improved patient care. In Study 2, 62 staff described 197 multiple personal benefits and elicited patient care improvements. Respondents were mostly nursing (57) and medical (13) staff. Only three intrusive effects were reported: audibility, initial suspicion, and relaxation causing slowing of work pace. A substantive grounded theory emerged applicable to the two cancer centers: Staff witnessing MT can experience personally helpful emotions, moods, self-awarenesses, and teamwork and thus perceive improved patient care. Intrusive effects are uncommon. Music therapy's benefits for staff are attributed to the presence of live music, the human presence of the music therapist, and the observed positive effects in patients and families. Patient-centered oncologic music therapy in two cancer centers is an incidental supportive care modality for staff, which can reduce their stress and improve work environments and perceived

  16. A comprehensive overview on the surgical management of secondary lymphedema of the upper and lower extremities related to prior oncologic therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Garza, Ramon; Skoracki, Roman; Hock, Karen; Povoski, Stephen P.

    2017-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema of the upper and lower extremities related to prior oncologic therapies, including cancer surgeries, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy, is a major cause of long-term morbidity in cancer patients. For the upper extremities, it is most commonly associated with prior oncologic therapies for breast cancer, while for the lower extremities, it is most commonly associated with oncologic therapies for gynecologic cancers, urologic cancers, melanoma, and lymphoma. Both non-surgi...

  17. Patient perspectives: Kundalini yoga meditation techniques for psycho-oncology and as potential therapies for cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shannahoff-Khalsa, David S

    2005-03-01

    The ancient system of Kundalini Yoga (KY) includes a vast array of meditation techniques. Some were discovered to be specific for treating psychiatric disorders and others are supposedly beneficial for treating cancers. To date, 2 clinical trials have been conducted for treating obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). The first was an open uncontrolled trial and the second a single-blinded randomized controlled trial (RCT) comparing a KY protocol against the Relaxation Response and Mindfulness Meditation (RRMM) techniques combined. Both trials showed efficacy on all psychological scales using the KY protocol; however, the RCT showed no efficacy on any scale with the RRMM control group. The KY protocol employed an OCD-specific meditation technique combined with other techniques that are individually specific for anxiety, low energy, fear, anger, meeting mental challenges, and turning negative thoughts into positive thoughts. In addition to OCD symptoms, other symptoms, including anxiety and depression, were also significantly reduced. Elements of the KY protocol other than the OCD-specific technique also may have applications for psycho-oncology patients and are described here. Two depression-specific KY techniques are described that also help combat mental fatigue and low energy. A 7-part protocol is described that would be used in KY practice to affect the full spectrum of emotions and distress that complicate a cancer diagnosis. In addition, there are KY techniques that practitioners have used in treating cancer. These techniques have not yet been subjected to formal clinical trials but are described here as potential adjunctive therapies. A case history demonstrating rapid onset of acute relief of intense fear in a terminal breast cancer patient using a KY technique specific for fear is presented. A second case history is reported for a surviving male diagnosed in 1988 with terminal prostate cancer who has used KY therapy long term as part of a self

  18. Contributions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG) in Improving the Quality of Life in Women With Gynecological Malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futagami, Masayuki; Yokoyama, Yoshihito; Shimada, Muneaki; Sato, Shinya; Miyagi, Etsuko; Tozawa-Ono, Akiko; Suzuki, Nao; Fujimura, Masaki; Aoki, Yoichi; Sagae, Satoru; Sugiyama, Toru

    2017-04-01

    The Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG) is leading Japan in the treatment of gynecological malignancies. The JGOG consists of three treatment committees focusing on uterine cervical cancer, endometrial cancer, and ovarian cancer. Each committee makes efforts to improve treatment and diagnosis. In addition, the Supportive and Palliative Care Committee was established in 2015. Novel studies of supportive care and palliative care have been initiated by this committee. Furthermore, surveys about not only treatment results such as overall survival rates but also quality of life (QOL) and cost-effectiveness assessments are performed by the ovarian cancer committee. Improvements of patients' QOL in the treatment of gynecological malignancies were divided into three concepts as follows: QOL associated with cancer treatment, health care after cancer therapy, and progression of cancer. In this review, we report the contributions and future plans for the improvement of QOL in patients with gynecological malignancies.

  19. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: Results of online focus groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamps Willem A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated communication preferences of childhood cancer patients, parents, and survivors of childhood cancer. Methods Communication preferences were examined by means of online focus groups. Seven patients (aged 8–17, 11 parents, and 18 survivors (aged 8–17 at diagnosis participated. Recruitment took place by consecutive inclusion in two Dutch university oncological wards. Questions concerned preferences regarding interpersonal relationships, information exchange and participation in decision making. Results Participants expressed detailed and multi-faceted views regarding their needs and preferences in communication in paediatric oncology. They agreed on the importance of several interpersonal and informational aspects of communication, such as honesty, support, and the need to be fully informed. Participants generally preferred a collaborative role in medical decision making. Differences in views were found regarding the desirability of the patient's presence during consultations. Patients differed in their satisfaction with their parents' role as managers of the communication. Conclusion Young patients' preferences mainly concur with current guidelines of providing them with medical information and enabling their participation in medical decision making. Still, some variation in preferences was found, which faces health care providers with the task of balancing between the sometimes conflicting preferences of young cancer patients and their parents.

  20. Immuno-Oncology-The Translational Runway for Gene Therapy: Gene Therapeutics to Address Multiple Immune Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weß, Ludger; Schnieders, Frank

    2017-12-01

    Cancer therapy is once again experiencing a paradigm shift. This shift is based on extensive clinical experience demonstrating that cancer cannot be successfully fought by addressing only single targets or pathways. Even the combination of several neo-antigens in cancer vaccines is not sufficient for successful, lasting tumor eradication. The focus has therefore shifted to the immune system's role in cancer and the striking abilities of cancer cells to manipulate and/or deactivate the immune system. Researchers and pharma companies have started to target the processes and cells known to support immune surveillance and the elimination of tumor cells. Immune processes, however, require novel concepts beyond the traditional "single-target-single drug" paradigm and need parallel targeting of diverse cells and mechanisms. This review gives a perspective on the role of gene therapy technologies in the evolving immuno-oncology space and identifies gene therapy as a major driver in the development and regulation of effective cancer immunotherapy. Present challenges and breakthroughs ranging from chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy, gene-modified oncolytic viruses, combination cancer vaccines, to RNA therapeutics are spotlighted. Gene therapy is recognized as the most prominent technology enabling effective immuno-oncology strategies.

  1. A strategy for young members within national radiation oncology societies: the Italian experience (AIRO Giovani group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Andrea Riccardo; Alongi, Filippo; Ciammella, Patrizia; De Bari, Berardino; Franco, Pierfrancesco; Livi, Lorenzo

    2012-09-01

    To briefly review history, structure, past events and future projects of AIRO (Associazione Italiana Radioterapia Oncologica) young group (AIRO Giovani), focusing on its specific commitment to multidisciplnary networking among junior clinical oncologists at a national and international level. AIRO Giovani is a part of AIRO composed by members under 40 years old. Its main activities are scientific and educational meetings dedicated to young Italian radiation oncologists and collaborative research projects. AIRO Giovani structure, events organized and supported by AIRO giovani as well as scientific activities are here reported from its creation in 2007 up to current days. AIRO Giovani group was able to create a consolidated network between Italian junior radiation oncologists, while opening the possibility to collaborate with junior groups of other national scientific societies in the field of oncology and with ESTRO young members. Scientific projects carried out by the group have been successful and will be further implemented in next years. AIRO Giovani is still in its infancy, but its early positive experience supports the creation and development of young groups within national radiation oncology societies.

  2. Group therapy with the terminally ill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, I D; Greaves, C

    1977-04-01

    The authors describe their four-year experience with a therapy group for patients with metastatic carcinoma. Patients in the group are helped by helping one another, by moving out of a morbid self-absorption, and by finding that they have much of value to share and to teach. The most important aspect of the group experience is the "presence" it offers; patients find support and the opportunity to express their needs and fears openly. The authors believe that group therapy is a valuable modality for the treatment of terminally ill patients and that much can be learned from such groups for the everyday therapy of the living.

  3. The clinical trial landscape in oncology and connectivity of somatic mutational profiles to targeted therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Sara E; Liu, Rangjiao; Statz, Cara M; Durkin, Daniel; Lakshminarayana, Anuradha; Mockus, Susan M

    2016-01-16

    Precision medicine in oncology relies on rapid associations between patient-specific variations and targeted therapeutic efficacy. Due to the advancement of genomic analysis, a vast literature characterizing cancer-associated molecular aberrations and relative therapeutic relevance has been published. However, data are not uniformly reported or readily available, and accessing relevant information in a clinically acceptable time-frame is a daunting proposition, hampering connections between patients and appropriate therapeutic options. One important therapeutic avenue for oncology patients is through clinical trials. Accordingly, a global view into the availability of targeted clinical trials would provide insight into strengths and weaknesses and potentially enable research focus. However, data regarding the landscape of clinical trials in oncology is not readily available, and as a result, a comprehensive understanding of clinical trial availability is difficult. To support clinical decision-making, we have developed a data loader and mapper that connects sequence information from oncology patients to data stored in an in-house database, the JAX Clinical Knowledgebase (JAX-CKB), which can be queried readily to access comprehensive data for clinical reporting via customized reporting queries. JAX-CKB functions as a repository to house expertly curated clinically relevant data surrounding our 358-gene panel, the JAX Cancer Treatment Profile (JAX CTP), and supports annotation of functional significance of molecular variants. Through queries of data housed in JAX-CKB, we have analyzed the landscape of clinical trials relevant to our 358-gene targeted sequencing panel to evaluate strengths and weaknesses in current molecular targeting in oncology. Through this analysis, we have identified patient indications, molecular aberrations, and targeted therapy classes that have strong or weak representation in clinical trials. Here, we describe the development and disseminate

  4. Poetry and Therapeutic Factors in Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Marion

    1989-01-01

    Describes the ways in which the use of poetry in group therapy facilitates therapeutic goals consistent with interpersonal theory. Discusses the relationship between poetic interventions and I. D. Yalom's therapeutic factors, and offers a case example of an in-patient therapy group. (SR)

  5. Comparative oncology evaluation of intravenous recombinant oncolytic Vesicular Stomatitis Virus therapy in spontaneous canine cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naik, Shruthi; Galyon, Gina D; Jenks, Nathan J; Steele, Michael B; Miller, Amber C; Allstadt, Sara D; Suksanpaisan, Lukkana; Peng, Kah Whye; Federspiel, Mark J; Russell, Stephen J; LeBlanc, Amy K

    2017-11-20

    Clinical translation of intravenous therapies to treat disseminated or metastatic cancer is imperative. Comparative oncology, the evaluation of novel cancer therapies in animals with spontaneous cancer, can be utilized to inform and accelerate clinical translation. Preclinical murine studies demonstrate that single shot systemic therapy with a VSV-IFNβ-NIS, a novel recombinant oncolytic Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV), can induce curative remission in tumor bearing mice. Clinical translation of VSV-IFNβ-NIS therapy is dependent on comprehensive assessment of clinical toxicities, virus shedding, pharmacokinetics, and efficacy in clinically relevant models. Dogs spontaneously develop cancer with comparable etiology, clinical progression and response to therapy as human malignancies. A comparative oncology study was carried out to investigate feasibility and tolerability of intravenous oncolytic VSV-IFNβ-NIS therapy in pet dogs with spontaneous cancer. Nine dogs with various malignancies were treated with a single intravenous dose of VSV-IFNβ-NIS. Two dogs with high-grade peripheral T-cell lymphoma had rapid but transient remission of disseminated disease and transient hepatotoxicity that resolved spontaneously. There was no shedding of infectious virus. Correlative pharmacokinetic studies revealed elevated levels of VSV RNA in blood in dogs with measurable disease remission. This is the first evaluation of intravenous oncolytic virus therapy for spontaneous canine cancer, demonstrating that VSV-IFNβ-NIS is well-tolerated and safe in dogs with advanced or metastatic disease. This approach has informed clinical translation, including dose and target indication selection, leading to a clinical investigation of intravenous VSV-IFNβ-NIS therapy, and provided preliminary evidence of clinical efficacy, and potential biomarkers that correlate with therapeutic response. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  6. Inclusion, children's groups, music therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holck, Ulla; Jacobsen, Stine Lindahl

    2016-01-01

    a delightful build-up of tension or soothes us, and its narrative character gives rise to mental imagery or memories. Music brings people together and helps build communities across languages and common divides. And – not least – music captures children’s immediate attention, so when the music starts, so do...... the children! Initially by rocking in time to the rhythm, and then with dance moves or spontaneous singing. In this chapter, we demonstrate how music and music activities can be used as a means of including vulnerable children in school or preschool settings. Based on experiences from music therapy, we have...

  7. Clinical evaluation of dental and periodontal status in a group of oncological patients before chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Galindo, Mónica Paula; Bagán, José V; Jiménez-Soriano, Yolanda; Alpiste, Francisco; Camps, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the dental status of 88 cancer patients before chemotherapy. Eighty-eight patients with cancer in different body locations were studied and compared with a control group. Dental plaque was assessed by means of the Silness and Löe index, dental status with the DMFT index, and periodontal status with the modified CPI index. In the oncological patients the mean Silness and Löe index was 1.28-/+0.11. Patients showed multiple missing teeth (mean number 7.55-/+0.80); the mean number of decayed teeth was 2.10-/+0.36; and the mean number of filled teeth was 2.27-/+0.37. As to periodontal status, the mean modified CPI index was 1.45-/+0.11. In the control group, the mean Silness and Löe index was 0.94-/+0.00. The mean number of decayed teeth was 1.21-/+0.25; the mean number of missing teeth was 4.97-/+0.67; and the mean number of filled teeth was 4.82-/+0.44. The mean modified CPI index was 1.29-/+0.10. Oncological patients in our study showed more dental plaque versus healthy patients and more decayed and missing teeth. However, patients in the control group showed more filled teeth than cancer patients. Periodontal status as determined by the modified CPI index was similar in both patient groups.

  8. Systematic reviews of oral complications from cancer therapies, Oral Care Study Group, MASCC/ISOO : methodology and quality of the literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brennan, Michael T.; Elting, Linda S.; Spijkervet, Fred K. L.

    Oral complications are commonly experienced by patients undergoing cancer therapies. The Oral Care Study Group of the Multinational Association of Supportive Care in Cancer/International Society of Oral Oncology (MASCC/ISOO) has completed nine systematic reviews including Bisphosphonate

  9. Impact of cancer support groups on childhood cancer treatment and abandonment in a private pediatric oncology centre

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arathi Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To analyze the impact of two cancer support groups in the treatment and abandonment of childhood cancer. Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective review of children with cancer funded and non-funded who were treated at Kanchi Kamakoti CHILDS Trust Hospital from 2010 to 2013. A total of 100 patients were funded, 57 by Ray of Light Foundation and 43 by Pediatric Lymphoma Project and 70 non-funded. Results: The total current survival of 80%, including those who have completed treatment and those currently undergoing treatment, is comparable in both the groups. Abandonment of treatment after initiating therapy was not seen in the financially supported group whereas abandonment of treatment after initiation was seen in one child in the non-funded group. Conclusions: Besides intensive treatment with good supportive care, financial support also has an important impact on compliance and abandonment in all socioeconomic strata of society. Financial support from private cancer support groups also has its impact beyond the patient and family, in reducing the burden on government institutions by non-governmental funding in private sector. Improvement in the delivery of pediatric oncology care in developing countries could be done by financial support from the private sector.

  10. High stathmin expression is a marker for poor clinical outcome in endometrial cancer: An NRG oncology group/gynecologic oncology group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Henry D; Miecznikowski, Jeffrey; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Devor, Eric J; Zhang, Yuping; Thiel, Kristina W; Samuelson, Megan I; McDonald, Megan; Stephan, Jean-Marie; Hanjani, Parviz; Guntupalli, Saketh; Tewari, Krishnansu S; Backes, Floor; Ramirez, Nilsa; Fleming, Gini F; Filiaci, Virginia; Birrer, Michael J; Leslie, Kimberly K

    2017-08-01

    Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) 177 demonstrated that addition of paclitaxel to a backbone of adriamycin/cisplatin improves overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) for patients with advanced or recurrent endometrial cancer. Using patient specimens from GOG-177, our objective was to identify potential mechanisms underlying the improved clinical response to taxanes. Stathmin (STMN1) is a recognized poor prognostic marker in endometrial cancer that functions as a microtubule depolymerizing protein, allowing cells to transit rapidly through mitosis. Therefore, we hypothesized that one possible mechanism underlying the beneficial effects of paclitaxel could be to counter the impact of stathmin. We analyzed the expression of stathmin by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in 69 specimens from patients enrolled on GOG-177. We also determined the correlation between stathmin mRNA expression and clinical outcomes in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) dataset for endometrial cancer. We first established that stathmin expression was significantly associated with shorter PFS and OS for all analyzed cases in both GOG-177 and TCGA. However, subgroup analysis from GOG-177 revealed that high stathmin correlated with poor PFS and OS particularly in patients who received adriamycin/cisplatin only. In contrast, there was no statistically significant association between stathmin expression and OS or PFS in patients treated with paclitaxel/adriamycin/cisplatin. Our findings demonstrate that high stathmin expression is a poor prognostic marker in endometrial cancer. Paclitaxel may help to negate the impact of stathmin overexpression when treating high risk endometrial cancer cases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Emotional intelligence: A unique group training in a hematology-oncology unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadmor, Tamar; Dolev, Niva; Attias, Dina; Lelong, Ayalla Reuven; Rofe, Amnon

    2016-01-01

    Emotional intelligence (EI) is increasingly viewed as one of the important skills required for a successful career and personal life. Consequently, efforts have been made to improve personal and group performance in EI, mostly in commercial organizations. However, these programs have not been widely applied in the health field. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of a unique special EI interventional process within the framework of an active hematology-oncology unit in a general hospital. This investigation employed a pre- and post-training design using the Bar-On Emotional Quotient Inventory (EQ-i) measure of EI, both before and after completion of training 10 months later. The training included personal and group EI assessments and 10 EI workshops, each 2 weeks apart and each lasting approximately 2 h. Results were compared to a control group of medical staff who did not undergo any EI training program during the same time period. Average total Bar-On EQ-i level at baseline for the group was 97.9, which increased significantly after the interventional process to a score of 105.6 (P = 0.001). There were also significant increases in all five main EQ-i scales, as well as for 12 of the 15 subscales. In contrast, the control group showed no significant differences in general EI level, in any of the five main scales or 15 EI subscale areas. This pilot study demonstrated the capability of a group intervention to improve EI of medical staff working in a hematology-oncological unit. The results are encouraging and suggest that the model program could be successfully applied in a large-scale interventional program.

  12. Borderline personality disorder and group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehls, N

    1991-06-01

    This study examined the process and outcome of group therapy for community health center clients with borderline personality disorder. The results indicated that group members rated Yalom's curative factors to be increasingly helpful over time, and that universality and existential factors were consistently ranked as very helpful group process variables. The group sessions also were associated with positive outcomes, as evidenced by significant improvement in Goal Attainment Scale scores and the depression and hostility scales of the Brief Symptom Inventory. The results of this study suggest that group therapy is a valued and effective treatment option for people with borderline personality disorder.

  13. Similarities and Differences in Group and Family Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Max

    1988-01-01

    Examines contextual and process similarities and differences in group and family therapy, with emphasis on Yalom's group therapy and structural, strategic, and symbolic-experiential family therapy. (Author)

  14. Evidence for an age cutoff greater than 365 days for neuroblastoma risk group stratification in the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, W B; Castleberry, R P; Matthay, K K; Look, A T; Seeger, R C; Shimada, H; Thorner, P; Brodeur, G; Maris, J M; Reynolds, C P; Cohn, S L

    2005-09-20

    In the Children's Oncology Group, risk group assignment for neuroblastoma is critical for therapeutic decisions, and patients are stratified by International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage, MYCN status, ploidy, Shimada histopathology, and diagnosis age. Age less than 365 days has been associated with favorable outcome, but recent studies suggest that older age cutoff may improve prognostic precision. To identify the optimal age cutoff, we retrospectively analyzed data from the Pediatric Oncology Group biology study 9047 and Children's Cancer Group studies 321p1-p4, 3881, 3891, and B973 on 3,666 patients (1986 to 2001) with documented ages and follow-up data. Twenty-seven separate analyses, one for each different age cutoff (adjusting for MYCN and stage), tested age influence on outcome. The cutoff that maximized outcome difference between younger and older patients was selected. Thirty-seven percent of patients were younger than 365 days, and 64% were > or = 365 days old (4-year event-free survival [EFS] rate +/- SE: 83% +/- 1% [n = 1,339] and 45% +/- 1% [n = 2,327], respectively; P nature of the prognostic contribution of age to outcome. The optimal 460-day cutoff we selected maximized the outcome difference between younger and older patients. Forty-three percent were younger than 460 days, and 57% were > or = 460 days old (4-year EFS rate +/- SE: 82% +/- 1% [n = 1,589] and 42% +/- 1% [n = 2,077], respectively; P nature. Within clinically relevant risk stratification, statistical support exists for an age cutoff of 460 days.

  15. [An art education programme for groups in the psycho-oncological after-care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Buttstädt, Marianne; Richter, Robert; Böhler, Ursula; Singer, Susanne

    2011-03-01

    In this paper the formal and contentual structure of the outpatient art education programme for oncological patients is presented. The group intervention was comprised of 22 separate sessions. The course consisted of 3 phases. The first unit helped to foster mutual understanding and to learn various experimental drawing techniques using a given topic. The second unit merged into the shaping of personal thoughts and feelings with the aim of encouraging self-perception and reflection. The aim in the third phase is to create a personal book. The effects of the intervention for the participants were examined in studies. The art therapist as well as the supervisor sees development of better coping strategies, contact with other patients and enhancement of scope of action through the regular activities as main effects. Participants reported the enlargement of means of expression, emotional stabilization, coping with illness, personal growth and contacts with other patients as meanings. This art education course enlarges the field of psycho-oncological interventions in outpatient care with a low-treshhold and resource-oriented creative programme. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Systemic neoadjuvant chemotherapy for Group B intraocular retinoblastoma (ARET0331): A report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Debra L; Krailo, Mark; Villaluna, Doojduen; Gombos, Dan; Langholz, Bryan; Jubran, Rima; Shields, Carol; Murphree, Linn; O'Brien, Joan; Kessel, Sandra; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Chintagumpala, Murali; Meadows, Anna T

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate a chemoreduction regimen using systemic vincristine and carboplatin (VC) and local ophthalmic therapies to avoid external-beam radiotherapy (EBRT) or enucleation in patients with Group B intraocular retinoblastoma. Twenty-one patients (25 eyes) were treated with six cycles of VC, accompanied by local ophthalmic therapies after cycle 1. The primary study objective was to determine the 2-year event-free survival (EFS) where an event was defined as the use of systemic chemotherapy in addition to vincristine or carboplatin, EBRT, and/or enucleation. All patients had tumor regression after the first cycle of VC and only two patients had progression during therapy. There were seven treatment failures within 2 years of study enrollment, resulting in 2-year EFS of 65% and early study closure in accordance with the statistical design. The 2-year cumulative incidence of enucleation was 15%; for external beam radiation therapy, it was 10%; and for chemotherapy to control progressive disease, it was 10%. All patients sustaining a treatment failure were salvaged with additional therapy. For the majority of patients with Group B intraocular retinoblastoma, chemoreduction with VC, without etoposide, in conjunction with local therapy provides excellent opportunity for ocular salvage. Local therapy given with every chemotherapy cycle and incorporation of etoposide may provide improved ocular salvage rates. Central review of group at diagnosis is critical in assigning appropriate therapies. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. [Multi-family group therapy in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Born, Anja

    2012-01-01

    Multi-family therapy, common group therapy with several families per one index patient, has been gaining popularity recently. This has occasioned an exploratory study of the status of implementation and common factors in all multi-family therapy programs in Germany. In a survey conducted across Germany, all providers of multi-family therapy interventions were requested to give a detailed description of their intervention. Quantitative data were analyzed with descriptive statistics, and verbal data were summarized categorically with qualitative content analysis. Of the 25 intervention programs examined 21 are directed at emotionally disturbed children and young people and their families; mainly with disturbances in social behavior. Over 4,000 families per year are treated in multi-family therapy, and five programs were systematically evaluated. MFT is characterized by systematically oriented group therapy methods. Those surveyed traced the effect of this form of intervention back to activating problems in the group, activating resources, changing perspective, learning models, experiencing self-efficacy, and the therapeutic relationship. Systematic studies of multi-family therapy in evaluations and in random controlled study designs are recommended.

  18. Southwest Oncology Group S0008: a phase III trial of high-dose interferon Alfa-2b versus cisplatin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine, plus interleukin-2 and interferon in patients with high-risk melanoma--an intergroup study of cancer and leukemia Group B, Children's Oncology Group, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, and Southwest Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Lawrence E; Othus, Megan; Atkins, Michael B; Tuthill, Ralph J; Thompson, John A; Vetto, John T; Haluska, Frank G; Pappo, Alberto S; Sosman, Jeffrey A; Redman, Bruce G; Moon, James; Ribas, Antoni; Kirkwood, John M; Sondak, Vernon K

    2014-11-20

    High-dose interferon (IFN) for 1 year (HDI) is the US Food and Drug Administration-approved adjuvant therapy for patients with high-risk melanoma. Efforts to modify IFN dose and schedule have not improved efficacy. We sought to determine whether a shorter course of biochemotherapy would be more effective. S0008 (S0008: Chemotherapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Melanoma) was an Intergroup phase III trial that enrolled high-risk patients (stage IIIA-N2a through IIIC-N3), randomly assigning them to receive either HDI or biochemotherapy consisting of dacarbazine, cisplatin, vinblastine, interleukin-2, IFN alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor given every 21 days for three cycles. Coprimary end points were relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). In all, 432 patients were enrolled. Grade 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 57% and 7% of HDI patients and 36% and 40% of biochemotherapy patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 7.2 years, biochemotherapy improved RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.97; P = .015), with a median RFS of 4.0 years (95% CI, 1.9 years to not reached [NR]) versus 1.9 years for HDI (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.8 years) and a 5-year RFS of 48% versus 39%. Median OS was not different (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.31; P = .55), with a median OS of 9.9 years (95% CI, 4.62 years to NR) for biochemotherapy versus 6.7 years (95% CI, 4.5 years to NR) for HDI and a 5-year OS of 56% for both arms. Biochemotherapy is a shorter, alternative adjuvant treatment for patients with high-risk melanoma that provides statistically significant improvement in RFS but no difference in OS and more toxicity compared with HDI. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  19. Brain Malignancy Steering Committee clinical trials planning workshop: report from the Targeted Therapies Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Brian M; Galanis, Evanthia; Yung, W K Alfred; Ballman, Karla V; Boyett, James M; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Degroot, John F; Huse, Jason T; Mann, Bhupinder; Mason, Warren; Mellinghoff, Ingo K; Mikkelsen, Tom; Mischel, Paul S; O'Neill, Brian P; Prados, Michael D; Sarkaria, Jann N; Tawab-Amiri, Abdul; Trippa, Lorenzo; Ye, Xiaobu; Ligon, Keith L; Berry, Donald A; Wen, Patrick Y

    2015-02-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain malignancy and is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, which is related to a paucity of viable treatment options in both the newly diagnosed and recurrent settings. Even so, the rapidly increasing number of targeted therapies being evaluated in oncology clinical trials offers hope for the future. Given the broad range of possibilities for future trials, the Brain Malignancy Steering Committee convened a clinical trials planning meeting that was held at the Udvar-Hazy Center in Chantilly, Virginia, on September 19 and 20, 2013. This manuscript reports the deliberations leading up to the event from the Targeted Therapies Working Group and the results of the meeting. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro-Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Interpersonal Group Therapy for Women Experiencing Bulimia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choate, Laura

    2010-01-01

    Bulimia Nervosa (BN) is a chronic disorder that results in a high degree of psychological impairment for many women. This article presents a description of Interpersonal Therapy for Group (IPT-G), an evidence-based approach for the treatment of BN. The author presents a rationale for the use of IPT-G, an outline of the group model, and provides…

  1. Group Therapy Training in a Doctoral Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffaro, John

    This document describes a program at the California School of Professional Psychology-Los Angeles that provides a three-semester sequence of group therapy courses to counseling students. In the students' final year, they are required to take an advanced clinical course titled Advanced Group Process. The course synthesizes didactic methods for…

  2. Online focus groups as a tool to collect data in hard-to-include populations : examples from paediatric oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tates, Kiek; Zwaanswijk, Marieke; Otten, Roel; van Dulmen, Sandra; Hoogerbrugge, Peter M.; Kamps, Willem A.; Bensing, Jozien M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this article is to describe and evaluate the methodology of online focus group discussions within the setting of paediatric oncology. Methods: Qualitative study consisting of separate moderated asynchronous online discussion groups with 7 paediatric cancer patients (aged

  3. Online focus groups as a tool to collect data in hard-to-include populations: examples from paediatric oncology.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tates, K.; Zwaanswijk, M.; Otten, R.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Kamps, W.A.; Bensing, J.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The purpose of this article is to describe and evaluate the methodology of online focus group discussions within the setting of paediatric oncology. METHODS: Qualitative study consisting of separate moderated asynchronous online discussion groups with 7 paediatric cancer patients (aged

  4. The Children's Oncology Group Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN): case catchment in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Jessica R B; Spector, Logan G; Krailo, Mark D; Reaman, Gregory H; Linabery, Amy M; Poynter, Jenny N; Stork, Susan K; Adamson, Peter C; Ross, Julie A

    2014-10-01

    The Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) was established within the Children's Oncology Group (COG) in July 2008 to provide a centralized pediatric cancer research registry for investigators conducting approved etiologic and survivorship studies. The authors conducted an ecological analysis to characterize CCRN catchment at >200 COG institutions by demographic characteristics, diagnosis, and geographic location to determine whether the CCRN can serve as a population-based registry for childhood cancer. During 2009 to 2011, 18,580 US children newly diagnosed with cancer were registered in the CCRN. These observed cases were compared with age-specific, sex-specific, and race/ethnicity-specific expected numbers calculated from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer incidence rates and 2010 US Census data. Overall, 42% of children (18,580 observed/44,267 expected) who were diagnosed with cancer at age Cancer Society.

  5. Lessons Learned From The Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) Review of Children's Oncology Group Trial AAML1031

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshinchi, Soheil; Hunger, Stephen P.; Aplenc, Richard; Adamson, Peter C.; Jessup, J. Milburn

    2012-01-01

    The FDA is now exerting its regulatory authority over molecular diagnostics and their assays used for medical-decision making in clinical trials by performing pre-Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) reviews in all phases of clinical trials. This review assesses the analytical performance of the assay for the diagnostic and considers how that performance affects the diagnostic and the patient and their risks and benefits from treatment. This manuscript reviews the process of the first review that was performed on a new Children's Oncology Group (COG) Phase III trial in Acute Myelogenous Leukemia. The lessons learned and recommendations for how to prepare for and incorporate this new level of regulatory review into the protocol development process are presented. PMID:22422407

  6. Late Effects on the Urinary Bladder in Patients Treated for Cancer in Childhood: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritchey, Michael; Ferrer, Fernando; Shearer, Patricia; Spunt, Sheri L.

    2010-01-01

    Childhood cancer survivors who have had pelvic or central nervous system surgery or have received alkylator-containing chemotherapy or pelvic radiotherapy as part of their cancer therapy may experience urinary bladder late effects. This article reviews the medical literature on long-term bladder complications in survivors of childhood cancer and outlines the Children’s Oncology Group Long Term Followup (COG LTFU) Guidelines related to bladder function. An overview of the treatment of bladder late effects and recommended counseling for survivors with these complications are presented. PMID:18985721

  7. Methods to increase efficiency of laser therapy of oncologic diseases: methods, equipment, experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikov, A. A.; Svirin, V. N.

    2008-04-01

    The rapid development of quantum electronics and the advent of various types of lasers favored the formation of an independent line in medicine, namely, laser medicine In recent years devices based on semiconductor lasers have been introduced into medicine at a most rapid pace At present day this is connected with , that the essential improvement energy and spectral features has occurred in development semiconductor laser. The power of serial discrete near-IR semiconductor lasers has reached a level of 5 W and more, the spectral range has extended to 1.7...1.8 μm. Laser-optical information technologies and devices develop since the 70- years at the end of 20 century and are broadly used for treatment of oncologic diseases. Although such methods as photodynamic therapy (PDT), laser-induce thermotherapy (LITT), fluorescent diagnostics and spectrophotometry already more than 30 years are used for treatment and diagnostics of oncologic diseases, nevertheless, they are enough new methods and, as a rule, are used in large scientific centers and medical institutions. This is bound, first of all, with lack of information on modern method of cancer treatment, the absence of widely available laser procedures and corresponding devices in the polyclinics and even in district hospitals, as well as insufficient understanding of application areas, where laser methods has an advantage by comparison, for instance, with beam or chemotherapy. Presented in the article are new developed methods and results of designing equipment and software for their realization aimed at increase in efficiency of treatment of oncologic diseases as well as several clinical materials of the use of industrial models of the developed devices at medical institutions.

  8. Correlative Studies in Clinical Trials: A Position Statement From the International Thyroid Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bible, Keith C; Cote, Gilbert J; Demeure, Michael J; Elisei, Rossella; Jhiang, Sissy; Ringel, Matthew D

    2015-12-01

    Patients with progressive thyroid cancer in distant metastatic sites represent a population with a need for new therapeutic options. Aspiring to improve the treatment of such patients, the objective of this position statement from the International Thyroid Oncology Group (ITOG) is to clarify the importance of incorporating high-quality correlative studies into clinical trials. ITOG was formed to develop and support high-quality multicenter and multidisciplinary clinical trials for patients with aggressive forms of thyroid cancer. The Correlative Sciences Committee of the ITOG focuses on the quality and types of correlative studies included in ITOG-associated clinical trials. This document represents expert consensus from ITOG regarding this issue based on extensive collective experience in clinical and translational trials informed by basic science. The Correlative Studies Committee identified an international writing group representative of diverse specialties, including basic sciences. Drafts were reviewed by all members of the writing group, the larger committee, and the ITOG board. After consideration of all comments by the writing group and modification of the document, the final document was then approved by the authors and the ITOG board. High-quality correlative studies, which include variety in the types of correlates, should be intrinsic to the design of thyroid cancer clinical trials to offer the best opportunity for each study to advance treatment for patients with advanced and progressive thyroid cancer.

  9. The National Center for Oncological Hadron Therapy: status of the project and future clinical use of the facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orecchia, Roberto; Fossati, Piero; Rossi, Sandro

    2009-01-01

    Hadron therapy is an advanced radiotherapy technique that employs charged particle beams. Several particles (pions, oxygen, neon and helium ions) have been investigated in the past, but at present only protons and carbon ions are used in clinical practice. Hadron therapy has been used for more than 50 years, more than 50,000 patients have been treated worldwide, and many new facilities are being built. Indications are still a matter of debate. The Italian National Center for Oncological Hadron Therapy (CNAO) is under construction in Pavia and will begin to treat patients in the near future. The CNAO will be a center capable of using both protons and carbon ions. In the first phase, three rooms with vertical and horizontal fixed beams will be available, subsequently the center will be upgraded with two more rooms equipped with a rotating gantry. The facility will use active scanning delivery systems and state-of-the-art immobilization and setup verification devices. One additional room will be devoted to physical and radiobiological research. The CNAO will be a high-patient-throughput facility capable of treating more than 3,000 patients per year. Seven areas of interest have been identified: lung cancer, liver cancer, head and neck malignancies, pediatric solid cancers, eye tumors, sarcoma and central nervous system cancers. A disease-specific working group has been created for each area and has defined selection criteria and protocols to be used at the CNAO. Two more working groups are being set up on gynecological and digestive (pancreas, biliary tract and rectum) tumors. All the patients will participate in clinical trials to establish with sound evidence the real indications for hadron therapy. National and international cooperation networks are being set up to facilitate patient referral and follow-up. A medical service is already operative to assist patients and in selected case to refer them abroad. The CNAO will be the only carbon ion facility in Italy and

  10. Envy in the group-therapy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubner, M A

    1998-10-01

    The origins and vicissitudes of envy are discussed from the viewpoints of Boris and the Kleinians. Their ideas, coupled with a relational perspective of the therapeutic process, enrich our understanding and inform our work concerning the emergence, processing, and working through of envy in the therapy group. A variable in the negative therapeutic reaction, envy can be destructive to the therapy process. It is proposed that envy, accompanied by shame and guilt, is likely to enter the group via enactments. They are fueled by projective identification, which, if ignored, impede the continuation of the group process. Four clinical vignettes illustrate how envy enters the group and how the group functions as a container and transformational object as it processes the projective identifications and works through the enactments.

  11. Group behaviour therapy programmes for smoking cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stead, Lindsay F; Carroll, Allison J; Lancaster, Tim

    2017-03-31

    Group therapy offers individuals the opportunity to learn behavioural techniques for smoking cessation, and to provide each other with mutual support. To determine the effect of group-delivered behavioural interventions in achieving long-term smoking cessation. We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialized Register, using the terms 'behavior therapy', 'cognitive therapy', 'psychotherapy' or 'group therapy', in May 2016. Randomized trials that compared group therapy with self-help, individual counselling, another intervention or no intervention (including usual care or a waiting-list control). We also considered trials that compared more than one group programme. We included those trials with a minimum of two group meetings, and follow-up of smoking status at least six months after the start of the programme. We excluded trials in which group therapy was provided to both active therapy and placebo arms of trials of pharmacotherapies, unless they had a factorial design. Two review authors extracted data in duplicate on the participants, the interventions provided to the groups and the controls, including programme length, intensity and main components, the outcome measures, method of randomization, and completeness of follow-up. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up in participants smoking at baseline. We used the most rigorous definition of abstinence in each trial, and biochemically-validated rates where available. We analysed participants lost to follow-up as continuing smokers. We expressed effects as a risk ratio for cessation. Where possible, we performed meta-analysis using a fixed-effect (Mantel-Haenszel) model. We assessed the quality of evidence within each study and comparison, using the Cochrane 'Risk of bias' tool and GRADE criteria. Sixty-six trials met our inclusion criteria for one or more of the comparisons in the review. Thirteen trials compared a group programme with a self

  12. Validation of post-induction Curie scores in high risk neuroblastoma. A Children's Oncology Group (COG) and SIOPEN group report on SIOPEN/HR-NBL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanik, Gregory A; Parisi, Marguerite T; Naranjo, Arlene; Nadel, Helen; Gelfand, Michael J; Park, Julie R; Ladenstein, Ruth L; Poetschger, Ulrike; Boubaker, Ariane; Valteau-Couanet, Dominique; Lambert, Bieke; Castellani, Maria-Rita; Bar-Sever, Zvi; Oudoux, Aurore; Kaminska, Anna; Kreissman, Susan G; Shulkin, Barry L; Matthay, Katherine K

    2017-09-08

    A semi-quantitative metaiodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) scoring method (Curie scoring, CS) was previously examined in the Children's Oncology Group (COG) high risk neuroblastoma trial, COG A3973 (A Randomized Study of Purged vs. Unpurged Peripheral Blood Stem Cell Transplant Following Dose Intensive Induction Therapy for High Risk Neuroblastoma), with a post-induction CS>2 associated with poor event free survival (EFS). The validation of Curie scoring in an independent data set, High Risk Neuroblastoma1/International Society of Pediatric Oncology European Network (SIOPEN/HR-NBL1), is now reported. Methods: A retrospective analysis of mIBG scans obtained from patients that had been prospectively enrolled on SIOPEN/HR-NBL1 was performed. All patients exhibited mIBG avid, International Neuroblastoma Staging System stage 4 neuroblastoma. mIBG scans were evaluated at two time points, diagnosis (n = 345) and post-induction (n = 330), prior to consolidation myeloablative therapy. Scans were evaluated in 10 different anatomic regions, each region scored 0-3 based upon disease extent, with a cumulative Curie score generated. Cut-points for outcome analysis were identified by Youden methodology. Curie scores from patients enrolled on COG A3973 were used for comparison. Results: The optimal cut-point for Curie score at diagnosis was 12 in SIOPEN/HR-NBL1, with a significant outcome difference by Curie score noted [5-year EFS: 43.0 ±5.7 (CS≤12) vs. 21.4 ±3.6% (CS>12), pinduction was 2 in SIOPEN/HR-NBL1, with a post-induction Curie score >2 associated with inferior outcome [5-year EFS:39.2 ±4.7% (CS≤2) vs. 16.4 ±4.2% (CS>2), pinduction Curie score maintained independent statistical significance in Cox models, when adjusted for the covariates of age and MYCN (V-Myc Avian Myelocytomatosis Viral Oncogene Neuroblastoma Derived Homolog) gene copy number. Conclusion: The prognostic significance of post-induction Curie scores has now been validated in an independent cohort of

  13. Implementation of the Southwestern Oncology Group Committee on Women’s Health Research Agenda: A Special Sabbatical for the Chairperson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-07-01

    Yes, specify: Pathologic Characteristics Dermal lymphatic invasion[:]No E]Yes 0 Unk Prior exogenous hormones No Yes Involvement pectoral E]No EYes C...cancer by hormonal, cytotoxic, or immune therapy. Lancet 339:1-15, 71-85, 1992. 7. Molina R, Ciocca DR, Tandon AK, et al. Expression of HER-2/neu...Medicine NEUR: Neurology ONC: Oncology ORTH: Orthopedics OSTEO: Osteopathy O TO L: Otolaryngology PATH: Pathology PS: Plastic Surgery S C: Scientific

  14. Cardio-oncology Related to Heart Failure: Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Target-Based Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenigsberg, Benjamin; Jain, Varun; Barac, Ana

    2017-04-01

    Cancer therapy targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)/erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene B (ErbB)/human EGFR receptor (HER) family of tyrosine kinases has been successfully used in treatment of several malignancies. The ErbB pathways play a role in the maintenance of cardiac homeostasis. This article summarizes current knowledge about EGFR/ErbB/HER receptor-targeted cancer therapeutics focusing on their cardiotoxicity profiles, molecular mechanisms, and implications in clinical cardio-oncology. The article discusses challenges in predicting, monitoring, and treating cardiac dysfunction and heart failure associated with ErbB-targeted cancer therapeutics and highlights opportunities for researchers and clinical investigators. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Association between prolonged neutropenia and reduced relapse risk in pediatric AML: A report from the children's oncology group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sung, Lillian; Aplenc, Richard; Alonzo, Todd A; Gerbing, Robert B; Wang, Yi-Cheng; Meshinchi, Soheil; Gamis, Alan S

    2016-11-01

    Objective was to describe the relationship between the number of sterile site infections and duration of neutropenia during the first four cycles of chemotherapy and the risk of recurrence and overall survival in children with newly diagnosed acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AAML0531 was a Children's Oncology Group randomized phase 3 clinical trial that included 1022 children with de novo AML. For this analysis, we focused on non-Down syndrome favorable and standard risk patients who completed at least 4 cycles of chemotherapy without recurrence or withdrawal during protocol therapy. Those receiving hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in first remission were excluded. Five hundred and sixty-nine patients were included; 274 (48.2%) were favorable risk. The median cumulative time with neutropenia between Induction II to completion of Intensification II was 96 (range 54-204) days. Number of sterile site infections did not influence the risk of relapse or overall survival. However, longer duration of neutropenia was associated with a lower risk of relapse (hazard ratio 0.81 per 20 days neutropenia, p = 0.007). Longer duration of neutropenia was associated with a reduced risk of relapse for children with favorable and standard risk AML. Toxicity may be influenced by pharmacogenomics suggesting that individualized chemotherapy dosing may be an effective strategy. © 2016 UICC.

  16. Treatment strategy and results in children treated on three Dutch Childhood Oncology Group acute myeloid leukemia trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kardos, G; Zwaan, CM; Kaspers, GJL; de-Graaf, SSN; de Bont, ESJM; Postma, A; Bokkerink, JPM; Weening, RS; van der Does-van den Berg, A; van Wering, ER; Korbijn, C; Hahlen, K

    2005-01-01

    This report describes the long-term follow-up data of three consecutive Dutch Childhood Oncology Group acute myeloid leukemia (AML) protocols. A total of 303 children were diagnosed with AML, of whom 209 were eligible for this report. The first study was the AML-82 protocol. Results were inferior

  17. The Efficacy of Art Therapy in Pediatric Oncology Patients: An Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Bree A

    Children undergoing cancer treatment experience detrimental adverse side effects that may be addressed with complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) such as art therapy. The purpose of this research was to examine the effects of art therapy in pediatric patients living with cancer. An integrative literature review was conducted using the CINAHL, OVID Medline, and PsycINFO databases. Studies were included if they were a primary source utilizing an art therapy intervention in children with cancer age birth to 18years old, was published between the year 2000 and 2016, and written in the English language. Seven primary sources met inclusion criteria. Few studies were reported in this review. Findings of this review suggest that children who participated in various forms of drawing interventions exhibited enhanced communication with family members and healthcare providers. Additionally, children were able to better express underlying emotions, developed more effective coping skills, and experienced a reduction in adverse side effects. Implementing a drawing intervention or other forms of art into the holistic care of a pediatric oncology patient may assist in maximizing quality of life and allow for a more tolerable lifestyle. Acquiring a means of proper communication with children through art allows nurses to gain insight on the needs of this special patient population, resulting in a higher quality plan of care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Individualization of anticancer therapy; molecular targets of novel drugs in oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Regulska

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Deregulation of cellular signal transduction, caused by gene mutations, has been recognized as a basic factor of cancer initiation, promotion and progression. Thus, the ability to control the activity of overstimulated signal molecules by the use of appropriate inhibitors became the idea of targeted cancer therapy, which has provided an effective tool to normalize the molecular disorders in malignant cells and to treat certain types of cancer. The molecularly targeted drugs are divided into two major pharmaceutical classes: monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule kinase inhibitors. This review presents a summary of their characteristics, analyzing their chemical structures, specified molecular targets, mechanisms of action and indications for use. Also the molecules subjected to preclinical trials or phase I, II and III clinical trials evaluating their efficiency and safety are presented. Moreover, the article discusses further perspectives for development of targeted therapies focusing on three major directions: systematic searching and discovery of new targets that are oncogenic drivers, improving the pharmacological properties of currently known drugs, and developing strategies to overcome drug resistance. Finally, the role of proper pharmacodiagnostics as a key to rational anticancer therapy has been emphasized since the verification of reliable predictive biomarkers is a basis of individualized medicine in oncology

  19. Group Therapy Graduate Seminar: A Developmental Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Shulamit; Shadach, Eran

    2015-07-01

    Teaching group therapy is an essential aspect of graduate studies within the helping professions. Existing models discuss four basic elements required for such training: experience, observation, supervised practice, and theory. The present paper offers a model for a group therapy seminar based on these four elements and organized along developmental concepts. Clinical observations of 120 psychology students who participated in the seminar were gathered over a five-year period. Teaching techniques included supervised observation, fish-bowl, one-way mirror, and a final paper integrating theory and practice. The seminar enabled students to practice and to theorize about group processes, both as participants and as co-leaders. Seminar outcomes and conclusions are discussed.

  20. TU-EF-210-04: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farahani, K. [National Cancer Institute (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound to provide targeted therapy is an active research area that has a broad application scope. The invited talks in this session will address currently implemented strategies and protocols for both hyperthermia and ablation applications using therapeutic ultrasound. The role of both ultrasound and MRI in the monitoring and assessment of these therapies will be explored in both pre-clinical and clinical applications. Katherine Ferrara: High Intensity Focused Ultrasound, Drug Delivery, and Immunotherapy Rajiv Chopra: Translating Localized Doxorubicin Delivery to Pediatric Oncology using MRI-guided HIFU Elisa Konofagou: Real-time Ablation Monitoring and Lesion Quantification using Harmonic Motion Imaging Keyvan Farahani: AAPM Task Groups in Interventional Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy Learning Objectives: Understand the role of ultrasound in localized drug delivery and the effects of immunotherapy when used in conjunction with ultrasound therapy. Understand potential targeted drug delivery clinical applications including pediatric oncology. Understand the technical requirements for performing targeted drug delivery. Understand how radiation-force approaches can be used to both monitor and assess high intensity focused ultrasound ablation therapy. Understand the role of AAPM task groups in ultrasound imaging and therapies. Chopra: Funding from Cancer Prevention and Research Initiative of Texas (CPRIT), Award R1308 Evelyn and M.R. Hudson Foundation; Research Support from Research Contract with Philips Healthcare; COI are Co-founder of FUS Instruments Inc Ferrara: Supported by NIH, UCDavis and California (CIRM and BHCE) Farahani: In-kind research support from Philips Healthcare.

  1. Radiation Therapy for Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quon, Harry; Vapiwala, Neha; Forastiere, Arlene; Kennedy, Erin B; Adelstein, David J; Boykin, Holly; Califano, Joseph A; Holsinger, F Chris; Nussenbaum, Brian; Rosenthal, David I; Siu, Lillian L; Waldron, John N

    2017-10-24

    Purpose The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) produced an evidence-based guideline on radiation therapy in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) that was determined to be relevant to the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) membership. After applying standard critical appraisal policy and endorsement procedures, ASCO chose to endorse the ASTRO guideline. Methods The ASTRO guideline was reviewed by ASCO content experts for clinical accuracy and by ASCO methodologists for developmental rigor. On favorable review, an ASCO Expert Panel was convened to review the guideline contents and recommendations. The ASCO guideline approval body, the Clinical Practice Guidelines Committee, approved the final endorsement. Results The ASCO Expert Panel determined that the ASTRO guideline recommendations, published in July 2017, are clear, thorough, and based upon the most relevant scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the ASTRO guideline and added minor qualifying statements. Recommendations Recommendations for the addition of systemic therapy to definitive radiotherapy in the treatment of OPSCC, postoperative radiotherapy with and without systemic therapy following primary surgery of OPSCC, induction chemotherapy in the treatment of OPSCC, and the appropriate dose, fractionation, and volume regimens with and without systemic therapy in the treatment of OPSCC are outlined for a variety of disease stages and clinical scenarios. ASCO Endorsement Panel qualifying statements and minor modifications were made to the ASTRO recommendations. The staging system that is referenced in these guidelines is the American Joint Committee on Cancer Staging Manual, 7th edition. Additional information is available at: www.asco.org/head-neck-cancer-guidelines and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  2. Psychosocial Late Effects in Pediatric Cancer Survivors: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsko, Matthew J; Cohen, Debra; Dillon, Robyn; Harvey, Jeanne; Krull, Kevin; Klosky, James L

    2016-02-01

    This review was conducted to update the Children's Oncology Group (COG) Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines (COG-LTFU Guidelines, version 4.0) regarding screening for psychosocial late effects of pediatric cancer. Articles published between August 2009 and January 2011 that addressed psychosocial late effects of long-term survivors of pediatric cancer (n = 35) were reviewed by a multidisciplinary team of COG late effect experts. The majority of studies in this time period indicate that survivors experience few psychosocial problems in long-term survivorship. A critical subset, however, is at increased risk for psychosocial late effects secondary to the treatment. Highlighted findings from this review include increased rates of suicidal ideation (SI), and health beliefs as robust predictors of SI, anxiety, and global distress. Survivors' health beliefs were associated with their perceptions of physical limitations, overall late effects, and cancer-related pain. While many survivorship studies continue to specify risk factors for anxiety and posttraumatic stress symptoms/posttraumatic stress disorder, others outcomes (e.g., developmental, interpersonal, and familial factors) appear to be emerging in importance. Although the majority of childhood cancer survivors do not experience psychosocial problems, a subset will. The recent research findings have been included in the new COG-LTFU Guidelines that will assist in the targeted assessment and the treatment of survivors' psychosocial health. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Psychosocial Late Effects in Pediatric Cancer Survivors: A report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bitsko, Matthew J.; Cohen, Debra; Dillon, Robyn; Harvey, Jeanne; Krull, Kevin; Klosky, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Background This review was conducted to update the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines (COG-LTFU Guidelines; version 4.0) regarding screening for psychosocial late effects of pediatric cancer. Procedure Articles published between August 2009 and January 2011 that addressed psychosocial late effects of long-term survivors of pediatric cancer (n = 35) were reviewed by a multidisciplinary team of COG late effect experts. Results The majority of studies in this time period indicate that survivors experience few psychosocial problems in long-term survivorship. A critical subset, however, are at increased risk for psychosocial late effects secondary to treatment. Highlighted findings from this review include increased rates of suicidal ideation (SI), and health beliefs as robust predictors of SI, anxiety, and global distress. Survivors’ health beliefs were associated with their perceptions of physical limitations, overall late effects, and cancer-related pain. While many survivorship studies continue to specify risk factors for anxiety and post-traumatic stress symptoms (PTSS)/disorder (PTSD), others outcomes (e.g. developmental, interpersonal, and familial factors) appear to be emerging in importance. Conclusions Although the majority of childhood cancer survivors do not experience psychosocial problems, a subset will. The recent research findings have been included in the new COG-LTFU guidelines that will assist in the targeted assessment and treatment of survivors’ psychosocial health. PMID:26488337

  4. Parental infertility, infertility treatment and hepatoblastoma: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puumala, Susan E; Ross, Julie A; Feusner, James H; Tomlinson, Gail E; Malogolowkin, Marcio H; Krailo, Mark D; Spector, Logan G

    2012-06-01

    A recent study suggested a markedly increased risk of hepatoblastoma (HB) among children conceived with treatment for infertility. However, it is not clear whether this finding is confounded by the association between HB and low birthweight (LBW). Associations between parental infertility and its treatment and HB were examined using data from a case-control study conducted through the Children's Oncology Group (COG). Telephone interviews were completed for 383 mothers of cases diagnosed with HB at US COG institutions between January 2000 and December 2008 and for 387 mothers of controls recruited through state birth registries. Logistic regression was used to examine possible associations. After adjusting for birthweight and other potential confounders, no significant association was found for any of the measures of parental infertility or its treatment. In HB cases conceived through assisted reproductive technology (ART), 4 of 16 also had Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome (BWS) compared with 9 of 365 in HB cases without ART. Little evidence of an association between parental infertility or its treatment and HB was found. The relationship found in a previous study could be due to LBW and BWS which are risk factors for HB and also associated with parental infertility and its treatment.

  5. The Children’s Oncology Group Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musselman, Jessica R. B.; Spector, Logan G.; Krailo, Mark D.; Reaman, Gregory H.; Linabery, Amy M.; Poynter, Jenny N.; Stork, Susan K.; Adamson, Peter C.; Ross, Julie A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND The Childhood Cancer Research Network (CCRN) was established within the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) in July 2008 to provide a centralized pediatric cancer research registry for investigators conducting approved etiologic and survivorship studies. The authors conducted an ecological analysis to characterize CCRN catchment at >200 COG institutions by demographic characteristics, diagnosis, and geographic location to determine whether the CCRN can serve as a population-based registry for childhood cancer. METHODS During 2009 to 2011, 18,580 US children newly diagnosed with cancer were registered in the CCRN. These observed cases were compared with age-specific, sex-specific, and race/ethnicity-specific expected numbers calculated from Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program cancer incidence rates and 2010 US Census data. RESULTS Overall, 42% of children (18,580 observed/44,267 expected) who were diagnosed with cancer at age <20 years were registered in the CCRN, including 45%, 57%, 51%, 44%, and 24% of those diagnosed at birth, ages 1 to 4 years, ages 5 to 9 years, ages 10 to 14 years, and ages 15 to 19 years, respectively. Some malignancies were better represented in the CCRN (leukemia, 59%; renal tumors, 67%) than others (retinoblastoma, 34%). There was little evidence of differences by sex or race/ethnicity, although rates in nonwhites were somewhat lower than rates in whites. CONCLUSIONS Given the low observed-to-expected ratio, it will be important to identify challenges and barriers to registration to improve case ascertainment, especially for rarer diagnoses and older age groups; however, it is encouraging that some diagnoses in younger children are fairly representative of the population. Overall, the CCRN is providing centralized, real-time access to cases for research and could be used as a model for other national cooperative groups. PMID:24889136

  6. Art therapy in psycho-oncology--recruitment of participants and gender differences in usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geue, Kristina; Richter, Robert; Buttstaedt, Marianne; Braehler, Elmar; Boehler, Ursula; Singer, Susanne

    2012-04-01

    Over the last years, there has been increasing focus on the effect of art therapy for oncological patients. The small sample sizes of these studies show that recruiting participants is difficult and has been poorly investigated. It is also apparent that women participate in art therapy more often than men. The question remains why this difference exists and if participating men benefit from these courses more, less or in a different way than women do. We developed and tested an outpatient art intervention for cancer patients, whereby different recruitment strategies were documented. Participants were questioned about their mental health (HADS), coping strategies (FKV), and quality of life (EORTC QLQ-C30) at the beginning and end of the intervention. The recruitment strategies included personal letters, referrals from the "Information Center For Cancer Patients", press releases and leaflets/posters distributed to hospitals and medical practices. About half of the participants (N=35), especially the male ones, took part in response to receiving a personal letter. All in all, 14 men and 60 women took part in the intervention whereby all 18 drop-outs were female. There were no significant gender differences regarding distress and quality of life before and after the intervention (men=14; women=41). A variety of approaches and intense public relations are necessary to recruit patients for art therapy. Describing recruitment strategies more in detail is suggested for upcoming art therapy studies. First gender specific differences were found in recruitment and usage. Exploring further questions in this area referring to quality of life and distress larger and uniformly distributed samples are desirable.

  7. Evolución de la terapia ocupacional en el campo de la oncología = Occupational therapy evolution in oncology field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Navarrete Salas, E

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Resumen:El objetivo de lasiguiente revisión bibliográfica fue conocer la trayectoria de la Terapia Ocupacional (T.O. en el área oncológica durante las últimas 4 décadas. Para ello se realizó una búsqueda en las bases de datos MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINALH y AMED, con los descriptores Terapia Ocupacional, oncología y cáncer, tanto en el título como en el abstract; se excluyeron los artículos que no estuviesen en idioma inglés o español.Los resultados arrojaron un total de 68 publicaciones de T.O. y cáncer, con una curva sostenida de crecimiento en el número de trabajos publicados. En cuanto a tipo de cáncer predominan las publicaciones que aluden a cáncer en general, aunque destaca el interés por estudiar pacientes con cáncer mamario. La metodología predominante es descriptiva aunque en las últimas 2 décadas los trabajos publicados con metodología cualitativa alcanzaron un 30% del total. Destaca el foco puesto en los pacientes (86% de las publicaciones, aunque también hay trabajos referidos al equipo de salud oncológica (14%. Se comprueba además que la gran mayoría de las publicaciones corresponde a intervenciones de T.O. (80%. En conclusión, pese a que el número total de publicaciones de T.O. en oncología es reducido, nuestra revisión bibliográfica permite afirmar que existe un creciente y sostenido interés por explorar este tipo de patologías e integrar activamente los equipos de salud oncológica Abstract:The aim of following bibliographical review was to know which path of the Occupational Therapy (O.T. has been in the oncology area during the last 4 decades. A research was carried out in the databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINALH and AMED, with key words Occupational Therapy, oncology and cancer, as much in the title as in the abstract; only articles in English or Spanishwere included. Results threw a total of 68 publications of O.T. and cancer, with a sustained curve of growth in the number of published papers

  8. Mind-body therapies: evidence and implications in advanced oncology practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayden, Kelley D

    2012-11-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application.

  9. Mind-Body Therapies: Evidence and Implications in Advanced Oncology Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayden,, Kelley D.

    2012-01-01

    The idea that thoughts and emotions influence health outcomes is an ancient concept that was initially abandoned by Western medicine researchers. Today, researchers are showing a renewed interest in the interactions of the mind and body and the role these interactions play in disease formation and recovery. Complementary and alternative interventions, such as mind-body therapies, are increasingly being used by cancer survivors for disease prevention, immune system enhancement, and symptom control. Traditional training has not been structured to provide advanced practitioners with an in-depth knowledge of the clinical applications of mind-body therapies. The aim of this article is to acquaint the reader with common mind-body modalities (meditation/mindfulness-based stress reduction, relaxation therapy, cognitive-behavioral therapy, hypnosis, biofeedback, music therapy, art therapy, support groups, and aromatherapy) and to examine important evidence in support of or against their clinical application. PMID:25031967

  10. Patterns of Performance of Oncologic Surgery by North American Pediatric Urologists: A Report from the Pediatric Urologic Oncology Working Group of the Society for Pediatric Urology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cost, Nicholas G; Ross, Jonathan H; Ferrer, Fernando A; Lorenzo, Armando J; Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Routh, Jonathan C; Kieran, Kathleen; Ritchey, Michael L

    2017-05-01

    Objective data on patterns of oncology practice among pediatric urologists are lacking. We reviewed surgical case logs submitted to the American Board of Urology by those self-reporting as pediatric urologists. We hypothesized that logs would reveal a low oncology volume (fewer than 5 cases) and identify orchiectomy as the most common oncology cases, and that less than 25% of logs would show nephrectomy for renal tumor. Case logs submitted for American Board of Urology certification, recertification or pediatric subspecialty certification were reviewed and standardized to represent 12-month practice. Data were collected on pediatric oncologic surgeries as noted by procedure codes linked with oncologic diagnosis codes for patients up to age 30 years. We identified 281 case logs meeting study criteria. A total of 364 oncology cases were logged and 131 logs (46.6%) listed at least 1 oncology case, while 150 (53.4%) contained no oncology cases. The 75th, 90th and 95th percentiles of oncology volume were represented by reporting 2, 3 and 4 cases, respectively. A total of 13 logs (4.6%) accounted for more than a third of all oncology cases (35.9%). The most frequent oncology case logged was orchiectomy, which was documented in 83 logs (29.5%). On Poisson regression surgeon variables associated with higher oncology volume included male gender (IRR 2.8, 95% CI 2.1-3.9), 2010 log year (IRR 2.4, 95% CI 1.3-4.4), 2015 log year (IRR 3.7, 95% CI 2.1-6.4) and nonpediatric subspecialty certification log (IRR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2-2.3). Few pediatric urologists perform a high volume of oncologic surgeries based on surgical case logs submitted to the American Board of Urology. A small cohort of pediatric urologists logged the majority of such cases. Copyright © 2017 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cardio-Oncology: Cancer Therapy-related Cardiovascular Complications in a Molecular Targeted Era: New Concepts and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurtado-de-Mendoza, David; Loaiza-Bonilla, Arturo; Bonilla-Reyes, Paula A; Tinoco, Gabriel; Alcorta, Rodrigo

    2017-05-18

    Cardio-oncology is a medical discipline that identifies, prevents, and treats the cardiovascular complications related to cancer therapy. Due to the remarkable proliferation of new cancer therapies causing cardiovascular complications, such as hypertension, heart failure, vascular complications, and cardiac arrhythmia, we provide an extensive, comprehensive revision of the most up-to-date scientific information available on the cardiovascular complications associated with the use of newer, novel chemotherapeutic agents, including their reported incidence, suggested pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, potential treatment, and prevention. The authors consider this topic to be relevant for the clinicians since cardiovascular complications associated with the administration of recently approved drugs are relatively underappreciated. The purpose of this article is to provide a state-of-the-art review of cardiovascular complications associated with the use of newer, novel chemotherapeutic agents and targeted therapies, including their reported incidence, suggested pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, potential treatment, and prevention.  Ongoing efforts are needed to provide a better understanding of the frequency, mechanisms of disease, prevention, and treatment of cardiovascular complications induced by the newer, novel chemotherapeutic agents. Development of a cardio-oncology discipline is warranted in order to promote task forces aimed at the creation of oncology patient-centered guidelines for the detection, prevention, and treatment of potential cardiovascular side effects associated with newer cancer therapies.

  12. A Comparison of Quality-of-Life Domains and Clinical Factors in Ovarian Cancer Patients: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Gruenigen, Vivian E.; Huang, Helen Q.; Gil, Karen M.; Gibbons, Heidi E.; Monk, Bradley J.; Rose, Peter G.; Armstrong, Deborah K.; Cella, David; Wenzel, Lari

    2013-01-01

    Context Women diagnosed with ovarian cancer are at risk for reduced quality of life (QOL). It is imperative to further define these declines to interpret treatment outcomes and design appropriate clinical interventions. Objectives The primary objective of this study was to compare data obtained from ovarian cancer patients with normative data to assess the degree to which QOL differs from the norm. Secondary objectives were to examine demographic variables and determine if there was a correlation between physical/functional and social/emotional scores during chemotherapy. Methods Patients with Stage III/IV ovarian cancer on Gynecologic Oncology Group Protocols 152 and 172 who underwent surgery followed by intravenous paclitaxel and cisplatin completed the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Ovarian. The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy scale includes the four domains of physical, functional, social, and emotional well-being (PWB, FWB, SWB, and EWB, respectively). Results Ovarian cancer patients had a total QOL (Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General) score similar to the U.S. female adult population. However, the reported subscale scores were 2.0 points (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.4–2.5, P < 0.001, effect size = 0.37) lower in PWB, 0.9 points (95% CI 0.3–1.5, P = 0.005, effect size = 0.13) lower in FWB, 5.0 points (95% CI 4.6–5.3, P < 0.001, effect size = 0.74) higher in SWB, and 0.8 points (95% CI 0.3–1.2, P < 0.001, effect size = 0.16) lower in EWB. Correlation between the sum of PWB and FWB and the sum of SWB and EWB was r = 0.53 (P < 0.001). Age was positively correlated with EWB (r = 0.193; 95% CI 0.09–0.29). Conclusion Ovarian cancer patients have decreased QOL in physical, functional, and emotional domains; however, they may compensate with increased social support. At the time of diagnosis and treatment, patients’ QOL is affected by inherent characteristics. Assessment of treatment outcomes should take into account the

  13. Lymph node sampling in localized neuroblastoma: a Pediatric Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contador, M P; Johnston, S; Smith, E I; Shuster, J J; Hayes, F A; Castleberry, R P

    1999-06-01

    Lymph node (LN) sampling was required by the Pediatric Oncology Group (POG) staging for neuroblastoma and currently is required as a part of the International Neuroblastoma Staging System (INSS). This retrospective study of planned lymph node sampling in patients with localized neuroblastoma was carried out with the intent of assisting surgeons in carrying out this procedure. The report documents the POG experience where LN, both uninvolved and involved with tumor, were found based on site of primary. From 391 patients with localized neuroblastoma of the abdomen, chest, and neck, 238 patients had LN sampling at the primary operation, and these patients constitute the major part of the study. In addition, 89 patients had a carefully documented search for LN, and 64 had neither search nor biopsy. The operative note, pathology report, and surgical study sheet were used in the 238 patients based on the site of the primary tumor to determine which nodal groups or basins underwent biopsy, and in which groups tumor was found. The pattern of drainage, based on the primary site of abdominal tumors, favored an arterial rather than venous pathway. Primary tumors and metastatic LN were more numerous on the left side. The abdominal drainage followed three pathways: (1) infrarenal tumors from the left and midline were associated with paraaortic LN; (2) right infrarenal tumors were associated with LN in the paracaval basin; (3) with suprarenal primaries and with both adrenals, the superior mesenteric-portal-celiac basins were most productive for nodal sampling. Tumor was found most frequently in the left adrenal-renal basin and in the paraaortic basin. The actual number of LN sampled in a single case varied from 1 to 19 LN, with a mean number of LN based on stage and primary from one to seven LN. The tumor spread in LN was consistent with a "watershed" course, but this was not statistically significant. Patients for whom LN were sought had a better outcome, contrasting with the

  14. Sexual Function of Endometrial Cancer Patients Enrolled on the Gynecologic Oncology Group LAP2 Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Jeanne; Huang, Helen; Chase, Dana M; Walker, Joan L.; Cella, David; Wenzel, Lari

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To present responses to sexual function items contained within the quality of life (QOL) survey of the Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) LAP2 study, to investigate associations between sexual function and other factors such as relationship quality and body image), and to explore patterns of response in endometrial cancer patients. Methods Participants enrolled on the LAP2 QOL study arm completed a self-report QOL survey, which contained sexual function items, before surgery, and at 1, 3, 6-weeks and 6-months post surgery. Responses to sexual function questions were classified into three patterns—responder, intermittent responder and non-responder—based on whether the sexual function items were answered when the QOL survey was completed. Results Of 752 patients who completed the QOL survey, 225 completed the sexual function items within the QOL survey, 224 responded intermittently, and 303 did not respond at all. No significant differences of sexual function were found between the patients randomized to laparoscopy compared to laparotomy. Among those who responded completely or intermittently, sexual function scores declined after surgery and recovered to pre-surgery levels at 6 months. Sexual function was positively associated with better quality of relationship (Pquality relationships were more likely to answer the sexual function items and have better quality of sexual function. Factors such as age, relationship quality, body image, and pain may place women with endometrial cancer at risk for sexual difficulties in the immediate recovery period; however, sexual function improved by 6-months postoperatively in our cohort of early-stage endometrial cancer patients. PMID:23095778

  15. Detection of preoperative wilms tumor rupture with CT: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khanna, Geetika; Naranjo, Arlene; Hoffer, Fredric; Mullen, Elizabeth; Geller, James; Gratias, Eric J; Ehrlich, Peter F; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Rosen, Nancy; Grundy, Paul; Dome, Jeffrey S

    2013-02-01

    To retrospectively determine the diagnostic performance of computed tomography (CT) in identifying the presence or absence of preoperative Wilms tumor rupture. The cohort was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children's Oncology Group. The study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Written informed consent was obtained before enrollment. The diagnosis of Wilms tumor rupture was established by central review of notes from surgery and/or pathologic examination. Seventy Wilms tumor cases with rupture were matched to 70 Wilms tumor controls without rupture according to age and tumor weight (within 6 months and 50 g, respectively). CT scans were independently reviewed by two radiologists, and the following CT findings were assessed: poorly circumscribed mass, perinephric fat stranding, peritumoral fat planes obscured, retroperitoneal fluid (subcapsular vs extracapsular), ascites beyond the cul-de-sac, peritoneal implants, ipsilateral pleural effusion, and intratumoral hemorrhage. All fluids were classified as hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by using a cutoff of 30 HU. The relationship between CT findings and rupture was assessed with logistic regression models. The sensitivity and specificity for detecting Wilms tumor rupture were 54% (36 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 1 and 70% (47 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 2. Interobserver agreement was substantial (ĸ = 0.76). All imaging signs tested, except peritoneal implants, intratumoral hemorrhage, and subcapsular fluid, showed a significant association with rupture (P ≤ .02). The attenuation of ascitic fluid did not have a significant correlation with rupture (P = .9990). Ascites beyond the cul-de-sac was the single best indicator of rupture for both reviewers, followed by perinephric fat stranding and retroperitoneal fluid for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively (P < .01). CT has moderate specificity but

  16. Pediatric germ cell tumors and parental infertility and infertility treatment: a Children's Oncology Group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puumala, Susan E; Ross, Julie A; Wall, Melanie M; Spector, Logan G

    2011-10-01

    Few risk factors have been established for childhood germ cell tumors (GCT). Parental infertility and infertility treatment may be associated with GCT development but these risk factors have not been fully investigated. A case-control study of childhood GCT was conducted through the Children's Oncology Group (COG). Cases, under the age of 15 years at diagnosis, were recruited through COG institutions from January 1993 to December 2002. Controls were obtained through random digit dialing. Information about infertility and infertility treatment along with demographic factors was collection through maternal interviews. Subgroups created by gender, age at diagnosis, and tumor location were examined separately. Statistical analysis was performed using multivariate logistic regression models. Overall, no association between GCT and infertility or its treatment was found. In subgroup analysis, females whose mothers had two or more fetal losses were found to be at increased risk for non-gonadal tumors (Odds ratio (OR)=3.32, 95% Confidence interval (CI)=1.12-9.88). Younger maternal age was associated with a lower risk of gonadal GCT in females (OR=0.52, 95% CI=0.28-0.96). There was an increased risk of all GCT and gonadal GCT in males born to older mothers (OR=2.88, 95% CI=1.13-7.37 and OR=3.70, 95% CI=1.12-12.24). While no association between parental infertility or its treatment and childhood GCT was found overall, possible associations with maternal age and history of recurrent fetal loss were found in subgroups defined by gender. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The use, publication and future directions of immunocytochemistry in veterinary medicine: a consensus of the Oncology-Pathology Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priest, H L; Hume, K R; Killick, D; Kozicki, A; Rizzo, V L; Seelig, D; Snyder, L A; Springer, N L; Wright, Z M; Robat, C

    2017-09-01

    One of the primary objectives of the Oncology Pathology Working Group (OPWG), a joint initiative of the Veterinary Cancer Society and the American College of Veterinary Pathologists, is for oncologists and pathologists to collaboratively generate consensus documents to standardize aspects of and provide guidelines for oncologic pathology. Consensus is established through review of relevant peer-reviewed literature relative to a subgroup's particular focus. In this document, the authors provide descriptions of the literature reviewed, the review process, and a summary of the information gathered on immunocytochemistry. The intent of this publication is to help educate practitioners and pathologists on the process of immunocytochemistry and to provide a guide for the use of this technique in veterinary medicine. This document represents the opinions of the working group and the authors and does not constitute a formal endorsement by the American College of Veterinary Pathologists or the Veterinary Cancer Society. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Adjuvant radiation therapy is associated with better oncological outcome compared with salvage radiation therapy in patients with pN1 prostate cancer treated with radical prostatectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tilki, Derya; Preisser, Felix; Tennstedt, Pierre; Tober, Patrick; Mandel, Philipp; Schlomm, Thorsten; Steuber, Thomas; Huland, Hartwig; Schwarz, Rudolf; Petersen, Cordula; Graefen, Markus; Ahyai, Sascha

    2017-05-01

    To analyse the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NT) or salvage radiation therapy (sRT) at biochemical recurrence (BCR) vs adjuvant radiation therapy (aRT) in patients with lymph node (LN)-positive prostate cancer (PCa) after radical prostatectomy (RP). A total of 773 patients with LN-positive PCa at RP, with or without additional radiation therapy (RT), in the period 2005-2013, were retrospectively analysed. Cox regression analysis was used to assess factors influencing BCR and metastasis-free survival (MFS). Propensity score-matched analyses were performed. The median follow-up for the entire patient group was 33.8 months. Four-year BCR-free and MFS rates were 43.3% and 86.6%, respectively, for all patients. In multivariate analysis, NT/sRT (n = 505) was an independent risk factor for BCR and metastasis compared with aRT (n = 213). The superiority of aRT was confirmed after propensity score matching. The 4-year MFS in the matched cohort was 82.5% vs 91.8% for the NT/sRT and aRT groups, respectively (P = 0.02). Early sRT (pre-RT prostate-specific antigen [PSA] ≤0.5 ng/mL) compared with sRT at PSA >0.5 ng/mL was significantly associated with a lower risk of metastasis. Patients with LN-positive PCa who received aRT had a significantly better oncological outcome than patients with NT/sRT, independent of tumour characteristics. Patients with early sRT had higher rates of response and better MFS than patients with pre-RT PSA >0.5 ng/mL. © 2016 The Authors BJU International © 2016 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A Community Art Therapy Group for Adults with Chronic Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neill, Aimee; Moss, Hilary

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes a community art therapy group for people living with chronic pain. Nine adults were offered 12 weekly group art therapy sessions that included art therapy activities such as guided imagery focusing on body scans followed by art responses and artistic expressions of the pain experience. This pilot group art therapy program is…

  20. Effect of design specifications in dose-finding trials for combination therapies in oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirakawa, Akihiro; Sato, Hiroyuki; Gosho, Masahiko

    2016-11-01

    Model-based dose-finding methods for a combination therapy involving two agents in phase I oncology trials typically include four design aspects namely, size of the patient cohort, three-parameter dose-toxicity model, choice of start-up rule, and whether or not to include a restriction on dose-level skipping. The effect of each design aspect on the operating characteristics of the dose-finding method has not been adequately studied. However, some studies compared the performance of rival dose-finding methods using design aspects outlined by the original studies. In this study, we featured the well-known four design aspects and evaluated the impact of each independent effect on the operating characteristics of the dose-finding method including these aspects. We performed simulation studies to examine the effect of these design aspects on the determination of the true maximum tolerated dose combinations as well as exposure to unacceptable toxic dose combinations. The results demonstrated that the selection rates of maximum tolerated dose combinations and UTDCs vary depending on the patient cohort size and restrictions on dose-level skipping However, the three-parameter dose-toxicity models and start-up rules did not affect these parameters. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroose, C.M. [UZ Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); Stroobants, S. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Liu, Y. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Shankar, L.K. [National Cancer Institute, Diagnostic Imaging Branch, Cancer Imaging Program, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bourguet, P. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University of Rennes 1, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rennes (France)

    2017-08-15

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  2. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: results of online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Tates, K.; Dulmen, A.M. van; Hoogerbrugge, P.M.; Kamps, W.A.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated

  3. Young patients', parents', and survivors' communication preferences in paediatric oncology: using online focus groups.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwaanswijk, M.; Tates, K.; Dulmen, S. van; Hoogerbrugge, M.; Kamps, W.A.; Bensing, J.M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Guidelines in paediatric oncology encourage health care providers to share relevant information with young patients and parents to enable their active participation in decision making. It is not clear to what extent this mirrors patients' and parents' preferences. This study investigated

  4. What is the role of retroperitoneal exploration in optimally debulked stage IIIC epithelial ovarian cancer? An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group ancillary data study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rungruang, Bunja J; Miller, Austin; Krivak, Thomas C; Horowitz, Neil S; Rodriguez, Noah; Hamilton, Chad A; Backes, Floor J; Carson, Linda F; Friedlander, Michael; Mutch, David G; Goodheart, Michael J; Tewari, Krishnansu S; Wenham, Robert M; Bookman, Michael A; Maxwell, G Larry; Richard, Scott D

    2017-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of retroperitoneal (RP) exploration on progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients with stage IIIC disease who underwent optimal debulking surgery. Data were collected from records of the Gynecologic Oncology Group 182 (GOG-182) study of stage IIIC EOC patients cytoreduced to no gross residual disease (R0) or minimal gross residual ( 2 cm IP tumor without lymph node involvement (IP/RP-), 2) > 2 cm IP tumor with lymph node involvement (IP/RP+), and 3) > 2 cm IP tumor with no RP exploration (IP/RP?). The effects of disease distribution and RP exploration on PFS and OS were assessed using Kaplan-Meier and proportional hazards methods. There were 1871 stage IIIC patients in GOG-182 who underwent optimal primary debulking surgery. Of these, 689 (36.8%) underwent RP exploration with removal of lymph nodes from at least 1 para-aortic site, and 1182 (63.2%) did not. There were 269 patients in the IP/RP- group, 420 patients in the IP/RP + group, and 1182 patients in the IP/RP? group. Improved PFS (18.5 vs 16.0 months; P Cancer 2017;123:985-93. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  5. Staff attitudes and expectations about music therapy: pediatric oncology versus neonatal intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouhairie, Annie; Kemper, Kathi J; Martin, Kathleen; Woods, Charles

    2006-01-01

    Music is commonly used to reduce stress, but it has not been universally adopted in inpatient and outpatient settings. We compared the attitudes of staff in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) and the pediatric outpatient hematology oncology unit (PEDS ONC) toward music therapy. A cross-sectional survey of NICU staff was performed in the winter of 2003 and of PEDS ONC staff in the summer of 2005. Eligible subjects were 187 NICU and 20 PEDS ONC staff members. Surveys were distributed by e-mail, in person, and in staff mail boxes. Data were analyzed using simple descriptive statistics, chi-square test, and logistic regression. t-Tests and chi-square test were used to compare responses in the two units. The response rate was 75% in the NICU and 100% in PEDS ONC unit. Staff in the two locations were similar: the mean age of the staff was 37 years in NICU and 40 years in the PEDS ONC (p>.1); over 80% of the staff were female in both units and most (70% in the NICU, 75% in PEDS ONC) reported some previous musical training . Most agreed that music enjoyed by patients could reduce stress (86% in the NICU, 100% in PEDS ONC) and improve sleep (79% in the NICU, 95% in PEDS ONC). Attitudes toward music in both clinical settings were significantly associated with prior musical training , experience, and profession. Staff in both the NICU and PEDS ONC hold favorable attitudes toward music for patients. Staff attitudes in both inpatient and outpatient settings are not barriers to providing music therapy.

  6. Group therapy for kidney transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, D C

    1975-01-01

    A short-term, open membership group therapy program for kidney transplant patients and their families is described. The content and process of this group is related to the ten curative factors described by Yalom for psychiatric patients. The primary benefits for the patients seemed to be the opportunity to observe others cope with similar problems and to learn of the adaptive strategies used by others. The patients were able to offer advice to others, to overcome their tendency toward seclusion and in general, experience a feeling of hope for the future. The family members gained more from a sense of group cohesiveness than did the patients. Both family and patients utilized the meetings to ventilate their anger and frustrations associated with chronic illness and to learn more about transplantation. A more realistic expectation of the future was provided. The group did not seem long enough to measurably improve the interpersonal relations between patients and their families nor did the group members comment upon maladaptive behaviors exhibited between family members within the meetings.

  7. Factors associated with grade 3 or 4 treatment-related toxicity in women with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer: an exploratory analysis of NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group trials 179 and 204.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chase, Dana M; Kauderer, James; Wenzel, Lari; Ramondetta, Lois; Cella, David; Long, Harry J; Monk, Bradley J

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to describe pretreatment patient characteristics and baseline quality-of-life scores as they relate to the development of grade 3 or 4 toxicity in patients receiving chemotherapy for advanced/recurrent cervical cancer. The study sample was drawn from Gynecologic Oncology Group protocols 179 and 204. Grade 3 or 4 toxicities were considered in 4 specified categories as follows: peripheral neuropathy, fatigue, hematological, and gastrointestinal (GI). The data variables explored included age, stage, pretreatment radiation, performance status (PS) at treatment initiation, and baseline Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cervix (FACT-Cx) score. A logistic regression model was developed with various adverse events as binary (0/1) outcomes. Six hundred seventy-three patient-reported questionnaires were used in the analyses. At baseline, pain was the most severe patient-reported symptom. Baseline line-item patient concerns did demonstrate specific correlations with the development of individual toxicities. In 401 patients who were enrolled on Gynecologic Oncology Group 204 (fatigue not measured on 179), a worse PS predicted the development of grade 3 or 4 fatigue (odds ratio, 2.78; 95% confidence interval, 1.66-4.68). Exposure to previous radiation, treatment regimen, and a worse FACT-Cx score were associated with the reporting of both grade 3 or 4 leukopenia (P < 0.05) and anemia (P < 0.0005). Performance status and treatment regimen (P < 0.05) were associated with the development of grade 3 or 4 thrombocytopenia. Age and treatment regimen (P < 0.05) were associated with the development of grade 3 or 4 neutropenia. The FACT-Cx score (P = 0.0016) predicted grade 3 or 4 GI toxicity. The development of fatigue, hematological, and GI toxicity might be predictable based on factors other than treatment assignment such as age, PS, and patient-reported quality-of-life measurement.

  8. Radiation Therapy for Glioblastoma: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the American Society for Radiation Oncology Guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sulman, Erik P; Ismaila, Nofisat; Armstrong, Terri S; Tsien, Christina; Batchelor, Tracy T; Cloughesy, Tim; Galanis, Evanthia; Gilbert, Mark; Gondi, Vinai; Lovely, Mary; Mehta, Minesh; Mumber, Matthew P; Sloan, Andrew; Chang, Susan M

    2017-01-20

    Purpose The American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) produced an evidence-based guideline on radiation therapy for glioblastoma. Because of its relevance to the ASCO membership, ASCO reviewed the guideline and applied a set of procedures and policies used to critically examine guidelines developed by other organizations. Methods The ASTRO guideline on radiation therapy for glioblastoma was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists. An ASCO endorsement panel updated the literature search and reviewed the content and recommendations. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations from the ASTRO guideline, published in 2016, are clear, thorough, and based on current scientific evidence. ASCO endorsed the ASTRO guideline on radiation therapy for glioblastoma and added qualifying statements. Recommendations Partial-brain fractionated radiotherapy with concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide is the standard of care after biopsy or resection of newly diagnosed glioblastoma in patients up to 70 years of age. Hypofractionated radiotherapy for elderly patients with fair to good performance status is appropriate. The addition of concurrent and adjuvant temozolomide to hypofractionated radiotherapy seems to be safe and efficacious without impairing quality of life for elderly patients with good performance status. Reasonable options for patients with poor performance status include hypofractionated radiotherapy alone, temozolomide alone, or best supportive care. Focal reirradiation represents an option for select patients with recurrent glioblastoma, although this is not supported by prospective randomized evidence. Additional information is available at www.asco.org/glioblastoma-radiotherapy-endorsement and www.asco.org/guidelineswiki .

  9. Long-Term Results of Radiation Therapy Oncology Group 9903: A Randomized Phase 3 Trial to Assess the Effect of Erythropoietin on Local-Regional Control in Anemic Patients Treated With Radiation Therapy for Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenouda, George, E-mail: George.shenouda@muhc.mcgill.ca [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Zhang, Qiang [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center (United States); Ang, K. Kian [University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Machtay, Mitchell [University Hospitals of Cleveland, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Parliament, Matthew B. [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, Alberta (Canada); Hershock, Diane [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Suntharalingam, Mohan [University of Maryland Medical System, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Lin, Alexander [University of Pennsylvania Medical Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Rotman, Marvin [Brooklyn Minority-based Community Clinical Oncology Program, State University of New York Downstate Medical Center, Brooklyn, New York (United States); Nabid, Abdenour [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke (Québec), Québec (Canada); Hong, Susan [Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Shehata, Sarwat [Northeastern Ontario Regional Cancer Centre, Sudbury, Ontario (Canada); Cmelak, Anthony J. [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); Sultanem, Khalil [McGill University, Montreal, Quebec (Canada); Le, Quynh-Thu [Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: This paper reports long-term results of RTOG 9903, to determine whether the addition of erythropoietin (EPO) would improve the outcomes of radiation therapy (RT) in mildly to moderately anemic patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa). Methods and Materials: The trial included HNSCCa patients treated with definitive RT. Patients with stage III or IV disease received concomitant chemoradiation therapy or accelerated fractionation. Pretreatment hemoglobin levels were required to be between 9.0 and 13.5 g/dL (12.5 g/dL for females). EPO, 40,000 U, was administered weekly starting 7 to 10 days before RT was initiated in the RT + EPO arm. Results: A total of 141 of 148 enrolled patients were evaluable. The baseline median hemoglobin level was 12.1 g/dL. In the RT + EPO arm, the mean hemoglobin level at 4 weeks increased by 1.66 g/dL, whereas it decreased by 0.24 g/dL in the RT arm. With a median follow-up of 7.95 years (range: 1.66-10.08 years) for surviving patients and 3.33 years for all patients (range: 0.03-10.08 years), the 5-year estimate of local-regional failure was 46.2% versus 39.4% (P=.42), local-regional progression-free survival was 31.5% versus 37.6% (P=.20), and overall survival was 36.9% versus 38.2% (P=.54) for the RT + EPO and RT arms, respectively. Late toxicity was not different between the 2 arms. Conclusions: This long-term analysis confirmed that despite the ability of EPO to raise hemoglobin levels in anemic patients with HNSCCa, it did not improve outcomes when added to RT. The possibility of a detrimental effect of EPO could not be ruled out.

  10. Redecision Family Therapy: Its Use with Intensive Multiple Family Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadis, Leslie B.; McClendon, Ruth Ann

    1981-01-01

    Describes intensive multiple family group therapy which combines the advantages of group therapy with those of time-limited, goal-oriented approaches. Using the Redecision Family Therapy model further refines the technique by integrating the seemingly disparate methods of intra- psychic and systemic therapy. (Author)

  11. Cognitive Group Therapy for Test Anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevinç ULUSOY

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Test anxiety is a major problem that affects students’ academic, vocational and emotional state and several treatment strategies have been developed and applied. Cognitive behavioral therapy is one of the efficacious treatments for test anxiety, but we know little about whether cognitive or behavioral techniques (or both are effective. The aim of this study is to assess the efficacy of cognitive techniques without behavioral interventions. The study was carried out with 38 individual who complained of test anxiety and were divided into four groups. Six 90 min sessions of cognitive group therapy is applied weekly. Test Anxiety Inventory (TAI, Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI, State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI, Ruminative Thought Style Questionnaire (RTSQ and Automatic Thoughts Questionnaire (ATQ were given to attendants. There was statistically significant difference between first and last evaluation of mean rank of BAI total and its cognitive and somatic subscales, ATQ and STAI-II. There was no significant difference for mean rank of STAI-I and RTSQ total scores. Statistically significant difference was found between first and last evaluation of total TAI and 3 subscales of TAI which were ‘Others’ opinions’, ‘Worry about future’, ‘Worry about preparation and unspecified test anxiety’. Cognitive techniques are effective for treatment of test anxiety even without behavioral interventions. However, its effect on self-related perception componenet of test anxiety and ruminative response styles is uncertain. Adding behavioral interventions to cognitive techniques may increase the efficacy of treatment for test anxiety. [JCBPR 2016; 5(1.000: 28-37

  12. Infrequent tumor initiative of the Children's Oncology Group: initial lessons learned and their impact on future plans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pappo, Alberto S; Krailo, Mark; Chen, Zhengjia; Rodriguez-Galindo, Carlos; Reaman, Gregory

    2010-11-20

    The merger of the Pediatric Oncology Group, Children's Cancer Group, the Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group, and the National Wilms Tumor Study Group in 2000 offered the newly formed Children's Oncology Group (COG), an opportunity to study rare cancers that had not been the subject of organized evaluation within the context of a cooperative group. In 2002, the COG formed the rare tumor committee which is comprised of four subcommittees. This article details the experience of the infrequent tumor subcommittee for the period of 2002 to 2007. During the initial implementation of this strategy, we have observed low rates of registration within the COG registry and low levels of participation in open banking, biology, and first-line therapeutic studies. This initial experience has allowed us to develop alternative strategies to increase registration rates and clinical trial enrollments. It is hoped that these new plans will allow us to increase our ability to better understand the biology and improve the treatment outcome of young patients with infrequent cancers. Furthermore, our initial experience has demonstrated to us the potential power of expanded cooperation and collaboration at a global level.

  13. Group Play Therapy with Sexually Abused Preschool Children: Group Behaviors and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Karyn Dayle

    2002-01-01

    Group play therapy is a common treatment modality for children who have been sexually abused. Sexually abused preschoolers exhibit different group play therapy behaviors than do nonabused children. Group workers need to be aware of these differences and know the appropriate group interventions. This article describes group play therapy with…

  14. Cytokine Gene Polymorphisms Associated With Symptom Clusters in Oncology Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miaskowski, Christine; Conley, Yvette P; Mastick, Judy; Paul, Steven M; Cooper, Bruce A; Levine, Jon D; Knisely, Mitchell; Kober, Kord M

    2017-09-01

    Most of the reviews on the biological basis for symptom clusters suggest that inflammatory processes are involved in the development and maintenance of the symptom clusters. However, no studies have evaluated for associations between genetic polymorphisms and common symptom clusters (e.g., mood disturbance, sickness behavior). Examine the associations between cytokine gene polymorphisms and the severity of three distinct symptom clusters (i.e., mood-cognitive, sickness-behavior, treatment-related) in a sample of patients with breast and prostate cancer (n = 157) at the completion of radiation therapy. Symptom severity was assessed using the Memorial Symptom Assessment Scale. Symptom clusters were created using exploratory factor analysis. The associations between cytokine gene polymorphisms and the symptom cluster severity scores were evaluated using regression analyses. Polymorphisms in C-X-C motif chemokine ligand 8 (CXCL8), interleukin (IL13), and nuclear factor kappa beta 2 (NFKB2) were associated with severity scores for the mood-cognitive symptom cluster. In addition to interferon gamma (IFNG1), the same polymorphism in NFKB2 (i.e., rs1056890) that was associated with the mood-cognitive symptom cluster score was associated with the sickness-behavior symptom cluster. Polymorphisms in interleukin 1 receptor 1 (IL1R1), IL6, and NFKB1 were associated with severity factor scores for the treatment-related symptom cluster. Our findings support the hypotheses that symptoms that cluster together have a common underlying mechanism and the most common symptom clusters in oncology patients are associated polymorphisms in genes involved in a variety of inflammatory processes. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Exercise therapy in oncology rehabilitation in Australia: A mixed-methods study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dennett, Amy M; Peiris, Casey L; Shields, Nora; Morgan, Delwyn; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-10-01

    Oncology rehabilitation improves outcomes for cancer survivors but little is known about program availability in Australia. The aims of this study were: to describe oncology rehabilitation programs in Australia: determine whether the exercise component of programs is consistent with guidelines: and to explore barriers and facilitators to program implementation. A sequential, explanatory mixed-methods study was completed in two phases: (1) a survey of Australian oncology rehabilitation programs; and (2) purposively sampled follow-up semistructured interviews with senior clinicians working in oncology rehabilitation who were involved with exercise prescription. Hospitals and/or cancer centers from 42 public hospital health networks (representing 163 hospitals) and 39 private hospitals were contacted to identify 31 oncology rehabilitation programs. All 31 surveys were returned (100% response rate). Programs were typically multidisciplinary, ran twice weekly, provided education and exercise and included self-management strategies. Exercise prescription and progression was patient centered and included a combination of resistance and aerobic training supplemented by balance, pelvic floor, and core stability exercises. Challenges to implementation included a lack of awareness of programs in the community and organizational barriers such as funding. Strong links with oncologists facilitated program referrals. Despite evidence to support oncology rehabilitation, there are few programs in Australia and there are challenges that limit it becoming part of standard practice. Programs that exist are multidisciplinary with a focus on exercise with the majority of programs following a cardiac rehabilitation model of care. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  16. Completeness of reporting of radiation therapy planning, dose, and delivery in veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts from 2005 to 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyerleber, Michele A; McEntee, Margaret C; Farrelly, John; Podgorsak, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    Surrounding a shift toward evidence-based medicine and widespread adoption of reporting guidelines such as the Consolidated Standards of Reporting Trials (CONSORT) statement, there has been a growing body of literature evaluating the quality of reporting in human and veterinary medicine. These reviews have consistently demonstrated the presence of substantive deficiencies in completeness of reporting. The purpose of this study was to assess the current status of reporting in veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts in regards to treatment planning methods, dose, and delivery and to introduce a set of reporting guidelines to serve as a standard for future reporting. Forty-six veterinary radiation oncology manuscripts published between 2005 and 2010 were evaluated for reporting of 50 items pertaining to patient data, treatment planning, radiation dose, delivery of therapy, quality assurance, and adjunctive therapy. A mean of 40% of checklist items were reported in a given manuscript (range = 8-75%). Only 9/50 (18%) checklist items were reported in > or = 80% manuscripts. The completeness of reporting was best in regards to a statement of prescription radiation protocol (91-98% reported) and worst in regards to specification of absorbed dose within target volumes and surrounding normal tissues (0-6% reported). No manuscripts met the current International Commission of Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) dose specification recommendations. Incomplete reporting may stem from the predominance of retrospective manuscripts and the variability of protocols and equipment in veterinary radiation oncology. Adoption of reporting guidelines as outlined in this study is recommended to improve the quality of reporting in veterinary radiation oncology.

  17. [Group memory therapy in neurologic amnesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvard, M; Hibert, O; Serclerat, D

    1995-01-01

    The aim of our approach was to improve the memory of head injured memory impaired people without associated intellectual deterioration. Subjects participated in group each weekday during ten weeks. The aim of strategies was to help the patient of recovery learning strategies. Exercises can be repeated to produce the use of learning strategies in the real life. 19 patients (11 subjects with a traumatic brain injury and 8 subjects with a cerebral vascular accident) completed the treatment are measured before and after the rehabilitation. In a clinic study our memory therapy was more satisfactory on visual memory than verbal memory on a French standardised memory test (the Signoret memory battery). But there is no change in the evaluation of everyday memory measured with the AMQ of Van Der Linden. The comparison of the two sub groups has given to show which pathology will benefit the more the method. These first findings suggested that it was useful to reinforce everyday memory and to include the family members more. It will also be interesting to modify the program for the reeducation of the verbal memory. A control study was necessary to evaluate the validity of our approach.

  18. Adjuvant and Salvage Radiation Therapy After Prostatectomy: American Society for Radiation Oncology/American Urological Association Guidelines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valicenti, Richard K., E-mail: Richard.valicenti@ucdmc.ucdavis.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, Davis School of Medicine, Davis, California (United States); Thompson, Ian [Department of Urology, University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States); Albertsen, Peter [Division of Urology, University of Connecticut Health Center, Farmington, Connecticut (United States); Davis, Brian J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Medical School, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Goldenberg, S. Larry [Department of Urologic Sciences, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia (Canada); Wolf, J. Stuart [Department of Urology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Sartor, Oliver [Department of Medicine and Urology, Tulane Medical School, New Orleans, Louisiana (United States); Klein, Eric [Glickman Urological Kidney Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio (United States); Hahn, Carol [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Roach, Mack [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Faraday, Martha M. [Four Oaks, Inc (United States)

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this guideline was to provide a clinical framework for the use of radiation therapy after radical prostatectomy as adjuvant or salvage therapy. Methods and Materials: A systematic literature review using PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane database was conducted to identify peer-reviewed publications relevant to the use of radiation therapy after prostatectomy. The review yielded 294 articles; these publications were used to create the evidence-based guideline statements. Additional guidance is provided as Clinical Principles when insufficient evidence existed. Results: Guideline statements are provided for patient counseling, use of radiation therapy in the adjuvant and salvage contexts, defining biochemical recurrence, and conducting a restaging evaluation. Conclusions: Physicians should offer adjuvant radiation therapy to patients with adverse pathologic findings at prostatectomy (ie, seminal vesicle invastion, positive surgical margins, extraprostatic extension) and salvage radiation therapy to patients with prostate-specific antigen (PSA) or local recurrence after prostatectomy in whom there is no evidence of distant metastatic disease. The offer of radiation therapy should be made in the context of a thoughtful discussion of possible short- and long-term side effects of radiation therapy as well as the potential benefits of preventing recurrence. The decision to administer radiation therapy should be made by the patient and the multidisciplinary treatment team with full consideration of the patient's history, values, preferences, quality of life, and functional status. The American Society for Radiation Oncology and American Urological Association websites show this guideline in its entirety, including the full literature review.

  19. Group Art Therapy with Incarcerated Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Bonnie J.; Young, Mark E.

    2010-01-01

    Art therapy is often thought of as an adjunct to counseling; however, because of its unique ability to bypass defenses, in some situations, art therapy may be a treatment of choice to allow clients to discover and express feelings that are often difficult to express verbally. Using art as therapy does not require that the therapist or the client…

  20. [Nutritional risk evaluation and establishment of nutritional support in oncology patients according to the protocol of the Spanish Nutrition and Cancer Group].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marín Caro, M M; Gómez Candela, C; Castillo Rabaneda, R; Lourenço Nogueira, T; García Huerta, M; Loria Kohen, V; Villarino Sanz, M; Zamora Auñón, P; Luengo Pérez, L; Robledo Sáenz, P; López-Portabella, C; Zarazaga Monzón, A; Espinosa Rojas, J; Nogués Boqueras, Raquel; Rodríguez Suárez, L; Celaya Pérez, S; Pardo Masferrer, J

    2008-01-01

    Cancer and its oncological treatment cause symptoms which increase the patients risk to suffer from malnutrition. This affects the patients health status negatively by increasing the number of complications, reducing the tolerance to the oncology treatment and a decrease of the patients quality of life. Motivated by this, a group of health professionals from several spanish regions met with the backing of the Sociedad Española de Nutrición Básica y Aplicada (SENBA) to address strategies to improve the quality of nutritional intervention in cancer patients. This multidisciplinary group developed a protocol describing nutritional assessment and intervention in form of algorithms based on literature and personal experience. The patients are classified in a three step process: 1. type of their oncology treatment (curative or palliative); 2. nutritional risk of the antineoplastic therapy (low, medium or high risk) and 3. depending on the Subjective Global Assessment patient-generated (SGA-pg). The patients are classified as: A. patients with adequate nutritional state, B. patients with malnutrition or risk of malnutrition and C. patients suffering from severe malnutrition. During one year, the protocol has been used for 226 randomly chosen female and male patients older than 18 years. They were treated by the Medical and Radiotherapy Oncology outpatient clinic. More than a half of the patients were suffering from malnutrition (64%) increasing up to 81% for patients undergoing palliative treatment. Most of them were treated curatively (83%) and received oncology treatment with moderate or high nutritional risk (69%). 68% of patients were affected by some feeding difficulty. The mean percentage of weight loss has been 6.64% +/- 0.87 (min 0%, max 33%). Albumin values of 32% of the patients were between 3 and 3.5 g/dl and negatively correlated with feeding difficulties (p = 0.001). The body mass index (BMI) has not found to be a significant parameter for detecting

  1. Is age a prognostic biomarker for survival among women with locally advanced cervical cancer treated with chemoradiation? An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group ancillary data analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Kathleen N; Java, James J; Slaughter, Katrina N; Rose, Peter G; Lanciano, Rachelle; DiSilvestro, Paul A; Thigpen, J Tate; Lee, Yi-Chun; Tewari, Krishnansu S; Chino, Junzo; Seward, Shelly M; Miller, David S; Salani, Ritu; Moore, David H; Stehman, Frederick B

    2016-11-01

    To determine the effect of age on completion of and toxicities following treatment of local regionally advanced cervical cancer (LACC) on Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) Phase I-III trials. An ancillary data analysis of GOG protocols 113, 120, 165, 219 data was performed. Wilcoxon, Pearson, and Kruskal-Wallis tests were used for univariate and multivariate analysis. Log rank tests were used to compare survival lengths. One-thousand-three-hundred-nineteen women were included; 60.7% were Caucasian, 15% were age 60-70years and an additional 5% were >70; 87% had squamous histology, 55% had stage IIB disease and 34% had IIIB disease. Performance status declined with age (p=0.006). Histology and tumor stage did not significantly differ. Number of cycles of chemotherapy received, radiation treatment time, nor dose modifications varied with age. Notably, radiation protocol deviations and failure to complete brachytherapy (BT) did increase with age (p=0.022 and p50 for all-cause mortality (HR 1.02; 95% CI, 1.01-1.04) was found, but no association between age and disease specific mortality was found. This represents a large analysis of patients treated for LACC with chemo/radiation, approximately 20% of whom were >60years of age. Older patients, had higher rates of incomplete brachytherapy which is not explained by collected toxicity data. Age did not adversely impact completion of chemotherapy and radiation or toxicities. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Far infrared ray (FIR) therapy: An effective and oncological safe treatment modality for breast cancer related lymphedema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ke; Xia, Liang; Liu, Ning Fei; Nicoli, Fabio; Constantinides, Joannis; D'Ambrosia, Christopher; Lazzeri, Davide; Tremp, Mathias; Zhang, Ju Fang; Zhang, Yi Xin

    2017-07-01

    The incidence of breast cancer related lymphedema is approximately 5%. Far infrared ray (FIR) treatment can potentially reduce fluid volume and extremity circumference as well as the frequency of dermato-lymphangitis (DLA). However, there is no published data on the oncological safety of FIR and the potential for activation of any residual breast cancer cells. The aim of this study is to investigate the safety of far infrared ray (FIR) treatment of postmastectomy lymphedema, clinically and in vitro. Patients who underwent mastectomy more than 5years ago complicated by upper extremity lymphedema for more than 1year were included. The enrolled patients were divided into an FIR treatment group and a control group (conservative treatment using bandage compression). Outcome measures included tumor markers (CA153, CA125), ultrasonography of relevant structures and monitoring for adverse reactions 1year after treatment. For the in vitro part of the study, the effects of FIR on human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MCF7, MDA-MB231) compared to the effects of FIR on human dermal fibroblasts as a control were considered. The viability, proliferation, cell cycle and apoptotic statistics of the adenocarcinoma and human dermal fibroblast cell lines were analyzed and compared. Results demonstrated that after treatment with FIR, tumor marker (CA153, CA125) concentrations in both the FIR and control groups were not elevated. There was no statistically significant difference between FIR and control group marker expression (p>0.05). Furthermore, no patients were diagnosed with lymphadenectasis or newly enlarged lymph nodes in these two groups. Importantly, there were no adverse events in either group. The in vitro experiment indicated that FIR radiation does not affect viability, proliferation, cell cycle and apoptosis of fibroblasts, MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. FIR should be considered as feasible and safe for the treatment of breast cancer related lymphedema patients 5years

  3. Outcome of Patients With Recurrent Osteosarcoma Enrolled in Seven Phase II Trials Through Children's Cancer Group, Pediatric Oncology Group, and Children's Oncology Group: Learning From the Past to Move Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krailo, Mark D.; Dang, Ha; Kim, AeRang; Hawkins, Douglas S.; Beaty, Orren; Widemann, Brigitte C.; Zwerdling, Theodore; Bomgaars, Lisa; Langevin, Anne-Marie; Grier, Holcombe E.; Weigel, Brenda; Blaney, Susan M.; Gorlick, Richard; Janeway, Katherine A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The use of radiographic response as the primary end point in phase II osteosarcoma trials may limit optimal detection of treatment response because of the calcified tumor matrix. We performed this study to determine if time to progression could be used as an end point for subsequent studies. Patients and Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of outcome for patients with recurrent/refractory osteosarcoma enrolled in one of seven phase II trials conducted by the Children’s Oncology Group and predecessor groups from 1997 to 2007. All trials used RECIST or WHO radiographic response criteria and the primary end point of response rate. The following potential prognostic factors—age, trial, number of prior chemotherapy regimens, sex, and race/ethnicity—were evaluated for their impact on event-free survival (EFS). We used data from a phase II study (AOST0221) of patients with osteosarcoma who were given inhaled granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor with first pulmonary recurrence who had an EFS as well as biologic end point to determine the historical disease control rate for patients with fully resected disease. Results In each included trial, the drugs tested were determined to be inactive on the basis of radiographic response rates. The EFS for 96 patients with osteosarcoma and measurable disease was 12% at 4 months (95% CI, 6% to 19%). There was no significant difference in EFS across trials according to number of prior treatment regimens or patient age, sex, and ethnicity. The 12-month EFS for the 42 evaluable patients enrolled in AOST0221 was 20% (95% CI, 10% to 34%). Conclusion The EFS was uniformly poor for children with recurrent/refractory osteosarcoma in these single-arm phase II trials. We have now constructed baseline EFS outcomes that can be used as a comparison for future phase II trials for recurrent osteosarcoma. PMID:27400942

  4. Dosing anticancer drugs in infants: Current approach and recommendations from the Children's Oncology Group's Chemotherapy Standardization Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balis, Frank M; Womer, Richard B; Berg, Stacey; Winick, Naomi; Adamson, Peter C; Fox, Elizabeth

    2017-11-01

    An analysis of dose modifications for infants in 29 Children's Oncology Group protocols across 10 cancer types revealed 11 sets of criteria defining the infant population using age, weight, body surface area (BSA), or a combination of these parameters and eight dose modification methods. A new method of dosing anticancer drugs in infants was developed based on the rationale that prior modifications were implemented to reduce toxicity, which is not cancer-specific. The new method uses BSA dose banding in dosing tables for infants and children with a BSA <0.6 m 2 and gradually transitions from body weight based to BSA-based dosing. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Perspectives of medical oncologists regarding music therapy for patients with cancer in Turkey - can musicology be integrated into psycho-oncology?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Aydemir, Nil Fatma

    2014-01-01

    Music therapy is a common complementary and alternative therapy in addition to medical treatment for patients with cancer. If music therapy, which is known has a positive effect on human emotions and behaviors, is a useful additional therapy, it should be more integrated into pyscho-oncology. In this study, we aimed to determine medical oncologist attitudes to music therapy for patients with cancer and knowledge about musicology and music therapy in Turkey. This survey study included questions about participant attitudes and knowledge regarding music therapy as well as demographic characteristics. The population of the study were 402 physicians working in medical oncology in Turkey and the sample covered 112 participants in the the survey. For statistical analyses the chi-square test, Fischer exact test, and Mann-Whitney U analysis are applied. In our study the rate for medical oncologists who were interested in music therapy was 28% (n=112). Some 30% (n=34) of medical oncologists recommended music therapy for their patients and 55% (n=61) recommended music therapy to prevent anxiety in patients with cancer. In this study, for more harmony with patients and in order to ensure management of adverse effect, it was concluded that music therapy should be regrded as an additional therapy in oncology clinics.

  6. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht; Kristensen, Ellids

    Objectives: A recent meta-analysis also concluded that psychotherapeutic approaches are beneficial for adult with a history of CSA and maintained for at least six months follow-up. The results suggest that different characteristics of therapy moderate the therapeutic outcome. We found in a random...

  7. Group Milieu in systemic and psychodynamic group therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lau, Marianne Engelbrecht

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: A recent meta-analysis also concluded that psychotherapeutic approaches are beneficial for adult with a history of CSA and maintained for at least six months follow-up. The results suggest that different characteristics of therapy moderate the therapeutic outcome. We found in a random...

  8. Surgical principles for managing stage IB2, IIA2, and IIB uterine cervical cancer (Bulky Tumors) in Japan: a survey of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Mikio; Aoki, Yoichi; Sakamoto, Masaru; Shimada, Muneaki; Takeshima, Nobuhiro; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kita, Tunekazu; Takizawa, Ken

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the current operative management of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage IB2, IIA2, and IIB uterine cervical cancer (bulky tumors) in Japan by surveying the member institutions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group. We conducted a survey to assess current operative management, including indications and treatment, at all 199 active member institutions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group. A total of 166 institutions (83.4%) responded to the survey. For patients with stage IIB squamous cell carcinoma, 35.5% (59/166) of the institutions performed surgery. For stage IIB nonsquamous cell carcinoma, surgery was performed at 88 (53.7%) of 164 institutions. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy was provided by 75 (45.5%) of 165 institutions (actively in 44 and reluctantly in 31). At 101 (61.2%) of 165 institutions, para-aortic node dissection was performed as part of radical surgery in patients with any indications. At 96 (57.9%) of 166 institutions, high-risk patients underwent chemoradiotherapy after surgery. On the other hand, adjuvant chemotherapy was given to high-risk and intermediate-risk patients at 19.9% and 33.1% institutions, respectively. More than half of the 166 institutions considered the number of metastatic nodes (91/166, 54.8%) and tumor histology (116/166, 69.9%) when selecting adjuvant therapy. This survey provided information regarding the current surgical management of uterine cervical cancer (stages IB2, IIA2, and IIA) in Japan.

  9. Coping style and performance status in a group of oncological inpatients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Chau Pérez-Aranibar

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available The associations between coping styles, measured by COPE Test, dispositional version (Carver,Scheier and Weintraub, 1989, and Health Status inferred through a performance status, measured by Karnofsky's Index of Behavioral Performance are examined. The study focuses upon 28 oncological in patients. Positive moderate Pearson's correlations were found between these two variables in this correlational-descriptive study. These were interpreted in the following sense: the larger use of the style, the less health status among the scales suppression of competent activities, procrastination of coping, instrumental social support, focusing and releasing of emotions and behavioral disengagement. The active coping scale presented a negative correlationwith regard to Performance Status as a health measure.

  10. A Phase II Evaluation of Nintedanib (BIBF-1120) in the Treatment of Recurrent or Persistent Endometrial Cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon, Don S.; Sill, Michael W.; Schilder, Jeanne M.; McGonigle, Kathryn F.; Rahman, Zia; Miller, David S.; Mutch, David G.; Leslie, Kimberly K.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Patients presenting with advanced, recurrent, or metastatic endometrial cancer have limited treatment options. On behalf of the Gynecologic Oncology Group, we conducted this phase II trial of nintedanib (BIBF 1120), a potent small molecule triple receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor of PDGFR α and β, FGFR 1/3, and VEGFR 1-3, in this population. Objectives The primary objectives were to estimate event-free survival (EFS) at six months and the proportion of patients who have an objective tumor response. In addition, we sought to determine the nature and degree of toxicity. Secondary objectives were to estimate progression-free and overall survival. Methods This was a two-stage, single-arm phase II study. Eligible patients were treated with single-agent nintedanib at a dose of 200 mg twice daily. Results Of 37 patients enrolled, 32 were eligible. There were zero complete and three partial responses for an overall response rate of 9.4% (90% 2-sided CI 2.6 ~ 22.5%). Seven patients (21.9%; 90% 2-sided CI 10.7 ~ 37.2%) were EFS at six months, with one patient continuing on study at the time of this writing. Serious toxicity included the following grade 3 events: gastrointestinal toxicity (5), neutropenia (1), edema (1), hypertension (1), and liver function abnormalities (5). Conclusions Nintedanib lacked sufficient activity as a single agent to warrant enrollment to second stage. However, preclinical data indicate it may be synergistic with paclitaxel in a population of patients enriched for specific p53 mutations that result in loss of function. Subsequent studies may evaluate this agent in combination with paclitaxel. PMID:25312396

  11. Hub Group: An Innovative Approach to Group Therapy in a Short-Term Inpatient Adolescent Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beitel, Ashley; And Others

    1983-01-01

    Describes Hub Group, a short-term ward-based group therapy program for institutionalized adolescents. Backed by a behaviorally-based privilege system, Hub Group contracting methods facilitate rapid investment in group therapy and promote change. Advantages and disadvantages of including mixed levels of functioning in the same group are discussed.…

  12. How Effective Are Spiritual Care and Body Manipulation Therapies in Pediatric Oncology? A Systematic Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Thomas G.; Lemieux, Renald

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effects of cancer and associated treatments have a considerable impact on the well-being and quality of life of pediatric oncology patients. To support children and their families, complementary and alternative medicines are seen by nurses and doctors as practical to integrate to the services offered by hospitals. Objective: The purpose of this paper is to examine if the practice of complementary and alternative medicine, specifically spiritual care and treatments based on body manipulation, is likely to improve the health and well-being of children suffering from cancer. Method: This objective is achieved through a systematic review of the literature. The level of evidence associated with each practice of complementary and alternative medicine was assessed according to the methodological design used by the studies reviewed. Results and Conclusion: Studies reviewed are of a methodological quality that could be described as fair due to the small sample size of patients and the existence of a number of biases in the conduct and analysis of these studies. However, results obtained are consistent from one study to another, allowing us to make certain recommendations. It is thus advisable to consider the introduction of hypnotherapy in pediatric oncology services. Based on the data collected, it is the complementary and alternative medicine with the most evidence in favor of effectiveness of the well-being of pediatric oncology patients, especially during painful procedures. It is also recommended to use art therapy and music therapy. Conversely, too little evidence is present to be able to recommend the use of acupuncture, chiropractic or osteopathy. PMID:24576371

  13. Southwest Oncology Group S0008: A Phase III Trial of High-Dose Interferon Alfa-2b Versus Cisplatin, Vinblastine, and Dacarbazine, Plus Interleukin-2 and Interferon in Patients With High-Risk Melanoma—An Intergroup Study of Cancer and Leukemia Group B, Children's Oncology Group, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group, and Southwest Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaherty, Lawrence E.; Othus, Megan; Atkins, Michael B.; Tuthill, Ralph J.; Thompson, John A.; Vetto, John T.; Haluska, Frank G.; Pappo, Alberto S.; Sosman, Jeffrey A.; Redman, Bruce G.; Moon, James; Ribas, Antoni; Kirkwood, John M.; Sondak, Vernon K.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose High-dose interferon (IFN) for 1 year (HDI) is the US Food and Drug Administration–approved adjuvant therapy for patients with high-risk melanoma. Efforts to modify IFN dose and schedule have not improved efficacy. We sought to determine whether a shorter course of biochemotherapy would be more effective. Patients and Methods S0008 (S0008: Chemotherapy Plus Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Melanoma) was an Intergroup phase III trial that enrolled high-risk patients (stage IIIA-N2a through IIIC-N3), randomly assigning them to receive either HDI or biochemotherapy consisting of dacarbazine, cisplatin, vinblastine, interleukin-2, IFN alfa-2b (IFN-α-2b) and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor given every 21 days for three cycles. Coprimary end points were relapse-free survival (RFS) and overall survival (OS). Results In all, 432 patients were enrolled. Grade 3 and 4 adverse events occurred in 57% and 7% of HDI patients and 36% and 40% of biochemotherapy patients, respectively. At a median follow-up of 7.2 years, biochemotherapy improved RFS (hazard ratio [HR], 0.75; 95% CI, 0.58 to 0.97; P = .015), with a median RFS of 4.0 years (95% CI, 1.9 years to not reached [NR]) versus 1.9 years for HDI (95% CI, 1.2 to 2.8 years) and a 5-year RFS of 48% versus 39%. Median OS was not different (HR, 0.98; 95% CI, 0.74 to 1.31; P = .55), with a median OS of 9.9 years (95% CI, 4.62 years to NR) for biochemotherapy versus 6.7 years (95% CI, 4.5 years to NR) for HDI and a 5-year OS of 56% for both arms. Conclusion Biochemotherapy is a shorter, alternative adjuvant treatment for patients with high-risk melanoma that provides statistically significant improvement in RFS but no difference in OS and more toxicity compared with HDI. PMID:25332243

  14. New technologies in radiation therapy: ensuring patient safety, radiation safety and regulatory issues in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amols, Howard I

    2008-11-01

    New technologies such as intensity modulated and image guided radiation therapy, computer controlled linear accelerators, record and verify systems, electronic charts, and digital imaging have revolutionized radiation therapy over the past 10-15 y. Quality assurance (QA) as historically practiced and as recommended in reports such as American Association of Physicists in Medicine Task Groups 40 and 53 needs to be updated to address the increasing complexity and computerization of radiotherapy equipment, and the increased quantity of data defining a treatment plan and treatment delivery. While new technology has reduced the probability of many types of medical events, seeing new types of errors caused by improper use of new technology, communication failures between computers, corrupted or erroneous computer data files, and "software bugs" are now being seen. The increased use of computed tomography, magnetic resonance, and positron emission tomography imaging has become routine for many types of radiotherapy treatment planning, and QA for imaging modalities is beyond the expertise of most radiotherapy physicists. Errors in radiotherapy rarely result solely from hardware failures. More commonly they are a combination of computer and human errors. The increased use of radiosurgery, hypofractionation, more complex intensity modulated treatment plans, image guided radiation therapy, and increasing financial pressures to treat more patients in less time will continue to fuel this reliance on high technology and complex computer software. Clinical practitioners and regulatory agencies are beginning to realize that QA for new technologies is a major challenge and poses dangers different in nature than what are historically familiar.

  15. Clinical trial design for systemic agents in patients with brain metastases from solid tumours: a guideline by the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Brain Metastases working group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camidge, D Ross; Lee, Eudocia Q; Lin, Nancy U; Margolin, Kim; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Bendszus, Martin; Chang, Susan M; Dancey, Janet; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; Harris, Gordon J; Hodi, F Stephen; Lassman, Andrew B; Macdonald, David R; Peereboom, David M; Schiff, David; Soffietti, Ricardo; van den Bent, Martin J; Wefel, Jeffrey S; Wen, Patrick Y

    2018-01-01

    Patients with active CNS disease are often excluded from clinical trials, and data regarding the CNS efficacy of systemic agents are usually obtained late in the drug development process or not at all. In this guideline from the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology Brain Metastases (RANO-BM) working group, we provide detailed recommendations on when patients with brain metastases from solid tumours should be included or excluded in clinical trials of systemic agents. We also discuss the limitations of retrospective studies in determining the CNS efficacy of systemic drugs. Inclusion of patients with brain metastases early on in the clinical development of a drug or a regimen is needed to generate appropriate CNS efficacy or non-efficacy signals. We consider how to optimally incorporate or exclude such patients in systemic therapy trials depending on the likelihood of CNS activity of the agent by considering three scenarios: drugs that are considered very unlikely to have CNS antitumour activity or efficacy; drugs that are considered very likely to have CNS activity or efficacy; and drugs with minimal baseline information on CNS activity or efficacy. We also address trial design issues unique to patients with brain metastases, including the selection of appropriate CNS endpoints in systemic therapy trials. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. SAMITAL®: a new botanical drug for the treatment of mucositis induced by oncological therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morazzoni, Paolo; Petrangolini, Giovanna; Bombardelli, Ezio; Ronchi, Massimo; Cabri, Walter; Riva, Antonella

    2013-11-01

    SAMITAL(®) (Indena SpA, Milan, Italy) is a new multicomponent and multiacting botanical formulation rationally designed for the relief of oral mucositis induced by chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy in oncological patients. Each of the individual botanical constituents of SAMITAL-standardized extracts of Vaccinium myrtillus, Macleaya cordata and Echinacea angustifolia have a long history of clinical use that corroborates their safety and activity in SAMITAL. A number of pilot trials in oncological patients demonstrated that SAMITAL has good clinical efficacy and tolerability as evidenced by its significant effects in terms of reduction of mucositis, pain and a general improvement in patient quality of life. Importantly, the use of this botanical formulation had the added benefit that patients were able to complete their chemotherapy/radiotherapy regimen. Phase II trials with SAMITAL as part of an overall clinical development program are currently ongoing in Italy and are planned in the USA.

  17. Building a National Framework for Adolescent and Young Adult Hematology and Oncology and Transition from Pediatric to Adult Care: Report of the Inaugural Meeting of the "AjET" Working Group of the German Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escherich, Gabriele; Bielack, Stefan; Maier, Stephan; Braungart, Ralf; Brümmendorf, Tim H; Freund, Mathias; Grosse, Regine; Hoferer, Anette; Kampschulte, Rebecca; Koch, Barbara; Lauten, Melchior; Milani, Valeria; Ross, Henning; Schilling, Freimut; Wöhrle, Dieter; Cario, Holger; Dirksen, Uta

    2017-06-01

    Adolescents and young adults (AYAs) with hemato-oncological problems constitute a heterogenous group with characteristic particularities, specific needs, and age-related clinical and unique psychosocial features. Strong collaboration between pediatric and adult hemato-oncology settings is essential to address their needs appropriately. This is not only true for patients who first become ill during adolescence or young adulthood, but equally so for people who contract hemato-oncological diseases congenitally or as younger children and who are now becoming old enough to leave the pediatric setting and have to transit into "adult" medical care. Efforts to create environments that meet the specific needs of the AYA population affected by hemato-oncological diseases have been initiated in many countries. Due to international variations between societies in general and healthcare infrastructures in particular, the challenges posed to creating such environments vary considerably from country to country. Aiming at addressing these on a national basis for Germany, a dedicated Working Group on Adolescents, Young Adults, and Transition (Arbeitsgemeinschaft Adoleszenten, junge Erwachsene, Transition, AjET) was established. This meeting report depicts the content and discussions of the first interdisciplinary conference on treatment, transition, and long-term follow-up in AYAs with cancer or chronic/inborn hematological diseases. The AjET group of the German Society for Pediatric Oncology and Hematology (GPOH) intends to increase the national awareness for AYAs; strengthen the collaboration of pediatric and adult care givers; and initiate, promote, and coordinate collaborative activities in the fields of basic and translational research, clinical care, and long-term follow-up aimed at improving the current situation.

  18. Application of adult attachment theory to group member transference and the group therapy process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markin, Rayna D; Marmarosh, Cheri

    2010-03-01

    Although clinical researchers have applied attachment theory to client conceptualization and treatment in individual therapy, few researchers have applied this theory to group therapy. The purpose of this article is to begin to apply theory and research on adult dyadic and group attachment styles to our understanding of group dynamics and processes in adult therapy groups. In particular, we set forth theoretical propositions on how group members' attachment styles affect relationships within the group. Specifically, this article offers some predictions on how identifying group member dyadic and group attachment styles could help leaders predict member transference within the therapy group. Implications of group member attachment for the selection and composition of a group and the different group stages are discussed. Recommendations for group clinicians and researchers are offered. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  19. Radiotherapy Quality Assurance Report From Children's Oncology Group AHOD0031

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dharmarajan, Kavita V. [Mount Sinai Medical Center, New York, New York (United States); Friedman, Debra L. [Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee (United States); FitzGerald, T.J. [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); McCarten, Kathleen M. [Rhode Island Hospital/Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, Providence, Rhode Island (United States); Constine, Louis S. [University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Chen, Lu [Children' s Oncology Group, Arcadia, California (United States); Kessel, Sandy K.; Iandoli, Matt; Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, Rhode Island (United States); Schwartz, Cindy L. [MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: A phase 3 trial assessing response-based therapy in intermediate-risk Hodgkin lymphoma mandated real-time central review of involved field radiation therapy (IFRT) and imaging records by a centralized review center to maximize protocol compliance. We report the impact of centralized radiation therapy review on protocol compliance. Methods and Materials: Review of simulation films, port films, and dosimetry records was required before and after treatment. Records were reviewed by study-affiliated or review center–affiliated radiation oncologists. A deviation of 6% to 10% from protocol-specified dose was scored as “minor”; a deviation of >10% was “major.” A volume deviation was scored as “minor” if margins were less than specified or “major” if fields transected disease-bearing areas. Interventional review and final compliance review scores were assigned to each radiation therapy case and compared. Results: Of 1712 patients enrolled, 1173 underwent IFRT at 256 institutions in 7 countries. An interventional review was performed in 88% of patients and a final review in 98%. Overall, minor and major deviations were found in 12% and 6% of patients, respectively. Among the cases for which ≥1 pre-IFRT modification was requested by the Quality Assurance Review Center and subsequently made by the treating institution, 100% were made compliant on final review. By contrast, among the cases for which ≥1 modification was requested but not made by the treating institution, 10% were deemed compliant on final review. Conclusions: In a large trial with complex treatment pathways and heterogeneous radiation therapy fields, central review was performed in a large percentage of cases before IFRT and identified frequent potential deviations in a timely manner. When suggested modifications were performed by the institutions, deviations were almost eliminated.

  20. A Research Agenda for Radiation Oncology: Results of the Radiation Oncology Institute's Comprehensive Research Needs Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jagsi, Reshma, E-mail: rjagsi@med.umich.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Bekelman, Justin E. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Brawley, Otis W. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Emory University, and American Cancer Society, Atlanta, Georgia (United States); Deasy, Joseph O. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Le, Quynh-Thu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University, St. Louis, MO (United States); Movsas, Benjamin [Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Health System, Detroit, MI (United States); Thomas, Charles R. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR (United States); Lawton, Colleen A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI (United States); Lawrence, Theodore S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Hahn, Stephen M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To promote the rational use of scarce research funding, scholars have developed methods for the systematic identification and prioritization of health research needs. The Radiation Oncology Institute commissioned an independent, comprehensive assessment of research needs for the advancement of radiation oncology care. Methods and Materials: The research needs assessment used a mixed-method, qualitative and quantitative social scientific approach, including structured interviews with diverse stakeholders, focus groups, surveys of American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) members, and a prioritization exercise using a modified Delphi technique. Results: Six co-equal priorities were identified: (1) Identify and develop communication strategies to help patients and others better understand radiation therapy; (2) Establish a set of quality indicators for major radiation oncology procedures and evaluate their use in radiation oncology delivery; (3) Identify best practices for the management of radiation toxicity and issues in cancer survivorship; (4) Conduct comparative effectiveness studies related to radiation therapy that consider clinical benefit, toxicity (including quality of life), and other outcomes; (5) Assess the value of radiation therapy; and (6) Develop a radiation oncology registry. Conclusions: To our knowledge, this prioritization exercise is the only comprehensive and methodologically rigorous assessment of research needs in the field of radiation oncology. Broad dissemination of these findings is critical to maximally leverage the impact of this work, particularly because grant funding decisions are often made by committees on which highly specialized disciplines such as radiation oncology are not well represented.

  1. Cost minimization analysis of two treatment regimens for low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma in children: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Heidi; Swint, J Michael; Lal, Lincy; Meza, Jane; Walterhouse, David; Hawkins, Douglas S; Okcu, M Fatih

    2014-06-01

    Recent Children's Oncology Group trials for low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma attempted to reduce therapy while maintaining excellent outcomes. D9602 delivered 45 weeks of outpatient vincristine and dactinomycin (VA) for patients in Subgroup A. ARST0331 reduced the duration of therapy to 22 weeks but added four doses of cyclophosphamide to VA for patients in Subset 1. Failure-free survival was similar. We undertook a cost minimization comparison to help guide future decision-making. Addressing the costs of treatment from the healthcare perspective we modeled a simple decision-analytic model from aggregate clinical trial data. Medical care inputs and probabilities were estimated from trial reports and focused chart review. Costs of radiation, surgery and off-therapy surveillance were excluded. Unit costs were obtained from literature and national reimbursement and inpatient utilization databases and converted to 2012 US dollars. Model uncertainty was assessed with first-order sensitivity analysis. Direct medical costs were $46,393 for D9602 and $43,261 for ARST0331 respectively, making ARST0331 the less costly strategy. Dactinomycin contributed the most to D9602 total costs but varied with age (42-69%). Chemotherapy administration costs accounted for the largest proportion of ARST0331 total costs (39-57%). ARST0331 incurred fewer costs than D9602 under most alternative distributive models and alternative clinical practice assumptions. Cost analysis suggests that ARST0331 may incur fewer costs than D9602 from the healthcare system's perspective. Attention to the services driving the costs provides directions for future efficiency improvements. Future studies should prospectively consider the patient and family's perspective. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Randomized trial of group musi therapy with Chinese prisoners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Xi Jing; Hannibal, Niels; Gold, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of group music therapy on improving anxiety, depression, and self-esteem in Chinese prisoners. Two hundred male prisoners were randomly assigned to music therapy (n = 100) or standard care (n = 100). The music therapy had 20 sessions of group therapy compared...... to standard care. Anxiety (STAI), depression (BDI) and self-esteem (TSBI, RSI) were measured by standardized scales at baseline, mid-program and post-program. Data were analyzed based on the intention to treat principle. Compared to standard care, anxiety and depression in the music therapy condition...... decreased significantly at mid-test and post-test; self-esteem improved significantly at mid-test (TSBI) and at post-test (TSBI, RSI). Improvements were greater in younger participants (STAI-Trait, RSI) and/or those with a lower level of education (STAI-State, STAI-Trait). Group music therapy seems...

  3. The World Health Organization Classification of Skeletal Muscle Tumors in Pediatric Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudzinski, Erin R; Anderson, James R; Hawkins, Douglas S; Skapek, Stephen X; Parham, David M; Teot, Lisa A

    2015-10-01

    The World Health Organization Classification Since 1995, the International Classification of Rhabdomyosarcoma has provided prognostically relevant classification for rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) and allowed risk stratification for children with RMS. The International Classification of Rhabdomyosarcoma includes botryoid and spindle cell RMS as superior-risk groups, embryonal RMS as an intermediate-risk group, and alveolar RMS as an unfavorable-risk group. The 2013 World Health Organization (WHO) classification of skeletal muscle tumors modified the histologic classification of RMS to include sclerosing RMS as a type of spindle cell RMS separate from embryonal RMS. The current WHO classification includes embryonal, alveolar, spindle cell/sclerosing, and pleomorphic subtypes of RMS and does not separate the botryoid subtype. To determine if the WHO classification applies to pediatric RMS. To accomplish this goal, we reviewed 9 consecutive Children's Oncology Group clinical trials to compare the WHO and International Classification of Rhabdomyosarcoma classifications with outcome and site of disease. Except for a subset of low-risk RMS, the outcome for botryoid was not significantly different from typical embryonal RMS when analyzed by primary site. Similarly, pediatric spindle cell and sclerosing patterns of RMS did not appear significantly different from typical embryonal RMS, with one exception: spindle cell RMS in the parameningeal region had an inferior outcome with 28% event-free survival. Our data support use of the WHO RMS classification in the pediatric population, with the caveat that histologic diagnosis does not necessarily confer the same prognostic information in children as in adults.

  4. Characterization of Adolescent and Pediatric Renal Cell Carcinoma, a Report from the Children's Oncology Group Study AREN03B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, James I.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Cost, Nicholas G.; Khanna, Geetika; Mullen, Elizabeth A.; Gratias, Eric J.; Naranjo, Arlene; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE To characterize the epidemiology, histology, radiographic features and surgical approach of pediatric and adolescent renal cell carcinoma (pRCC). PATIENTS AND METHODS pRCC cases prospectively enrolled on the Children's Oncology Group study AREN03B2 underwent central pathology, radiology, surgery and oncology review. RESULTS As of June 2012, of 3250 patients enrolled on AREN03B2, 120 (3.7%) had unilateral RCC (median age 12.9 years, range 1.9-22.1; 52.5% female). Central review classified these as translocation morphology (56), papillary (20), renal medullary carcinoma (13), chromophobe (4), oncocytoma (1), conventional clear cell (1), and RCC not otherwise specified (25). Lymph node (LN) involvement (N+) was found in 35/73 (47.9%) cases for which LN were sampled, including 19/40 (47.5%) with primary tumors cut-off of 1cm, imaging detection of N+ had a sensitivity of 57.14% [(20/35); 95% CI: 39.35%, 73.68%] and specificity of 94.59% [(35/37); 95% CI: 81.81%, 99.34%]. Distant metastases were present in 23 (19.2%). Initial surgery was radical nephrectomy (RN) in 88 (73.3%), nephron-sparing surgery (NSS) in 18 (15.0%), and biopsy in 14 (11.7%). Patients undergoing NSS compared to RN were less likely to have LNs sampled (6/18 (33.3%) vs. 65/88 (73.9%), p-value = 0.002). CONCLUSIONS Translocation RCC is the most common form of pediatric and adolescent RCC. Nodal disease is common and seen with small primary tumors. Imaging has a high specificity but relatively low sensitivity for detection of such lymph node disease. Failure to sample LNs results in incomplete staging and potentially inadequate disease control for younger RCC patients. PMID:25845370

  5. Barriers to a Career Focus in Cancer Prevention: A Report and Initial Recommendations From the American Society of Clinical Oncology Cancer Prevention Workforce Pipeline Work Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian, Carol J; Meyskens, Frank L; Bajorin, Dean F; George, Thomas J; Jeter, Joanne M; Khan, Shakila; Tyne, Courtney A; William, William N

    2016-01-10

    To assist in determining barriers to an oncology career incorporating cancer prevention, the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) Cancer Prevention Workforce Pipeline Work Group sponsored surveys of training program directors and oncology fellows. Separate surveys with parallel questions were administered to training program directors at their fall 2013 retreat and to oncology fellows as part of their February 2014 in-training examination survey. Forty-seven (67%) of 70 training directors and 1,306 (80%) of 1,634 oncology fellows taking the in-training examination survey answered questions. Training directors estimated that ≤ 10% of fellows starting an academic career or entering private practice would have a career focus in cancer prevention. Only 15% of fellows indicated they would likely be interested in cancer prevention as a career focus, although only 12% thought prevention was unimportant relative to treatment. Top fellow-listed barriers to an academic career were difficulty in obtaining funding and lower compensation. Additional barriers to an academic career with a prevention focus included unclear career model, lack of clinical mentors, lack of clinical training opportunities, and concerns about reimbursement. Reluctance to incorporate cancer prevention into an oncology career seems to stem from lack of mentors and exposure during training, unclear career path, and uncertainty regarding reimbursement. Suggested approaches to begin to remedy this problem include: 1) more ASCO-led and other prevention educational resources for fellows, training directors, and practicing oncologists; 2) an increase in funded training and clinical research opportunities, including reintroduction of the R25T award; 3) an increase in the prevention content of accrediting examinations for clinical oncologists; and 4) interaction with policymakers to broaden the scope and depth of reimbursement for prevention counseling and intervention services. © 2015 by American

  6. Intermediate-risk grouping of cervical cancer patients treated with radical hysterectomy: a Korean Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, S Y; Kim, M H; Nam, B H; Lee, T S; Song, E S; Park, C Y; Kim, J W; Kim, Y B; Ryu, H S; Park, S Y; Kim, K T; Cho, C H; Lee, C; Kim, S M; Kim, B G; Bae, D S; Kim, Y T; Nam, J-H

    2014-01-21

    In this study, we sought to identify a criterion for the intermediate-risk grouping of patients with cervical cancer who exhibit any intermediate-risk factor after radical hysterectomy. In total, 2158 patients with pathologically proven stage IB-IIA cervical cancer with any intermediate-risk factor after radical hysterectomy were randomly assigned to two groups, a development group and a validation group, at a ratio of 3 : 1 (1620 patients:538 patients). To predict recurrence, multivariate models were developed using the development group. The ability of the models to discriminate between groups was validated using the log-rank test and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Four factors (histology, tumour size, deep stromal invasion (DSI), and lymphovascular space involvement (LVSI)) were significantly associated with disease recurrence and included in the models. Among the nine possible combinations of the four variables, models consisting of any two of the four intermediate-risk factors (tumour size ≥3 cm, DSI of the outer third of the cervix, LVSI, and adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma histology) demonstrated the best performance for predicting recurrence. This study identified a 'four-factor model' in which the presence of any two factors may be useful for predicting recurrence in patients with cervical cancer treated with radical hysterectomy.

  7. Supportive groups for siblings of pediatric oncology patients: impact on anxiety

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Houtzager, B. A.; Grootenhuis, M. A.; Last, B. F.

    2001-01-01

    Childhood cancer can have a substantial emotional impact on the siblings of the sick child. In order to help these siblings adjust to the illness, supportive groups were started in 1994 at our medical center. The program is based on a model of psychosocial support; the aim of the group is to enhance

  8. Results of the First Prospective Multi-institutional Treatment Study in Children With Bilateral Wilms Tumor (AREN0534): A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Peter; Chi, Yuen Y; Chintagumpala, Murali M; Hoffer, Fred A; Perlman, Elizabeth J; Kalapurakal, John A; Warwick, Ann; Shamberger, Robert C; Khanna, Geetika; Hamilton, Tom E; Gow, Ken W; Paulino, Arnold C; Gratias, Eric J; Mullen, Elizabeth A; Geller, James I; Grundy, Paul E; Fernandez, Conrad V; Ritchey, Michael L; Dome, James S

    2017-09-01

    The Children's Oncology Group study AREN0534 aimed to improve event-free survival (EFS) and overall survival (OS) while preserving renal tissue by intensifying preoperative chemotherapy, completing definitive surgery by 12 weeks from diagnosis, and modifying postoperative chemotherapy based on histologic response. No prospective therapeutic clinic trials in children with bilateral Wilms tumors (BWT) exist. Historical outcomes for this group were poor and often involved prolonged chemotherapy; on NWTS-5, 4-year EFS for all children with BWT was 56%. Patients were enrolled and imaging studies were centrally reviewed to assess for bilateral renal lesions. They were treated with 3-drug induction chemotherapy (vincristine, dactinomycin, and doxorubicin) for 6 or 12 weeks based on radiographic response followed by surgery and further chemotherapy determined by histology. Radiation therapy was provided for postchemotherapy stage III and IV disease. One hundred eighty-nine of 208 patients were evaluable. Four-year EFS and OS were 82.1% (95% CI: 73.5%-90.8%) and 94.9% (95% CI: 90.1%-99.7%. Twenty-three patients relapsed and 7 had disease progression. After induction chemotherapy 163 of 189 (84.0%) underwent definitive surgical treatment in at least 1 kidney by 12 weeks and 39% retained parts of both kidneys. Surgical approaches included: unilateral total nephrectomy with contralateral partial nephrectomy (48%), bilateral partial nephrectomy (35%), unilateral total nephrectomy (10.5%), unilateral partial nephrectomy (4%), and bilateral total nephrectomies (2.5%). This treatment approach including standardized 3-drug preoperative chemotherapy, surgical resection within 12 weeks of diagnosis and response and histology-based postoperative therapy improved EFS and OS and preservation of renal parenchyma compared with historical outcomes for children with BWT.

  9. Impact of three courses of intensified CHOP prior to high-dose sequential therapy followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation as first-line treatment in poor-risk, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma : comparative analysis of Dutch-Belgian hemato-oncology cooperative group studies 27 and 40

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Imhoff, GW; van der Holt, B; MacKenzie, MA; van't Veer, MB; Wijermans, PW; Ossenkoppele, GL; Schouten, HC; Sonneveld, P; Steijaert, MMC; Kluin, PM; Kluin-Nelemans, NC; Verdonck, LF

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Timing, appropriate amount, and composition of treatment before high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with poor-risk, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are still unknown. We conducted two consecutive multicenter phase 11 trials with up-front,

  10. Impact of three courses of intensified CHOP prior to high-dose sequential therapy followed by autologous stem-cell transplantation as first-line treatment in poor-risk, aggressive non-hodgkin's lymphoma: comparative analysis of Dutch-Belgian Hemato-Oncology Cooperative Group Studies 27 and 40.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Imhoff, G.W. van; Holt, B. van der; MacKenzie, M.A.; Veer, M.B. van 't; Wijermans, P.W.; Ossenkoppele, G.J.; Schouten, H.C.; Sonneveld, P.; Steijaert, M.M.; Kluin, P.; Kluin-Nelemans, H.C.; Verdonck, L.F.

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Timing, appropriate amount, and composition of treatment before high-dose therapy and autologous stem-cell transplantation (ASCT) in patients with poor-risk, aggressive non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) are still unknown. We conducted two consecutive multicenter phase II trials with up-front,

  11. Difference in Practice Patterns in the Management of Endometrial Cancer: A Survey of the Members of 4 East Asian Gynecologic Oncology Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jung-Yun; Kim, Jae Weon; Lee, Taek Sang; Zang, Rongyu; Chen, Xiaojun; Yang, Jiaxin; Wang, Kung-Liahng; Sugiyama, Toru

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this article was to identify current practice patterns of care in the surgical and adjuvant management of endometrial cancer in East Asia (Korea, Japan, China, and Taiwan) METHODS: A validated 20-item questionnaire on surgical and adjuvant procedures for endometrial cancer was sent to active members of the Gynecologic Oncology Group from 4 East Asian countries. Data were collected using an Internet survey database. A total of 376 members from Korea (n = 108), Japan (n = 140), China (n = 51), and Taiwan (n = 77) responded to the survey. With respect to early-stage endometrial cancer, laparotomy (57.7%) was the most preferred mode of surgery in Japan, whereas laparoscopy was the most common in the remaining 3 countries. For patients with presumed stage IA/G1 disease, approximately 65% of respondents favored systematic lymphadenectomy. For patients with presumed stage IB disease, most respondents stated that systematic lymphadenectomy should be performed (92.6% for stage IBG1, 95.8% for stage IBG3). Meanwhile, the extents of lymphadenectomy differed among countries (P Japan, whereas concurrent chemoradiotherapy was preferred in the other countries. Considerable agreement was identified with respect to the necessity for lymphadenectomy for surgical staging and the indications for adjuvant therapy. However, extents of surgery and preferred adjuvant treatment options for endometrial cancer varied widely between countries.

  12. Evaluation of irofulven (MGI-114) in the treatment of recurrent or persistent endometrial carcinoma: A phase II study of the Gynecologic Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, Russell J; Blessing, John A; Pearl, Michael L; Rose, Peter G

    2004-08-01

    This multi-center phase II trial was conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group to evaluate the activity and toxicity of irofulven in patients with previously treated adenocarcinoma of the endometrium. Eligible patients had documented recurrent or persistent endometrial carcinoma after receiving definitive locoregional therapy, and were required to have measurable disease, performance status of 0-2, and adequate bone marrow, hepatic and renal functions prior to study entry. Patients were allowed one prior chemotherapy regimen. The initial dose of irofulven was 11 mg/m(2)/day for four days administered intravenously. Cycles were repeated every 28 days. Doses were escalated or reduced based on previous cycle toxicity. Twenty-five patients were enrolled onto the trial. There was one (4%) confirmed complete response. Seven (28%) patients had stable disease, with a median duration of 10.4 (range: 4.4-21.6) months. Patients received a median of one (range: 1-5) cycle of protocol treatment. There were three early treatment-related deaths due to renal failure and severe electrolyte disturbances. Two patients experienced grade 4 hematologic adverse effects. Irofulven administered at the dose and schedule used in this trial was minimally active and resulted in significant toxicity.

  13. Salivary gland carcinoma : Independent prognostic factors for locoregional control, distant metastases, and overall survival: Results of the Dutch Head and Neck Oncology Cooperative Group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terhaard, CHJ; Lubsen, H; Van der Tweel, [No Value; Hilgers, FJM; Eijkenboom, WMH; Marres, HAM; Tjho-Heslinga, RE; de Jong, JMA; Roodenburg, JLN

    Background. We analyzed the records of patients with malignant salivary gland tumors, as diagnosed in centers of the Dutch Head and Neck Oncology Cooperative Group, in search of independent prognostic factors for locoregional control, distant metastases, and overall survival. Methods. In 565

  14. Causes of death - other than progressive leukemia - in childhood acute lymphoblastic (ALL) and myeloid leukemia (AML) : the Dutch Childhood Oncology Group experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Slats, AM; Egeler, RM; van der Does-van den Berg, A; Korbijn, C; Hahlen, K; Kamps, WA; Veerman, AJP; Zwaan, CM

    We analyzed causes of death, other than resistant disease or relapse, in 875 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia ( ALL) and 229 with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), treated on three different Dutch Childhood Oncology Group (DCOG) ALL and three AML protocols. Overall, 23 (2.6%) ALL and 44

  15. The impact of a weekend group experience on individual therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, I D; Bond, G; Bloch, S; Zimmerman, E; Friedman, L

    1977-04-01

    Thirty-three patients in long-term individual therapy were referred to one of three weekend groups: two experimental (affect-arousing, gestalt therapy) groups and one control (meditation-Tai Chi) group. The impact of the weekend group experience (WGE) on individual therapy was examined six and 12 weeks later. At six weeks the patients in the experimental groups showed, on some measures, a significantly greater improvement in their individual therapy than did controls. By 12 weeks, there were no demonstrable differences. The WGE was not without risk: even though the group leaders were highly trained, responsible clinicians, two patients suffered considerable psychological damage. The control (meditation-Tai Chi) group offered a relatively innocuous experience; there was no risk, but few members found the specific procedures useful in their lives. Intense affect arousal in the WGE was not related to positive change in subsequent individual therapy. Those expressing the greatest affect in either experimental group were no more likely to have had a measurable positive impact on their subsequent individual therapy than patients expressing little or no measurable affect.

  16. Group Therapy for Anxiety in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConachie, Helen; McLaughlin, Eleanor; Grahame, Victoria; Taylor, Helen; Honey, Emma; Tavernor, Laura; Rodgers, Jacqui; Freeston, Mark; Hemm, Cahley; Steen, Nick; Le Couteur, Ann

    2014-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the acceptability and feasibility of adapted group therapy for anxiety in children with autism spectrum disorder in a pilot randomised controlled trial. Method: A total of 32 children aged 9-13 years were randomised to immediate or delayed therapy using the "Exploring Feelings" manual (Attwood, 2004). Child and parent…

  17. A review of the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on the reduction of body image concern in patients with breast cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Faraji, J; A. Mahdavi; Samkhaniyan, E; Asadi, SH; Dezhkam, N

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Taking the appropriate psychological actions to boost the mental health of patients with breast cancer is critical. This research was performed with the aim of examining the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on reducing body image concerns in patients with breast cancer. Methodology: TThe method used was quasi-experimental with a pretest-posttest plan and control group. Therefore, 40 patients with breast cancer who had referred to the oncology and radiotherapy dep...

  18. Group Therapy for Adolescents Living With an Eating Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Downey

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Group models are commonly used to treat eating disorders; however, research in this area remains largely underdeveloped. Interest in group work is likely to increase due to the demands on the public health system and the cost-effectiveness of group modalities. This scoping review sought to explore the evidence underpinning group therapy for adolescents living with an eating disorder. A literature search of 10 academic databases and four gray literature databases was undertaken in 2013. Selected Internet resources were searched and the author consulted professionals from Eating Disorders Victoria, the Butterfly Foundation, and the University of Melbourne. A total of 11 peer-reviewed articles published between 2003 and 2013 were included for review. There was an overall lack of research with no randomized-controlled trials available. Six program evaluations and five program descriptions were found, and they reported on a range of eating disorders and group modalities. The program evaluations suggested the utility of group therapy for promoting weight restoration in underweight individuals living with an eating disorder. Cognitive behavioral therapy groups were found to be more effective for bulimia nervosa and multifamily group therapy showed promise for anorexia nervosa. More rigorous research is needed to establish the effectiveness of group therapy for adolescents living with an eating disorder.

  19. Oncologic photodynamic therapy: Basic principles, current clinical status and future directions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Straten, D. (Demian); Mashayekhi, V. (Vida); H.S. de Bruijn (Riette); S. Oliveira (Sabrina); D.J. Robinson (Dominic)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractPhotodynamic therapy (PDT) is a clinically approved cancer therapy, based on a photochemical reaction between a light activatable molecule or photosensitizer, light, and molecular oxygen. When these three harmless components are present together, reactive oxygen species are formed. These

  20. Cognitive group therapy for depressive students: The case study

    OpenAIRE

    Tiuraniemi, Juhani; Korhola, Jarno

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether a course of cognitive group therapy could help depressed students and to assess whether assimilation analysis offers a useful way of analysing students' progress through therapy. ?Johanna? was a patient in a group that was designed for depressive students who had difficulties with their studies. The assimilation of Johanna's problematic experience progressed as the meetings continued from level one (unpleasant thoughts) to level six (solving the p...

  1. Cognitive group therapy for depressive students: The case study

    OpenAIRE

    Tiuraniemi, Juhani; Korhola, Jarno

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether a course of cognitive group therapy could help depressed students and to assess whether assimilation analysis offers a useful way of analysing students' progress through therapy. "Johanna" was a patient in a group that was designed for depressive students who had difficulties with their studies. The assimilation of Johanna's problematic experience progressed as the meetings continued from level one (unpleasant thoughts) to level six (solving the p...

  2. New Insights in the Design of Bioactive Peptides and Chelating Agents for Imaging and Therapy in Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lucia Tornesello

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Many synthetic peptides have been developed for diagnosis and therapy of human cancers based on their ability to target specific receptors on cancer cell surface or to penetrate the cell membrane. Chemical modifications of amino acid chains have significantly improved the biological activity, the stability and efficacy of peptide analogues currently employed as anticancer drugs or as molecular imaging tracers. The stability of somatostatin, integrins and bombesin analogues in the human body have been significantly increased by cyclization and/or insertion of non-natural amino acids in the peptide sequences. Moreover, the overall pharmacokinetic properties of such analogues and others (including cholecystokinin, vasoactive intestinal peptide and neurotensin analogues have been improved by PEGylation and glycosylation. Furthermore, conjugation of those peptide analogues to new linkers and bifunctional chelators (such as AAZTA, TETA, TRAP, NOPO etc., produced radiolabeled moieties with increased half life and higher binding affinity to the cognate receptors. This review describes the most important and recent chemical modifications introduced in the amino acid sequences as well as linkers and new bifunctional chelators which have significantly improved the specificity and sensitivity of peptides used in oncologic diagnosis and therapy.

  3. Tendency of cancer patients and their relatives to use internet for health-related searches: Turkish Oncology Group (TOG) Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayir, Erdinc; Tanriverdi, Ozgur; Karakas, Yusuf; Kilickap, Saadettin; Serdar Turhal, Nazim; Avci, Nilufer; Okutur, Kerem; Koca, Dogan; Erdem, Dilek; Abali, Huseyin; Yamac, Deniz; Bilir, Cemil; Kacan, Turgut

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to reveal the habits of using internet by cancer patients and their relatives to access health-related information and services in Turkey. An 18-item questionnaire survey was applied in cancer patients and their relatives. A total of 1106 patients (male, 37.3%, and female, 62.7%) and their relatives were included in the study. The responders had been using internet to obtain health information about oncological diseases, once a month (34.2%), 1-2 times a week (27.4%) or 2-3 times a month (21.9%). After diagnosis of cancer was made, participants more frequently (64.4%) investigated health-related issues, while 64.9% of them considered internet as an important search tool, and 16.7% of them had thought to give up cancer therapy under the influence of internet information. Some (33.1%) participants had used herbal medicine, and 16.7% of them had learnt these herbal products from internet. Still 12.7% of them had not questioned the accuracy of internet information, while 26.9% of them indicated that they had not shared the internet information about cancer with their physicians, and 13 % of them searched information in internet without asking their physicians. Cancer patients and their relatives showed a higher tendency to use health-related internet information which may mislead them, and can result in treatment incompliance. Health professionals should offer evidence-based information to the patients and their relatives through internet.

  4. Bevacizumab for advanced cervical cancer: patient-reported outcomes of a randomised, phase 3 trial (NRG Oncology-Gynecologic Oncology Group protocol 240).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penson, Richard T; Huang, Helen Q; Wenzel, Lari B; Monk, Bradley J; Stockman, Sharon; Long, Harry J; Ramondetta, Lois M; Landrum, Lisa M; Oaknin, Ana; Reid, Thomas J A; Leitao, Mario M; Method, Michael; Michael, Helen; Tewari, Krishnansu S

    2015-03-01

    GOG 240 was a practice-changing randomised phase 3 trial that concluded that chemotherapy plus bevacizumab for advanced cervical cancer significantly improves overall and progression-free survival, and the proportion of patients achieving an overall objective response, compared with chemotherapy alone. In this study, we aimed to analyse patient-reported outcomes in GOG 240. Eligible adult participants (aged ≥18 years) had primary stage IVB or recurrent or persistent carcinoma of the cervix with measurable disease and GOG performance status of 0-1. Participants were randomly assigned by web-based permuted block randomisation (block size 4) in a 1:1:1:1 ratio to the four treatment groups: cisplatin (50 mg/m(2) intravenously on day 1 or 2 of the treatment cycle) and paclitaxel (135 mg/m(2) intravenously over 24 h or 175 mg/m(2) intravenously over 3 h on day 1), with or without bevacizumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1 or 2), or paclitaxel (175 mg/m(2) over 3 h on day 1) and topotecan (0·75 mg/m(2) for 30 min on days 1-3) with or without bevacizumab (15 mg/kg intravenously on day 1). Treatment assignment was concealed at randomisation (everyone was masked to treatment assignment, achieved by the use of a computer encrypted numbering system at the National Cancer Institute) and became open-label when each patient was registered to the trial. Treatment cycles were repeated every 21 days until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity, whichever occurred first. The coprimary endpoints of the trial were overall survival and safety; the primary quality-of-life endpoint was the score on the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cervix Trial Outcome Index (FACT-Cx TOI). For our analysis of patient-reported outcomes, participants were assessed before treatment cycles 1, 2, and 5, and at 6 and 9 months after the start of cycle 1, with the FACT-Cx TOI, items from the FACT-GOG-Neurotoxicity subscale, and a worst pain item from the Brief Pain Inventory. All patients who

  5. Response assessment after stereotactic body radiotherapy for spinal metastasis: a report from the SPIne response assessment in Neuro-Oncology (SPINO) group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thibault, Isabelle; Chang, Eric L; Sheehan, Jason; Ahluwalia, Manmeet S; Guckenberger, Matthias; Sohn, Moon-Jun; Ryu, Samuel; Foote, Matthew; Lo, Simon S; Muacevic, Alexander; Soltys, Scott G; Chao, Samuel; Gerszten, Peter; Lis, Eric; Yu, Eugene; Bilsky, Mark; Fisher, Charles; Schiff, David; Fehlings, Michael G; Ma, Lijun; Chang, Susan; Chow, Edward; Parelukar, Wendy R; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Sahgal, Arjun

    2015-12-01

    The SPine response assessment In Neuro-Oncology (SPINO) group is a committee of the Response Assessment in Neuro-Oncology working group and comprises a panel of international experts in spine stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT). Here, we present the group's first report on the challenges in standardising imaging-based assessment of local control and pain for spinal metastases. We review current imaging modalities used in SBRT treatment planning and tumour assessment and review the criteria for pain and local control in registered clinical trials specific to spine SBRT. We summarise the results of an international survey of the panel to establish the range of current practices in assessing tumour response to spine SBRT. The ultimate goal of the SPINO group is to report consensus criteria for tumour imaging, clinical assessment, and symptom-based response criteria to help standardise future clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. FOLFOX+Nab-Paclitaxel (FOLFOX-A) for Advanced Pancreatic Cancer: A Brown University Oncology Research Group Phase I Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, Howard; Charpentier, Kevin P; Perez, Kimberly; Mantripragada, Kalyan; Miner, Thomas; DiPetrillo, Thomas; Kuritzky, Benjamin; Apor, Emmanuel; Bishop, Kenneth; Luppe, Denise; Mitchell, Kristen; Rosati, Kayla

    2016-12-01

    The Brown University Oncology Research Group performed a phase I study to remove irinotecan from FOLFIRINOX (5-fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, irinotecan, and leucovorin) and substitute nab-paclitaxel. Patients with newly diagnosed advanced pancreatic adenocarcinoma were eligible. Patients received oxaliplatin 85 mg/m, leucovorin 400 mg/m, and 5-fluorouracil 2400 mg/m with 3 dose levels of nab-paclitaxel (125, 150, and 175 mg/m) every 2 weeks. Dose-limiting toxicities were assessed in the first 2 cycles of treatment. The final dose level was expanded to assess cumulative neurotoxicity. Thirty-five patients were entered; 24 with metastatic and 11 with locally advanced pancreatic cancer. The maximum tolerated dose of nab-paclitaxel was 150 mg/m every 2 weeks with FOLFOX. Cumulative neuropathy was the most important toxicity. Grade 3 neuropathy developed in 2 of the first 6 patients at 10 and 11 cycles of FOLFOX-A. Following an amendment to reduce oxaliplatin to 65 mg/m if grade 2 neuropathy developed, no additional patients developed grade 3 neurotoxicity. Twenty-one of 35 patients (60%) had a partial response. The median survival for patients with metastatic disease was 15 months. The maximum tolerated dose of nab-paclitaxel is 150 mg/m every 2 weeks with FOLFOX. The regimen of FOLFOX-A represents a promising treatment for pancreatic cancer.

  7. Deep infection in tumor endoprosthesis around the knee: a multi-institutional study by the Japanese musculoskeletal oncology group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The incidence of endoprosthesis failure has been well studied, but few studies have described the clinical characteristics of deep infection in tumor prostheses. This study aimed to analyze the characteristics of deep infection in tumor endoprostheses around the knee. Methods We analyzed clinical data of 57 patients with deep infections involving tumor endoprostheses around the knee enrolled from the Japanese Musculoskeletal Oncology Group. Profile of clinical presentation including time between surgery and infection, initial symptoms/blood tests and microbial cultures was evaluated. In addition pre-, intra-, and postoperative clinical factors influencing clinical presentation and treatment outcomes of infections were analyzed. Results Mean interval between the initial operation and diagnosis was 13 months, and mean time required for infection control was 12 months. The most common pathogen was Staphylococcus. Infection control rates were significantly higher when prostheses were removed rather than salvaged. Ten-year prosthesis survival and limb salvage rates were 41.6% and 75.6%, respectively. Analysis of underlying clinical factors suggested that soft-tissue condition significantly influenced the duration of the infection control period and likelihood of limb salvage. Conclusions Infection control is a prolonged process. Deep infection frequently results in amputation or prosthesis loss. Intensive analysis of clinical characteristics may aid infection control. PMID:23369129

  8. Sporadic Retinoblastoma and Parental Smoking and Alcohol Consumption before and after Conception: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeedeh Azary

    Full Text Available Retinoblastoma is the most frequent tumor of the eye in children and very little is known about the etiology of non-familial (sporadic retinoblastoma. In this study we examined whether parental tobacco smoking or alcohol consumption (pre- or post-conception contribute to the two phenotypes (bilateral or unilateral of sporadic retinoblastoma.Two large multicenter case-control studies identified 488 cases through eye referral centers in the United States and Canada or through the Children's Oncology Group. Controls (n = 424 were selected from among friends and relatives of cases and matched by age. Risk factor information was obtained via telephone interview. We employed multivariable logistic regression to estimate the effects of parental tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on retinoblastoma.Maternal smoking before and during pregnancy contributed to unilateral retinoblastoma risk in the child: year before pregnancy conditional Odds Ratio (OR, 8.9; 95% confidence interval (CI 1.5-51, and unconditional OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.7; month before or during pregnancy, conditional OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 0.5-20.8, and unconditional OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.0. No association was found for maternal or paternal alcohol consumption.The results of this study indicate that maternal active smoking during pregnancy may be a risk factor for sporadic retinoblastoma. Our study supports a role for tobacco exposures in embryonal tumors.

  9. Sporadic Retinoblastoma and Parental Smoking and Alcohol Consumption before and after Conception: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azary, Saeedeh; Ganguly, Arupa; Bunin, Greta R; Lombardi, Christina; Park, Andrew S; Ritz, Beate; Heck, Julia E

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most frequent tumor of the eye in children and very little is known about the etiology of non-familial (sporadic) retinoblastoma. In this study we examined whether parental tobacco smoking or alcohol consumption (pre- or post-conception) contribute to the two phenotypes (bilateral or unilateral) of sporadic retinoblastoma. Two large multicenter case-control studies identified 488 cases through eye referral centers in the United States and Canada or through the Children's Oncology Group. Controls (n = 424) were selected from among friends and relatives of cases and matched by age. Risk factor information was obtained via telephone interview. We employed multivariable logistic regression to estimate the effects of parental tobacco smoking and alcohol consumption on retinoblastoma. Maternal smoking before and during pregnancy contributed to unilateral retinoblastoma risk in the child: year before pregnancy conditional Odds Ratio (OR), 8.9; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.5-51, and unconditional OR, 2.4; 95% CI, 1.3-4.7; month before or during pregnancy, conditional OR, 3.3; 95% CI, 0.5-20.8, and unconditional OR, 2.8; 95% CI, 1.1-7.0. No association was found for maternal or paternal alcohol consumption. The results of this study indicate that maternal active smoking during pregnancy may be a risk factor for sporadic retinoblastoma. Our study supports a role for tobacco exposures in embryonal tumors.

  10. Geriatric assessment in daily oncology practice for nurses and allied health care professionals: Opinion paper of the Nursing and Allied Health Interest Group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhenn, Peggy S; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Begue, Aaron; Nightingale, Ginah; Cheng, Karis; Kenis, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The management of older persons with cancer has become a major public health concern in developed countries because of the aging of the population and the steady increase in cancer incidence with advancing age. Nurses and allied health care professionals are challenged to address the needs of this growing population. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Nursing and Allied Health (NAH) Interest Group described key issues that nurses and allied health care professionals face when caring for older persons with cancer. The domains of the Geriatric Assessment (GA) are used as a guiding framework. The following geriatric domains are described: demographic data and social support, functional status, cognition, mental health, nutritional status, fatigue, comorbidities, polypharmacy, and other geriatric syndromes (e.g. falls, delirium). In addition to these geriatric domains, quality of life (QoL) is described based on the overall importance in this particular population. Advice for integration of assessment of these geriatric domains into daily oncology practice is made. Research has mainly focused on the role of treating physicians but the involvement of nurses and allied health care professionals is crucial in the care of older persons with cancer through the GA process. The ability of nurses and allied health care professionals to perform this assessment requires specialized training and education beyond standard oncology knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Art therapy focus groups for children and adolescents with epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stafstrom, Carl E; Havlena, Janice; Krezinski, Anthony J

    2012-06-01

    Children with epilepsy are at risk for numerous psychological and social challenges. We hypothesized that art therapy focus groups would enhance the self-image of children and adolescents with epilepsy. Sixteen children with epilepsy, ages 7-18 years, were recruited from pediatric neurology clinics at the University of Wisconsin to participate in four art therapy sessions. Pre-group assessments included psychological screens (Piers-Harris Children's Self-Concept Scale; Childhood Attitude Toward Illness Scale; Impact of Childhood Neurologic Disability Scale) and art therapy instruments (Formal Elements Art Therapy Scale; Seizure Drawing Task; Levick Emotional and Cognitive Art Therapy Assessment). Developmental levels of drawings were significantly below age-expected standards. Following completion of focus groups, a repeat Childhood Attitude Toward Illness Scale showed no differences between pre- and post-test scores on any measure of this scale. However, subjects and parents were uniformly positive about their group experiences, suggesting a qualitative benefit from participation in art therapy focus groups. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Eva between anxiety and hope: integrating anthroposophic music therapy in supportive oncology care

    OpenAIRE

    Eran Ben-Arye; Yotam Ben-Arye; Yael Barak

    2015-01-01

    Music therapy is a significant modality in the treatment of patients with cancer, who suffer emotional and spiritual distress as well as chemotherapy side effects that impair their quality of life. In this article, we present a case study of a patient challenged with recurrent ovarian cancer who received, concomitant with chemotherapy, a special form of music therapy based on anthroposophic medicine (AM) aimed at alleviating anxiety and improving her general well-being. AM-centered music ther...

  13. Local Control for Intermediate-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma: Results From D9803 According to Histology, Group, Site, and Size: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolden, Suzanne L., E-mail: woldens@mskcc.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Lyden, Elizabeth R. [Department of Preventive and Societal Medicine, Nebraska Medical Center, Omaha, Nebraska (United States); Arndt, Carola A. [Department of Pediatric and Adolescent Medicine, Mayo Clinic and Foundation, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Seattle Children' s Hospital, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Anderson, James R. [Frontier Science and Technology Research Foundation, Madison, Wisconsin (United States); Rodeberg, David A. [Department of Surgery, East Carolina University, Greenville, North Carolina (United States); Morris, Carol D. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, California (United States)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To determine local control according to clinical variables for patients with intermediate-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated on Children's Oncology Group protocol D9803. Patients and Methods: Of 702 patients enrolled, we analyzed 423 patients with central pathology–confirmed group III embryonal (n=280) or alveolar (group III, n=102; group I-II, n=41) RMS. Median age was 5 years. Patients received 42 weeks of VAC (vincristine, dactinomycin, cyclophosphamide) or VAC alternating with VTC (T = topotecan). Local therapy with 50.4 Gy radiation therapy with or without delayed primary excision began at week 12 for group III patients. Patients with group I/II alveolar RMS received 36-41.4 Gy. Local failure (LF) was defined as local progression as a first event with or without concurrent regional or distant failure. Results: At a median follow-up of 6.6 years, patients with clinical group I/II alveolar RMS had a 5-year event-free survival rate of 69% and LF of 10%. Among patients with group III RMS, 5-year event-free survival and LF rates were 70% and 19%, respectively. Local failure rates did not differ by histology, nodal status, or primary site, though there was a trend for increased LF for retroperitoneal (RP) tumors (P=.12). Tumors ≥5 cm were more likely to fail locally than tumors <5 cm (25% vs 10%, P=.0004). Almost all (98%) RP tumors were ≥5 cm, with no difference in LF by site when the analysis was restricted to tumors ≥5 cm (P=.86). Conclusion: Local control was excellent for clinical group I/II alveolar RMS. Local failure constituted 63% of initial events in clinical group III patients and did not vary by histology or nodal status. The trend for higher LF in RP tumors was related to tumor size. There has been no clear change in local control over RMS studies, including IRS-III and IRS-IV. Novel approaches are warranted for larger tumors (≥5 cm).

  14. Effect of Group Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F Ranjbar

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Depression is the most prevalent psychotic disorder. In order to cure and prevent the recurrence of this disease, it is necessary to gain more information about remedial methods like Group Cognitive- Behavior Therapy. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of group cognitive-behavioral therapy on the amount of depression on the patients. Methods: This study was experimental and it included both experimental and control group with a pre test. The subjects were selected from patients with mild depression. Their Beck inventory score ranged between 17-20. Patients were randomly divided in two groups. The subjects of experimental group received eight sessions of group cognitive-behavioral therapy. The Beck depression test was completed by the subjects in three phases before the intervention, after the intervention and one month after that. The data was transferred to SPSS program and analyzed. Results: The results indicated a significant difference between the experimental and control group after the intervention at Beck tests (P=0.043. Furthermore, there was a significant difference in the experimental group between the depression score in patients before and after the intervention (p=0.033 and the score of patients before and one month after the intervention (p=0.492. Conclusion: Group Cognitive-Behavioral therapy decreases depression in patients who suffer from mild depression.

  15. Quality of life in colorectal cancer patients: an Izmir Oncology Group (IZOG) study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyol, Murat; Ulger, Eda; Alacacioglu, Ahmet; Kucukzeybek, Yuksel; Bayoglu, Vedat; Yildiz, Yasar; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Salman, Tarik; Varol, Umut; Demir, Lutfiye; Dirican, Ahmet; Gumus, Zehra; Oktay Tarhan, Mustafa

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the variables of quality of life (QoL) among Turkish patients with colorectal cancer (CRC). In this prospective study we investigated the QoL of Turkish CRC patients. Two hundred and twenty two patients with CRC were included. The sociodemographic form and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire (EORTC QLQ-C30) were used. The study group consisted of 142 males (64%) and 80 females (36%). The mean patient age was 55.68±11.387 years. The majority of the patients (36.9%) had local disease while advanced-stage disease and locally advanced stage disease had 32.2% and 28.8% of the patients; respectively. The mean QoL score was moderate (62.81± 27.0). The most common complaints were fatigue, economic difficulties and constipation. Gender, education level and disease stage were associated with QoL. Physical, role and social functioning were more adversely affected in female patients. Compared to women, men had significantly more favorable global QoL (p=0.044). Some functional scales were worse in advanced disease compared to other stages.These outcomes were statistically significant in the functional scales of global health (p=0.007), physical (p=0.03), cognitive (p=0.01) and emotional function (p=0.007). Patients with advanced disease had worse outcomes in some symptoms (nausea, vomiting, dyspnea, loss of appetite and financial distress). Female gender and advanced disease were strongly associated with poorer QoL among Turkish CRC patients.

  16. Outcome of adolescents and young adults compared to children with Hodgkin lymphoma treated with response-based chemotherapy on pediatric protocols: A Children's Oncology Group report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, Karen S; Schwartz, Cindy L; Chen, Lu; Constine, Louis S; Chauvenet, Allen; de Alarcón, Pedro A

    2017-12-01

    We evaluated the outcome of children (Children's Oncology Group clinical trials, P9425 and P9426, that used dose-dense, response-based chemotherapy and reduced dose radiotherapy. Subjects 21 years or younger with HL were eligible for these studies. Subjects with low-risk (stages IA, IIA, and IIIA1) without large mediastinal adenopathy biopsy-proven HL, eligible for P9426, were treated with two to four 28-day cycles of doxorubicin, bleomycin, vincristine, and etoposide (ABVE) chemotherapy and 25.5 Gy of involved field radiotherapy. Subjects with intermediate-risk (stages IB, IIA, IIIA1 with large mediastinal adenopathy, and IIIA2) and high-risk (stages IIB, IIIB, and IV) biopsy-proven HL, eligible for P9425, were treated with three to five 21-day cycles of ABVE plus prednisone and cyclophosphamide (ABVE-PC) chemotherapy and 21 Gy of involved region radiotherapy. We compared the 5-year event-free survival (EFS), based on Kaplan-Meier product-limit method, of children versus that of AYA. Four hundred seventy-one subjects were enrolled on P9425 and P9426 combined. Of these subjects, 203 were AYA, 104 with intermediate and high-risk HL, and 99 with low-risk HL. The 5-year EFS of children did not significantly differ from that of AYA (85.9 vs. 87.1%) with a median follow up of 7.7 years (P = 0.51). Given the equivalent and excellent results of therapy, HL represents an opportunity for adult and pediatric cancer treatment collaborative groups to jointly design clinical trials targeted to AYA. These trials should focus on both treatment efficacy and the quality of life of AYA while receiving chemotherapy and in reduction of long-term side effects in the survivorship years. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Interdependent Group Contingencies Decrease Adolescents' Disruptive Behaviors During Group Therapy: A Practitioner's Demonstration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brogan, Kristen M; Falligant, John Michael; Rapp, John T

    2017-05-01

    Adolescents who have been adjudicated for illegal sexual behavior may receive treatment that requires attending group therapy sessions and classes. For some adolescents, nonsexual problem behavior (e.g., verbal outbursts, noncompliance) interferes with their ability to participate in group treatment. Researchers used a multiple-baseline across groups design with an embedded changing criterion design to evaluate the effects of an interdependent group contingency for decreasing disruptive behavior in adolescents across two therapy groups. Results indicated that the procedure was effective in reducing disruptive behavior emitted by adolescents in group therapy. Measures of social validity indicated that both the therapists and students viewed the overall procedures and outcomes as acceptable. Implications for interdependent group contingencies across diverse populations are discussed.

  18. An Application of General System Theory (GST) to Group Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Charles O.

    1992-01-01

    Demonstrates the compatibility of General System Theory (GST) with the traditional counseling literature in explicating a therapy group's progression through Tuckman's (1965, 1977) developmental stages (forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning). Description uses both traditional group literature and GST concepts. (Author/NB)

  19. Group Psychological Therapy in Obstetric Fistula Care: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    AJRH Managing Editor

    Group psychotherapy in Obstetric fistula care. African Journal of Reproductive Health March 2014; 18(1): 156. ORIGINAL RESEARCH ARTICLE. Group Psychological Therapy in Obstetric Fistula Care: A. Complementary Recipe for the Accompanying Mental Ill Health. Morbidities? Oladosu A Ojengbede. 1. , Yvonne Baba. 2.

  20. Alcoholics in interactional group therapy: an outcome study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalom, I D; Bloch, S; Bond, G; Zimmerman, E; Qualls, B

    1978-04-01

    Three interactional therapy groups of alcoholic patients (N = 20) were formed, and treatment outcome after eight months and again after 12 months of therapy was compared with the outcome of 17 neurotic patients in comparable therapy. Outcome assessment was obtained from three sources: patient, therapist, and independent judge, using both nomothetic and ideographic measures. The results indicated that although more alcoholic than neurotic patients terminated therapy within the first six sessions, a higher percentage of alcoholic patients remained in therapy for 12 months. At the end of 12 months, both samples had improved along a wide variety of variables, and there were no significant differences between the alcoholic and neurotic population in degree of improvement.

  1. Acceptance and commitment group therapy for health anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eilenberg, Trine

    2013-01-01

    Health anxiety (or hypochondriasis) is prevalent, may be persistent and disabling for the sufferers and associated with high societal costs. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a new third-wave behavioral cognitive therapy that has not yet been tested in health anxiety. 34 consecutive Danish...... patients with severe health anxiety were referred from general practitioners or hospital departments and received a ten session ACT group therapy. Patients were followed-up by questionnaires for 6 months. There were significant reductions in health anxiety, somatic symptoms and emotional distress at 6...

  2. [A group therapy model in the rehabilitation fo alcoholism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vittadini, G; Giorgi, I

    1998-01-01

    At present group psychotherapy is one of the most important resources in the treatment of alcoholism. Among the various theoretical orientations present in this setting, the systemic approach has always favoured interventions designed to improve interpersonal relationships. More recently, the concepts of constructivism and "narrative" therapy have laid greater emphasis upon the relational and linguistic aspect of any individual problem. Starting from these premises, a systemic-constructivistic therapy group was created for persons with problems associated with alcohol, as part of an inpatient rehabilitation programme. Given the novelty of this initiative and the particular context, several solutions were adopted that may represent a proposal for the extension of the method. The characteristics and ways in which this particular group might evolve are discussed under four headings: 1) the characteristics of the group, 2) techniques for guiding the group, 3) the role and problems facing the therapist, and 4) the recurrent problems in the life of the group.

  3. Oncologic Photodynamic Therapy: Basic Principles, Current Clinical Status and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian van Straten

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT is a clinically approved cancer therapy, based on a photochemical reaction between a light activatable molecule or photosensitizer, light, and molecular oxygen. When these three harmless components are present together, reactive oxygen species are formed. These can directly damage cells and/or vasculature, and induce inflammatory and immune responses. PDT is a two-stage procedure, which starts with photosensitizer administration followed by a locally directed light exposure, with the aim of confined tumor destruction. Since its regulatory approval, over 30 years ago, PDT has been the subject of numerous studies and has proven to be an effective form of cancer therapy. This review provides an overview of the clinical trials conducted over the last 10 years, illustrating how PDT is applied in the clinic today. Furthermore, examples from ongoing clinical trials and the most recent preclinical studies are presented, to show the directions, in which PDT is headed, in the near and distant future. Despite the clinical success reported, PDT is still currently underutilized in the clinic. We also discuss the factors that hamper the exploration of this effective therapy and what should be changed to render it a more effective and more widely available option for patients.

  4. 'Thinking outside the box': complementary and alternative therapies use in paediatric oncology patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molassiotis, Alexander; Cubbin, Denise

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use among children with cancer who had received or were receiving treatment at a large hospital in the UK, including the identification of the most commonly used therapies and parental motives for doing so. Using a cross-sectional survey design, questionnaires were sent to parents of paediatric patients diagnosed with cancer. Of the 49 respondents, 32.7% reported using some type of CAM. The most commonly used therapies included multivitamins, aromatherapy massage, diets and music as therapy. Most children had used more than one therapy. Many of the factors that motivated parents to use CAM were related to helping or supporting their child's medical treatment. The main benefits identified from using CAM included increased confidence, pain relief and relaxation. The longer the time since diagnosis the more children tended to use CAM. The reasons for parents not using CAM included the child doing well and therefore not seeing the need for CAM use; not being aware of CAM; CAM not being offered and lack of information available. Parents identified a need for more information to be available both at ward level and for information about CAM to be discussed by medical staff, particularly at the start of treatment. The results indicate that CAM is frequently used by children and young people with cancer and that their use plays a substantial role in helping children through their conventional cancer treatment.

  5. Pharmacogenetics in cancer therapy - 8 years of experience at the Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavic, Milena; Krivokuca, Ana; Boljevic, Ivana; Brotto, Ksenija; Jovanovic, Katarina; Tanic, Miljana; Filipovic, Lana; Zec, Manja; Malisic, Emina; Jankovic, Radmila; Radulovic, Sinisa

    2016-01-01

    Pharmacogenetics is a study of possible mechanism by which an individual's response to drugs is genetically determined by variations in their DNA sequence. The aim of pharmacogenetics is to identify the optimal drug and dose for each individual based on their genetic constitution, i.e. to individualize drug treatment. This leads to achieving the maximal therapeutic response for each patient, while reducing adverse side effects of therapy and the cost of treatment. A centralized pharmacogenetics service was formed at the Institute for Oncology and Radiology of Serbia (IORS) with the aim to provide a personalized approach to cancer treatment of Serbian patients. Analyses of KRAS mutations in metastatic colorectal cancer, EGFR mutations in advanced non-small cell lung cancer, CYP2D6 polymorphism in breast cancer, DPD polymorphism in colorectal cancer and MTHFR polymorphism in osteosarcoma have been performed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Mutation testing analyses were successful for 1694 KRAS samples and 1821 EGFR samples, while polymorphism testing was successful for 9 CYP2D6 samples, 65 DPD samples and 35 MTHFR samples. Pharmacogenetic methods presented in this paper provide cancer patients in Serbia the best possible choice of treatment at the moment.

  6. Do Oncologists Engage in Bereavement Practices? A Survey of the Israeli Society of Clinical Oncology and Radiation Therapy (ISCORT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabtai, Esther; Merimsky, Ofer; Inbar, Moshe; Rosenbaum, Eli; Meirovitz, Amichay; Wexler, Isaiah D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose. We sought to determine the level of involvement of oncologists in bereavement rituals after a patient dies. Subjects and Methods. Members of the Israeli Society for Clinical Oncology and Radiation Therapy (ISCORT) were surveyed. The survey instrument consisted of questions regarding participation in bereavement rituals for patients in general and those with whom the oncologist had a special bond. Oncologists were queried as to the reasons for nonparticipation in bereavement rituals. Results. Nearly 70% of the ISCORT membership (126 of 182) completed the survey tool. Respondents included radiation, surgical, and medical oncologists. In general, oncologists rarely participated in bereavement rituals that involved direct contact with families such as funerals and visitations. Twenty-eight percent of physicians at least occasionally participated in rituals involving direct contact whereas 45% had indirect contact (e.g., letter of condolence) with the family on an occasional basis. There was significantly greater involvement in bereavement rituals when oncologists developed a special bond with the patient. In a stepwise linear regression model, the only factor significantly associated with greater participation in bereavement rituals was self-perceived spirituality in those claiming not to be religious. The major reasons offered for nonparticipation were time constraints, need to maintain appropriate boundaries between physicians and patients, and fear of burnout. Conclusion. Although many oncologists participate at least occasionally in some sort of bereavement ritual, a significant proportion of oncologists are not involved in these practices at all. PMID:20228130

  7. Outcome of patients with recurrent adult-type granulosa cell tumors--a Taiwanese Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng-Hui; Sun, Hsu-Dong; Lin, Hao; Wang, Kung-Liahng; Liou, Wen-Shiung; Hung, Yao-Ching; Chiang, Ying-Cheng; Lu, Chien-Hsing; Lai, Hung-Cheng; Chang, Ting-Chang

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the long-term outcome of ovarian recurrent granulosa cell tumors (GCTs) in a large series of patients treated in Taiwanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (TGOG) centers and to define the prognostic parameters for survival. A retrospective multi-institutional review of patients with recurrent ovarian GCTs treated in TGOG centers was conducted. The clinical and pathological characteristics, treatment, and outcomes of patients with ovarian recurrent GCTs were analyzed using Kaplan-Meier and Cox proportional hazards analyses to determine the predictors for survival. A total of 44 patients from 16 medical centers were identified between January 1994 and December 2010. The median disease-free survival (DFS), postrecurrence survival, and overall survival (OS) were 61.5 months (range, 3.7-219.3 months), 55.8 months (range, 4.6-193.7 months), and 115.3 months (range, 17.2-390.6 months), respectively. In multivariate analysis, DFS (> 61.5 months versus ≤ 61.5 months, hazard ratio (HR) 0.15, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.03-0.78, p = 0.024) at the initial operation after diagnosis of relapse was the only predictor that correlated with OS. DFS after the initial operation was the only important predictor for overall survival in patients with recurrent GCTs, regardless of treatment, suggesting that the natural behavior of the tumor is a critical factor for patients with recurrent GCTs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Late Effects Surveillance Recommendations among Survivors of Childhood Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: A Children’s Oncology Group Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Eric J.; Anderson, Lynnette; Baker, K. Scott; Bhatia, Smita; Guilcher, Gregory M.T.; Huang, Jennifer T.; Pelletier, Wendy; Perkins, Joanna L.; Rivard, Linda S.; Schechter, Tal; Shah, Ami Jayant; Wilson, Karla Dee; Wong, Kenneth; Grewal, Satkiran; Armenian, Saro; Meacham, Lillian R.; Mulrooney, Daniel A.; Castellino, Sharon M.

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is an important curative treatment for children with high-risk hematologic malignancies and solid tumors, and increasingly, non-malignant diseases. Given improvements in care, there is a growing number of long-term survivors of pediatric HCT. Compared with non-transplanted childhood cancer survivors, HCT survivors have been shown to have a substantially increased burden of serious chronic conditions and impairments involving virtually every organ system and overall quality of life. This likely reflects the joint contributions of pre-transplant treatment exposures and organ dysfunction, the transplant conditioning regimen, and any post-transplant graft versus host disease (GVHD). In response, the Children’s Oncology Group (COG) has created Long-Term Follow-Up Guidelines (www.survivorshipguidelines.org) for survivors of childhood, adolescent, and young adult cancer, including those treated with HCT. Guidelines taskforces, consisting of HCT specialists, other pediatric oncologists, radiation oncologists, organ-specific subspecialists, nurses, social workers, other healthcare professionals, and patient advocates have systematically reviewed the literature with regards to late effects after childhood cancer and HCT since 2002, with the most recent review completed in 2013. For the most recent review cycle, over 800 articles from the medical literature relevant to childhood cancer and HCT survivorship were reviewed, including 586 original research articles. Provided here-in is an organ system-based overview that emphasizes the most relevant COG recommendations (with accompanying evidence grade) for the long-term follow-up care of childhood HCT survivors (regardless of current age) based on a rigorous review of the available evidence. These recommendations cover both autologous and allogeneic HCT survivors, those transplanted for non-malignant diseases, and those with a history of chronic GVHD. PMID:26802323

  9. Adverse Renal Effects of Novel Molecular Oncologic Targeted Therapies: A Narrative Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenar D. Jhaveri

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Novel targeted anti-cancer therapies have resulted in improvement in patient survival compared to standard chemotherapy. Renal toxicities of targeted agents are increasingly being recognized. The incidence, severity, and pattern of renal toxicities may vary according to the respective target of the drug. Here we review the adverse renal effects associated with a selection of currently approved targeted cancer therapies, directed to EGFR, HER2, BRAF, MEK, ALK, PD1/PDL1, CTLA-4, and novel agents targeted to VEGF/R and TKIs. In summary, electrolyte disorders, renal impairment and hypertension are the most commonly reported events. Of the novel targeted agents, ipilumumab and cetuximab have the most nephrotoxic events reported. The early diagnosis and prompt recognition of these renal adverse events are essential for the general nephrologist taking care of these patients.

  10. Phase I feasibility study of intraperitoneal cisplatin and intravenous paclitaxel followed by intraperitoneal paclitaxel in untreated ovarian, fallopian tube, and primary peritoneal carcinoma: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dizon, Don S.; Sill, Michael W.; Gould, Natalie; Rubin, Stephen C.; Yamada, S. Diane; DeBernardo, Robert L.; Mannel, Robert S.; Eisenhauer, Eric L.; Duska, Linda R.; Fracasso, Paula M.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Intraperitoneal chemotherapy has shown a survival advantage over intravenous chemotherapy for women with newly diagnosed optimally debulked epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, or primary peritoneal carcinoma. However, significant toxicity has limited its acceptance. In an effort to reduce toxicity, the Gynecologic Oncology Group conducted a Phase I study to evaluate the feasibility of day 1 intravenous (IV) paclitaxel and intraperitoneal (IP) cisplatin followed by day 8 IP paclitaxel on an every 21-day cycle. Methods Patients with Stage IIB-IV epithelial ovarian, fallopian tube, primary peritoneal carcinomas or carcinosarcoma received paclitaxel 135 mg/m2 IV over 3 hours followed by cisplatin 75 mg/m2 IP on day 1 and paclitaxel 60 mg/m2 IP on day 8 of a 21 day cycle with 6 cycles planned. Dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) was defined as febrile neutropenia or dose-delay of greater than 2 weeks due to failure to recover counts, or Grade 3-5 non-hematologic toxicity occurring within the first 4 cycles of treatment. Results Twenty of 23 patients enrolled were evaluable and nineteen (95%) completed all six cycles of therapy. Three patients experienced a DLT consisting of infection with normal absolute neutrophil count, grade 3 hyperglycemia, and grade 4 abdominal pain. Conclusions This modified IP regimen which administers both IV paclitaxel and IP cisplatin on day one, followed by IP paclitaxel on day eight, of a twenty-one day cycle appears feasible and is an attractive alternative to the intraperitoneal treatment regimen administered in GOG-0172. PMID:21820161

  11. Surgical Protocol Violations in Children with Renal Tumors Provides an Opportunity to Improve Pediatric Cancer Care: A Report from the Children's Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehrlich, Peter F.; Hamilton, Thomas E.; Gow, Kenneth; Barnhart, Douglas; Ferrer, Fernando; Kandel, Jessica; Glick, Richard; Dasgupta, Roshni; Naranjo, Arlene; He, Ying; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Kalapurakal, John A.; Khanna, Geetika; Dome, Jeffrey S.; Geller, James; Mullen, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency and characteristics of surgical protocol violations (SPV) among children undergoing surgery for renal tumors who were enrolled on the Children's Oncology Group (COG) renal tumor biology and classification study AREN03B2. Methods AREN03B2 opened in February 2006 and as of March 31, 2013, there were 3664 eligible patients. The surgical review forms for 3536 patients with unilateral disease were centrally reviewed for SPVs. The frequency, type, number of violations, institutional prevalence, and quartiles for SPVs were assessed. Results Of the 3536 patients, there were a total of 505 with at least one SPV (564 total SPVs reported), for an overall incidence of 14.28%. The types of SPVs included a lack of lymph node sampling in 365 (64.7%), avoidable spill in 61 (10.8%), biopsy immediately before nephrectomy in 89 (15.8%), an incorrect abdominal incision in 32 (5.7%), and unnecessary resection of organs in 17 (3.0%). The SPVs occurred in 163/215 participating institutions (75.8%). For centers with at least 1 SPV, the mean number of SPVs reported was 3.10 ± 2.39 (mean ± standard deviation). The incidence of protocol violation per institution ranged from 0 to 67%. Centers with an average of ≤1 case/year had an incidence of SPVs of 12.2 ± 3.8%, those with an average of >1 to 0.05). Conclusion SPVs that potentially result in additional exposure to chemotherapy and radiation therapy are not uncommon in children undergoing resection of renal malignancies. PMID:27229358

  12. Late xerostomia after intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy of upper aero-digestive tract cancers: study 2004-03 by the head and neck oncology and radiotherapy Group (Gortec); Xerostomie tardive apres radiotherapie conformationnelle avec modulation d'intensite des cancers des voies aero-digestives superieures: etude 2004-03 du Groupe oncologie et radiotherapie de la tete et du cou (Gortec)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Toledano, I.; Lapeyre, M. [Centre Jean-Perrin, 63 - Clermont-Ferrand (France); Graff, P. [Centre Alexis-Vautrin, 54 - Vandoeuvre-les-Nancy (France); Serre, C. [Centre Val d' Aurelle, 34 - Montpellier (France); Bensadoun, R.J. [CHU La Miletrie, 86 - Poitiers (France); Bensadoun, R.J.; Ortholan, C. [Centre Antoine-Lacassagne, 06 - Nice (France); Calais, G. [CHU Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France); Alfonsi, M. [Institut Sainte-Catherine, 84 - Avignon (France); Giraud, P. [Institut Curie, 75 - Paris (France); Hopital europeen Georges-Pompidou, 75 - Paris (France); Racadot, S. [Centre Leon-Berrard, 69 - Lyon (France)

    2010-10-15

    The authors report a retrospective assessment of late xerostomia according to the RTOG (Radiation Therapy Oncology Group) classification of the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) among patients treated by intensity-modulated conformational radiotherapy (IMRT) and suffering from upper aero-digestive tract carcinomas of different stages. Some of these patients have bee operated, and some have been treated by chemotherapy. It appears that the IMRT results in a reduction of late xerostomia, and even in an absence of salivary toxicity. Short communication

  13. Rationale for the design of an oncology trial using a generic targeted therapy multi-drug regimen for NSCLC patients without treatment options (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    LANGHAMMER, STEFAN

    2013-01-01

    Despite more than 70 years of research concerning medication for cancer treatment, the disease still remains one of the leading causes of mortality worldwide. Many cancer types lead to death within a period of months to years. The original class of chemotherapeutics is not selective for tumor cells and often has limited efficacy, while treated patients suffer from adverse side-effects. To date, the concept of tumor-specific targeted therapy drugs has not fulfilled its expectation to provide a key for a cure. Today, many oncology trials are designed using a combination of chemotherapeutics with targeted therapy drugs. However, these approaches have limited outcomes in most cancer indications. This perspective review provides a rationale to combine targeted therapy drugs for cancer treatment based on observations of evolutionary principles of tumor development and HIV infections. In both diseases, the mechanisms of immune evasion and drug resistance can be compared to some extent. However, only for HIV is a breakthrough treatment available, which is the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The principles of HAART and recent findings from cancer research were employed to construct a hypothetical model for cancer treatment with a multi-drug regimen of targeted therapy drugs. As an example of this hypothesis, it is proposed to combine already marketed targeted therapy drugs against VEGFRs, EGFR, CXCR4 and COX2 in an oncology trial for non-small cell lung cancer patients without further treatment options. PMID:23877481

  14. Comparative Oncologic and Toxicity Outcomes of Salvage Radical Prostatectomy Versus Nonsurgical Therapies for Radiorecurrent Prostate Cancer: A Meta-Regression Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippou, Yiannis; Parker, Richard A; Volanis, Dimitrios; Gnanapragasam, Vincent J

    2016-06-01

    In the absence of randomised controlled trials comparing the oncologic, toxicity, and functional outcomes of salvage radical prostatectomy (SRP), salvage high-intensity focused ultrasound (SHIFU), salvage brachytherapy (SBT), and salvage cryotherapy (SCT), controversy exists as to the optimal salvage modality in radiorecurrent prostate cancer. We carried out a meta-regression analysis to determine whether there is a difference in oncologic, toxicity, and functional outcomes using data from original publications of salvage modalities in the postradiation setting. We performed a systematic review of PubMed/Medline citations according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Review and Meta-analysis (PRISMA) statement. We included 63 articles in the analysis (25 on SRP, 8 on SHIFU, 16 on SCT, 14 on SBT). Median values of the following variables were extracted from each study: patient age, length of follow-up, prostate-specific antigen (PSA) before radiotherapy (RT), PSA before salvage therapy, Gleason score before RT, and time interval between RT and salvage therapy. Functional, toxicity, and oncologic outcomes were measured according to rates of impotence, incontinence, fistula formation, urethral strictures, and biochemical recurrence. Meta-regression adjusting for confounders found no significant difference in oncologic outcomes between SRP and nonsurgical salvage modalities. SBT, SCT, and SHIFU appeared to have better continence outcomes than SRP. No significant difference in toxicity outcomes between modalities was found, although limitations such as reporting, selection, and publication bias and between-study heterogeneity must also be considered with these conclusions. Oncologic outcomes are comparable for SRP and all three nonsurgical salvage modalities. We found no significant differences in toxicity outcomes among modalities; however, SRP appears to be associated with worse rates of urinary incontinence than SBT, SCT, and SHIFU. We performed a meta

  15. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajić, Gordana Mandić

    2013-11-01

    The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original "Synallactic collective image technique" (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.). The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI) and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF) scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  16. Group art therapy as adjunct therapy for the treatment of schizophrenic patients in day hospital

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandić-Gajić Gordana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. The schizophrenics are frequently disinterested and resistant to standard care. Case report. We presented clinical observations of group art therapy of two schizophrenic patients during integrative therapy in Day Hospital. We modified the original “Synallactic collective image technique” (Vassiliou G, Vassiliou V.. The group is open, heterogeneous, meets once a week and discusses on exhibited drawings, drawn by free associations. The patients' drawings and group protocols showed clinical improvement by lowering depressive themes, more human figures and self-confidence. The obvious severity of markedly impairment on Clinical Global Impression (CGI and Global Assessment of Functioning (GAF scales on admission with minimal improvement at discharge was rated. Conclusion. Group art therapy enables visual expression of emotions, perceptions and cognitions, develops creative potentials and support within the group, thus facilitating the integrative therapeutic process of schizophrenics. It may be useful adjunctive therapy for schizoprenic patients.

  17. Brain Malignancy Steering Committee clinical trials planning workshop: Report from the Targeted Therapies Working Group

    OpenAIRE

    Alexander, Brian M; Galanis, Evanthia; Yung, W.K. Alfred; Ballman, Karla V.; Boyett, James M.; Cloughesy, Timothy F.; Degroot, John F.; Huse, Jason T.; Mann, Bhupinder; Mason, Warren; Ingo K Mellinghoff; Mikkelsen, Tom; Mischel, Paul S.; O'Neill, Brian P.; Prados, Michael D.

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common primary brain malignancy and is associated with poor prognosis despite aggressive local and systemic therapy, which is related to a paucity of viable treatment options in both the newly diagnosed and recurrent settings. Even so, the rapidly increasing number of targeted therapies being evaluated in oncology clinical trials offers hope for the future. Given the broad range of possibilities for future trials, the Brain Malignancy Steering Committee convened a cli...

  18. The Social Profiles of Occupational Therapy Students’ Educational Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tore Bonsaksen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Today’s occupational therapy models emphasize that a person’s choice of, satisfaction with, and performance in occupations are markedly influenced by the context. For students undergoing a group-based study module, the group is an important context factor. Until recently, there has been a lack of instruments available for the assessment of functioning and participation at the group level. This mixed methods pilot study aimed to examine occupational therapy students’ perceptions of their group’s level of functioning and course of development during one study module. Methods: The students’ perceptions of their group’s functioning were assessed in two ways: by examining their scores on the Social Profile (SP, a new instrument, and by examining their qualitative descriptions of the groups and how the groups developed over time. The sample consisted of four occupational therapy students. Results: Two students perceived their group functioning as stable over time. One student’s scores indicated an increase in group functioning over time, whereas one student’s showed a decrease. The interview statements showed varying degrees of connectedness with the SP items. Conclusions: Descriptions of stability and change corresponded very well with the students’ SP trajectories, indicating content validity of the assessment as a whole.

  19. Evolución de la terapia ocupacional en el campo de la oncología = Occupational therapy evolution in oncology field

    OpenAIRE

    Navarrete Salas, E

    2006-01-01

    Resumen:El objetivo de lasiguiente revisión bibliográfica fue conocer la trayectoria de la Terapia Ocupacional (T.O.) en el área oncológica durante las últimas 4 décadas. Para ello se realizó una búsqueda en las bases de datos MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINALH y AMED, con los descriptores Terapia Ocupacional, oncología y cáncer, tanto en el título como en el abstract; se excluyeron los artículos que no estuviesen en idioma inglés o español.Los resultados arrojaron un total de 68 publicaciones de T.O. y...

  20. Is there an Optimal Neoadjuvant Therapy for Locally Advanced Pancreatic Cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Richard Kim; Muhammad Wasif Saif

    2008-01-01

    ASCO: American Society of Clinical Oncology; CALGB: Cancer and Leukemia Group B; CBR: clinical benefit response; CDHP: 5-chloro-2,4- dihydroxypyridine; CIV: continuous infusional; EBRT: external beam radiation therapy; ECOG: Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group; FFCD-SFRO: Federation Francophone de Cancerologie Digestive and Societe Francaise de Radiotherapie Oncologique (GITSG: Gastrointestinal Tumor Study Group; OXO: potassium oxonate; RTOG: Radiation Therapy Oncology Group; SMF: streptozocin...

  1. Treatment Compliance in Group Therapy: Issues and Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunnicutt Hollenbaugh, Karen Michelle

    2011-01-01

    In this manuscript, research on treatment compliance and dropout in group therapy is reviewed. A number of variables found to be related to the compliance and dropout are identified including client characteristics, treatment characteristics, and therapist perceptions and behavior. Implications of these results for increasing treatment compliance…

  2. Evaluation of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Adults with ADHD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bramham, Jessica; Young, Susan; Bickerdike, Alison; Spain, Deborah; McCartan, Denise; Xenitidis, Kiriakos

    2009-01-01

    Objective: A brief cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) group intervention was designed to treat comorbid anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem and self-efficacy in adults with ADHD. It was hypothesised that participants would gain knowledge about ADHD, experience a reduction in comorbid symptoms, and benefit from the supportive aspect of group…

  3. The Use of Dreams in Couples' Group Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nell, Renee

    1975-01-01

    Describes the use of Jung's subjective approach to dream interpretation in couples' group therapy to bring unconscious material quickly to the surface. Dreams show the connection between the manifest behavior and the underlying dynamics. They clarify the characteristic behavior of the psychological types. Finally, they aid the therapeutic process.…

  4. Group-Integrated Reality Therapy in a Wilderness Camp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clagett, Arthur F.

    1992-01-01

    Abridges Glasser's (1975) theory of United States as identity society to explicate causative characteristics of "identity achievers" versus "failures" in U.S. society. Discusses Reality Therapy and therapeutic treatment programs developed by Hope Center Wilderness Camp. Presents evidence to suggest that group-integrated reality…

  5. Treating Social Anxiety in Adolescents: Ten Group Therapy Lesson Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazur-Elmer, Alison; McBride, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    This project provides a comprehensive overview of the research literature on social anxiety disorder (SAD) in adolescents and concludes by offering a set of 10 group therapy lesson plans for SAD that therapists can use in their practice. The overview includes a description of social anxiety disorder and highlights various theories of anxiety. The…

  6. Cognitive group therapy for depressive students: The case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiuraniemi, Juhani; Korhola, Jarno

    2009-01-01

    The aims of this study were to assess whether a course of cognitive group therapy could help depressed students and to assess whether assimilation analysis offers a useful way of analysing students' progress through therapy. “Johanna” was a patient in a group that was designed for depressive students who had difficulties with their studies. The assimilation of Johanna's problematic experience progressed as the meetings continued from level one (unpleasant thoughts) to level six (solving the problem). Johanna's problematic experience manifested itself as severe and excessive criticism towards herself and her study performance. As the group meetings progressed, Johanna found a new kind of tolerance that increased her determination and assertiveness regarding the studies. The dialogical structure of Johanna's problematic experience changed: she found hope and she was more assertive after the process. The results indicated that this kind of psycho-educational group therapy was an effective method for treating depression. The assimilation analysis offered a useful way of analysing the therapy process. PMID:20523883

  7. Therapists' group attachments and their expectations of patients' attitudes about group therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmarosh, Cheri L; Franz, Victoria A; Koloi, Mosetsanagape; Majors, Rebekah C; Rahimi, Amanda M; Ronquillo, Jonne G; Somberg, Rachel J; Swope, Jessica S; Zimmer, Katherine

    2006-07-01

    A large body of literature has supported the application of attachment theory to the understanding of psychotherapy. In addition, a more recent social psychological literature is exploring the application of attachment theory to the area of group dynamics and group process. The current study is designed to integrate these two distinct bodies of literature. In a preliminary fashion, we examined the relationship between group therapists' group attachment styles and their assumptions and expectations of their patients' attitudes about group psychotherapy. Seventy-six therapists completed the Smith, Murphy & Coats (1999) measure of group attachment style. They also completed the Revised Group Therapy Survey (Carter, Mitchell, & Krautheim, 2001) from the viewpoint of a typical patient they treat. As hypothesized, therapists with more group attachment anxiety assumed that patients would hold more negative myths and misconceptions about group treatment than therapists with less group attachment anxiety. The utility of a group attachment construct in future research and practice is discussed.

  8. Performances of the scanning system for the CNAO center of oncological hadron therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordanengo, S., E-mail: giordane@to.infn.i [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Donetti, M. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); CNAO - Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica Foundation, Milano (Italy); Marchetto, F. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Ansarinejad, A. [Department of Physics, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Attili, A. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Bourhaleb, F. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Burini, F. [OCEM SpA, Bologna (Italy); Cirio, R. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Fabbricatore, P. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Genova (Italy); Voelker, F. [CERN, Geneve (Switzerland); Garella, M.A. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Incurvati, M. [OCEM SpA, Bologna (Italy); Monaco, V. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Pardo, J. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Peroni, C.; Russo, G.; Sacchi, R. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy); Department of Physics, University of Torino, Torino (Italy); Taddia, G. [OCEM SpA, Bologna (Italy); Zampieri, A. [INFN - Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Torino (Italy)

    2010-02-01

    In hadron therapy one of the most advanced methods for beam delivery is the active scanning technique which uses fast scanning magnets to drive a narrow particle beam across the target. The Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO) will treat tumours with this technique. The CNAO scanning system includes two identical dipole magnets for horizontal and vertical beam deflection, each one connected to a fast power supply. The dose delivery system exploits a set of monitor chambers to measure the fluence and position of the beam and drives the beam during the treatment by controlling the sequence of currents set by the power supplies. A test of the dynamic performance of the scanning system has been performed using a Hall probe to measure the field inside the magnet and the results are presented in this paper.

  9. Precision Medicine in Pediatric Oncology: Translating Genomic Discoveries into Optimized Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Thai Hoa; Shah, Avanthi Tayi; Loh, Mignon L

    2017-09-15

    Survival of children with cancers has dramatically improved over the past several decades. This success has been achieved through improvement of combined modalities in treatment approaches, intensification of cytotoxic chemotherapy for those with high-risk disease, and refinement of risk stratification incorporating novel biologic markers in addition to traditional clinical and histologic features. Advances in cancer genomics have shed important mechanistic insights on disease biology and have identified "driver" genomic alterations, aberrant activation of signaling pathways, and epigenetic modifiers that can be targeted by novel agents. Thus, the recently described genomic and epigenetic landscapes of many childhood cancers have expanded the paradigm of precision medicine in the hopes of improving outcomes while minimizing toxicities. In this review, we will discuss the biologic rationale for molecularly targeted therapies in genomically defined subsets of pediatric leukemias, solid tumors, and brain tumors. Clin Cancer Res; 23(18); 5329-38. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  10. TU-B-210-00: MR-Guided Focused Ultrasound Therapy in Oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    MR guided focused ultrasound (MRgFUS), or alternatively high-intensity focused ultrasound (MRgHIFU), is approved for thermal ablative treatment of uterine fibroids and pain palliation in bone metastases. Ablation of malignant tumors is under active investigation in sites such as breast, prostate, brain, liver, kidney, pancreas, and soft tissue. Hyperthermia therapy with MRgFUS is also feasible, and may be used in conjunction with radiotherapy and for local targeted drug delivery. MRI allows in situ target definition and provides continuous temperature monitoring and subsequent thermal dose mapping during HIFU. Although MRgHIFU can be very precise, treatment of mobile organs is challenging and advanced techniques are required because of artifacts in MR temperature mapping, the need for intercostal firing, and need for gated HIFU or tracking of the lesion in real time. The first invited talk, “MR guided Focused Ultrasound Treatment of Tumors in Bone and Soft Tissue”, will summarize the treatment protocol and review results from treatment of bone tumors. In addition, efforts to extend this technology to treat both benign and malignant soft tissue tumors of the extremities will be presented. The second invited talk, “MRI guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound – Advanced Approaches for Ablation and Hyperthermia”, will provide an overview of techniques that are in or near clinical trials for thermal ablation and hyperthermia, with an emphasis of applications in abdominal organs and breast, including methods for MRTI and tracking targets in moving organs. Learning Objectives: Learn background on devices and techniques for MR guided HIFU for cancer therapy Understand issues and current status of clinical MRg HIFU Understand strategies for compensating for organ movement during MRgHIFU Understand strategies for strategies for delivering hyperthermia with MRgHIFU CM - research collaboration with Philips.

  11. Longitudinal analysis of quality of life outcomes in children during treatment for acute lymphoblastic leukemia: A report from the Children's Oncology Group AALL0932 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Daniel J; Lu, Xiaomin; Schore, Reuven J; Balsamo, Lyn; Devidas, Meenakshi; Winick, Naomi J; Raetz, Elizabeth A; Loh, Mignon L; Carroll, William L; Sung, Lillian; Hunger, Stephen P; Angiolillo, Anne L; Kadan-Lottick, Nina S

    2017-11-07

    Children with average-risk acute lymphoblastic leukemia (AR-ALL) face many challenges that can adversely affect their quality of life (QOL). However, to the authors' knowledge, patterns and predictors of QOL impairment during therapy have not been well characterized to date. Patients with AR-ALL who were enrolled on the Children's Oncology Group AALL0932 trial were offered participation in this prospective cohort study if they were aged ≥4 years at the time of diagnosis and had an English-speaking parent. At approximately 2 months, 8 months, 17 months, 26 months, and 38 months (boys only) after diagnosis, parents completed the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory Generic Core Scales Version 4.0 (PedsQL4.0) and McMaster Family Assessment Device instruments for QOL (physical, emotional, and social functioning) and family functioning, respectively. The proportions of individuals scoring in the impaired range (2 standard deviations below the population mean) were calculated at each time point. Longitudinal impairment patterns and predictors were examined. A total of 594 participants with AR-ALL were diagnosed at a mean age of 6.0 years (standard deviation, 1.6 years). At 2 months, a substantial proportion of participants had impaired scores for physical (36.5%; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 32.3%-40.8%) and emotional (26.2%; 95% CI, 22.5%-30.2%) functioning compared with population norms of 2.3%. These elevations persisted at 26 months. Emotional impairment at 2 months (odds ratio, 3.4; 95% CI, 1.5-7.7) was found to significantly predict emotional impairment at 26 months. In repeated measures analysis with multivariate modeling, unhealthy family functioning (odds ratio, 1.5; 95% CI, 1.1-2.1) significantly predicted emotional impairment controlling for age and sex. QOL outcomes were similar between sexes at the end of therapy (26 months for girls and 38 months for boys). Many children with AR-ALL experience physical and emotional functioning impairment that begins

  12. [Burn out syndrome in oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schraub, Simon; Marx, E

    2004-09-01

    SEPS or burnout syndrome was described among health care workers. Oncology care givers--physicians and nurses--can be concerned. Burnout is a chronical stress reaction. Emotional exhaustion and depersonalisation are more prevalent than low personal accomplishment. Burnout is essentially assessed by questionnaires. Oncologists report an higher level of burnout, than AIDS medical or palliative care staff. Causes of burn out are numerous: insufficient personal time, sense of failure,... followed by poorly management and difficulties in staff or institution relationships. Prevention and therapy of burn out can be considered on three levels: personal, (psychotherapy, advices on health way of life), team (improvement in communication) and institution (support meetings and talking groups).

  13. A Comparative Effectiveness of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Group Cognitive Therapy for Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shima Tamannaeifar

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT is a new method of psychotherapy for major depressive disorder (MDD. The aim of this experimental study is evaluating the effectiveness of acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Materials and Methods: In this randomized clinical trial, 19 depressive out-patients were randomly divided into 2 groups (acceptance and commitment therapy and cognitive therapy. Twelve therapeutic sessions administered in consulting center of Tehran University twice a week. All the subjects were tested by Beck Depression Inventory (BDI-II and the Ruminative Response Scale (RRS before and after the treatments. Data were analyzed by multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA. Results: The results show no significant differences between the two groups in terms of the variables of depression and rumination. Conclusion: Overall, the results suggest that ACT is an effective treatment, the effectiveness of which appears equivalent to that of CT.

  14. Detection of Preoperative Wilms Tumor Rupture with CT: A Report from the Children’s Oncology Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naranjo, Arlene; Hoffer, Fredric; Mullen, Elizabeth; Geller, James; Gratias, Eric J.; Ehrlich, Peter F.; Perlman, Elizabeth J.; Rosen, Nancy; Grundy, Paul; Dome, Jeffrey S.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To retrospectively determine the diagnostic performance of computed tomography (CT) in identifying the presence or absence of preoperative Wilms tumor rupture. Materials and Methods: The cohort was derived from the AREN03B2 study of the Children’s Oncology Group. The study was approved by the institutional review board and was compliant with HIPAA. Written informed consent was obtained before enrollment. The diagnosis of Wilms tumor rupture was established by central review of notes from surgery and/or pathologic examination. Seventy Wilms tumor cases with rupture were matched to 70 Wilms tumor controls without rupture according to age and tumor weight (within 6 months and 50 g, respectively). CT scans were independently reviewed by two radiologists, and the following CT findings were assessed: poorly circumscribed mass, perinephric fat stranding, peritumoral fat planes obscured, retroperitoneal fluid (subcapsular vs extracapsular), ascites beyond the cul-de-sac, peritoneal implants, ipsilateral pleural effusion, and intratumoral hemorrhage. All fluids were classified as hemorrhagic or nonhemorrhagic by using a cutoff of 30 HU. The relationship between CT findings and rupture was assessed with logistic regression models. Results: The sensitivity and specificity for detecting Wilms tumor rupture were 54% (36 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 1 and 70% (47 of 67 cases) and 88% (61 of 69 cases), respectively, for reviewer 2. Interobserver agreement was substantial (ĸ = 0.76). All imaging signs tested, except peritoneal implants, intratumoral hemorrhage, and subcapsular fluid, showed a significant association with rupture (P ≤ .02). The attenuation of ascitic fluid did not have a significant correlation with rupture (P = .9990). Ascites beyond the cul-de-sac was the single best indicator of rupture for both reviewers, followed by perinephric fat stranding and retroperitoneal fluid for reviewers 1 and 2, respectively (P

  15. Acupuncture Therapy in a Group Setting for Chronic Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kligler, Benjamin; Nielsen, Arya; Kohrherr, Corinne; Schmid, Tracy; Waltermaurer, Eve; Perez, Elidania; Merrell, Woodson

    2018-02-01

    This project was designed to test the feasibility and effectiveness of acupuncture therapy given in a group setting for chronic pain. Nonrandomized, repeated measures quasi-experimental trial. Care was delivered in a primary care clinic waiting area after clinic hours. Included were primary care patients (≥18 years old) with chronic pain of the neck, back, shoulder, or osteoarthritis of any site of at least three months' duration. Subjects received eight weekly acupuncture therapy sessions in a group setting. Acupuncture therapy included a combination of palpation, acupuncture needling, Tui na, Gua sha, and auricular treatment. Baseline pain levels were established in a two- to four-week run-in; assessment of the intervention impact on pain intensity, mood, and functional status were made at the end of the treatment period (eight weeks) and 16 weeks after completion of intervention (24 weeks). Of the total 113 participants recruited for the trial, 96 completed the 24-week protocol. We found a statistically and clinically significant decrease in pain severity, pain interference, and depression in our study population. There were no serious adverse events. Acupuncture therapy offered in the group setting was effective in reducing pain severity, pain interference, and depression in patients with chronic neck, back, or shoulder pain or osteoarthritis. Benefit persisted through the 24-week measure despite no additional treatment. This finding has potentially important implications for improving access to effective acupuncture treatment for patients with limited financial resources.

  16. Group therapy in public mental health services: approaches, patients and group therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorentzen, S; Ruud, T

    2014-04-01

    Group therapy is used extensively within public mental health services, but more detailed knowledge is needed. All 25 health authorities in Norway were invited to describe their groups: theory, primary tasks, interventions, structure, patients and therapists. Four hundred twenty-six groups, 296 in community mental health centres and 130 in hospitals, were categorized into nine types, based on theoretical background. Psychodynamic groups were most frequent, followed by cognitive-behavioural, psycho-educative, social skills/coping and art/expressive groups. Weekly sessions of 90 min and treatment duration 12 months was most frequent. Main diagnosis for 2391 patients: depression (517), personality disorder (396), schizophrenia/psychosis (313) and social phobia (249). Patients with depression or personality disorder were mostly in psychodynamic groups, psychosis/bipolar disorder in psycho-educative groups. Cognitive-behavioural groups were used across several diagnoses. Most therapists were nurses, only 50% had a formal training in group therapy. There is a plethora of groups, some based on one theoretical school, while others integrate theory from several 'camps'. Patients with similar diagnosis were offered different group approaches, although some trends existed. More research evidence from regular clinical groups is needed, and clinician-researcher networks should be developed. More group therapists with formal training are needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Early discontinuation of intravenous antimicrobial therapy in pediatric oncology patients with febrile neutropenia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grundy Paul E

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There are no standard criteria for when to discontinue intravenous antimicrobial therapy (IVAMT in children with febrile neutropenia (FN, but it is now common to discontinue IVAMT and discharge patients with an absolute neutrophil count (ANC ≤ 500 /mm3. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of a large cohort of children with FN who had IVAMT discontinued with an ANC ≤ 500 /mm3 Methods A retrospective chart review was completed of patients in the Northern Alberta Children's Cancer Program with FN and no apparent clinical source of fever from June 1, 1997 to July 1, 2002. Results Out of a total of 275 patients, 127 (46% had at least one episode of FN, with FN occurring in patients with sarcomas more commonly than in those with leukemia/ lymphoma and least in those with other solid tumors. In 59 of 276 episodes of FN (21% patients had a microbiologically defined infection at admission. Of the 217 remaining episodes, 112 of 199 patients (56% with known neutrophil counts had IVAMT discontinued before their absolute neutrophil count (ANC reached 500 /mm3 at the discretion of the clinician. Fever recurred in only two of these patients after discharge, and there were no bacterial infections diagnosed after parenteral antibiotics were discontinued. Conclusion Even without use of standard criteria for early discharge, clinicians appear to be skilled at selecting children with FN who can safely have IVAMT discontinued with an ANC ≤ 500 /mm3.

  18. A phase I pharmacokinetic study of intraperitoneal bortezomib and carboplatin in patients with persistent or recurrent ovarian cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jandial, Danielle A; Brady, William E; Howell, Stephen B; Lankes, Heather A; Schilder, Russell J; Beumer, Jan H; Christner, Susan M; Strychor, Sandra; Powell, Matthew A; Hagemann, Andrea R; Moore, Kathleen N; Walker, Joan L; DiSilvestro, Paul A; Duska, Linda R; Fracasso, Paula M; Dizon, Don S

    2017-05-01

    Intraperitoneal (IP) therapy improves survival compared to intravenous (IV) treatment for women with newly diagnosed, optimally cytoreduced, ovarian cancer. However, the role of IP therapy in recurrent disease is unknown. Preclinical data demonstrated IP administration of the proteasome inhibitor, bortezomib prior to IP carboplatin increased tumor platinum accumulation resulting in synergistic cytotoxicity. We conducted this phase I trial of IP bortezomib and carboplatin in women with recurrent disease. Women with recurrent ovarian cancer were treated with escalating doses of IP bortezomib - in combination with IP carboplatin (AUC 4 or 5) every 21days for 6cycles. Pharmacokinetics of both agents were evaluated in cycle 1. Thirty-three women participated; 32 were evaluable for safety. Two patients experienced dose-limiting toxicity (DLT) at the first dose level (carboplatin AUC 5, bortezomib 0.5mg/m2), prompting carboplatin reduction to AUC 4 for subsequent dose levels. With carboplatin dose fixed at AUC 4, bortezomib was escalated from 0.5 to 2.5mg/m2 without DLT. Grade 3/4 related toxicities included abdominal pain, nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea which were infrequent. The overall response rate in patients with measurable disease (n=21) was 19% (1 complete, 3 partial). Cmax and AUC in peritoneal fluid and plasma increased linearly with dose, with a favorable exposure ratio of the peritoneal cavity relative to peripheral blood plasma. IP administration of this novel combination was feasible and showed promising activity in this phase I trial of heavily pre-treated women with ovarian cancer. Further evaluation of this IP combination should be conducted. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Preemptive Ethanol Lock Therapy in Pediatric Hematology/Oncology Patients With Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infection: Impact on Length of Stay, Cost, and Catheter Salvage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Eric; Du, Wei; Rajpurkar, Madhvi

    2018-03-01

    Ethanol lock therapy (ELT) with systemic antimicrobial therapy is a promising therapy for catheter-related infection (CRI). The impact of ELT timing on treatment efficacy and costs is unknown. A prospective study was conducted in the Hematology/Oncology Unit at the Children's Hospital of Michigan. Patients with suspected CRI were randomized to Preemptive ELT arm or Rescue ELT arm after positive culture. Five cases in Preemptive arm and 9 in Rescue arm had a confirmed CRI. All cases cleared infection with line salvage with no adverse events due to ELT or recurrence within 14 days. Our data showed a trend toward 36% reduction in average hospital costs and 40% reduction in average length of stay in Preemptive arm over Rescue arm. Although a small study, our data on preemptive ELT with systemic antimicrobial therapy suggest a potentially important treatment strategy in reducing length of stay as well as hospital costs.

  20. Practice patterns of palliative radiation therapy in pediatric oncology patients in an international pediatric research consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Avani Dholakia; Chen, Qinyu; Ermoian, Ralph P; Alcorn, Sara R; Figueiredo, Maria Luisa S; Chen, Michael J; Dieckmann, Karin; MacDonald, Shannon M; Ladra, Matthew M; Kobyzeva, Daria; Nechesnyuk, Alexey V; Nilsson, Kristina; Ford, Eric C; Winey, Brian A; Villar, Rosangela C; Terezakis, Stephanie A

    2017-11-01

    The practice of palliative radiation therapy (RT) is based on extrapolation from adult literature. We evaluated patterns of pediatric palliative RT to describe regimens used to identify opportunity for future pediatric-specific clinical trials. Six international institutions with pediatric expertise completed a 122-item survey evaluating patterns of palliative RT for patients ≤21 years old from 2010 to 2015. Two institutions use proton RT. Palliative RT was defined as treatment with the goal of symptom control or prevention of immediate life-threatening progression. Of 3,225 pediatric patients, 365 (11%) were treated with palliative intent to a total of 427 disease sites. Anesthesia was required in 10% of patients. Treatment was delivered to metastatic disease in 54% of patients. Histologies included neuroblastoma (30%), osteosarcoma (18%), leukemia/lymphoma (12%), rhabdomyosarcoma (12%), medulloblastoma/ependymoma (12%), Ewing sarcoma (8%), and other (8%). Indications included pain (43%), intracranial symptoms (23%), respiratory compromise (14%), cord compression (8%), and abdominal distention (6%). Sites included nonspine bone (35%), brain (16% primary tumors, 6% metastases), abdomen/pelvis (15%), spine (12%), head/neck (9%), and lung/mediastinum (5%). Re-irradiation comprised 16% of cases. Techniques employed three-dimensional conformal RT (41%), intensity-modulated RT (23%), conventional RT (26%), stereotactic body RT (6%), protons (1%), electrons (1%), and other (2%). The most common physician-reported barrier to consideration of palliative RT was the concern about treatment toxicity (83%). There is significant diversity of practice in pediatric palliative RT. Combined with ongoing research characterizing treatment response and toxicity, these data will inform the design of forthcoming clinical trials to establish effective regimens and minimize treatment toxicity for this patient population. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. American College of Radiology (ACR) and American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Practice Guideline for Intensity-modulated Radiation Therapy (IMRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartford, Alan C; Galvin, James M; Beyer, David C; Eichler, Thomas J; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Kavanagh, Brian; Schultz, Christopher J; Rosenthal, Seth A

    2012-12-01

    Intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) is a complex technique for the delivery of radiation therapy preferentially to target structures while minimizing doses to adjacent normal critical structures. It is widely utilized in the treatment of a variety of clinical indications in radiation oncology, including tumors of the central nervous system, head and neck, breast, prostate, gastrointestinal tract, and gynecologic organs, as well as in situations where previous radiation therapy has been delivered, and has allowed for significant therapeutic advances in many clinical areas. IMRT treatment planning and delivery is a complex process. Safe and reliable delivery of IMRT requires appropriate process design and adherence to quality assurance (QA) standards. A collaborative effort of the American College of Radiology and American Society for Therapeutic Radiation Oncology has produced a practice guideline for IMRT. The guideline defines the qualifications and responsibilities of all the involved personnel, including the radiation oncologist, physicist, dosimetrist, and radiation therapist. Factors with respect to the QA of the treatment planning system, treatment-planning process, and treatment-delivery process are discussed, as are issues related to the utilization of volumetric modulated arc therapy. Patient-specific QA procedures are presented. Successful IMRT programs involve integration of many processes: patient selection, patient positioning/immobilization, target definition, treatment plan development, and accurate treatment delivery. Appropriate QA procedures, including patient-specific QA procedures, are essential to ensure quality in an IMRT program and to assure patient safety.

  2. [Using focus groups to explore the group music therapy experience of long term care elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Hui-Chuan; Chen, Shu-Ling

    2007-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the elderly's experience and perceptions of group music therapy. The residents of a long term care institution received group music therapy for one year. Afterwards, three interviews were conducted in focus groups of between six and eight of the elderly. Their ages ranged from 64 to 90. Ninety-five percent of these elderly subjects participated in the therapy for over ten months. The tape-recorded interviews were transcribed and analyzed using content analysis. Six themes emerged regarding the elderly subjects' experiences and perceptions of group music therapy, as follows: (1) becoming more willing to participate; (2) feeling pain relief and more controlled moods; (3) getting physically better; (4) being more motivated to live; (5) learning positive personal interaction and obedience to the rules of the group; and (6) learning skills to improve personal health. This information might be used as a helpful and valuable reference in nursing education and by administrative organizations involved in the planning of therapeutic programs for the elderly.

  3. Group treatment for trichotillomania: cognitive-behavioral therapy versus supportive therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledo, Edson Luiz; De Togni Muniz, Enilde; Brito, Antônio Marcelo Cabrita; de Abreu, Cristiano Nabuco; Tavares, Hermano

    2015-04-01

    Trichotillomania is a psychiatric condition characterized by the chronic pulling and plucking of one's own hair. Cognitive-behavioral therapy shows promise as a treatment for trichotillomania and might be preferable to pharmacotherapy. However, there have been no randomized, controlled studies of the efficacy of group cognitive-behavioral therapy. We evaluated 44 subjects, recruited from April 2009 to May 2010, all of whom met DSM-IV criteria for a diagnosis of trichotillomania. Subjects were randomized to receive 22 sessions of either group cognitive-behavioral therapy or group supportive therapy (control). Treatment evaluation was non-blind and used self-report scales. The primary outcome measure was the improvement of hair-plucking behavior as assessed by the Massachusetts General Hospital Hairpulling Scale. Secondary measures included scores on the Beck Depression Inventory, the Beck Anxiety Inventory, and the Social Adjustment Scale-Self-Report. Both groups showed significant posttreatment improvement in the scores from the Massachusetts General Hospital Hairpulling Scale (F = 23.762, P behavior over time was significantly greater in the study group than in the control group (F = 3.545, P cognitive-behavioral therapy is a valid treatment for trichotillomania. This treatment model should be further revised and expanded to address comorbidities such as anxiety and social maladjustment. ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01968343. © Copyright 2015 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  4. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Susan G.; Emma Morrow; Michiel v Vreeswijk; Caroline Reid

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case-series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioural change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dro...

  5. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    OpenAIRE

    Simpson, Susan G.; Morrow, Emma; van Vreeswijk, Michiel; Reid, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential, and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioral change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropp...

  6. Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders: A Pilot Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan G Simpson

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g in a case-series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioural change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviours, whilst providing a de-stigmatising and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  7. Group schema therapy for eating disorders: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Susan G; Morrow, Emma; van Vreeswijk, Michiel; Reid, Caroline

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the use of Group Schema Therapy for Eating Disorders (ST-E-g) in a case series of eight participants with chronic eating disorders and high levels of co-morbidity. Treatment was comprised of 20 sessions which included cognitive, experiential, and interpersonal strategies, with an emphasis on behavioral change. Specific schema-based strategies focused on bodily felt-sense and body-image, as well as emotional regulation skills. Six attended until end of treatment, two dropped-out at mid-treatment. Eating disorder severity, global schema severity, shame, and anxiety levels were reduced between pre- and post-therapy, with a large effect size at follow-up. Clinically significant improvement in eating severity was found in four out of six completers. Group completers showed a mean reduction in schema severity of 43% at post-treatment, and 59% at follow-up. By follow-up, all completers had achieved over 60% improvement in schema severity. Self-report feedback suggests that group factors may catalyze the change process in schema therapy by increasing perceptions of support and encouragement to take risks and try out new behaviors, whilst providing a de-stigmatizing and de-shaming therapeutic experience.

  8. Group therapy compared with individual desensitization for dental anxiety

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moore, R.; Brødsgaard, I.

    1994-01-01

    Results of group therapy (GT) for extreme dental anxiety were compared with individual treatment (IT). Scales used measured dental anxiety, beliefs or trust in dentists, and fear of the next dentist after specialist treatment which showed reduced dental anxiety and improved dental beliefs compared...... with a static control group of 45 patients. The 30 GT patients showed no significant difference in dropouts during training compared with the 68 IT patients, but for patients who completed treatment, GT (n = 24) had greater dental anxiety reduction than IT subjects (n = 60). GT patients required fewer therapist...

  9. On the importance of multidimensional evaluation of elderly oncologic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Mauro, S; Distefano, A; Di Fazio, I; Leotta, C; Malaguarnera, M

    2000-01-01

    The role of comorbidity and the psycho-affective attitudes have been studied in 108 elderly oncological patients, in comparison with 25 elderly subjects without tumor pathologies. The results have revealed positive correlations between the activity of daily living (ADL), as well as the instrumental activity of daily living (IADL) scales and the comorbidity both in the oncological subjects and the controls. The performance status defined by the eastern cooperative oncology group (ECOG-PS) positively correlated with the parameters of ADL and IADL scales, demonstrating an increased vulnerability and fragility of the oncological patients in their everyday activities. An increased psychological fragility of the oncological patients has also been revealed by the scores of the geriatric depression scale (GDS), which might be cause and consequence at the same time of the disease itself. In addition, the polypathologies are not associated with an increased gravity of the tumor stage, although there have been 2.5 accompanying pathologies, mainly diseases of osteoarticular and cardial character. The correction of functional damages of various organs due to aging or concomitant or previous diseases is a period of fundamental importance for an adequate oncological therapy. The principal goal of any intervention in the elderly oncological patient should certainly be an improvement of the quality of life, including an alleviation of the impact of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures on it.

  10. Long-Term Outcomes Among Patients Who Achieve Complete or Near-Complete Responses After the Induction Phase of Bladder-Preserving Combined-Modality Therapy for Muscle-Invasive Bladder Cancer: A Pooled Analysis of NRG Oncology/RTOG 9906 and 0233

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitin, Timur, E-mail: mitin@ohsu.edu [Oregon Health & Science University, Portland, Oregon (United States); George, Asha [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Zietman, Anthony L.; Heney, Niall M.; Kaufman, Donald S. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Uzzo, Robert G. [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Dreicer, Robert [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia (United States); Wallace, H. James [University of Vermont College of Medicine, Burlington, Vermont (United States); Souhami, Luis [McGill University Health Centre, Montreal, Québec (Canada); Dobelbower, M. Chris [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Birmingham, Alabama (United States); Sandler, Howard M. [Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, Los Angeles, California (United States); Shipley, William U. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the differences in outcomes among patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer on NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group protocols 9906 and 0233 who achieved complete response and near-complete response after induction chemoradiation and then completed bladder-preserving therapy with chemoradiation therapy (chemo-RT) to full dose (60-64 Gy). Patients and Methods: A pooled analysis was performed on 119 eligible patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer enrolled on NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group trials 9906 and 0233, who were classified as having a complete (T0) or near-complete (Ta or Tis) response after induction chemo-RT and completed consolidation with a total RT dose of at least 60 Gy. Bladder recurrence, salvage cystectomy rates, and disease-specific survival were estimated by the cumulative incidence method and bladder-intact and overall survivals by the Kaplan-Meier method. Results: Among the 119 eligible patients, 101 (85%) achieved T0, and 18 (15%) achieved Ta or Tis after induction chemo-RT and proceeded to consolidation. After a median follow-up of 5.9 years, 36 of 101 T0 patients (36%) versus 5 of 18 Ta or Tis patients (28%) experienced bladder recurrence (P=.52). Thirteen patients among complete responders eventually required late salvage cystectomy for tumor recurrence, compared with 1 patient among near-complete responders (P=.63). Disease-specific, bladder-intact, and overall survivals were not significantly different between T0 and Ta/Tis cases. Conclusions: The bladder recurrence and salvage cystectomy rates of the complete and the near-complete responders were similar. Therefore it is reasonable to recommend that patients with Ta or Tis after induction chemo-RT continue with bladder-sparing therapy with consolidation chemo-RT to full dose (60-64 Gy).

  11. Psychosocial Demands of Speech Therapy with Head-and-Neck Cancer Patients: Clinical Experiences, Communicative Skills and Need for Training of Speech Therapists in Oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Ullrich

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Head and neck cancer patients suffer from high levels of psychological comorbidity and often do not receive adequate psychological assistance. Therefore, speech therapists are frequently confronted with specific psychosocial challenges beyond the scope of their standard professional education. The following aspects were examined via a mixed-methods approach to explore their own perceptions of these challenges and their skills to deal with them: 1 The experiences and problems of speech therapists working with head and neck cancer patients; 2 the self-assessment of speech therapists' skills in cancer patient care; 3 the experiences and observations of psychologists supervising case discussions in oncology with speech therapists; 4 the communication skills of speech therapists working with emotionally distressed patients in oncology Our results show that therapists are acutely aware of their patients' distress. They agree that there is a need for patients to receive psychosocial counseling and that a significant portion of their speech therapy sessions is often dedicated to talking about personal problems. This difficult situation leads to: 1 deficiencies in speech therapists' ability to address patients' demands and deficiencies in distancing themselves from their patients; 2 speech therapists feeling overwhelmed with excessive demands and experiencing mental distress themselves. The psycho-oncological knowledge and communication skills among speech therapists were often deficient in light of such demands. There is a need for further training in psychological and social skills for speech therapists working with head and neck cancer patients. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1001220

  12. Diagnosis of Upper Quadrant Lymphedema Secondary to Cancer: Clinical Practice Guideline From the Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenhagen, Kimberly; Davies, Claire; Perdomo, Marisa; Ryans, Kathryn; Gilchrist, Laura

    2017-07-01

    The Oncology Section of the American Physical Therapy Association (APTA) developed a clinical practice guideline to aid the clinician in diagnosing secondary upper quadrant cancer-related lymphedema. Following a systematic review of published studies and a structured appraisal process, recommendations were written to guide the physical therapist and other health care clinicians in the diagnostic process. Overall clinical practice recommendations were formulated based on the evidence for each diagnostic method and were assigned a grade based on the strength of the evidence for different patient presentations and clinical utility. In an effort to maximize clinical applicability, recommendations were based on the characteristics as to the location and stage of a patient's upper quadrant lymphedema. © American Physical Therapy Association 2017. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the American Physical Therapy Association].

  13. Does time interval between surgery and intraperitoneal chemotherapy administration in advanced ovarian cancer carry a prognostic impact? An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group study ancillary study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Soto, Arlene E; Java, James J; Nieves Neira, Wilberto; Pearson, J Matthew; Cohn, David E; Lele, Shashikant B; Tewari, Krishnansu S; Walker, Joan L; Alvarez Secord, Angeles; Armstrong, Deborah K; Copeland, Larry J

    2016-12-01

    To determine the relationship of the time from surgery to intraperitoneal (IP) chemotherapy (TSIC) initiation with survival of patients with stage III epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) patients using ancillary data from cooperative group clinical trials. Data from 420 patients with stage III EOC treated with IP chemotherapy under GOG-0114 and 172 were reviewed. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to evaluate independent prognostic factors and estimate their covariate-adjusted effects on PFS and OS. The median TSIC was 62.5days (interquartile range 28-83). The median TSIC was longer for patients in GOG-0114 vs those in GOG-172 (83 vs 26days, pcancer. TSIC was significantly associated with PFS for the entire cohort, suggesting increase in PFS with longer TSIC. However, this was not found when only data from GOG 172 or GOG 114 were analyzed separately. Hence, the relationship between IP chemotherapy initiation and time from surgery needs to be studied further. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Definitive radiation therapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Executive summary of an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, George; Choy, Hak; Bradley, Jeffrey; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Bogart, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter J; Gore, Elizabeth; Langer, Corey; Louie, Alexander V; Lutz, Stephen; Machtay, Mitchell; Puri, Varun; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Videtic, Gregory M M

    2015-01-01

    To provide guidance to physicians and patients with regard to the use of definitive external beam radiation therapy (RT) in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) based on available medical evidence complemented by consensus-based expert opinion. A panel authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Board of Directors and Guidelines Subcommittee conducted 3 systematic reviews on the following topics: (1) ideal radical RT dose fractionation for RT alone; (2) ideal radical RT dose fractionation for chemoradiation; and (3) ideal timing of radical radiation therapy with systemic chemotherapy. Practice guideline recommendations were approved using an a priori-defined consensus-building methodology supported by ASTRO and approved tools for the grading of evidence quality and the strength of guideline recommendations. For patients managed by RT alone, a minimum dose of 60 Gy of RT is recommended. Dose escalation beyond 60 Gy in the context of combined modality concurrent chemoradiation has not been found to be associated with any clinical benefits. In the context of combined modality therapy, chemotherapy and radiation should ideally be given concurrently to maximize survival, local control, and disease response rate. A consensus and evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the definitive radiotherapeutic management of LA NSCLC has been created that addresses 3 important questions. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Radiation Oncology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Cancer Screening in Patients with Idiopathic Venous Thromboembolism--a Position Paper of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology Working Group on Hemostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzdorff, Axel; Riess, Hanno; Bergmann, Frauke; Bisping, Guido; Koschmieder, Steffen; Parmentier, Stefani; Petrides, Petro E; Sosada, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cancer can trigger thromboembolism. There is a 4-10% chance of finding an asymptomatic occult cancer in patients with idiopathic venous thromboembolism (VTE). Current guidelines recommend limited cancer screening with history, physical examination, and screening examinations according to age after idiopathic VTE. Recent studies found that a more extensive screening program, including endoscopy and computed tomography, may increase the cancer detection rate. The Hemostasis Working Group of the German Society of Hematology and Oncology recommends a more extensive screening program after idiopathic VTE. © 2015 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  16. Standardizing naming conventions in radiation oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanam, Lakshmi; Hurkmans, Coen; Mutic, Sasa; van Vliet-Vroegindeweij, Corine; Brame, Scott; Straube, William; Galvin, James; Tripuraneni, Prabhakar; Michalski, Jeff; Bosch, Walter

    2012-07-15

    The aim of this study was to report on the development of a standardized target and organ-at-risk naming convention for use in radiation therapy and to present the nomenclature for structure naming for interinstitutional data sharing, clinical trial repositories, integrated multi-institutional collaborative databases, and quality control centers. This taxonomy should also enable improved plan benchmarking between clinical institutions and vendors and facilitation of automated treatment plan quality control. The Advanced Technology Consortium, Washington University in St. Louis, Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Dutch Radiation Oncology Society, and the Clinical Trials RT QA Harmonization Group collaborated in creating this new naming convention. The International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements guidelines have been used to create standardized nomenclature for target volumes (clinical target volume, internal target volume, planning target volume, etc.), organs at risk, and planning organ-at-risk volumes in radiation therapy. The nomenclature also includes rules for specifying laterality and margins for various structures. The naming rules distinguish tumor and nodal planning target volumes, with correspondence to their respective tumor/nodal clinical target volumes. It also provides rules for basic structure naming, as well as an option for more detailed names. Names of nonstandard structures used mainly for plan optimization or evaluation (rings, islands of dose avoidance, islands where additional dose is needed [dose painting]) are identified separately. In addition to its use in 16 ongoing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group advanced technology clinical trial protocols and several new European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer protocols, a pilot version of this naming convention has been evaluated using patient data sets with varying treatment sites. All structures in these data sets were satisfactorily identified using this

  17. Integrative oncology: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Gary; Cassileth, Barrie

    2014-01-01

    Integrative oncology, the diagnosis-specific field of integrative medicine, addresses symptom control with nonpharmacologic therapies. Known commonly as "complementary therapies" these are evidence-based adjuncts to mainstream care that effectively control physical and emotional symptoms, enhance physical and emotional strength, and provide patients with skills enabling them to help themselves throughout and following mainstream cancer treatment. Integrative or complementary therapies are rational and noninvasive. They have been subjected to study to determine their value, to document the problems they ameliorate, and to define the circumstances under which such therapies are beneficial. Conversely, "alternative" therapies typically are promoted literally as such; as actual antitumor treatments. They lack biologic plausibility and scientific evidence of safety and efficacy. Many are outright fraudulent. Conflating these two very different categories by use of the convenient acronym "CAM," for "complementary and alternative therapies," confuses the issue and does a substantial disservice to patients and medical professionals. Complementary and integrative modalities have demonstrated safety value and benefits. If the same were true for "alternatives," they would not be "alternatives." Rather, they would become part of mainstream cancer care. This manuscript explores the medical and sociocultural context of interest in integrative oncology as well as in "alternative" therapies, reviews commonly-asked patient questions, summarizes research results in both categories, and offers recommendations to help guide patients and family members through what is often a difficult maze. Combining complementary therapies with mainstream oncology care to address patients' physical, psychologic and spiritual needs constitutes the practice of integrative oncology. By recommending nonpharmacologic modalities that reduce symptom burden and improve quality of life, physicians also enable

  18. Oncologic and Functional Hazards of Obesity Among Patients With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer Following Neoadjuvant Chemoradiation Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In J; You, Y Nancy; Skibber, John M; Rodriguez-Bigas, Miguel A; Das, Prajnan; Eng, Cathy; Kopetz, Scott; Wolff, Robert A; Crane, Christopher H; Krishnan, Sunil; Minsky, Bruce; Hu, Chung-Yuan; Nguyen, Sa; Chang, George J

    2017-06-01

    Obesity is a major health concern and risk factor for colorectal cancer that may also impact cancer treatment and outcomes. Rectal cancer response to chemoradiotherapy (CXRT) is associated with long-term survival and sphincter preservation. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of obesity on treatment outcomes after neoadjuvant CXRT for rectal cancer. A retrospective cohort study of patients diagnosed (1993 to 2010) with cT3-4 or cN+ (by endorectal ultrasound, computed tomography, or magnetic resonance imaging) rectal carcinoma and treated with CXRT and total mesorectal excision was performed. Patients were classified as obese (body mass index ≥30 kg/m) or nonobese (body mass index obesity, tumor response, and sphincter preservation were evaluated using multivariate logistic regression analysis and survival outcomes by Cox regression. A total of 753 patients met criteria and 28.7% (n=216) patients were obese. Obese and nonobese groups did not differ in age, sex, tumor location, grade, or number of examined lymph nodes. However, obesity was associated with a lower rate of pCR (ORmulti=0.60; 95% confidence interval, 0.38-0.94; P=0.04) and among mid to low rectal cancer patients, a lower rate of sphincter preservation (ORmulti=0.67; 95% confidence interval, 0.45-0.99). Among both obese and nonobese patients, CR was associated with more favorable recurrence-free survival than pIR. Considering the increasing obesity prevalence and its association with CXRT response, oncologic outcomes, and sphincter preservation, further study is needed regarding the impact of obesity on neoadjuvant treatment response. Moreover, obesity should be targeted as a modifiable risk factor for adverse outcomes following multimodality treatment for rectal cancer.

  19. Computational oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefor, Alan T

    2011-08-01

    Oncology research has traditionally been conducted using techniques from the biological sciences. The new field of computational oncology has forged a new relationship between the physical sciences and oncology to further advance research. By applying physics and mathematics to oncologic problems, new insights will emerge into the pathogenesis and treatment of malignancies. One major area of investigation in computational oncology centers around the acquisition and analysis of data, using improved computing hardware and software. Large databases of cellular pathways are being analyzed to understand the interrelationship among complex biological processes. Computer-aided detection is being applied to the analysis of routine imaging data including mammography and chest imaging to improve the accuracy and detection rate for population screening. The second major area of investigation uses computers to construct sophisticated mathematical models of individual cancer cells as well as larger systems using partial differential equations. These models are further refined with clinically available information to more accurately reflect living systems. One of the major obstacles in the partnership between physical scientists and the oncology community is communications. Standard ways to convey information must be developed. Future progress in computational oncology will depend on close collaboration between clinicians and investigators to further the understanding of cancer using these new approaches.

  20. Cancer patients' preferences for therapy decisions can be grouped into categories and separated by demographic factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnholdt, Jana; Haier, Jörg

    2017-08-01

    Shared decision-making is based on comparable understanding of decision criteria on both sides that requires knowledge about preferences, reception/prioritization of benefits and covariates influencing these criteria. We addressed identification of cancer patients' preferences for treatment decisions and covariates for preference patterns in certain patient cohorts. Using preference surveys ordinal ranking of decisional preferences in life (PL) and during therapy (PT) were obtained and aggregated by factorial analysis. Demographic and clinical data enabled clustering of patient groups including non-malignant control group with distinct preference patterns. Covariates for these patterns were determined by multivariate ANOVA. 1777 cancer and 367 non-oncological patients (≥18 years) were evaluable (response 56.0%). Patient-reported PT was grouped into distinctive categories: immediate treatment effectivity, long-term effects and survival, empathy, easy treatment and employability/healing. Gender, parenthood, family status, age and educational level mainly determine importance of PL (52.1% variance) and PT (55.1% variance) enabling discrimination of specific preference patterns in patients: older males, non-single, younger males, non-single female with children and young, single patients without children that mainly significantly differed from non-cancer patients (p groups. If patients recognize direct social responsibility, immediate treatment effects gain importance accompanied by reduced impact of employability, rehabilitation and financial security. For young and independent patients empathy has similar impact as treatment effects. Consequently, clinical research should consider age-specific endpoints and distinct decisional preferences to match patients' perspective by specific evidence.

  1. A review of the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on the reduction of body image concern in patients with breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, J; Mahdavi, A; Samkhaniyan, E; Asadi, S H; Dezhkam, N

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Taking the appropriate psychological actions to boost the mental health of patients with breast cancer is critical. This research was performed with the aim of examining the effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy on reducing body image concerns in patients with breast cancer. Methodology: TThe method used was quasi-experimental with a pretest-posttest plan and control group. Therefore, 40 patients with breast cancer who had referred to the oncology and radiotherapy department of Imam Hossein Hospital of Tehran were selected by convenience sampling method and organized into two groups: experimental and control group. Both groups were pretested by using demographic and body image concern questionnaires. Then the experimental group received cognitive-behavioral group therapy training for eight sessions and the control group did not receive any intervention. Afterwards, both groups were post-tested, and the data were analyzed by using SPSS software with descriptive and inferential statistics methods. Findings: The findings showed that the cognitive-behavioral group therapy training significantly contributed to the reduction of body image concern in patients with cancer (p cognitive-behavioral group therapy training is an effective strategy to help patients with breast cancer who suffer from the concern about body image due to its high efficiency, especially when it was held in groups, it had low cost, and it was acceptable by the patients.

  2. Safety and activity of crizotinib for paediatric patients with refractory solid tumours or anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: a Children’s Oncology Group phase 1 consortium study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossé, Yael P; Lim, Megan S; Voss, Stephan D; Wilner, Keith; Ruffner, Katherine; Laliberte, Julie; Rolland, Delphine; Balis, Frank M; Maris, John M; Weigel, Brenda J; Ingle, Ashish M; Ahern, Charlotte; Adamson, Peter C; Blaney, Susan M

    2013-01-01

    1 years (range 1·1–21·4); 43 patients were included in the dose escalation phase (A1), 25 patients in part A2, and 11 patients in part A3. Crizotinib was well tolerated with a recommended phase 2 dose of 280 mg/m2 twice daily. Grade 4 adverse events in cycle 1 were neutropenia (two) and liver enzyme elevation (one). Grade 3 adverse events that occurred in more than one patient in cycle 1 were lymphopenia (two), and neutropenia (eight). The mean steady state peak concentration of crizotinib was 630 ng/mL and the time to reach this peak was 4 h (range 1–6). Objective tumour responses were documented in 14 of 79 patients (nine complete responses, five partial responses); and the anti-tumour activity was enriched in patients with known activating ALK aberrations (eight of nine with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, one of 11 with neuroblastoma, three of seven with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour, and one of two with NSCLC). Interpretation The findings suggest that a targeted inhibitor of ALK has antitumour activity in childhood malignancies harbouring ALK translocations, particularly anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours, and that further investigation in the subset of neuroblastoma harbouring known ALK oncogenic mutations is warranted. Funding Pfizer and National Cancer Institute grant to the Children’s Oncology Group. PMID:23598171

  3. Safety and activity of crizotinib for paediatric patients with refractory solid tumours or anaplastic large-cell lymphoma: a Children's Oncology Group phase 1 consortium study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mossé, Yael P; Lim, Megan S; Voss, Stephan D; Wilner, Keith; Ruffner, Katherine; Laliberte, Julie; Rolland, Delphine; Balis, Frank M; Maris, John M; Weigel, Brenda J; Ingle, Ashish M; Ahern, Charlotte; Adamson, Peter C; Blaney, Susan M

    2013-05-01

    patients were included in the dose escalation phase (A1), 25 patients in part A2, and 11 patients in part A3. Crizotinib was well tolerated with a recommended phase 2 dose of 280 mg/m(2) twice daily. Grade 4 adverse events in cycle 1 were neutropenia (two) and liver enzyme elevation (one). Grade 3 adverse events that occurred in more than one patient in cycle 1 were lymphopenia (two), and neutropenia (eight). The mean steady state peak concentration of crizotinib was 630 ng/mL and the time to reach this peak was 4 h (range 1-6). Objective tumour responses were documented in 14 of 79 patients (nine complete responses, five partial responses); and the anti-tumour activity was enriched in patients with known activating ALK aberrations (eight of nine with anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, one of 11 with neuroblastoma, three of seven with inflammatory myofibroblastic tumour, and one of two with NSCLC). The findings suggest that a targeted inhibitor of ALK has antitumour activity in childhood malignancies harbouring ALK translocations, particularly anaplastic large-cell lymphoma and inflammatory myofibroblastic tumours, and that further investigation in the subset of neuroblastoma harbouring known ALK oncogenic mutations is warranted. Pfizer and National Cancer Institute grant to the Children's Oncology Group. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mindfulness and acceptance-based group therapy and traditional cognitive behavioral group therapy for social anxiety disorder: Mechanisms of change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocovski, Nancy L; Fleming, Jan E; Hawley, Lance L; Ho, Moon-Ho Ringo; Antony, Martin M

    2015-07-01

    The present study investigated mechanisms of change for two group treatments for social anxiety disorder (SAD): cognitive behavioral group therapy (CBGT) and mindfulness and acceptance-based group therapy (MAGT). Participants were treatment completers (n = 37 for MAGT, n = 32 for CBGT) from a randomized clinical trial. Cognitive reappraisal was the hypothesized mechanism of change for CBGT. Mindfulness and acceptance were hypothesized mechanisms of change for MAGT. Latent difference score (LDS) analysis results demonstrate that cognitive reappraisal coupling (in which cognitive reappraisal is negatively associated with the subsequent rate of change in social anxiety) had a greater impact on social anxiety for CBGT than MAGT. The LDS bidirectional mindfulness model (mindfulness predicts subsequent change in social anxiety; social anxiety predicts subsequent change in mindfulness) was supported for both treatments. Results for acceptance were less clear. Cognitive reappraisal may be a more important mechanism of change for CBGT than MAGT, whereas mindfulness may be an important mechanism of change for both treatments. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Evaluation of the prevalence of burnout and psychological morbidity among radiation oncologist members of the Kyoto Radiation Oncology Study Group (KROSG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mampuya, Wambaka Ange; Matsuo, Yukinori; Nakamura, Akira; Hiraoka, Masahiro

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the self-reported prevalence of burnout and psychological morbidity among radiation oncologists members of the Kyoto Radiation Oncology Study Group (KROSG) and to identify factors contributing to burnout. We mailed an anonymous survey to 125 radiation oncologists members of the KROSG. The survey included; the demographic data, the Maslach Burnout Inventory - Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) and the 12-item General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). There were 87 responses out of 125 eligible respondents (69.6% response rate). In terms of burnout, three participants (3.4%) fulfilled the MBI-HSS criteria of having simultaneously high emotional exhaustion (EE), high depersonalization (DP) and low sense of personal accomplishment (PA). Eighteen (20.6%) reported a high score for either EE or DP meeting the alternative criteria for burnout with three of these simultaneously having high EE and high DP. The prevalence of psychological morbidity estimated using GHQ-12 was 32%. A high level of EE and low level of PA significantly correlated with high level of psychological morbidity with P morbidity among radiation oncologists in Japan. Compared with other studies involving radiation oncologists, the prevalence of low personal accomplishment was particularly high in the present study. The prevalence of psychological morbidity was almost the double that of the Japanese general population and was significantly associated with low PA and high EE. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japan Radiation Research Society and Japanese Society for Radiation Oncology.

  6. Dummy Run of Quality Assurance Program in a Phase 3 Randomized Trial Investigating the Role of Internal Mammary Lymph Node Irradiation in Breast Cancer Patients: Korean Radiation Oncology Group 08-06 Study

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    Chung, Yoonsun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jun Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Proton Therapy Center, Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, Goyang (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Su Ssan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Sung-Ja [Department of Radiation Oncology, Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Park, Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyung-Sik [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dong-A University Hospital, Dong-A University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dong Won [Department of Radiation Oncology, Pusan National University Hospital, Pusan National University School of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kyu Chan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Hyun Suk [Department of Radiation Oncology, Ewha Womans University Mokdong Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jin Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Hyun Soo [Department of Radiation Oncology, Bundang CHA Hospital, School of Medicine, CHA University, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Yong Bae, E-mail: ybkim3@yuhs.ac [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Chang-Ok [Department of Radiation Oncology, Yonsei Cancer Center, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-01

    Purpose: The Korean Radiation Oncology Group (KROG) 08-06 study protocol allowed radiation therapy (RT) technique to include or exclude breast cancer patients from receiving radiation therapy to the internal mammary lymph node (IMN). The purpose of this study was to assess dosimetric differences between the 2 groups and potential influence on clinical outcome by a dummy run procedure. Methods and Materials: All participating institutions were asked to produce RT plans without irradiation (Arm 1) and with irradiation to the IMN (Arm 2) for 1 breast-conservation treatment case (breast-conserving surgery [BCS]) and 1 mastectomy case (modified radical mastectomy [MRM]) whose computed tomography images were provided. We assessed interinstitutional variations in IMN delineation and evaluated the dose-volume histograms of the IMN and normal organs. A reference IMN was delineated by an expert panel group based on the study guidelines. Also, we analyzed the potential influence of actual dose variation observed in this study on patient survival. Results: Although physicians intended to exclude the IMN within the RT field, the data showed almost 59.0% of the prescribed dose was delivered to the IMN in Arm 1. However, the mean doses covering the IMN in Arm 1 and Arm 2 were significantly different for both cases (P<.001). Due to the probability of overdose in Arm 1, the estimated gain in 7-year disease-free survival rate would be reduced from 10% to 7.9% for BCS cases and 7.1% for MRM cases. The radiation doses to the ipsilateral lung, heart, and coronary artery were lower in Arm 1 than in Arm 2. Conclusions: Although this dummy run study indicated that a substantial dose was delivered to the IMN, even in the nonirradiation group, the dose differences between the 2 groups were statistically significant. However, this dosimetric profile should be studied further with actual patient samples and be taken into consideration when analyzing clinical outcomes according to IMN

  7. Radical nephroureterectomy for pathologic T4 upper tract urothelial cancer: can oncologic outcomes be improved with multimodality therapy?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramy F. Youssef

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To report the outcomes of patients with pathologic T4 UTUC and investigate the potential impact of peri-operative chemotherapy combined with radical nephroureterectomy (RNU and regional lymph node dissection (LND on oncologic outcomes. Materials and Methods Patients with pathologic T4 UTUC were identified from the cohort of 1464 patients treated with RNU at 13 academic centers between 1987 and 2007. Oncologic outcomes were stratified according to utilization of perioperative systemic chemotherapy and regional LND as an adjunct to RNU. Results The study included 69 patients, 42 males (61% with median age 73 (range 43-98. Median follow-up was 17 months (range: 6-88. Lymphovascular invasion was found in 47 (68% and regional lymph node metastases were found in 31 (45%. Peri-operative chemotherapy was utilized in 29 (42% patients. Patients treated with peri-operative chemotherapy and RNU with LND demonstrated superior oncologic outcomes compared to those not treated by chemotherapy and/or LND during RNU (3Y-DFS: 35% vs. 10%; P = 0.02 and 3Y-CSS: 28% vs. 14%; P = 0.08. In multivariate Cox regression analysis, administration of peri-operative chemotherapy and utilization of LND during RNU was associated with lower probability of recurrence (HR: 0.4, P = 0.01, and cancer specific mortality (HR: 0.5, P = 0.06. Conclusions Pathological T4 UTUC is associated with poor prognosis. Peri-operative chemotherapy combined with aggressive surgery, including lymph node dissection, may improve oncological outcomes. Our findings support the use of aggressive multimodal treatment in patients with advanced UTUC.

  8. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of real world data comparative effectiveness research of systemic therapies in lung oncology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Bas J M; Janssen, Vivi E M T; Schramel, Franz M; van de Garde, Ewoudt M W

    2016-10-01

    The growing interest in comparative effectiveness research (CER) based on data from routine clinical practice also extends towards lung oncology. Although CER studies using real world data (RWD) have the potential to assist clinical decision-making, concerns about the quality and validity of studies with observational data subsist. The primary objective of the present study is to assess the current status of observational CER in the field of lung oncology, both quantitatively as qualitatively. We performed a systematic electronic literature database search in MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to 1 July 2015). The quality of all selected studies was assessed according to the Good ReseArch for Comparative Effectiveness (GRACE) checklist. The first selection included 657 publications. After screening the corresponding abstracts and full-text papers, 38 studies remained. A total of 36 studies included patients with advanced NSCLC. The comparison of the effectiveness of gefitinib versus erlotinib was the main objective in 22% of the studies. The median number of patients per study was 202 (range 21-10064). The number of publications increased over the years whereas the quality score remained stable over the years with several common shortcomings (checklist items M5, D1, D4, D6). The growing interest in clinical oncology CER studies using RWD is reflected in an increasing number of publications in the recent years. The studies have several common methodological shortcomings possibly limiting their applicability in clinical decision-making. To fulfil the promise of RWD CER in lung oncology effort should be continued to overcome these shortcomings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. [Effects of Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy on Social Anxiety Disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu-Chen; Meng, Ya-Jing; Yuan, Min-Lan; Zhu, Hong-Ru; Ren, Zheng-Jia; Qiu, Chang-Jian; Zhang, Wei

    2017-11-01

    To evaluate the effect of group cognitive behavioral therapy (GCBT) on social anxiety disorders (SAD). A total of 50 patients with SAD were recruited in this study. A survey containing the Liebowitz social anxiety scale (LSAS),the automatic thoughts questionnaire (ATQ),the fear of negative evaluation questionnaire (FNE),the social support rating scale (SSRS),the tridimensional personality questionnaire (TPQ),and the egna minnen barndoms uppfostran (EMBU) was administered before and (one week) after the GCBT,including in the 50 healthy controls. About 21 patients completed the eight-week GCBT (once a week,2 h a session). Follow-up surveys were conducted on 40 patients (22 patients treated with GCBT and 18 untreated) over a 1-5 year period. Significant differences were found between the SAD patients and healthy controls in thinking mode,personality characteristics,social support,parental rearing styles,and social anxiety symptoms. Significant decrease in social anxiety symptom ( t =4.06, P =0.000) , negative automatic thoughts ( t =4.58, P =0.000) and fear for rejection ( t =3.85, P =0.000) were observed after the GCBT therapy. Such improvement was positively correlated with subjective social support ( r =0.361, P =0.022) ,and negatively correlated with rejection of father ( r =-0.431, P =0.005) . There was also statistical difference between the patients with and without the GCBT therapy ( P =0.033) . GCBT treatment can relieve SAD symptoms by changing the negative cognitive of SAD patients. Social support and rejection of father affects the prognosis of SAD.

  10. Oncological Impact of M-Tor Inhibitor Immunosuppressive Therapy after Liver Transplantation for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Tarantino

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Hepatocellular Carcinoma (HCC represents the fifth most common malignancy and the third cancer-related cause of death worldwide. Hepatitis B (HBV and C (HCV viral infections and alcohol abuse are the principal etiological factors for HCC. Liver transplantation (LT is oncologically the preferable approach to HCC, as it can remove all the intrahepatic tumor foci, and also the oncogenic cirrhotic liver. The use of mTOR inhibitors (mTORi for immunosuppression after LT for HCC has been proposed due to rapamycin antitumor activity. We decided to review the literature to clarify the oncological role of mTORi after liver transplantation for HCC, analyzing both present condition and future perspectives.Material and Methods: A systematic literature search was performed using PubMed, EMBASE, Scopus and the Cochrane Library Central. The search was limited to studies in humans and to those reported in the English language in the period of time between January 2005 and December 2015. Results: The literature search yielded 93 articles; after duplicates were removed, 77 titles and abstracts were reviewed. Most relevant data and papers are herein reported and discussed.Conclusions: So far, the use of mTORi is encouraging in terms of oncological outcomes for patients underwent LT for HCC, both for prevention and treatment of HCC recurrence although definitive data are still awaited.

  11. The symptom burden of cancer: Evidence for a core set of cancer-related and treatment-related symptoms from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Symptom Outcomes and Practice Patterns study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleeland, Charles S; Zhao, Fengmin; Chang, Victor T; Sloan, Jeff A; O'Mara, Ann M; Gilman, Paul B; Weiss, Matthias; Mendoza, Tito R; Lee, Ju-Whei; Fisch, Michael J

    2013-12-15

    A set of common cancer-related and treatment-related symptoms has been proposed for quality of care assessment and clinical research. Using data from a large, multicenter, prospective study, the authors assessed the effects of disease site and stage on the percentages of patients rating these proposed symptoms as moderate to severe. The severity of 13 symptoms proposed to represent "core" oncology symptoms was rated by 3106 ambulatory patients with cancer of the breast, prostate, colon/rectum, or lung, regardless of disease stage or phase of care; 2801 patients (90%) repeated the assessment 4 to 5 weeks later. At the time of the initial assessment, approximately 33% of the patients reported ≥ 3 symptoms in the moderate-to-severe range; 11 of the 13 symptoms were rated as moderate to severe by at least 10% of all patients and 6 were rated as moderate to severe by at least 20% of those receiving active treatment. Fatigue/tiredness was the most severe symptom, followed by disturbed sleep, pain, dry mouth, and numbness/tingling. More patients with lung cancer and patients receiving active treatment reported moderate to severe symptoms. Percentages of symptomatic patients increased by disease stage, less adequate response to therapy, and declining Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status. The percentages of patients reporting moderate to severe symptoms were stable across both assessments. The results of the current study support a core set of moderate to severe symptoms that are common across outpatients with solid tumors, that can guide consideration of progression-free survival as a trial outcome, and that should be considered in clinical care and in assessments of quality of care and treatment benefit. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  12. Early-stage mantle cell lymphoma: a retrospective analysis from the International Lymphoma Radiation Oncology Group (ILROG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabaja, B S; Zelenetz, A D; Ng, A K; Tsang, R W; Qi, S; Allen, P K; Hodgson, D; Ricardi, U; Hoppe, R T; Advani, R; Mauch, P M; Constine, L S; Specht, L; Li, Y; Terezakis, S A; Wirth, A; Reinartz, G; Eich, H T; Aleman, B M P; Barr, P; Yahalom, J

    2017-09-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) rarely presents as early-stage disease, but clinical observations suggest that patients who present with early-stage disease may have better outcomes than those with advanced-stage disease. In this 13-institution study, we examined outcomes among 179 patients with early-stage (stage I or II) MCL in an attempt to identify prognostic factors that influence treatment selection and outcome. Variables examined included clinical characteristics, treatment modality, response to therapy, sites of failure, and survival. Patients were predominantly male (78%) with head and neck being the most common presenting sites (75%). Most failures occurred outside the original disease site (79%). Although the administration of radiation therapy, either alone or with chemotherapy, reduced the risk of local failure, it did not translate into an improved freedom from progression or overall survival (OS). The treatment outcomes were independent of treatment modality. The 10-year OS for patients treated with chemotherapy alone, chemo-radiation therapy and radiation therapy alone were 69%, 62%, and 74% (P = 0.79), and the 10-year freedom from progression were 46%, 43%, and 31% (P = 0.64), respectively. Given the excellent OS rates regardless of initial therapy in patients with early-stage MCL, de-intensified therapy to limit treatment-related toxicity is a reasonable approach.

  13. The MRI as a valid help for oncoplastic surgery: esthetic and oncologic results analysis in a group of 489 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semprini, G; Cattin, F; Riccio, M; Cedolini, C; Parodi, P C

    2013-02-01

    There is an increased expectation from breast cancer patients to retain their "normal breast appearance". To help to achieve this expectation, many radiologic exams have been created to get the exact extension and position of the tumor. MRI is effective to obtain correct information about neoplasms, especially those with shaded edges, like DCIS. MRI might change the surgical project, thus avoiding second operations for cancer relapses. We have performed MRI to all the patients except those with big lesions or adypous breasts. We have chosen for reconstruction various oncoplastic techniques. We have had early complications in 98/489 (20%) cases. As late complications, we have found scar retractions and minus areas in 20/489 cases (4.08%), while we have found asymmetries and bigger deformities in 34/489 cases (6.95%). We have not found any cancer relapse after one year, we have had 3 cases of relapse (0.6%) after five years of follow-up, after 5, 4 and 2 years. Our good oncologic and plastic results have to be attributed to many factors, among which stands out the MRI done in all the cases. We think that an immediate breast reshaping following quadrantectomy is the best esthetic and psychologic option for breast cancer patients.

  14. Group therapy for early adolescent girls at the Counseling Room affiliated with the Showa Women's University

    OpenAIRE

    佐藤, 昌子; 松永, しのぶ; Akiko, SATO; Shinobu, MATSUNAGA; 昭和女子大学生活心理研究所; 昭和女子大学大学院生活機構研究科

    2011-01-01

    The Counseling Room affiliated with the Showa Women's University has been providing group therapy for improving social skills in parallel with individual psychotherapy for early adolescent girls. Group therapy, and other forms of psychological support suitable for early adolescent girls were investigated, and the practice of the group therapy is reported. Clinical psychologists and graduate students in clinical psychology held 15 group therapy sessions over a period of one and a half years. T...

  15. From radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy and oncoplastic breast surgery: a narrative review comparing oncological result, cosmetic outcome, quality of life, and health economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaviani, Ahmad; Sodagari, Nassim; Sheikhbahaei, Sara; Eslami, Vahid; Hafezi-Nejad, Nima; Safavi, Amin; Noparast, Maryam; Fitoussi, Alfred

    2013-09-12

    Surgical management of breast cancer has evolved considerably over the last two decades. There has been a major shift toward less-invasive local treatments, from radical mastectomy to breast-conserving therapy (BCT) and oncoplastic breast surgery (OBS). In order to investigate the efficacy of each of the three abovementioned methods, a literature review was conducted for measurable outcomes including local recurrence, survival, cosmetic outcome, quality of life (QOL), and health economy. From the point of view of oncological result, there is no difference between mastectomy and BCT in local recurrence rate and survival. Long-term results for OBS are not available. The items assessed in the QOL sound a better score for OBS in comparison with mastectomy or BCT. OBS is also associated with a better cosmetic outcome. Although having low income seems to be associated with lower BCT and OBS utilization, prognosis of breast cancer is worse in these women as well. Thus, health economy is the matter that should be studied seriously. OBS is an innovative, progressive, and complicated subspeciality that lacks published randomized clinical trials comparing surgical techniques and objective measures of outcome, especially from oncologic and health economy points of view.

  16. Radiation Therapy Did Not Induce Long-Term Changes in Rectal Mucosa: Results From the Randomized Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group 7 Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slagsvold, Jens Erik, E-mail: Jens.Erik.Slagsvold@stolav.no [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Viset, Trond [Department of Pathology, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Wibe, Arne [Institute of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Department of Surgery, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); Kaasa, Stein [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); European Palliative Care Research Center, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway); Widmark, Anders [Department of Radiation Sciences, Cancercentrum, Umeå (Sweden); Lund, Jo-Åsmund [Cancer Clinic, St. Olavs Hospital, Trondheim University Hospital, Trondheim (Norway); European Palliative Care Research Center, Department of Cancer Research and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Trondheim (Norway)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate long-term changes in the rectal mucosa after curative external beam radiation therapy in the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Materials: In the Scandinavian Prostate Cancer Group 7 trial, 880 men with locally advanced prostate cancer were randomized to hormonal therapy alone versus hormonal therapy plus radiation therapy to 70 Gy. A subcohort from this trial being randomized at our center (n=178) was invited to a study on late anorectal side effects during 2003-2005, approximately 5 years after treatment, including measuring health-reported quality of life and physician-assessed toxicity score by the Late Effects Normal Tissue Task Force/Subjective, Objective, Management, Analytic (LENT/SOMA) and European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer/Radiation Therapy Oncology Group score. Sixty-seven patients had a rectal mucosa biopsy. Sixty-four biopsies were included in the final analysis, of which 33 patients were randomized to hormonal treatment and 31 to hormonal treatment plus radiation therapy. The presence of fibrosis, number of capillaries, and lymphocyte infiltration was then evaluated by light microscopy. Results: The group receiving radiation therapy had significantly higher LENT/SOMA and function/bother scale scores than the group that only received hormonal treatment, but there was no significant difference in the presence of fibrosis, ectasia, number of capillaries in the lamina propria, or lymphocyte infiltration between the groups. Conclusion: Radiation therapy to 70 Gy to the prostate does not induce long-term microscopic mucosal changes in the rectum 5 years after treatment. This is in contrast to the general assumption that structural changes, including fibrosis, seen after radiation therapy include the mucosa. We speculate that the main late effects of radiation therapy on the structure of the rectum are located in the deeper layers of the rectal wall than the mucosa.

  17. Sequential Assessments of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group Performance Scale Enhance Prognostic Value in Patients With Terminally Ill Cancer Receiving Palliative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Meng-Ting; Liu, Chien-Ting; Hung, Yu-Shin; Kao, Chen-Yi; Chang, Pei-Hung; Yeh, Kun-Yun; Wang, Hung-Ming; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chou, Wen-Chi

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to assess the utility of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) performance scale assessments on days 1 and 8 of palliative care, as well as scale change between these assessments, as prognostic tools for patients with terminally ill cancer. A total of 2392 patients with terminally ill cancer who received palliative care between January 2006 and December 2011 at a single medical center were analyzed. Our study showed that the ECOG scale is a useful prognostic tool to predict life expectancy in patients with terminally ill cancer. The ECOG scale assessments at different time points under palliative care were independent predictors for overall survival. The combined ECOG scale assessments on days 1 and 8 predicted survival more precisely than using day 1 ECOG scale assessment alone. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Group-Wide, Prospective Study of Ototoxicity Assessment in Children Receiving Cisplatin Chemotherapy (ACCL05C1): A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Kristin R; Chen, Lu; Freyer, David; Aplenc, Richard; Bancroft, Mary; Bliss, Bonnie; Dang, Ha; Gillmeister, Biljana; Hendershot, Eleanor; Kraemer, Dale F; Lindenfeld, Lanie; Meza, Jane; Neuwelt, Edward A; Pollock, Brad H; Sung, Lillian

    2017-02-01

    Purpose Optimal assessment methods and criteria for reporting hearing outcomes in children who receive treatment with cisplatin are uncertain. The objectives of our study were to compare different ototoxicity classification systems, to evaluate the feasibility of including otoacoustic emissions and extended high frequency audiometry, and to evaluate a central review mechanism for audiologic results for cisplatin-treated children in the cooperative group setting. Patients and Methods Eligible participants were 1 to 30 years, with planned cisplatin-containing treatment. Hearing evaluations were conducted at baseline, before each cisplatin cycle, and at the end of therapy. Audiologic results were assessed and graded by the testing audiologist and by two central review audiologists using the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Ototoxicity Criteria (ASHA), Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events, version 3.0 (CTCAE), and Brock Ototoxicity Grades (Brock). One central reviewer also used the Society for Industrial and Organizational Psychology Ototoxicity Scale (SIOP). Results At the end of treatment, the prevalence of any degree of ototoxicity ranged from 40% to 56%, and severe ototoxicity ranged from 7% to 22%. Compared with CTCAE, SIOP detected significantly more ototoxicity ( P = .004), whereas Brock criteria detected significantly fewer patients with any or severe ototoxicity ( P < .001 for both). SIOP detected ototoxicity earlier than did the other scales. Agreement between the central reviewers and the institutional audiologist was almost perfect for ASHA and Brock, whereas the poorest agreement occurred with CTCAE. Conclusion The SIOP scale may be superior to ASHA, Brock, and CTCAE scales for classifying ototoxicity in pediatric patients who were treated with cisplatin. Future studies should evaluate inter-rater reliability of the SIOP scale.

  19. [Relapse prevention group therapy for paedophiles: French adaptation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J; Petibon, C

    2005-01-01

    Psychotherapy for sex offenders has only very recently started to develop in France. The French law on compulsory treatment for sex offenders was voted in 1998, and many mental health practitioners are not trained to treat such patients yet. In our ambulatory forensic consultation, sex offenders have been treated since 1992 and group psychotherapy has been offered to them since 1994. Our first therapeutic models were the North-American behavioural-cognitive therapy and Pithers' relapse prevention model. Behavioural-cognitive theory describes paedophilia as an acquired sexual preference maintained by positive reinforcement. Pithers (1990) considered that relapse only occurs in high-risk situations, and that high-risk situations always come after offence precursors. In North America, relapse prevention consists in helping paedophiles spot their high-risk situations and offence precursors, and enhance their skills to cope with such situations or to prevent them. Therapy programs were developed according to these models, aiming to help offenders develop such skills, ie empathy, social skills, cognitive restructuring, self-esteem, etc. Trying to apply these therapy programs in France, our team quickly realised that we would have to adapt them to French culture. On the one hand, behavioural-cognitive theory did not seem satisfactory enough in explaining paedophilic behaviour and paedophilic preference. On the other hand, behavioural-cognitive therapy made patients into children too much and increased resistance. Therapy based on programs seemed too rigid for French patients and therapists, and we often felt we were working on an issue that would have been much more accurate to work on a few sessions earlier, when this issue was spontaneously brought up by a patient. We believe change occurs all the more as issues are worked on at the right moment for the patient. Moreover, on a cultural point of view, we also realised the use of programs in psychotherapy was difficult to

  20. [Galen's oncology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigliani, R

    1995-10-01

    "Claudius Galenus" is the Author of "De tumoribus praeter naturam". The book was studied on the original Greek text with Latin version edited by K.G. Kühn ("Opera omnia Claudii Galeni": VII, 705-732). This Galen's clinical and pathological oncology was examined as far as categorization, classification, morphology, etiology, pathogenesis, morphogenesis, topography, behaviour (with related therapeutic and prognostic implications) and terminology are concerned. Problems, aspects and concepts, more or less clarified by Galen, were extensively discussed with special reference to the Galen's scientific knowledge and compared with the modern oncology.

  1. Constipation in paediatric oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selwood, Karen

    2006-02-01

    Constipation is a common problem encountered by many children during treatment for childhood cancer. It can be distressing and impact on the quality of life for the child. However, the advice and information they and their families receive can vary enormously. The clinical practice group (a subgroup of the paediatric oncology nurses forum (PONF)) decided to examine the management of constipation throughout the paediatric oncology units in the UK. This paper presents the findings and the subsequent action taken and highlights the need for further work.

  2. Oncologic safety of breast conserving surgery after tumour downsizing by neoadjuvant therapy: a retrospective single centre cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzal, F; Riedl, O; Mittlböck, M; Dubsky, P; Bartsch, R; Steger, G; Jakesz, R; Gnant, M

    2011-05-01

    The objective of this study is to analyse local recurrence rates in patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy (nCT) comparing mastecomized (MX) patients with those undergoing breast conserving therapy (BCT). Patients undergoing breast cancer surgery after nCT (3xCMF or 3-6xED) between 1995 and 2007 at our department were retrospectively analysed. The median follow up was 60 months for 308 patients. Patients who were downsized from MX to BCT with partial or complete response (n = 104) had a similar local recurrence free survival (LRFS) compared to patients who did not experience successful downsizing (n = 67) and finally undergoing MX (LRFS MX-BCT 81% vs. MX-MX 91%; P = 0.79). Uni- and multivariate analyses demonstrated that BCT itself was not an independent prognostic factor for a worse LRFS (P = 0.07 and 0.14). After no pathologic change or progressive disease the risk of local recurrence was increased in patients undergoing BCT (MX-BCT; n = 6 LRFS 66%) compared with MX (n = 44; LRFS 90%; P = 0.04). Overall survival in general was better for the BCT group (n = 197) compared with MX group (n = 111) regardless of clinical response (92% vs. 72%; P downsizing by nCT in patients primarily scheduled for mastectomy. These patients, however, should not be treated with breast conservation in the absence of any proven response after nCT.

  3. Feasibility and safety of en bloc resection for primary spine tumors: a systematic review by the Spine Oncology Study Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Tomasato; McLoughlin, Gregory S; Patel, Shreyaskuma; Rhines, Laurence D; Fourney, Daryl R

    2009-10-15

    Systematic review. To determine the general feasibility and safety of en bloc resection for primary spine tumors by analyzing (1) the effect of incisional biopsy performed before definitive en bloc resection and (2) the rate of achievement of disease-free margins, morbidity, mortality, and health resource utilization. The feasibility of en bloc resection is determined by careful surgical and oncologic staging, and a key step in this process is obtaining a tissue diagnosis. There is currently good evidence to support the premise that the best chance for surgical cure in primary tumors of the spine is by en bloc resection with disease-free margins; however, the early morbidity of these procedures begs the question of whether they are justified. A formal systematic review with search of MEDLINE, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews databases was undertaken. Included reports described patients with low grade malignant spine tumors, the method of staging and surgical resection, and the complications. Two blinded, independent reviewers used a standardized study selection worksheet. About 89 articles were identified, with 8 selected after excluding small case series and studies that included other pathologies (e.g., metastatic disease). Weinstein, Boriani, Biagini staging accurately predicted the attainment of wide or marginal en bloc resection in 88% of cases. There was a clear increase in tumor recurrence when intralesional procedures were performed before the definitive en bloc resection. Tumor recurrence significantly shortened patient survival. Surgical complication rates ranged from 13% to 56% and mortality ranged from 0% to 7.7%. (1) Incisional biopsy or intralesional resection significantly increases the risk of local recurrence, therefore, transcutaneous computed tomography-guided trocar biopsy is recommended. When there is a suspicion of primary spine tumor, the surgeon who performs the definitive surgery should ideally perform or direct the

  4. American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline: Update on Adjuvant Endocrine Therapy for Women With Hormone Receptor–Positive Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burstein, Harold J.; Prestrud, Ann Alexis; Seidenfeld, Jerome; Anderson, Holly; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Davidson, Nancy E.; Gelmon, Karen E.; Giordano, Sharon H.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Malin, Jennifer; Mamounas, Eleftherios P.; Rowden, Diana; Solky, Alexander J.; Sowers, MaryFran R.; Stearns, Vered; Winer, Eric P.; Somerfield, Mark R.; Griggs, Jennifer J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To develop evidence-based guidelines, based on a systematic review, for endocrine therapy for postmenopausal women with hormone receptor–positive breast cancer. Methods A literature search identified relevant randomized trials. Databases searched included MEDLINE, PREMEDLINE, the Cochrane Collaboration Library, and those for the Annual Meetings of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and the San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium (SABCS). The primary outcomes of interest were disease-free survival, overall survival, and time to contralateral breast cancer. Secondary outcomes included adverse events and quality of life. An expert panel reviewed the literature, especially 12 major trials, and developed updated recommendations. Results An adjuvant treatment strategy incorporating an aromatase inhibitor (AI) as primary (initial endocrine therapy), sequential (using both tamoxifen and an AI in either order), or extended (AI after 5 years of tamoxifen) therapy reduces the risk of breast cancer recurrence compared with 5 years of tamoxifen alone. Data suggest that including an AI as primary monotherapy or as sequential treatment after 2 to 3 years of tamoxifen yields similar outcomes. Tamoxifen and AIs differ in their adverse effect profiles, and these differences may inform treatment preferences. Conclusion The Update Committee recommends that postmenopausal women with hormone receptor–positive breast cancer consider incorporating AI therapy at some point during adjuvant treatment, either as up-front therapy or as sequential treatment after tamoxifen. The optimal timing and duration of endocrine treatment remain unresolved. The Update Committee supports careful consideration of adverse effect profiles and patient preferences in deciding whether and when to incorporate AI therapy. PMID:20625130

  5. Nanomedicine in veterinary oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Tzu-Yin; Rodriguez, Carlos O; Li, Yuanpei

    2015-08-01

    Nanomedicine is an interdisciplinary field that combines medicine, engineering, chemistry, biology and material sciences to improve disease management and can be especially valuable in oncology. Nanoparticle-based agents that possess functions such as tumor targeting, imaging and therapy are currently under intensive investigation. This review introduces the basic concept of nanomedicine and the classification of nanoparticles. Because of their favorable pharmacokinetics, tumor targeting properties, and resulting superior efficacy and toxicity profiles, nanoparticle-based agents can overcome several limitations associated with conventional diagnostic and therapeutic protocols in veterinary oncology. The two most important tumor targeting mechanisms (passive and active tumor targeting) and their dominating factors (i.e. shape, charge, size and nanoparticle surface display) are discussed. The review summarizes published clinical and preclinical studies that utilize different nanoformulations in veterinary oncology, as well as the application of nanoparticles for cancer diagnosis and imaging. The toxicology of various nanoformulations is also considered. Given the benefits of nanoformulations demonstrated in human medicine, nanoformulated drugs are likely to gain more traction in veterinary oncology. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Results of high-risk neutropenia therapy of hematology-oncology patients in a university hospital in Uruguay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Boada Burutaran

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Febrile neutropenia is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in hematology-oncology patients undergoing chemotherapy. The management of febrile neutropenia is typically algorithm-driven. The aim of this study was to assess the results of a standardized protocol for the treatment of febrile neutropenia. Methods: A retrospective cohort study (2011-2012 was conducted of patients with high-risk neutropenia in a hematology-oncology service. Results: Forty-four episodes of 17 patients with a median age of 48 years (range: 18-78 years were included. The incidence of febrile neutropenia was 61.4%. The presence of febrile neutropenia was associated with both the duration and severity of neutropenia. Microbiological agents were isolated from different sources in 59.3% of the episodes with bacteremia iso- lated from blood being the most prevalent (81.3%. Multiple drug-resistant gram-negative bacilli were isolated in 62.5% of all microbiologically documented infections. Treatment of 63% of the episodes in which the initial treatment was piperacillin/tazobactam needed to be escalated to meropenem. The mortality rate due to febrile neutropenia episodes was 18.5%. Conclusion: The high rate of gram-negative bacilli resistant to piperacillin/tazobactam (frontline antibiotics in our protocol and the early need to escalate to carbapenems raises the question as to whether it is necessary to change the current protocol.

  7. Selection of oncology medicines in low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazargani, Y T; de Boer, A; Schellens, J H M; Leufkens, H G M; Mantel-Teeuwisse, A K

    2014-01-01

    High cancer mortality rates in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) have raised concerns regarding access to oncology medicines. Essential medicines are those which satisfy the primary health care needs and provide a basis for public procurement or reimbursement decisions in LMICs. We explored selection of oncology medicines in LMICs through investigating national essential medicines lists (NEMLs) for cancer treatments. Recently updated NEMLs were retrieved for 76 countries. Oncology medicines were classified based on therapeutic categories. Countries were clustered based on geographic regions, income levels and burden of cancer (mortality and morbidity). Indicators of frequency (number of medicines), diversity (number of therapeutic (sub)categories) and more importantly absence were measured and compared across countries using parametric and nonparametric tests. The overall median number of oncology medicines on NEMLs was 16 (interquartile range = 23) chosen predominantly from subcategories of 'antineoplastic agents', with substantial variation across regions and income groups. Five countries did not select any oncology medicine and 68% did not have any 'hormones and related agents' on their NEMLs. Newer technologies like targeted therapies were infrequently incorporated. The cluster of countries suffering most from the burden of cancer selected more essential oncology medicines and diversified further. The observed selection of oncology essential medicines can reflect insufficiencies and inequalities in access to cancer treatments at least in the public sector of LMICs. Further resources need to be allocated from governments and international organizations to tackle the problem of access to oncology medicines in these countries.

  8. The Effects of Therapist Gender on Group Therapy for Eating-Disordered Clients

    OpenAIRE

    Soutor, Todd A.

    1995-01-01

    This present study examined the session-by-session content of group therapy for eating-disordered clients. The main objective of this study was to identify how therapist-client gender match affects group therapy process , regarding the disclosure of important issues relevant to eating-disordered clients. It was hypothesized that the group therapy process for eating-disordered clients would be qualitatively different if therapy was facilitated by a female as opposed to a male therapist. The ev...

  9. Group education sessions and compliance with nasal CPAP therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Likar, L L; Panciera, T M; Erickson, A D; Rounds, S

    1997-05-01

    To determine an effective means of improving compliance with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Retrospective chart review. An outpatient clinic at a Veterans Affairs Medical Center. Seventy-three patients with OSA. Hour meters on CPAP machines provided documentation of nightly machine use. A 2-h group CPAP clinic, scheduled every 6 months, provided education, support, symptom treatment, and equipment monitoring for all CPAP patients. Twenty-five patients had hour meter readings taken at their first CPAP clinic. In these patients, nightly CPAP use increased from 5.2 +/- 0.6 to 6.3 +/- 0.6 h per night after attendance at one CPAP clinic (p CPAP use increased from 5.2 +/- 0.5 before CPAP clinic to 6.3 +/- 0.6 h per night after attendance at all subsequent CPAP clinics for 34 patients (p CPAP use by at least 2 h, while only 6% decreased by > or = 2 h (p CPAP use prior to CPAP clinic compared to patients not receiving oxygen (p CPAP therapy provided a simple and effective means of improving treatment of OSA.

  10. Impact of histology and surgical approach on survival among women with early-stage, high-grade uterine cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group ancillary analysis ✩

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fader, Amanda N.; Java, James; Tenney, Meaghan; Ricci, Stephanie; Gunderson, Camille C.; Temkin, Sarah M.; Spirtos, Nick; Kushnir, Christina L.; Pearl, Michael L.; Zivanovic, Oliver; Tewari, Krishnansu S.; O'Malley, David; Hartenbach, Ellen M.; Hamilton, Chad A.; Gould, Natalie S.; Mannel, Robert S.; Rodgers, William; Walker, Joan L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We sought to analyze the clinicopathologic features, recurrence patterns and survival outcomes of women with high-grade uterine cancer (UC) enrolled on The Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) LAP2 trial. Methods This is a post-hoc analysis of LAP-2 patients with grade 3 endometrioid adenocarcinoma (ENDO), uterine serous (USC), clear cell (CC) and carcinosarcoma (CS). Demographics, clinicopathologic features, and recurrence patterns, were compared by histology and surgical approach. Progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were estimated using the Kaplan-Meier method. Results Of the 2600 patients enrolled in LAP-2, 753 patients had high-grade UC: 350 had ENDO, 289 had USC, 42 had CC and 72 had CS. Compared with the ENDO cohort, those with other high-grade subtypes were older (p cytology (p < 0.001), positive lymph nodes (p = 0.05) and higher disease stage on final pathology (p < 0.001). With a median follow-up time of 60 months, compared to patients with ENDO, those with USC, CCC and CS subtypes had higher recurrence rates (p < 0.001), extra-pelvic recurrences (p < 0.001) and poorer PFS (p < 0.001) and OS (p < 0.001). Those diagnosed with USC and CS experienced the worst survival outcomes (p = 0.003). Patterns of recurrence and survival were not different in those staged with LSC vs LAP. On multivariable analysis, age, stage, pelvic washings and Type II histology were independently and adversely associated with survival. Conclusions Women with apparent early-stage, USC and CS histologies have poorer outcomes than women with grade 3 endometrioid adenocarcinoma. Patterns of recurrence and survival were not impacted by surgical approach. PMID:27743738

  11. Group physical therapy during inpatient rehabilitation for acute spinal cord injury: findings from the SCIRehab Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanca, Jeanne M; Natale, Audrey; Labarbera, Jacqueline; Schroeder, Sally Taylor; Gassaway, Julie; Backus, Deborah

    2011-12-01

    Inpatient rehabilitation for spinal cord injury (SCI) includes the use of both individual and group physical therapy sessions. A greater understanding of group physical therapy use will help in the evaluation of the appropriateness of its use and contribute to the development of standards of practice. This report describes the extent to which group physical therapy is being used in inpatient rehabilitation for SCI, identifies group physical therapy interventions being delivered, and examines patterns in the types of activities being used for people with different levels and completeness of injury (ie, injury groups). The SCIRehab Study is a 5-year, multicenter investigation that uses practice-based evidence research methodology. Data on characteristics of participants and treatments provided were collected through detailed chart review and customized research documentation completed by clinicians at the point of care. The analyses described here included data from 600 participants enrolled during the first year of the project. Most of the participants (549/600) spent time in group physical therapy, and 23% of all documented physical therapy time was spent in group sessions. The most common group physical therapy activities were strengthening, manual wheelchair mobility, gait training, endurance activities, and range of motion/stretching. Time spent in group physical therapy and the nature of activities performed varied among the injury groups. Physical therapy use patterns observed in the 6 participating centers may not represent all facilities providing inpatient rehabilitation for SCI. Research documentation did not include all factors that may affect group physical therapy use, and some sessions were not documented. The majority of physical therapy was provided in individual sessions, but group physical therapy contributed significantly to total physical therapy time. Group physical therapy time and activities differed among the injury groups in patterns

  12. Treatment of relapsed precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia with intensive chemotherapy: POG (Pediatric Oncology Group) study 9411 (SIMAL 9).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Michael E; Lu, Xiaomin; Devidas, Meenakshi; Camitta, Bruce; Abshire, Thomas; Bernstein, Mark L; Billett, Amy; Homans, Alan; Sandler, Eric; Buchanan, George

    2013-10-01

    Pediatric patients who experience a bone marrow relapse of precursor-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia are cured <50% of the time. This study was designed to determine if intensification of therapies with known activity in this disease would improve the cure rates for patients with relapsed acute lymphoblastic leukemia. Patients were treated with intensive asparaginase during induction followed by repeated cycles of ifosfamide/etoposide and cytarabine/idarubicin. Patients with well-matched related donors were encouraged to undergo hematopoietic stem cell transplant as consolidation. The results of this study demonstrate no significant difference in disease-free survival in patients who received chemotherapy alone (45%) or chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplant (50%). Furthermore, results from this study show no significant difference in event-free survival (39.9%±6.2%) or overall survival (41.6%±6.1%) at 8 years when compared with previous studies using less intensive regimens. Our results suggest that alternative therapies are needed to improve cure rates for pediatric patients with relapsed leukemia.

  13. Phonological/Traditional Approaches to Articulation Therapy: A Retrospective Group Comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Edward S.

    1996-01-01

    A study of 36 children (ages 3-5) compared traditional and phonological treatment of 36 children with multiple articulation disorders. Results found that the response of children in the traditional therapy group was substantially inferior; the children in the phonological therapy group showed more improvement with fewer therapy sessions. (CR)

  14. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy as Treatments for Academic Procrastination: A Randomized Controlled Group Session

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shuo; Zhou, Ya; Yu, Shi; Ran, Li-Wen; Liu, Xiang-Ping; Chen, Yu-Fei

    2017-01-01

    Objective: This study tested the efficacy of Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT), compared with Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy (CBT), in alleviating academic procrastination. Method: A total of 60 (53.3% male) undergraduates suffering from academic procrastination were randomly assigned to two treatment groups (ACT and CBT) and a control group.…

  15. Molecular imaging in oncology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schober, Otmar; Riemann, Burkhard (eds.) [Universitaetsklinikum Muenster (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin

    2013-02-01

    Considers in detail all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. Examines technological issues and probe design. Discusses preclinical studies in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. Presents current clinical use of PET/CT, SPECT/CT, and optical imagingWritten by acknowledged experts. The impact of molecular imaging on diagnostics, therapy, and follow-up in oncology is increasing significantly. The process of molecular imaging includes key biotarget identification, design of specific molecular imaging probes, and their preclinical evaluation, e.g., in vivo using small animal studies. A multitude of such innovative molecular imaging probes have already entered clinical diagnostics in oncology. There is no doubt that in future the emphasis will be on multimodality imaging in which morphological, functional, and molecular imaging techniques are combined in a single clinical investigation that will optimize diagnostic processes. This handbook addresses all aspects of molecular imaging in oncology, ranging from basic research to clinical applications in the era of evidence-based medicine. The first section is devoted to technology and probe design, and examines a variety of PET and SPECT tracers as well as multimodality probes. Preclinical studies are then discussed in detail, with particular attention to multimodality imaging. In the third section, diverse clinical applications are presented, and the book closes by looking at future challenges. This handbook will be of value to all who are interested in the revolution in diagnostic oncology that is being brought about by molecular imaging.

  16. Group Metacognitive Therapy vs. Mindfulness Meditation Therapy in a Transdiagnostic Patient Sample: A Randomised Feasibility Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capobianco, Lora; Reeves, David; Morrison, Anthony P; Wells, Adrian

    2018-01-01

    Two transdiagnostic therapies for treating psychological disorder are Metacognitive Therapy (MCT) and Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction (MBSR). These two approaches have yet to be compared and therefore the current study aimed to evaluate the feasibility of a study of group MCT and MBSR in treating anxiety and depression. A feasibility trial with 40 participants (aged 19-56) was conducted. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either eight weeks of group MCT or MBSR. The primary outcome was feasibility which included recruitment rates, retention and treatment acceptability. The primary symptom outcome was the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) total score, which provided an overall measure of distress. Both treatments were found to be acceptable with low attrition and similar ratings of acceptability. Changes in outcomes were analyzed based on the intention-to-treat principle using mixed effect models. Preliminary analyses revealed that MCT was more effective in treating anxiety and depression in comparison to MBSR, and in reducing both positive and negative metacognitive beliefs. Reliable improvement rates favoured MCT at post-treatment and 6-month follow up. Both treatments appeared to be feasible and acceptable in treating transdiagnostic samples; however, a larger, definitive trial is required. The limitations and directions for future research are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A phase 2 evaluation of irofulven as second-line treatment of recurrent or persistent intermediately platinum-sensitive ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer: a Gynecologic Oncology Group trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, Russell J; Blessing, John A; Shahin, Mark S; Miller, David S; Tewari, Krishnansu Sujata; Muller, Carolyn Y; Warshal, David P; McMeekin, Scott; Rotmensch, Jacob

    2010-10-01

    This multicenter phase 2 trial was conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group to evaluate the activity and the safety of irofulven in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Eligible patients had documented recurrent ovarian cancer 6 to 12 months after receiving a front-line platinum-based regimen and no other chemotherapy. Patients were required to have measurable disease, performance status of 0 to 2, and adequate bone marrow, hepatic, and renal functions before study entry. The dose of irofulven was 0.45 mg/kg intravenously on days 1 and 8 every 21 days. Responses were defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors. Fifty-five of 61 enrolled patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. There were 7 partial responses (12.7%), and 30 patients (54.6%) had stable disease. Median progression-free and overall survival were 6.4 months (1.3-37.5 months) and 22.1 months or more (2.8-57.8+ months), respectively. Patients received a median of 3 cycles (range, 1-21) of protocol therapy. Grade 4 hematologic toxicity was limited to reversible neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Grade 4 nonhematologic toxicity was limited to one patient with anorexia and another with hypomagnesemia. Irofulven administered at this dose and schedule was well tolerated but had modest activity as a single agent.

  18. A phase II evaluation of Irofulven (IND#55804, NSC#683863) as second-line treatment of recurrent or persistent intermediately platinum-sensitive ovarian or primary peritoneal cancer: A Gynecologic Oncology Group trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilder, Russell J.; Blessing, John A.; Shahin, Mark S.; Miller, David S; Tewari, Krishnansu Sujata; Muller, Carolyn Y.; Warshal, David; McMeekin, D. Scott; Rotmensch, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    This multi-center phase II trial was conducted by the Gynecologic Oncology Group to evaluate the activity and safety of irofulven in patients with recurrent epithelial ovarian cancer. Eligible patients had documented recurrent ovarian cancer 6-12 months after receiving a front-line platinum-based regimen and no other chemotherapy. Patients were required to have measurable disease, performance status of 0-2, and adequate bone marrow, hepatic, and renal function prior to study entry. The dose of irofulven was 0.45 mg/kg IV on days 1 and 8 every 21 days. Responses were defined by RECIST. Fifty-five of 61 enrolled patients were evaluable for response and toxicity. There were seven partial responses (12.7%) and 30 patients (54.6%) had stable disease. Median progression-free and overall survival were 6.4 mo (1.3-37.5) and 22.1+ mo (2.8-57.8+), respectively. Patients received a median of three cycles (range 1-21) of protocol therapy. Grade 4 hematologic toxicity was limited to reversible neutropenia and thrombocytopenia. Grade 4 non-hematologic toxicity was limited to one patient with anorexia and another with hypomagnesemia. Irofulven administered at this dose and schedule was well tolerated but had modest activity as a single agent. PMID:21495215

  19. The report of Task Group 100 of the AAPM: Application of risk analysis methods to radiation therapy quality management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, M Saiful; Fraass, Benedick A; Dunscombe, Peter B; Gibbons, John P; Ibbott, Geoffrey S; Mundt, Arno J; Mutic, Sasa; Palta, Jatinder R; Rath, Frank; Thomadsen, Bruce R; Williamson, Jeffrey F; Yorke, Ellen D

    2016-07-01

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery challenges traditional prescriptive quality management (QM) methods, such as many of those included in guidelines published by organizations such as the AAPM, ASTRO, ACR, ESTRO, and IAEA. These prescriptive guidelines have traditionally focused on monitoring all aspects of the functional performance of radiotherapy (RT) equipment by comparing parameters against tolerances set at strict but achievable values. Many errors that occur in radiation oncology are not due to failures in devices and software; rather they are failures in workflow and process. A systematic understanding of the likelihood and clinical impact of possible failures throughout a course of radiotherapy is needed to direct limit QM resources efficiently to produce maximum safety and quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and has developed a framework for designing QM activities, based on estimates of the probability of identified failures and their clinical outcome through the RT planning and delivery process. The Task Group has chosen a specific radiotherapy process required for "intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)" as a case study. The goal of this work is to apply modern risk-based analysis techniques to this complex RT process in order to demonstrate to the RT community that such techniques may help identify more effective and efficient ways to enhance the safety and quality of our treatment processes. The task group generated by consensus an example quality management program strategy for the IMRT process performed at the institution of one of the authors. This report describes the methodology and nomenclature developed, presents the process maps, FMEAs, fault trees, and QM programs developed, and makes suggestions on how this information could be used in the clinic. The development and implementation of risk-assessment techniques will make radiation therapy

  20. The report of Task Group 100 of the AAPM: Application of risk analysis methods to radiation therapy quality management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huq, M. Saiful; Fraass, Benedick A.; Dunscombe, Peter B.; Gibbons, John P.; Mundt, Arno J.; Mutic, Sasa; Palta, Jatinder R.; Rath, Frank; Thomadsen, Bruce R.; Williamson, Jeffrey F.; Yorke, Ellen D.

    2016-01-01

    The increasing complexity of modern radiation therapy planning and delivery challenges traditional prescriptive quality management (QM) methods, such as many of those included in guidelines published by organizations such as the AAPM, ASTRO, ACR, ESTRO, and IAEA. These prescriptive guidelines have traditionally focused on monitoring all aspects of the functional performance of radiotherapy (RT) equipment by comparing parameters against tolerances set at strict but achievable values. Many errors that occur in radiation oncology are not due to failures in devices and software; rather they are failures in workflow and process. A systematic understanding of the likelihood and clinical impact of possible failures throughout a course of radiotherapy is needed to direct limit QM resources efficiently to produce maximum safety and quality of patient care. Task Group 100 of the AAPM has taken a broad view of these issues and has developed a framework for designing QM activities, based on estimates of the probability of identified failures and their clinical outcome through the RT planning and delivery process. The Task Group has chosen a specific radiotherapy process required for “intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT)” as a case study. The goal of this work is to apply modern risk-based analysis techniques to this complex RT process in order to demonstrate to the RT community that such techniques may help identify more effective and efficient ways to enhance the safety and quality of our treatment processes. The task group generated by consensus an example quality management program strategy for the IMRT process performed at the institution of one of the authors. This report describes the methodology and nomenclature developed, presents the process maps, FMEAs, fault trees, and QM programs developed, and makes suggestions on how this information could be used in the clinic. The development and implementation of risk-assessment techniques will make radiation

  1. Local Control With Reduced-Dose Radiotherapy for Low-Risk Rhabdomyosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group D9602 Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breneman, John, E-mail: john.breneman@uchealth.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Cincinnati and Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH (United States); Meza, Jane [Department of Biostatistics, University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Public Health, Omaha, NE (United States); Donaldson, Sarah S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA (United States); Raney, R. Beverly [Children' s Cancer Hospital and Division of Pediatrics, University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Children' s Ambulatory Blood and Cancer Center, Dell Children' s Medical Center of Central Texas, Austin, TX (United States); Wolden, Suzanne [Department of Radiation Oncology, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, NY (United States); Michalski, Jeff [Department of Radiation Oncology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO (United States); Laurie, Fran [Quality Assurance Review Center, Lincoln, RI (United States); Rodeberg, David A. [Department of Surgery, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC (United States); Meyer, William [Section of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, OK (United States); Walterhouse, David [Division of Hematology/Oncology, Children' s Memorial Medical Center, Chicago, IL (United States); Hawkins, Douglas S. [Department of Pediatrics, Seattle Children' s Hospital, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To analyze the effect of reduced-dose radiotherapy on local control in children with low-risk rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) treated in the Children's Oncology Group D9602 study. Methods and Materials: Patients with low-risk RMS were nonrandomly assigned to receive radiotherapy doses dependent on the completeness of surgical resection of the primary tumor (clinical group) and the presence of involved regional lymph nodes. After resection, most patients with microscopic residual and uninvolved nodes received 36 Gy, those with involved nodes received 41.4 to 50.4 Gy, and those with orbital primary tumors received 45 Gy. All patients received vincristine and dactinomycin, with cyclophosphamide added for patient subsets with a higher risk of relapse in Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV studies. Results: Three hundred forty-two patients were eligible for analysis; 172 received radiotherapy as part of their treatment. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 15% in patients with microscopic involved margins when cyclophosphamide was not part of the treatment regimen and 0% when cyclophosphamide was included. The cumulative incidence of local/regional failure was 14% in patients with orbital tumors. Protocol-specified omission of radiotherapy in girls with Group IIA vaginal tumors (n = 5) resulted in three failures for this group. Conclusions: In comparison with Intergroup Rhabdomyosarcoma Study Group III and IV results, reduced-dose radiotherapy does not compromise local control for patients with microscopic tumor after surgical resection or with orbital primary tumors when cyclophosphamide is added to the treatment program. Girls with unresected nonbladder genitourinary tumors require radiotherapy for postsurgical residual tumor for optimal local control to be achieved.

  2. Vectors for inhaled gene therapy in lung cancer. Application for nano oncology and safety of bio nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarogouldis, Paul; Karamanos, Nikos K; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Domvri, Kalliopi; Huang, Haidong; Hohenforst-Schimdt, Wolfgang; Goldberg, Eugene P; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2012-01-01

    Novel aerosol therapeutic modalities have been investigated for lung cancer. Inhaled gene therapy has presented safety and effectiveness previously in cystic fibrosis. However, safety concerns have been raised regarding the safety of non-viral vectors for inhaled gene therapy in lung cancer, and therefore small steps have been made towards this multifunctional treatment modality. During the last decade, numerous new nanocomplexes have been created and investigated as a safe gene delivery nano-vehicle. These formulations are multifunctional; they can be used as either local therapy or carrier for an effective inhaled gene therapy for lung cancer. Herein, we present current and future perspectives of nanocomplexes for inhaled gene therapy treatment in lung cancer.

  3. Predictors of Radiation Therapy–Related Gastrointestinal Toxicity From Anal Cancer Dose-Painted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy: Secondary Analysis of NRG Oncology RTOG 0529

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, Jeffrey R., E-mail: Jeffrey.R.Olsen@ucdenver.edu [University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Moughan, Jennifer [NRG Oncology Statistics and Data Management Center, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Myerson, Robert [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Abitbol, Andre [Baptist Hospital of Miami, Miami, Florida (United States); Doncals, Desiree E. [Summa Akron City Hospital accruals for Akron City Hospital, Akron, Ohio (United States); Johnson, Douglas [Florida Radiation Oncology Group–Baptist Regional, Jacksonville, Florida (United States); Schefter, Tracey E. [University of Colorado Denver, Aurora, Colorado (United States); Chen, Yuhchyau [University of Rochester Medical Center, Rochester, New York (United States); Fisher, Barbara [London Regional Cancer Program—University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario (Canada); Michalski, Jeff [Washington University, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Narayan, Samir [Michigan Cancer Research Consortium CCOP, Ann Arbor, Michigan (United States); Chang, Albert [University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California (United States); Crane, Christopher H. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York (United States); Kachnic, Lisa [Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee (United States)

    2017-06-01

    Purpose: NRG Oncology RTOG 0529 assessed the feasibility of dose-painted intensity modulated radiation therapy (DP-IMRT) to reduce the acute morbidity of chemoradiation with 5-fluorouracil (5FU) and mitomycin-C (MMC) for T2-4N0-3M0 anal cancer. This secondary analysis was performed to identify patient and treatment factors associated with acute and late gastrointestinal (GI) adverse events (AEs). Methods and Materials: NRG Oncology RTOG 0529 treatment plans were reviewed to extract dose-volume data for tightly contoured small bowel, loosely contoured anterior pelvic contents (APC), and uninvolved colon outside the target volume (UC). Univariate logistic regression was performed to evaluate association between volumes of each structure receiving doses ≥5 to 60 Gy (V5-V60) in 5-Gy increments between patients with and without grade ≥2 acute and late GI AEs, and grade ≥3 acute GI AEs. Additional patient and treatment factors were evaluated in multivariate logistic regression (acute AEs) or Cox proportional hazards models (late AEs). Results: Among 52 evaluable patients, grade ≥2 acute, grade ≥2 late, and grade ≥3 acute GI AEs were observed in 35, 17, and 10 patients, respectively. Trends (P<.05) toward statistically significant associations were observed between grade ≥2 acute GI AEs and small bowel dose (V20-V40), grade ≥2 late GI AEs and APC dose (V60), grade ≥3 acute GI AEs and APC dose (V5-V25), increasing age, tumor size >4 cm, and worse Zubrod performance status. Small bowel volumes of 186.0 cc, 155.0 cc, 41.0 cc, and 30.4 cc receiving doses greater than 25, 30, 35, and 40 Gy, respectively, correlated with increased risk of acute grade ≥2 GI AEs. Conclusions: Acute and late GI AEs from 5FU/MMC chemoradiation using DP-IMRT correlate with radiation dose to the small bowel and APC. Such associations will be incorporated in the dose-volume normal tissue constraint design for future NRG oncology anal cancer studies.

  4. Effect of p16 Status on the Quality-of-Life Experience During Chemoradiation for Locally Advanced Oropharyngeal Cancer: A Substudy of Randomized Trial Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) 02.02 (HeadSTART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringash, Jolie; Fisher, Richard; Peters, Lester; Trotti, Andy; O'Sullivan, Brian; Corry, June; Kenny, Lizbeth; Van Den Bogaert, Walter; Wratten, Chris; Rischin, Danny

    2017-03-15

    Human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal cancer (OPC) has a favorable prognosis. Current research de-escalates treatment, aiming to improve quality of life (QOL). Understanding the QOL experience with current standard treatment (chemoradiation therapy) provides context for emerging data. We report the impact of p16 status on QOL for patients with stage III or IV OPC undergoing chemoradiation therapy in an international phase 3 trial (TROG 02.02 [HeadSTART]). A subgroup analysis by p16 status was conducted in patients with OPC treated in a phase 3 randomized trial. The study subset with OPC and known p16 status was mainly from Australasia, Western Europe, and North America. Of 861 participants, 200 had OPC, known p16 status, and baseline QOL data; 82 were p16 negative and 118 were p16 positive. Radiation therapy (70 Gy over a period of 7 weeks) was given concurrently with 3 cycles of either cisplatin (100 mg/m2) or cisplatin (75 mg/m2) plus tirapazamine. QOL was measured with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Head and Neck (FACT-H&N) questionnaire at baseline and 2, 6, 12, 23, and 38 months. Because no significant difference in QOL score was observed between arms, results by p16 status are reported with arms combined. The p16-positive patients were younger, had a better Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status, and were less often current smokers. Our primary hypothesis that the change in FACT-H&N score from baseline to 6 months would be more favorable in the p16-positive cohort was not met (p16 positive, -6.3; p16 negative, -1.8; P=.14). The mean baseline FACT-H&N score was statistically and clinically significantly better in p16-positive patients (111 vs 102, P<.001); at 2 months, scores declined in both groups but more dramatically for p16-positive patients. By 12 months, p16-positive patients again had superior scores. A higher baseline FACT-H&N score and p16-positive status were independent predictors of overall survival

  5. Transitioning to Independence and Maintaining Research Careers in a New Funding Climate: American Society of Preventive Oncology Junior Members Interest Group Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jada G.; Birmingham, Wendy C.; Tehranifar, Parisa; Irwin, Melinda L.; Klein, William M. P.; Nebeling, Linda; Chubak, Jessica

    2013-01-01

    The American Society of Preventive Oncology (ASPO) is a professional society for multi-disciplinary investigators in cancer prevention and control. The ASPO Junior Members Interest Group promotes the interests of predoctoral, postdoctoral, and junior faculty members within the Society, and provides them with career development and training opportunities. To this end, as part of the 37th ASPO Annual Meeting held in Memphis, Tennessee in March 2013, the Junior Members Interest Group organized a session designed to address issues faced by early career investigators as they navigate the transition to become an independent, well-funded scientist with a sustainable program of research in the current climate of reduced and limited resources. Four speakers were invited to provide their complementary but distinct perspectives on this topic based on their personal experiences in academic, research-intensive positions and in federal funding agencies. This report summarizes the main themes that emerged from the speakers’ presentations and audience questions related to mentoring; obtaining grant funding; publishing; developing expertise; navigating appointments, promotion, and tenure; and balancing demands. These lessons can be used by early career investigators in cancer prevention and control as they transition to independence and build programs of fundable research. PMID:24190867

  6. Predictors of mother and child DNA yields in buccal cell samples collected in pediatric cancer epidemiologic studies: a report from the Children’s Oncology group

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Collection of high-quality DNA is essential for molecular epidemiology studies. Methods have been evaluated for optimal DNA collection in studies of adults; however, DNA collection in young children poses additional challenges. Here, we have evaluated predictors of DNA quantity in buccal cells collected for population-based studies of infant leukemia (N = 489 mothers and 392 children) and hepatoblastoma (HB; N = 446 mothers and 412 children) conducted through the Children’s Oncology Group. DNA samples were collected by mail using mouthwash (for mothers and some children) and buccal brush (for children) collection kits and quantified using quantitative real-time PCR. Multivariable linear regression models were used to identify predictors of DNA yield. Results Median DNA yield was higher for mothers in both studies compared with their children (14 μg vs. <1 μg). Significant predictors of DNA yield in children included case–control status (β = −0.69, 50% reduction, P = 0.01 for case vs. control children), brush collection type, and season of sample collection. Demographic factors were not strong predictors of DNA yield in mothers or children in this analysis. Conclusions The association with seasonality suggests that conditions during transport may influence DNA yield. The low yields observed in most children in these studies highlight the importance of developing alternative methods for DNA collection in younger age groups. PMID:23937514

  7. Predictors of mother and child DNA yields in buccal cell samples collected in pediatric cancer epidemiologic studies: a report from the Children's Oncology group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poynter, Jenny N; Ross, Julie A; Hooten, Anthony J; Langer, Erica; Blommer, Crystal; Spector, Logan G

    2013-08-12

    Collection of high-quality DNA is essential for molecular epidemiology studies. Methods have been evaluated for optimal DNA collection in studies of adults; however, DNA collection in young children poses additional challenges. Here, we have evaluated predictors of DNA quantity in buccal cells collected for population-based studies of infant leukemia (N = 489 mothers and 392 children) and hepatoblastoma (HB; N = 446 mothers and 412 children) conducted through the Children's Oncology Group. DNA samples were collected by mail using mouthwash (for mothers and some children) and buccal brush (for children) collection kits and quantified using quantitative real-time PCR. Multivariable linear regression models were used to identify predictors of DNA yield. Median DNA yield was higher for mothers in both studies compared with their children (14 μg vs. mothers or children in this analysis. The association with seasonality suggests that conditions during transport may influence DNA yield. The low yields observed in most children in these studies highlight the importance of developing alternative methods for DNA collection in younger age groups.

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals in the elderly cancer patient: Practical considerations, with a focus on prostate cancer therapy: A position paper from the International Society of Geriatric Oncology Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, John O; Gillessen, Silke; Wirth, Manfred; Dale, William; Aapro, Matti; Oyen, Wim J G

    2017-05-01

    Molecular imaging using radiopharmaceuticals has a clear role in visualising the presence and extent of tumour at diagnosis and monitoring response to therapy. Such imaging provides prognostic and predictive information relevant to management, e.g. by quantifying active tumour mass using positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT). As these techniques require only pharmacologically inactive doses, age and potential frailty are generally not important. However, this may be different for therapy involving radionuclides because the radiation can impact normal bodily function (e.g. myelosuppression). Since the introduction of Iodine-131 as a targeted therapy in thyroid cancer, several radiopharmaceuticals have been widely used. These include antibodies and peptides targeting specific epitopes on cancer cells. Among therapeutic bone seeking agents, radium-223 ((223)Ra) stands out as it results in survival gains in patients with castration-resistant prostate cancer and symptomatic bone metastases. The therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals in elderly cancer patients specifically has received little attention. In elderly prostate cancer patients, there may be advantages in radionuclides' ease of use and relative lack of toxicity compared with cytotoxic and cytostatic drugs. When using radionuclide therapies, close coordination between oncology and nuclear medicine is needed to ensure safe and effective use. Bone marrow reserve has to be considered. As most radiopharmaceuticals are cleared renally, dose adjustment may be required in the elderly. However, compared with younger patients there is less, if any, concern about adverse long-term radiation effects such as radiation-induced second cancers. Issues regarding the safety of medical staff, care givers and the wider environment can be managed by current precautions. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Active versus receptive group music therapy for major depressive disorder-A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atiwannapat, Penchaya; Thaipisuttikul, Papan; Poopityastaporn, Patchawan; Katekaew, Wanwisa

    2016-06-01

    To compare the effects of 1) active group music therapy and 2) receptive group music therapy to group counseling in treatment of major depressive disorder (MDD). On top of standard care, 14 MDD outpatients were randomly assigned to receive 1) active group music therapy (n=5), 2) receptive group music therapy (n=5), or 3) group counseling (n=4). There were 12 one-hour weekly group sessions in each arm. Participants were assessed at baseline, 1 month (after 4 sessions), 3 months (end of interventions), and 6 months. Primary outcomes were depressive scores measured by Montgomery-Åsberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) Thai version. Secondary outcomes were self-rated depression score and quality of life. At 1 month, 3 months, and 6 months, both therapy groups showed statistically non-significant reduction in MADRS Thai scores when compared with the control group (group counseling). The reduction was slightly greater in the active group than the receptive group. Although there were trend toward better outcomes on self-report depression and quality of life, the differences were not statistically significant. Group music therapy, either active or receptive, is an interesting adjunctive treatment option for outpatients with MDD. The receptive group may reach peak therapeutic effect faster, but the active group may have higher peak effect. Group music therapy deserves further comprehensive studies. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Intensified Chemotherapy With Dexrazoxane Cardioprotection in Newly Diagnosed Nonmetastatic Osteosarcoma: A Report From the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Cindy L; Wexler, Leonard H; Krailo, Mark D; Teot, Lisa A; Devidas, Meenakshi; Steinherz, Laurel J; Goorin, Allen M; Gebhardt, Mark C; Healey, John H; Sato, Judith K; Meyers, Paul A; Grier, Holcombe E; Bernstein, Mark L; Lipshultz, Steven E

    2016-01-01

    Although chemotherapy has improved outcome of osteosarcoma, 30-40% of patients succumb to this disease. Survivors experience substantial morbidity and mortality from anthracycline-induced cardiotoxicity. We hypothesized that the cardioprotectant dexrazoxane would (i) support escalation of the cumulative doxorubicin dose (600 mg/m(2)) and (ii) not interfere with the cytotoxicity of chemotherapy measured by necrosis grading in comparison to historical control data. Children and adolescents with nonmetastatic osteosarcoma were treated with MAP (methotrexate, doxorubicin, cisplatin) or MAPI (MAP/ifosfamide). Dexrazoxane was administered with all doxorubicin doses. Cardioprotection was assessed by measuring left ventricular fractional shortening. Interference with chemotherapy-induced cytotoxicity was determined by measuring tumor necrosis after induction chemotherapy. Feasibility of intensifying therapy with either high cumulative-dose doxorubicin or high-dose ifosfamide/etoposide was evaluated for "standard responders" (SR, chemotherapy. With doxorubicin (450-600 mg/m(2)) and dexrazoxane, grade 1 or 2 left ventricular dysfunction occurred in five patients; 4/5 had transient effects. Left ventricular fractional shortening z-scores (FSZ) showed minimal reductions (0.0170  ±  0.009/week) over 78 weeks. Two patients (chemotherapy. These findings support the use of dexrazoxane in children and adolescents with osteosarcoma. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in Oncology: Evaluating Efficacy of Anti-Cancer Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris P. Reutelingsperger

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Evaluation of efficacy of anti-cancer therapy is currently performed by anatomical imaging (e.g., MRI, CT. Structural changes, if present, become apparent 1–2 months after start of therapy. Cancer patients thus bear the risk to receive an ineffective treatment, whilst clinical trials take a long time to prove therapy response. Both patient and pharmaceutical industry could therefore profit from an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. Diagnostic methods providing information on a functional level, rather than a structural, could present the solution. Recent technological advances in molecular imaging enable in vivo imaging of biological processes. Since most anti-cancer therapies combat tumors by inducing apoptosis, imaging of apoptosis could offer an early assessment of efficacy of therapy. This review focuses on principles of and clinical experience with molecular imaging of apoptosis using Annexin A5, a widely accepted marker for apoptosis detection in vitro and in vivo in animal models. 99mTc-HYNIC-Annexin A5 in combination with SPECT has been probed in clinical studies to assess efficacy of chemo- and radiotherapy within 1–4 days after start of therapy. Annexin A5-based functional imaging of apoptosis shows promise to offer a personalized medicine approach, now primarily used in genome-based medicine, applicable to all cancer patients.

  12. Adjuvant radiation therapy in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer: Executive summary of an American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) evidence-based clinical practice guideline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, George; Choy, Hak; Bradley, Jeffrey; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Bogart, Jeffrey; Curran, Walter J; Gore, Elizabeth; Langer, Corey; Louie, Alexander V; Lutz, Stephen; Machtay, Mitchell; Puri, Varun; Werner-Wasik, Maria; Videtic, Gregory M M

    2015-01-01

    To provide guidance to physicians and patients with regard to the use of adjuvant external beam radiation therapy (RT) in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (LA NSCLC) based on available medical evidence complemented by consensus-based expert opinion. A panel authorized by the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO) Board of Directors and Guidelines Subcommittee conducted 2 systematic reviews on the following topics: (1) indications for postoperative adjuvant RT and (2) indications for preoperative neoadjuvant RT. Practice guideline recommendations were approved using an a priori-defined consensus-building methodology supported by ASTRO and approved tools for the grading of evidence quality and the strength of guideline recommendations. For patients who have undergone surgical resection, high-level evidence suggests that use of postoperative RT does not influence survival, but optimizes local control for patients with N2 involvement, and its use in the setting of positive margins or gross primary/nodal residual disease is recommended. No high-level evidence exists for the routine use of preoperative induction chemoradiation therapy; however, modern surgical series and a post-hoc Intergroup 0139 clinical trial analysis suggest that a survival benefit may exist if patients are properly selected and surgical techniques/postoperative care is optimized. A consensus and evidence-based clinical practice guideline for the adjuvant radiotherapeutic management of LA NSCLC has been created addressing 2 important questions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nuclear medical oncology; Nuklearmedizinische Onkologie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krause, Bernd J.; Buck, Andreas K.; Schwaiger, Markus (eds.) [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Nuklearmedizinische Klinik und Poliklinik

    2007-07-01

    Modern nuclear oncology is based on molecular imaging techniques and radiotherapy. The book is aimed to integrate efficiently nuclear medical diagnostics and therapy into oncologic patient management. The book covers the following topics: Chapter 1: basics: instrumentation (SPECT, PET, PET/CT), digital image processing, radiopharmaceuticals, radiation protection, nuclear medical dosimetry, radiotherapy planning. Chapter 2: diagnostics: PET and PET/CT, skeleton metastases diagnostics, lymphoma diagnostics in case of mammary carcinomas and malign melanoma, MIBG (metaiodobenzylguanidin) diagnostics. Chapter 3: therapy: Radiotherapy of thyroid carcinomas, radioimmunotherapy of malign melanomas and in haematology, MIBG therapy, radiotherapy of neuroendocrine tumors, radiotherapy of skeleton metastases, intercavitary and locoregional therapy, 32{sup 3}2 phosphor therapy of polycythaemia vera.

  14. Avoiding Severe Toxicity From Combined BRAF Inhibitor and Radiation Treatment: Consensus Guidelines from the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anker, Christopher J., E-mail: chris.anker@UVMHealth.org [Division of Radiation Oncology, University of Vermont Cancer Center, Burlington, Vermont (United States); Grossmann, Kenneth F. [Division of Medical Oncology, Department of Medicine, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Atkins, Michael B. [Department of Oncology, Georgetown-Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center, Georgetown University School of Medicine, Washington, District of Columbia (United States); Suneja, Gita [Department of Radiation Oncology, Huntsman Cancer Institute, University of Utah, Salt Lake City, Utah (United States); Tarhini, Ahmad A.; Kirkwood, John M. [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2016-06-01

    BRAF kinase gene V600 point mutations drive approximately 40% to 50% of all melanomas, and BRAF inhibitors (BRAFi) have been found to significantly improve survival outcomes. Although radiation therapy (RT) provides effective symptom palliation, there is a lack of toxicity and efficacy data when RT is combined with BRAFi, including vemurafenib and dabrafenib. This literature review provides a detailed analysis of potential increased dermatologic, pulmonary, neurologic, hepatic, esophageal, and bowel toxicity from the combination of BRAFi and RT for melanoma patients described in 27 publications. Despite 7 publications noting potential intracranial neurotoxicity, the rates of radionecrosis and hemorrhage from whole brain RT (WBRT), stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), or both do not appear increased with concurrent or sequential administration of BRAFis. Almost all grade 3 dermatitis reactions occurred when RT and BRAFi were administered concurrently. Painful, disfiguring nondermatitis cutaneous reactions have been described from concurrent or sequential RT and BRAFi administration, which improved with topical steroids and time. Visceral toxicity has been reported with RT and BRAFi, with deaths possibly related to bowel perforation and liver hemorrhage. Increased severity of radiation pneumonitis with BRAFi is rare, but more concerning was a potentially related fatal pulmonary hemorrhage. Conversely, encouraging reports have described patients with leptomeningeal spread and unresectable lymphadenopathy rendered disease free from combined RT and BRAFi. Based on our review, the authors recommend holding RT ≥3 days before and after fractionated RT and ≥1 day before and after SRS. No fatal reactions have been described with a dose <4 Gy per fraction, and time off systemic treatment should be minimized. Future prospective data will serve to refine these recommendations.

  15. Practising oncology via telemedicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doolittle, G C; Allen, A

    1997-01-01

    Although there are increasing numbers of telemedicine programmes in the USA, few have offered teleoncology services, so that the role of telemedicine in the practice of clinical oncology has yet to be fully defined. Telemedicine has been used successfully for direct patient care in Kansas. It is also a method of providing supportive care for the cancer patient, including assessments of pain and nutrition. In addition, televised tumour conferences and nursing education courses can help smaller communities develop a level of expertise that allows patients to be treated locally. Telemedicine may well be used in future for access to national and international cancer experts, and for participation in new cancer treatment protocols through cooperative group trials. When practising oncology via telemedicine, there are unique problems, including issues regarding technology (interactive video and radiograph review) and practice (patient/oncologist preferences and doctor-patient communication). Very little has been published in the area of tele-oncology so far, and studies concerning its efficacy, cost-effectiveness and the best organizational structure are still in progress. However, telemedicine appears to be a useful technique in the practice of oncology.

  16. Randomized clinical trial of therapeutic music video intervention for resilience outcomes in adolescents/young adults undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplant: a report from the Children's Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Sheri L; Burns, Debra S; Stegenga, Kristin A; Haut, Paul R; Monahan, Patrick O; Meza, Jane; Stump, Timothy E; Cherven, Brooke O; Docherty, Sharron L; Hendricks-Ferguson, Verna L; Kintner, Eileen K; Haight, Ann E; Wall, Donna A; Haase, Joan E

    2014-03-15

    To reduce the risk of adjustment problems associated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) for adolescents/young adults (AYAs), we examined efficacy of a therapeutic music video (TMV) intervention delivered during the acute phase of HSCT to: 1) increase protective factors of spiritual perspective, social integration, family environment, courageous coping, and hope-derived meaning; 2) decrease risk factors of illness-related distress and defensive coping; and 3) increase outcomes of self-transcendence and resilience. This was a multisite randomized, controlled trial (COG-ANUR0631) conducted at 8 Children's Oncology Group sites involving 113 AYAs aged 11-24 years undergoing myeloablative HSCT. Participants, randomized to the TMV or low-dose control (audiobooks) group, completed 6 sessions over 3 weeks with a board-certified music therapist. Variables were based on Haase's Resilience in Illness Model (RIM). Participants completed measures related to latent variables of illness-related distress, social integration, spiritual perspective, family environment, coping, hope-derived meaning, and resilience at baseline (T1), postintervention (T2), and 100 days posttransplant (T3). At T2, the TMV group reported significantly better courageous coping (Effect Size [ES], 0.505; P = .030). At T3, the TMV group reported significantly better social integration (ES, 0.543; P = .028) and family environment (ES, 0.663; P = .008), as well as moderate nonsignificant effect sizes for spiritual perspective (ES, 0.450; P = .071) and self-transcendence (ES, 0.424; P = .088). The TMV intervention improves positive health outcomes of courageous coping, social integration, and family environment during a high-risk cancer treatment. We recommend the TMV be examined in a broader population of AYAs with high-risk cancers. © 2013 American Cancer Society.

  17. Humor, Self-Attitude, Emotions, and Cognitions in Group Art Therapy with War Veterans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopytin, Alexander; Lebedev, Alexey

    2013-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study of the therapeutic effects of group art therapy in a psychotherapy unit of a Russian hospital for war veterans. The researchers randomly assigned 112 veterans being treated for stress-related disorders to an experimental group (art therapy) and a control group. The emphasis was on the use of humor in the…

  18. Evaluating Animal-Assisted Therapy in Group Treatment for Child Sexual Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietz, Tracy J.; Davis, Diana; Pennings, Jacquelyn

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluates and compares the effectiveness of three group interventions on trauma symptoms for children who have been sexually abused. All of the groups followed the same treatment protocol, with two of them incorporating variations of animal-assisted therapy. A total of 153 children ages 7 to 17 who were in group therapy at a Child…

  19. Predictive value of the pretreatment extent of disease system in hepatoblastoma: Results from the International Society of Pediatric Oncology Liver Tumor Study Group SIOPEL-1 Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aronson, Daniël C.; Schnater, J. Marco; Staalman, Chris R.; Weverling, Gerrit J.; Plaschkes, Jack; Perilongo, Giorgio; Brown, Julia; Phillips, Angela; Otte, Jean-Bernard; Czauderna, Piotr; MacKinlay, Gordon; Vos, Anton

    2005-01-01

    Purpose Preoperative staging (pretreatment extent of disease [PRETEXT]) was developed for the first prospective liver tumor study by the International Society of Pediatric Oncology (SIOPEL-1 study; preoperative chemotherapy and delayed surgery). Study aims were to analyze the accuracy and

  20. Advanced Stage Mucinous Adenocarcinoma of the Ovary is both Rare and Highly Lethal: A Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaino, Richard J.; Brady, Mark F.; Lele, Subodh M.; Michael, Helen; Greer, Benjamin; Bookman, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Primary mucinous adenocarcinomas of the ovary are uncommon and their biologic behavior uncertain. Retrospective studies suggest that many mucinous carcinomas diagnosed as primary to the ovary were actually metastatic from another site. A prospective randomized trial provided an opportunity to estimate the frequency of mucinous tumors, diagnostic reproducibility, and clinical outcomes. Methods A phase III trial enrolled 4000 women with stage III or IV ovarian carcinoma, treated by surgical staging and debulking, with randomization to one of five chemotherapeutic arms. Slides and pathology reports classified as primary mucinous carcinoma were reviewed independently by three pathologists. Cases were re-classified as primary or metastatic to the ovary according to two methods. Overall survival (OS) of reclassified groups was compared with each other and with that of patients with serous carcinomas. Results Forty-four cases were classified as mucinous adenocarcinoma at review. Using either method, only about one third were interpreted by the three reviewers as primary mucinous carcinomas. Reproducibility of interpretations among the reviewers was high with unanimity of opinion in 30 of the 44 (68%) cases. The median survival (MS) did not differ significantly between the groups interpreted as primary or metastatic, but the OS was significantly less than that for women with serous carcinoma (14 vs 42 months, povary is very rare and is associated with poor OS. Many mucinous adenocarcinomas that are diagnosed as primary ovarian neoplasms appear to be metastatic to the ovary. PMID:20862744

  1. Effectiveness of Cognitive Behavioral Group Therapy for Treatment of Panic Disorder: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Servet Kacar Basaran

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to review empirical studies that evaluate effectiveness of cognitive-behavioral group therapy programs for treatment for panic disorder. Articles in English and Turkish that were published between the years of 2000 and 2015 (February have been searched in the national and international databases. The articles that were not therapy effectiveness studies, and group therapies that not based on cognitive behavioral approach were eliminated. The remaining 19 studies that were met the criteria were introduced in terms of method, therapy characteristics and results. The results of the studies showed that cognitive behavioral group therapies have similar efficacy with individual cognitive behavioral therapy on panic disorder symptoms (panic attacks frequency, the level of agoraphobia etc. and comorbid disorders (depression, anxiety sensitivity. However, cognitive behavioral group therapy is more cost-effective. [Psikiyatride Guncel Yaklasimlar - Current Approaches in Psychiatry 2016; 8(Supplement 1: 79-94

  2. Efficacy of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for insomnia in adolescents: A randomized controlled trial with internet therapy, group therapy and a waiting list condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruin, E.J.; Bögels, S.M.; Oort, F.J.; Meijer, A.M.

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTI) in adolescents. Design: A randomized controlled trial of CBTI in group therapy (GT), guided internet therapy (IT), and a waiting list (WL), with assessments at baseline, directly after treatment

  3. The role of prophylactic cranial irradiation in regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. A Southwest Oncology Group Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusch, V.W.; Griffin, B.R.; Livingston, R.B. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-10-01

    Lung cancer is the most common malignant disease in the United States. Only the few tumors detected very early are curable, but there has been some progress in the management of more advanced non-small cell lung cancer, particularly in regionally inoperable disease. Prevention of central nervous system relapse is an important issue in this group of patients because brain metastases ultimately develop in 20% to 25% of them. Seventy-three patients with regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer were entered into a Phase II trial of neutron chest radiotherapy sandwiched between four cycles of chemotherapy including cisplatin, vinblastine, and mitomycin C. Prophylactic cranial irradiation was administered concurrently with chest radiotherapy (3000 cGy in 10 fractions in 15 patients; 3600 cGy in 18 fractions in the remaining 50 patients). Patients underwent computed tomographic scan of the brain before treatment and every 3 months after treatment. The initial overall response rate was 79%, but 65 of the 73 patients have subsequently died of recurrent disease. Median follow-up is 9 months for all 73 patients and 26 months for eight long-term survivors. No patient who completed the prophylactic cranial irradiation program had clinical or radiologic brain metastases. Toxic reactions to prophylactic cranial irradiation included reversible alopecia in all patients, progressive dementia in one patient, and possible optic neuritis in one patient. Both of these patients received 300 cGy per fraction of irradiation. The use of prophylactic cranial irradiation has been controversial, but its safety and efficacy in this trial supports its application in a group of patients at high risk for central nervous system relapse. Further evaluation of prophylactic cranial irradiation in clinical trials for regionally advanced non-small cell lung cancer is warranted.

  4. Current surgical principle for uterine cervical cancer of stages Ia2, Ib1, and IIa1 in Japan: a survey of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikami, Mikio; Aoki, Yoichi; Sakamoto, Masaru; Shimada, Muneaki; Takeshima, Nobuhiro; Fujiwara, Hisaya; Matsumoto, Takashi; Kita, Tunekazu; Takizawa, Ken

    2013-11-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the current operative principle of uterine cervical cancer of stages Ia2, Ib1, and IIa1 (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) in Japan by surveying member institutions of the Japanese Gynecologic Oncology Group (JGOG). We conducted a survey to assess the current operative principle, including indications and treatment, at all 199 active member institutions of the JGOG. A total of 166 institutions (83.4%) responded to the survey. For Ia2 squamous cell carcinoma without the need to preserve fertility, modified radical hysterectomy was performed, and lymph node dissection was done in about 85%. At 60% of JGOG institutions, it was considered that less invasive procedures might be suitable. At the majority of JGOG institutions, radical surgery and lymph node dissection were considered necessary for stages Ib1 and IIa1 squamous cell carcinoma, with 70% considering that less invasive procedures might not be suitable. This survey provides information regarding the current status of surgical principle for uterine cervical cancer (stages Ia2, Ib1, and IIa1) in Japan.

  5. Interim positron emission tomography scans in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma: an independent expert nuclear medicine evaluation of the Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group E3404 study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horning, Sandra J; Juweid, Malik E; Schöder, Heiko; Wiseman, Gregory; McMillan, Alex; Swinnen, Lode J; Advani, Ranjana; Gascoyne, Randy; Quon, Andrew

    2010-01-28

    Positive interim positron emission tomography (PET) scans are thought to be associated with inferior outcomes in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. In the E3404 diffuse large B-cell lymphoma study, PET scans at baseline and after 3 cycles of rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone were centrally reviewed by a single reader. To determine the reproducibility of interim PET interpretation, an expert panel of 3 external nuclear medicine physicians visually scored baseline and interim PET scans independently and were blinded to clinical information. The binary Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group (ECOG) study criteria were based on modifications of the Harmonization Criteria; the London criteria were also applied. Of 38 interim scans, agreement was complete in 68% and 71% by ECOG and London criteria, respectively. The range of PET(+) interim scans was 16% to 34% (P = not significant) by reviewer. Moderate consistency of reviews was observed: kappa statistic = 0.445 using ECOG criteria, and kappa statistic = 0.502 using London criteria. These data, showing only moderate reproducibility among nuclear medicine experts, indicate the need to standardize PET interpretation in research and practice. This trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00274924 [corrected].

  6. Validation of the 2015 prostate cancer grade groups for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes in a shared equal-access health system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulman, Ariel A; Howard, Lauren E; Tay, Kae Jack; Tsivian, Efrat; Sze, Christina; Amling, Christopher L; Aronson, William J; Cooperberg, Matthew R; Kane, Christopher J; Terris, Martha K; Freedland, Stephen J; Polascik, Thomas J

    2017-11-01

    A 5-tier prognostic grade group (GG) system was enacted to simplify the risk stratification of patients with prostate cancer in which Gleason scores of ≤6, 3 + 4, 4 + 3, 8, and 9 or 10 are considered GG 1 through 5, respectively. The authors investigated the utility of biopsy GG for predicting long-term oncologic outcomes after radical prostatectomy in an equal-access health system. Men who underwent prostatectomy at 1 of 6 Veterans Affairs hospitals in the Shared Equal Access Regional Cancer Hospital database between 2005 and 2015 were reviewed. The prognostic ability of biopsy GG was examined using Cox models. Interactions between GG and race also were tested. In total, 2509 men were identified who had data available on biopsy Gleason scores, covariates, and follow-up. The cohort included men with GG 1 (909 patients; 36.2%), GG 2 (813 patients; 32.4%), GG 3 (398 patients; 15.9%), GG 4 (279 patients; 11.1%), and GG 5 (110 patients; 4.4%) prostate cancer. The cohort included 1002 African American men (41%). The median follow-up was 60 months (interquartile range, 33-90 months). Higher GG was associated with higher clinical stage, older age, more recent surgery, and surgical center (P prostate cancer, metastases, and prostate cancer-specific mortality (all P Cancer 2017;123:4122-4129. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  7. Introduction of online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer through a multicentre clinical trial (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 10.01: Lessons learned

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Pham

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Online adaptive radiotherapy for bladder cancer is a novel radiotherapy technique that was found feasible in a pilot study at a single academic institution. In September 2010 this technique was opened as a multicenter study through the Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG 10.01 bladder online adaptive radiotherapy treatment. Twelve centers across Australia and New-Zealand registered interest into the trial. A multidisciplinary team of radiation oncologists, radiation therapists and medical physicists represented the trial credentialing and technical support team. To provide timely activation and proper implementation of the adaptive technique the following key areas were addressed at each site: Staff education/training; Practical image guided radiotherapy assessment; provision of help desk and feedback. The trial credentialing process involved face-to-face training and technical problem solving via full day site visits. A dedicated "help-desk" team was developed to provide support for the clinical trial. 26% of the workload occurred at the credentialing period while the remaining 74% came post-center activation. The workload was made up of the following key areas; protocol clarification (36%, technical problems (46% while staff training was less than 10%. Clinical trial credentialing is important to minimizing trial deviations. It should not only focus on site activation quality assurance but also provide ongoing education and technical support.

  8. Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT) Practice Patterns and IGRT's Impact on Workflow and Treatment Planning: Results From a National Survey of American Society for Radiation Oncology Members.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabavizadeh, Nima; Elliott, David A; Chen, Yiyi; Kusano, Aaron S; Mitin, Timur; Thomas, Charles R; Holland, John M

    2016-03-15

    To survey image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) practice patterns, as well as IGRT's impact on clinical workflow and planning treatment volumes (PTVs). A sample of 5979 treatment site-specific surveys was e-mailed to the membership of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO), with questions pertaining to IGRT modality/frequency, PTV expansions, method of image verification, and perceived utility/value of IGRT. On-line image verification was defined as images obtained and reviewed by the physician before treatment. Off-line image verification was defined as images obtained before treatment and then reviewed by the physician before the next treatment. Of 601 evaluable responses, 95% reported IGRT capabilities other than portal imaging. The majority (92%) used volumetric imaging (cone-beam CT [CBCT] or megavoltage CT), with volumetric imaging being the most commonly used modality for all sites except breast. The majority of respondents obtained daily CBCTs for head and neck intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), lung 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy or IMRT, anus or pelvis IMRT, prostate IMRT, and prostatic fossa IMRT. For all sites, on-line image verification was most frequently performed during the first few fractions only. No association was seen between IGRT frequency or CBCT utilization and clinical treatment volume to PTV expansions. Of the 208 academic radiation oncologists who reported working with residents, only 41% reported trainee involvement in IGRT verification processes. Consensus guidelines, further evidence-based approaches for PTV margin selection, and greater resident involvement are needed for standardized use of IGRT practices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Interpersonal processes in psychodynamic-interpersonal and cognitive behavioral group therapy: a systematic case study of two groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasca, Giorgio A; Foot, Meredith; Leite, Catherine; Maxwell, Hilary; Balfour, Louise; Bissada, Hany

    2011-09-01

    This mixed method systematic case study applied an interpersonal stage model of the therapeutic process to examine interpersonal processes among a highly adherent Group Psychodynamic-Interpersonal Psychotherapy (GPIP) therapist and a highly adherent Group Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (GCBT) therapist and their groups of binge eating disordered (BED) patients. This is the first case study to apply the interpersonal stage model of psychotherapy to compare GCBT and GPIP methods and the first to apply the model to group therapy. Early-, middle-, and late-stage transcribed video recordings of sequential interactions among therapists and patients in each of these two time-limited group therapies were analyzed with the Structural Analysis of Social Behavior (SASB). We also provide qualitative presentations of the transcripts from each stage as context for the quantitative analyses. BED patients in both groups achieved positive outcomes for binge eating and depression. Consistent with their treatment model, the GPIP therapist was more autonomy-giving, whereas the GCBT therapist was more controlling/directive. The GPIP therapist and her group had high levels of interpersonal complementary interaction sequences in the early stage followed by lower complementarity in the middle stage. The GCBT therapist and her group showed a high-low-high pattern of complementarity across the three stage of therapy. However, overall the GPIP group had higher levels complementarity than the GCBT group. This mixed method case study of group processes based on an interpersonal stage model of psychotherapy suggested specific therapist behaviors in each modality to maximize positive therapeutic interactions at each stage of group therapy. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved.

  10. Impact of treatment in long-term survival patients with follicular lymphoma: A Spanish Lymphoma Oncology Group registry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Provencio

    Full Text Available Follicular lymphoma is the second most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the United States and Europe. However, most of the prospective randomized studies have very little follow-up compared to the long natural history of the disease. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the long-term survival of our series of patients with follicular lymphoma.A total of 1074 patients with newly diagnosed FL were enrolled. Patients diagnosed were prospectively enrolled from 1980 to 2013.Median follow-up was 54.9 months and median overall survival is over 20 years in our series. We analyzed the patients who are still alive beyond 10 years from diagnosis in order to fully assess the prognostic factors that condition this group. Out of 166 patients who are still alive after more than 10 years of follow-up, 118 of them (73% are free of evident clinical disease. Variables significantly associated with survival at 10 years were stage < II (p <0.03, age < 60 years (p <0.0001, low FLIPI (p <0.002, normal β2 microglobulin (p <0.005, no B symptoms upon diagnosis (p <0.02, Performance Status 0-1 (p <0.03 and treatment with anthracyclines and rituximab (p <0.001, or rituximab (p <0.0001.A longer follow-up and a large series demonstrated a substantial population of patients with follicular lymphoma free of disease for more than 10 years.

  11. CHEMOTHERAPY INTENSITY AND TOXICITY AMONG BLACK AND WHITE WOMEN WITH ADVANCED AND RECURRENT ENDOMETRIAL CANCER: A GYNECOLOGIC ONCOLOGY GROUP STUDY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, John H.; Tian, Chunqiao; Rose, G. Scott; Brown, Carol L.; Birrer, Michael; Risinger, John I; Thigpen, J. Tate; Fleming, Gini F.; Gallion, Holly H.; Maxwell, G. Larry

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to confirm whether Black and White women with endometrial cancer are equally tolerant of chemotherapy and identify factors that impact survival. METHODS: A retrospective review of 169 Black women and 982 White women with FIGO Stage III/IV or recurrent endometrial carcinoma was performed. All patients received doxorubicin combined with cisplatin. Chemotherapy parameters that were reviewed included relative dose (RD), relative time (RT), and relative dose intensity (RDI). Treatment cycles ≥ 7 were defined as treatment completion. RESULTS: Although Black patients were more likely to experience grade 3-4 anemia (20% vs. 14%) and genitourinary (5% vs. 1%) toxicity, and less likely to experience severe GI toxicity (10% vs. 17%), the overall incidence of grade 3-4 treatment-related chemotoxicity was the same between the two groups (82% vs. 82%). There were no differences in the number of cycles received, RD (0.57 vs. 0.58), RT (0.77 vs. 0.78), or RDI (0.76 vs. 0.76) for Black and White patients. CONCLUSION: Black patients with advanced stage or recurrent endometrial cancer, treated on four GOG protocols, had similar dose intensity and severe chemotherapy-related toxicity compared to White patients, suggesting that previously described racial disparities in survival among patients in GOG trials may have an novel etiology. PMID:19924790

  12. Age, Tumor Characteristics, and Treatment Regimen as Event Predictors in Ewing: A Children’s Oncology Group Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neyssa Marina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To associate baseline patient characteristics and relapse across consecutive COG studies. Methods. We analyzed risk factors for LESFT patients in three randomized COG trials. We evaluated age at enrollment, primary site, gender, tumor size, and treatment (as randomized. We estimated event-free survival (EFS, Kaplan-Meier and compared risk across groups (log-rank test. Characteristics were assessed by proportional hazards regression with the characteristic of interest as the only component. Confidence intervals (CI for RR were derived. Factors related to outcome at level 0.05 were included in a multivariate regression model. Results. Between 12/1988 and 8/2005, 1444 patients were enrolled and data current to 2001, 2004, or 2008 were used. Patients were with a median age of 12 years (0–45, 55% male and 88% Caucasian. The 5-year EFS was 68.3% ± 1.3%. In univariate analysis age, treatment, and tumor location were identified for inclusion in the multivariate model, and all remained significant (p 18 years, pelvic tumor, size > 8 cms, and chemotherapy without ifosfamide/etoposide significantly predict worse outcome. AEWS0031 is NCT00006734, INT0091 and INT0054 designed before 1993 (unregistered.

  13. Gesture and Naming Therapy for People with Severe Aphasia: A Group Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Jane; Best, Wendy; Cocks, Naomi; Cruice, Madeline; Pring, Tim; Bulcock, Gemma; Creek, Gemma; Eales, Nancy; Mummery, Alice Lockhart; Matthews, Niina; Caute, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: In this study, the authors (a) investigated whether a group of people with severe aphasia could learn a vocabulary of pantomime gestures through therapy and (b) compared their learning of gestures with their learning of words. The authors also examined whether gesture therapy cued word production and whether naming therapy cued gestures.…

  14. Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Group Therapy for Social Anxiety Disorder: An Open Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocovski, Nancy L.; Fleming, Jan E.; Rector, Neil A.

    2009-01-01

    Mindfulness and Acceptance-Based Group Therapy (MAGT) for Social Anxiety Disorder (SAD) is based largely on Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT; Hayes et al., 1999), with enhanced mindfulness mostly from Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT; Segal et al., 2002). The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility and initial…

  15. Breast interest group faculty of radiation oncology: Australian and New Zealand patterns of practice survey on breast radiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Kimberley; Mackenzie, Penny; Allen, Angela; Dreosti, Marcus; Morgia, Marita; Zissiadis, Yvonne; Lamoury, Gilian; Windsor, Apsara

    2017-08-01

    This patterns of practice study was conducted on behalf of the RANZCR Breast Interest Group in order to document current radiotherapy practices for breast cancer in Australia and New Zealand. The survey identifies variations and highlights potential contentious aspects of radiotherapy management of breast cancer. A fifty-eight question survey was disseminated via the Survey Monkey digital platform to 388 Radiation Oncologists in Australia and New Zealand. In total, 156 responses were received and collated. Areas of notable consensus among respondents included hypofractionation (77.3% of respondents would 'always' or 'sometimes' consider hypofractionation in the management of ductal carcinoma in-situ and 99.3% in early invasive breast cancer); margin status in early breast cancer (73.8% believe a clear inked margin is sufficient and does not require further surgery) and use of bolus in post-mastectomy radiotherapy (PMRT) (91.1% of participants use bolus in PMRT). Areas with a wider degree of variability amongst respondents included regional nodal irradiation and components of radiotherapy planning and delivery (examples include the technique used for delivery of boost and frequency of bolus application for PMRT). The results of these patterns of practice survey informs radiation oncologists in Australia and New Zealand of the current clinical practices being implemented by their peers. The survey identifies areas of consensus and contention, the latter of which may lead to a development of research trials and/or educational activities to address these areas of uncertainty. © 2016 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  16. Impact of treatment in long-term survival patients with follicular lymphoma: A Spanish Lymphoma Oncology Group registry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Provencio, Mariano; Sabín, Pilar; Gomez-Codina, Jose; Calvo, Virginia; Llanos, Marta; Gumá, Josep; Quero, Cristina; Blasco, Ana; Cruz, Miguel Angel; Aguiar, David; García-Arroyo, Francisco; Lavernia, Javier; Martinez, Natividad; Morales, Manuel; Saez-Cusi, Alvaro; Rodriguez, Delvys; de la Cruz, Luis; Sanchez, Jose Javier; Rueda, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Background Follicular lymphoma is the second most common non-Hodgkin lymphoma in the United States and Europe. However, most of the prospective randomized studies have very little follow-up compared to the long natural history of the disease. The primary aim of this study was to investigate the long-term survival of our series of patients with follicular lymphoma. Patients and methods A total of 1074 patients with newly diagnosed FL were enrolled. Patients diagnosed were prospectively enrolled from 1980 to 2013. Results Median follow-up was 54.9 months and median overall survival is over 20 years in our series. We analyzed the patients who are still alive beyond 10 years from diagnosis in order to fully assess the prognostic factors that condition this group. Out of 166 patients who are still alive after more than 10 years of follow-up, 118 of them (73%) are free of evident clinical disease. Variables significantly associated with survival at 10 years were stage < II (p <0.03), age < 60 years (p <0.0001), low FLIPI (p <0.002), normal β2 microglobulin (p <0.005), no B symptoms upon diagnosis (p <0.02), Performance Status 0–1 (p <0.03) and treatment with anthracyclines and rituximab (p <0.001), or rituximab (p <0.0001). Conclusions A longer follow-up and a large series demonstrated a substantial population of patients with follicular lymphoma free of disease for more than 10 years. PMID:28493986

  17. Patient-Reported Outcomes and Survivorship in Radiation Oncology: Overcoming the Cons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Farzan; Liu, Arthur K.; Watkins-Bruner, Deborah; Movsas, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Although patient-reported outcomes (PROs) have become a key component of clinical oncology trials, many challenges exist regarding their optimal application. The goal of this article is to methodically review these barriers and suggest strategies to overcome them. This review will primarily focus on radiation oncology examples, will address issues regarding the “why, how, and what” of PROs, and will provide strategies for difficult problems such as methods for reducing missing data. This review will also address cancer survivorship because it closely relates to PROs. Methods Key articles focusing on PROs, quality of life, and survivorship issues in oncology trials are highlighted, with an emphasis on radiation oncology clinical trials. Publications and Web sites of various governmental and regulatory agencies are also reviewed. Results The study of PROs in clinical oncology trials has become well established. There are guidelines provided by organizations such as the US Food and Drug Administration that clearly indicate the importance of and methodology for studying PROs. Clinical trials in oncology have repeatedly demonstrated the value of studying PROs and suggested ways to overcome some of the key challenges. The Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) has led some of these efforts, and their contributions are highlighted. The current state of cancer survivorship guidelines is also discussed. Conclusion The study of PROs presents significant benefits in understanding and treating toxicities and enhancing quality of life; however, challenges remain. Strategies are presented to overcome these hurdles, which will ultimately improve cancer survivorship. PMID:25113760

  18. Influencing and moderating factors analyzed in the group art therapy of two schizophrenic inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chung-Chieh; Ku, Yung-Wen

    2015-12-01

    Art therapy has been considered a guideline treatment for schizophrenia. Due to difficulty in the outcome measurement, the research is difficult and controversial. Here, we presented two schizophrenic patients receiving the regular art group therapy. We compared their characteristics and different outcome. Art therapy is difficult to quantify. However, we could qualify the improvement from the individual case. Further study might be focus on how to make appropriate qualification of art therapy and individualized difference instead of enrollment of huge data bank.

  19. The cost of molecular-guided therapy in oncology: a prospective cost study alongside the MOSCATO trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagès, Arnaud; Foulon, Stéphanie; Zou, Zhaomin; Lacroix, Ludovic; Lemare, François; de Baère, Thierry; Massard, Christophe; Soria, Jean-Charles; Bonastre, Julia

    2017-06-01

    There is increasing use of molecular technologies to guide cancer treatments, but few cost data are available. Our objective was to assess the costs of molecular-guided therapy for patients with advanced solid tumors alongside the Molecular Screening for Cancer Treatment and Optimization (MOSCATO) trial. The study population consisted of 529 patients. The molecular diagnosis included seven steps from tumor biopsy to the multidisciplinary molecular tumor board. The cost of a complete molecular diagnosis was assessed by micro-costing. Direct costs incurred from enrollment until progression were assessed from the French National Health Insurance perspective. The patients' mean age was 54 years (range: 3-82) and the mean follow-up period was 145 days (range: 1-707 days). A complete molecular diagnosis cost [euro ]2,396. There were 220 patients with an actionable target (42%), among whom 105 (20%) actually received a targeted therapy. The cost of molecular-guided therapy per patient was [euro ]31,269. The main cost drivers were anticancer drugs (54%) and hospitalizations (35%). This prospective cost analysis showed that molecular diagnosis accounts for only 6% of the cost of molecular-guided therapy per patient. The costs of drugs and hospitalizations are the main cost drivers.Genet Med advance online publication 01 December 2016.

  20. Randomized clinical trial: group counseling based on tinnitus retraining therapy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry, James A; Loovis, Carl; Montero, Melissa; Kaelin, Christine; Anselmi, Kathryn-Anne; Coombs, Rebecca; Hensley, June; James, Kenneth E

    2007-01-01

    .... We conducted a randomized clinical trial to test the hypothesis that group educational counseling based on TRT principles would effectively treat veterans who have clinically significant tinnitus...

  1. Effects of Active Versus Passive Group Music Therapy on Preadolescents with Emotional, Learning, and Behavioral Disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montello; Coons

    1999-01-01

    This study attempted to compare the behavioral effects of active, rhythm-based group music therapy vs. those of passive, listening-based group music therapy on preadolescents with emotional, learning, and behavioral disorders. It was hypothesized that preadolescents who participated in active music therapy would more significantly improve target behaviors than those involved in passive music therapy. Achenbach's Teacher Report Form (TRF) was used to confirm changes among subjects in attention, motivation, and hostility as rated by homeroom teachers. Twelve music therapy sessions were conducted over a 4-month period with three different groups of subjects (n = 16), with two groups participating in active music therapy and the other receiving passive music therapy. Results indicate that subjects improved significantly after receiving both music therapy interventions. The most significant change in subjects was found on the aggression/hostility scale. These results suggest that group music therapy can facilitate the process of serf-expression in emotionally disturbed/learning disabled adolescents and provide a channel for transforming frustration, anger, and aggression into the experience of creativity and self-mastery. Discussion of results also includes recommendations for chousing one music therapy approach over another based on personality types and/or clinical diagnoses of subjects.

  2. Cardioprotection and Safety of Dexrazoxane in Patients Treated for Newly Diagnosed T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia or Advanced-Stage Lymphoblastic Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma: A Report of the Children’s Oncology Group Randomized Trial Pediatric Oncology Group 9404

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devidas, Meenakshi; Chen, Lu; Franco, Vivian I.; Pullen, Jeanette; Borowitz, Michael J.; Hutchison, Robert E.; Ravindranath, Yaddanapudi; Armenian, Saro H.; Camitta, Bruce M.; Lipshultz, Steven E.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the oncologic efficacy, cardioprotective effectiveness, and safety of dexrazoxane added to chemotherapy that included a cumulative doxorubicin dose of 360 mg/m2 to treat children and adolescents with newly diagnosed T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) or lymphoblastic non-Hodgkin lymphoma (L-NHL). Patients and Methods Patients were treated on Pediatric Oncology Group Protocol POG 9404, which included random assignment to treatment with or without dexrazoxane given as a bolus infusion immediately before every dose of doxorubicin. Cardiac effects were assessed by echocardiographic measurements of left ventricular function and structure. Results Of 573 enrolled patients, 537 were eligible, evalua