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Sample records for therapy clinical trials

  1. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  2. Gene therapy clinical trials worldwide to 2017: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, Samantha L; Amaya, Anais K; Alexander, Ian E; Edelstein, Michael; Abedi, Mohammad R

    2018-03-25

    To date, almost 2600 gene therapy clinical trials have been completed, are ongoing or have been approved worldwide. Our database brings together global information on gene therapy clinical activity from trial databases, official agency sources, published literature, conference presentations and posters kindly provided to us by individual investigators or trial sponsors. This review presents our analysis of clinical trials that, to the best of our knowledge, have been or are being performed worldwide. As of our November 2017 update, we have entries on 2597 trials undertaken in 38 countries. We have analysed the geographical distribution of trials, the disease indications (or other reasons) for trials, the proportions to which different vector types are used, and the genes that have been transferred. Details of the analyses presented, and our searchable database are available via The Journal of Gene Medicine Gene Therapy Clinical Trials Worldwide website at: http://www.wiley.co.uk/genmed/clinical. We also provide an overview of the progress being made in gene therapy clinical trials around the world, and discuss key trends since the previous review, namely the use of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for the treatment of cancer and advancements in genome editing technologies, which have the potential to transform the field moving forward. Copyright © 2018 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Clinical trials for stem cell therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lomax Geoff

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, clinical trials with stem cells have taken the emerging field in many new directions. While numerous teams continue to refine and expand the role of bone marrow and cord blood stem cells for their vanguard uses in blood and immune disorders, many others are looking to expand the uses of the various types of stem cells found in bone marrow and cord blood, in particular mesenchymal stem cells, to uses beyond those that could be corrected by replacing cells in their own lineage. Early results from these trials have produced mixed results often showing minor or transitory improvements that may be attributed to extracellular factors. More research teams are accelerating the use of other types of adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells for diseases where beneficial outcome could result from either in-lineage cell replacement or extracellular factors. At the same time, the first three trials using cells derived from pluripotent cells have begun.

  4. Core journals that publish clinical trials of physical therapy interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Leonardo Oliveira Pena; Moseley, Anne M; Sherrington, Catherine; Maher, Christopher G; Herbert, Robert D; Elkins, Mark R

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this study was to identify core journals in physical therapy by identifying those that publish the most randomized controlled trials of physical therapy interventions, provide the highest-quality reports of randomized controlled trials, and have the highest journal impact factors. This study was an audit of a bibliographic database. All trials indexed in the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) were analyzed. Journals that had published at least 80 trials were selected. The journals were ranked in 4 ways: number of trials published; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal, regardless of publication year; mean total PEDro score of the trials published in the journal from 2000 to 2009; and 2008 journal impact factor. The top 5 core journals in physical therapy, ranked by the total number of trials published, were Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Clinical Rehabilitation, Spine, British Medical Journal (BMJ), and Chest. When the mean total PEDro score was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), Stroke, Spine, and Clinical Rehabilitation. When the mean total PEDro score of the trials published from 2000 to 2009 was used as the ranking criterion, the top 5 journals were Journal of Physiotherapy, JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, and Pain. The most highly ranked physical therapy-specific journals were Physical Therapy (ranked eighth on the basis of the number of trials published) and Journal of Physiotherapy (ranked first on the basis of the quality of trials). Finally, when the 2008 impact factor was used for ranking, the top 5 journals were JAMA, Lancet, BMJ, American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, and Thorax. There were no significant relationships among the rankings on the basis of trial quality, number of trials, or journal impact factor. Physical therapists who are trying to keep up-to-date by reading the best

  5. Risk of discontinuation of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Eve; Rémuzat, Cecile; Auquier, Pascal; Toumi, Mondher

    2016-01-01

    Advanced therapy medicinal products (ATMPs) constitute a class of innovative products that encompasses gene therapy, somatic cell therapy, and tissue-engineered products (TEP). There is an increased investment of commercial and non-commercial sponsors in this field and a growing number of ATMPs randomized clinical trials (RCT) and patients enrolled in such trials. RCT generate data to prove the efficacy of a new therapy, but the discontinuation of RCTs wastes scarce resources. Our objective is to identify the number and characteristics of discontinued ATMPs trials in order to evaluate the rate of discontinuation. We searched for ATMPs trials conducted between 1999 to June 2015 using three databases, which are Clinicaltrials.gov, the International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP), and the EU Drug Regulating Authorities Clinical Trials (EudraCT). We selected the ATMPs trials after elimination of the duplicates. We identified the disease areas and the sponsors as commercial or non-commercial organizations. We classified ATMPs by type and trial status, that is, ongoing, completed, terminated, discontinued, and prematurely ended. Then, we calculated the rate of discontinuation. Between 1999 and June 2015, 143 withdrawn, terminated, or prematurely ended ATMPs clinical trials were identified. Between 1999 and June 2013, 474 ongoing and completed clinical trials were identified. Therefore, the rate of discontinuation of ATMPs trials is 23.18%, similar to that for non-ATMPs drugs in development. The probability of discontinuation is, respectively, 27.35, 16.28, and 16.34% for cell therapies, gene therapies, and TEP. The highest discontinuation rate is for oncology (43%), followed by cardiology (19.2%). It is almost the same for commercial and non-commercial sponsors; therefore, the discontinuation reason may not be financially driven. No failure risk rate per development phase is available for ATMPs. The discontinuation rate may prove helpful when assessing the

  6. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J., E-mail: Thomas.Fitzgerald@umassmed.edu [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Followill, David S. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Houston, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Philadelphia, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Knopp, Michael V. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Ohio, Wexner Medical Center, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio (United States); Michalski, Jeff M. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core St. Louis, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Rosen, Mark A. [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Philadelphia, University of Pennsylvania Health System, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Bradley, Jeffrey D. [Washington University School of Medicine–Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Shankar, Lalitha K. [National Cancer Institute, Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch, Rockville, Maryland (United States); Laurie, Fran [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Moni, Janaki [Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Rhode Island, University of Massachusetts Memorial Medical Center, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Coleman, C. Norman; Deye, James A.; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain [National Cancer Institute, Clinical Radiation Oncology Branch, Rockville, Maryland (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  7. Imaging and Data Acquisition in Clinical Trials for Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    FitzGerald, Thomas J.; Bishop-Jodoin, Maryann; Followill, David S.; Galvin, James; Knopp, Michael V.; Michalski, Jeff M.; Rosen, Mark A.; Bradley, Jeffrey D.; Shankar, Lalitha K.; Laurie, Fran; Cicchetti, M. Giulia; Moni, Janaki; Coleman, C. Norman; Deye, James A.; Capala, Jacek; Vikram, Bhadrasain

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment evolves through oncology clinical trials. Cancer trials are multimodal and complex. Assuring high-quality data are available to answer not only study objectives but also questions not anticipated at study initiation is the role of quality assurance. The National Cancer Institute reorganized its cancer clinical trials program in 2014. The National Clinical Trials Network (NCTN) was formed and within it was established a Diagnostic Imaging and Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance Organization. This organization is Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core, the Imaging and Radiation Oncology Core Group, consisting of 6 quality assurance centers that provide imaging and radiation therapy quality assurance for the NCTN. Sophisticated imaging is used for cancer diagnosis, treatment, and management as well as for image-driven technologies to plan and execute radiation treatment. Integration of imaging and radiation oncology data acquisition, review, management, and archive strategies are essential for trial compliance and future research. Lessons learned from previous trials are and provide evidence to support diagnostic imaging and radiation therapy data acquisition in NCTN trials.

  8. Comparison of manual therapy and exercise therapy in osteoarthritis of the hip: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoeksma, H.L.; Dekker, J.; Ronday, H.K.; Heering, A.; Lubbe, N. van der; Vel, C.; Breedveld, F.C.; Ende, C.H.M. van den

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effectiveness of a manual therapy program compared with an exercise therapy program in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip. METHODS: A single-blind, randomized clinical trial of 109 hip OA patients was carried out in the outpatient clinic for physical therapy of

  9. Childhood asthma clusters and response to therapy in clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Timothy S; Lemanske, Robert F; Mauger, David T; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Sorkness, Christine A; Szefler, Stanley J; Gangnon, Ronald E; Page, C David; Jackson, Daniel J

    2014-02-01

    Childhood asthma clusters, or subclasses, have been developed by computational methods without evaluation of clinical utility. To replicate and determine whether childhood asthma clusters previously identified computationally in the Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) are associated with treatment responses in Childhood Asthma Research and Education (CARE) Network clinical trials. A cluster assignment model was determined by using SARP participant data. A total of 611 participants 6 to 18 years old from 3 CARE trials were assigned to SARP pediatric clusters. Primary and secondary outcomes were analyzed by cluster in each trial. CARE participants were assigned to SARP clusters with high accuracy. Baseline characteristics were similar between SARP and CARE children of the same cluster. Treatment response in CARE trials was generally similar across clusters. However, with the caveat of a smaller sample size, children in the early-onset/severe-lung function cluster had best response with fluticasone/salmeterol (64% vs 23% 2.5× fluticasone and 13% fluticasone/montelukast in the Best ADd-on Therapy Giving Effective Responses trial; P = .011) and children in the early-onset/comorbidity cluster had the least clinical efficacy to treatments (eg, -0.076% change in FEV1 in the Characterizing Response to Leukotriene Receptor Antagonist and Inhaled Corticosteroid trial). In this study, we replicated SARP pediatric asthma clusters by using a separate, large clinical trials network. Early-onset/severe-lung function and early-onset/comorbidity clusters were associated with differential and limited response to therapy, respectively. Further prospective study of therapeutic response by cluster could provide new insights into childhood asthma treatment. Copyright © 2013 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group clinical trials with misonidazole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wasserman, T.H.; Stetz, J.; Phillips, T.L.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents a review of the progressive clinical trials of the hypoxic cell radiosensitizer, misonidazole, in the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). Presentation is made of all the schemas of the recently completed and currently active RTOG Phase II and Phase III studies. Detailed information is provided on the clinical toxicity of the Phase II trials, specifically regarding neurotoxicity. With limitations in drug total dose, a variety of dose schedules have proven to be tolerable, with a moderate incidence of nausea and vomiting and mild peripheral neuropathy or central neuropathy. No other organ toxicity has been seen, specifically no liver, renal or bone marrow toxicities. An additional Phase III malignant glioma trial in the Brain Tumor Study Group is described

  11. Reinventing clinical trials: a review of innovative biomarker trial designs in cancer therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ja-An; He, Pei

    2015-06-01

    Recently, new clinical trial designs involving biomarkers have been studied and proposed in cancer clinical research, in the hope of incorporating the rapid growing basic research into clinical practices. Journal articles related to various biomarkers and their role in cancer clinical trial, articles and books about statistical issues in trial design, and regulatory website, documents, and guidance for submission of targeted cancer therapies. The drug development process involves four phases. The confirmatory Phase III is essential in regulatory approval of a special treatment. Regulatory agency has restrictions on confirmatory trials 'using adaptive designs'. No rule of thumb to pick the most appropriate design for biomarker-related trials. Statistical issues to solve in new designs. Regulatory acceptance of the 'newly proposed trial designs'. Biomarker-related trial designs that can resolve the statistical issues and satisfy the regulatory requirement. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Quality control of radiation therapy in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kramer, S.; Lustig, R.; Grundy, G.

    1983-01-01

    The RTOG is a group of participating institutions which has a major interest in furthering clinical radiation oncology. They have formulated protocols for clinical investigation in which radiation therapy is the major modality of treatment. In addition, other modalities, such as chemotherapy, radiation sensitizers, and hyperthermia, are used in combined approach to cancer. Quality control in all aspects of patient management is necessary to insure quality data. These areas include evaluation of pathology, physics, and dosimetry, and clinical patient data. Quality control is both time consuming and expensive. However, by dividing these tasks into various levels and time frames, by using computerized data-control mechanisms, and by employing appropriate levels of ancillary personnel expertise, quality control can improve compliance and decrease the cost of investigational trials

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. The DSMB also reviews research results ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. ( ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ...

  16. A randomized clinical trial of alpha(1)-antitrypsin augmentation therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirksen, A; Dijkman, J H; Madsen, F; Stoel, B; Hutchison, D C; Ulrik, C S; Skovgaard, L T; Kok-Jensen, A; Rudolphus, A; Seersholm, N; Vrooman, H A; Reiber, J H; Hansen, N C; Heckscher, T; Viskum, K; Stolk, J

    1999-11-01

    We have investigated whether restoration of the balance between neutrophil elastase and its inhibitor, alpha(1)-antitrypsin, can prevent the progression of pulmonary emphysema in patients with alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency. Twenty-six Danish and 30 Dutch ex-smokers with alpha(1)-antitrypsin deficiency of PI*ZZ phenotype and moderate emphysema (FEV(1) between 30% and 80% of predicted) participated in a double-blind trial of alpha(1)-antitrypsin augmentation therapy. The patients were randomized to either alpha(1)-antitrypsin (250 mg/kg) or albumin (625 mg/kg) infusions at 4-wk intervals for at least 3 yr. Self-administered spirometry performed every morning and evening at home showed no significant difference in decline of FEV(1) between treatment and placebo. Each year, the degree of emphysema was quantified by the 15th percentile point of the lung density histogram derived from computed tomography (CT). The loss of lung tissue measured by CT (mean +/- SEM) was 2.6 +/- 0.41 g/L/yr for placebo as compared with 1.5 +/- 0.41 g/L/yr for alpha(1)-antitrypsin infusion (p = 0.07). Power analysis showed that this protective effect would be significant in a similar trial with 130 patients. This is in contrast to calculations based on annual decline of FEV(1) showing that 550 patients would be needed to show a 50% reduction of annual decline. We conclude that lung density measurements by CT may facilitate future randomized clinical trials of investigational drugs for a disease in which little progress in therapy has been made in the past 30 yr.

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... questions and clinical trials. Optimizing our Clinical Trials Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical ... multi-pronged approach to Optimize our Clinical Trials Enterprise that will make our clinical trials enterprise even ...

  18. Clinical trial to compare tinnitus masking and tinnitus retraining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, J A; Schechter, M A; Zaugg, T L; Griest, S; Jastreboff, P J; Vernon, J A; Kaelin, C; Meikle, M B; Lyons, K S; Stewart, B J

    2006-12-01

    Both tinnitus masking (TM) and tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) can be effective therapies for amelioration of tinnitus. TM may be more effective for patients in the short term, but with continued treatment TRT may produce the greatest effects. Although TM and TRT have been used for many years, research has not documented definitively the efficacy of these methods. The present study was a controlled clinical trial to prospectively evaluate the clinical efficacy of these two methods for US military veterans with severe tinnitus. Over 800 veterans were screened to ensure that enrolled patients had tinnitus of sufficient severity to justify 18 months of individualized treatment. Qualifying patients (n=123) were placed quasi-randomly (alternating placement) into treatment with either TM or TRT. Treatment was administered at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Outcomes of treatment were evaluated primarily using three self-administered tinnitus questionnaires (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire, Tinnitus Severity Index). Findings are presented from the three written questionnaires with respect to three categories of patients: describing tinnitus as a 'moderate,' 'big,' and 'very big' problem at baseline. Based on effect sizes, both groups showed considerable improvement overall. In general, TM effects remained fairly constant over time while TRT effects improved incrementally. For the patients with a 'moderate' and 'big' problem, TM provided the greatest benefit at 3 and 6 months; benefit to these TRT patients was slightly greater at 12 months, and much greater at 18 months. For patients with a 'very big' problem, TM provided the greatest benefit at 3 months. For these latter patients, results were about the same between groups at 6 months, and improvement for TRT was much greater at 12 months, with further gains at 18 months.

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a ... will be done during the clinical trial and why. Each medical center that does the study uses ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ...

  1. Clinical trial registration in physical therapy journals: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, Abraham Samuel; Veluswamy, Sundar Kumar; Rao, Pratiksha Tilak; Maiya, Arun G

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trial registration has become an important part of editorial policies of various biomedical journals, including a few physical therapy journals. However, the extent to which editorial boards enforce the need for trial registration varies across journals. The purpose of this study was to identify editorial policies and reporting of trial registration details in MEDLINE-indexed English-language physical therapy journals. This study was carried out using a cross-sectional design. Editorial policies on trial registration of MEDLINE-indexed member journals of the International Society of Physiotherapy Journal Editors (ISPJE) (Journal of Geriatric Physical Therapy, Journal of Hand Therapy, Journal of Neurologic Physical Therapy, Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, Journal of Physiotherapy [formerly Australian Journal of Physiotherapy], Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport, Manual Therapy, Physical Therapy, Physical Therapy in Sport, Physiotherapy, Physiotherapy Research International, Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, and Revista Brasileira de Fisioterapia) were reviewed in April 2013. Full texts of reports of clinical trials published in these journals between January 1, 2008, and December 31, 2012, were independently assessed for information on trial registration. Among the 13 journals, 8 recommended trial registration, and 6 emphasized prospective trial registration. As of April 2013, 4,618 articles were published between January 2008 and December 2012, of which 9% (417) were clinical trials and 29% (121/417) of these reported trial registration details. A positive trend in reporting of trial registration was observed from 2008 to 2012. The study was limited to MEDLINE-indexed ISPJE member journals. Editorial policies on trial registration of physical therapy journals and a rising trend toward reporting of trial registration details indicate a positive momentum toward trial registration. Physical therapy journal editors need to show

  2. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ...] Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug... Biologics Evaluation and Research (CBER) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy... Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), gene and cellular therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or ... and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance ...

  4. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tendler, Rabbi Moshe D.; Loike, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal. PMID:26241230

  5. Mitochondrial Replacement Therapy: Halachic Considerations for Enrolling in an Experimental Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabbi Moshe D. Tendler

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The transition of new biotechnologies into clinical trials is a critical step in approving a new drug or therapy in health care. Ethically recruiting appropriate volunteers for these clinical trials can be a challenging task for both the pharmaceutical companies and the US Food and Drug Administration. In this paper we analyze the Jewish halachic perspectives of volunteering for clinical trials by focusing on an innovative technology in reproductive medicine, mitochondrial replacement therapy. The halachic perspective encourages individuals to volunteer for such clinical trials under the ethical principles of beneficence and social responsibility, when animal studies have shown that health risks are minimal.

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... take part in a clinical trial. When researchers think that a trial's potential risks are greater than ... care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are ... earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ...

  8. Cellular Therapies Clinical Research Roadmap: lessons learned on how to move a cellular therapy into a clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouseph, Stacy; Tappitake, Darah; Armant, Myriam; Wesselschmidt, Robin; Derecho, Ivy; Draxler, Rebecca; Wood, Deborah; Centanni, John M

    2015-04-01

    A clinical research roadmap has been developed as a resource for researchers to identify critical areas and potential pitfalls when transitioning a cellular therapy product from the research laboratory, by means of an Investigational New Drug (IND) application, into early-phase clinical trials. The roadmap describes four key areas: basic and preclinical research, resource development, translational research and Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) and IND assembly and submission. Basic and preclinical research identifies a new therapeutic concept and demonstrates its potential value with the use of a model of the relevant disease. During resource development, the appropriate specialists and the required expertise to bring this product into the clinic are identified (eg, researchers, regulatory specialists, GMP manufacturing staff, clinicians and clinical trials staff, etc). Additionally, the funds required to achieve this goal (or a plan to procure them) are identified. In the next phase, the plan to translate the research product into a clinical-grade therapeutic is developed. Finally regulatory approval to start the trial must be obtained. In the United States, this is done by filing an IND application with the Food and Drug Administration. The National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-funded Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies program has facilitated the transition of a variety of cellular therapy products from the laboratory into Phase1/2 trials. The five Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies facilities have assisted investigators by performing translational studies and GMP manufacturing to ensure that cellular products met release specifications and were manufactured safely, reproducibly and at the appropriate scale. The roadmap resulting from this experience is the focus of this article. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal ... for the clinical trial. The protocol outlines what will be done during the clinical trial and why. ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial is led by a principal investigator ( ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Trial Protocol Each clinical trial has a master plan called a protocol (PRO-to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The trial ... clinical trial; and detailed information about the treatment plan. Eligibility Criteria A clinical trial's protocol describes what ...

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because they want ... care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find ...

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's role is to review data from a clinical trial ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, ... required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research studies ... parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... for trials with cutting-edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and ... trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A ...

  17. TU-G-BRB-00: Clinical Trials in Proton and Particle Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... protocol affect the trial's results. Comparison Groups In most clinical trials, researchers use comparison groups. This means ... study before you agree to take part. Randomization Most clinical trials that have comparison groups use randomization. ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... more information about eligibility criteria, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Work?" Some trials enroll people who ... for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical Trials Protect Participants?" For more information about ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... study? How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital? ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... from a study at any time, for any reason. Also, during the trial, you have the right ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in ... Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place in medical centers and ... trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain access to new treatments before ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key ... Enterprise NHLBI has a strong tradition of supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

  4. Randomized clinical trial of antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated appendicitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, H C; Kim, M J; Lee, B H

    2017-12-01

    Uncomplicated appendicitis may resolve spontaneously or require treatment with antibiotics or appendicectomy. The aim of this randomized trial was to compare the outcome of a non-antibiotic management strategy with that of antibiotic therapy in uncomplicated appendicitis. Patients presenting to a university teaching hospital with CT-verified uncomplicated simple appendicitis (appendiceal diameter no larger than 11 mm and without any signs of perforation) were randomized to management with a no-antibiotic regimen with supportive care (intravenous fluids, analgesia and antipyretics as necessary) or a 4-day course of antibiotics with supportive care. The primary endpoint was rate of total treatment failure, defined as initial treatment failure within 1 month and recurrence of appendicitis during the follow-up period. Some 245 patients were randomized within the trial, and followed up for a median of 19 months. The duration of hospital stay was shorter (mean 3·1 versus 3·7 days; P antibiotics. There was no difference in total treatment failure rate between the groups: 29 of 124 (23·4 per cent) in the no-antibiotic group and 25 of 121 (20·7 per cent) in the antibiotic group (P = 0·609). Eighteen patients (9 in each group) had initial treatment failure, 15 of whom underwent appendicectomy and three received additional antibiotics. Thirty-six patients (20 in the no-antibiotic group, 16 in the antibiotic group) experienced recurrence, of whom 30 underwent appendicectomy and six received further antibiotics. Treatment failure rates in patients presenting with CT-confirmed uncomplicated appendicitis appeared similar among those receiving supportive care with either a no-antibiotic regimen or a 4-day course of antibiotics. Registration number: KCT0000124 ( http://cris.nih.go.kr). © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Results of two randomised clinical trials of neutron therapy in rectal adenocarcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duncan, W.; Arnott, S.J.; Jack, W.J.L.; Orr, J.A.; Kerr, G.R.; Williams, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    Two clinical trials of neutron therapy were instituted to compare fast neutron therapy with megavoltage therapy in inoperable adenocarcinoma of the rectum and in postoperative recurrent adenocarcinoma of the rectum and to evaluate local tumour control, radiation morbidity and survival rates. In both rectal trials, complete local regression and persistent local control of tumour were similar in each treatment group. Survival was poor and so there is little long-term experience of tumour control and morbidity. The possibility that the relatively poor penetration of the neutron beam had an adverse effect on the results of neutron therapy should be considered. (Auth.)

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Working at the NHLBI Contact and FAQs Accessible Search Form Search the NHLBI, use the drop down list to ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This method helps ensure that any differences observed during a ... to learn more about clinical research and to search for clinical trials: NHLBI Clinical Trials Browse a ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... these results are important because they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding ... All types of clinical trials contribute to medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials. If you're thinking about taking part in a clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about the risks and benefits of any clinical trial before you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about ...

  10. Outcomes of clinical trial: tinnitus masking versus tinnitus retraining therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, James A; Schechter, Martin A; Zaugg, Tara L; Griest, Susan; Jastreboff, Pawel J; Vernon, Jack A; Kaelin, Christine; Meikle, Mary B; Lyons, Karen S; Stewart, Barbara J

    2006-02-01

    A controlled clinical study was conducted to evaluate prospectively the clinical efficacy of tinnitus masking (TM) and tinnitus retraining therapy (TRT) in military veterans having clinically significant tinnitus. Qualifying patients were placed into the two groups in an alternating manner (to avoid selection bias), and treatment was administered at 0, 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Outcomes of treatment were evaluated using three self-administered tinnitus questionnaires (Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, Tinnitus Handicap Questionnaire, Tinnitus Severity Index) and the verbally administered TRT interview forms. Findings are presented from the three written questionnaires, and from two of the interview questions (percentage time aware of, and annoyed by, tinnitus). Outcomes were analyzed on an intent-to-treat basis, using a multilevel modeling approach. Of the 123 patients enrolled, 118 were included in the analysis. Both groups showed significant declines (improvements) on these measures, with the TRT decline being significantly greater than for TM. The greater declines in TRT compared to TM occurred most strongly in patients who began treatment with a "very big" tinnitus problem. When patients began treatment with a "moderate" tinnitus problem, the benefits of TRT compared to TM were more modest.

  11. Regulation of Clinical Trials with Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Matthias; Anliker, Brigitte; Sanzenbacher, Ralf; Schuele, Silke

    2015-01-01

    In the European Union, clinical trials for Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products are regulated at the national level, in contrast to the situation for a Marketing Authorisation Application, in which a centralised procedure is foreseen for these medicinal products. Although based on a common understanding regarding the regulatory requirement to be fulfilled before conduct of a clinical trial with an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product, the procedures and partly the scientific requirements for approval of a clinical trial application differ between the European Union Member States. This chapter will thus give an overview about the path to be followed for a clinical trial application and the subsequent approval process for an Advanced Therapy Investigational Medicinal Product in Germany and will describe the role of the stakeholders that are involved. In addition, important aspects of manufacturing, quality control and non-clinical testing of Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products in the clinical development phase are discussed. Finally, current and future approaches for harmonisation of clinical trial authorisation between European Union Member States are summarised.

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... resources to the strategies and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. In some ways, taking part in a clinical trial is different ...

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Health Topics / About Clinical Trials About Clinical Trials Clinical trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, ... tool for advancing medical knowledge and patient care. Clinical research is done only if doctors don't know ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... about your health or fill out forms about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center in Bethesda, Maryland, runs clinical trials. Many other clinical trials take place ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Clinical trials for children have the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment options. Together, you can make the ... more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about ... clinical trials. NIH Clinical Research Studies ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about specific trials you're ... part in a clinical trial is your decision. Talk with your doctor about all of your treatment ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... any clinical trial before you agree to take part in the trial. Talk with your doctor about specific trials you're interested in. For a list of questions to ask your doctor and the ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key research tool for ... other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors and patients. The results ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Entire Site NHLBI Entire Site Health Topics News & Resources Intramural Research ... or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research ...

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    Full Text Available ... sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, ... and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including the NHLBI) usually ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards ... otherwise. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies follow strict scientific standards. These standards ...

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    Full Text Available ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials ... medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. These studies also may show which ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... care providers might be part of your treatment team. They will monitor your health closely. You may ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute of Health ...

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    Full Text Available ... to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human ... of people. Clinical trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients to find out whether a ... phase I clinical trials test new treatments in small groups of people for safety and side effects. ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments of Defense and ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... risks that outweigh any possible benefits. Clinical Trial Phases Clinical trials of new medicines or medical devices are done in phases. These phases have different purposes and help researchers ...

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... clinical trials. An IRB is an independent committee created by the institution that sponsors a clinical trial. ... have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health of millions of ...

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include ... U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers ( ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Clinical trials, like the two described above, ... in a clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about ...

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    Full Text Available ... Clinical trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ... and advance medical care. They also can help health care decisionmakers direct resources to the strategies and treatments ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... whether a new approach causes any harm. In later phases of clinical trials, researchers learn more about ... other National Institutes of Health (NIH) Institutes and Centers sponsor clinical trials. Many other groups, companies, and ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective for ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

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    Full Text Available ... treatment, or device is safe and effective for humans. What Are Clinical Trials? Clinical trials are research ... are required to have an IRB. Office for Human Research Protections The U.S. Department of Health and ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, so the studies ... Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Events About NHLBI About NHLBI Home Mission and Strategic Vision Leadership Scientific Divisions Operations and Administration Advisory ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

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    Full Text Available ... Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of products, such as medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. ...

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    Full Text Available ... What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might ... enroll in a clinical trial, a doctor or nurse will give you an informed consent form that ...

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    Full Text Available ... and doctors' offices around the country. Benefits and Risks Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial ... volunteer because they want to help others. Possible Risks Clinical trials do have risks and some downsides, ...

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    Full Text Available ... providers don't always cover all patient care costs for clinical trials. If you're thinking about ... clinical trial, find out ahead of time about costs and coverage. You should learn about the risks ...

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... Learn More Connect With Us Contact Us Directly Policies Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and treatments that work best. How Clinical Trials Work If you take part in a clinical trial, ... your doctor about all of your treatment options. Together, you can make the best choice for you. ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... medical knowledge and practice. Why Clinical Trials Are Important Clinical trials are a key research tool for ... and Usage No FEAR Act Grants and Funding Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ... Customer Service/Center for Health Information Email Alerts Jobs and Careers Site Index About NHLBI National Institute ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part in clinical trials. Find a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, ...

  11. Establishing Evidence-Based Indications for Proton Therapy: An Overview of Current Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mishra, Mark V., E-mail: mmishra@umm.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Aggarwal, Sameer [Department of Internal Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Bentzen, Soren M. [Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Knight, Nancy [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Mehta, Minesh P. [Miami Cancer Institute at Baptist Health South Florida, Miami, Florida (United States); Regine, William F. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2017-02-01

    Purpose: To review and assess ongoing proton beam therapy (PBT) clinical trials and to identify major gaps. Methods and Materials: Active PBT clinical trials were identified from (clinicaltrials.gov) and the World Health Organization International Clinical Trials Platform Registry. Data on clinical trial disease site, age group, projected patient enrollment, expected start and end dates, study type, and funding source were extracted. Results: A total of 122 active PBT clinical trials were identified, with target enrollment of >42,000 patients worldwide. Ninety-six trials (79%), with a median planned sample size of 68, were classified as interventional studies. Observational studies accounted for 21% of trials but 71% (n=29,852) of planned patient enrollment. The most common PBT clinical trials focus on gastrointestinal tract tumors (21%, n=26), tumors of the central nervous system (15%, n=18), and prostate cancer (12%, n=15). Five active studies (lung, esophagus, head and neck, prostate, breast) will randomize patients between protons and photons, and 3 will randomize patients between protons and carbon ion therapy. Conclusions: The PBT clinical trial portfolio is expanding rapidly. Although the majority of ongoing studies are interventional, the majority of patients will be accrued to observational studies. Future efforts should focus on strategies to encourage optimal patient enrollment and retention, with an emphasis on randomized, controlled trials, which will require support from third-party payers. Results of ongoing PBT studies should be evaluated in terms of comparative effectiveness, as well as incremental effectiveness and value offered by PBT in comparison with conventional radiation modalities.

  12. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... for trials with cutting-edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and health ... trials that involve high-risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as children). A DSMB's ...

  13. The efficacy of maggot debridement therapy - a review of comparative clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zarchi, K.; Jemec, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    in a variety of ulcers. However, comparative clinical trials and in particular randomized controlled trials investigating the efficacy of MDT are sparse. A systematic search in the literature showed three randomized clinical trials and five non randomized studies evaluating the efficacy of sterile Lucilia......, including hydrocolloid, hydrogel and saline moistened gauze. However, the design of the studies was suboptimal, with important differences in the use of other therapies, such as compression, that may influence both debridement and healing between the compared groups, as well as inappropriately short follow...

  14. Clinical trial experience using erythropoietin during radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lavey, R.S.

    1998-01-01

    Oncologists have several reasons for trying to maintain or increase hemoglobin levels in their patients during therapy. Relief of the symptoms of anemia, including fatigue and dyspnea, are traditional, well-accepted indications. A newer rationale is to enhance the efficacy of radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy in controlling tumors. A laboratory animal study found that administration of recombinant human erythropoietin (rHuEPO) increased intratumoral median oxygen levels and diminished the proportion of measurements in the very low ( [de

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... more screening tests to see which test produces the best results. Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the ... and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner with these companies or groups to help sponsor some trials. All ...

  16. Innovating cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs in an era of successful standard of care therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanDevanter, Donald R; Mayer-Hamblett, Nicole

    2017-11-01

    Evolving cystic fibrosis 'standards of care' have influenced recent cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs for new therapies; care additions/improvements will require innovative trial designs to maximize feasibility and efficacy detection. Three cystic fibrosis therapeutic areas (pulmonary exacerbations, Pseudomonas aeruginosa airway infections, and reduced cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator [CFTR] protein function) differ with respect to the duration for which recognized 'standards of care' have been available. However, developers of new therapies in all the three areas are affected by similar challenges: standards of care have become so strongly entrenched that traditional placebo-controlled studies in cystic fibrosis populations likely to benefit from newer therapies have become less and less feasible. Today, patients/clinicians are more likely to entertain participation in active-comparator trial designs, that have substantial challenges of their own. Foremost among these are the selection of 'valid' active comparator(s), estimation of a comparator's current clinical efficacy (required for testing noninferiority hypotheses), and effective blinding of commercially available comparators. Recent and future cystic fibrosis clinical trial designs will have to creatively address this collateral result of successful past development of effective cystic fibrosis therapies: patients and clinicians are much less likely to accept simple, placebo-controlled studies to evaluate future therapies.

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... you to explore NIH Clinical Center for patient recruitment and clinical trial information. For more information, please email the NIH Clinical Center Office of Patient Recruitment at cc-prpl@cc.nih.gov or call ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the same scientific safeguards as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ... based on what is known to work in adults. To improve clinical care of children, more studies ...

  19. Development of a manualized protocol of massage therapy for clinical trials in osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Ather

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Clinical trial design of manual therapies may be especially challenging as techniques are often individualized and practitioner-dependent. This paper describes our methods in creating a standardized Swedish massage protocol tailored to subjects with osteoarthritis of the knee while respectful of the individualized nature of massage therapy, as well as implementation of this protocol in two randomized clinical trials. Methods The manualization process involved a collaborative process between methodologic and clinical experts, with the explicit goals of creating a reproducible semi-structured protocol for massage therapy, while allowing some latitude for therapists’ clinical judgment and maintaining consistency with a prior pilot study. Results The manualized protocol addressed identical specified body regions with distinct 30- and 60-min protocols, using standard Swedish strokes. Each protocol specifies the time allocated to each body region. The manualized 30- and 60-min protocols were implemented in a dual-site 24-week randomized dose-finding trial in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee, and is currently being implemented in a three-site 52-week efficacy trial of manualized Swedish massage therapy. In the dose-finding study, therapists adhered to the protocols and significant treatment effects were demonstrated. Conclusions The massage protocol was manualized, using standard techniques, and made flexible for individual practitioner and subject needs. The protocol has been applied in two randomized clinical trials. This manualized Swedish massage protocol has real-world utility and can be readily utilized both in the research and clinical settings. Trial registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00970008 (18 August 2009

  20. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Intermittent Explosive Disorder: A Pilot Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCloskey, Michael S.; Noblett, Kurtis L.; Deffenbacher, Jerry L.; Gollan, Jackie K.; Coccaro, Emil F.

    2008-01-01

    No randomized clinical trials have evaluated the efficacy of psychotherapy for intermittent explosive disorder (IED). In the present study, the authors tested the efficacy of 12-week group and individual cognitive-behavioral therapies (adapted from J. L. Deffenbacher & M. McKay, 2000) by comparing them with a wait-list control in a randomized…

  1. Moving from Efficacy to Effectiveness in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Psychosis: A Randomized Clinical Practice Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lincoln, Tania M.; Ziegler, Michael; Mehl, Stephanie; Kesting, Marie-Luise; Lullmann, Eva; Westermann, Stefan; Rief, Winfried

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized controlled trials have attested the efficacy of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) in reducing psychotic symptoms. Now, studies are needed to investigate its effectiveness in routine clinical practice settings. Method: Eighty patients with schizophrenia spectrum disorders who were seeking outpatient treatment were randomized…

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... groups, companies, and organizations also sponsor clinical trials. Examples include Government Agencies, such as the U.S. Departments ... sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored whether the benefits of ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including ... our campus or trials NIH has sponsored at universities, medical centers, and hospitals. ClinicalTrials.gov View a ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... identified earlier than they would be in general medical practice. This is because late-phase trials have large ... supporting clinical trials that have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health ...

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the past, clinical trial participants often were White men. Researchers assumed that trial results were valid for ... different ethnic groups sometimes respond differently than White men to the same medical approach. As a result, ...

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... or strategies work best for certain illnesses or groups of people. Some clinical trials show a positive result. For example, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) sponsored a trial of two different ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... healthy people to test new approaches to prevention, diagnosis, or screening. In the past, clinical trial participants ... DSMBs for large trials comparing alternative strategies for diagnosis or treatment. In addition, the NIH requires DSMBs ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. The NIH may partner with these companies or groups to help sponsor some trials. All ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... trials produce the best data available for health care decisionmaking. The purpose of clinical trials is research, ... they advance medical knowledge and help improve patient care. Sponsorship and Funding The National Heart, Lung, and ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored ... risks. Other examples of clinical trials that test principles or strategies include studies that explore whether surgery ...

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to ... as clinical trials for adults. For more information, go to "How Do Clinical ...

  12. Cell therapy in dilated cardiomyopathy: from animal models to clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. del Corsso

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Dilated cardiomyopathy can be the end-stage form and common denominator of several cardiac disorders of known cause, such as hypertensive, ischemic, diabetic and Chagasic diseases. However, some individuals have clinical findings, such as an increase in ventricular chamber size and impaired contractility (classical manifestations of dilated cardiomyopathy even in the absence of a diagnosed primary disease. In these patients, dilated cardiomyopathy is classified as idiopathic since its etiology is obscure. Nevertheless, regardless of all of the advances in medical, pharmacological and surgical procedures, the fate of patients with dilated cardiomyopathy (of idiopathic or of any other known cause is linked to arrhythmic episodes, severe congestive heart failure and an increased risk of sudden cardiac death. In this review, we will summarize present data on the use of cell therapies in animal models of dilated cardiomyopathies and will discuss the few clinical trials that have been published so far involving patients affected by this disease. The animal models discussed here include those in which the cardiomyopathy is produced by genetic manipulation and those in which disease is induced by chemical or infectious agents. The specific model used clearly creates restrictions to translation of the proposed cell therapy to clinical practice, insofar as most of the clinical trials performed to date with cell therapy have used autologous cells. Thus, translation of genetic models of dilated cardiomyopathy may have to wait until the use of allogeneic cells becomes more widespread in clinical trials of cell therapies for cardiac diseases.

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT was already in common use for the treatment of menopausal symptoms. It also ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, ... whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women. (When the trial began, HT ... also was increasingly being used for prevention of heart disease.) The study found that HT increased the risk ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... part. Randomization Most clinical trials that have comparison groups use randomization. This involves assigning patients to different comparison groups by chance, rather than choice. This ...

  17. [A clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamenhof, R.G.

    1990-01-01

    This document briefly describes recent advances in the author's laboratory. Topics described include neutron beam design, high- resolution autoradiography, boronated phenylalanine (BPA) distribution and survival studies in glioma bearing mice, computer- aided treatment planning, prompt gamma boron 10 analysis facility at MITI-II, non-rodent BPA toxicity studies, and preparations for clinical studies

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in ... Possible Benefits Taking part in a clinical trial can have many benefits. For example, you may gain ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... you may get tests or treatments in a hospital, clinic, or doctor's office. In some ways, taking ... people will need to travel or stay in hospitals to take part in clinical trials. For example, ...

  20. Recruitment of Participants to a Clinical Trial of Botanical Therapy for Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Harris E.; McVary, Kevin T.; Meleth, Sreelatha; Stavris, Karen; Downey, Joe; Kusek, John W.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Objectives The timely recruitment of study participants is a critical component of successful trials. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common nonmalignant urologic condition among older men, is characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Successful recruitment methods for a trial of medical therapy for BPH, Medical Therapy of Prostate Symptoms (MTOPS), were mass mailing and advertising. The Complementary and Alternative Medicines Trial for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) was designed to evaluate a botanical therapy, saw palmetto, for the treatment of BPH. The objective of this study was to evaluate recruitment strategies for CAMUS and to contrast the baseline characteristics of CAMUS participants with those recruited to a similar trial using conventional medical therapy. Design CAMUS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of saw palmetto given at escalating doses over an 18-month period on relief from LUTS. Subjects The target enrollment goal was 350 men with LUTS from 11 clinical centers over a 12-month period. The recruitment techniques used and participants contacted, screened, and randomized through each technique were obtained from the clinical centers. Baseline characteristics of the CAMUS participants were compared with participants in the MTOPS trial who met the CAMUS eligibility criteria for LUTS. Results The target enrollment goal was achieved in 11 months. The overall monthly recruitment rate per site was 3.7 and ranged from 2.4 to 8.0. The most successful recruitment methods were mass mailing and advertising, which accounted for 39% and 35% of the study participants, respectively. In comparison to MTOPS participants, CAMUS participants were younger, more highly educated, more diverse, and had less severe urinary symptoms. Conclusions Successful recruitment methods for CAMUS were similar to those in MTOPS. The use of botanical therapy attracted a less symptomatic and more educated

  1. Recruitment of participants to a clinical trial of botanical therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jeannette Y; Foster, Harris E; McVary, Kevin T; Meleth, Sreelatha; Stavris, Karen; Downey, Joe; Kusek, John W

    2011-05-01

    The timely recruitment of study participants is a critical component of successful trials. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH), a common nonmalignant urologic condition among older men, is characterized by lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). Successful recruitment methods for a trial of medical therapy for BPH, Medical Therapy of Prostate Symptoms (MTOPS), were mass mailing and advertising. The Complementary and Alternative Medicines Trial for Urological Symptoms (CAMUS) was designed to evaluate a botanical therapy, saw palmetto, for the treatment of BPH. The objective of this study was to evaluate recruitment strategies for CAMUS and to contrast the baseline characteristics of CAMUS participants with those recruited to a similar trial using conventional medical therapy. CAMUS is a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to evaluate the effects of saw palmetto given at escalating doses over an 18-month period on relief from LUTS. The target enrollment goal was 350 men with LUTS from 11 clinical centers over a 12-month period. The recruitment techniques used and participants contacted, screened, and randomized through each technique were obtained from the clinical centers. Baseline characteristics of the CAMUS participants were compared with participants in the MTOPS trial who met the CAMUS eligibility criteria for LUTS. The target enrollment goal was achieved in 11 months. The overall monthly recruitment rate per site was 3.7 and ranged from 2.4 to 8.0. The most successful recruitment methods were mass mailing and advertising, which accounted for 39% and 35% of the study participants, respectively. In comparison to MTOPS participants, CAMUS participants were younger, more highly educated, more diverse, and had less severe urinary symptoms. Successful recruitment methods for CAMUS were similar to those in MTOPS. The use of botanical therapy attracted a less symptomatic and more educated study population.

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the clinical trial you take part in, the information gathered can help others and add to scientific knowledge. People who take part in clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people volunteer because ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... from other clinical trials show what doesn't work or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative ... safe a treatment is or how well it works. Children (aged 18 and younger) get ... legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ... clinical trials are vital to the process of improving medical care. Many people ... participants, it may not work for you. A new treatment may have side ...

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ... phase II clinical trials. The risk of side effects might be even greater for ... treatments. Health insurance and health care providers don't always ...

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    Full Text Available ... a Clinical Trial If you're interested in learning more about, or taking part in, clinical trials, talk with your doctor. He or she may know about studies going on in your area. You can visit the following website to learn more about ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... products, such as medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these clinical trials. ... cancer also increased. As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now recommends never using HT ... Clinical Trials Work If you take ...

  8. Physiotherapy and Occupational Therapy vs No Therapy in Mild to Moderate Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Carl E; Patel, Smitaa; Ives, Natalie; Rick, Caroline E; Dowling, Francis; Woolley, Rebecca; Wheatley, Keith; Walker, Marion F; Sackley, Catherine M

    2016-03-01

    It is unclear whether physiotherapy and occupational therapy are clinically effective and cost-effective in Parkinson disease (PD). To perform a large pragmatic randomized clinical trial to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of individualized physiotherapy and occupational therapy in PD. The PD REHAB Trial was a multicenter, open-label, parallel group, controlled efficacy trial. A total of 762 patients with mild to moderate PD were recruited from 38 sites across the United Kingdom. Recruitment took place between October 2009 and June 2012, with 15 months of follow-up. Participants with limitations in activities of daily living (ADL) were randomized to physiotherapy and occupational therapy or no therapy. The primary outcome was the Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) Scale score at 3 months after randomization. Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life (assessed by Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 and EuroQol-5D); adverse events; and caregiver quality of life. Outcomes were assessed before trial entry and then 3, 9, and 15 months after randomization. Of the 762 patients included in the study (mean [SD] age, 70 [9.1] years), 381 received physiotherapy and occupational therapy and 381 received no therapy. At 3 months, there was no difference between groups in NEADL total score (difference, 0.5 points; 95% CI, -0.7 to 1.7; P = .41) or Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index (0.007 points; 95% CI, -1.5 to 1.5; P = .99). The EuroQol-5D quotient was of borderline significance in favor of therapy (-0.03; 95% CI, -0.07 to -0.002; P = .04). The median therapist contact time was 4 visits of 58 minutes over 8 weeks. Repeated-measures analysis showed no difference in NEADL total score, but Parkinson Disease Questionnaire-39 summary index (diverging 1.6 points per annum; 95% CI, 0.47 to 2.62; P = .005) and EuroQol-5D score (0.02; 95% CI, 0.00007 to 0.03; P = .04) showed small differences in favor of therapy. There was no difference in

  9. [Bibliometrics study on indications of acupuncture therapy based on foreign acupuncture clinical trials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Wei; Tong, Yuan-Yuan; Zhao, Ying-Kai; Rong, Pei-Jing; Wang, Hong-Cai

    2012-10-01

    In the present paper, the authors make a bibliometrics study on clinical indications of acupuncture therapy based on the published foreign articles about acupuncture clinical trials collected from PubMed database and Excerpta Medica database (EMbase). In 1996, 64 acupuncture indications were declared by WHO in Milan conference. But in recent 15 years, clinical trials have been conducted extensively in the foreign countries. Till now, 77 new indications for acupuncture therapy have been found in the foreign journals. The authors recommended that 29 indications (knee osteoarthritis, critique age problems, muscular fasciae ache, anxiety, etc.) should be added to the first class, 4 indications (irritable bowel syndrome, malposition, backache, simple obesity) should be upgraded from the second class to the first class, and the other 3 indications (childbirth pain, male and female barren) should be upgraded from the third class to the first class due to their application frequency in clinical trials. Increase of clinical indications reflects extensive application of acupuncture therapy and may help providing a better service for people's health.

  10. The role of radiation therapy in pediatric oncology as assessed by cooperative clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Angio, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    Major advances have been made in pediatric oncology, and many are due to the advent of the cooperative clinical trial. This important research tool was originally developed for the testing of various therapeutic strategies for the management of children with acute leukemia. Such trials were eminently successful, as the consistently better long-term survival rates for children with this hitherto uniformly lethal disease can attest. The method soon found favor for the investigation of patients with so-called solid tumors. These trails were originally concerned with the elucidation of the value of various chemotherapeutic agents. Radiation therapists soon became involved, however, and this discipline became more heavily represented in study design and data analyses. Much radiation therapy information has been gained, some through prospective, randomized clinical investigations and some through retrospective reviews of roentgen therapy as it was employed in protocols accenting other aspects of care. Voluminous, important radiation therapy data have been deduced through the latter retrospective kinds of analyses, but this review will be confined largely to the published results of prospective, randomized cooperative clinical trials where radiation therapy was a governing variable. Certain investigations of historical interest will also be cited together with other results that established important principles even though not so rigorous in design

  11. Preparations for the next generation of clinical trials with proton therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newhauser, W.D.; Smith, A.R.; Fitzek, M.; Ibbott, G.; Munzenrider, J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: As proton radiation therapy centers become more widely available, we anticipate an increase in clinical proton therapy research, e.g. clinical trials to compare the efficacy of proton therapy with that of conformal photon therapy. In this presentation, we explore some of the quality assurance (QA) work that will be necessary to support multi-institution clinical trials to include facilities in Europe, Asia and the United States. Specifically, we shall concentrate on three areas pertaining to practical clinical proton dosimetry for which clear, concise, and coherent guidance is needed. First, the existing proton therapy dosimetry protocols (e.g. ICRU Report 59, IAEA TRS-398) provide general methods that are well suited for adoption in proton therapy. Many additional techniques are required in order to implement dosimetry in a contemporary proton clinic. For example, special situations arise for small fields including those for radiosurgery and ocular treatments, and for rotational therapy. Fortunately, this additional information is emerging from various proton therapy centers. For example, Vatnitsky et al. described the dosimetry of small beams, Newhauser et al. described absolute proton dosimetry techniques for radiosurgery and for ocular beams. Newhauser et al. also reported on a general formalism and practical methods for dosimetry measurements in a rotational proton gantry. Our aim is to discuss some specific needs for the standardization of these tasks, which will be essential in achieving adequate uniformity in multi-institution clinical trials. Second, we will discuss means to standardize of writing the physics QA portion of protocols for multi-institution clinical trials, through which a statistically significant number of patient outcomes may be obtained more rapidly. Surprisingly, only two multi-institution proton clinical trials have been undertaken (a skull base sarcoma trial and a prostate cancer trial, both shared between MGH and Loma Linda

  12. Indirect vs Direct Voice Therapy for Children With Vocal Nodules: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnick, Christopher; Ballif, Catherine; De Guzman, Vanessa; Sataloff, Robert; Campisi, Paolo; Kerschner, Joseph; Shembel, Adrianna; Reda, Domenic; Shi, Helen; Sheryka Zacny, Elinore; Bunting, Glenn

    2018-02-01

    Benign vocal fold nodules affect 12% to 22% of the pediatric population, and 95% of otolaryngologists recommend voice therapy as treatment. However, no randomized clinical trials that we are aware of have shown its benefits. To determine the impact of voice therapy in children with vocal fold nodules according to pretherapy and posttherapy scores on the Pediatric Voice-Related Quality of Life (PVRQOL) survey; secondary objectives included changes in phonatory parameters. For this multicenter randomized clinical trial, 114 children ages 6 to 10 years with vocal fold nodules, PVRQOL scores less than 87.5, and dysphonia for longer than 12 weeks were recruited from outpatient voice and speech clinics. This age range was identified because these patients have not experienced pubertal changes of the larynx, tolerate stroboscopy, and cooperate with voice therapy. Participants were blinded to treatment arm. Participants received either indirect or direct therapy for 8 to 12 weeks. Indirect therapy focused on education and discussion of voice principles, while direct treatment used the stimulus, response, antecedent paradigm. The primary outcome measure was PVRQOL score change before and after treatment. Secondary phonatory measures were also compared. Overall, 114 children were recruited for study (mean [SD] age, 8 [1.4] years; 83 males [73%]); with 57 randomized to receive either indirect or direct therapy. Both direct and indirect therapy approaches showed significant differences in PVRQOL scores pretherapy to posttherapy. The mean increase in PVRQOL score for direct therapy was 19.2, and 14.7 for indirect therapy (difference, 4.5; 95.3% CI, -10.8 to 19.8). Of 44 participants in the direct therapy group, 27 (61%) achieved a clinically meaningful PVRQOL improvement, compared with 26 of 49 (53%) for indirect therapy (difference, 8%; 95% CI, -12 to 28). Post hoc stratification showed robust effects in the direct therapy group for older children (Cohen d = 0.50) and the

  13. Multicentre quality assurance of intensity-modulated radiation therapy plans: a precursor to clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Williams, M. J.; Bailey, M. J.; Forstner, D.; Metcalfe, P. E

    2007-01-01

    Full text: A multicentre planning study comparing intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans for the treatment of a head and neck cancer has been carried out. Three Australian radiotherapy centres, each with a different planning system, were supplied a fully contoured CT dataset and requested to generate an IMRT plan in accordance with the requirements of an IMRT-based radiation therapy oncology group clinical trial. Plan analysis was carried out using software developed specifically for reviewing multicentre clinical trial data. Two out of the three plans failed to meet the prescription requirements with one misinterpreting the prescription and the third failed to meet one of the constraints. Only one plan achieved all of the dose objectives for the critical structures and normal tissues. Although each centre used very similar planning parameters and beam arrangements the resulting plans were quite different. The subjective interpretation and application of the prescription and planning objectives emphasize one of the many difficulties in carrying out multicentre IMRT planning studies. The treatment prescription protocol in a clinical trial must be both lucid and unequivocally stated to avoid misinterpretation. Australian radiotherapy centres must show that they can produce a quality IMRT plan and that they can adhere to protocols for IMRT planning before using it in a clinical trial

  14. Statin therapy and clinical outcomes in myocardial infarction patients complicated by acute heart failure : insights from the EPHESUS trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobre, Daniela; Rossignol, Patrick; Murin, Jan; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Lamiral, Zohra; Krum, Henry; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J.; Pitt, Bertram; Zannad, Faiez

    Several clinical trials have shown that in patients with acute myocardial infarction (MI), statin therapy improves cardiovascular (CV) outcomes, but in these trials patients with acute heart failure (HF) were excluded or only a few were included. In patients with chronic HF, statin therapy does not

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... and compare new treatments with other available treatments. Steps To Avoid Bias The researchers doing clinical trials take steps to avoid bias. "Bias" means that human choices ...

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    Full Text Available ... materials, and offer advice on research-related issues. Data Safety Monitoring Board Every National Institutes of Health ( ... III clinical trial is required to have a Data and Safety Monitoring Board (DSMB). This board consists ...

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    ... of Personal Stories Peers Celebrating Art Peers Celebrating Music Be Vocal Support Locator DBSA In-Person Support ... by participating in a clinical trial is to science first and to the patient second. More About ...

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    Full Text Available ... Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and Sleep Disorders Lung Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision ... women and that are ethnically diverse. Children also need clinical trials that focus on them, as medical ...

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  3. Olsalazine is contraindicated during pelvic radiation therapy: results of a double-blind, randomized clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martenson, James A.; Hyland, Glenn; Moertel, Charles G.; Mailliard, James A.; O'Fallon, Judith R.; Collins, Roger T.; Morton, Roscoe F.; Tewfik, Hamed H.; Moore, Randy L.; Frank, Albert R.; Urias, Rodolfo E.; Deming, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: A randomized clinical trial from Great Britain suggested a possible beneficial effect of acetylsalicylate in the prevention of radiation-induced bowel toxicity. Olsalazine is an orally administered drug designed to deliver 5-aminosalicylate to the large bowel with minimal systemic absorption. A randomized clinical trial was undertaken to assess the effectiveness of olsalazine in preventing acute diarrhea in patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy were randomized, in double-blind fashion, to olsalazine 250 mg, two capsules twice daily, or an identical appearing placebo, two capsules twice daily. Patients were then evaluated weekly during radiation therapy for the primary study endpoint, diarrhea, as well as rectal bleeding, abdominal cramping, and tenesmus. Results: The study was closed early, after entry of 58 evaluable patients, when a preliminary analysis showed excessive diarrhea in patients randomized to olsalazine. The incidence and severity of diarrhea were worse in patients randomized to olsalazine (p 0.0036). Sixty percent of the patients randomized to olsalazine experienced Grade 3 or 4 diarrhea compared to only 14% randomized to placebo. There was also a trend toward higher incidence and greater severity of abdominal cramping in patients who were randomized to olsalazine (p = 0.084). Conclusion: Administration of olsalazine during pelvic radiation therapy resulted in an increased incidence and severity of diarrhea. Olsalazine is contraindicated in patients receiving pelvic radiation therapy

  4. From Molecular Biology to Clinical Trials: Toward Personalized Colorectal Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palma, Sabina; Zwenger, Ariel O; Croce, María V; Abba, Martín C; Lacunza, Ezequiel

    2016-06-01

    During the past years, molecular studies through high-throughput technologies have led to the confirmation of critical alterations in colorectal cancer (CRC) and the discovery of some new ones, including mutations, DNA methylations, and structural chromosomal changes. These genomic alterations might act in concert to dysregulate specific signaling pathways that normally exert their functions on critical cell phenotypes, including the regulation of cellular metabolism, proliferation, differentiation, and survival. Targeted therapy against key components of altered signaling pathways has allowed an improvement in CRC treatment. However, a significant percentage of patients with CRC and metastatic CRC will not benefit from these targeted therapies and will be restricted to systemic chemotherapy. Mechanisms of resistance have been associated with specific gene alterations. To fully understand the nature and significance of the genetic and epigenetic defects in CRC that might favor a tumor evading a given therapy, much work remains. Therefore, a dynamic link between basic molecular research and preclinical studies, which ultimately constitute the prelude to standardized therapies, is very important to provide better and more effective treatments against CRC. We present an updated revision of the main molecular features of CRC and their associated therapies currently under study in clinical trials. Moreover, we performed an unsupervised classification of CRC clinical trials with the aim of obtaining an overview of the future perspectives of preclinical studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Global Harmonization of Quality Assurance Naming Conventions in Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melidis, Christos, E-mail: christos.melidis@eortc.be [European Organization for the Research and Treatment of Cancer–Radiation Oncology Group (EORTC-ROG), Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance (RTQA), Brussels (Belgium); Bosch, Walther R. [Washington University, representing Advanced Technology Consortium, Radiation Oncology, St. Louis, Missouri (United States); Izewska, Joanna [Dosimetry Laboratory, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Fidarova, Elena; Zubizarreta, Eduardo [Applied Radiation Biology and Radiotherapy Section, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria); Ulin, Kenneth [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Representing Quality Assurance Review Center, Worcester, Massachusetts (United States); Ishikura, Satoshi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Juntendo University, Representing Japan Clinical Oncology Group, RTQA, Tokyo (Japan); Followill, David [Department of Radiation Physics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Representing Radiological Physics Center, RTQA, Houston, Texas (United States); Galvin, James [Department of Radiation Oncology, Thomas Jefferson University, Representing Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, RTQA, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Haworth, Annette [Department of Physical Sciences, Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, representing TransTasman Radiation Oncology Group (TROG) Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Besuijen, Deidre [North West Cancer Centre, Representing TROG Cancer Research, Newcastle (Australia); Clark, Clark H. [Department of Medical Physics, St. Luke' s Cancer Centre, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, Surrey and National Physical Laboratory, Teddington, Middlesex, representing Radiation Therapy Trials Quality Assurance (RTTQA) (United Kingdom); Miles, Elizabeth; Aird, Edwin [Mount Vernon Cancer Centre, Northwood, Middlesex representing RTTQA (United Kingdom); and others

    2014-12-01

    Purpose: To review the various radiation therapy quality assurance (RTQA) procedures used by the Global Clinical Trials RTQA Harmonization Group (GHG) steering committee members and present the harmonized RTQA naming conventions by amalgamating procedures with similar objectives. Methods and Materials: A survey of the GHG steering committee members' RTQA procedures, their goals, and naming conventions was conducted. The RTQA procedures were classified as baseline, preaccrual, and prospective/retrospective data capture and analysis. After all the procedures were accumulated and described, extensive discussions took place to come to harmonized RTQA procedures and names. Results: The RTQA procedures implemented within a trial by the GHG steering committee members vary in quantity, timing, name, and compliance criteria. The procedures of each member are based on perceived chances of noncompliance, so that the quality of radiation therapy planning and treatment does not negatively influence the trial measured outcomes. A comparison of these procedures demonstrated similarities among the goals of the various methods, but the naming given to each differed. After thorough discussions, the GHG steering committee members amalgamated the 27 RTQA procedures to 10 harmonized ones with corresponding names: facility questionnaire, beam output audit, benchmark case, dummy run, complex treatment dosimetry check, virtual phantom, individual case review, review of patients' treatment records, and protocol compliance and dosimetry site visit. Conclusions: Harmonized RTQA harmonized naming conventions, which can be used in all future clinical trials involving radiation therapy, have been established. Harmonized procedures will facilitate future intergroup trial collaboration and help to ensure comparable RTQA between international trials, which enables meta-analyses and reduces RTQA workload for intergroup studies.

  6. Incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian patients: Analysis of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melva Louisa

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim To review the effi cacy and safety data on incretin-based therapies currently available (exenatide, liraglutide, sitagliptin, vildagliptin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian population.Methods We conducted Medline search of all relevant randomized clinical trials of incretin-based therapies for type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian populations. Data pertinent to the efficacy and safety of GLP-1 mimetics and DPP-4 inhibitors were extracted and used.Results We found 14 randomized controlled trials of incretin based-therapy which included 3567 type 2 diabetes mellitus in Asian population (Japanese, Chinese, Korean, Indian. It was shown that incretin-based therapies improved HbA1c at higher extent (up to -1.42% in exenatide 10 mcg bid, -1.85% for liraglutide 0.9 mg qd, -1.4% for sitagliptin 100 mg and -1.4% for vildagliptin 50 mg bid compared to the effects observed in studies with Caucasian population, with comparable safety profile.Conclusion The efficacy of incretin-based therapies in Asian patients improved glycemic parameters in a higher magnitude on some glycemic parameters compared with those in Caucasian population. These results indicate that incretin-based therapies may be more effective in Asian population than in Caucasian. (Med J Indones 2010; 19: 205-12Key words: exenatide, incretin, liraglutide, sitagliptin, type-2 diabetes, vildagliptin

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... taking the same treatment the same way. These patients are closely watched by Data and Safety Monitoring Boards. Even if you don't directly ... risk procedures (such as gene therapy) or vulnerable patients (such as ... trial for safety problems or differences in results among different groups. ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... edge approaches, such as gene therapy or new biological treatments. Health insurance and health care providers don't ... of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and ...

  9. Randomized, controlled clinical trial evaluating the efficacy of pulsed signal therapy in dogs with osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Meghan O; Gordon-Evans, Wanda J; Knap, Kim E; Evans, Richard B

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of pulsed signal therapy (PST) in reducing pain and increasing function in dogs with osteoarthritis (OA) using a randomized, blinded, controlled clinical trial. Randomized, controlled, blinded clinical trial. Adult dogs (n = 60) with moderate-to-severe clinical signs of OA. Dogs were randomized by age into 2 groups: dogs ≥ 9 years and dogs Goniometry and gait analysis were performed, and the Canine Brief Pain Inventory (CBPI) questionnaire was given to the owners to fill out without supervision. Outcome measures were repeated at the end of treatment (Day 11) and 6 weeks after beginning treatment (Day 42). The PST group performed significantly better than the control group as measured by the CBPI Severity and Interference scores (P Veterinary Surgeons.

  10. Is laser acupuncture an effective complementary therapy for obesity management? A systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namazi, Nazli; Khodamoradi, Kajal; Larijani, Bagher; Ayati, Mohammad Hossein

    2017-12-01

    Complementary therapies may increase the success rate of weight loss via a calorie-restricted diet. Acupuncture is a popular complementary therapy for obesity management. To our knowledge, no studies have summarised the effects of laser acupuncture (LA) on obesity. To evaluate the efficacy of LA, in particular with respect to its impact on anthropometric features and appetite in obese adults, by conducting a systematic review of previous clinical trials. We searched PubMed/Medline, Scopus, Web of Science, the Cochrane Library, Embase and Google Scholar electronic databases for papers published through October 2016. All clinical trials in English containing either anthropometric indices or appetite parameters were included. Two reviewers independently examined studies based on a predefined form for data extraction and the Jadad scale for quality assessment in order to minimise bias throughout the evaluation. After screening the papers, seven clinical trials met the criteria and were included in the systematic review. Positive effects of LA therapy were seen in body weight (n=3), body mass index (n=5), waist circumference (n=4), hip circumference (n=3), waist to hip ratio (n=4) and % fat mass (n=3). Appetite parameters were reported in one study, which showed that LA can reduce appetite and increase the sensation of feeling full. Although some studies have indicated beneficial effects for LA on obesity, the lack of evidence with high methodological quality made it impossible to reach a definitive conclusion about the efficacy of LA for obesity management. Further high-quality, randomised, sham-controlled clinical trials with a larger sample size are needed to shed light on the efficacy of LA for obesity management and weight maintenance. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies Program has been successfully developed and evaluated to fill an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, ...

  12. Optimizing Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance in Clinical Trials: A TROG 08.03 RAVES Substudy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trada, Yuvnik, E-mail: yuvnik@gmail.com [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia); Kneebone, Andrew [Royal North Shore Hospital, St Lenoards, New South Wales (Australia); Paneghel, Andrea [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Pearse, Maria [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Sidhom, Mark [Liverpool Hospital, Liverpool, New South Wales (Australia); Tang, Colin [Sir Charles Gairdner Hospital, Nedlands, Western Australia (Australia); Wiltshire, Kirsty; Haworth, Annette [Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, Melbourne, Victoria (Australia); Fraser-Browne, Carol [Auckland Hospital, Auckland (New Zealand); Martin, Jarad [Calvary Mater Newcastle, Waratah, New South Wales (Australia)

    2015-12-01

    Purpose: To explore site- and clinician-level factors associated with protocol violations requiring real-time-review (RTR) resubmission in a multicenter clinical trial to help tailor future quality assurance (QA) protocols. Methods and Materials: RAVES (Radiation Therapy–Adjuvant vs Early Salvage) (Trans-Tasman Radiation Oncology Group 08.03) is a randomized trial comparing adjuvant with early salvage radiation therapy in men with positive surgical margins or pT3 disease after prostatectomy. Quality assurance in RAVES required each clinician and site to submit a credentialing dummy run (DR) and for each patient's radiation therapy plan to undergo external RTR before treatment. Prospectively defined major violations from trial protocol required remedy and resubmission. Site and clinician factors associated with RTR resubmission were examined using hierarchical modeling. Results: Data were collected from 171 consecutive patients, treated by 46 clinicians at 32 hospitals. There were 47 RTR resubmissions (27%) due to 65 major violations. The relative rate of resubmission decreased by 29% per year as the study progressed (odds ratio OR. 0.71, P=.02). The majority of resubmissions were due to contouring violations (39 of 65) and dosimetric violations (22 of 65). For each additional patient accrued, significant decreases in RTR resubmission were seen at both clinician level (OR 0.75, P=.02) and site level (OR 0.72, P=.01). The rate of resubmission due to dosimetric violations was only 1.6% after the first 5 patients. Use of IMRT was associated with lower rates of resubmission compared with 3-dimensional conformal radiation therapy (OR 0.38, P=.05). Conclusion: Several low- and high-risk factors that may assist with tailoring future clinical trial QA were identified. Because the real-time resubmission rate was largely independent of the credentialing exercise, some form of RTR QA is recommended. The greatest benefit from QA was derived early in trial activation

  13. Effects of music therapy on intravitreal injections: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xuejing; Seth, Rajeev K; Rao, Veena S; Huang, John J; Adelman, Ron A

    2012-08-01

    To investigate the effects of music therapy on anxiety, perceived pain, and satisfaction in patients undergoing intravitreal injections in the outpatient setting. This is a randomized clinical trial. Seventy-three patients were recruited from the retina clinic at 1 institution and randomized into a music therapy (n=37) or control (n=36) group. Prior to injection, patients completed the state portion of the Spielberger State Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI-S). The music therapy group listened to classical music through computer speakers while waiting for and during the injection. The control group underwent the injection in the same setting without music. Afterward, all patients completed another STAI-S and a satisfaction and pain questionnaire. The main outcome measures were objective anxiety derived from STAI-S scores and subjective pain and anxiety from the post procedure questionnaire. The music therapy group had a greater decrease in anxiety than the control group (P=0.0480). Overall, 73% of all patients requested music for future injections (P=0.0001). The music therapy group (84%) requested music in future injections more frequently than the control group (61%) (P=0.0377). Both groups reported similar levels of pain (P=0.5879). Classical music before and during intravitreal injections decreases anxiety in patients without decreasing pain. Most patients desire to have music during future injections. Music therapy is a low-cost, easy, safe intervention that reduces anxiety during intravitreal injections in the outpatient setting.

  14. Sociodemographic analysis of patients in radiation therapy oncology group clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamberlain, Robert M.; Winter, Kathryn A.; Vijayakumar, Srinivasan; Porter, Arthur T.; Roach, M.; Streeter, Oscar; Cox, James D.; Bondy, Melissa L.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the degree to which the sociodemographic characteristics of patients enrolled in Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trails are representative of the general population. Methods and Materials: Sociodemographic data were collected on 4016 patients entered in 33 open RTOG studies between July 1991 and June 1994. The data analyzed included educational attainment, age, gender, and race. For comparison, we obtained similar data from the U.S. Department of Census. We also compared our RTOG data with Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data for patients who received radiation therapy, to determine how RTOG patients compared with cancer patients in general, and with patients with cancers at sites typically treated with radiotherapy. Results: Overall, the sociodemographic characteristics of patients entered in RTOG trials were similar to those of the Census data. We found that, in every age group of African-American men and at nearly every level of educational attainment, the proportion of RTOG trial participants mirrored the proportion in the census data. Significant differences were noted only in the youngest category of African-American men, where the RTOG accrues more in the lower educational categories and fewer with college experience. For African-American women, we found a similar pattern in every age group and at each level of educational attainment. As with men, RTOG trials accrued a considerably larger proportion of younger, less educated African-American women than the census reported. Using SEER for comparison, the RTOG enrolled proportionately more African-American men to trials all cancer sites combined, and for prostate and head and neck cancer. In head and neck trials, the RTOG enrolled nearly twice as many African-American men than would be predicted by SEER data. In lung cancer trials, RTOG underrepresented African-American men significantly; however, there was no difference for brain cancer trials. There were

  15. Implementation of Remote 3-Dimensional Image Guided Radiation Therapy Quality Assurance for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cui Yunfeng [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Parker, William [Department of Medical Physics, McGill University Health Center, Montreal, QC (Canada); Breen, Stephen [Department of Radiation Physics, Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto, ON (Canada); Yin Fangfang; Cai Jing [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Papiez, Lech S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas, Texas (United States); Li, X. Allen [Department of Radiation Oncology, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, Wisconsin (United States); Bednarz, Greg [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania (United States); Chen Wenzhou [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Xiao Ying, E-mail: ying.xiao@jefferson.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, American College of Radiology, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To report the process and initial experience of remote credentialing of three-dimensional (3D) image guided radiation therapy (IGRT) as part of the quality assurance (QA) of submitted data for Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials; and to identify major issues resulting from this process and analyze the review results on patient positioning shifts. Methods and Materials: Image guided radiation therapy datasets including in-room positioning CT scans and daily shifts applied were submitted through the Image Guided Therapy QA Center from institutions for the IGRT credentialing process, as required by various RTOG trials. A centralized virtual environment is established at the RTOG Core Laboratory, containing analysis tools and database infrastructure for remote review by the Physics Principal Investigators of each protocol. The appropriateness of IGRT technique and volumetric image registration accuracy were evaluated. Registration accuracy was verified by repeat registration with a third-party registration software system. With the accumulated review results, registration differences between those obtained by the Physics Principal Investigators and from the institutions were analyzed for different imaging sites, shift directions, and imaging modalities. Results: The remote review process was successfully carried out for 87 3D cases (out of 137 total cases, including 2-dimensional and 3D) during 2010. Frequent errors in submitted IGRT data and challenges in the review of image registration for some special cases were identified. Workarounds for these issues were developed. The average differences of registration results between reviewers and institutions ranged between 2 mm and 3 mm. Large discrepancies in the superior-inferior direction were found for megavoltage CT cases, owing to low spatial resolution in this direction for most megavoltage CT cases. Conclusion: This first experience indicated that remote review for 3D IGRT as part of QA

  16. Clinical Trials of Immunogene Therapy for Spontaneous Tumors in Companion Animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Claudio Glikin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the important progress obtained in the treatment of some pets’ malignancies, new treatments need to be developed. Being critical in cancer control and progression, the immune system’s appropriate modulation may provide effective therapeutic options. In this review we summarize the outcomes of published immunogene therapy veterinary clinical trials reported by many research centers. A variety of tumors such as canine melanoma, soft tissue sarcomas, osteosarcoma and lymphoma, feline fibrosarcoma, and equine melanoma were subjected to different treatment approaches. Both viral and mainly nonviral vectors were used to deliver gene products as cytokines, xenogeneic tumor associated antigens, specific ligands, and proapoptotic regulatory factors. In some cases autologous, allogenic, or xenogeneic transgenic cytokine producing cells were assayed. In general terms, minor or no adverse collateral effects appeared during this kind of therapies and treated patients usually displayed a better course of the disease (longer survival, delayed or suppressed recurrence or metastatic spread, and improvement of the quality of life. This suggests the utility of these methodologies as standard adjuvant treatments. The encouraging outcomes obtained in companion animals support their ready application in veterinary clinical oncology and serve as preclinical proof of concept and safety assay for future human gene therapy trials.

  17. A randomized controlled trial of cognitive behavioral therapy for individuals at clinical high risk of psychosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addington, Jean; Epstein, Irvin; Liu, Lu; French, Paul; Boydell, Katherine M; Zipursky, Robert B

    2011-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in early detection during the prodromal phase of a psychotic disorder. To date a few treatment studies have been published with some promising results for both pharmacological treatments, using second generation antipsychotics, and psychological interventions, mainly cognitive behavioral therapy. The purpose of this study was to determine first if cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) was more effective in reducing the rates of conversion compared to a supportive therapy and secondly whether those who received CBT had improved symptoms compared to those who received supportive therapy. Fifty-one individuals at clinical high risk of developing psychosis were randomized to CBT or a supportive therapy for up to 6 months. The sample was assessed at 6, 12 and 18 months post baseline on attenuated positive symptoms, negative symptoms, depression, anxiety and social functioning. Conversions to psychosis only occurred in the group who received supportive therapy although the difference was not significant. Both groups improved in attenuated positive symptoms, depression and anxiety and neither improved in social functioning and negative symptoms. There were no differences between the two treatment groups. However, the improvement in attenuated positive symptoms was more rapid for the CBT group. There are limitations of this trial and potential explanations for the lack of differences. However, both the results of this study and the possible explanations have significant implications for early detection and intervention in the pre-psychotic phase and for designing future treatments. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Metabolic control after years of completing a clinical trial on sensor-augmented pump therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirós, Carmen; Giménez, Marga; Orois, Aida; Conget, Ignacio

    2015-11-01

    Sensor-augmented pump (SAP) therapy has been shown to be effective and safe for improving metabolic control in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) in a number of trials. Our objective was to assess glycemic control in a group of T1DM patients on insulin pump or SAP therapy after years of participating in the SWITCH (Sensing With Insulin pump Therapy To Control HbA1c) trial and their return to routine medical monitoring. A retrospective, observational study of 20 patients who participated in the SWITCH trial at our hospital from 2008 to 2010. HbA1c values were compared at the start, during (at the end of the periods with/without SAP use - Sensor On/Sensor Off period respectively - of the cross-over design), and 3 years after study completion. HbA1c values of patients who continued SAP therapy (n=6) or only used insulin pump (n=14) were also compared. Twenty patients with T1DM (44.4±9.3 years, 60% women, baseline HbA1c level 8.43±0.55%) were enrolled into the SWITCH study). Three years after study completion, HbA1c level was 7.79±0.77 in patients on pump alone, with no significant change from the value at the end of the Off period of the study (7.85±0.57%; p=0.961). As compared to the end of the On period, HbA1c worsened less in patients who remained on SAP than in those on pump alone (0.18±0.42 vs. 0.55±0.71%; p=0.171), despite the fact that levels were similar at study start (8.41±0.60 vs. 8.47±0.45; p=0.831) and at the end of the On period (7.24±0.48 vs. 7.38±0.61; p=0.566). Frequency of CGM use in patients who continued SAP therapy was high (61.2% of the time in the last 3 months). Our study suggests that the additional benefit of SAP therapy achieved in a clinical trial may persist in the long term in routine clinical care of patients with T1DM. Copyright © 2015 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. TU-G-BRB-05: Panel Discussion: Clinical Trials in Proton and Ion Therapy - Are We Ready?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schulte, R.

    2015-01-01

    Proton therapy, in particular, and ion therapy, just beginning, are becoming an increasing focus of attention in clinical radiation oncology and medical physics. Both modalities have been criticized of lacking convincing evidence from randomized trials proving their efficacy, justifying the higher costs involved in these therapies. This session will provide an overview of the current status of clinical trials in proton therapy, including recent developments in ion therapy. As alluded to in the introductory talk by Dr. Schulte, opinions are diverging widely as to the usefulness and need for clinical trials in particle therapy and the challenge of equipoise. The lectures will highlight some of the challenges that surround clinical trials in particle therapy. One, presented by Dr. Choy from UT Southwestern, is that new technology and even different types of particles such as helium and carbon ions are introduced into this environment, increasing the phase space of clinical variables. The other is the issue of medical physics quality assurance with physical phantoms, presented by Mrs. Taylor from IROC Houston, which is more challenging because 3D and 4D image guidance and active delivery techniques are in relatively early stages of development. The role of digital phantoms in developing clinical treatment planning protocols and as a QA tool will also be highlighted by Dr. Lee from NCI. The symposium will be rounded off by a panel discussion among the Symposium speakers, arguing pro or con the need and readiness for clinical trials in proton and ion therapy. Learning Objectives: To get an update on the current status of clinical trials allowing or mandating proton therapy. Learn about the status of planned clinical trials in the U.S. and worldwide involving ion therapy. Discuss the challenges in the design and QA of clinical trials in particle therapy. Learn about existing and future physical and computational anthropomorphic phantoms for charged particle clinical trial

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment team. ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available Skip to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatments produce better results for certain illnesses or groups of people; look at the best age and frequency for doing screening tests, such as mammography; and compare two or more screening tests to see which test ... Some companies and groups sponsor clinical trials that test the safety of ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... patient has had certain treatments or has other health problems. Eligibility criteria ensure that new approaches are tested ... public. What to Expect During a clinical trial, doctors, nurses, social workers, and other health care providers might be part of your treatment ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... This shows how the approach affects a living body and whether it's harmful. However, an approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start ...

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... to main content U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Health Topics Health Topics A-Z Clinical Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep Science and ...

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... protect patients and help produce reliable study results. Clinical trials are one of the final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... benefits of lowering high blood pressure in the elderly outweighed the risks. Other examples of clinical trials ... child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older often must agree (assent) to take part ... about how you feel. Some people will need to travel or stay in hospitals ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... safe a treatment is or how well it works. Children (aged 18 and younger) get special protection as research subjects. Almost always, parents must give legal consent for their child to take part in a clinical trial. When ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... As a result, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration now recommends never using HT to prevent heart disease. When HT is used for menopausal symptoms, it should be taken only at the smallest dose and for the shortest time possible. Clinical trials, like the two described above, ...

  10. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical trials start with small groups of patients to find out whether a ...

  11. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deroose, C.M.; Stroobants, S.; Liu, Y.; Shankar, L.K.; Bourguet, P.

    2017-01-01

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  12. Using PET for therapy monitoring in oncological clinical trials: challenges ahead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deroose, C.M. [UZ Leuven, Nuclear Medicine, Leuven (Belgium); KU Leuven, Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven (Belgium); European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); Stroobants, S. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Antwerp, Edegem (Belgium); Liu, Y. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); EORTC Headquarters, Brussels (Belgium); Shankar, L.K. [National Cancer Institute, Diagnostic Imaging Branch, Cancer Imaging Program, Bethesda, MD (United States); Bourguet, P. [European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) Imaging Group, Leuven (Belgium); University of Rennes 1, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Rennes (France)

    2017-08-15

    Molecular imaging with PET has emerged as a powerful imaging tool in the clinical care of oncological patients. Assessing therapy response is a prime application of PET and so the integration of PET into multicentre trials can offer valuable scientific insights and shape future clinical practice. However, there are a number of logistic and methodological challenges that have to be dealt with. These range from availability and regulatory compliance of the PET radiopharmaceutical to availability of scan time for research purposes. Standardization of imaging and reconstruction protocols, quality control, image processing and analysis are of paramount importance. Strategies for harmonization of the final image and the quantification result are available and can be implemented within the scope of multicentre accreditation programmes. Data analysis can be performed either locally or by centralized review. Response assessment can be done visually or using more quantitative approaches, depending on the research question. Large-scale real-time centralized review can be achieved using web-based solutions. Specific challenges for the future are inclusion of PET/MRI scanners in multicentre trials and the incorporation of radiomic analyses. Inclusion of PET in multicentre trials is a necessity to guarantee the further development of PET for routine clinical care and may yield very valuable scientific insights. (orig.)

  13. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for somatization and symptom syndromes: a critical review of controlled clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroenke, K; Swindle, R

    2000-01-01

    Few treatments for somatization have been proven effective. In the past decade, however, clinical trials of cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) have been promising. Our aim was to critically review and synthesize the evidence from these trials. A search of the Medline database from 1966 through July 1999 was conducted to identify controlled trials designed to evaluate the efficacy of CBT in patients with somatization or symptom syndromes. A total of 31 controlled trials (29 randomized and 2 nonrandomized) were identified. Twenty-five studies targeted a specific syndrome (e.g. chronic fatigue, irritable bowel, pain) while 6 focused on more general somatization or hypochondriasis. Primary outcome assessment included physical symptoms, psychological distress and functional status in 28, 26 and 19 studies, respectively. Physical symptoms appeared the most responsive: CBT-treated patients improved more than control subjects in 71% of the studies and showed possibly greater improvement (i.e., a trend) in another 11% of the studies. A definite or possible advantage of CBT for reducing psychological distress was demonstrated in only 38 and 8% of studies, and for improving functional status in 47 and 26%. Group therapy and interventions as brief as 5 sessions proved efficacious. Benefits were sustained for up to 12 months. CBT can be an effective treatment for patients with somatization or symptom syndromes. Benefits can occur whether or not psychological distress is ameliorated. Since chronic symptoms are exceptionally common and most studies were conducted in referral populations, the optimal sequencing of CBT in treating primary care patients and the identification of those most likely to accept and respond to therapy should be further evaluated. Copyright 2000 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  14. Comparison of doses delivered in clinical trials of neutron capture therapy in the USA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Albritton, J.R.; Binns, P.J.; Riley, K.J.; Coderre, J.A.; Harling, O.K.; Kiger, W.S. III

    2006-01-01

    A combined 81 brain tumor patients have been treated in dose escalation trials of Neutron Capture Therapy (NCT) at Harvard-MIT and Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Pooling the clinical outcomes from these trials will permit evaluation with more statistical rigor. However, differences in physical and computational dosimetry between the institutions make direct comparison of the clinical dosimetry difficult. This paper describes work performed to normalize the BNL clinical dosimetry to that of Harvard-MIT for combined dose response analysis. This normalization involved analysis of MIT measurements and calculations using the BNL treatment planning system (TPS), BNCT - Rtpe, for two different phantoms. The BNL TPS was calibrated to dose measurements made by MIT at the BMRR in the BNL calibration phantom, a Lucite cube, and then validated by MIT dose measurements at the BMMR in an ellipsoidal water phantom. Treatment plans for all BNL patients were recomputed using the newly determined TPS calibration, yielding reductions in reported mean brain doses of 19% on average in the initial 15 patients and 31% in the latter 38 patients. These reductions in reported doses have clinically significant implications for those relying on reported BNL doses as a basis for initial dose selection in clinical studies. (author)

  15. Ear Acupuncture Therapy for Masticatory Myofascial and Temporomandibular Pain: A Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Ambrosio Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ear acupuncture works by reducing painful sensations with analgesic effect through microsystem therapy and has been demonstrated to be as effective as conventional therapies in the control of facial pain. This clinical trial aimed to evaluate the adjuvant action of auricular acupuncture through an observation of the evolution of temporomandibular and masticatory myofascial symptoms in two groups defined by the therapies elected: auricular acupuncture associated with occlusal splint (study and the use of the occlusal splint plate alone (control. We have selected 20 patients, who were randomly allocated into two groups of ten individuals. Symptoms were evaluated in five different moments, every seven days. We analyzed the orofacial muscle and joint palpation in order to measure the intensity of the experienced pain. Both groups showed a statistically significant decrease in muscle and joint symptoms (p<0.05. However, comparisons between the groups showed an expressive and significant reduction of symptomatology in the study group (p<0.05 already on the first week of therapy. According to the results, to the methodological criteria developed and statistical analysis applied, the conclusion is that auricular acupuncture therapy has synergistic action on conventional occlusal splint treatment. It was demonstrated to be effective in the reduction of symptoms in the short term.

  16. Stem cell therapy for type 1 diabetes mellitus: a review of recent clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Couri Carlos

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cell therapy is one of the most promising treatments for the near future. It is expected that this kind of therapy can ameliorate or even reverse some diseases. With regard to type 1 diabetes, studies analyzing the therapeutic effects of stem cells in humans began in 2003 in the Hospital das Clínicas of the Faculty of Medicine of Ribeirão Preto - SP USP, Brazil, and since then other centers in different countries started to randomize patients in their clinical trials. Herein we summarize recent data about beta cell regeneration, different ways of immune intervention and what is being employed in type 1 diabetic patients with regard to stem cell repertoire to promote regeneration and/or preservation of beta cell mass. The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT was a 7-year longitudinal study that demonstrated the importance of the intensive insulin therapy when compared to conventional treatment in the development of chronic complications in patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM. This study also demonstrated another important issue: there is a reverse relationship between C-peptide levels (endogenous indicator of insulin secretion chronic complications - that is, the higher the C-peptide levels, the lower the incidence of nephropathy, retinopathy and hypoglycemia. From such data, beta cell preservation has become an additional target in the management of T1DM 1.

  17. Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Anxiety Disordered Youth: A Randomized Clinical Trial Evaluating Child and Family Modalities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Philip C.; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Gosch, Elizabeth; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Suveg, Cynthia

    2008-01-01

    This randomized clinical trial compared the relative efficacy of individual (child) cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT), family cognitive-behavioral therapy (FCBT), and a family-based education/support/attention (FESA) active control for treating anxiety disordered youth ages 7-14 years (M = 10.27). Youth (N = 161; 44% female; 85% Caucasian, 9%…

  18. New therapies for chronic hepatitis C infection: a systematic review of evidence from clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, L Y; Tong, C Y W; Wong, T; Wilkinson, M

    2012-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) affects approximately 3% of the world population. The current standard of care for treatment of HCV is a combination of pegylated interferon and ribavirin. Approximately 10% of patients will stop treatment and 30% of patients require dose reduction because of side effects. For genotype 1 HCV-infected patients, only 40% of patients will achieve undetectable viral load 26 weeks posttreatment. The objectives of this review were to identify new treatments that are in clinical trials. These include boceprevir and telaprevir which are in routine clinical use and form part of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD) 2011 guidelines as well as drugs based on observational studies, improving/modifying ribavirin or interferon-based therapies, modifying the host response and finally the use of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAA).   MEDLINE and EMBASE databases were searched from 2008 to 2011 for treatments for hepatitis C. Furthermore, abstracts and poster presentations for the annual European Association Study of the Liver, AASLD, Digestive Disease Week and Asian Pacific Association for the study of the Liver were searched for relevant material. All four classes of DAA; NS3/NS4a serine protease inhibitors, cyclophilin inhibitors, NS5b polymerase inhibitors and NS5a inhibitors, show good success rates. Trials have been performed without ribavirin or interferon and demonstrate good antiviral activity with a decreased side effect profile. Combinations of DAA are a promising area of research with a high success rate. Clinical trials show that future HCV therapy could be personalised, achieve higher success rates with decreased adverse incidents. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  19. JAK2 inhibitor therapy in myeloproliferative disorders: rationale, preclinical studies and ongoing clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardanani, A

    2008-01-01

    The recent identification of somatic mutations such as JAK2V617F that deregulate Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription signaling has spurred development of orally bioavailable small-molecule inhibitors that selectively target JAK2 kinase as an approach to pathogenesis-directed therapy of myeloproliferative disorders (MPD). In pre-clinical studies, these compounds inhibit JAK2V617F-mediated cell growth at nanomolar concentrations, and in vivo therapeutic efficacy has been demonstrated in mouse models of JAK2V617F-induced disease. In addition, ex vivo growth of progenitor cells from MPD patients harboring JAK2V617F or MPLW515L/K mutations is also potently inhibited. JAK2 inhibitors currently in clinical trials can be grouped into those designed to primarily target JAK2 kinase (JAK2-selective) and those originally developed for non-MPD indications, but that nevertheless have significant JAK2-inhibitory activity (non-JAK2 selective). This article discusses the rationale for using JAK2 inhibitors for the treatment of MPD, as well as relevant aspects of clinical trial development for these patients. For instance, which group of MPD patients is appropriate for initial Phase I studies? Should JAK2V617F-negative MPD patients be included in the initial studies? What are the likely consequences of 'off-target' JAK3 and wild-type JAK2 inhibition? How should treatment responses be monitored?

  20. Photodynamic therapy as an adjunct to non-surgical periodontal treatment: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christodoulides, Nicos; Nikolidakis, Dimitris; Chondros, Panagiotis; Becker, Jürgen; Schwarz, Frank; Rössler, Ralf; Sculean, Anton

    2008-09-01

    Recent preclinical and clinical data have suggested a potential benefit of photodynamic therapy (PDT) in the treatment of periodontitis. However, there are very limited data from controlled clinical trials evaluating the effect of PDT in the treatment of periodontitis. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and microbiologic effects of the adjunctive use of PDT to non-surgical periodontal treatment. Twenty-four subjects with chronic periodontitis were randomly treated with scaling and root planing followed by a single episode of PDT (test) or scaling and root planing alone (control). Full-mouth plaque score (FMPS), full-mouth bleeding score (FMBS), probing depth (PD), gingival recession, and clinical attachment level (CAL) were measured at baseline and 3 and 6 months after therapy. Primary outcome variables were changes in PD and CAL. Microbiologic evaluation of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans (previously Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans), Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia, Tannerella forsythia (previously T. forsythensis), Treponema denticola, Parvimonas micra (previously Peptostreptococcus micros or Micromonas micros), Fusobacterium nucleatum, Campylobacter rectus, Eubacterium nodatum, Eikenella corrodens, and Capnocytophaga spp. was performed at baseline and 3 and 6 months following therapy by using a commercially available polymerase chain reaction test. At 3 and 6 months after treatment, there were no statistically significant differences between the groups with regard to CAL, PD, FMPS, or microbiologic changes. At 3 and 6 months, a statistically significantly greater improvement in FMBS was found in the test group. The additional application of a single episode of PDT to scaling and root planing failed to result in an additional improvement in terms of PD reduction and CAL gain, but it resulted in a significantly higher reduction in bleeding scores compared to scaling and root planing alone.

  1. Self-reported use of complementary and alternative medicine therapies in a reflexology randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyatt, Gwen; Sikorskii, Alla; You, Mei

    2013-01-01

    According to the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine (NCCAM), about one-third of American cancer patients have used complementary and alternative medicine (CAM). The objective of this secondary analysis was an assessment of the use of other CAM by women with advanced breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy and who participated in a randomized clinical trial (RCT) studying the safety and efficacy of reflexology. For this secondary analysis, the research team hypothesized an increased CAM use due to exposure to the reflexology trial. For this secondary analysis, the team conducted telephone interviews at baseline, wk 5, and wk 11 to assess the use of 23 common CAM therapies. The study took place at 14 medical oncology clinics across the Midwestern United States. Participants included women with advanced breast cancer who were undergoing chemotherapy and/or hormonal therapy. In the study related to this secondary analysis, the research team randomly assigned the women to one of three primary groups: (1) reflexology; (2) lay foot manipulation (LFM); and (3) control. In addition, the research team used two test groups to establish the study's protocol: (1) test reflexology and (2) test LFM. For this secondary analysis, the research team considered the two reflexology groups (test and intervention) and the two LFM groups (test and intervention) to be the active groups, comparing their use of CAM to the control group's use at the selected time points. The research team used a linear, mixed-effects model to analyze the number of therapies used at the three time points. The team performed t tests to compare therapy use at baseline for those women who completed the study vs those who dropped out. The team used the CAM-use instrument. In total, 385 women participated. The research team found no differences in CAM use for the active groups vs the control group over time or in those women who stayed in the study vs those who dropped out. The team

  2. Cognitive-behavioral group therapy in obsessive-compulsive disorder: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cordioli Aristides V

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop a cognitive-behavioral group therapy protocol and to verify its efficacy to reduce obsessive-compulsive symptoms. Methods: An open clinical trial with 32 obsessive-compulsive patients was performed, in which a cognitive-behavioral group therapy protocol of 12 weekly sessions of two hours, in 5 consecutive groups, was applied. The severity of symptoms was rated with the Yale-Brown Obsessive-Compulsive (Y-BOCS, Hamilton Anxiety (HAM A and Hamilton Depression (HAM D scales. The patients were followed up for 3 months after the end of the treatment. Results: There was a significant reduction in the scores of Y-BOCS, HAM A and HAM D scales with the treatment regardless the use of anti-obsessive medications. The rate of improved patients (decrease of > or = 35% in Y-BOCS was 78.1%. Two patients (6.25% dropped out from the study. The effect size calculated for the Y-BOCS scale was 1.75. Conclusions: This study suggests that cognitive-behavioral group therapy reduces obsessive-compulsive symptoms. In addition, patients presented good compliance.

  3. Textbook of clinical trials

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day, Simon; Machin, David; Green, Sylvan B

    2006-01-01

    ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . xix INTRODUCTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 1 The Development of Clinical Trials Simon...

  4. The Effect of Cognitive Behavior Therapy in Insomnia due to Methadone Maintenance Therapy: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robabeh Soleimani

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep disturbance is a common complaint of patients undergoing methadone maintenance therapy (MMT. There are limited studies about the effect of different treatments on insomnia due to MMT. In this study, we evaluated the effect of cognitive-behavioral treatment for insomnia (CBTI on sleep disorders in patients undergoing MMT. Methods: Twenty-two patients with insomnia due to MMT (aged 18-60 years participated in this randomized double-blind clinical trial. The intervention group received CBTI from a clinical psychologist for 8 weeks, whereas the control group received behavioral placebo therapy (BPT. The duration of individual sessions was 45 minutes, which was conducted once a week. The primary outcome was sleep disturbance assessed with Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI. Data were analyzed using SPSS software version 19. Results: Eleven patients were assigned to each group. Two groups were matched according to demographic characteristics (age, marital status, education, and daily methadone doses. Although PSQI score was significantly reduced during weeks 5 and 8 after both interventions, there was a significant difference in intervention versus time interaction (P<0.02. The effects of CBTI versus placebo were significantly different (P<0.001. The time course was also significant (P<0.001. Conclusion: This study showed that CBTI is more effective than BPT in overall sleep quality. We recommend further studies, with a larger sample, on CBTI in patients undergoing MMT.

  5. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... criteria differ from trial to trial. They include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the ... bias. "Bias" means that human choices or other factors not related to the protocol affect the trial's ...

  6. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... under way. For example, some trials are stopped early if benefits from a strategy or treatment are ... stop a trial, or part of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful ...

  7. Reports from the 2010 Clinical and Translational Cancer Research Think Tank meeting: design strategies for personalized therapy trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Donald A; Herbst, Roy S; Rubin, Eric H

    2012-02-01

    It has long been evident that cancer is a heterogeneous disease, but only relatively recently have we come to realize the extent of this heterogeneity. No single therapy is effective for every patient with tumors having the same histology. A clinical strategy based on a single-therapy approach results in overtreatment for the majority of patients. Biomarkers can be considered as knives that dissect the disease ever more finely. The future of clinical research will be based on learning whether certain therapies are more appropriate than others for biomarker-defined subsets of patients. Therapies will eventually be tailored to narrow biomarker subsets. The ability to determine which therapies are appropriate for which patients requires information from biological science as well as empirical evidence from clinical trials. Neither is easy to achieve. Here we describe some nascent approaches for designing clinical trials that are biomarker-based and adaptive. Our focus is on adaptive trials that address many questions at once. In a way, these clinical experiments are themselves part of a much larger experiment: learning how (or whether it is possible) to design experiments that match patients in small subsets of disease with therapies that are especially effective and possibly even curative for them.

  8. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves; Courdi, Adel; Bahadoran, Phillipe; Chamorey, Emmanuel; Queille-Roussel, Catherine; Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial

  9. Phase 1 Clinical Trial of Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Concomitant With Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bondiau, Pierre-Yves, E-mail: pierre-yves.bondiau@nice.unicancer.fr [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Courdi, Adel [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Bahadoran, Phillipe [Department of Dermatology, University Hospital of Nice, Nice (France); Chamorey, Emmanuel [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France); Queille-Roussel, Catherine [Centre de Pharmacologie Clinique Appliquée à la Dermatologie, Nice (France); Lallement, Michel; Birtwisle-Peyrottes, Isabelle; Chapellier, Claire; Pacquelet-Cheli, Sandrine; Ferrero, Jean-Marc [Department of Radiotherapy, Centre Antoine Lacassagne, Nice (France)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) allows stereotactic irradiation of thoracic tumors. It may have a real impact on patients who may not otherwise qualify for breast-conserving surgery. We conducted a phase 1 trial that tested 5 dose levels of SBRT concomitant with neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) before to surgery. The purpose of the current dose escalation study was to determine the maximum tolerable dose of SBRT in the treatment of breast cancer. Methods and Materials: To define toxicity, we performed dermatologic examinations that included clinical examinations by 2 separate physicians and technical evaluations using colorimetry, dermoscopy, and skin ultrasonography. Dermatologic examinations were performed before NACT, 36 and 56 days after the beginning of NACT, and before surgery. Surgery was performed 4 to 8 weeks after the last chemotherapy session. Efficacy, the primary endpoint, was determined by the pathologic complete response (pCR) rate. Results: Maximum tolerable dose was not reached. Only 1 case of dose-limiting toxicity was reported (grade 3 dermatologic toxicity), and SBRT was overall well tolerated. The pCR rate was 36%, with none being observed at the first 2 dose levels, and the highest rate being obtained at dose level 3 (25.5 Gy delivered in 3 fractions). Furthermore, the breast-conserving surgery rate was up to 92% compared with an 8% total mastectomy rate. No surgical complications were reported. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that SBRT can be safely combined with NACT. Regarding the efficacy endpoints, this trial showed promising results in terms of pCR rate (36%) and breast-conserving rate (92%). The findings provide a strong rationale for extending the study into a phase 2 trial. In view of the absence of correlation between dose and pCR, and given that the data from dose level 3 met the statistical requirements, a dose of 25.5 Gy in 3 fractions should be used for the phase 2 trial.

  10. Oversight and Management of a Cell Therapy Clinical Trial Network: Experience and Lessons Learned

    OpenAIRE

    Moyé, Lemuel A.; Sayre, Shelly L.; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C.; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A.; Skarlatos, Sonia I.

    2011-01-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This arti...

  11. Concomitant Anticonvulsants With Bitemporal Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Randomized Controlled Trial With Clinical and Neurobiological Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh, Gopalkumar; Thirthalli, Jagadisha; Kumar, Channaveerachari Naveen; Muralidharan, Kesavan; Phutane, Vivek H; Gangadhar, Bangalore N

    2017-03-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for major affective disorders. The combined use of ECT and anticonvulsant mood stabilizers is a common clinical scenario. There is dearth of systematic studies on the use of this combination with regard to clinical or cognitive outcomes. We aimed to compare clinical improvement and cognitive adverse effects between patients who received only ECT versus those who received ECT and anticonvulsants. We hypothesized that improvement would be fastest in patients who received only ECT. We conducted a randomized controlled trial in which patients prescribed ECT while being treated with anticonvulsants were randomized into 3 groups: full-dose (FD), half-dose (HD), and stop anticonvulsant. A blind rater assessed clinical improvement in patients using rating scales [Young's Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and Clinical Global Impression] for clinical improvement and cognitive adverse effects (Postgraduate Institute memory scale). Analysis was done using mixed-effects modeling to delineate differences in clinical and cognitive outcomes across the 3 arms of the study over the course of ECT. Of the 54 patients recruited, 36 patients went into treatment allocation arms per the initial randomization plan. The main anticonvulsants prescribed were sodium valproate and carbamazepine. Patients in the 3 groups were comparable on clinical features. The most common diagnosis was bipolar affective disorder-with current episode of mania. Overall, there was no difference across the 3 groups in final clinical outcome scores (YMRS and Clinical Global Impression) when analyzed as intention to treat (ITT) or "as treated." In both analyses, group × time interaction was significant when comparing trend of YMRS scores between the FD anticonvulsant group and the HD group from baseline to last ECT (P = 0.0435 in ITT and P = 0.0055 in as treated). Patients in the FD group improved faster than those in the HD group. There were no differences across

  12. Intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM as a novel therapy for pressure Ulcers: A randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamimi Nouri K

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of pressure ulcers of the foot is a major health care problem in frail elderly patients. A pressure sore dramatically increases the cost of medical and nursing care, and effective treatment has always been an essential nursing concern. Management options for pressure ulcers include local wound care; surgical repair and, more recently, topical application of growth factors.The main goal of this study was to examine the effects of intravenous treatment of Semelil (ANGIPARSTM, a new herbal extract in patients with severe, noninfected pressure ulcers of the foot.As a randomized clinical trial, 18 patients with pressure ulcers were recruited from Vali-e-Asr hospital, Medical Sciences/ University of Tehran, Iran. Nine patients received intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM besides to conventional therapy and nine received only conventional treatment.At the baseline, the treatment and control groups did not differ across demographic variables, clinical characteristics, and functional measures. The mean surface areas of the ulcers were reduced 43.2 ± 57.4 cm2 (80.3% and 2.8± 6.2 cm² (6.3% in the treatment and control groups, respectively (p=0.000. The average reduction in pressure ulcer area at four weeks was statistically and clinically greater in the treatment group than in the control group So, intravenous Semelil (ANGIPARSTM can be recommended as an effective treatment for patients with severe pressure ulcers.

  13. Evaluation of Wet Cupping Therapy: Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Bedah, Abdullah M N; Khalil, Mohamed K M; Posadzki, Paul; Sohaibani, Imen; Aboushanab, Tamer Shaaban; AlQaed, Meshari; Ali, Gazzaffi I M

    2016-10-01

    Wet cupping is a widely used traditional therapy in many countries, which justifies a continuous scientific evaluation of its efficacy and safety. To perform a systematic review to critically evaluate and update the available evidence of wet cupping in traditional and complementary medicine. Ten electronic databases were searched from their inceptions to February 2016. Included studies were randomized clinical trials (RCTs) that evaluated wet cupping against any type of control interventions in patients with any clinical condition, as well as healthy individuals. Cochrane risk of bias tool was used to appraise the included RCTs. Fourteen RCTs met the eligibility criteria. The included studies evaluated the following clinical conditions: nonspecific low back pain (NSLBP), hypertension, brachialgia, carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS), chronic neck pain, metabolic syndrome, migraine headaches, oxygen saturation in smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease. Two RCTs evaluated physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals. Overall, 9 RCTs favored wet cupping over various control interventions in NSLBP (n = 2), hypertension (n = 1), brachialgia (n = 1), CTS (n = 1), chronic neck pain (n = 2), oxygen saturation in smokers with COPD (n = 1), and oral and genital ulcers due to Behçet disease (n = 1). Five RCTs showed no statistically significant between-group differences: NSLBP (n = 1), metabolic syndrome (n = 1), migraine headaches (n = 1), and physiologic and biochemical parameters of healthy individuals (n = 2). Included RCTs had a variable risk of bias across all domains and suffered methodologic limitations. There is a promising evidence in favor of the use of wet cupping for musculoskeletal pain, specifically NSLBP, neck pain, CTS, and brachialgia. Better-quality trials are needed to generate solid evidence and firmly inform policy makers.

  14. Clinical Trials for Disease-Modifying Therapies in Alzheimer's Disease: A Primer, Lessons Learned, and a Blueprint for the Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cummings, Jeffrey; Ritter, Aaron; Zhong, Kate

    2018-03-16

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has no currently approved disease-modifying therapies (DMTs), and treatments to prevent, delay the onset, or slow the progression are urgently needed. A delay of 5 years if available by 2025 would decrease the total number of patients with AD by 50% in 2050. To meet the definition of DMT, an agent must produce an enduring change in the course of AD; clinical trials of DMTs have the goal of demonstrating this effect. AD drug discovery entails target identification followed by high throughput screening and lead optimization of drug-like compounds. Once an optimized agent is available and has been assessed for efficacy and toxicity in animals, it progresses through Phase I testing with healthy volunteers, Phase II learning trials to establish proof-of-mechanism and dose, and Phase III confirmatory trials to demonstrate efficacy and safety in larger populations. Phase III is followed by Food and Drug Administration review and, if appropriate, market access. Trial populations include cognitively normal at-risk participants in prevention trials, mildly impaired participants with biomarker evidence of AD in prodromal AD trials, and subjects with cognitive and functional impairment in AD dementia trials. Biomarkers are critical in trials of DMTs, assisting in participant characterization and diagnosis, target engagement and proof-of-pharmacology, demonstration of disease-modification, and monitoring side effects. Clinical trial designs include randomized, parallel group; delayed start; staggered withdrawal; and adaptive. Lessons learned from completed trials inform future trials and increase the likelihood of success.

  15. Brief Behavioral Therapy for Pediatric Anxiety and Depression in Primary Care: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weersing, V Robin; Brent, David A; Rozenman, Michelle S; Gonzalez, Araceli; Jeffreys, Megan; Dickerson, John F; Lynch, Frances L; Porta, Giovanna; Iyengar, Satish

    2017-06-01

    Anxiety and depression affect 30% of youth but are markedly undertreated compared with other mental disorders, especially in Hispanic populations. To examine whether a pediatrics-based behavioral intervention targeting anxiety and depression improves clinical outcome compared with referral to outpatient community mental health care. This 2-center randomized clinical trial with masked outcome assessment conducted between brief behavioral therapy (BBT) and assisted referral to care (ARC) studied 185 youths (aged 8.0-16.9 years) from 9 pediatric clinics in San Diego, California, and Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, recruited from October 6, 2010, through December 5, 2014. Youths who met DSM-IV criteria for full or probable diagnoses of separation anxiety disorder, generalized anxiety disorder, social phobia, major depression, dysthymic disorder, and/or minor depression; lived with a consenting legal guardian for at least 6 months; and spoke English were included in the study. Exclusions included receipt of alternate treatment for anxiety or depression, presence of a suicidal plan, bipolar disorder, psychosis, posttraumatic stress disorder, substance dependence, current abuse, intellectual disability, or unstable serious physical illness. The BBT consisted of 8 to 12 weekly 45-minute sessions of behavioral therapy delivered in pediatric clinics by master's-level clinicians. The ARC families received personalized referrals to mental health care and check-in calls to support accessing care from master's-level coordinators. The primary outcome was clinically significant improvement on the Clinical Global Impression-Improvement scale (score ≤2). Secondary outcomes included the Pediatric Anxiety Rating Scale, Children's Depression Rating Scale-Revised, and functioning. A total of 185 patients were enrolled in the study (mean [SD] age, 11.3 [2.6] years; 107 [57.8%] female; 144 [77.8%] white; and 38 [20.7%] Hispanic). Youths in the BBT group (n = 95), compared with those in

  16. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacDonald, Shannon M., E-mail: smacdonald@partners.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Specht, Michelle [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Isakoff, Steven J. [Division of Hematology and Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L. [Department of Surgical Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Yeap, Beow Y. [Department of Medicine, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States); Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts (United States)

    2013-07-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods.

  17. Proton Therapy for Breast Cancer After Mastectomy: Early Outcomes of a Prospective Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacDonald, Shannon M.; Patel, Sagar A.; Hickey, Shea; Specht, Michelle; Isakoff, Steven J.; Gadd, Michele; Smith, Barbara L.; Yeap, Beow Y.; Adams, Judith; DeLaney, Thomas F.; Kooy, Hanne; Lu, Hsiao-Ming; Taghian, Alphonse G.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Dosimetric planning studies have described potential benefits for the use of proton radiation therapy (RT) for locally advanced breast cancer. We report acute toxicities and feasibility of proton delivery for 12 women treated with postmastectomy proton radiation with or without reconstruction. Methods and Materials: Twelve patients were enrolled in an institutional review board-approved prospective clinical trial. The patients were assessed for skin toxicity, fatigue, and radiation pneumonitis during treatment and at 4 and 8 weeks after the completion of therapy. All patients consented to have photographs taken for documentation of skin toxicity. Results: Eleven of 12 patients had left-sided breast cancer. One patient was treated for right-sided breast cancer with bilateral implants. Five women had permanent implants at the time of RT, and 7 did not have immediate reconstruction. All patients completed proton RT to a dose of 50.4 Gy (relative biological effectiveness [RBE]) to the chest wall and 45 to 50.4 Gy (RBE) to the regional lymphatics. No photon or electron component was used. The maximum skin toxicity during radiation was grade 2, according to the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events (CTCAE). The maximum CTCAE fatigue was grade 3. There have been no cases of RT pneumonitis to date. Conclusions: Proton RT for postmastectomy RT is feasible and well tolerated. This treatment may be warranted for selected patients with unfavorable cardiac anatomy, immediate reconstruction, or both that otherwise limits optimal RT delivery using standard methods

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... people who fit the patient traits for that study (the eligibility criteria). Eligibility criteria differ from trial to trial. They include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective ... trials are research studies that explore whether a medical strategy, treatment, or device is safe and effective ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... sponsored a trial of two different combinations of asthma treatments. The trial found that one of the ... much better than the other for moderate persistent asthma. The results provided important treatment information for doctors ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Sponsors also may stop a trial, or part of a trial, early if the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight ...

  2. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baar, M.E. van; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R.A.B.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T.B.; Lemmens, J.A.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. Methods: A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were

  3. The effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis of the hip or knee: a randomized clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Baar, M. E.; Dekker, J.; Oostendorp, R. A.; Bijl, D.; Voorn, T. B.; Lemmens, J. A.; Bijlsma, J. W.

    1998-01-01

    To determine the effectiveness of exercise therapy in patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the hip or knee. A randomized single blind, clinical trial was conducted in a primary care setting. Patients with hip or knee OA by American College of Rheumatology criteria were selected. Two intervention

  4. Virtual reality therapy for refractory auditory verbal hallucinations in schizophrenia: A pilot clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    du Sert, Olivier Percie; Potvin, Stéphane; Lipp, Olivier; Dellazizzo, Laura; Laurelli, Mélanie; Breton, Richard; Lalonde, Pierre; Phraxayavong, Kingsada; O'Connor, Kieron; Pelletier, Jean-François; Boukhalfi, Tarik; Renaud, Patrice; Dumais, Alexandre

    2018-02-24

    Schizophrenia is a chronic and severe mental illness that poses significant challenges. While many pharmacological and psychosocial interventions are available, many treatment-resistant schizophrenia patients continue to suffer from persistent psychotic symptoms, notably auditory verbal hallucinations (AVH), which are highly disabling. This unmet clinical need requires new innovative treatment options. Recently, a psychological therapy using computerized technology has shown large therapeutic effects on AVH severity by enabling patients to engage in a dialogue with a computerized representation of their voices. These very promising results have been extended by our team using immersive virtual reality (VR). Our study was a 7-week phase-II, randomized, partial cross-over trial. Nineteen schizophrenia patients with refractory AVH were recruited and randomly allocated to either VR-assisted therapy (VRT) or treatment-as-usual (TAU). The group allocated to TAU consisted of antipsychotic treatment and usual meetings with clinicians. The TAU group then received a delayed 7weeks of VRT. A follow-up was ensured 3months after the last VRT therapy session. Changes in psychiatric symptoms, before and after TAU or VRT, were assessed using a linear mixed-effects model. Our findings showed that VRT produced significant improvements in AVH severity, depressive symptoms and quality of life that lasted at the 3-month follow-up period. Consistent with previous research, our results suggest that VRT might be efficacious in reducing AVH related distress. The therapeutic effects of VRT on the distress associated with the voices were particularly prominent (d=1.2). VRT is a highly novel and promising intervention for refractory AVH in schizophrenia. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. PROCTITIS ONE WEEK AFTER STEREOTACTIC BODY RADIATION THERAPY FOR PROSTATE CANCER: IMPLICATIONS FOR CLINICAL TRIAL DESIGN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ima Paydar

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Proctitis following prostate cancer radiation therapy is a primary determinant of quality of life (QOL. While previous studies have assessed acute rectal morbidity at 1 month after stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT, little data exist on the prevalence and severity of rectal morbidity within the first week following treatment. This study reports the acute bowel morbidity one week following prostate SBRT. Materials and methods: Between May 2013 and August 2014, 103 patients with clinically localized prostate cancer were treated with 35 to 36.25 Gy in five fractions using robotic SBRT delivered on a prospective clinical trial. Bowel toxicity was graded using the Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 4.0 (CTCAEv.4. Bowel QOL was assessed using EPIC-26 questionnaire bowel domain at baseline, one week, one month, and three months. Time-dependent changes in bowel symptoms were statistically compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Clinically significant change was assessed by the minimally important difference (MID in EPIC score. This was defined as a change of one-half standard deviation (SD from the baseline score. Results: One hundred and three patients with a minimum of three months of follow-up were analyzed. The cumulative incidence of acute grade 2 GI toxicity was 23%. There were no acute ≥ grade 3 bowel toxicities. EPIC bowel summary scores maximally declined at 1 week after SBRT (-13.9, p<0.0001 before returning to baseline at three months after SBRT (+0.03, p=0.94. Prior to treatment, 4.9% of men reported that their bowel bother was a moderate to big problem. This increased to 28.4% (p<0.0001 one week after SBRT and returned to baseline at three months after SBRT (0.0%, p=0.66. Only the bowel summary and bowel bother score declines at 1 week met the MID threshold for clinically significant change. Conclusion: The rate and severity of acute proctitis following prostate SBRT peaked at one week after

  6. Medication Therapy Management after Hospitalization in CKD: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuttle, Katherine R; Alicic, Radica Z; Short, Robert A; Neumiller, Joshua J; Gates, Brian J; Daratha, Kenn B; Barbosa-Leiker, Celestina; McPherson, Sterling M; Chaytor, Naomi S; Dieter, Brad P; Setter, Stephen M; Corbett, Cynthia F

    2018-02-07

    CKD is characterized by remarkably high hospitalization and readmission rates. Our study aim was to test a medication therapy management intervention to reduce subsequent acute care utilization. The CKD Medication Intervention Trial was a single-blind (investigators), randomized clinical trial conducted at Providence Health Care in Spokane, Washington. Patients with CKD stages 3-5 not treated by dialysis who were hospitalized for acute illness were recruited. The intervention was designed to improve posthospitalization care by medication therapy management. A pharmacist delivered the intervention as a single home visit within 7 days of discharge. The intervention included these fundamental elements: comprehensive medication review, medication action plan, and a personal medication list. The primary outcome was a composite of acute care utilization (hospital readmissions and emergency department and urgent care visits) for 90 days after hospitalization. Baseline characteristics of participants ( n =141) included the following: age, 69±11 (mean±SD) years old; women, 48% (67 of 141); diabetes, 56% (79 of 141); hypertension, 83% (117 of 141); eGFR, 41±14 ml/min per 1.73 m 2 (serum creatinine-based Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration equation); and urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio median, 43 mg/g (interquartile range, 8-528) creatinine. The most common primary diagnoses for hospitalization were the following: cardiovascular events, 36% (51 of 141); infections, 18% (26 of 141); and kidney diseases, 12% (17 of 141). The primary outcome occurred in 32 of 72 (44%) of the medication intervention group and 28 of 69 (41%) of those in usual care (log rank P =0.72). For only hospital readmission, the rate was 19 of 72 (26%) in the medication intervention group and 18 of 69 (26%) in the usual care group (log rank P =0.95). There was no between-group difference in achievement of guideline-based goals for use of renin-angiotensin system inhibition or for BP

  7. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    spectrum disorders , and assessing the efficacy of this approach in comparison to an active Enriched Supportive Therapy (EST) intervention . Major...This project is focused on conducting the first randomized-controlled trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy (CET) in 54 verbal adults with autism ...of the neuroplastic effects of CET on brain function in support of cognitive enhancement in adult autism . Analyses of treatment effects to date

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often had to ...

  9. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often ... participants. Children and Clinical Studies Learn about the importance of children in clinical studies and get answers ...

  10. Trial sponsorship and self-reported conflicts of interest in breast cancer radiation therapy: An analysis of prospective clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Elton T T; Moraes, Fabio Y; Marta, Gustavo N; Taunk, Neil K; Vieira, Marina T L; Hanna, Samir A; Silva, João Luis F; Carvalho, Heloisa A

    2017-06-01

    We aim to assess any association between study and self-reported conflict of interest (COI) or trial sponsorship in breast cancer radiation clinical trials. We searched PubMed for all clinical trials (CTs) published between 09/2004 and 09/2014 related to breast cancer. We included only radiotherapy CTs with primary clinical endpoints. We classified eligible trials according to the funding source, presence or absence of conflict of interest, study conclusion and impact factor (IF). 1,603 CTs were retrieved. 72 randomized clinical trials were included for analysis. For-profit (PO), not for profit organization (nPO), none and not reported sponsorship rates were 9/72 (12.5%), 35/72 (48.6%), 1/72 (1.4%), 27/72 (37.5%), respectively. Present, absent or not reported COI were found in 6/72 (8.3%), 43/72 (59.7%) and 23/72 (32%) of the CTs, respectively. Conclusion was positive, neutral and negative in 57/72 (79.1%), 9/72 (12.5%) and 6/72 (8.4%) of the trials, respectively. Positive conclusion was reported in 33/44 (75%) funded trials (PO and nPO) and 5/6 (83.3%) CTs with reported COI. On univariate analysis no association with funding source (P=0.178), COI (P=0.678) or trial region (P=0.567) and trial positive conclusion was found. Sponsored trials (HR 4.50, 95CI-0.1.23-16.53;P=0.0023) and positive trials (HR 4.78, 95CI- 1.16-19.63;P=0.030) were more likely to be published in higher impact factor journals in the multivariate analysis. nPO funding was reported in almost 50% of the evaluated CTs. No significant association between study conclusion and funding source, COI or trial region was identified. Sponsored trials and positive trials were more likely to be published in higher impact factor journals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical trial of cancer therapy with heavy ions at heavy ion research facility in lanzhou

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong

    With collaborative efforts of scientists from the Institute of Modern Physics (IMP), Chinese Academy of Sciences and hospitals in Gansu, initial clinical trial on cancer therapy with heavy ions has been successfully carried out in China. From November 2006 to December 2007, 51 patients with superficially-placed tumors were treated with carbon ions at Heavy Ion Research Facility in Lanzhou (HIRFL) within four beam time blocks of 6-11 days, collaborating with the General Hospital of Lanzhou Command and the Tumor Hospital of Gansu Province. Patients and Methods: There were 51 patients (31 males and 20 females) with superficially-placed tumors (squamous cell carcinoma of the skin, basal cell carcinoma of the skin, malignant skin melanoma, sarcoma, lymphoma, breast cancer, metastatic lymph nodes of carcinomas and other skin lesions). The tumors were less than 2.1 cm deep to the skin surface. All patients had histological confirmation of their tumors. Karnofsky Performance Scale (KPS) of all patients was more than 70. The majority of patients were with failures or recurrences of conventional therapies. Median age at the time of radiotherapy (RT) was 55.5 years (range 5-85 years). Patients were immobilized with a vacuum cushion or a head mask and irradiated by carbon ion beams with energy 80-100 MeV/u at spread-out Bragg peak field generated from HIRFL, with two and three-dimensional conformal irradiation methods. Target volume was defined by physical palpation [ultrasonography and Computerized tomography (CT), for some cases]. The clinical target volume (CTV) was defined as the gross total volume GTV with a 0.5-1.0cm margin axially. Field placement for radiation treatment planning was done based on the surface markings. RBE of 2.5-3 within the target volume, and 40-75 GyE with a weekly fractionation of 7 × 3-15 GyE/fraction were used in the trial. Patients had follow-up examinations performed 1 month after treatment, in 1 or 2 months for the first 6 months, and 3

  12. Periodontal Therapy Effects on Nitrite Related to Oral Bacteria: A 6-Month Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortelli, Sheila C; Costa, Fernando O; Rodrigues, Edson; Cota, Luis O M; Cortelli, Jose R

    2015-08-01

    Nitrite is a biologic factor relevant to oral and systemic homeostasis. Through an oral bacteria reduction process, it was suggested that periodontal therapy and chlorhexidine (CHX) rinse could affect nitrite levels, leading to negative effects, such as an increase in blood pressure. This 6-month randomized clinical trial evaluated the effects of periodontal therapeutic protocols on salivary nitrite and its relation to subgingival bacteria. One hundred patients with periodontitis were allocated randomly to debridement procedures in four weekly sections (quadrant scaling [QS]) or within 24 hours (full-mouth scaling [FMS]) in conjunction with a 60-day CHX (QS + CHX and FMS + CHX), placebo (QS + placebo and FMS + placebo), or no mouthrinse (QS + none and FMS + none) use. Real-time polymerase chain reaction determined total bacterial, Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis, Tannerella forsythia, Treponema denticola, Streptococcus oralis, and Actinomyces naeslundii levels. Salivary nitrite concentration was determined with Griess reagent. Data were analyzed statistically at baseline and 3 and 6 months by analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney U, and Spearman correlation tests (P periodontal pockets. The relationship between nitrite and bacterial levels appears weak. Short-term scaling exhibited a greater influence on nitrite concentrations then long-term CHX use.

  13. Formal Physical Therapy May Not Be Necessary After Unicompartmental Knee Arthroplasty: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillingham, Yale A; Darrith, Brian; Lonner, Jess H; Culvern, Chris; Crizer, Meredith; Della Valle, Craig J

    2018-02-21

    The purpose of this randomized clinical trial was to compare formal outpatient physical therapy (PT) and unsupervised home exercises after unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA). Fifty-two patients were randomized to 6 weeks of outpatient PT or an unsupervised home exercise program after UKA. The primary outcome was change in range of motion at 6 weeks with secondary outcomes including total arc of motion, Knee Society Score, Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score Jr, Lower Extremity Functional Scale, and Veterans Rands-12 score. Twenty-five patients received outpatient PT, 22 patients the self-directed exercise program, while 3 patients deviated from the protocol, 1 patient withdrew, and 1 patient was lost to follow-up. There was no difference in the change of range of motion (P = .43) or total arc of motion at 6 weeks (P = .17) between the groups and likewise no significant differences were found in any of the secondary outcomes. Two patients who crossed over from the unsupervised home exercise program to formal outpatient PT within the first 2 weeks postoperatively required a manipulation under anesthesia. Our results suggest self-directed exercises may be appropriate for most patients following UKA. However, there is a subset of patients who may benefit from formal PT. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, and whether ... How long will the trial last? Who will pay for the tests and treatments I receive? Will ...

  15. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... medicines, and how well they work. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees these ... trials are a key research tool for advancing medical knowledge and patient care. ...

  16. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Masking, or "blinding," helps avoid bias. For this reason, researchers also may not be told which treatments ... from a study at any time, for any reason. Also, during the trial, you have the right ...

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... get special protection as research subjects. Almost always, parents must give legal consent for their child to ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... risk of heart disease in the first few years, and HT also increased the risk of stroke ... a safety measure. They ensure a trial excludes any people for whom the protocol has known risks ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... risk of heart disease in the first few years, and HT also increased the risk of stroke ... master plan called a protocol (PRO-to-kol). This plan explains how the trial will work. The ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug ... life? Will I have to be in the hospital? How long will the trial last? Who will ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... procedures painful? What are the possible risks, side effects, and benefits of taking part in the study? How might this trial affect my daily life? Will I have to be in the hospital? ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... are ethical and that the participants' rights are protected. The IRB reviews the trial's protocol before the ... may know about studies going on in your area. You can visit the following website to learn ...

  3. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ideas. If an approach seems promising, the ... Centers (including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study ...

  4. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... trials optimization . Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn more about getting to NIH Get ... and Funding Building 31 31 Center Drive Bethesda, MD 20892 Learn more about getting to NIH Connect ...

  5. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... that the participants' rights are protected. The IRB reviews the trial's protocol before the study begins. An IRB will only approve research that deals with medically important questions ...

  6. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... to preexisting differences between the patients. Usually, a computer program makes the group assignments. Masking The term " ... under way. For example, some trials are stopped early if benefits from a strategy or treatment are ...

  7. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... treatment of menopausal symptoms. It also was increasingly being used for prevention of heart disease.) The study ... a trial are due to the different strategies being used, not to preexisting differences between the patients. ...

  8. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A- ... assumed that trial results were valid for other populations as well. Researchers now realize that women and ...

  9. Adjunctive Non-Surgical Therapy of Inflamed Periodontal Pockets During Maintenance Therapy Using Diode Laser: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Naomi-Trang; Byarlay, Matthew R; Reinhardt, Richard A; Marx, David B; Meinberg, Trudy A; Kaldahl, Wayne B

    2015-10-01

    Numerous studies have documented the clinical outcomes of laser therapy for untreated periodontitis, but very few have reported on lasers treating inflamed pockets during maintenance therapy. The aim of this study is to compare the effectiveness of scaling and root planing (SRP) plus the adjunctive use of diode laser therapy to SRP alone on changes in the clinical parameters of disease and on the gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) inflammatory mediator interleukin-1β (IL-1β) in patients receiving regular periodontal maintenance therapy. This single-masked and randomized, controlled, prospective study includes 22 patients receiving regular periodontal maintenance therapy who had one or more periodontal sites with a probing depth (PD) ≥ 5 mm with bleeding on probing (BOP). Fifty-six sites were treated with SRP and adjunctive laser therapy (SRP + L). Fifty-eight sites were treated with SRP alone. Clinical parameters, including PD, clinical attachment level (CAL), and BOP, and GCF IL-1β levels were measured immediately before treatment (baseline) and 3 months after treatment. Sites treated with SRP + L and SRP alone resulted in statistically significant reductions in PD and BOP and gains in CAL. These changes were not significantly different between the two therapies. Similarly, differences in GCF IL-1β levels between SRP + L and SRP alone were not statistically significant. In periodontal maintenance patients, SRP + L did not enhance clinical outcomes compared to SRP alone in the treatment of inflamed sites with ≥ 5 mm PD.

  10. Standards for gene therapy clinical trials based on pro-active risk assessment in a London NHS Teaching Hospital Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bamford, K B; Wood, S; Shaw, R J

    2005-02-01

    Conducting gene therapy clinical trials with genetically modified organisms as the vectors presents unique safety and infection control issues. The area is governed by a range of legislation and guidelines, some unique to this field, as well as those pertinent to any area of clinical work. The relevant regulations covering gene therapy using genetically modified vectors are reviewed and illustrated with the approach taken by a large teaching hospital NHS Trust. Key elements were Trust-wide communication and involvement of staff in a pro-active approach to risk management, with specific emphasis on staff training and engagement, waste management, audit and record keeping. This process has led to the development of proposed standards for clinical trials involving genetically modified micro-organisms.

  11. Understanding Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watch these videos to learn about some basic aspects of cancer clinical trials such as the different phases of clinical trials, methods used to protect patient safety, and how the costs of clinical trials are covered.

  12. Cultural Competency Training to Increase Minority Enrollment into Radiation Therapy Clinical Trials-an NRG Oncology RTOG Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Jessica S; Pugh, Stephanie; Boparai, Karan; Rearden, Jessica; Yeager, Katherine A; Bruner, Deborah W

    2017-12-01

    Despite initiatives to increase the enrollment of racial and ethnic minorities into cancer clinical trials in the National Cancer Institute National Cancer Clinical Trials Network (NCCTN), participation by Latino and African American populations remain low. The primary aims of this pilot study are (1) to develop a Cultural Competency and Recruitment Training Program (CCRTP) for physician investigators and clinical research associates (CRAs), (2) to determine if the CCRTP increases cultural competency scores among physician investigators and CRAs, and (3) to determine the impact of the CCRTP on minority patient recruitment into NRG Oncology Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) clinical trials. Sixty-seven CRAs and physicians participated in an in-person or online 4-h CRRTP training. Five knowledge and attitude items showed significant improvements from pre- to post-training. A comparison between enrolling sites that did and did not participate in the CCRTP demonstrated a pre to 1-year post-incremental increase in minority accrual to clinical trials of 1.2 % among participating sites. While not statistically significant, this increase translated into an additional 300 minority patients accrued to NCCTN clinical trials in the year following the training from those sites who participated in the training.

  13. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants and Training ... or may cause harm. For example, the NHLBI Women's Health Initiative tested whether hormone therapy (HT) reduced ...

  14. ‘Third wave’ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy for major depressive disorder. A protocol for a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakobsen Janus Christian

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most interventions for depression have shown small or no effects. ‘Third wave‘ cognitive therapy and mentalization-based therapy have both gained some ground as treatments of psychological problems. No randomised trial has compared the effects of these two interventions for patients with major depression. Methods/ design We plan a randomised, parallel group, assessor-blinded superiority clinical trial. During two years we will include 84 consecutive adult participants diagnosed with major depressive disorder. The participants will be randomised to either ‘third wave‘ cognitive therapy versus mentalization-based therapy. The primary outcome will be the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression at cessation of treatment at 18 weeks. Secondary outcomes will be the proportion of patients with remission, Symptom Checklist 90 Revised, Beck’s Depression Inventory, and The World Health Organisation-Five Well-being Index 1999. Discussion Interventions for depression have until now shown relatively small effects. Our trial results will provide knowledge about the effects of two modern psychotherapeutic interventions. Trial registration ClinicalTrials: NCT01070134

  15. Oversight and management of a cell therapy clinical trial network: experience and lessons learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyé, Lemuel A; Sayre, Shelly L; Westbrook, Lynette; Jorgenson, Beth C; Handberg, Eileen; Anwaruddin, Saif; Wagner, Kristi A; Skarlatos, Sonia I

    2011-09-01

    The Cardiovascular Cell Therapy Research Network (CCTRN), sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), was established to develop, coordinate, and conduct multiple collaborative protocols testing the effects of cell therapy on cardiovascular diseases. The Network was born into a difficult political and ethical climate created by the recent removal of a dozen drugs from the US formulary and the temporary halting of 27 gene therapy trials due to safety concerns. This article describes the Network's challenges as it initiated three protocols in a polarized cultural atmosphere at a time when oversight bodies were positioning themselves for the tightest vigilance of promising new therapies. Effective strategies involving ongoing education, open communication, and relationship building with the oversight community are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluating Intermittent Androgen-Deprivation Therapy Phase III Clinical Trials: The Devil Is in the Details.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Maha; Tangen, Catherine; Higano, Celestia; Vogelzang, Nicholas; Thompson, Ian

    2016-01-20

    Intermittent androgen deprivation (IAD) has been widely tested in prostate cancer. However, phase III trials testing continuous androgen deprivation (CAD) versus IAD have reached inconclusive and seemingly contradictory results. Different design and conduct issues must be critically evaluated to better interpret the results. Seven published phase III trials were examined for prespecified design and outcomes. Treatment specifications; primary end point; superiority versus noninferiority design assumptions, including magnitude of assumed versus observed noninferiority margin (NIM); duration of follow-up; and quality-of-life (QOL) outcomes were considered in terms of the results and conclusions reported. Five trials had a superiority and three had a noninferiority primary hypothesis. Only three trials had a uniform population and overall survival (OS) end point. All trials observed better outcomes in terms of OS and progression-free survival (PFS) than assumed at time of study design, translating into prespecified NIMs or hazard ratios that reflected larger absolute differences in OS or PFS between arms. Lower-than-expected event rates also reduced statistical power for the trials. Other factors, including length of follow-up, cause of death, QOL, and primary end point, and their impact on trial interpretation are discussed. No trial to date has demonstrated survival superiority of IAD compared with CAD. Trials concluding IAD is noninferior to CAD were based on wide NIMs that included clinically important survival differences, not likely to be considered comparable by physicians or patients. Interim analyses relying on short follow-up and including a majority of non-prostate cancer deaths will favor a noninferiority conclusion and should be interpreted cautiously. Adequate follow-up is required to ensure capture of prostate cancer deaths in both superiority and noninferiority trials. © 2015 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  17. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about Children and ...

  18. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... go to the NHLBI's Children and Clinical Studies Web page. Children and Clinical Studies Learn more about ... Protections The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ (HHS’) Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) oversees ...

  19. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Studies Learn more about Children and Clinical Studies Importance of Children in Clinical Studies Children have often ... rights that help protect them. Scientific Oversight Institutional Review Board Institutional review boards (IRBs) help provide scientific ...

  20. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... U.S. Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs; private companies; universities; and nonprofit organizations. NIH Institutes and Centers (including the NHLBI) usually sponsor trials that test principles or strategies. For example, one NHLBI study explored whether the ...

  1. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Trials Publications and Resources Health Education and Awareness The Science Science Home Blood Disorders and Blood Safety Sleep ... Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies Women’s Health All Science A-Z Grants ... in the Press Research Features All Events Past Events Upcoming ...

  2. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... Diseases Heart and Vascular Diseases Precision Medicine Activities Obesity, Nutrition, and Physical Activity Population and Epidemiology Studies ... include factors such as a patient's age and gender, the type and stage of disease, ... helps ensure that any differences observed during a trial are due to the ...

  3. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an important gap in information and education for parents, clinicians, researchers, children, and the general public. What to Expect During ... trial's potential risks are greater than minimal, both parents must give permission for their child to enroll. Also, children aged 7 and older ...

  4. Physiotherapy and occupational therapy interventions for people with benign joint hypermobility syndrome: a systematic review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Toby O; Bacon, Holly; Jerman, Emma; Easton, Vicky; Armon, Kate; Poland, Fiona; Macgregor, Alex J

    2014-01-01

    This study assessed the literature to determine the efficacy and effectiveness of physiotherapy and occupational therapy interventions in the treatment of people with benign joint hypermobility syndrome (BJHS). Published literature databases including: AMED, CINAHL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed and the Cochrane Library, in addition to unpublished databases and trial registries were searched to October 2012. All clinical trials comparing the clinical outcomes of Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy interventions compared to non-treatment or control intervention for people with BJHS were included. Of the 126 search results, 3 clinical studies satisfied the eligibility criteria. The data provides limited support for the use of wrist/hand splints for school children. While there is some support for exercise-based intervention, there is insufficient research to determine the optimal mode, frequency, dosage or type of exercise which should be delivered. The current evidence-base surrounding Occupational Therapy and Physiotherapy in the management of BJHS is limited in size and quality. There is insufficient research exploring the clinical outcomes of a number of interventions including sensory integration, positioning and posture management and education. Longer term, rigorous multi-centre randomised controlled trials are warranted to begin to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions for children and adults with BJHS. Implications for Rehabilitation There is an evidence-base to support clinician's use of proprioceptive-based exercises in adults, and either tailored or generalised physiotherapy regimes for children with BJHS. Clinicians should be cautious when considering the prescription of hand/wrist splints for school age children with BJHS, based on the current research. Until further multi-centre trials are conducted assessing the clinical and cost-effectiveness of interventions for children and adult with BJHS, clinical decision-making should be

  5. A randomized trial of emotion-focused therapy for couples in a training clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, W H; Burleson, B R; Clark, T E; Rodriguez, C P; Hobbs, B V

    2000-01-01

    Forty married couples participated in a randomized trial comparing 8 weekly sessions of emotion-focused therapy (EFT) for couples to a group of couples who were placed on an 8-week waiting list. A composite marital satisfaction score was created from scores on the Dyadic Adjustment Scale, Positive Feelings Questionnaire, and Personal Assessment of Intimacy in Relationships scale. Controlling for pretest scores, participants in the treatment group had significantly higher levels of marital satisfaction after 8 weeks than wait-list participants. Supplementary analyses identified variables associated with gains in therapy and with dropping out of the study.

  6. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, Irene; Austin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136......Dual diagnosis is chronic psychiatric condition involving serious mental illness and substance abuse. Experts recommend the integration of treatment for concurrent substance abuse and serious psychiatric problems. The following pragmatic trial examined the implementation and outcomes of cognitive...

  7. Chemotherapy and targeted therapy in advanced biliary tract carcinoma: a pooled analysis of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckel, Florian; Schmid, Roland M

    2014-01-01

    In biliary tract cancer, gemcitabine platinum (GP) doublet palliative chemotherapy is the current standard treatment. The aim of this study was to analyze recent trials, even those small and nonrandomized, and identify superior new regimens. Trials published in English between January 2000 and January 2014 were analyzed, as well as ASCO abstracts from 2010 to 2013. In total, 161 trials comprising 6,337 patients were analyzed. The pooled results of standard therapy GP (no fluoropyrimidine, F, or other drug) were as follows: the median response rate (RR), tumor control rate (TCR), time to tumor progression (TTP) and overall survival (OS) were 25.9 and 63.5%, and 5.3 and 9.5 months, respectively. GFP triplets as well as G-based chemotherapy plus targeted therapy were significantly superior to GP concerning tumor control (TCR, TTP) and OS, with no difference in RR. Triplet combinations of GFP as well as G-based chemotherapy with (predominantly EGFR) targeted therapy are most effective concerning tumor control and survival.

  8. Osteopathic manual therapy in heart failure patients: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomaz, Sergio R; Teixeira, Felipe A; de Lima, Alexandra C G B; Cipriano Júnior, Gerson; Formiga, Magno F; Cahalin, Lawrence Patrick

    2018-04-01

    Heart Failure (HF) patients usually present with increased arterial resistance and reduced blood pressure (BP) leading to an impaired functional capacity. Osteopathic Manual Therapy (OMT) focused on myofascial release techniques (MRT) and in the balancing of diaphragmatic tensions, has been shown to improve blood flow in individuals using the resistive index (RI). However, its effects in HF patients have not been examined. To evaluate the acute response of selected osteopathic techniques on RI, heart rate (HR), and BP in patients with HF. Randomized-controlled clinical trial of HF patients assigned to MRT (six different techniques with three aimed at the pelvis, two at the thorax, and one at the neck for 15 min) or Control group (subjects in supine position for 15 min without intervention). The RI of the femoral, brachial and carotid arteries was measured via doppler ultrasound while HR and BP were measured via sphygmomanometry before and after a single MRT or control intervention. Twenty-two HF patients equally distributed (50% male, mean age 53 years; range 32-69 years) (ejection fraction = 35.6%, VO 2peak : 12.9 mL/kg -1 min -1 ) were evaluated. We found no intra or inter group differences in RI of the carotid (Δ MRT : 0.07% vs Δ Control :11.8%), brachial (Δ MRT :0.17% vs Δ Control : 2.9%), or femoral arteries (Δ MRT :1.65% vs Δ Control : 0.97%) (P > 0.05) and no difference in HR or BP (Δ MRT :0.6% vs Δ Control : 3%), (P > 0.05). A single MRT session did not significantly change the RI, HR, or BP of HF patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Preclinical studies and clinical trial of targeted alpha therapy for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allen, B.J.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Targeted Alpha therapy (TAT) offers the potential to inhibit the growth of micrometastases by selectively killing isolated and preangiogenic clusters of cancer cells. The practicality and efficacy of TAT is tested by in vitro and in vivo studies in melanoma, leukemia, colorectal, breast and prostate cancers. Materials and Methods: The alpha-emitting radioisotope is Bi-213, which is produced by the Ac-225 generator and chelated to a cancer specific monoclonal antibody (mab) or protein (eg plasmmogen activator inhibitor PAI2) to form the alpha-conjugate (AC). Stable alpha-ACs have been produced which have been tested for specificity and cytotoxicity in vitro against melanoma (9.2.27 mab), leukemia (WM60 mab), colorectal (C30.6 mab), breast (PAI2) and prostate (PAI2, J591 mab) cancers. Subcutaneous inoculation of 1-1.5 million human cancer cells into the flanks of nude mice causes tumours to grow in all mice. Tumour growth is compared for untreated controls, nonspecific AC and specific AC, for local (subcutaneous) and systemic (tail vein or intraperitoneal) injection models. Results: In vitro studies show that TAT is one to two orders of magnitude more cytotoxic to targeted cells than nonspecific ACs, specific beta emitting conjugates or free isotope. In vivo local TAT at 2 days post-inoculation completely prevents tumour formation for all cancers tested so far. Intra-lesional TAT can also completely regress advanced sc melanomas but is less successful for breast and prostate cancers. Systemic TAT inhibits the growth of sc melanoma xenografts and gives almost complete control of breast and prostate cancer tumour growth. Conclusions: These results point to the application of local and systemic TAT in the management of secondary cancer. A phase 1 and 2 clinical trial of TAT of subcutaneous, secondary melanoma has commenced at St George Hospital, and 10/30 subjects have been treated by intralesional injection

  10. The Effect of Debriefing and Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Postpartum Depression in Traumatic Childbirth: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Sedigheh Abdollahpour; Afsaneh Keramat; Seyyed Abbas Mousavi; Ahmad Khosravi; zahra motaghi

    2018-01-01

    Background & aim: Childbirth is a stressful event in women’s lives, and if a mother perceives it as an unpleasant event, it can influence her postpartum mental health. Depression is a common mental disorder, which can has serious consequences depending on its severity. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of debriefing and brief cognitive-behavioral therapy on postpartum depression in traumatic childbirth. Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 179 mothers who experien...

  11. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and useful results, which in turn will improve public health. We offer a variety of funding mechanisms tailored to planning and conducting clinical ... Privacy Policy Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) Accessibility ...

  12. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and devices specific to children. Resources for a Wide Range of Audiences The Children and Clinical Studies ... have not only shaped medical practice around the world, but have improved the health of millions of ...

  13. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the strategy or treatment is having harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight for clinical ...

  14. Clinical Trials

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    Full Text Available ... harmful effects. Food and Drug Administration In the United States, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) provides oversight ... of research studies at the NIH Clinical Center, America's research hospital, located on the NIH campus in ...

  15. Timed Light Therapy for Sleep and Daytime Sleepiness Associated With Parkinson Disease: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videnovic, Aleksandar; Klerman, Elizabeth B; Wang, Wei; Marconi, Angelica; Kuhta, Teresa; Zee, Phyllis C

    2017-04-01

    Impaired sleep and alertness are some of the most common nonmotor manifestations of Parkinson disease (PD) and currently have only limited treatment options. Light therapy (LT), a widely available treatment modality in sleep medicine, has not been systematically studied in the PD population. To determine the safety and efficacy of LT on excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) associated with PD. This randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical intervention study was set in PD centers at Northwestern University and Rush University. Participants were 31 patients with PD receiving stable dopaminergic therapy with coexistent EDS, as assessed by an Epworth Sleepiness Scale score of 12 or greater, and without cognitive impairment or primary sleep disorder. Participants were randomized 1:1 to receive bright LT or dim-red LT (controlled condition) twice daily in 1-hour intervals for 14 days. This trial was conducted between March 1, 2007, and October 31, 2012. Data analysis of the intention-to-treat population was conducted from November 1, 2012, through April 30, 2016. The primary outcome measure was the change in the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score comparing the bright LT with the dim-red LT. Secondary outcome measures included the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index score, the Parkinson's Disease Sleep Scale score, the visual analog scale score for daytime sleepiness, and sleep log-derived and actigraphy-derived metrics. Among the 31 patients (13 males and 18 females; mean [SD] disease duration, 5.9 [3.6] years), bright LT resulted in significant improvements in EDS, as assessed by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale score (mean [SD], 15.81 [3.10] at baseline vs 11.19 [3.31] after the intervention). Both bright LT and dim-red LT were associated with improvements in sleep quality as captured by mean (SD) scores on the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index (7.88 [4.11] at baseline vs 6.25 [4.27] after bright LT, and 8.87 [2.83] at baseline vs 7.33 [3.52] after dim-red LT) and the Parkinson's Disease

  16. Statistical significance versus clinical importance: trials on exercise therapy for chronic low back pain as example.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Tulder, M.W.; Malmivaara, A.; Hayden, J.; Koes, B.

    2007-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN. Critical appraisal of the literature. OBJECIVES. The objective of this study was to assess if results of back pain trials are statistically significant and clinically important. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA. There seems to be a discrepancy between conclusions reported by authors and

  17. Artemisinin versus Nonartemisinin Combination Therapy for Uncomplicated Malaria: Randomized Clinical Trials from Four Sites in Uganda

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeka, Adoke; Banek, Kristin; Bakyaita, Nathan; Staedke, Sarah G; Kamya, Moses R; Talisuna, Ambrose; Kironde, Fred; Nsobya, Samuel L; Kilian, Albert; Slater, Madeline; Reingold, Arthur; Rosenthal, Philip J; Wabwire-Mangen, Fred; Dorsey, Grant

    2005-01-01

    Background Drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum poses a major threat to malaria control. Combination antimalarial therapy including artemisinins has been advocated recently to improve efficacy and limit the spread of resistance, but artemisinins are expensive and relatively untested in highly endemic areas. We compared artemisinin-based and other combination therapies in four districts in Uganda with varying transmission intensity. Methods and Findings We enrolled 2,160 patients aged 6 mo or greater with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Patients were randomized to receive chloroquine (CQ) + sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP); amodiaquine (AQ) + SP; or AQ + artesunate (AS). Primary endpoints were the 28-d risks of parasitological failure either unadjusted or adjusted by genotyping to distinguish recrudescence from new infections. A total of 2,081 patients completed follow-up, of which 1,749 (84%) were under the age of 5 y. The risk of recrudescence after treatment with CQ + SP was high, ranging from 22% to 46% at the four sites. This risk was significantly lower (p AQ + SP or AQ + AS (7%–18% and 4%–12%, respectively). Compared to AQ + SP, AQ + AS was associated with a lower risk of recrudescence but a higher risk of new infection. The overall risk of repeat therapy due to any recurrent infection (recrudescence or new infection) was similar at two sites and significantly higher for AQ + AS at the two highest transmission sites (risk differences = 15% and 16%, pAQ + AS was the most efficacious regimen for preventing recrudescence, but this benefit was outweighed by an increased risk of new infection. Considering all recurrent infections, the efficacy of AQ + SP was at least as efficacious at all sites and superior to AQ + AS at the highest transmission sites. The high endemicity of malaria in Africa may impact on the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy. The registration number for this trial is ISRCTN67520427 (http://www.controlled-trials.com/isrctn/trial

  18. Antibiotic Therapy vs Appendectomy for Treatment of Uncomplicated Acute Appendicitis: The APPAC Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salminen, Paulina; Paajanen, Hannu; Rautio, Tero; Nordström, Pia; Aarnio, Markku; Rantanen, Tuomo; Tuominen, Risto; Hurme, Saija; Virtanen, Johanna; Mecklin, Jukka-Pekka; Sand, Juhani; Jartti, Airi; Rinta-Kiikka, Irina; Grönroos, Juha M

    2015-06-16

    An increasing amount of evidence supports the use of antibiotics instead of surgery for treating patients with uncomplicated acute appendicitis. To compare antibiotic therapy with appendectomy in the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis confirmed by computed tomography (CT). The Appendicitis Acuta (APPAC) multicenter, open-label, noninferiority randomized clinical trial was conducted from November 2009 until June 2012 in Finland. The trial enrolled 530 patients aged 18 to 60 years with uncomplicated acute appendicitis confirmed by a CT scan. Patients were randomly assigned to early appendectomy or antibiotic treatment with a 1-year follow-up period. Patients randomized to antibiotic therapy received intravenous ertapenem (1 g/d) for 3 days followed by 7 days of oral levofloxacin (500 mg once daily) and metronidazole (500 mg 3 times per day). Patients randomized to the surgical treatment group were assigned to undergo standard open appendectomy. The primary end point for the surgical intervention was the successful completion of an appendectomy. The primary end point for antibiotic-treated patients was discharge from the hospital without the need for surgery and no recurrent appendicitis during a 1-year follow-up period. There were 273 patients in the surgical group and 257 in the antibiotic group. Of 273 patients in the surgical group, all but 1 underwent successful appendectomy, resulting in a success rate of 99.6% (95% CI, 98.0% to 100.0%). In the antibiotic group, 70 patients (27.3%; 95% CI, 22.0% to 33.2%) underwent appendectomy within 1 year of initial presentation for appendicitis. Of the 256 patients available for follow-up in the antibiotic group, 186 (72.7%; 95% CI, 66.8% to 78.0%) did not require surgery. The intention-to-treat analysis yielded a difference in treatment efficacy between groups of -27.0% (95% CI, -31.6% to ∞) (P = .89). Given the prespecified noninferiority margin of 24%, we were unable to demonstrate noninferiority of

  19. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... seems promising, the next step may involve animal testing. This shows how the approach affects a living body and whether it's harmful. However, an approach that works well in the lab or animals doesn't always work well in people. Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical ...

  20. Clinical Trials

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the final stages of a long and careful research process. The process often begins in a laboratory (lab), where scientists first develop and test new ideas. If an approach seems ... Thus, research in humans is needed. For safety purposes, clinical ...

  1. Randomized controlled trial of oral vs intravenous therapy for the clinically diagnosed acute uncomplicated diverticulitis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ridgway, P F

    2009-11-01

    Despite the high prevalence of hospitalization for left iliac fossa tenderness, there is a striking lack of randomized data available to guide therapy. The authors hypothesize that an oral antibiotic and fluids are not inferior to intravenous (IV) antibiotics and \\'bowel rest\\' in clinically diagnosed acute uncomplicated diverticulitis.

  2. The failure of anxiolytic therapies in early clinical trials: what needs to be done.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Adam Michael; Nguyen, Michael; Poudel, Manoj K; Warnick, Jason E; Echevarria, David J; Beaton, Elliott A; Song, Cai; Kalueff, Allan V

    2015-04-01

    Anxiety spectrum disorders (ASDs) are highly prevalent psychiatric illnesses that affect millions of people worldwide. Strongly associated with stress, common ASDs include generalized anxiety disorder, panic, social anxiety, phobias and drug-abuse-related anxiety. In addition to ASDs, several other prevalent psychiatric illnesses represent trauma/stressor-related disorders, such as post-traumatic stress disorder and acute stress disorder. Anxiolytic drugs, commonly prescribed to treat ASDs and trauma/stressor-related disorders, form a highly heterogenous group, modulating multiple neurotransmitters and physiological mechanisms. However, overt individual differences in efficacy and the potential for serious side-effects (including addiction and drug interaction) indicate a need for further drug development. Yet, over the past 50 years, there has been relatively little progress in the development of novel anxiolytic medications, especially when promising candidate drugs often fail in early clinical trials. Herein, the authors present recommendations of the Task Force on Anxiolytic Drugs of the International Stress and Behavior Society on how to improve anxiolytic drug discovery. These recommendations cover a wide spectrum of aspects, ranging from methodological improvements to conceptual insights and innovation. In order to improve the success of anxiolytic drugs in early clinical trials, the goals of preclinical trials may need to be adjusted from a clinical perspective and better synchronized with those of clinical studies. Indeed, it is important to realize that the strategic goals and approaches must be similar if we want to have a smoother transition between phases.

  3. Landscape of current and emerging cell therapy clinical trials in the UK: current status, comparison to global trends and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisson, Isabelle; Green, Emma; Sharpe, Michaela; Herbert, Chris; Hyllner, Johan; Mount, Natalie

    2015-01-01

    Cell Therapy Clinical Trial and Preclinical Research databases have been established by the Cell Therapy Catapult to document current and future cell therapy clinical trials in the UK. We identified 41 ongoing trials in April 2014, an increase of seven trials from April 2013. In addition, we identified 45 late-stage preclinical research projects. The majority of the clinical trials are early phase, primarily led by academic groups. The leading therapeutic areas are cancer, cardiology and neurology. The trends in the UK are also seen globally. As the field matures, more later phase and commercial studies will emerge and the challenges will likely evolve into how to manufacture sufficient cell quantities, manage complex logistics for multi-center trials and control cost.

  4. Should positive phase III clinical trial data be required before proton beam therapy is more widely adopted? No

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, Herman; Kooy, Hanne; Trofimov, Alexei; Farr, Jonathan; Munzenrider, John; DeLaney, Thomas; Loeffler, Jay; Clasie, Benjamin; Safai, Sairos; Paganetti, Harald

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: Evaluate the rationale for the proposals that prior to a wider use of proton radiation therapy there must be supporting data from phase III clinical trials. That is, would less dose to normal tissues be an advantage to the patient? Methods: Assess the basis for the assertion that proton dose distributions are superior to those of photons for most situations. Consider the requirements for determining the risks of normal tissue injury, acute and remote, in the examination of the data from a trial. Analyze the probable cost differential between high technology photon and proton therapy. Evaluate the rationale for phase III clinical trials of proton vs photon radiation therapy when the only difference in dose delivered is a difference in distribution of low LET radiation. Results: The distributions of biological effective dose by protons are superior to those by X-rays for most clinical situations, viz. for a defined dose and dose distribution to the target by protons there is a lower dose to non-target tissues. This superiority is due to these physical properties of protons: (1) protons have a finite range and that range is exclusively dependent on the initial energy and the density distribution along the beam path; (2) the Bragg peak; (3) the proton energy distribution may be designed to provide a spread out Bragg peak that yields a uniform dose across the target volume and virtually zero dose deep to the target. Importantly, proton and photon treatment plans can employ beams in the same number and directions (coplanar, non-co-planar), utilize intensity modulation and employ 4D image guided techniques. Thus, the only difference between protons and photons is the distribution of biologically effective dose and this difference can be readily evaluated and quantified. Additionally, this dose distribution advantage should increase the tolerance of certain chemotherapeutic agents and thus permit higher drug doses. The cost of service (not developmental) proton

  5. Efficacy of Cellular Therapy for Diabetic Foot Ulcer: A Meta-Analysis of Randomized Controlled Clinical Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ye; Deng, Hong; Tang, Zhouping

    2017-12-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a widely spread chronic disease with growing incidence worldwide, and diabetic foot ulcer is one of the most serious complications of diabetes. Cellular therapy has shown promise in the management of diabetic foot ulcer in many preclinical experiments and clinical researches. Here, we performed a meta-analysis to evaluate the efficacy and safety of cellular therapy in the management of diabetic foot ulcer. We systematically searched PubMed, MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to May 2017 for randomized controlled trials assessing the efficacy of cellular therapy in diabetic foot ulcer, and a meta-analysis was conducted. A total of 6 randomized controlled clinical trials involving 241 individuals were included in this meta-analysis. The results suggested that cellular therapy could help accelerating the healing of diabetic foot ulcer, presented as higher ankle-brachial index (mean difference = 0.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.11 to 0.23), higher transcutaneous oxygen pressure (standardized mean difference [SMD] = 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09- to 1.78), higher ulcer healing rate (relative risk [RR] = 1.78; 95% CI, 1.41 to 2.25), higher amputation-free survival (RR = 1.25; 95% CI, 1.11 to 1.40), and lower scale of pain (SMD = -1.69; 95% CI, -2.05 to -1.33). Furthermore, cellular therapy seemed to be safe, with no serious complications and low risk of short-term slight complications. Cellular therapy could accelerate the rate of diabetic foot ulcer healing and may be more efficient than standard therapy for diabetic foot treatment.

  6. [PARAMOUNT trial: clinical meaning of continuous maintenance therapy in lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gridelli, Cesare

    2015-05-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains one of the leading causes of cancer related deaths worldwide across both sex. Patients with Advanced -NSCLC (A-NSCLC) do not have curative treatment options, so the primary endpoint of every therapeutic decision aims to prolong survival, improving or maintain a good Quality of Life (QoL). Histology could represent a positive predictive factor for patients with Non squamous NSCLC (Nsq-NSCLC) respect to pemetrexed treatment. Pemetrexed is an antifolate that inhibits primarily thymidylate synthase (TS), together with dihydrofolate reductase and glycinamide ribonucleotide formyl transferase. Pemetrexed in combination with cisplatin is approved in the first line setting and as monotherapy in the switch or continuous maintenance of Non Squamous A-NSCLC. Maintenance therapy is a widely used therapeutic option in other solid and hematologic malignancies, but in the A-NSCLC represent an innovative approach. The rationale in this new setting of patients is based on the evidence that patients who benefit from an initial induction therapy platinum based may benefit from maintenance therapy with the third generation agent dropping the platinum drug after four to six cycles. We can define two types of maintenance therapy: continuation maintenance and switch maintenance. Major results in prolonging Overall Survival (OS) was reported with the continuation maintenance strategy as in the PARAMOUNT trial.

  7. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    ... in the pharmaceutical industry, Clinical trial methodology emphasizes the importance of statistical thinking in clinical research and presents the methodology as a key component of clinical research...

  8. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care: Design of a randomised trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Severens Johan L

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Major depression is a common mental health problem in the general population, associated with a substantial impact on quality of life and societal costs. However, many depressed patients in primary care do not receive the care they need. Reason for this is that pharmacotherapy is only effective in severely depressed patients and psychological treatments in primary care are scarce and costly. A more feasible treatment in primary care might be computerised cognitive behavioural therapy. This can be a self-help computer program based on the principles of cognitive behavioural therapy. Although previous studies suggest that computerised cognitive behavioural therapy is effective, more research is necessary. Therefore, the objective of the current study is to evaluate the (cost- effectiveness of online computerised cognitive behavioural therapy for depression in primary care. Methods/Design In a randomised trial we will compare (a computerised cognitive behavioural therapy with (b treatment as usual by a GP, and (c computerised cognitive behavioural therapy in combination with usual GP care. Three hundred mild to moderately depressed patients (aged 18–65 will be recruited in the general population by means of a large-scale Internet-based screening (N = 200,000. Patients will be randomly allocated to one of the three treatment groups. Primary outcome measure of the clinical evaluation is the severity of depression. Other outcomes include psychological distress, social functioning, and dysfunctional beliefs. The economic evaluation will be performed from a societal perspective, in which all costs will be related to clinical effectiveness and health-related quality of life. All outcome assessments will take place on the Internet at baseline, two, three, six, nine, and twelve months. Costs are measured on a monthly basis. A time horizon of one year will be used without long-term extrapolation of either costs or quality of life

  9. Artemisinin versus nonartemisinin combination therapy for uncomplicated malaria: randomized clinical trials from four sites in Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adoke Yeka

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Drug resistance in Plasmodium falciparum poses a major threat to malaria control. Combination antimalarial therapy including artemisinins has been advocated recently to improve efficacy and limit the spread of resistance, but artemisinins are expensive and relatively untested in highly endemic areas. We compared artemisinin-based and other combination therapies in four districts in Uganda with varying transmission intensity. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We enrolled 2,160 patients aged 6 mo or greater with uncomplicated falciparum malaria. Patients were randomized to receive chloroquine (CQ + sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP; amodiaquine (AQ + SP; or AQ + artesunate (AS. Primary endpoints were the 28-d risks of parasitological failure either unadjusted or adjusted by genotyping to distinguish recrudescence from new infections. A total of 2,081 patients completed follow-up, of which 1,749 (84% were under the age of 5 y. The risk of recrudescence after treatment with CQ + SP was high, ranging from 22% to 46% at the four sites. This risk was significantly lower (p < 0.01 after AQ + SP or AQ + AS (7%-18% and 4%-12%, respectively. Compared to AQ + SP, AQ + AS was associated with a lower risk of recrudescence but a higher risk of new infection. The overall risk of repeat therapy due to any recurrent infection (recrudescence or new infection was similar at two sites and significantly higher for AQ + AS at the two highest transmission sites (risk differences = 15% and 16%, p < 0.003. CONCLUSION: AQ + AS was the most efficacious regimen for preventing recrudescence, but this benefit was outweighed by an increased risk of new infection. Considering all recurrent infections, the efficacy of AQ + SP was at least as efficacious at all sites and superior to AQ + AS at the highest transmission sites. The high endemicity of malaria in Africa may impact on the efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy. The registration number for this trial is ISRCTN

  10. Clinical efficacy, onset time and safety of bright light therapy in acute bipolar depression as an adjunctive therapy: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Tian-Hang; Dang, Wei-Min; Ma, Yan-Tao; Hu, Chang-Qing; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Guo-Yi; Wang, Gang; Shi, Chuan; Zhang, Hua; Guo, Bin; Zhou, Shu-Zhe; Feng, Lei; Geng, Shu-Xia; Tong, Yu-Zhen; Tang, Guan-Wen; He, Zhong-Kai; Zhen, Long; Yu, Xin

    2018-02-01

    Bright light therapy (BLT) is an effective treatment for seasonal affective disorder and non- seasonal depression. The efficacy of BLT in treating patients with bipolar disorder is still unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the efficacy, onset time and clinical safety of BLT in treating patients with acute bipolar depression as an adjunctive therapy (trial registration at ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT02009371). This was a multi-center, single blind, randomized clinical trial. Seventy-four participants were randomized in one of two treatment conditions: BLT and control (dim red light therapy, dRLT). Sixty-three participants completed the study (33 BLT, 30 dRLT). Light therapy lasted for two weeks, one hour every morning. All participants were required to complete several scales assessments at baseline, and at the end of weeks 1 and 2. The primary outcome measures were the clinical efficacy of BLT which was assessed by the reduction rate of HAMD-17 scores, and the onset time of BLT which was assessed by the reduction rate of QIDS-SR16 scores. The secondary outcome measures were rates of switch into hypomania or mania and adverse events. 1) Clinical efficacy: BLT showed a greater ameliorative effect on bipolar depression than the control, with response rates of 78.19% vs. 43.33% respectively (p < 0.01). 2) Onset day: Median onset day was 4.33 days in BLT group. 3) BLT-emergent hypomania: No participants experienced symptoms of hypomania. 4) Side effects: No serious adverse events were reported. BLT can be considered as an effective and safe adjunctive treatment for patients with acute bipolar depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The effectiveness of mangosteen rind extract as additional therapy on chronic periodontitis (Clinical trials)

    OpenAIRE

    Ina Hendiani; Dede Hadidjah; Agus Susanto; Indra Mustika Setia Pribadi

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Introduction: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that attacks the periodontal tissue comprises the gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone caused mainly by plaque bacteriophage or other specific dominant type of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of clinical application of mangosteen peel extract gel as adjunctive therapy scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. This research was expect...

  12. A Randomized Clinical Trial of a Brief, Problem-Focused Couple Therapy for Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Cohen, Shiri; O’Leary, K. Daniel; Foran, Heather

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a brief couple therapy for depression targeted for mildly discordant or nondiscordant couples struggling with the negative impact of depression. Subjects included women with major depression or dysthymia who had husbands without clinical depression. Thirty-five couples were randomly assigned to the 5-week intervention (n = 18) or a waitlist control group (n = 17), and followed up 1 and 3 months later. Results showed a significant effect of treatment in re...

  13. Automated Text Messaging as an Adjunct to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression: A Clinical Trial

    OpenAIRE

    Aguilera, Adrian; Bruehlman-Senecal, Emma; Demasi, Orianna; Avila, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Background: Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for depression is efficacious, but effectiveness is limited when implemented in low-income settings due to engagement difficulties including nonadherence with skill-building homework and early discontinuation of treatment. Automated messaging can be used in clinical settings to increase dosage of depression treatment and encourage sustained engagement with psychotherapy. Objectives: The aim of this study was to test whether a text messag...

  14. Cognitive enhancement therapy for adult autism spectrum disorder: Results of an 18-month randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eack, Shaun M; Hogarty, Susan S; Greenwald, Deborah P; Litschge, Maralee Y; Porton, Shannondora A; Mazefsky, Carla A; Minshew, Nancy J

    2018-03-01

    Cognitive remediation is a promising approach to treating core cognitive deficits in adults with autism, but rigorously controlled trials of comprehensive interventions that target both social and non-social cognition over a sufficient period of time to impact functioning are lacking. This study examined the efficacy of cognitive enhancement therapy (CET) for improving core cognitive and employment outcomes in adult autism. Verbal adult outpatients with autism spectrum disorder (N = 54) were randomized to an 18-month, single-blind trial of CET, a cognitive remediation approach that integrates computer-based neurocognitive training with group-based training in social cognition, or an active enriched supportive therapy (EST) comparison focused on psychoeducation and condition management. Primary outcomes were composite indexes of neurocognitive and social-cognitive change. Competitive employment was a secondary outcome. Intent-to-treat analyses indicated that CET produced significant differential increases in neurocognitive function relative to EST (d = .46, P = .013). Both CET and EST were associated with large social-cognitive improvements, with CET demonstrating an advantage at 9 (d = .58, P = 0.020), but not 18 months (d = .27, P = 0.298). Effects on employment indicated that participants treated with CET were significantly more likely to gain competitive employment than those in EST, OR = 6.21, P = 0.023, which was mediated by cognitive improvement. CET is a feasible and potentially effective treatment for core cognitive deficits in adult autism spectrum disorder. The treatment of cognitive impairments in this population can contribute to meaningful improvements in adult outcomes. Autism Res 2018, 11: 519-530. © 2017 International Society for Autism Research, Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Cognitive enhancement therapy (CET), an 18-month cognitive remediation intervention designed to improve thinking and social understanding, was

  15. A virtual clinical trial comparing static versus dynamic PET imaging in measuring response to breast cancer therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangerin, Kristen A.; Muzi, Mark; Peterson, Lanell M.; Linden, Hannah M.; Novakova, Alena; Mankoff, David A.; E Kinahan, Paul

    2017-05-01

    We developed a method to evaluate variations in the PET imaging process in order to characterize the relative ability of static and dynamic metrics to measure breast cancer response to therapy in a clinical trial setting. We performed a virtual clinical trial by generating 540 independent and identically distributed PET imaging study realizations for each of 22 original dynamic fluorodeoxyglucose (18F-FDG) breast cancer patient studies pre- and post-therapy. Each noise realization accounted for known sources of uncertainty in the imaging process, such as biological variability and SUV uptake time. Four definitions of SUV were analyzed, which were SUVmax, SUVmean, SUVpeak, and SUV50%. We performed a ROC analysis on the resulting SUV and kinetic parameter uncertainty distributions to assess the impact of the variability on the measurement capabilities of each metric. The kinetic macro parameter, K i , showed more variability than SUV (mean CV K i   =  17%, SUV  =  13%), but K i pre- and post-therapy distributions also showed increased separation compared to the SUV pre- and post-therapy distributions (mean normalized difference K i   =  0.54, SUV  =  0.27). For the patients who did not show perfect separation between the pre- and post-therapy parameter uncertainty distributions (ROC AUC  dynamic imaging outperformed SUV in distinguishing metabolic change in response to therapy, ranging from 12 to 14 of 16 patients over all SUV definitions and uptake time scenarios (p  PET imaging.

  16. A Prospective Clinical Trial Combining Radiation Therapy With Systemic Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiniker, Susan M., E-mail: shiniker@stanford.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Reddy, Sunil A. [Division of Oncology, Department of Medicine, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Maecker, Holden T.; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael [Human Immune Monitoring Center, Institute for Immunity, Transplantation, and Infection, Stanford University Medical Center, Stanford, California (United States); Swetter, Susan M. [Department of Dermatology, Pigmented Lesion and Melanoma Program, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States); Dermatology Service, Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System, Palo Alto, California (United States); Saha, Saurabh [Atlas Venture, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Shura, Lei; Knox, Susan J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University Medical Center and Cancer Institute, Stanford, California (United States)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: Local radiation therapy (RT) combined with systemic anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated protein-4 immunotherapy may enhance induction of systemic antimelanoma immune responses. The primary objective of the present trial was to assess the safety and efficacy of combining ipilimumab with RT in patients with stage IV melanoma. The secondary objectives included laboratory assessment of induction of antimelanoma immune responses. Methods and Materials: In our prospective clinical trial, 22 patients with stage IV melanoma were treated with palliative RT and ipilimumab for 4 cycles. RT to 1 to 2 disease sites was initiated within 5 days after starting ipilimumab. Patients had ≥1 nonirradiated metastasis measuring ≥1.5 cm available for response assessment. Tumor imaging studies were obtained at baseline, 2 to 4 weeks after cycle 4 of ipilimumab, and every 3 months until progression. Laboratory immune response parameters were measured before and during treatment. Results: Combination therapy was well-tolerated without unexpected toxicities. Eleven patients (50.0%) experienced clinical benefit from therapy, including complete and partial responses and stable disease at median follow-up of 55 weeks. Three patients (27.3%) achieved an ongoing systemic complete response at a median follow-up of 55 weeks (range 32-65), and 3 (27.3%) had an initial partial response for a median of 40 weeks. Analysis of immune response data suggested a relationship between elevated CD8-activated T-cells and response. Conclusion: This is the second prospective clinical trial of treatment of metastatic melanoma using the combination of RT and systemic immunotherapy and the first using this sequence of therapy. The results from the present trial demonstrate that a subset of patients may benefit from combination therapy, arguing for continued clinical investigation of the use of RT combined with immunotherapy, including programmed cell death 1 inhibitors, which might have the

  17. A Prospective Clinical Trial Combining Radiation Therapy With Systemic Immunotherapy in Metastatic Melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiniker, Susan M.; Reddy, Sunil A.; Maecker, Holden T.; Subrahmanyam, Priyanka B.; Rosenberg-Hasson, Yael; Swetter, Susan M.; Saha, Saurabh; Shura, Lei; Knox, Susan J.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Local radiation therapy (RT) combined with systemic anti-cytotoxic T-lymphocyte–associated protein-4 immunotherapy may enhance induction of systemic antimelanoma immune responses. The primary objective of the present trial was to assess the safety and efficacy of combining ipilimumab with RT in patients with stage IV melanoma. The secondary objectives included laboratory assessment of induction of antimelanoma immune responses. Methods and Materials: In our prospective clinical trial, 22 patients with stage IV melanoma were treated with palliative RT and ipilimumab for 4 cycles. RT to 1 to 2 disease sites was initiated within 5 days after starting ipilimumab. Patients had ≥1 nonirradiated metastasis measuring ≥1.5 cm available for response assessment. Tumor imaging studies were obtained at baseline, 2 to 4 weeks after cycle 4 of ipilimumab, and every 3 months until progression. Laboratory immune response parameters were measured before and during treatment. Results: Combination therapy was well-tolerated without unexpected toxicities. Eleven patients (50.0%) experienced clinical benefit from therapy, including complete and partial responses and stable disease at median follow-up of 55 weeks. Three patients (27.3%) achieved an ongoing systemic complete response at a median follow-up of 55 weeks (range 32-65), and 3 (27.3%) had an initial partial response for a median of 40 weeks. Analysis of immune response data suggested a relationship between elevated CD8-activated T-cells and response. Conclusion: This is the second prospective clinical trial of treatment of metastatic melanoma using the combination of RT and systemic immunotherapy and the first using this sequence of therapy. The results from the present trial demonstrate that a subset of patients may benefit from combination therapy, arguing for continued clinical investigation of the use of RT combined with immunotherapy, including programmed cell death 1 inhibitors, which might have the

  18. Cell-based Therapy for Acute Organ Injury: Preclinical Evidence and On-going Clinical Trials Using Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsel, Antoine; Zhu, Ying-gang; Gennai, Stephane; Hao, Qi; Liu, Jia; Lee, Jae W.

    2014-01-01

    Critically ill patients often suffer from multiple organ failures involving lung, kidney, liver or brain. Genomic, proteomic and metabolomic approaches highlight common injury mechanisms leading to acute organ failure. This underlines the need to focus on therapeutic strategies affecting multiple injury pathways. The use of adult stem cells such as mesenchymal stem or stromal cells (MSC) may represent a promising new therapeutic approach as increasing evidence shows that MSC can exert protective effects following injury through the release of pro-mitotic, anti-apoptotic, anti-inflammatory and immunomodulatory soluble factors. Furthermore, they can mitigate metabolomic and oxidative stress imbalance. In this work, we review the biological capabilities of MSC and the results of clinical trials using MSC as therapy in acute organ injuries. Although preliminary results are encouraging, more studies concerning safety and efficacy of MSC therapy are needed to determine their optimal clinical use. PMID:25211170

  19. Effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery in pain processing due to carpal tunnel syndrome: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, C; Cleland, J; Palacios-Ceña, M; Fuensalida-Novo, S; Alonso-Blanco, C; Pareja, J A; Alburquerque-Sendín, F

    2017-08-01

    People with carpal tunnel syndrome (CTS) exhibit widespread pressure pain and thermal pain hypersensitivity as a manifestation of central sensitization. The aim of our study was to compare the effectiveness of manual therapy versus surgery for improving pain and nociceptive gain processing in people with CTS. The trial was conducted at a local regional Hospital in Madrid, Spain from August 2014 to February 2015. In this randomized parallel-group, blinded, clinical trial, 100 women with CTS were randomly allocated to either manual therapy (n = 50), who received three sessions (once/week) of manual therapies including desensitization manoeuvres of the central nervous system, or surgical intervention (n = 50) group. Outcomes including pressure pain thresholds (PPT), thermal pain thresholds (HPT or CPT), and pain intensity which were assessed at baseline, and 3, 6, 9 and 12 months after the intervention by an assessor unaware of group assignment. Analysis was by intention to treat with mixed ANCOVAs adjusted for baseline scores. At 12 months, 95 women completed the follow-up. Patients receiving manual therapy exhibited higher increases in PPT over the carpal tunnel at 3, 6 and 9 months (all, p < 0.01) and higher decrease of pain intensity at 3 month follow-up (p < 0.001) than those receiving surgery. No significant differences were observed between groups for the remaining outcomes. Manual therapy and surgery have similar effects on decreasing widespread pressure pain sensitivity and pain intensity in women with CTS. Neither manual therapy nor surgery resulted in changes in thermal pain sensitivity. The current study found that manual therapy and surgery exhibited similar effects on decreasing widespread pressure pain sensitivity and pain intensity in women with carpal tunnel syndrome at medium- and long-term follow-ups investigating changes in nociceptive gain processing after treatment in carpal tunnel syndrome. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  20. A Bayesian Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Antimetabolite Therapies for Non-Infectious Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Erica N; Rathinam, Sivakumar R; Kanakath, Anuradha; Thundikandy, Radhika; Babu, Manohar; Lietman, Thomas M; Acharya, Nisha R

    2017-02-01

    To conduct a Bayesian analysis of a randomized clinical trial (RCT) for non-infectious uveitis using expert opinion as a subjective prior belief. A RCT was conducted to determine which antimetabolite, methotrexate or mycophenolate mofetil, is more effective as an initial corticosteroid-sparing agent for the treatment of intermediate, posterior, and pan-uveitis. Before the release of trial results, expert opinion on the relative effectiveness of these two medications was collected via online survey. Members of the American Uveitis Society executive committee were invited to provide an estimate for the relative decrease in efficacy with a 95% credible interval (CrI). A prior probability distribution was created from experts' estimates. A Bayesian analysis was performed using the constructed expert prior probability distribution and the trial's primary outcome. A total of 11 of the 12 invited uveitis specialists provided estimates. Eight of 11 experts (73%) believed mycophenolate mofetil is more effective. The group prior belief was that the odds of treatment success for patients taking mycophenolate mofetil were 1.4-fold the odds of those taking methotrexate (95% CrI 0.03-45.0). The odds of treatment success with mycophenolate mofetil compared to methotrexate was 0.4 from the RCT (95% confidence interval 0.1-1.2) and 0.7 (95% CrI 0.2-1.7) from the Bayesian analysis. A Bayesian analysis combining expert belief with the trial's result did not indicate preference for one drug. However, the wide credible interval leaves open the possibility of a substantial treatment effect. This suggests clinical equipoise necessary to allow a larger, more definitive RCT.

  1. The effectiveness of mangosteen rind extract as additional therapy on chronic periodontitis (Clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Hendiani

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT   Introduction: Periodontitis is an inflammatory disease that attacks the periodontal tissue comprises the gingiva, periodontal ligament, cementum and alveolar bone caused mainly by plaque bacteriophage or other specific dominant type of bacteria. The purpose of this study was to determine the therapeutic effect of clinical application of mangosteen peel extract gel as adjunctive therapy scaling and root planing in patients with chronic periodontitis. This research was expected to developed new treatment in the field of dentistry, particularly in periodontics, which can be used as supporting material for the treatment of chronic periodontitis. Methods: Quasi-experimental research, split mouth, with as many as 14 chronic periodontitis patients. Mangosteen rind was prepared to be formed into extract gel, dried at room temperature, then the dried samples were macerated by using ethanol, then evaporated and decanted for 3 days until obtained condensed extract. The samples were patients with chronic periodontitis in at least 2 teeth with pockets ≥ 5 mm. Clinical parameters of pocket depth, gingival bleeding, and clinical epithelial attachment level were measured at baseline and 1 month after treatment. Analysis of data using the t-test. Results: The comparison of average gap ratio of pockets depth, gingival index, gingival bleeding and epithelium attachment levels, before and after treatment showed significant differences, such as in the test and control sides. Conclusion: The mangosteen rind gel as adjunctive therapy for scaling and root planing is able to reduce pockets depth, gingival index, and gingival bleeding, and improve clinical epithelial attachment.

  2. Role of cooperative groups and funding source in clinical trials supporting guidelines for systemic therapy of breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibau, Ariadna; Anguera, Geòrgia; Andrés-Pretel, Fernando; Templeton, Arnoud J; Seruga, Bostjan; Barnadas, Agustí; Amir, Eitan; Ocana, Alberto

    2018-03-13

    Clinical research is conducted by academia, cooperative groups (CGs) or pharmaceutical industry. Here, we evaluate the role of CGs and funding sources in the development of guidelines for breast cancer therapies. We identified 94 studies. CGs were involved in 28 (30%) studies while industry either partially or fully sponsored 64 (68%) studies. The number of industry funded studies increased over time (from 0% in 1976 to 100% in 2014; p for trend = 0.048). Only 10 (11%) government or academic studies were identified. Studies conducted by GCs included a greater number of subjects (median 448 vs. 284; p = 0.015), were more common in the neo/adjuvant setting ( p funding was associated with higher likelihood of positive outcomes favoring the sponsored experimental arm ( p = 0.013) but this relationship was not seen for CG-sponsored trials ( p = 0.53). ASCO, ESMO, and NCCN guidelines were searched to identify systemic anti-cancer therapies for early-stage and metastatic breast cancer. Trial characteristics and outcomes were collected. We identified sponsors and/or the funding source(s) and determined whether CGs, industry, or government or academic institutions were involved. Chi-square tests were used for comparison between studies. Industry funding is present in the majority of studies providing the basis for which recommendations about treatment of breast cancer are made. Industry funding, but not CG-based funding, was associated with higher likelihood of positive outcomes in clinical studies supporting guidelines for systemic therapy.

  3. Effectiveness of cognitive behavioural therapy in a community-based pulmonary rehabilitation programme: A controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luk, Edwin K; Gorelik, Alexandra; Irving, Louis; Khan, Fary

    2017-03-06

    To investigate whether the use of cognitive behavioural therapy in pulmonary rehabilitation addresses the depression and anxiety burden and thereby improves rehabilitation outcomes. Prospective controlled clinical trial. A total of 70 patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who were referred to a community centre for pulmonary rehabilitation. Patients were allocated to either the control group, consisting of pulmonary rehabilitation alone, or to the treatment group, receiving pulmonary rehabilitation and an additional 6 sessions of group-based cognitive behavioural therapy. Assessments consisting of questionnaires and walk tests were conducted pre- and post-pulmonary rehabilitation. A total of 28 patients were enrolled. The cognitive behavioural therapy group had significant improvements in exercise capacity following pulmonary rehabilitation (mean change 32.9 m, p = 0.043), which was maintained at 3 months post-pulmonary rehabilitation (mean change 23.4 m, p = 0.045). Patients in the cognitive behavioural therapy group showed significant short-term improvements in fatigue, stress and depression (mean change 2.4, p = 0.016, 3.9, p = 0.024 and 4.3, p = 0.047, respectively) and a 3-month post-pulmonary rehabilitation improvement in anxiety score (mean change 3.1, p = 0.01). No significant changes were seen in the control group. The addition of cognitive behavioural therapy improved patients' physical, psychological and quality of life results. Cognitive behavioural therapy should be considered for inclusion in a pulmonary rehabilitation programme to enhance outcomes.

  4. Phase I clinical trial of fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ishikawa

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Previous studies have demonstrated that less-differentiated T cells are ideal for adoptive T cell transfer therapy (ACT and that fibronectin CH296 (FN-CH296 together with anti-CD3 resulted in cultured cells that contain higher amounts of less-differentiated T cells. In this phase I clinical trial, we build on these prior results by assessing the safety and efficacy of FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy in patients with advanced cancer. METHODS: Patients underwent fibronectin CH296-stimulated T cell therapy up to six times every two weeks and the safety and antitumor activity of the ACT were assessed. In order to determine immune function, whole blood cytokine levels and the number of peripheral regulatory T cells were analyzed prior to ACT and during the follow up. RESULTS: Transferred cells contained numerous less-differentiated T cells greatly represented by CD27+CD45RA+ or CD28+CD45RA+ cell, which accounted for approximately 65% and 70% of the total, respectively. No ACT related severe or unexpected toxicities were observed. The response rate among patients was 22.2% and the disease control rate was 66.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The results obtained in this phase I trial, indicate that FN-CH296 stimulated T cell therapy was very well tolerated with a level of efficacy that is quite promising. We also surmise that expanding T cell using CH296 is a method that can be applied to other T- cell-based therapies. TRIAL REGISTRATION: UMIN UMIN000001835.

  5. Automated Text Messaging as an Adjunct to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Depression: A Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Adrian; Bruehlman-Senecal, Emma; Demasi, Orianna; Avila, Patricia

    2017-05-08

    Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) for depression is efficacious, but effectiveness is limited when implemented in low-income settings due to engagement difficulties including nonadherence with skill-building homework and early discontinuation of treatment. Automated messaging can be used in clinical settings to increase dosage of depression treatment and encourage sustained engagement with psychotherapy. The aim of this study was to test whether a text messaging adjunct (mood monitoring text messages, treatment-related text messages, and a clinician dashboard to display patient data) increases engagement and improves clinical outcomes in a group CBT treatment for depression. Specifically, we aim to assess whether the text messaging adjunct led to an increase in group therapy sessions attended, an increase in duration of therapy attended, and reductions in Patient Health Questionnaire-9 item (PHQ-9) symptoms compared with the control condition of standard group CBT in a sample of low-income Spanish speaking Latino patients. Patients in an outpatient behavioral health clinic were assigned to standard group CBT for depression (control condition; n=40) or the same treatment with the addition of a text messaging adjunct (n=45). The adjunct consisted of a daily mood monitoring message, a daily message reiterating the theme of that week's content, and medication and appointment reminders. Mood data and qualitative responses were sent to a Web-based platform (HealthySMS) for review by the therapist and displayed in session as a tool for teaching CBT skills. Intent-to-treat analyses on therapy attendance during 16 sessions of weekly therapy found that patients assigned to the text messaging adjunct stayed in therapy significantly longer (median of 13.5 weeks before dropping out) than patients assigned to the control condition (median of 3 weeks before dropping out; Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney z=-2.21, P=.03). Patients assigned to the text messaging adjunct also generally

  6. Easy rider wheelchair biking. A nursing-recreation therapy clinical trial for the treatment of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzsimmons, S

    2001-05-01

    Depression is a common condition among long-term care residents with limited treatment options available. There are few nonpharmacological interventions available to this population. This study examined the use of a prescribed, therapeutic recreation-nursing intervention, wheelchair biking, for treatment of symptoms of depression in older adults in a long-term care setting. A classical experimental design was used and was guided by the Roy Adaptation Model. Forty residents were pretested for depression and randomly assigned to two groups. A 2-week trial of biking therapy was provided to the treatment group. All participants were posttested. Findings indicated there was a statistically significant improvement in depression scores for the treatment group and no significant change for the control group. This study contributes to the body of knowledge of nursing regarding options for the treatment of depression in older adults, and is an encouraging indicator that psychosocial interventions may be effective in reducing depression.

  7. Research Areas - Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about NCI programs and initiatives that sponsor, conduct, develop, or support clinical trials, including NCI’s Clinical Trial Network (NCTN) and NCI Community Oncology Research Program (NCORP) initiatives.

  8. Clinical trial methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Peace, Karl E; Chen, Ding-Geng

    2011-01-01

    "Now viewed as its own scientific discipline, clinical trial methodology encompasses the methods required for the protection of participants in a clinical trial and the methods necessary to provide...

  9. A randomized clinical trial of manual therapy and physiotherapy for persistent back and neck complaints : Subgroup analysis and relationship between outcome measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koes, B. W.; Bouter, L. M.; Van Mameren, H.; Essers, A. H M; Verstegen, G. J M G; Hofhuizen, D. M.; Houben, J. P.; Knipschild, P. G.

    1993-01-01

    Objective: To study the efficacy of manual therapy and physiotherapy in subgroups of patients with persistent back and neck complaints. The second objective was to determine the correlation between three important outcome measures used in this trial. Design: Randomized clinical trial (subgroup

  10. Value of Prophylactic Postoperative Antibiotic Therapy after Bimaxillary Orthognathic Surgery: A Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Eshghpour

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Antibiotic therapy before or after orthognathic surgery is commonly recommended by surgeons to minimize the risk of wound infection. This article evaluates the value of Prophylactic antibiotic therapy in order to diminish the incidence of postoperative wound infection after orthognathic surgery.   Materials and Methods: Fifty candidates for bimaxillary orthognathic surgery were divided into cases and controls. Cefazolin (1g was administered intravenously to all participants 30 mins prior to surgery followed by a similar dose 4 hours later. Case-group patients ingested amoxicillin (500 mg orally for 7 days after surgery. Postoperative wound infection was assessed using clinical features, and the P-value significance was set at P  Results: Both groups were similar according to gender, age, and operating time. During the follow-up period no infection was observed in either the case or control group.   Conclusion:  The results of this study suggest that long-term postoperative antibiotic therapy is not essential for the prevention of postoperative infection, and that application of aseptic surgical technique and hygiene instruction after surgery are sufficient.

  11. Combined therapy in gastro-esophageal reflux disease of term neonates resistant to conservative therapy and monotherapy: a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peymaneh Alizadeh Taheri

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD is one of the most common problems in neonates. The main clinical manifestations of neonatal GERD are frequent regurgitation or vomiting associated with irritability, crying, anorexia or feeding refusal, failure to thrive, arching of the back and sleep disturbance.Aims: As no study has compared metoclopramide plus ranitidine with metoclopramide plus omeprazole in the management of neonatal GERD resistant to conservative and monotherapy, this study was carried out.Study design: This study was a randomized clinical trial of term neonates with GERD resistant to conservative and monotherapy admitted to the neonatal ward of Bahrami Children Hospital during 2013-2015. Totally, 116 term neonates (mean age 10.53 ± 8.17 days; girls 50.9% were randomly assigned to a double blind trial with either oral omeprazole plus metoclopramide (group A or oral ranitidine plus metoclopramide (group B. The changes of the symptoms and signs were recorded after one week and one month.Results: There was no significant difference in demographic and baseline characteristics between the two groups. The response rate of “omeprazole plus metoclopramide” was significantly higher than “ranitidine plus metoclopramide” (93.74% ± 7.28% vs. 75.43% ± 23.24%, p = 0.028. All clinical manifestations recovered significantly in group A while the response rate of irritability and wheezing was not significant in group B (primary outcome. There were no side effects in either group after one week and one month of treatment (secondary outcome.Conclusions: The response rate was > 70% in each group, but it was significantly higher in group A (> 90%. Combination of each acid suppressant with metoclopramide led to higher response rate in comparison with monotherapy used before intervention.

  12. Third prize : A blinded randomized clinical trial of manual therapy and physiotherapy for chronic back and neck complaints: Physical outcome measures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koes, B. W.; Bouter, L. M.; Van Mameren, H.; Essers, A. H M; Verstegen, G. M J R; Hofhuizen, D. M.; Houben, J. P.; Knipschild, P. G.

    1992-01-01

    In a blinded randomized clinical trial, we compared the effectiveness of manual therapy, physiotherapy, (continued) treatment by the general practitioner (GP), and a placebo therapy (detuned ultrasound and detuned short wave diathermy) for patients (n = 256) with chronic nonspecific back and neck

  13. Effect of Prolonged Exposure Therapy Delivered Over 2 Weeks vs 8 Weeks vs Present-Centered Therapy on PTSD Symptom Severity in Military Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foa, Edna B; McLean, Carmen P; Zang, Yinyin; Rosenfield, David; Yadin, Elna; Yarvis, Jeffrey S; Mintz, Jim; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Borah, Elisa V; Dondanville, Katherine A; Fina, Brooke A; Hall-Clark, Brittany N; Lichner, Tracey; Litz, Brett T; Roache, John; Wright, Edward C; Peterson, Alan L

    2018-01-23

    Effective and efficient treatment is needed for posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in active duty military personnel. To examine the effects of massed prolonged exposure therapy (massed therapy), spaced prolonged exposure therapy (spaced therapy), present-centered therapy (PCT), and a minimal-contact control (MCC) on PTSD severity. Randomized clinical trial conducted at Fort Hood, Texas, from January 2011 through July 2016 and enrolling 370 military personnel with PTSD who had returned from Iraq, Afghanistan, or both. Final follow-up was July 11, 2016. Prolonged exposure therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy involving exposure to trauma memories/reminders, administered as massed therapy (n = 110; 10 sessions over 2 weeks) or spaced therapy (n = 109; 10 sessions over 8 weeks); PCT, a non-trauma-focused therapy involving identifying/discussing daily stressors (n = 107; 10 sessions over 8 weeks); or MCC, telephone calls from therapists (n = 40; once weekly for 4 weeks). Outcomes were assessed before and after treatment and at 2-week, 12-week, and 6-month follow-up. Primary outcome was interviewer-assessed PTSD symptom severity, measured by the PTSD Symptom Scale-Interview (PSS-I; range, 0-51; higher scores indicate greater PTSD severity; MCID, 3.18), used to assess efficacy of massed therapy at 2 weeks posttreatment vs MCC at week 4; noninferiority of massed therapy vs spaced therapy at 2 weeks and 12 weeks posttreatment (noninferiority margin, 50% [2.3 points on PSS-I, with 1-sided α = .05]); and efficacy of spaced therapy vs PCT at posttreatment. Among 370 randomized participants, data were analyzed for 366 (mean age, 32.7 [SD, 7.3] years; 44 women [12.0%]; mean baseline PSS-I score, 25.49 [6.36]), and 216 (59.0%) completed the study. At 2 weeks posttreatment, mean PSS-I score was 17.62 (mean decrease from baseline, 7.13) for massed therapy and 21.41 (mean decrease, 3.43) for MCC (difference in decrease, 3.70 [95% CI,0.72 to 6.68]; P = .02

  14. Basic Body Awareness Therapy in patients suffering from fibromyalgia: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bravo, Cristina; Skjaerven, Liv Helvik; Espart, Anna; Guitard Sein-Echaluce, Luisa; Catalan-Matamoros, Daniel

    2018-05-03

    The aim of this study is to assess whether Basic Body Awareness Therapy (BBAT) improves musculoskeletal pain, movement quality, psychological function, and quality of life. The effects of BBAT in addition to treatment as usual (TAU) were studied in a randomized controlled trial. Forty-one patients were randomly assigned to a control group (n = 21) and an intervention group (n = 20). Both groups received TAU including pharmacological therapy. The intervention group took part in 10 BBAT sessions. Outcome variables were measured regarding pain, movement quality, psychological function, and quality of life. Outcome measures were assessed before intervention, in posttest, and in follow-ups at 12 and 24 weeks. The BBAT group showed significant improvement in 'pain' at posttest (p = 0.037) and in 'movement quality' from baseline to 24 weeks (p = 0.000). Intragroup analysis showed significant improvements in the SF-36 body pain subscale at 12 and 24 weeks (p = 0.001, p = 0.014), Hospital Anxiety Depression scale in anxiety subscale at 12 weeks (p = 0.019), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory anxiety questionnaire at 12 and 24 weeks (p = 0.012, p = 0.002), and STAI state at 12 and 24 weeks (p = 0.042, p = 0.004). This study showed that BBAT might be an effective intervention in patients suffering from fibromyalgia in relation to pain, movement quality, and anxiety.

  15. Quality Assurance for Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibbott, Geoffrey S.; Haworth, Annette; Followill, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Cooperative groups, of which the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group is one example, conduct national clinical trials that often involve the use of radiation therapy. In preparation for such a trial, the cooperative group prepares a protocol to define the goals of the trial, the rationale for its design, and the details of the treatment procedure to be followed. The Radiological Physics Center (RPC) is one of several quality assurance (QA) offices that is charged with assuring that participating institutions deliver doses that are clinically consistent and comparable. The RPC does this by conducting a variety of independent audits and credentialing processes. The RPC has compiled data showing that credentialing can help institutions comply with the requirements of a cooperative group clinical protocol. Phantom irradiations have been demonstrated to exercise an institution’s procedures for planning and delivering advanced external beam techniques (1–3). Similarly, RPC data indicate that a rapid review of patient treatment records or planning procedures can improve compliance with clinical trials (4). The experiences of the RPC are presented as examples of the contributions that a national clinical trials QA center can make to cooperative group trials. These experiences illustrate the critical need for comprehensive QA to assure that clinical trials are successful and cost-effective. The RPC is supported by grants CA 10953 and CA 81647 from the National Cancer Institute, NIH, DHHS. PMID:24392352

  16. A Multisite, Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial of Computerized Cognitive Remediation Therapy for Schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomar, Jesús J; Valls, Elia; Radua, Joaquim; Mareca, Celia; Tristany, Josep; del Olmo, Francisco; Rebolleda-Gil, Carlos; Jañez-Álvarez, María; de Álvaro, Francisco J; Ovejero, María R; Llorente, Ana; Teixidó, Cristina; Donaire, Ana M; García-Laredo, Eduardo; Lazcanoiturburu, Andrea; Granell, Luis; Mozo, Cristina de Pablo; Pérez-Hernández, Mónica; Moreno-Alcázar, Ana; Pomarol-Clotet, Edith; McKenna, Peter J

    2015-11-01

    The effectiveness of cognitive remediation therapy (CRT) for the neuropsychological deficits seen in schizophrenia is supported by meta-analysis. However, a recent methodologically rigorous trial had negative findings. In this study, 130 chronic schizophrenic patients were randomly assigned to computerized CRT, an active computerized control condition (CC) or treatment as usual (TAU). Primary outcome measures were 2 ecologically valid batteries of executive function and memory, rated under blind conditions; other executive and memory tests and a measure of overall cognitive function were also employed. Carer ratings of executive and memory failures in daily life were obtained before and after treatment. Computerized CRT was found to produce improvement on the training tasks, but this did not transfer to gains on the primary outcome measures and most other neuropsychological tests in comparison to either CC or TAU conditions. Nor did the intervention result in benefits on carer ratings of daily life cognitive failures. According to this study, computerized CRT is not effective in schizophrenia. The use of both active and passive CCs suggests that nature of the control group is not an important factor influencing results. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center.

  17. Cue exposure therapy for the treatment of opiate addiction: results of a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marissen, Marlies A E; Franken, Ingmar H A; Blanken, Peter; van den Brink, Wim; Hendriks, Vincent M

    2007-01-01

    Persistent cue reactivity to drug-related stimuli is a well-known phenomenon among abstinent drug users and has been found to be a predictor of relapse. Cue exposure therapy (CET) aims to reduce this cue reactivity by exposing abstinent drug users to conditioned drug-related stimuli while preventing their habitual response, i.e. drug use. 127 abstinent heroin-dependent Dutch inpatients were randomized to CET (n = 65; 55 completers) and placebo psychotherapy treatment (PPT) (n = 62; 59 completers). It was examined whether CET would lead to a decrease in drug-related cue reactivity (using mixed-design ANOVA) and subsequently to lower dropout and relapse rates (using logistic regression) compared to PPT. Both groups responded with a similar decrease in self-reported cue reactivity (craving, mood). The CET group did show a significant decrease in physiological reactivity (skin conductance) compared to PPT. However, dropout and relapse rates were, contrary to our expectations, significantly higher in the CET group. This is the first randomized controlled trial showing that CET, compared to a non-specific psychotherapy, might increase dropout and relapse rates among abstinent heroin-dependent clients in a drug-free setting. Caution is warranted when applying CET in this specific context. Copyright 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. Modulation of Autoimmune T-Cell Memory by Stem Cell Educator Therapy: Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Elias; Perez-Basterrechea, Marcos; Suarez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Zhou, Huimin; Revuelta, Eva Martinez; Garcia-Gala, Jose Maria; Perez, Silvia; Alvarez-Viejo, Maria; Menendez, Edelmiro; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Tang, Ruifeng; Zhu, Zhenlong; Hu, Wei; Moss, Thomas; Guindi, Edward; Otero, Jesus; Zhao, Yong

    2015-12-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that causes a deficit of pancreatic islet β cells. The complexities of overcoming autoimmunity in T1D have contributed to the challenges the research community faces when devising successful treatments with conventional immune therapies. Overcoming autoimmune T cell memory represents one of the key hurdles. In this open-label, phase 1/phase 2 study, Caucasian T1D patients (N = 15) received two treatments with the Stem Cell Educator (SCE) therapy, an approach that uses human multipotent cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs). SCE therapy involves a closed-loop system that briefly treats the patient's lymphocytes with CB-SCs in vitro and returns the "educated" lymphocytes (but not the CB-SCs) into the patient's blood circulation. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01350219. Clinical data demonstrated that SCE therapy was well tolerated in all subjects. The percentage of naïve CD4(+) T cells was significantly increased at 26 weeks and maintained through the final follow-up at 56 weeks. The percentage of CD4(+) central memory T cells (TCM) was markedly and constantly increased at 18 weeks. Both CD4(+) effector memory T cells (TEM) and CD8(+) TEM cells were considerably decreased at 18 weeks and 26 weeks respectively. Additional clinical data demonstrated the modulation of C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expressions on naïve T, TCM, and TEM cells. Following two treatments with SCE therapy, islet β-cell function was improved and maintained in individuals with residual β-cell function, but not in those without residual β-cell function. Current clinical data demonstrated the safety and efficacy of SCE therapy in immune modulation. SCE therapy provides lasting reversal of autoimmune memory that could improve islet β-cell function in Caucasian subjects. Obra Social "La Caixa", Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Red de Investigación Renal, European Union FEDER Funds, Principado de

  19. Clinical effectiveness of cognitive therapy v. interpersonal psychotherapy for depression: results of a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemmens, L H J M; Arntz, A; Peeters, F; Hollon, S D; Roefs, A; Huibers, M J H

    2015-07-01

    Although both cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) have been shown to be effective treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD), it is not clear yet whether one therapy outperforms the other with regard to severity and course of the disorder. This study examined the clinical effectiveness of CT v. IPT in a large sample of depressed patients seeking treatment in a Dutch outpatient mental health clinic. We tested whether one of the treatments was superior to the other at post-treatment and at 5 months follow-up. Furthermore, we tested whether active treatment was superior to no treatment. We also assessed whether initial depression severity moderated the effect of time and condition and tested for therapist differences. Depressed adults (n = 182) were randomized to either CT (n = 76), IPT (n = 75) or a 2-month waiting list control (WLC) condition (n = 31). Main outcome was depression severity, measured with the Beck Depression Inventory - II (BDI-II), assessed at baseline, 2, 3, and 7 months (treatment phase) and monthly up to 5 months follow-up (8-12 months). No differential effects between CT and IPT were found. Both treatments exceeded response in the WLC condition, and led to considerable improvement in depression severity that was sustained up to 1 year. Baseline depression severity did not moderate the effect of time and condition. Within our power and time ranges, CT and IPT appeared not to differ in the treatment of depression in the acute phase and beyond.

  20. Effect of photodynamic therapy in the reduction of halitosis in patients with multiple sclerosis: clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Marcela Leticia Leal; Kalil Bussadori, Sandra; Dadalti Fragoso, Yara; da Silva, Vinicius Vieira Belarmino; Melo Deana, Alessandro; da Mota, Ana Carolina Costa; Horácio Pinto, Erika; Horliana, Anna Carolina RattoTempestini; Miranda França, Cristiane

    2017-10-27

    Smell and odours play a vital role in social interaction. Halitosis is a social problem that affects one third of the population, causing a negative impact on the quality of life. There is little knowledge on the prevalence and management of halitosis in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. The present study aims to evaluate the presence of halitosis in patients with MS when compared to a control group, and also evaluate treatment of the problem with antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT). This is a case-control clinical study in which 60 patients were evaluated: 30 MS patients in treatment at the Specialties Clinic School of Medicine, and 30 healthy patients, matched in age and gender for the control group. Data was collected on the duration of the disease as well as the degree of disability and medication use in the MS group. For all patients, halitosis was assessed with Oral Chroma™. Individuals with halitosis underwent treatment with tongue scraping and aPDT. The photosensitizer was methylene blue (0.005%) and a THERAPY XT-EC ® laser (660 nm, 9 J, 100 mW for 90 s per point, 320 J cm -2 , 3537 mW cm -2 ) was used. Six points 1 cm apart from each other were irradiated in the tongue dorsum. There was a positive correlation between the disability and disease duration. No parameter was correlated with halitosis. Patients with MS have higher levels of SH 2 compounds when compared to the control group (p = 0.003, Mann-Whitney), but after aPDT both groups significantly reduced the levels to under the halitosis threshold. The aPDT scraping treatment was effective in the immediate reduction of halitosis in both groups.

  1. Two-year results of vital pulp therapy in permanent molars with irreversible pulpitis: an ongoing multicenter randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asgary, Saeed; Eghbal, Mohammad Jafar; Ghoddusi, Jamileh

    2014-01-01

    Oral healthcare expenses are increasing rapidly as a result of the growth of high-cost health technologies worldwide. In many developing/developed countries, low-cost tooth extraction is the alternative treatment option for a high-cost root canal therapy (RCT) for management of human molars with irreversible pulpitis. Vital pulp therapy with calcium-enriched mixture cement (VPT/CEM) as a new alternative treatment option has demonstrated excellent treatment outcomes up to 1 year; if 2-year radiographic/clinical effectiveness as well as cost-effectiveness of the VPT/CEM is also non-inferior compared with RCT, it can serve as a viable treatment for mature molars with irreversible pulpitis. In this prospective, multicenter (n = 23), non-inferiority clinical trial, 407 patients were randomized to either one-visit RCT (n = 202) or VPT/CEM (n = 205) for 27 months. In this part of study, the primary outcome measure was the 2-year clinical and radiographic treatment outcomes. Cost-effectiveness was also analyzed. Mean follow-up times were 24.62 ± 0.72 and 24.61 ± 0.69 months in RCT (n = 166) and VPT/CEM (n = 166) arms, respectively. Clinical success rates in the two study arms were equal (98.19%); however, radiographic success rates were 79.5 and 86.7% in RCT and VPT/CEM arms, respectively, with no statistical difference (P = 0.053). The treatment time span mean was approximately three times greater in the RCT than in the VPT/CEM arm (94.07 vs. 31.09 min; P pulpitis. Vital pulp therapy with CEM is a cost-effective and reliable biological technique for endodontic treatment of permanent molar teeth with irreversible pulpitis and can be recommended for general clinical practice.

  2. Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet: A Multifaceted Approach to Bringing Disease-Modifying Therapy to Clinical Use in Type 1 Diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingley, Polly J; Wherrett, Diane K; Shultz, Ann; Rafkin, Lisa E; Atkinson, Mark A; Greenbaum, Carla J

    2018-04-01

    What will it take to bring disease-modifying therapy to clinical use in type 1 diabetes? Coordinated efforts of investigators involved in discovery, translational, and clinical research operating in partnership with funders and industry and in sync with regulatory agencies are needed. This Perspective describes one such effort, Type 1 Diabetes TrialNet, a National Institutes of Health-funded and JDRF-supported international clinical trials network that emerged from the Diabetes Prevention Trial-Type 1 (DPT-1). Through longitudinal natural history studies, as well as trials before and after clinical onset of disease combined with mechanistic and ancillary investigations to enhance scientific understanding and translation to clinical use, TrialNet is working to bring disease-modifying therapies to individuals with type 1 diabetes. Moreover, TrialNet uses its expertise and experience in clinical studies to increase efficiencies in the conduct of trials and to reduce the burden of participation on individuals and families. Herein, we highlight key contributions made by TrialNet toward a revised understanding of the natural history of disease and approaches to alter disease course and outline the consortium's plans for the future. © 2018 by the American Diabetes Association.

  3. Nabiximols combined with motivational enhancement/cognitive behavioral therapy for the treatment of cannabis dependence: A pilot randomized clinical trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose M Trigo

    Full Text Available The current lack of pharmacological treatments for cannabis use disorder (CUD warrants novel approaches and further investigation of promising pharmacotherapy. We previously showed that nabiximols (27 mg/ml Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC/ 25 mg/ml cannabidiol (CBD, Sativex® can decrease cannabis withdrawal symptoms. Here, we assessed in a pilot study the tolerability and safety of self-titrated nabiximols vs. placebo among 40 treatment-seeking cannabis-dependent participants.Subjects participated in a double blind randomized clinical trial, with as-needed nabiximols up to 113.4 mg THC/105 mg CBD or placebo daily for 12 weeks, concurrently with Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MET/CBT. Primary outcome measures were tolerability and abstinence, secondary outcome measures were days and amount of cannabis use, withdrawal, and craving scores. Participants received up to CDN$ 855 in compensation for their time.Medication was well tolerated and no serious adverse events (SAEs were observed. Rates of adverse events did not differ between treatment arms (F1,39 = 0.205, NS. There was no significant change in abstinence rates at trial end. Participants were not able to differentiate between subjective effects associated with nabiximols or placebo treatments (F1,40 = 0.585, NS. Cannabis use was reduced in the nabiximols (70.5% and placebo groups (42.6%. Nabiximols reduced cannabis craving but no significant differences between the nabiximols and placebo groups were observed on withdrawal scores.Nabiximols in combination with MET/CBT was well tolerated and allowed for reduction of cannabis use. Future clinical trials should explore the potential of high doses of nabiximols for cannabis dependence.

  4. Nabiximols combined with motivational enhancement/cognitive behavioral therapy for the treatment of cannabis dependence: A pilot randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trigo, Jose M; Soliman, Alexandra; Quilty, Lena C; Fischer, Benedikt; Rehm, Jürgen; Selby, Peter; Barnes, Allan J; Huestis, Marilyn A; George, Tony P; Streiner, David L; Staios, Gregory; Le Foll, Bernard

    2018-01-01

    The current lack of pharmacological treatments for cannabis use disorder (CUD) warrants novel approaches and further investigation of promising pharmacotherapy. We previously showed that nabiximols (27 mg/ml Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC)/ 25 mg/ml cannabidiol (CBD), Sativex®) can decrease cannabis withdrawal symptoms. Here, we assessed in a pilot study the tolerability and safety of self-titrated nabiximols vs. placebo among 40 treatment-seeking cannabis-dependent participants. Subjects participated in a double blind randomized clinical trial, with as-needed nabiximols up to 113.4 mg THC/105 mg CBD or placebo daily for 12 weeks, concurrently with Motivational Enhancement Therapy and Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (MET/CBT). Primary outcome measures were tolerability and abstinence, secondary outcome measures were days and amount of cannabis use, withdrawal, and craving scores. Participants received up to CDN$ 855 in compensation for their time. Medication was well tolerated and no serious adverse events (SAEs) were observed. Rates of adverse events did not differ between treatment arms (F1,39 = 0.205, NS). There was no significant change in abstinence rates at trial end. Participants were not able to differentiate between subjective effects associated with nabiximols or placebo treatments (F1,40 = 0.585, NS). Cannabis use was reduced in the nabiximols (70.5%) and placebo groups (42.6%). Nabiximols reduced cannabis craving but no significant differences between the nabiximols and placebo groups were observed on withdrawal scores. Nabiximols in combination with MET/CBT was well tolerated and allowed for reduction of cannabis use. Future clinical trials should explore the potential of high doses of nabiximols for cannabis dependence.

  5. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  6. Leaflet manual of external beam radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a review of the indications, evidences, and clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rim CH

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Chai Hong Rim, Won Sup Yoon Department of Radiation Oncology, Ansan Hospital, Korea University Medical College, Ansan, Republic of Korea Abstract: The use of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC, which was rarely performed due to liver toxicity with a previous technique, has increased. Palliation of portal vein thrombosis, supplementation for insufficient transarterial chemoembolization, and provision of new curative opportunities using stereotactic body radiotherapy are the potential indications for use of EBRT. The mechanism of EBRT treatment, with its radiobiological and physical perspectives, differs from those of conventional medical treatment or surgery. Therefore, understanding the effects of EBRT may be unfamiliar to physicians other than radiation oncologists, especially in the field of HCC, where EBRT has recently begun to be applied. The first objective of this review was to concisely explain the indications for use of EBRT for HCC for all physicians treating HCC. Therefore, this review focuses on the therapeutic outcomes rather than the detailed biological and physical background. We also reviewed recent clinical trials that may extend the indications for use of EBRT. Finally, we reviewed the current clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of HCC and discuss the current recommendations and future perspectives. Keywords: hepatocellular carcinoma, liver neoplasm, external beam radiotherapy, stereotactic body radiotherapy, clinical trials, sorafenib, guidelines

  7. A randomized, controlled clinical trial: the effect of mindfulness-based cognitive therapy on generalized anxiety disorder among Chinese community patients: protocol for a randomized trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wong Samuel YS

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Research suggests that an eight-week Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT program may be effective in the treatment of generalized anxiety disorders. Our objective is to compare the clinical effectiveness of the MBCT program with a psycho-education programme and usual care in reducing anxiety symptoms in people suffering from generalized anxiety disorder. Methods A three armed randomized, controlled clinical trial including 9-month post-treatment follow-up is proposed. Participants screened positive using the Structure Clinical Interview for DSM-IV (SCID for general anxiety disorder will be recruited from community-based clinics. 228 participants will be randomly allocated to the MBCT program plus usual care, psycho-education program plus usual care or the usual care group. Validated Chinese version of instruments measuring anxiety and worry symptoms, depression, quality of life and health service utilization will be used. Our primary end point is the change of anxiety and worry score (Beck Anxiety Inventory and Penn State Worry Scale from baseline to the end of intervention. For primary analyses, treatment outcomes will be assessed by ANCOVA, with change in anxiety score as the baseline variable, while the baseline anxiety score and other baseline characteristics that significantly differ between groups will serve as covariates. Conclusions This is a first randomized controlled trial that compare the effectiveness of MBCT with an active control, findings will advance current knowledge in the management of GAD and the way that group intervention can be delivered and inform future research. Unique Trail Number (assigned by Centre for Clinical Trails, Clinical Trials registry, The Chinese University of Hong Kong: CUHK_CCT00267

  8. Failure to Integrate Quantitative Measurement Methods of Ocular Inflammation Hampers Clinical Practice and Trials on New Therapies for Posterior Uveitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbort, Carl P; Tugal-Tutkun, Ilknur; Neri, Piergiorgio; Pavésio, Carlos; Onal, Sumru; LeHoang, Phuc

    2017-05-01

    Uveitis is one of the fields in ophthalmology where a tremendous evolution took place in the past 25 years. Not only did we gain access to more efficient, more targeted, and better tolerated therapies, but also in parallel precise and quantitative measurement methods developed allowing the clinician to evaluate these therapies and adjust therapeutic intervention with a high degree of precision. Objective and quantitative measurement of the global level of intraocular inflammation became possible for most inflammatory diseases with direct or spill-over anterior chamber inflammation, thanks to laser flare photometry. The amount of retinal inflammation could be quantified by using fluorescein angiography to score retinal angiographic signs. Indocyanine green angiography gave imaging insight into the hitherto inaccessible choroidal compartment, rendering possible the quantification of choroiditis by scoring indocyanine green angiographic signs. Optical coherence tomography has enabled measurement and objective monitoring of retinal and choroidal thickness. This multimodal quantitative appraisal of intraocular inflammation represents an exquisite security in monitoring uveitis. What is enigmatic, however, is the slow pace with which these improvements are integrated in some areas. What is even more difficult to understand is the fact that clinical trials to assess new therapeutic agents still mostly rely on subjective parameters such as clinical evaluation of vitreous haze as a main endpoint; whereas a whole array of precise, quantitative, and objective modalities are available for the design of clinical studies. The scope of this work was to review the quantitative investigations that improved the management of uveitis in the past 2-3 decades.

  9. Effects of massage therapy and occlusal splint therapy on mandibular range of motion in individuals with temporomandibular disorder: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Cid André Fidelis de Paula; Politti, Fabiano; Andrade, Daniel Ventura; de Sousa, Dowglas Fernando Magalhães; Herpich, Carolina Marciela; Dibai-Filho, Almir Vieira; Gonzalez, Tabajara de Oliveira; Biasotto-Gonzalez, Daniela Aparecida

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of massage therapy compared with occlusal splint therapy on mandibular range of motion (ROM) in individuals with temporomandibular disorder (TMD) and compare the results with ROM obtained in a group of individuals without this disorder. A blinded randomized clinical trial was conducted. Twenty-eight volunteers with TMD were randomly distributed into either a massage therapy group or an occlusal splint group. Both treatments were provided for 4 weeks. Fourteen individuals without TMD were consecutively allocated to a comparison group. Fonseca anamnestic index was used to characterize TMD and allocate the volunteers to either of the intervention groups or asymptomatic comparison group. Mandibular ROM was evaluated before and after treatment using a digital caliper. Two-way repeated-measures analysis of variance with a post hoc Bonferroni testing was used for intergroup and intragroup comparisons (level of significance was set to 5%). Cohen d was used to calculate the effect size. In the intragroup analysis, significant increases in ROM were found for all measures in both the massage and occlusal splint groups (P massage therapy and asymptomatic comparison groups (0.2 Massage therapy on the masticatory muscles and the use of an occlusal splint lead to an increase in mandibular ROM similar to that of the asymptomatic comparison group with regard to maximum active mouth opening and both right and left excursion in individuals with TMD. © 2013. Published by National University of Health Sciences All rights reserved.

  10. Managing clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenyon Sara

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Managing clinical trials, of whatever size and complexity, requires efficient trial management. Trials fail because tried and tested systems handed down through apprenticeships have not been documented, evaluated or published to guide new trialists starting out in this important field. For the past three decades, trialists have invented and reinvented the trial management wheel. We suggest that to improve the successful, timely delivery of important clinical trials for patient benefit, it is time to produce standard trial management guidelines and develop robust methods of evaluation.

  11. Rational emotive behavior therapy, cognitive therapy, and medication in the treatment of major depressive disorder: a randomized clinical trial, posttreatment outcomes, and six-month follow-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    David, Daniel; Szentagotai, Aurora; Lupu, Viorel; Cosman, Doina

    2008-06-01

    A randomized clinical trial was undertaken to investigate the relative efficacy of rational-emotive behavior therapy (REBT), cognitive therapy (CT), and pharmacotherapy in the treatment of 170 outpatients with nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. The patients were randomly assigned to one of the following: 14 weeks of REBT, 14 weeks of CT, or 14 weeks of pharmacotherapy (fluoxetine). The outcome measures used were the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression and the Beck Depression Inventory. No differences among treatment conditions at posttest were observed. A larger effect of REBT (significant) and CT (nonsignificant) over pharmacotherapy at 6 months follow-up was noted on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression only. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Outpatient parenteral antimicrobial therapy in children with febrile urinary tract infection: a prospective randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nasiri Kalmarzi R

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Acute pyelonephritis may lead to permanent renal scarring. The standard recommendation for treatment of febrile children with urinary tract infection (UTI is hospitalization for intravenous antibiotics. The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of outpatient intravenous ceftriaxone and cefixime versus inpatient of the same regimen for children with febrile UTI.   "nMethods: In a randomized clinical trial, we compared the efficacy of administration two days intravenous ceftriaxone followed by an oral cefixime for eight days (as outpatient group versus four days intravenous ceftriaxone followed by an oral cefixime for six days (as inpatient group, in 203 children (99 cases in outpatient group and 104 cases in inpatient group 3 months to 15 years of age with febrile UTI, in terms of short-term clinical outcomes (sterilization of the urine and defeverescence and long-term morbidity (incidence of reinfection and renal scarring documented by DMSA scintigraphy. "nResults: Repeat urine cultures were sterile within 48 hours in all children, mean time to defeverescence was 27.58 (SD=±12.62 and 31.44 (SD=±17.06 hours for children in outpatient and inpatient groups, respectively (P=0.067. Reinfection occurred in 9.1% of outpatient and 13.4% of inpatient group (P=0.326. Renal scarring developed in 11% of children of outpatient and 7.6% of children of inpatient group (P=0.884. There was no significant difference between the two groups in respect of renal scarring. "nConclusions: Outpatient ceftriaxone for two days followed by cefixime to complete a 10 days course can be recommended as a safe and effective treatment for children with febrile UTI.

  13. Low-level laser therapy for treatment of neurosensory disorders after orthognathic surgery: A systematic review of randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bittencourt, M-A-V; Paranhos, L-R; Martins-Filho, P-R-S

    2017-11-01

    Low-level laser has been widely used in Dentistry and many studies have focused on its application in oral surgeries. This study was conducted with the aim of searching for scientific evidence concerning the effectiveness of laser to reduce pain or paresthesia related to orthognathic surgery. An electronic search was performed in PubMed, Scopus, Science Direct, LILACS, SciELO, CENTRAL, Google Scholar, OpenGrey, and ClinicalTrials.gov, up to November 2016, with no restrictions on language or year of publication. Additionally, a hand search of the reference list of the selected studies was carried out. The PICOS strategy was used to define the eligibility criteria and only randomized clinical trials were selected. Out of 1,257 identified citations, three papers fulfilled the criteria and were included in the systematic review. The risk of bias was assessed according to the Cochrane Guidelines for Clinical Trials and results were exposed based on a descriptive analysis. One study showed that laser therapy was effective to reduce postoperative pain 24 hours (P=0.007) and 72 hours (P=0.007) after surgery. Other study revealed the positive effect of laser to improve neurosensory recovery 60 days after surgery, evaluated also by the two-point discrimination (P=0.005) and sensory (P=0.008) tests. The third study reported an improvement for general sensibility of 68.75% for laser group, compared with 21.43% for placebo (P=0.0095), six months after surgery. Individual studies suggested a positive effect of low-level laser therapy on reduction of postoperative pain and acceleration of improvement of paresthesia related to orthognathic surgery. However, due to the insufficient number and heterogeneity of studies, a meta-analysis evaluating the outcomes of interest was not performed, and a pragmatic recommendation about the use of laser therapy is not possible. This systematic review was conducted according to the statements of PRISMA and was registered at PROSPERO under the

  14. Efficacy of Laser Therapy in Ankle Sprains : Design of a Randomized Clinical Trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bie, Robert A.; de Vet, Henrica CW; Knipschild, Paul G.; van den Wildenberg, Frans AJM; Lenssen, Ton F.; Bouter, Lex

    1997-01-01

    Studies on low intensity 904 nm laser therapy in the treatment of musculoskeletal disorders show conflicting results. Yet, on the basis of a systematic review we concluded that 904 nm laser therapy for musculoskeletal disorders seems to be promising, when compared to placebo laser therapy. Quick

  15. Safety and effectiveness of stem cell therapies in early-phase clinical trials in stroke: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagpal, Anjali; Choy, Fong Chan; Howell, Stuart; Hillier, Susan; Chan, Fiona; Hamilton-Bruce, Monica A; Koblar, Simon A

    2017-08-30

    Stem cells have demonstrated encouraging potential as reparative therapy for patients suffering from post-stroke disability. Reperfusion interventions in the acute phase of stroke have shown significant benefit but are limited by a narrow window of opportunity in which they are beneficial. Thereafter, rehabilitation is the only intervention available. The current review summarises the current evidence for use of stem cell therapies in stroke from early-phase clinical trials. The safety and feasibility of administering different types of stem cell therapies in stroke seem to be reasonably proven. However, the effectiveness needs still to be established through bigger clinical trials with more pragmatic clinical trial designs that address the challenges raised by the heterogeneous nature of stroke per se, as well those due to unique characteristics of stem cells as therapeutic agents.

  16. Differential benefits of amoxicillin-metronidazole in different phases of periodontal therapy in a randomized controlled crossover clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombelli, Andrea; Almaghlouth, Adnan; Cionca, Norbert; Courvoisier, Delphine S; Giannopoulou, Catherine

    2015-03-01

    The specific advantage of administering systemic antibiotics during initial, non-surgical therapy or in the context of periodontal surgery is unclear. This study assesses the differential outcomes of periodontal therapy supplemented with amoxicillin-metronidazole during either the non-surgical or the surgical treatment phase. This is a single-center, randomized placebo-controlled crossover clinical trial with a 1-year follow-up. Eighty participants with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans-associated moderate to advanced periodontitis were randomized into two treatment groups: group A, antibiotics (500 mg metronidazole plus 375 mg amoxicillin three times per day for 7 days) during the first, non-surgical phase of periodontal therapy (T1) and placebo during the second, surgical phase (T2); and group B, placebo during T1 and antibiotics during T2. The number of sites with probing depth (PD) >4 mm and bleeding on probing (BOP) per patient was the primary outcome. A total of 11,212 sites were clinically monitored on 1,870 teeth. T1 with antibiotics decreased the number of sites with PD >4 mm and BOP per patient significantly more than without (group A: from 34.5 to 5.7, 84%; group B: from 28.7 to 8.7, 70%; P antibiotics, but only eight treated with placebo, achieved a 10-fold reduction of diseased sites (P = 0.007). Consequently, fewer patients of group A needed additional therapy, the mean number of surgical interventions was lower, and treatment time in T2 was shorter. Six months after T2, the mean number of residual pockets (group A: 2.8 ± 5.2; group B: 2.2 ± 5.0) was not significantly different and was sustained over 12 months in both groups. Giving the antibiotics during T1 or T2 yielded similar long-term outcomes, but antibiotics in T1 resolved the disease quicker and thus reduced the need for additional surgical intervention.

  17. Results of a multicenter randomized controlled trial of the clinical effectiveness of schema therapy for personality disorders

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bamelis, L.L.M.; Evers, S.M.A.A.; Spinhoven, P.; Arntz, A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The authors compared the effectiveness of 50 sessions of schema therapy with clarification-oriented psychotherapy and with treatment as usual among patients with cluster C, paranoid, histrionic, or narcissistic personality disorder. Method: A multicenter randomized controlled trial, with

  18. Clinical trials of a new chlorin photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy of malignant tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Privalov, Valeriy A.; Lappa, Alexander V.; Seliverstov, Oleg V.; Faizrakhmanov, Alexey B.; Yarovoy, Nicolay N.; Kochneva, Elena V.; Evnevich, Michail V.; Anikina, Alla S.; Reshetnicov, Andrey V.; Zalevsky, Igor D.; Kemov, Yuriy V.

    2002-06-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) was performed with a new photosensitizer, a water soluble form of chlorins (Radachlorin, Russia) possessing an absorption peak around 662 nm. As light source there was used the diode laser (ML-662-SP, Russia) with 662 nm wavelength and 2.5 W optical power. The sensitizer had passed broad pre-clinical in vitro and in vivo studies, which showed safety and efficiency of it. PDT was applied to 51 patients with basal cell cancer of the skin (about 60% of all cases), breast cancer, lip cancer, melanoma, cancer of esophagus, stomach, and rectum, cancer and leucoplacia of vulva, malignant ganglioneuroma, sarcoma of soft tissue, cancer and reticular sarcoma of thyroid gland, cancer of ductus choledochus. Most of non-basalioma patients had either forth stage or recurrence of disease. The sensitizer was injected intravenously or applied externally (Radachlorin gel). There were used surface, endoscopic, and interstitial ways of irradiation. Full tumor regression with excellent cosmetic effect was reached in 100% cases of 1-3 stage basal cell cancer patients treated with intravenous Radachlorin injection. In most other (non-basalioma) cases significant regression of tumors and improvement of life quality of patients (recanalization and regain of conductivity) was obtained.

  19. The efficacy of herbal therapy on quality of life in patients with breast cancer: self-control clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lai Yi Eliza Wong

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Lai Yi Eliza Wong1, Chun Kwok Wong2, Ping Chung Leung3, Wei Kei Christopher Lam41Assistant Professor, Department of Community and Family Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; 2Associate Professor, Department of Chemical Pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong; 3Director, Institute of Chinese Medicine, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 5/F, School of Public Health Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, NT, Hong Kong; 4Chairman, Department of Chemical Pathology, The Chinese University of Hong Kong, 1/F, Clinical Sciences Building, Prince of Wales Hospital, NT, Hong KongBackground: Mounting evidence indicates that herbal therapy is effective in alleviating anxiety, lessening cancer treatment-related side-effects, and facilitating rehabilitation. This is the first trial to examine the herbal therapy of combined yunzhi and danshen on quality of life among breast cancer patients.Methods: A multicenter, longitudinal, and self-control study was used. Eighty-two breast cancer patients were given combined yunzhi and danshen capsules for six months on a daily basis. Data collection including quality of life, vitality status and adverse effects were taken.Results: Results showed a significant improvement in physical function, role-physical, role-emotion and health transition (P < 0.05. Patients also reported less fatigue, better quality of sleep, better appetite, more regular bowel movements and more stable emotions (P < 0.05. As far as side-effects were concerned, only mild discomforts including sore throat (13.4% and dry mouth (9.8% were recorded.Conclusion: The findings add clinical evidence to support the beneficial effects of herbal therapy on quality of life and vitality status in breast cancer patients. Therefore, herbal therapy has a potentially important role to play in managing psychological distress in cancer patients. This study also suggests that herbal therapy is clinically acceptable and can be used safely with breast cancer

  20. Types of Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Information about the several types of cancer clinical trials, including treatment trials, prevention trials, screening trials, supportive and palliative care trials. Each type of trial is designed to answer different research questions.

  1. Low-level laser therapy for pain relief after episiotomy: a double-blind randomised clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Jaqueline de O; de Oliveira, Sonia M J V; da Silva, Flora M B; Nobre, Moacyr R C; Osava, Ruth H; Riesco, Maria L G

    2012-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of a low-level laser therapy for pain relief in the perineum following episiotomy during childbirth. Laser irradiation is a painless and non-invasive therapy for perineal pain treatment and its effects have been investigated in several studies, with no clear conclusion on its effectiveness. A double-blind randomised controlled clinical trial. One hundred and fourteen women who underwent right mediolateral episiotomies during vaginal birth in an in-hospital birthing centre in São Paulo, Brazil and reported pain ≥ 3 on a numeric scale (0-10) were randomised into three groups of 38 women each: two experimental groups (treated with red and infrared laser) and a control group. The experimental groups were treated with laser applied at three points directly on the episiotomy after suturing in a single session between 6-56 hours postpartum. We used a diode laser with wavelengths of 660 nm (red laser) and 780 nm (infrared laser). The control group participants underwent all laser procedures, excluding the emission of irradiation. The participants and the pain scores evaluator were blinded to the type of intervention. The perineal pain scores were assessed at three time points: before, immediately after and 30 minutes after low-level laser therapy. The comparison of perineal pain between the three groups showed no significant differences in the three evaluations (p = 0.445), indicating that the results obtained in the groups treated with low-level laser therapy were equivalent to the control group. Low-level laser therapy did not decrease the intensity of perineal pain reported by women who underwent right mediolateral episiotomy. The effect of laser in perineal pain relief was not demonstrated in this study. The dosage may not have been sufficient to provide relief from perineal pain after episiotomy during a vaginal birth. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  2. Randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of ozone therapy as treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragab, A; Shreef, E; Behiry, E; Zalat, S; Noaman, M

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the safety and efficacy of ozone therapy in adult patients with sudden sensorineural hearing loss. Prospective, randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled, parallel group, clinical trial. Forty-five adult patients presented with sudden sensorineural hearing loss, and were randomly allocated to receive either placebo (15 patients) or ozone therapy (auto-haemotherapy; 30 patients). For the latter treatment, 100 ml of the patient's blood was treated immediately with a 1:1 volume, gaseous mixture of oxygen and ozone (from an ozone generator) and re-injected into the patient by intravenous infusion. Treatments were administered twice weekly for 10 sessions. The following data were recorded: pre- and post-treatment mean hearing gains; air and bone pure tone averages; speech reception thresholds; speech discrimination scores; and subjective recovery rates. Significant recovery was observed in 23 patients (77 per cent) receiving ozone treatment, compared with six (40 per cent) patients receiving placebo (p < 0.05). Mean hearing gains, pure tone averages, speech reception thresholds and subjective recovery rates were significantly better in ozone-treated patients compared with placebo-treated patients (p < 0.05). Ozone therapy is a significant modality for treatment of sudden sensorineural hearing loss; no complications were observed.

  3. Continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion therapy in Addison's disease: a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Lucia; Nenke, Marni A; Thynne, Tilenka R J; von der Borch, Jenny; Rankin, Wayne A; Henley, David E; Sorbello, Jane; Inder, Warrick J; Torpy, David J

    2014-11-01

    Patients with Addison's disease (AD) report impaired subjective health status (SHS). Since cortisol exhibits a robust circadian cycle that entrains other biological clocks, impaired SHS may be due to the noncircadian cortisol profile achieved with conventional glucocorticoid replacement. Continuous subcutaneous hydrocortisone infusion (CSHI) reproduces a circadian cortisol profile, but its effects on SHS have not been objectively evaluated. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of CSHI on SHS in AD. This was a multicentre, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of CSHI vs oral glucocorticoid therapy. Participants received in random order 4 weeks of: CSHI and oral placebo, and subcutaneous placebo and oral hydrocortisone, separated by a 2-week washout period. SHS was assessed using the Short-Form 36 (SF-36), General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-28), Fatigue Scale (FS), Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale (GSRS); and Addison's Quality of Life Questionnaire (AddiQoL). Participants were asked their (blinded) treatment preference. Twenty-four hour urine free cortisol (UFC) and diurnal salivary cortisol collections compared cortisol exposure during each treatment. Ten participants completed the study. Baseline SHS scores (mean ± SE) were consistent with mild impairment: SF-36 physical component summary 48.4 (± 2.4), mental component summary 53.3 (± 3.0); GHQ-28 18.1 (± 3.3); GSRS 3.7 (± 1.6), and AddiQoL 94.7 (± 3.7). FS was similar to other AD cohorts 13.5 (± 1.0) (P = 0.82). UFC between treatments was not different (P = 0.87). The salivary cortisol at 0800 h was higher during CSHI (P = 0.03), but not at any other time points measured. There was no difference between the treatments in the SHS assessments. Five participants preferred CSHI, four oral hydrocortisone, and one was uncertain. Biochemical measurements indicate similar cortisol exposure during each treatment period, although a more circadian pattern was evident during CSHI. CSHI does not

  4. Patent foramen ovale closure versus medical therapy after cryptogenic stroke: An updated meta-analysis of all randomized clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kheiri, Babikir; Abdalla, Ahmed; Osman, Mohammed; Ahmed, Sahar; Hassan, Mustafa; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2018-03-07

    Cryptogenic strokes can be attributed to paradoxical emboli through patent foramen ovale (PFO). However, the effectiveness of PFO closure in preventing recurrent stroke is uncertain and the results of previous randomized clinical trials (RCTs) have been inconclusive. Hence, this study provides an updated meta-analysis of all RCTs comparing PFO closure with medical therapy for secondary prevention of cryptogenic stroke. All RCTs were identified by a comprehensive literature search of PubMed, Embase, the Cochrane Collaboration Central Register of Controlled Trials, Scopus, and Clinicaltrials.gov. The primary outcome was recurrent ischemic stroke and secondary outcomes were transient ischemic attack (TIA), all-cause mortality, new-onset atrial fibrillation (AF), serious adverse events, and major bleeding. 5 RCTs with 3440 participants were included in the present study (1829 patients underwent PFO closure and 1611 were treated medically). Pooled analysis showed a statistically significant reduction in the rate of recurrent stroke with PFO closure in comparison to medical therapy (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.19-0.90; p = 0.03). However, there were no statistically significant reductions of recurrent TIAs (OR 0.77; 95% CI 0.51-1.14; p = 0.19) or all-cause mortality (OR 0.76; 95% CI 0.35-1.65; p = 0.48). The risk of developing new-onset AF was increased significantly with PFO closure (OR 4.74; 95% CI 2.33-9.61; p Patent foramen ovale closure in adults with recent cryptogenic stroke was associated with a lower rate of recurrent strokes in comparison with medical therapy alone.

  5. Relaxation Therapy on Fetal Outcomes in Complicated Pregnancies Suffering Sleep Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    azar nematollahi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Sleep disorders like snoring, mouth breathing, and insomnia are frequent in pregnancy and studies have shown that poor sleep is linked to obstetric complications. Muscle relaxation technique is an effective method used for improving sleep quality. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of muscle relaxation technique on fetal outcomes in complicated pregnancies with sleep disorders. Methods: This study was performed as a clinical trial on 160 pregnant women who suffered from preeclampsia and gestational diabetes. The participants filled the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI in order to measure the quality and patterns of their sleep. The participants with the total score of 5 or more were included in the present study. Intervention group were asked to use muscle relaxation technique twice a week at home for 8 weeks alongside the routine care. Study variables included sleep quality, Apgar scores, birth weight, levels of Interleukin- 6 (IL- 6, as well as umbilical cord PH and PO2. Results: The mean score of PSQI before the intervention was 9.28±4.16 and 9.18±3.06 in the intervention and control groups without a significant difference (P=0.6, respectively. However, PSQI global score of the experimental group was smaller than the control group at the end of the study (P<0.001. Also, birth weight (P=0.04, Apgar score (P=0.01, and umbilical cord blood po2 (P=0.03 and PH (P=0.01 were higher, and IL-6 (P=0.04 was smaller in the experimental group compared to the control group. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that muscle relaxation, as a simple, inexpensive and safe method, can improve the fetal outcomes such as birth weight, Apgar score, cord blood po2, and cord blood PH, and also it leads to lower IL-6 in complicated pregnancies.

  6. Psychosocial and Clinical Outcomes of a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Asians and Pacific Islanders with Type 2 Diabetes: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inouye, Jillian; Li, Dongmei; Davis, James; Arakaki, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are twice as likely to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes compared to Caucasians. The objective was to determine the effect of cognitive behavioral therapy on quality of life, general health perceptions, depressive symptoms, and glycemia in Asians and Pacific Islanders with type 2 diabetes. The design was a randomized controlled clinical trial comparing cognitive behavioral therapy to diabetes education and support for six weekly sessions. Participants were recruited from two endocrinology practices; 207 were enrolled. The cognitive behavioral therapy group was provided self-management tools which included biofeedback, breathing exercises, and stress relievers, while the diabetes education and support group included diabetes education and group discussions. Assessments of psychosocial and clinical outcomes were obtained before and after sessions and 12 months PostSession. Differences between the two groups were examined using linear mixed-effects models with linear contrasts. The cognitive behavioral therapy group had improved depressive symptom scores from PreSession to EndSession compared to the diabetes education and support group (P < .03), but the improvement did not extend to 12 months PostSession. Similar results were observed with misguided support scores in the Multidimensional Diabetes Questionnaire (P < .03) and susceptibility in health beliefs (P < .01), but no significant differences in HbA1c improvement were found between the two groups. Both interventions improved outcomes from baseline but were not sustained for 1 year.

  7. Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) applied to college students: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistorello, Jacqueline; Fruzzetti, Alan E; Maclane, Chelsea; Gallop, Robert; Iverson, Katherine M

    2012-12-01

    College counseling centers (CCCs) are increasingly being called upon to treat highly distressed students with complex clinical presentations. This study compared the effectiveness of Dialectical Behavior Therapy (DBT) for suicidal college students with an optimized control condition and analyzed baseline global functioning as a moderator. The intent-to-treat (ITT) sample included 63 college students between the ages of 18 and 25 years who were suicidal at baseline, reported at least 1 lifetime nonsuicidal self-injurious (NSSI) act or suicide attempt, and met 3 or more borderline personality disorder (BPD) diagnostic criteria. Participants were randomly assigned to DBT (n = 31) or an optimized treatment-as-usual (O-TAU) control condition (n = 32). Treatment was provided by trainees, supervised by experts in both treatments. Both treatments lasted 7-12 months and included both individual and group components. Assessments were conducted at pretreatment, 3 months, 6 months, 9 months, 12 months, and 18 months (follow-up). Mixed effects analyses (ITT sample) revealed that DBT, compared with the control condition, showed significantly greater decreases in suicidality, depression, number of NSSI events (if participant had self-injured), BPD criteria, and psychotropic medication use and significantly greater improvements in social adjustment. Most of these treatment effects were observed at follow-up. No treatment differences were found for treatment dropout. Moderation analyses showed that DBT was particularly effective for suicidal students who were lower functioning at pretreatment. DBT is an effective treatment for suicidal, multiproblem college students. Future research should examine the implementation of DBT in CCCs in a stepped care approach.

  8. Clinical effectiveness of cognitive therapy v. interpersonal psychotherapy for depression: results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmens, L.H.J.M.; Arntz, A.; Peeters, F.; Hollon, S.D.; Roefs, A.; Marcus, J.H.; Huibers, M.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Although both cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) have been shown to be effective treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD), it is not clear yet whether one therapy outperforms the other with regard to severity and course of the disorder. This study examined

  9. Effects of Coping-Oriented Couples Therapy on Depression: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodenmann, Guy; Plancherel, Bernard; Beach, Steven R. H.; Widmer, Kathrin; Gabriel, Barbara; Meuwly, Nathalie; Charvoz, Linda; Hautzinger, Martin; Schramm, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of treating depression with coping-oriented couples therapy (COCT) as compared with cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT; A. T. Beck, C. Ward, & M. Mendelson, 1961) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT; M. M. Weissman, J. C. Markowitz, & G. L. Klerman, 2000). Sixty couples, including 1…

  10. Clinical effectiveness of cognitive therapy v. interpersonal psychotherapy for depression: results of a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lemmens, L.H.J.M.; Arntz, A.; Peeters, F.; Hollon, S.D.; Roefs, A.; Huibers, M.J.H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although both cognitive therapy (CT) and interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT) have been shown to be effective treatments for major depressive disorder (MDD), it is not clear yet whether one therapy outperforms the other with regard to severity and course of the disorder. This study examined

  11. Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) versus Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) for Mixed Anxiety Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arch, Joanna J.; Eifert, Georg H.; Davies, Carolyn; Vilardaga, Jennifer C. Plumb; Rose, Raphael D.; Craske, Michelle G.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Randomized comparisons of acceptance-based treatments with traditional cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) for anxiety disorders are lacking. To address this gap, we compared acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) to CBT for heterogeneous anxiety disorders. Method: One hundred twenty-eight individuals (52% female, mean age = 38, 33%…

  12. Clinical and cost-effectiveness of cognitive behaviour therapy for health anxiety in medical patients: a multicentre randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrer, Peter; Cooper, Sylvia; Salkovskis, Paul; Tyrer, Helen; Crawford, Michael; Byford, Sarah; Dupont, Simon; Finnis, Sarah; Green, John; McLaren, Elenor; Murphy, David; Reid, Steven; Smith, Georgina; Wang, Duolao; Warwick, Hilary; Petkova, Hristina; Barrett, Barbara

    2014-01-18

    Health anxiety has been treated by therapists expert in cognitive behaviour therapy with some specific benefit in some patients referred to psychological services. Those in hospital care have been less often investigated. Following a pilot trial suggesting efficacy we carried out a randomised study in hospital medical clinics. We undertook a multicentre, randomised trial on health anxious patients attending cardiac, endocrine, gastroenterological, neurological, and respiratory medicine clinics in secondary care. We included those aged 16-75 years, who satisfied the criteria for excessive health anxiety, and were resident in the area covered by the hospital, were not under investigation for new pathology or too medically unwell to take part. We used a computer-generated random scheme to allocate eligible medical patients to an active treatment group of five-to-ten sessions of adapted cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-HA group) delivered by hospital-based therapists or to standard care in the clinics. The primary outcome was change in health anxiety symptoms measured by the Health Anxiety Inventory at 1 year and the main secondary hypothesis was equivalence of total health and social care costs over 2 years, with an equivalence margin of £150. Analysis was by intention to treat. The study is registered with controlled-trials.com, ISRCTN14565822. Of 28,991 patients screened, 444 were randomly assigned to receive either adapted cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT-HA group, 219 participants) or standard care (standard care group, 225), with 205 participants in the CBT-HA group and 212 in the standard care group included in the analyses of the primary endpoints. At 1 year, improvement in health anxiety in the patients in the CBT-HA group was 2·98 points greater than in those in the standard care group (95% CI 1·64-4·33, pbehaviour therapy achieved normal levels of health anxiety compared with those in the control group (13·9% vs 7·3%; odds ratio 2·15, 95% CI 1·09-4

  13. Computer Enabled Neuroplasticity Treatment: a Clinical Trial of a Novel Design for Neurofeedback Therapy in Adult ADHD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eCowley

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available BackgroundWe report a randomised controlled clinical trial of neurofeedback therapy intervention for ADHD/ADD in adults. We focus on internal mechanics of neurofeedback learning, to elucidate the primary role of cortical self-regulation in neurofeedback. We report initial results; more extensive analysis will follow.MethodsTrial has two phases: intervention and follow-up. The intervention consisted of neurofeedback treatment, including intake and outtake measurements, using a waiting-list control group. Treatment involved $sim$40 hour-long sessions 2-5 times per week. Training involved either theta/beta or sensorimotor-rhythm regimes, adapted by adding a novel 'inverse-training' condition to promote self-regulation. Follow-up (ongoing will consist of self-report and executive function tests.SettingIntake and outtake measurements were conducted at University of Helsinki. Treatment was administered at partner clinic Mental Capital Care, Helsinki.RandomisationWe randomly allocated half the sample then adaptively allocated the remainder to minimise baseline differences in prognostic variables.BlindingWaiting-list control design meant trial was not blinded.Participants54 adult Finnish participants (mean age 36 years; 29 females were recruited after screening by psychiatric review. 44 had ADHD diagnoses, 10 had ADD.MeasurementsSymptoms were assessed by computerised attention test (T.O.V.A. and self-report scales, at intake and outtake. Performance during neurofeedback trials was recorded.ResultsParticipants were recruited and completed intake measurements during summer 2012, before assignment to treatment and control, September 2012. Outtake measurements ran April-August 2013. After dropouts, 23 treatment and 21 waiting-list participants remained for analysis.Initial analysis showed that, compared to waiting-list control, neurofeedback promoted improvement of self-reported ADHD symptoms, but did not show transfer of learning to T.O.V.A. Comprehensive

  14. Relief from Back Pain Through Postural Adjustment: a Controlled Clinical Trial of the Immediate Effects of Muscular Chains Therapy (MCT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Jose L

    2014-09-01

    Back pain can be one of the most common health problems, causing suffering, disabilities, and financial losses. Postural models for pain treatment state that poor posture alters the joint position and causes pain, such as back pain. Muscular Chain Therapy (MCT) is a technique that is used to treat posture pathologies, among others. The aim of the present study was to assess the efficiency of a single session of Muscular Chain Therapy (MCT) on complaints of undiagnosed musculoskeletal spinal pain. Physical therapy clinic of the University of Center-West (Guarapuava, Brazil). 100 subjects, aged between 20 and 39 years, with complaints of spinal musculoskeletal pain. Randomized controlled trial. The participants were randomly assigned by a non-care provider into two groups: The MCT Group that received Muscular Chain Treatment and the Control Group that received a placebo treatment of 15 minutes turned off ultrasound therapy. All volunteers were assessed before and after treatment using an analog pain scale. A score of 0 indicated no pain and 10 was the maximum degree of pain on the scale. Degree of pain measured by analog scale. The chi-square goodness of fit test was used to compare gender distribution among groups displayed a p value = .25. Subject age had differences analyzed using the unpaired t test (p = .44). Pain assessment for treatment and placebo control groups was analyzed using a paired t test and unpaired t test. The paired t test was used for intragroup before/after treatment comparison (MCT p = .00001; Control Group p = .0001). The unpaired t test was used for comparing the difference of the pain level before and after treatment between groups (p = .0001). A priori statistical significance was set a p = .05. It is possible to conclude that one MCT session is an effective treatment of undiagnosed spinal musculoskeletal pain.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer: What is the Appropriate Patient-Reported Outcome for Clinical Trial Design?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Ai-Lian Woo

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT is increasingly utilized as primary treatment for clinically localized prostate cancer. Consensus regarding the appropriate patient-reported outcome (PRO endpoints for clinical trials for early stage prostate cancer RT is lacking. To aid in trial design, this study presents PROs over 36 months following SBRT for clinically localized prostate cancer. Methods: 174 hormone-naïve patients were treated with 35-36.25 Gy SBRT in 5 fractions. Patients completed the EPIC-26 questionnaire at baseline and all follow-ups; the proportion of patients developing a clinically significant decline in each EPIC domain was determined. The minimally important difference (MID was defined as a change of one-half SD from the baseline. Per RTOG 0938, we examined the percentage of patients who reported decline in EPIC urinary summary score of >2 points and EPIC bowel summary score of >5 points from baseline to one year. Results: 174 patients received SBRT with minimum follow-up of 36 months. The proportion of patients reporting a clinically significant decline in EPIC urinary/bowel scores was 34%/30%, 40%/32.2%, and 32.8%/21.5% at 6, 12, and 36 months. The percentage of patients reporting decline in the EPIC urinary summary score of >2 points was 43.2%, 51.6% and 41.8% at 6, 12, and 36 months. The percentage of patients reporting decline in EPIC bowel domain summary score of >5 points was 29.6% 29% and 22.4% at 6, 12, and 36 months. Conclusion: Our treatment protocol meets the RTOG 0938 criteria for advancing to a Phase III trial compared to conventionally fractionated RT. Between 12-36 months, the proportion of patients reporting decrease in both EPIC urinary and bowel scores declined, suggesting late improvement in these domains. Further investigation is needed to elucidate 1 which domains bear the greatest influence on post-treatment QOL, and 2 at what time point PRO endpoint(s should be assessed.

  16. Role of massage therapy on reduction of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia in term and preterm neonates: a review of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Bhawan Deep; Kabra, Nandkishor S; Balasubramanian, Haribalakrishna

    2017-09-13

    Neonatal hyperbilirubinemia (NNH) is one of the leading causes of admissions in nursery throughout the world. It affects approximately 2.4-15% of neonates during the first 2 weeks of life. To evaluate the role of massage therapy for reduction of NNH in both term and preterm neonates. The literature search was done for various randomized control trials (RCTs) by searching the Cochrane Library, PubMed, and EMBASE. This review included total of 10 RCTs (two in preterm neonates and eight in term neonates) that fulfilled inclusion criteria. In most of the trials, Field massage was given. Six out of eight trials reported reduction in bilirubin levels in term neonates. However, only one trial (out of two) reported significant reduction in bilirubin levels in preterm neonates. Both trials in preterm neonates and most of the trials in term neonates (five trials) reported increased stool frequencies. Role of massage therapy in the management of NNH is supported by the current evidence. However, due to limitations of the trials, current evidences are not sufficient to use massage therapy for the management of NNH in routine practice.

  17. A Randomized Clinical Trial of Cognitive Enhancement Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    life for more able individuals with autism or Asperger syndrome. Autism , 4(1), 63-83. Kanner, L. (1971). Follow-up study of eleven autistic...Enhancement Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Nancy J. Minshew, M.D. & Shaun M. Each, Ph.D...Therapy for Adults with Autism Spectrum Disorders 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0665 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR

  18. Cognitive Behavioral Insomnia Therapy for Those With Insomnia and Depression: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, Colleen E; Edinger, Jack D; Kuchibhatla, Maragatha; Lachowski, Angela M; Bogouslavsky, Olya; Krystal, Andrew D; Shapiro, Colin M

    2017-04-01

    To compare cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBT-I) + antidepressant medication (AD) against treatments that target solely depression or solely insomnia. A blinded, randomized split-plot experimental study. Two urban academic clinical centers. 107 participants (68% female, mean age 42 ± 11) with major depressive disorder and insomnia. Randomization was to one of three groups: antidepressant (AD; escitalopram) + CBT-I (4 sessions), CBT-I + placebo pill, or AD + 4-session sleep hygiene control (SH). Subjective sleep was assessed via 2 weeks of daily sleep diaries (use of medication was covaried in all analyses); although there were no statistically significant group differences detected, all groups improved from baseline to posttreatment on subjective sleep efficiency (SE) and total wake time (TWT) and the effect sizes were large. Objective sleep was assessed via overnight polysomnographic monitoring at baseline and posttreatment; analyses revealed both CBT groups improved on TWT (p = .03), but the AD + SH group worsened. There was no statistically significant effect for PSG SE (p = .07). There was a between groups medium effect observed for the AD + SH and CBT + placebo group differences on diary TWT and both PSG variables. All groups improved significantly from baseline to posttreatment on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD-17); the groups did not differ. Although all groups self-reported sleeping better after treatment, only the CBT-I groups improved on objective sleep, and AD + SH's sleep worsened. This suggests that we should be treating sleep in those with depression with an effective insomnia treatment and relying on self-report obscures sleep worsening effects. All groups improved on depression, even a group with absolutely no depression-focused treatment component (CBT-I + placebo). The depression effect in CBT-I only group has been reported in other studies, suggesting that we should further investigate the antidepressant properties of

  19. Outcomes of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease: a subanalysis from a randomized clinical trial of antimetabolite therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Elizabeth; Rathinam, Sivakumar R.; Babu, Manohar; Kanakath, Anuradha; Thundikandy, Radhika; Lee, Salena M.; Browne, Erica N.; Porco, Travis C.; Acharya, Nisha R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To report outcomes of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease from a clinical trial of antimetabolite therapies. Design Subanalysis from an observer-masked randomized clinical trial for non-infectious intermediate, posterior, and pan- uveitis. Methods Setting clinical practice at Aravind Eye Hospitals, India Patient Population Forty-three of 80 patients enrolled (54%) diagnosed with VKH. Intervention Patients were randomized to either 25mg oral methotrexate weekly or 1g mycophenolate mofetil twice daily, with a corticosteroid taper. Main outcome measures Primary outcome was corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation at 5 and 6 months. Secondary outcomes included visual acuity, central subfield thickness, and adverse events. Patients were categorized as acute (diagnosis ≤3 months prior to enrollment) or chronic (diagnosis >3 months prior to enrollment). Results Twenty-seven patients were randomized to methotrexate and 16 to mycophenolate mofetil; 30 had acute VKH. The odds of achieving corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation with methotrexate were 2.5 times (95% CI: 0.6, 9.8; P=0.20) the odds with mycophenolate mofetil, a difference which was not statistically significant. The average improvement in visual acuity was 12.5 Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study (ETDRS) letters. On average, visual acuity for patients with acute VKH improved by 14 more ETDRS letters than those with chronic VKH (P<0.001), but there was no difference in corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation (P=0.99). All 26 eyes with a serous retinal detachment at baseline resolved, and 88% achieved corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation. Conclusions The majority of patients treated with antimetabolites and corticosteroids were able to achieve corticosteroid-sparing control of inflammation by 6 months. Although patients with acute VKH gained more visual improvement than those with chronic VKH, this did not correspond with a higher rate of controlled inflammation. PMID

  20. Clarithromycin vs. Gemifloxacin in Quadruple Therapy Regimens for Empiric Primary Treatment of Helicobacter pylori Infection: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masoodi, Mohsen; Talebi-Taher, Mahshid; Tabatabaie, Khadijeh; Khaleghi, Siamak; Faghihi, Amir-Hossein; Agah, Shahram; Asadi, Reyhaneh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Eradication of Helicobacter pylori infection plays a crucial role in the treatment of peptic ulcer. Clarithromycin resistance is a major cause of treatment failure. This randomized clinical trial aimed at evaluating the efficacy of a clarithromycin versus gemifloxacin containing quadruple therapy regimen in eradication of H.pylori infection. METHODS In this randomized double blind clinical trial (RCT 2012102011054N2), a total of 120 patients were randomized to two groups of 60 patients each. Patients with proven H.pylori infection were consecutively assigned into two groups to receive OBAG or OBAC in gastroenterology clinic in Rasoul-e- Akram General Hospital in Tehran, Iran. The patients in the OBAG group received omeprazole (20 mg) twice daily, bismuth subcitrate (240 mg) twice daily, amoxicillin (1 gr) twice daily, and gemifloxacin (320 mg) once daily, and those in the OBAC group received omeprazole (20 mg) twice daily, 240 mg of bismuth subcitrate twice daily, amoxicillin (1 gr) twice daily, and clarithromycin (500 mg) twice daily for 10 days. RESULTS Five patients from each group were excluded from the study because of poor compliance, so 110 patients completed the study. The intention-to-treat eradication rate was 61.6% and 66.6% for the OBAC and OBAG groups, respectively. According to the per protocol analysis, the success rates of eradication of H.pylori infection were 67.2% and 72.7% for OBAC and OBAG groups, respectively (p=0.568). CONCLUSION The results of this study suggest that gemifloxacin containing regimen is at least as effective as clarithromycin regimen; hence, this new treatment could be considered as an alternative for the patients who cannot tolerate clarithromycin. PMID:26106468

  1. How Can Viral Dynamics Models Inform Endpoint Measures in Clinical Trials of Therapies for Acute Viral Infections?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolin Vegvari

    Full Text Available Acute viral infections pose many practical challenges for the accurate assessment of the impact of novel therapies on viral growth and decay. Using the example of influenza A, we illustrate how the measurement of infection-related quantities that determine the dynamics of viral load within the human host, can inform investigators on the course and severity of infection and the efficacy of a novel treatment. We estimated the values of key infection-related quantities that determine the course of natural infection from viral load data, using Markov Chain Monte Carlo methods. The data were placebo group viral load measurements collected during volunteer challenge studies, conducted by Roche, as part of the oseltamivir trials. We calculated the values of the quantities for each patient and the correlations between the quantities, symptom severity and body temperature. The greatest variation among individuals occurred in the viral load peak and area under the viral load curve. Total symptom severity correlated positively with the basic reproductive number. The most sensitive endpoint for therapeutic trials with the goal to cure patients is the duration of infection. We suggest laboratory experiments to obtain more precise estimates of virological quantities that can supplement clinical endpoint measurements.

  2. Clinical trials of homoeopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleijnen, J; Knipschild, P; ter Riet, G

    1991-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To establish whether there is evidence of the efficacy of homoeopathy from controlled trials in humans. DESIGN--Criteria based meta-analysis. Assessment of the methodological quality of 107 controlled trials in 96 published reports found after an extensive search. Trials were scored using a list of predefined criteria of good methodology, and the outcome of the trials was interpreted in relation to their quality. SETTING--Controlled trials published world wide. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Results of the trials with the best methodological quality. Trials of classical homoeopathy and several modern varieties were considered separately. RESULTS--In 14 trials some form of classical homoeopathy was tested and in 58 trials the same single homoeopathic treatment was given to patients with comparable conventional diagnosis. Combinations of several homoeopathic treatments were tested in 26 trials; isopathy was tested in nine trials. Most trials seemed to be of very low quality, but there were many exceptions. The results showed a positive trend regardless of the quality of the trial or the variety of homeopathy used. Overall, of the 105 trials with interpretable results, 81 trials indicated positive results whereas in 24 trials no positive effects of homoeopathy were found. The results of the review may be complicated by publication bias, especially in such a controversial subject as homoeopathy. CONCLUSIONS--At the moment the evidence of clinical trials is positive but not sufficient to draw definitive conclusions because most trials are of low methodological quality and because of the unknown role of publication bias. This indicates that there is a legitimate case for further evaluation of homoeopathy, but only by means of well performed trials. PMID:1825800

  3. Individual cognitive stimulation therapy for dementia: a clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness pragmatic, multicentre, randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgeta, Vasiliki; Leung, Phuong; Yates, Lauren; Kang, Sujin; Hoare, Zoe; Henderson, Catherine; Whitaker, Chris; Burns, Alistair; Knapp, Martin; Leroi, Iracema; Moniz-Cook, Esme D; Pearson, Stephen; Simpson, Stephen; Spector, Aimee; Roberts, Steven; Russell, Ian T; de Waal, Hugo; Woods, Robert T; Orrell, Martin

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Group cognitive stimulation therapy programmes can benefit cognition and quality of life for people with dementia. Evidence for home-based, carer-led cognitive stimulation interventions is limited. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of carer-delivered individual cognitive stimulation therapy (iCST) for people with dementia and their family carers, compared with treatment as usual (TAU). DESIGN A multicentre, single-blind, randomised controlled trial assessing clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness. Assessments were at baseline, 13 weeks and 26 weeks (primary end point). SETTING Participants were recruited through Memory Clinics and Community Mental Health Teams for older people. PARTICIPANTS A total of 356 caregiving dyads were recruited and 273 completed the trial. INTERVENTION iCST consisted of structured cognitive stimulation sessions for people with dementia, completed up to three times weekly over 25 weeks. Family carers were supported to deliver the sessions at home. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES Primary outcomes for the person with dementia were cognition and quality of life. Secondary outcomes included behavioural and psychological symptoms, activities of daily living, depressive symptoms and relationship quality. The primary outcome for the family carers was mental/physical health (Short Form questionnaire-12 items). Health-related quality of life (European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions), mood symptoms, resilience and relationship quality comprised the secondary outcomes. Costs were estimated from health and social care and societal perspectives. RESULTS There were no differences in any of the primary outcomes for people with dementia between intervention and TAU [cognition: mean difference -0.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.00 to 0.90; p-value = 0.45; self-reported quality of life: mean difference -0.02, 95% CI -1.22 to 0.82; p-value = 0.97 at the 6-month follow-up]. iCST did not improve mental

  4. Cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety disordered youth: a randomized clinical trial evaluating child and family modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendall, Philip C; Hudson, Jennifer L; Gosch, Elizabeth; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Suveg, Cynthia

    2008-04-01

    This randomized clinical trial compared the relative efficacy of individual (child) cognitive-behavioral therapy (ICBT), family cognitive-behavioral therapy (FCBT), and a family-based education/support/ attention (FESA) active control for treating anxiety disordered youth ages 7-14 years (M = 10.27). Youth (N = 161; 44% female; 85% Caucasian, 9% African American, 3% Hispanic, 3% other/mixed) with a principal diagnosis of separation anxiety disorder, social phobia, or generalized anxiety disorder and their parents participated. Outcome analyses were conducted using hierarchical linear models on the intent-to-treat sample at posttreatment and 1-year follow-up using diagnostic severity, child self-reports, parent reports, and teacher reports. Chi-square analyses were also conducted on diagnostic status at post and 1-year follow-up. Children evidenced treatment gains in all conditions, although FCBT and ICBT were superior to FESA in reducing the presence and principality of the principal anxiety disorder, and ICBT outperformed FCBT and FESA on teacher reports of child anxiety. Treatment gains, when found, were maintained at 1-year follow-up. FCBT outperformed ICBT when both parents had an anxiety disorder. Implications for treatment and suggestions for research are discussed. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved.

  5. Systematic Review of Randomized Clinical Trials of Acupressure Therapy for Primary Dysmenorrhea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-ru Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The evidence of acupressure is limited in the management of dysmenorrhea. To evaluate the efficacy of acupressure in the treatment of primary dysmenorrhea based on randomized controlled trials (RCTs, we searched MEDLINE, the Chinese Biomedical Database (CBM, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL databases from inception until March 2012. Two reviewers independently selected articles and extracted data. Statistical analysis was performed with RevMan 5.1 software. Eight RCTs were identified from the retrieved 224 relevant records. Acupressure improved pain measured with VAS (−1.41 cm 95% CI [−1.61, −1.21], SF-MPQ at the 3-month followup (WMD −2.33, 95% CI [−4.11, −0.54] and 6-month followup (WMD −4.67, 95% CI [−7.30, −2.04], and MDQ at the 3-month followup (WMD −2.31, 95% CI [−3.74, −0.87] and 6-month followup (WMD −4.67, 95% CI [−7.30, −2.04]. All trials did not report adverse events. These results were limited by the methodological flaws of trials.

  6. Psycho-education with problem solving (PEPS therapy for adults with personality disorder: A pragmatic multi-site community-based randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duggan Conor

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Impairment in social functioning is a key component of personality disorder. Therefore psycho-education and problem solving (PEPS therapy may benefit people with this disorder. Psycho-education aims to educate, build rapport, and motivate people for problem solving therapy. Problem solving therapy aims to help clients solve interpersonal problems positively and rationally, thereby improving social functioning and reducing distress. PEPS therapy has been evaluated with community adults with personality disorder in an exploratory trial. At the end of treatment, compared to a wait-list control group, those treated with PEPS therapy showed better social functioning, as measured by the Social Functioning Questionnaire (SFQ. A definitive evaluation is now being conducted to determine whether PEPS therapy is a clinically and cost-effective treatment for people with personality disorder Methods This is a pragmatic, two-arm, multi-centre, parallel, randomised controlled clinical trial. The target population is community-dwelling adults with one or more personality disorder, as identified by the International Personality Disorder Examination (IPDE. Inclusion criteria are: Living in the community (including residential or supported care settings; presence of one or more personality disorder; aged 18 or over; proficiency in spoken English; capacity to provide informed consent. Exclusion criteria are: Primary diagnosis of a functional psychosis; insufficient degree of literacy, comprehension or attention to be able to engage in trial therapy and assessments; currently engaged in a specific programme of psychological treatment for personality disorder or likely to start such treatment during the trial period; currently enrolled in any other trial. Suitable participants are randomly allocated to PEPS therapy plus treatment as usual (TAU or TAU only. We aim to recruit 340 men and women. The primary outcome is social functioning as measured

  7. Customized Versus Noncustomized Sound Therapy for Treatment of Tinnitus: A Randomized Crossover Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahboubi, Hossein; Haidar, Yarah M; Kiumehr, Saman; Ziai, Kasra; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2017-10-01

    To determine the effectiveness of a customized sound therapy and compare its effectiveness to that of masking with broadband noise. Subjects were randomized to receive either customized sound therapy or broadband noise for 2 hours per day for 3 months and then switched to the other treatment after a washout period. The outcome variables were tinnitus loudness (scored 0-10), Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (THI), Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI), minimum masking levels (MML), and residual inhibition (RI). Eighteen subjects completed the study. Mean age was 53 ± 11 years, and mean tinnitus duration was 118 ± 99 months. With customized sound therapy, mean loudness decreased from 6.4 ± 2.0 to 4.9 ± 1.9 ( P = .001), mean THI decreased from 42.8 ± 21.6 to 31.5 ± 20.3 ( P tinnitus patients, and the results may be superior to broadband noise.

  8. The efficacy of laser therapy for musculoskeletal and skin disorders : A criteria-based meta-analysis of randomized clinical trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beckerman, H.; De Bie, R. A.; Bouter, L. M.; De Cuyper, H. J.; Oostendorp, R. A.B.

    1992-01-01

    The efficacy of laser therapy for musculoskeletal and skin disorders has been assessed on the basis of the results of 36 randomized clinical trials (RCTs) involving 1,704 patients. For this purpose, a criteria-based meta- analysis that took into account the methodological quality of the individual

  9. “My whole life is ethics!” Ordinary ethics and gene therapy clinical trials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Addison, Courtney; Lassen, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    acquire some control in difficult medical situations, and practitioners can attune their care to their patients’ needs. The human provenance of gene therapy practice, and the irreducible sociality of ethics, means that understanding the ethics of this medical field also requires understanding the everyday...

  10. Cue exposure therapy for the treatment of opiate addiction: results of a randomized controlled clinical trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, Marlies A. E.; Franken, Ingmar H. A.; Blanken, Peter; van den Brink, Wim; Hendriks, Vincent M.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Persistent cue reactivity to drug-related stimuli is a well-known phenomenon among abstinent drug users and has been found to be a predictor of relapse. Cue exposure therapy (CET) aims to reduce this cue reactivity by exposing abstinent drug users to conditioned drug-related stimuli

  11. Virtual Reality Cognitive Behavior Therapy for Public Speaking Anxiety: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallach, Helene S.; Safir, Marilyn P.; Bar-Zvi, Margalit

    2009-01-01

    Public speaking anxiety (PSA) is a common phobia. Although cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) is preferred, difficulties arise with the exposure component (lack of therapist control, patient's inability to imagine, self-flooding, loss of confidentiality resulting from public exposure). Virtual reality CBT (VRCBT) enables a high degree of therapist…

  12. The Effect of Deep Oscillation Therapy in Fibrocystic Breast Disease. A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solangel Hernandez

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Fibrocystic breast disease is the most widespread disorder in women during their phase of sexual maturity. Deep oscillation (DO therapy has been used on patients who have undergone an operation for breast cancer as a special form of manual lymphatic drainage. Method: Experimental, prospective case-control studies were conducted in 401 women diagnosed with fibrocystic breast disease. The sample was selected at random and was divided into three groups, a study group and two control groups. Results: Pain was reduced in the three therapies applied. This was statistically significant in the study group. The sonography study presented a predominance of its fibrous form. Upon completion of the treatment a resolution of the fibrosis was observed in the study group. The women were using their bra in an incorrect manner. Conclusions: Pain was reduced in the three therapies applied. In the study group this reduction was statistically significant. It is possible to verify the magnitude of the resonant vibration in the connective tissue from surface to deep layers by viewing the effect of the deep oscillations through the use of diagnostic ultrasound. The most frequent sonographic finding was fibrosis. Deep oscillation therapy produces a tissue-relaxing, moderate vasoconstriction effect, favours local oedema reabsorption and fibrosis reduction. A factor that may affect breast pain is incorrect bra use. The majority of women studied were using their bra incorrectly.

  13. Using Mobile Health Gamification to Facilitate Cognitive Behavioral Therapy Skills Practice in Child Anxiety Treatment: Open Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramana, Gede; Parmanto, Bambang; Lomas, James; Lindhiem, Oliver; Kendall, Philip C; Silk, Jennifer

    2018-05-10

    an adjunctive component to brief cognitive behavioral therapy in an open clinical trial. To evaluate the effectiveness of gamification, we compared the app usage data at posttreatment with the earlier version of SmartCAT without gamification. Gamified SmartCAT was used frequently throughout treatment. On average, patients spent 35.59 min on the app (SD 64.18) completing 13.00 activities between each therapy session (SD 12.61). At the 0.10 significance level, the app usage of the gamified system (median 68.00) was higher than that of the earlier, nongamified SmartCAT version (median 37.00, U=76.00, Pcognitive behavioral therapy treatment. Integrating an mHealth gamification platform within treatment for anxious children seems to increase involvement in shorter treatment. Further study is needed to evaluate increase in involvement in full-length treatment. ©Gede Pramana, Bambang Parmanto, James Lomas, Oliver Lindhiem, Philip C Kendall, Jennifer Silk. Originally published in JMIR Serious Games (http://games.jmir.org), 10.05.2018.

  14. Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy for HIV at a Patient's First Clinic Visit: The RapIT Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydney Rosen

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available High rates of patient attrition from care between HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART initiation have been documented in sub-Saharan Africa, contributing to persistently low CD4 cell counts at treatment initiation. One reason for this is that starting ART in many countries is a lengthy and burdensome process, imposing long waits and multiple clinic visits on patients. We estimated the effect on uptake of ART and viral suppression of an accelerated initiation algorithm that allowed treatment-eligible patients to be dispensed their first supply of antiretroviral medications on the day of their first HIV-related clinic visit.RapIT (Rapid Initiation of Treatment was an unblinded randomized controlled trial of single-visit ART initiation in two public sector clinics in South Africa, a primary health clinic (PHC and a hospital-based HIV clinic. Adult (≥18 y old, non-pregnant patients receiving a positive HIV test or first treatment-eligible CD4 count were randomized to standard or rapid initiation. Patients in the rapid-initiation arm of the study ("rapid arm" received a point-of-care (POC CD4 count if needed; those who were ART-eligible received a POC tuberculosis (TB test if symptomatic, POC blood tests, physical exam, education, counseling, and antiretroviral (ARV dispensing. Patients in the standard-initiation arm of the study ("standard arm" followed standard clinic procedures (three to five additional clinic visits over 2-4 wk prior to ARV dispensing. Follow up was by record review only. The primary outcome was viral suppression, defined as initiated, retained in care, and suppressed (≤400 copies/ml within 10 mo of study enrollment. Secondary outcomes included initiation of ART ≤90 d of study enrollment, retention in care, time to ART initiation, patient-level predictors of primary outcomes, prevalence of TB symptoms, and the feasibility and acceptability of the intervention. A survival analysis was conducted comparing attrition

  15. Impact of early personal-history characteristics on the Pace of Aging: implications for clinical trials of therapies to slow aging and extend healthspan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belsky, Daniel W; Caspi, Avshalom; Cohen, Harvey J; Kraus, William E; Ramrakha, Sandhya; Poulton, Richie; Moffitt, Terrie E

    2017-08-01

    Therapies to extend healthspan are poised to move from laboratory animal models to human clinical trials. Translation from mouse to human will entail challenges, among them the multifactorial heterogeneity of human aging. To inform clinical trials about this heterogeneity, we report how humans' pace of biological aging relates to personal-history characteristics. Because geroprotective therapies must be delivered by midlife to prevent age-related disease onset, we studied young-adult members of the Dunedin Study 1972-73 birth cohort (n = 954). Cohort members' Pace of Aging was measured as coordinated decline in the integrity of multiple organ systems, by quantifying rate of decline across repeated measurements of 18 biomarkers assayed when cohort members were ages 26, 32, and 38 years. The childhood personal-history characteristics studied were known predictors of age-related disease and mortality, and were measured prospectively during childhood. Personal-history characteristics of familial longevity, childhood social class, adverse childhood experiences, and childhood health, intelligence, and self-control all predicted differences in cohort members' adulthood Pace of Aging. Accumulation of more personal-history risks predicted faster Pace of Aging. Because trials of anti-aging therapies will need to ascertain personal histories retrospectively, we replicated results using cohort members' retrospective personal-history reports made in adulthood. Because many trials recruit participants from clinical settings, we replicated results in the cohort subset who had recent health system contact according to electronic medical records. Quick, inexpensive measures of trial participants' early personal histories can enable clinical trials to study who volunteers for trials, who adheres to treatment, and who responds to anti-aging therapies. © 2017 The Authors. Aging Cell published by the Anatomical Society and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Leaflet manual of external beam radiation therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma: a review of the indications, evidences, and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rim, Chai Hong; Yoon, Won Sup

    2018-01-01

    The use of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT) in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which was rarely performed due to liver toxicity with a previous technique, has increased. Palliation of portal vein thrombosis, supplementation for insufficient transarterial chemoembolization, and provision of new curative opportunities using stereotactic body radiotherapy are the potential indications for use of EBRT. The mechanism of EBRT treatment, with its radiobiological and physical perspectives, differs from those of conventional medical treatment or surgery. Therefore, understanding the effects of EBRT may be unfamiliar to physicians other than radiation oncologists, especially in the field of HCC, where EBRT has recently begun to be applied. The first objective of this review was to concisely explain the indications for use of EBRT for HCC for all physicians treating HCC. Therefore, this review focuses on the therapeutic outcomes rather than the detailed biological and physical background. We also reviewed recent clinical trials that may extend the indications for use of EBRT. Finally, we reviewed the current clinical practice guidelines for the treatment of HCC and discuss the current recommendations and future perspectives.

  17. Current Molecular Targeted Therapy in Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Comprehensive Review of Therapeutic Mechanism, Clinical Trials, and Practical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaichun Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the great progress in the treatment of gastric cancer, it is still the third leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Patients often miss the opportunity for a surgical cure, because the cancer has already developed into advanced cancer when identified. Compared to best supportive care, chemotherapy can improve quality of life and prolong survival time, but the overall survival is often short. Due to the molecular study of gastric cancer, new molecular targeted drugs have entered the clinical use. Trastuzumab, an antibody targeting human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2, can significantly improve survival in advanced gastric cancer patients with HER2 overexpression. Second-line treatment of advanced gastric cancer with ramucirumab, an antibody targeting VEGFR-2, alone or in combination with paclitaxel, has been proved to provide a beneficial effect. The VEGFR-2 tyrosine kinase inhibitor, apatinib, can improve the survival of advanced gastric cancer patients after second-line chemotherapy failure. Unfortunately, none of the EGFR targeting antibodies (cetuximab or panitumumab, VEGF targeting monoclonal antibodies (bevacizumab, mTOR inhibitor (everolimus, or HGF/MET pathway targeting drugs has a significant survival benefit. Many other clinical trials based on molecular markers are underway. This review will summarize targeted therapies for advanced gastric cancer.

  18. Low- and high-dose radioiodine therapy for low-/intermediate-risk differentiated thyroid cancer. A preliminary clinical trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qu Yuan; Huang Rui; Li Lin

    2017-01-01

    therapeutic response, respectively. The incidences of adverse reactions were 18% (12/66) and 39% (26/66) in the low-dose and high-dose groups, respectively, and this difference between the two groups was significant (P = 0.007). The result of thyroid remnant ablation and the response to therapy did not differ significantly between the two groups. The low-dose group had a lower incidence of adverse reactions than the high-dose group. N1b and pre-treatment-stimulated Tg were factors influencing the ablation result, whereas pre-treatment-stimulated Tg was a factor influencing the therapeutic response. Pre-treatment-stimulated Tg of 0.47 and 3.09 μg/L were identified as cutoff values for predicting the ablation result and therapeutic response, respectively. The study protocol was approved by the Clinical Trials and Biomedical Ethics Committee of our hospital and registered on the Chinese Clinical Trial Registry under the registration number ChiCTR-IOR-15006139. (author)

  19. Randomized Clinical Trial Comparing Proton Beam Radiation Therapy with Transarterial Chemoembolization for Hepatocellular Carcinoma: Results of an Interim Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bush, David A., E-mail: dbush@llu.edu [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Smith, Jason C. [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Slater, Jerry D. [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Volk, Michael L. [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Reeves, Mark E. [VA Loma Linda Health Care System, Loma Linda, California (United States); Cheng, Jason [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Grove, Roger [Department of Radiation Medicine, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States); Vera, Michael E. de [Transplantation Institute and Liver Center, Loma Linda University Medical Center, Loma Linda, California (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Purpose: To describe results of a planned interim analysis of a prospective, randomized clinical trial developed to compare treatment outcomes among patients with newly diagnosed hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Methods and Materials: Eligible subjects had either clinical or pathologic diagnosis of HCC and met either Milan or San Francisco transplant criteria. Patients were randomly assigned to transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) or to proton beam radiation therapy. Patients randomized to TACE received at least 1 TACE with additional TACE for persistent disease. Proton beam radiation therapy was delivered to all areas of gross disease to a total dose of 70.2 Gy in 15 daily fractions over 3 weeks. The primary endpoint was progression-free survival, with secondary endpoints of overall survival, local tumor control, and treatment-related toxicities as represented by posttreatment days of hospitalization. Results: At the time of this analysis 69 subjects were available for analysis. Of these, 36 were randomized to TACE and 33 to proton. Total days of hospitalization within 30 days of TACE/proton was 166 and 24 days, respectively (P<.001). Ten TACE and 12 proton patients underwent liver transplantation after treatment. Viable tumor identified in the explanted livers after TACE/proton averaged 2.4 and 0.9 cm, respectively. Pathologic complete response after TACE/proton was 10%/25% (P=.38). The 2-year overall survival for all patients was 59%, with no difference between treatment groups. Median survival time was 30 months (95% confidence interval 20.7-39.3 months). There was a trend toward improved 2-year local tumor control (88% vs 45%, P=.06) and progression-free survival (48% vs 31%, P=.06) favoring the proton beam treatment group. Conclusions: This interim analysis indicates similar overall survival rates for proton beam radiation therapy and TACE. There is a trend toward improved local tumor control and progression-free survival with proton beam. There are

  20. Effect of Expedited Microneedle-Assisted Photodynamic Therapy for Field Treatment of Actinic Keratoses: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petukhova, Tatyana A; Hassoun, Lauren A; Foolad, Negar; Barath, Mayanka; Sivamani, Raja K

    2017-07-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an effective and cosmetically favorable treatment modality for actinic keratoses (AKs). However, prolonged incubation times and pain associated with treatment are burdensome to the patient and a hindrance to widespread use of PDT as standard field therapy for AK. To evaluate efficacy and pain associated with microneedle expedited PDT. The Microneedle Photodynamic Therapy II (MNPDT-II) study was a randomized, single-blinded, split-face controlled, 2-arm clinical trial. Thirty-three participants with AK on the face were recruited in a university dermatology outpatient clinic from 2015 to 2016, and 32 participants completed the study. Participants were randomized into 2 incubations arms, either 10-minute or 20-minute aminolevulinic acid (ALA) incubation times, after pretreatment with a microneedle roller (200 um) vs a sham roller. They were blinded to the laterality of microneedle and sham roller assignments. After incubation, they were exposed to blue light (Blu-U, Dusa Pharmaceuticals) for 1000 seconds for a total fluence of 10 J/cm2. The primary outcome was to quantitatively measure AK resolution, and the secondary outcome was to assess pain associated with microneedle pretreatment. Thirty-three individuals were recruited and randomized to either the 20-minute or the 10-minute incubation arm. Thirty-two participants completed the study with a mean follow-up time of 34.5 days in the 20-minute group, and 30.2 days in the 10-minute group. For the 20-minute incubation arm, average AK clearance was 76% vs 58% on the sham side (P microneedle and sham sides (0.7 and 0.4; P = .28), respectively. For the 10-minute incubation arm AK clearance for the microneedle pretreated side was 43% compared with 38% on the sham side (P = .66). Pain during the blue light exposure was not significantly different between the microneedle and sham sides, 4.5 mm and 3.4 mm (P = .21), respectively. Photodynamic therapy with microneedle pretreatment at

  1. Fundamentals of clinical trials

    CERN Document Server

    Friedman, Lawrence M; DeMets, David L; Reboussin, David M; Granger, Christopher B

    2015-01-01

    This is the fifth edition of a very successful textbook on clinical trials methodology, written by recognized leaders who have long and extensive experience in all areas of clinical trials. The three authors of the first four editions have been joined by two others who add great expertise.  Most chapters have been revised considerably from the fourth edition.  A chapter on regulatory issues has been included and the chapter on data monitoring has been split into two and expanded.  Many contemporary clinical trial examples have been added.  There is much new material on adverse events, adherence, issues in analysis, electronic data, data sharing, and international trials.  This book is intended for the clinical researcher who is interested in designing a clinical trial and developing a protocol. It is also of value to researchers and practitioners who must critically evaluate the literature of published clinical trials and assess the merits of each trial and the implications for the care and treatment of ...

  2. ClinicalTrials.gov

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Provides patients, family members, health care professionals, and members of the public easy access to information on clinical trials for a wide range of diseases...

  3. Cancer clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheurlen, A.; Kay, R.; Baum, M.

    1988-01-01

    This book contains the proceedings on Cancer clinical trials: A critical appraisal. Topics covered include: Scientific fundamentals; Heterogeneous treatment effects; On combining information: Historical controls, overviews, and comprehensive cohort studies; and assessment of quality of life

  4. The implementation and evaluation of cognitive milieu therapy for dual diagnosis inpatients: A pragmatic clinical trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykke, Jørn; Oestrich, I.; Austin, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    milieu therapy (CMT) among a group of dual diagnosis inpatients. CMT is an integrated treatment for both mental illness and substance abuse based on cognitive behavioral principles and carried out within a supportive inpatient environment. A convenience sample of dual diagnosis inpatients (N = 136......) was assessed pre- and post-intervention from an inpatient setting where CMT was the mode of treatment. Psychopathology was measured using the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale and substance abuse measured with the DrugCheck scale, breath/urine samples, and the Severity of Dependence Scale. Functioning...

  5. Falsificationism and clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senn, S J

    1991-11-01

    The relevance of the philosophy of Sir Karl Popper to the planning, conduct and analysis of clinical trials is examined. It is shown that blinding and randomization can only be regarded as valuable for the purpose of refuting universal hypotheses. The purpose of inclusion criteria is also examined. It is concluded that a misplaced belief in induction is responsible for many false notions regarding clinical trials.

  6. A sense of urgency: Evaluating the link between clinical trial development time and the accrual performance of cancer therapy evaluation program (NCI-CTEP) sponsored studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Steven K; Dietrich, Mary S; Dilts, David M

    2010-11-15

    Postactivation barriers to oncology clinical trial accruals are well documented; however, potential barriers prior to trial opening are not. We investigate one such barrier: trial development time. National Cancer Institute Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program (CTEP)-sponsored trials for all therapeutic, nonpediatric phase I, I/II, II, and III studies activated between 2000 and 2004 were investigated for an 8-year period (n = 419). Successful trials were those achieving 100% of minimum accrual goal. Time to open a study was the calendar time from initial CTEP submission to trial activation. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to calculate unadjusted and adjusted odds ratios (OR), controlling for study phase and size of expected accruals. Among the CTEP-approved oncology trials, 37.9% (n = 221) failed to attain the minimum accrual goals, with 70.8% (n = 14) of phase III trials resulting in poor accrual. A total of 16,474 patients (42.5% of accruals) accrued to those studies were unable to achieve the projected minimum accrual goal. Trials requiring less than 12 months of development were significantly more likely to achieve accrual goals (OR, 2.15; 95% confidence interval, 1.29-3.57, P = 0.003) than trials with the median development times of 12 to 18 months. Trials requiring a development time of greater than 24 months were significantly less likely to achieve accrual goals (OR, 0.40; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-0.78; P = 0.011) than trials with the median development time. A large percentage of oncology clinical trials do not achieve minimum projected accruals. Trial development time appears to be one important predictor of the likelihood of successfully achieving the minimum accrual goals. ©2010 AACR.

  7. Moving forward in uveitis therapy: preclinical to phase II clinical trial drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Méndez, Raquel; Yilmaz, Taygan; Cordero-Coma, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Several advances have been made in the diagnostic approach and therapeutic management of patients with immune-mediated uveitis over the last few decades, which have to lead to an improvement in the visual prognosis of patients. However, the use of available therapies, including steroids and immunosuppressive drugs, is still associated with limited efficacy and potentially serious side effects. Consequently, efforts have been made to develop novel therapeutic alternatives including new molecules and innovative therapeutic approaches. Herein, the authors provide an updated review of those drugs in the initial phases of evaluation for the treatment of immune-mediated uveitides as well as the latest evidence from basic research. Enhanced understanding of the pathogenic mechanisms leading to immune-mediated uveitis has led to the identification of new therapeutic targets and thus to the development of more specific drugs. In addition, considering that the eye is a semi-enclosed chamber and that local therapy has the benefit of sparing the rest of the body from potentially toxic exposure, several attempts of establishing direct ophthalmologic avenues for delivery of the established and emerging drugs have also been made. All these advances have been an unquestionable step forward in the challenging management of uveitis patients.

  8. Intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy for malignant gliomas. First clinical results of Tsukuba phase I/II trial using JAERI mixed thermal-epithermal beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumura, A.; Yamamoto, T.; Shibata, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Since October 1999, a clinical trial of intraoperative boron neutron capture therapy (IOBNCT) is in progress at JRR-4 (Japan Research Reactor-4) in Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) using mixed thermal-epithermal beam (thermal neutron beam I: TNB-I). Compared to pure thermal beam (thermal neutron beam II: TNB-II), TNB-I has an improved neutron delivery into the deep region than TNB-II. The clinical protocol and the preliminary results will be discussed. (author)

  9. A randomized clinical trial of cognitive behavioural therapy versus short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy versus no intervention for patients with hypochondriasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per; Birket-Smith, M; Wattar, U

    2011-01-01

    Hypochondriasis is common in the clinic and in the community. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in previous trials. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a treatment routinely offered to patients with hypochondriasis in many countries, including Denmark. The aim of this ......Hypochondriasis is common in the clinic and in the community. Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) has been found to be effective in previous trials. Psychodynamic psychotherapy is a treatment routinely offered to patients with hypochondriasis in many countries, including Denmark. The aim...... of this study was to test CBT for hypochondriasis in a centre that was not involved in its development and compare both CBT and short-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (STPP) to a waiting-list control and to each other. CBT was modified by including mindfulness and group therapy sessions, reducing the therapist...

  10. Cell-Based Therapies Used to Treat Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease: A Systematic Review of Animal Studies and Human Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Oehme

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Low back pain and degenerative disc disease are a significant cause of pain and disability worldwide. Advances in regenerative medicine and cell-based therapies, particularly the transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells and intervertebral disc chondrocytes, have led to the publication of numerous studies and clinical trials utilising these biological therapies to treat degenerative spinal conditions, often reporting favourable outcomes. Stem cell mediated disc regeneration may bridge the gap between the two current alternatives for patients with low back pain, often inadequate pain management at one end and invasive surgery at the other. Through cartilage formation and disc regeneration or via modification of pain pathways stem cells are well suited to enhance spinal surgery practice. This paper will systematically review the current status of basic science studies, preclinical and clinical trials utilising cell-based therapies to repair the degenerate intervertebral disc. The mechanism of action of transplanted cells, as well as the limitations of published studies, will be discussed.

  11. Credentialing for participation in clinical trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Followill, David S.; Urie, Marcia; Galvin, James M.; Ulin, Kenneth; Xiao, Ying; FitzGerald, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence-based clinical trial processes for improvements in patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process to launch, conduct, and publish clinical trials more rapidly. Institutional participation in clinical trials can be made more efficient and include the expansion of relationships with international partners. This paper reviews the current processes that are in use in radiation therapy trials and the importance of maintaining effective credentialing strategies to assure the quality of the outcomes of clinical trials. The paper offers strategies to streamline and harmonize credentialing tools and processes moving forward as the NCI undergoes transformative change in the conduct of clinical trials.

  12. Credentialing for participation in clinical trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Followill, David S. [Radiological Physics Center, Department of Radiation Physics, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX (United States); Urie, Marcia [Quality Assurance Review Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Galvin, James M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Ulin, Kenneth [Quality Assurance Review Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States); Xiao, Ying [Department of Radiation Oncology, Jefferson Medical College, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Radiation Therapy Oncology Group, Philadelphia, PA (United States); FitzGerald, Thomas J., E-mail: dfollowi@mdanderson.org [Quality Assurance Review Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Lincoln, RI (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Massachusetts Medical School, Worcester, MA (United States)

    2012-12-26

    The National Cancer Institute (NCI) clinical cooperative groups have been instrumental over the past 50 years in developing clinical trials and evidence-based clinical trial processes for improvements in patient care. The cooperative groups are undergoing a transformation process to launch, conduct, and publish clinical trials more rapidly. Institutional participation in clinical trials can be made more efficient and include the expansion of relationships with international partners. This paper reviews the current processes that are in use in radiation therapy trials and the importance of maintaining effective credentialing strategies to assure the quality of the outcomes of clinical trials. The paper offers strategies to streamline and harmonize credentialing tools and processes moving forward as the NCI undergoes transformative change in the conduct of clinical trials.

  13. The effect of exercise therapy on knee osteoarthritis: a randomized clinical trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejati, Parisa; Farzinmehr, Azizeh; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Knee osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common musculoskeletal disease among old individuals which affects ability for sitting on the chair, standing, walking and climbing stairs. Our objective was to investigate the short and long-term effects of the most simple and the least expensive exercise protocols in combination to conventional conservative therapy for knee OA. Methods: It was a single blind RCT study with a 12-months follow-up. Totally, 56 patients with knee OA were assigned into 2 random groups. The patients in exercise group received exercise for knee muscles in combination with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) and 10 sessions acupuncture and physiotherapy modalities. Non-exercise group received similar treatments except exercise program. The changes in patients’ pain and functional status were evaluated by visual analog scale (VAS), knee and osteoarthritis outcome score (KOOS) questionnaire and functional tests (4 steps, 5 sit up, and 6 min walk test) before and after treatment (1 and 3 months after intervention), and 1 year later at the follow-up. Results: The results showed that the patients with knee OA in exercise group had significant improvement in pain, disability, walking, stair climbing, and sit up speed after treatment at first and second follow-up when compared with their initial status and when compared with non-exercise group. At third follow up (1 year later) there was significant difference between groups in VAS and in three items of KOOS questionnaire in functional status. Conclusion: Non aerobic exercises for muscles around knee can augment the effect of other therapeutic interventions like medical therapy, acupuncture, and modalities for knee OA. PMID:26034739

  14. Safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy and gamma knife surgery for brain arteriovenous malformations in China: Study protocol for an observational clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengwei Jin

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The treatment of BAVM remains controversial. Microinvasive treatment, including endovascular therapy and gamma knife surgery, has been the first choice in many conditions. However, the overall clinical outcome of microinvasive treatment remains unknown and a prospective trial is needed. Methods: This is a prospective, non-randomized, and multicenter observational registry clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of microinvasive treatment for BAVMs. The study will require up to 400 patients in approximately 12 or more centers in China, followed for 2 years. Main subjects of this study are BAVM patients underwent endovascular therapy and/or gamma knife surgery. The trial will not affect the choice of treatment modality. The primary outcomes are perioperative complications (safety, and postoperative hemorrhage incidence rate and complete occlusion rate (efficacy. Secondary outcomes are elimination of hemorrhage risk factors (coexisting aneurysms and arteriovenous fistula, volume reduction and remission of symptoms. Safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy, gamma knife surgery, and various combination modes of the two modalities will be compared. Operative complications and outcomes at pretreatment, post-treatment, at discharge and at 3 months, 6 months and 2 years follow-up intervals will be analyzed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS. Discussion: The most confusion on BAVM treatment is whether to choose interventional therapy or medical therapy, and the choice of interventional therapy modes. This study will provide evidence for evaluating the safety and efficacy of microinvasive treatment in China, to characterize the microinvasive treatment strategy for BAVMs. Keywords: Brain arteriovenous malformation, Clinical trial, Endovascular therapy, Gamma knife, Safety, Efficacy

  15. Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of cognitive therapy, rational emotive behavioral therapy, and fluoxetine (Prozac) in treating depression: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sava, Florin A; Yates, Brian T; Lupu, Viorel; Szentagotai, Aurora; David, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Cost-effectiveness and cost-utility of cognitive therapy (CT), rational emotive behavioral therapy (REBT), and fluoxetine (Prozac) for major depressive disorder (MDD) were compared in a randomized clinical trial with a Romanian sample of 170 clients. Each intervention was offered for 14 weeks, plus three booster sessions. Beck Depression Inventory (BDI) scores were obtained prior to intervention, 7 and 14 weeks following the start of intervention, and 6 months following completion of intervention. CT, REBT, and fluoxetine did not differ significantly in changes in the BDI, depression-free days (DFDs), or Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). Average BDI scores decreased from 31.1 before treatment to 9.7 six months following completion of treatment. Due to lower costs, both psychotherapies were more cost-effective, and had better cost-utility, than pharmacotherapy: median $26.44/DFD gained/month for CT and $23.77/DFD gained/month for REBT versus $34.93/DFD gained/month for pharmacotherapy, median $/QALYs=$1,638, $1,734, and $2,287 for CT, REBT, and fluoxetine (Prozac), respectively. (c) 2008 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for 4- to 7-Year-Old Children with Anxiety Disorders: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirshfeld-Becker, Dina R.; Masek, Bruce; Henin, Aude; Blakely, Lauren Raezer; Pollock-Wurman, Rachel A.; McQuade, Julia; DePetrillo, Lillian; Briesch, Jacquelyn; Ollendick, Thomas H.; Rosenbaum, Jerrold F.; Biederman, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To examine the efficacy of a developmentally appropriate parent-child cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) protocol for anxiety disorders in children ages 4-7 years. Method: Design: Randomized wait-list controlled trial. Conduct: Sixty-four children (53% female, mean age 5.4 years, 80% European American) with anxiety disorders were…

  17. Effects of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy in patients with major depressive disorder: a systematic review of randomized clinical trials with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobsen, J C; Hansen, J L; Simonsen, S; Simonsen, E; Gluud, C

    2012-07-01

    Major depressive disorder afflicts an estimated 17% of individuals during their lifetime at tremendous suffering and cost. Cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy are treatment options, but their effects have only been limitedly compared in systematic reviews. Using Cochrane systematic review methodology we compared the benefits and harm of cognitive therapy versus interpersonal psychotherapy for major depressive disorder. Trials were identified by searching the Cochrane Library's CENTRAL, Medline via PubMed, EMBASE, Psychlit, PsycInfo, and Science Citation Index Expanded until February 2010. Continuous outcome measures were assessed by mean difference and dichotomous outcomes by odds ratio. We conducted trial sequential analysis to control for random errors. We included seven trials randomizing 741 participants. All trials had high risk of bias. Meta-analysis of the four trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression showed no significant difference between the two interventions [mean difference -1.02, 95% confidence interval (CI) -2.35 to 0.32]. Meta-analysis of the five trials reporting data at cessation of treatment on the Beck Depression Inventory showed comparable results (mean difference -1.29, 95% CI -2.73 to 0.14). Trial sequential analysis indicated that more data are needed to definitively settle the question of a differential effect. None of the included trial reported on adverse events. Randomized trials with low risk of bias and low risk of random errors are needed, although the effects of cognitive therapy and interpersonal psychotherapy do not seem to differ significantly regarding depressive symptoms. Future trials should report on adverse events.

  18. Novel devices for individualized controlled inhalation can optimize aerosol therapy in efficacy, patient care and power of clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the treatment of pulmonary diseases the inhalation of aerosols plays a key role - it is the preferred route of drug delivery in asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and cystic fibrosis. But, in contrast to oral and intravenous administration drug delivery to the lungs is controlled by additional parameters. Beside its pharmacology the active agent is furthermore determined by its aerosol characteristics as particle diameter, particle density, hygroscopicity and electrical charge. The patient related factors like age and stage of pulmonary disease will be additionally affected by the individual breathing pattern and morphometry of the lower airways. A number of these parameters with essential impact on the pulmonary drug deposition can be influenced by the performance of the inhalation system. Therefore, the optimization of nebulisation technology was a major part of aerosol science in the last decade. At this time the control of inspiration volume and air flow as well as the administration of a defined aerosol bolus was in the main focus. Up to date a more efficient and a more targeted pulmonary drug deposition - e.g., in the alveoli - will be provided by novel devices which also allow shorter treatment times and a better reproducibility of the administered lung doses. By such means of precise dosing and drug targeting the efficacy of inhalation therapy can be upgraded, e.g., the continuous inhalation of budesonide in asthma. From a patients' perspective an optimized inhalation manoeuvre means less side effects, e.g., in cystic fibrosis therapy the reduced oropharyngeal tobramycin exposure causes fewer bronchial irritations. Respecting to shorter treatment times also, this result in an improved quality of life and compliance. For clinical trials the scaling down of dose variability in combination with enhanced pulmonary deposition reduces the number of patients to be included and the requirement of pharmaceutical

  19. Fast Neutron Radiotherapy for Locally Advanced Prostate Cancer: Final Report of a Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Randomized Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laramore, G. E.; Krall, J. M.; Thomas, F. J.; Russell, K. J.; Maor, M. H.; Hendrickson, F. R.; Martz, K. L.; Griffin, T. W.; Davis, L. W.

    1993-01-01

    Between June 1977 and April 1983 the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG) sponsored a Phase III randomized trial investigating the use of fast neutron radiotherapy for patients with locally advanced (Stages C and D1) adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland. Patients were randomized to receive either conventional photon radiation or fast neutron radiation used in a mixed-beam (neutron/photon) treatment schedule. A total of 91 analyzable patients were entered into the study, and the two patient groups were balanced with respect to the major prognostic variables. Actuarial curves are presented for local/regional control and "overall" survival. Ten-year results for clinically assessed local control are 70% for the mixed-beam group versus 58% for the photon group (p = 0.03) and for survival are 46% for the mixed-beam group versus 29% for the photon group (p = 0.04). This study suggests that a regional method of treatment can influence both local tumor control and survival in patients with locally advanced adenocarcinoma of the prostate gland.

  20. Hypoalgesic effects of three different manual therapy techniques on cervical spine and psychological interaction: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Perez, Jose Luis; Lopez-Lopez, Almudena; La Touche, Roy; Lerma-Lara, Sergio; Suarez, Emilio; Rojas, Javier; Bishop, Mark D; Villafañe, Jorge Hugo; Fernández-Carnero, Josué

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the extent to which psychological factors interact with a particular manual therapy (MT) technique to induce hypoalgesia in healthy subjects. Seventy-five healthy volunteers (36 female, 39 males), were recruited in this double-blind, controlled and parallel study. Subjects were randomly assigned to receive: High velocity low amplitude technique (HVLA), joint mobilization, or Cervical Lateral glide mobilization (CLGM). Pressure pain threshold (PPT) over C7 unilaterally, trapezius muscle and lateral epicondyle bilaterally, were measured prior to single technique MT was applied and immediately after to applied MT. Pain catastrophizing, depression, anxiety and kinesiophobia were evaluated before treatment. The results indicate that hypoalgesia was observed in all groups after treatment in the neck and elbow region (P < 0.05), but mobilization induces more hypoalgesic effects. Catastrophizing interacted with change over time in PPT, for changes in C7 and in manipulation group. All the MT techniques studied produced local and segmental hypoalgesic effects, supporting the results of previous studies studying the individual interventions. Interaction between catastrophizing and HVLA technique suggest that whether catastrophizing level is low or medium, the chance of success is high, but high levels of catastrophizing may result in poor outcome after HVLA intervention. ClinicalTrials.gov Registration Number: NCT02782585. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The Effect of Debriefing and Brief Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy on Postpartum Depression in Traumatic Childbirth: A Randomized Clinical Trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedigheh Abdollahpour

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & aim: Childbirth is a stressful event in women’s lives, and if a mother perceives it as an unpleasant event, it can influence her postpartum mental health. Depression is a common mental disorder, which can has serious consequences depending on its severity. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate the effect of debriefing and brief cognitive-behavioral therapy on postpartum depression in traumatic childbirth. Methods: This clinical trial was performed on 179 mothers who experienced a traumatic childbirth and were admitted in postnatal ward of Nohom Dey Hospital in Torbat-e Heydarieh, North East of Iran in 2016. The subjects were randomly allocated into three groups, including two intervention groups of debriefing and brief cognitive-behavioral counseling and a control group. The intervention groups received appropriate counseling for 40-60 minutes in the first 48 postpartum hours and the control group received the routine postpartum care. Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale was used to evaluate postpartum depression 4-6 weeks and also three months after the intervention. Post-traumatic stress symptoms in were compared in three groups using t-test, chi-square test, and repeated measures analysis of variance. Results: No significant differences were observed between the mean depression scores of the two intervention groups and that of the control group 4-6 weeks after childbirth. However, three months after delivery, the mean depression scores of the two intervention groups was lower than the control group (P

  2. Intensive Language Action Therapy in Chronic Aphasia: A Randomized Clinical Trial Examining Guidance by Constraint

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanek,, Edward J.; Stokes, Polly; Li, Minming; Andrianopoulos, Mary

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Intensive language action therapy (ILAT) can be effective in overcoming learned nonuse in chronic aphasia. It is suggested that all three guiding principles (constraint, communication embedding, massed practice) are essential to ILAT's success. We examined whether one of these, guidance by constraint, is critical. Method Twenty-four participants with aphasia (PWAs) were assigned to ILAT or a modified version of promoting aphasic communicative effectiveness (PACE) in a randomized block, single-blind, parallel-group treatment study. Blocking was by severity (mild/moderate, moderate to severe, severe). Both groups received intensive treatment in the context of therapeutic language action games. Whereas the ILAT group was guided toward spoken responses, the PACE group could choose any response modality. Results All participants, whether assigned to ILAT or PACE groups, improved on the primary outcome measure, picture naming. There was a Severity × Treatment interaction, with the largest effects estimated for PWAs with mild/moderate and moderate to severe aphasia. Regardless of severity, the ILAT group outperformed the PACE group on untrained pictures, suggesting some benefit of ILAT to generalization. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion Although the groups differed in subtle ways, including better generalization to untrained pictures for ILAT, the study was inconclusive on the influence of guidance by constraint. PMID:27997954

  3. Intensive Language Action Therapy in Chronic Aphasia: A Randomized Clinical Trial Examining Guidance by Constraint.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, Jacquie; Stanek, Edward J; Stokes, Polly; Li, Minming; Andrianopoulos, Mary

    2016-12-01

    Intensive language action therapy (ILAT) can be effective in overcoming learned nonuse in chronic aphasia. It is suggested that all three guiding principles (constraint, communication embedding, massed practice) are essential to ILAT's success. We examined whether one of these, guidance by constraint, is critical. Twenty-four participants with aphasia (PWAs) were assigned to ILAT or a modified version of promoting aphasic communicative effectiveness (PACE) in a randomized block, single-blind, parallel-group treatment study. Blocking was by severity (mild/moderate, moderate to severe, severe). Both groups received intensive treatment in the context of therapeutic language action games. Whereas the ILAT group was guided toward spoken responses, the PACE group could choose any response modality. All participants, whether assigned to ILAT or PACE groups, improved on the primary outcome measure, picture naming. There was a Severity × Treatment interaction, with the largest effects estimated for PWAs with mild/moderate and moderate to severe aphasia. Regardless of severity, the ILAT group outperformed the PACE group on untrained pictures, suggesting some benefit of ILAT to generalization. However, this difference was not statistically significant. Although the groups differed in subtle ways, including better generalization to untrained pictures for ILAT, the study was inconclusive on the influence of guidance by constraint.

  4. Brief narrative exposure therapy for posttraumatic stress in Iraqi refugees: a preliminary randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hijazi, Alaa M; Lumley, Mark A; Ziadni, Maisa S; Haddad, Luay; Rapport, Lisa J; Arnetz, Bengt B

    2014-06-01

    Many Iraqi refugees suffer from posttraumatic stress. Efficient, culturally sensitive interventions are needed, and so we adapted narrative exposure therapy into a brief version (brief NET) and tested its effects in a sample of traumatized Iraqi refugees. Iraqi refugees in the United States reporting elevated posttraumatic stress (N = 63) were randomized to brief NET or waitlist control conditions in a 2:1 ratio; brief NET was 3 sessions, conducted individually, in Arabic. Positive indicators (posttraumatic growth and well-being) and symptoms (posttraumatic stress, depressive, and somatic) were assessed at baseline and 2- and 4-month follow-up. Treatment participation (95.1% completion) and study retention (98.4% provided follow-up data) were very high. Significant condition by time interactions showed that those receiving brief NET had greater posttraumatic growth (d = 0.83) and well-being (d = 0.54) through 4 months than controls. Brief NET reduced symptoms of posttraumatic stress (d = -0.48) and depression (d = -0.46) more, but only at 2 months; symptoms of controls also decreased from 2 to 4 months, eliminating condition differences at 4 months. Three sessions of brief NET increased growth and well-being and led to symptom reduction in highly traumatized Iraqi refugees. This preliminary study suggests that brief NET is both acceptable and potentially efficacious in traumatized Iraqi refugees. Copyright © 2014 International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies.

  5. Nominal effective radiation doses delivered during clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Capala, J.; Diaz, A.Z.; Chanana, A.D.

    1997-01-01

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a binary system that, in theory, should selectively deliver lethal, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation to tumor cells dispersed within normal tissues. It is based on the nuclear reaction 10-B(n, α)7-Li, which occurs when the stable nucleus of boron-10 captures a thermal neutron. Due to the relatively high cross-section of the 10-B nucleus for thermal neutron capture and short ranges of the products of this reaction, tumor cells in the volume exposed to thermal neutrons and containing sufficiently high concentration of 10-B would receive a much higher radiation dose than the normal cells contained within the exposed volume. Nevertheless, radiation dose deposited in normal tissue by gamma and fast neutron contamination of the neutron beam, as well as neutron capture in nitrogen, 14-N(n,p)14-C, hydrogen, 1-H(n,γ)2-H, and in boron present in blood and normal cells, limits the dose that can be delivered to tumor cells. It is, therefore, imperative for the success of the BNCT the dosed delivered to normal tissues be accurately determined in order to optimize the irradiation geometry and to limit the volume of normal tissue exposed to thermal neutrons. These are the major objectives of BNCT treatment planning

  6. Randomized Clinical Trial of Family-Based Treatment and Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy for Adolescent Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Grange, Daniel; Lock, James; Agras, W Stewart; Bryson, Susan W; Jo, Booil

    2015-11-01

    There is a paucity of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) for adolescents with bulimia nervosa (BN). Prior studies suggest cognitive-behavioral therapy adapted for adolescents (CBT-A) and family-based treatment for adolescent bulimia nervosa (FBT-BN) could be effective for this patient population. The objective of this study was to compare the relative efficacy of these 2 specific therapies, FBT-BN and CBT-A. In addition, a smaller participant group was randomized to a nonspecific treatment (supportive psychotherapy [SPT]), whose data were to be used if there were no differences between FBT-BN and CBT-A at end of treatment. This 2-site (Chicago and Stanford) randomized controlled trial included 130 participants (aged 12-18 years) meeting DSM-IV criteria for BN or partial BN (binge eating and purging once or more per week for 6 months). Outcomes were assessed at baseline, end of treatment, and 6 and 12 months posttreatment. Treatments involved 18 outpatient sessions over 6 months. The primary outcome was defined as abstinence from binge eating and purging for 4 weeks before assessment, using the Eating Disorder Examination. Participants in FBT-BN achieved higher abstinence rates than in CBT-A at end of treatment (39% versus 20%; p = .040, number needed to treat [NNT] = 5) and at 6-month follow-up (44% versus 25%; p = .030, NNT = 5). Abstinence rates between these 2 groups did not differ statistically at 12-month follow-up (49% versus 32%; p = .130, NNT = 6). In this study, FBT-BN was more effective in promoting abstinence from binge eating and purging than CBT-A in adolescent BN at end of treatment and 6-month follow-up. By 12-month follow-up, there were no statistically significant differences between the 2 treatments. Study of Treatment for Adolescents With Bulimia Nervosa; http://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT00879151. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newton, Robert U; Taaffe, Dennis R; Spry, Nigel; Gardiner, Robert A; Levin, Gregory; Wall, Bradley; Joseph, David; Chambers, Suzanne K; Galvão, Daniel A

    2009-01-01

    targeting bone density, cardiovascular function, lean and fat mass, physical function and falls risk as primary study endpoints. In terms of advancement of prostate cancer care, we expect dissemination of the knowledge gained from this project to reduce fracture risk, improve physical and functional ability, quality of life and ultimately survival rate in this population. A Phase III clinical trial of exercise modalities on treatment side-effects in men receiving therapy for prostate cancer; ACTRN12609000200280

  8. Intracerebral gene therapy in children with mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB syndrome: an uncontrolled phase 1/2 clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardieu, Marc; Zérah, Michel; Gougeon, Marie-Lise; Ausseil, Jérome; de Bournonville, Stéphanie; Husson, Béatrice; Zafeiriou, Dimitrios; Parenti, Giancarlo; Bourget, Philippe; Poirier, Béatrice; Furlan, Valérie; Artaud, Cécile; Baugnon, Thomas; Roujeau, Thomas; Crystal, Ronald G; Meyer, Christian; Deiva, Kumaran; Heard, Jean-Michel

    2017-09-01

    Mucopolysaccharidosis type IIIB syndrome (also known as Sanfilippo type B syndrome) is a lysosomal storage disease resulting in progressive deterioration of cognitive acquisition after age 2-4 years. No treatment is available for the neurological manifestations of the disease. We sought to assess the safety and efficacy of a novel intracerebral gene therapy. Local regulatory authorities in France allowed inclusion of up to four children in this phase 1/2 study. Treatment was 16 intraparenchymal deposits (four in the cerebellum) of a recombinant adenoassociated viral vector serotype 2/5 (rAAV2/5) encoding human α-N-acetylglucosaminidase (NAGLU) plus immunosuppressive therapy. We assessed tolerance, neurocognitive progression, brain growth, NAGLU enzymatic activity in CSF, and specific anti-NAGLU immune response for 30 months after surgery. This trial is registered with EudraCT, number 2012-000856-33, and the International Standard Clinical Trial Registry, number ISRCTN19853672. Of seven eligible children, the four youngest, from France (n=2), Italy (n=1), and Greece (n=1), aged 20, 26, 30, and 53 months, were included between February, 2012, and February, 2014. 125 adverse events were recorded, of which 117 were treatment emergent and included six classified as severe, but no suspected unexpected serious adverse drug reactions were seen. Vector genomes were detected in blood for 2 days after surgery. Compared with the natural history of mucopolysaccharidosis type III syndromes, neurocognitive progression was improved in all patients, with the youngest patient having function close to that in healthy children. Decrease in developmental quotient was -11·0 points in patient one, -23·0 in patient two, -29·0 in patient three, and -17·0 in patient four, compared with -37·7 in the natural history of the disease. NAGLU activity was detected in lumbar CSF and was 15-20% of that in unaffected children. Circulating T lymphocytes that proliferated and produced tumour

  9. Photodynamic therapy in non-surgical treatment of chronic periodontitis: short term randomized clinical trial study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, C.; Palaia, G.; Loskutova, E.; Libotte, F.; Kornblit, R.; Gaimari, G.; Tenore, G.; Romeo, U.

    2016-03-01

    Introduction: Periodontitis is a chronic inflammatory disease due to exposition to plaque and tartar. Conventional treatments consist of scaling and root planing (SRP) and antibiotics administration. Among them encouraging results have been obtained using alternative protocols, like the antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (PDT). Aim of the Study: Evaluation of PDT effects added to conventional methods. Materials and Methods: 11 patients (4M/7F, 37-67 years aged, non-smoking) affected by untreated chronic periodontal disease, with >3mm pockets in at least 4 teeth were divided in two groups, test and control group. Each patient had to made full-intraoral before and after the treatment. The test group received SRP+PDT, while the control group was subjected to SRP. The PDT was performed through the HELBO®TheraLite (Bredent Medical), diode laser battery powered 670nm with an output of 75mW/cm2. The Helbo Blue photosensitizer, containing methylene blue, was used. The exposure time to the laser effect was of 10'' for each site, for a total of 60'' at 3J/cm2. Results: Both groups had a significant improvement in the reduction of pocket depth (PD), above all in the test group. Statistical analysis was performed through the T-test, evaluating PD between the two groups p=0.96 (p> 0.05), resulting not statistically significant. Conclusion: PDT is a promising support to SRP, achieving a significant reduction in the pocket depth, but more cases are needed to confirm the validity of the used protocol.

  10. Clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of physiotherapy and occupational therapy versus no therapy in mild to moderate Parkinson's disease: a large pragmatic randomised controlled trial (PD REHAB).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Carl E; Patel, Smitaa; Ives, Natalie; Rick, Caroline E; Woolley, Rebecca; Wheatley, Keith; Walker, Marion F; Zhu, Shihua; Kandiyali, Rebecca; Yao, Guiqing; Sackley, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Cochrane reviews of physiotherapy (PT) and occupational therapy (OT) for Parkinson's disease found insufficient evidence of effectiveness, but previous trials were methodologically flawed with small sample size and short-term follow-up. To evaluate the clinical effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of individualised PT and OT in Parkinson's disease. Large pragmatic randomised controlled trial. Thirty-eight neurology and geriatric medicine outpatient clinics in the UK. Seven hundred and sixty-two patients with mild to moderate Parkinson's disease reporting limitations in activities of daily living (ADL). Patients were randomised online to either both PT and OT NHS services (n = 381) or no therapy (n = 381). Therapy incorporated a patient-centred approach with individual assessment and goal setting. The primary outcome was instrumental ADL measured by the patient-completed Nottingham Extended Activities of Daily Living (NEADL) scale at 3 months after randomisation. Secondary outcomes were health-related quality of life [Parkinson's Disease Questionnaire-39 (PDQ-39); European Quality of Life-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D)], adverse events, resource use and carer quality of life (Short Form questionnaire-12 items). Outcomes were assessed before randomisation and at 3, 9 and 15 months after randomisation. Data from 92% of the participants in each group were available at the primary time point of 3 months, but there was no difference in NEADL total score [difference 0.5 points, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.7 to 1.7; p = 0.4] or PDQ-39 summary index (0.007 points, 95% CI -1.5 to 1.5; p = 1.0) between groups. The EQ-5D quotient was of borderline significance in favour of therapy (-0.03, 95% CI -0.07 to -0.002; p = 0.04). Contact time with therapists was for a median of four visits of 58 minutes each over 8 weeks (mean dose 232 minutes). Repeated measures analysis including all time points showed no difference in NEADL total score, but PDQ-39 summary index

  11. Overcoming Age Limits in Cancer Clinical Trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adolescents, young adults, and the elderly lag far behind other age groups when it comes to enrolling in clinical trials. Their participation is critical to advancing effective therapies for these age groups.

  12. Anti-IgE: lessons from clinical trials in patients with severe allergic asthma symptomatic despite optimised therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Buhl

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of omalizumab has been extensively investigated in clinical trials in patients with severe persistent allergic (pre-treatment total immunoglobulin E 30–700 IU·mL–1 asthma including the Investigation of Omalizumab in Severe Asthma Treatment (INNOVATE study, which enrolled patients with inadequately controlled severe persistent allergic asthma despite receiving high-dose inhaled corticosteroid in combination with a long-acting beta2-agonist, and also additional controller medication if required. In the INNOVATE study, add-on omalizumab significantly reduced clinically significant exacerbation rates by 26% (0.68 versus 0.91, severe exacerbation rates by 50% (0.24 versus 0.48 and emergency visit rates by 44% (0.24 versus 0.43 and significantly improved asthma-related quality of life (QoL compared with placebo. In a pooled analysis of data from seven studies, add-on omalizumab significantly reduced asthma exacerbation rates by 38% (0.91 versus 1.47 and total emergency visits by 47% (0.332 versus 0.623. In addition, omalizumab significantly improved QoL versus current asthma therapy in a pooled analysis of data from six studies. Omalizumab has demonstrated a good safety and tolerability profile in completed phase-I, -II and -III studies involving >7,500 patients with asthma, rhinitis or related conditions. Omalizumab represents a major advance for the treatment of severe persistent allergic asthma that is inadequately controlled despite treatment with inhaled corticosteroids and a long-acting beta2-agonist.

  13. The effect of periodontal therapy on cardiovascular risk markers: a 6-month randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caúla, André Luis; Lira-Junior, Ronaldo; Tinoco, Eduardo Muniz Barretto; Fischer, Ricardo Guimarães

    2014-09-01

    To determine the influence of non-surgical mechanical periodontal treatment on inflammatory markers related to risk for cardiovascular disease. A total of 64 patients with severe chronic periodontitis was randomly subjected to immediately periodontal treatment (test group, n = 32) or delayed periodontal treatment, without treatment during the study period (control group, n = 32). Clinical periodontal and laboratory examinations were performed at baseline (T0), 2 months (T2), and 6 months (T6) after the initial examinations (Control group) or completion of periodontal treatment (Test group). After 2 months of periodontal treatment there was a significant reduction of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and triglycerides (p = 0.002, p = 0.004, respectively) in the test group. Median values of C-reactive protein, ESR, total cholesterol, and triglycerides were reduced after 6 month of periodontal treatment in the test group (p periodontal treatment was effective in reducing the levels of systemic inflammation markers and improved the lipid profile in subjects with severe chronic periodontitis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Conducting clinical trials in Singapore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, K T

    1999-04-01

    All clinical trials in Singapore will now have to conform to the Medicines (Clinical Trials) Amended Regulations 1998 and the Singapore Good Clinical Practice (GCP) Guidelines 1998. The Medical Clinical Research Committee (MCRC) has been established to oversee the conduct of clinical drug trials in Singapore and together with the legislations in place, these will ensure that clinical trials conducted in Singapore are properly controlled and the well-being of trial subjects are safe guarded. All clinical drug trials require a Clinical Trial Certificate from the MCRC before the trial can proceed. The hospital ethics committee (EC) vets the application for a trial certificate before it is sent to MCRC. The drug company sponsoring the trial has to indemnify the trial investigators and the hospital for negligence arising from the trial. The MCRC, apart from ensuring the safety of trial subjects, has to provide continuing review of the clinical trial and monitors adverse events in the course of the trial. The EC will conduct continuing review of clinical trials. When a non-drug clinical trial is carried out, the EC will ensure that the proposed protocol addresses ethical concerns and meets regulatory requirements for such trials. There is great potential for pharmaceutical Research & Development (R&D) in Singapore. We must develop our skills and infrastructure in clinical trials to enable Singapore to be a regional hub for R&D of drugs in Asia.

  15. Effect of Topical Intranasal Therapy on Epistaxis Frequency in Patients With Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Kevin J; Sautter, Nathan B; McWilliams, Justin P; Chakinala, Murali M; Merlo, Christian A; Johnson, Maribeth H; James, Melissa; Everett, Eric M; Clancy, Marianne S; Faughnan, Marie E; Oh, S Paul; Olitsky, Scott E; Pyeritz, Reed E; Gossage, James R

    2016-09-06

    Epistaxis is a major factor negatively affecting quality of life in patients with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT; also known as Osler-Weber-Rendu disease). Optimal treatment for HHT-related epistaxis is uncertain. To determine whether topical therapy with any of 3 drugs with differing mechanisms of action is effective in reducing HHT-related epistaxis. The North American Study of Epistaxis in HHT was a double-blind, placebo-controlled randomized clinical trial performed at 6 HHT centers of excellence. From August 2011 through March 2014, there were 121 adult patients who met the clinical criteria for HHT and had experienced HHT-related epistaxis with an Epistaxis Severity Score of at least 3.0. Follow-up was completed in September 2014. Patients received twice-daily nose sprays for 12 weeks with either bevacizumab 1% (4 mg/d), estriol 0.1% (0.4 mg/d), tranexamic acid 10% (40 mg/d), or placebo (0.9% saline). The primary outcome was median weekly epistaxis frequency during weeks 5 through 12. Secondary outcomes included median duration of epistaxis during weeks 5 through 12, Epistaxis Severity Score, level of hemoglobin, level of ferritin, need for transfusion, emergency department visits, and treatment failure. Among the 121 patients who were randomized (mean age, 52.8 years [SD, 12.9 years]; 44% women with a median of 7.0 weekly episodes of epistaxis [interquartile range {IQR}, 3.0-14.0]), 106 patients completed the study duration for the primary outcome measure (43 were women [41%]). Drug therapy did not significantly reduce epistaxis frequency (P = .97). After 12 weeks of treatment, the median weekly number of bleeding episodes was 7.0 (IQR, 4.5-10.5) for patients in the bevacizumab group, 8.0 (IQR, 4.0-12.0) for the estriol group, 7.5 (IQR, 3.0-11.0) for the tranexamic acid group, and 8.0 (IQR, 3.0-14.0) for the placebo group. No drug treatment was significantly different from placebo for epistaxis duration. All groups had a significant

  16. Dialectical behavior therapy for high suicide risk in individuals with borderline personality disorder: a randomized clinical trial and component analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, Marsha M; Korslund, Kathryn E; Harned, Melanie S; Gallop, Robert J; Lungu, Anita; Neacsiu, Andrada D; McDavid, Joshua; Comtois, Katherine Anne; Murray-Gregory, Angela M

    2015-05-01

    Dialectical behavior therapy (DBT) is an empirically supported treatment for suicidal individuals. However, DBT consists of multiple components, including individual therapy, skills training, telephone coaching, and a therapist consultation team, and little is known about which components are needed to achieve positive outcomes. To evaluate the importance of the skills training component of DBT by comparing skills training plus case management (DBT-S), DBT individual therapy plus activities group (DBT-I), and standard DBT which includes skills training and individual therapy. We performed a single-blind randomized clinical trial from April 24, 2004, through January 26, 2010, involving 1 year of treatment and 1 year of follow-up. Participants included 99 women (mean age, 30.3 years; 69 [71%] white) with borderline personality disorder who had at least 2 suicide attempts and/or nonsuicidal self-injury (NSSI) acts in the last 5 years, an NSSI act or suicide attempt in the 8 weeks before screening, and a suicide attempt in the past year. We used an adaptive randomization procedure to assign participants to each condition. Treatment was delivered from June 3, 2004, through September 29, 2008, in a university-affiliated clinic and community settings by therapists or case managers. Outcomes were evaluated quarterly by blinded assessors. We hypothesized that standard DBT would outperform DBT-S and DBT-I. The study compared standard DBT, DBT-S, and DBT-I. Treatment dose was controlled across conditions, and all treatment providers used the DBT suicide risk assessment and management protocol. Frequency and severity of suicide attempts and NSSI episodes. All treatment conditions resulted in similar improvements in the frequency and severity of suicide attempts, suicide ideation, use of crisis services due to suicidality, and reasons for living. Compared with the DBT-I group, interventions that included skills training resulted in greater improvements in the frequency of NSSI

  17. A randomized trial of family focused therapy with populations at clinical high risk for psychosis: effects on interactional behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Mary P; Miklowitz, David J; Candan, Kristin A; Marshall, Catherine; Domingues, Isabel; Walsh, Barbara C; Zinberg, Jamie L; De Silva, Sandra D; Woodberry, Kristen A; Cannon, Tyrone D

    2014-02-01

    This study investigated whether family focused therapy (FFT-CHR), an 18-session intervention that consisted of psychoeducation and training in communication and problem solving, brought about greater improvements in family communication than enhanced care (EC), a 3-session psychoeducational intervention, among individuals at clinical high risk for developing psychosis. This study was conducted within a randomized controlled trial across 8 sites. We examined 10-min problem-solving discussions at baseline and 6-month reassessment among 66 adolescents and young adults and their parents. Trained coders who were blind to treatment and time of assessment achieved high levels of interrater reliability when evaluating family discussions on categories of calm-constructive and critical-conflictual behavior. Individuals at high risk and their family members who participated in FFT-CHR demonstrated greater improvement from baseline to 6-month reassessment in constructive communication and decreases in conflictual behaviors during family interactions than those in EC. Participants in FFT-CHR showed greater increases from baseline to 6 months in active listening and calm communication and greater decreases in irritability and anger, complaints and criticism, and off-task comments compared to participants in EC. These changes occurred equally in high-risk participants and their family members. A 6-month family skills training treatment can bring about significant improvement in family communication among individuals at high risk for psychosis and their parents. Future studies should examine the association between enhancements in family communication and reduced risk for the onset of psychosis among individuals at high risk. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2014 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. Internet and In-Person Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for Insomnia in Military Personnel: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Daniel J; Peterson, Alan L; Pruiksma, Kristi E; Young-McCaughan, Stacey; Nicholson, Karin; Mintz, Jim

    2017-06-01

    Compare in-person and unguided Internet-delivered cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia (CBTi) with a minimal contact control condition in military personnel. A three-arm parallel randomized clinical trial of 100 active duty US Army personnel at Fort Hood, Texas. Internet and in-person CBTi were comparable, except for the delivery format. The control condition consisted of phone call assessments. Internet and in-person CBTi performed significantly better than the control condition on diary-assessed sleep efficiency (d = 0.89 and 0.53, respectively), sleep onset latency (d = -0.68 and -0.53), number of awakenings (d = -0.42 and -0.54), wake time after sleep onset (d = -0.88 and -0.50), the Insomnia Severity Index (d = -0.98 and -0.51), and the Dysfunctional Beliefs and Attitudes About Sleep Scale (d = -1.12 and -0.54). In-person treatment was better than Internet treatment on self-reported sleep quality (d = 0.80) and dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep (d = -0.58). There were no differences on self-reported daytime sleepiness or actigraphy-assessed sleep parameters (except total sleep time; d = -0.55 to -0.60). There were technical difficulties with the Internet treatment which prevented tailored sleep restriction upward titration for some participants. Despite the unique, sleep-disrupting occupational demands of military personnel, in-person and Internet CBTi are efficacious treatments for this population. The effect sizes for in-person were consistently better than Internet and both were similar to those found in civilians. Dissemination of CBTi should be considered for maximum individual and population benefits, possibly in a stepped-care model. © Sleep Research Society 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. A randomized clinical trial comparing an acceptance-based behavior therapy to applied relaxation for generalized anxiety disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes-Skelton, Sarah A; Roemer, Lizabeth; Orsillo, Susan M

    2013-10-01

    To examine whether an empirically and theoretically derived treatment combining mindfulness- and acceptance-based strategies with behavioral approaches would improve outcomes in generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) over an empirically supported treatment. This trial randomized 81 individuals (65.4% female, 80.2% identified as White, average age 32.92) diagnosed with GAD to receive 16 sessions of either an acceptance-based behavior therapy (ABBT) or applied relaxation (AR). Assessments at pretreatment, posttreatment, and 6-month follow-up included the following primary outcome measures: GAD clinician severity rating, Structured Interview Guide for the Hamilton Anxiety Rating Scale, Penn State Worry Questionnaire, Depression Anxiety Stress Scale, and the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Secondary outcomes included the Beck Depression Inventory-II, Quality of Life Inventory, and number of comorbid diagnoses. Mixed effect regression models showed significant, large effects for time for all primary outcome measures (ds = 1.27 to 1.61) but nonsignificant, small effects for condition and Condition × Time (ds = 0.002 to 0.20), indicating that clients in the 2 treatments improved comparably over treatment. For secondary outcomes, time was significant (ds = 0.74 to 1.38), but condition and Condition × Time effects were not (ds = 0.004 to 0.31). No significant differences emerged over follow-up (ds = 0.03 to 0.39), indicating maintenance of gains. Between 63.3 and 80.0% of clients in ABBT and 60.6 and 78.8% of clients in AR experienced clinically significant change across 5 calculations of change at posttreatment and follow-up. ABBT is a viable alternative for treating GAD. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved).

  20. Age at menopause, reproductive history, and venous thromboembolism risk among postmenopausal women: the Women's Health Initiative Hormone Therapy clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canonico, Marianne; Plu-Bureau, Geneviève; O'Sullivan, Mary Jo; Stefanick, Marcia L; Cochrane, Barbara; Scarabin, Pierre-Yves; Manson, Joann E

    2014-03-01

    This study aims to investigate venous thromboembolism (VTE) risk in relation to age at menopause, age at menarche, parity, bilateral oophorectomy, and time since menopause, as well as any interaction with randomized hormone therapy (HT) assignment, among postmenopausal women. Using pooled data from the Women's Health Initiative HT clinical trials including 27,035 postmenopausal women aged 50 to 79 years who had no history of VTE, we assessed the risk of VTE in relation to age at menopause, age at menarche, parity, bilateral oophorectomy, and time since menopause by Cox proportional hazards models. Linear trends, quadratic relationships, and interactions of reproductive life characteristics with HT on VTE risk were systematically tested. During follow-up, 426 women reported a first VTE, including 294 non-procedure-related events. No apparent interaction of reproductive life characteristics with HT assignment on VTE risk was detected, and there was not a significant association between VTE and age at menarche, age at menopause, parity, oophorectomy, or time since menopause. However, analyses restricted to non-procedure-related VTE showed a U-shaped relationship between age at menopause and thrombotic risk that persisted after multivariable analysis (P menopause, those who had early menopause (age menopause (age >55 y) had a significantly increased VTE risk (hazard ratio [95% CI]: 1.8 [1.2-2.7] and 1.5 [1.0-2.4], respectively). Reproductive life characteristics have little association with VTE and do not seem to influence the effect of HT on thrombotic risk among postmenopausal women. Nevertheless, early and late onset of menopause might be newly identified risk factors for non-procedure-related VTE.

  1. Cognitive mechanisms of sleep outcomes in a randomized clinical trial of internet-based cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Philip I; Ingersoll, Karen S; Thorndike, Frances P; Lord, Holly R; Gonder-Frederick, Linda; Morin, Charles M; Ritterband, Lee M

    2018-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate in a randomized clinical trial the role of sleep-related cognitive variables in the long-term efficacy of an online, fully automated cognitive behavioral therapy intervention for insomnia (CBT-I) (Sleep Healthy Using the Internet [SHUTi]). Three hundred and three participants (M age  = 43.3 years; SD = 11.6) were randomly assigned to SHUTi or an online patient education condition and assessed at baseline, postintervention (nine weeks after baseline), and six and 12 months after the intervention period. Cognitive variables were self-reported internal and chance sleep locus of control, dysfunctional beliefs and attitudes about sleep (DBAS), sleep specific self-efficacy, and insomnia knowledge. Primary outcomes were self-reported online ratings of insomnia severity (Insomnia Severity Index), and sleep onset latency and wake after sleep onset from online sleep diaries, collected 12 months after the intervention period. Those who received SHUTi had, at postassessment, higher levels of insomnia knowledge (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.10-0.16) and internal sleep locus of control (95% CI = 0.04-0.55) as well as lower DBAS (95% CI = 1.52-2.39) and sleep locus of control attributed to chance (95% CI = 0.15-0.71). Insomnia knowledge, chance sleep locus of control, and DBAS mediated the relationship between condition and at least one 12-month postassessment sleep outcome. Within the SHUTi condition, changes in each cognitive variable (with the exception of internal sleep locus of control) predicted improvement in at least one sleep outcome one year later. Online CBT-I may reduce the enormous public health burden of insomnia by changing underlying cognitive variables that lead to long-term changes in sleep outcomes. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  2. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Susan; John-Stewart, Grace; Egessa, John J; Mubezi, Sezi; Kusemererwa, Sylvia; Bii, Dennis K; Bulya, Nulu; Mugume, Francis; Campbell, James D; Wangisi, Jonathan; Bukusi, Elizabeth A; Celum, Connie; Baeten, Jared M

    2015-01-01

    During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART), despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  3. Rapid Antiretroviral Therapy Initiation for Women in an HIV-1 Prevention Clinical Trial Experiencing Primary HIV-1 Infection during Pregnancy or Breastfeeding.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Morrison

    Full Text Available During an HIV-1 prevention clinical trial in East Africa, we observed 16 cases of primary HIV-1 infection in women coincident with pregnancy or breastfeeding. Nine of eleven pregnant women initiated rapid combination antiretroviral therapy (ART, despite having CD4 counts exceeding national criteria for ART initiation; breastfeeding women initiated ART or replacement feeding. Rapid ART initiation during primary HIV-1 infection during pregnancy and breastfeeding is feasible in this setting.

  4. THE EFFICACY AND SAFETY OF CARMOLIS GEL IN THE COMBINATION THERAPY OF KNEE OSTEOARTHRITIS: RESULTS OF A MULTICENTER CLINICAL TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Denisov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most common rheumatic diseases. Knee OA is particularly frequently encountered among all forms of OA, the prevalence of knee OA being about 25% in the general population. Despite multiple guidelines for the management of knee OA, which have been prepared by the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR, the American College of Rheumatology (ACR, and the Osteoarthritis Research Society International (OARSI, many problems of its treatment policy remain to be solved. The same holds true for not only the symptomatic and disease-modifying effects of chondroprotectors, but also topical therapy options.Objective: to evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety of Carmolis gel in patients with knee OA.Subjects and methods.The trial included 280 patients with knee OA (a study group consisted of 190 patents; a control group comprised 90 patients. The mean age was 58.3±9.3 years in the study group and 59±10.5 years in the control group. The disease duration was 10.3±5.5 and 10.1±4.1 years, respectively. Carmolis gel was applied to the region of the most painful knee joint up to 4–5 times daily, followed by massage of this skin area. The treatment cycle lasted for 2 weeks. No therapy was performed in the control patients. The clinical efficacy was determined by the changes in joint pains at rest or on movement and palpation, according to a visual analogue scale (VAS, WOMAC questionnaire, the synovitis intensity (assessed by ultrasonography, patient and physician global assessments of disease activity (Likert scale, and the possibility of reducing the daily dosage of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs. The onset the therapeutic effect of the gel and the duration of its action were recorded.Results and discussion. The topical application of Carmolis gel caused a statistically significant reduction in joint pain at rest and on movement from 57.7±6.8 to 12±1.8 mm (р < 0.01 and from 52±5.3 to 17±2.7 mm

  5. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kraus, V B; Blanco, F J; Englund, M

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this work was to describe requirements for inclusion of soluble biomarkers in osteoarthritis (OA) clinical trials and progress toward OA-related biomarker qualification. The Guidelines for Biomarkers Working Group, representing experts in the field of OA biomarker research from...

  6. OARSI Clinical Trials Recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McAlindon, T. E.; Driban, J. B.; Henrotin, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this document is to update the original OARSI recommendations specifically for the design, conduct, and reporting of clinical trials that target symptom or structure modification among individuals with knee osteoarthritis (OA). To develop recommendations for the design, conduct...

  7. Music therapy as an adjunct to standard treatment for obsessive compulsive disorder and co-morbid anxiety and depression: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiranibidabadi, Shahrzad; Mehryar, Amirhooshang

    2015-09-15

    Previous studies have highlighted the potential therapeutic benefits of music therapy as an adjunct to standard care, in a variety of psychiatric ailments including mood and anxiety disorders. However, the role of music in the treatment of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) have not been investigated to date. In a single-center, parallel-group, randomized clinical trial (NCT02314195) 30 patients with OCD were randomly assigned to standard treatment (pharmacotherapy and cognitive-behavior therapy) plus 12 sessions of individual music therapy (n = 15) or standard treatment only (n = 15) for one month. Maudsley Obsessive-Compulsive Inventory, Beck Anxiety Inventory, and Beck Depression Inventory-Short Form were administered baseline and after one month. Thirty patients completed the study. Music therapy resulted in a greater decrease in total obsessive score (post-intervention score: music therapy+standard treatment: 12.4 ± 1.9 vs standard treatment only: 15.1 ± 1.7, p Music therapy was significantly more effective in reducing anxiety (post-intervention score: music therapy + standard treatment: 16.9 ± 7.4 vs standard treatment only: 22.9 ± 4.6, p music therapy + standard treatment: 10.8 ± 3.8 vs standard treatment: 17.1 ± 3.7, p music therapy, as an adjunct to standard care, seems to be effective in reducing obsessions, as well as co-morbid anxiety and depressive symptoms. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Ethics of clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palter, S F

    1996-05-01

    The modern clinical trial is a form of human experimentation. There is a long history of disregard for individual rights of the patient in this context, and special attention must be paid to ethical guidelines for these studies. Clinical trials differ in basic ways from clinical practice. Foremost is the introduction of outside interests, beyond those of the patient's health, into the doctor-patient therapeutic alliance. Steps must be taken to protect the interests of the patient when such outside influence exists. Kantian moral theory and the Hippocratic oath dictate that the physician must respect the individual patient's rights and hold such interests paramount. These principles are the basis for informed consent. Randomization of patients is justified when a condition of equipoise exists. The changing nature of health care delivery in the United States introduces new outside interests into the doctor-patient relationship.

  9. Efficiency of photodynamic therapy in the treatment of peri-implantitis: A three-month randomized controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakašević Dragana

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Peri-implantitis is an inflammatory lesion of peri-implant tissues. Eradication of the causative bacteria and decontamination of the implant surface is essential in achieving predictable and stabile clinical results. Photodynamic therapy (PDT is non-invasive adjuvant therapeutic method to surgery in the treatment of bacterial infection. Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate early clinical and microbiological outcomes of periimplantitis after surgical therapy with adjuvant PDT. Methods. Fifty-two diagnosed peri-implantitis sites were divided into two groups. PDT was used for decontamination of implant surface in the study group; in the control group, chlorhexidine gel (CHX followed by saline irrigation was applied. Several clinical parameters were recorded before the treatment (baseline values and three months after surgical treatment. Samples for microbiological identification were collected before therapy, during the surgical therapy (before and after decontamination of implant surface, and three months thereafter, and analyzed with identification systems using biochemical analysis. Results. The use of PDT resulted in significant decrease of bleeding on probing in comparison to CHX (p < 0.001. It showed significant decontamination of implant surfaces with complete elimination of anaerobic bacteria immediately after surgical procedure and three months later. Conclusion. The results indicate that PDT can be used as an adjuvant therapy to surgery for decontamination of implant surface and surrounding peri-implant tissues within the treatment of peri-implantitis. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 41008

  10. Ultrasound-Guided Application of Percutaneous Electrolysis as an Adjunct to Exercise and Manual Therapy for Subacromial Pain Syndrome: a Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de-Miguel-Valtierra, Lorena; Salom-Moreno, Jaime; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, César; Cleland, Joshua A; Arias-Buría, José L

    2018-05-16

    This randomized clinical trial compared the effects of adding US-guided percutaneous electrolysis into a program consisting of manual therapy and exercise on pain, related-disability, function and pressure sensitivity in subacromial pain syndrome. Fifty patients with subacromial pain syndrome were randomized into manual therapy and exercise or percutaneous electrolysis group. All patients received the same manual therapy and exercise program, one session per week for 5 consecutive weeks. Patients assigned to the electrolysis group also received the application of percutaneous electrolysis at each session. The primary outcome was Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH). Secondary outcomes included pain, function (Shoulder Pain and Disability Index-SPADI) pressure pain thresholds (PPTs) and Global Rating of Change (GROC). They were assessed at baseline, post-treatment, and 3, and 6 months after treatment. Both groups showed similar improvements in the primary outcome (DASH) at all follow-ups (P=0.051). Subjects receiving manual therapy, exercise, and percutaneous electrolysis showed significantly greater changes in shoulder pain (P0.91) for shoulder pain and function at 3 and 6 months in favour of the percutaneous electrolysis group. No between-groups differences in PPT were found. The current clinical trial found that the inclusion of US-guided percutaneous electrolysis in combination with manual therapy and exercise resulted in no significant differences for related-disability (DASH) than the application of manual therapy and exercise alone in patients with subacromial pain syndrome. Nevertheless, differences were reported for some secondary outcomes such as shoulder pain and function (SPADI). Whether or not these effects are reliable should be addressed in future studies Perspective This study found that the inclusion of US-guided percutaneous electrolysis into a manual therapy and exercise program resulted in no significant differences for disability

  11. Identification of potential neuromotor mechanisms of manual therapy in patients with musculoskeletal disablement: rationale and description of a clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulig Kornelia

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many health care practitioners use a variety of hands-on treatments to improve symptoms and disablement in patients with musculoskeletal pathology. Research to date indirectly suggests a potentially broad effect of manual therapy on the neuromotor processing of functional behavior within the supraspinal central nervous system (CNS in a manner that may be independent of modification at the level of local spinal circuits. However, the effect of treatment speed, as well as the specific mechanism and locus of CNS changes, remain unclear. Methods/Design We developed a placebo-controlled, randomized study to test the hypothesis that manual therapy procedures directed to the talocrural joint in individuals with post-acute ankle sprain induce a change in corticospinal excitability that is relevant to improve the performance of lower extremity functional behavior. Discussion This study is designed to identify potential neuromotor changes associated with manual therapy procedures directed to the appendicular skeleton, compare the relative effect of treatment speed on potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures, and determine the behavioral relevance of potential neuromotor effects of manual therapy procedures. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00847769.

  12. Photodynamic therapy in clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Filonenko

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The review is on opportunities and possibilities of application of photodynamic therapy in clinical practice. The advantages of this method are the targeting of effect on tumor foci and high efficiency along with low systemic toxicity. The results of the set of recent Russian and foreign clinical trials are represented in the review. The method is successfully used in clinical practice with both radical (for early vulvar, cervical cancer and pre-cancer, central early lung cancer, esophageal and gastric cancer, bladder cancer and other types of malignant tumors, and palliative care (including tumor pleuritis, gastrointestinal tumors and others. Photodynamic therapy delivers results which are not available for other methods of cancer therapy. Thus, photodynamic therapy allows to avoid gross scars (that is very important, for example, in gynecology for treatment of patients of reproductive age with cervical and vulvar cancer, delivers good cosmetic effect for skin tumors, allows minimal trauma for intact tissue surrounding tumor. Photodynamic therapy is also used in other fields of medicine, such as otorhinolaryngology, dermatology, ophthalmology, orthopaedics, for treatment of papilloma virus infection and purulent wounds as antibacterial therapy.

  13. Preladenant as an Adjunctive Therapy With Levodopa in Parkinson Disease: Two Randomized Clinical Trials and Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Robert A; Stocchi, Fabrizio; Rascol, Olivier; Huyck, Susan B; Capece, Rachel; Ho, Tony W; Sklar, Peter; Lines, Christopher; Michelson, David; Hewitt, David

    2015-12-01

    Preladenant is an adenosine 2A receptor antagonist that reduced "off" time in a placebo-controlled phase 2b trial in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). We sought to confirm its efficacy in phase 3 trials. To evaluate preladenant as an adjunct to levodopa in patients with PD and motor fluctuations. Two 12-week, phase 3, randomized, placebo-controlled, double-blind trials performed from July 15, 2010, to April 16, 2013. The setting included neurology clinics, clinical research centers, and hospitals in the Americas, the European Union, Eastern Europe, India, and South Africa. Participants included patients with moderate to severe PD taking levodopa who were experiencing motor fluctuations. In trial 1, a total of 778 eligible patients were randomized to the addition of preladenant (2 mg, 5 mg, or 10 mg twice daily), placebo, or rasagiline mesylate (1 mg/d) in a 1:1:1:1:1 ratio. In trial 2, a total of 476 eligible patients were randomized to the addition of preladenant (2 mg or 5 mg twice daily) or placebo in a 1:1:1 ratio. The primary outcome measure was change in off time from baseline to week 12. In trial 1, neither preladenant nor rasagiline was superior to placebo in reducing off time from baseline to week 12. The differences vs placebo were -0.10 hour (95% CI, -0.69 to 0.46 hour) for preladenant 2 mg twice daily, -0.20 hour (95% CI, -0.75 to 0.41 hour) for preladenant 5 mg twice daily, -0.00 hour (95% CI, -0.62 to 0.53 hour) for preladenant 10 mg twice daily, and -0.30 hour (95% CI, -0.90 to 0.26 hour) for rasagiline mesylate 1 mg/d. In trial 2, preladenant was not superior to placebo in reducing off time from baseline to week 12. The differences vs placebo were -0.20 hour (95% CI, -0.72 to 0.35 hour) for preladenant 2 mg twice daily and -0.30 hour (95% CI, -0.86 to 0.21 hour) for preladenant 5 mg twice daily. Preladenant was well tolerated, with the most common adverse event that showed an increase over placebo in both trials being constipation (6%-8% for

  14. Safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy and gamma knife surgery for brain arteriovenous malformations in China: Study protocol for an observational clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hengwei; Huo, Xiaochuan; Jiang, Yuhua; Li, Xiaolong; Li, Youxiang

    2017-09-01

    Brain arteriovenous malformations (BAVMs) are associated with high morbidity and mortality. The treatment of BAVM remains controversial. Microinvasive treatment, including endovascular therapy and gamma knife surgery, has been the first choice in many conditions. However, the overall clinical outcome of microinvasive treatment remains unknown and a prospective trial is needed. This is a prospective, non-randomized, and multicenter observational registry clinical trial to evaluate the safety and efficacy of microinvasive treatment for BAVMs. The study will require up to 400 patients in approximately 12 or more centers in China, followed for 2 years. Main subjects of this study are BAVM patients underwent endovascular therapy and/or gamma knife surgery. The trial will not affect the choice of treatment modality. The primary outcomes are perioperative complications (safety), and postoperative hemorrhage incidence rate and complete occlusion rate (efficacy). Secondary outcomes are elimination of hemorrhage risk factors (coexisting aneurysms and arteriovenous fistula), volume reduction and remission of symptoms. Safety and efficacy of endovascular therapy, gamma knife surgery, and various combination modes of the two modalities will be compared. Operative complications and outcomes at pretreatment, post-treatment, at discharge and at 3 months, 6 months and 2 years follow-up intervals will be analyzed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). The most confusion on BAVM treatment is whether to choose interventional therapy or medical therapy, and the choice of interventional therapy modes. This study will provide evidence for evaluating the safety and efficacy of microinvasive treatment in China, to characterize the microinvasive treatment strategy for BAVMs.

  15. Clinical effectiveness of online computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy without support for depression in primary care: randomised trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Graaf, L.E.; Gerhards, S.A.H.; Arntz, A.; Riper, H.; Metsemakers, J.F.M.; Evers, S.M.; Severens, J.L.; Widdershoven, G.A.M.; Huibers, M.J.H.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Computerised cognitive-behavioural therapy (CCBT) might offer a solution to the current undertreatment of depression. AIMS: To determine the clinical effectiveness of online, unsupported CCBT for depression in primary care. METHOD: Three hundred and three people with depression were

  16. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) versus acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) for dementia family caregivers with significant depressive symptoms: Results of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Losada, Andrés; Márquez-González, María; Romero-Moreno, Rosa; Mausbach, Brent T; López, Javier; Fernández-Fernández, Virginia; Nogales-González, Celia

    2015-08-01

    The differential efficacy of acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT) and cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) for dementia family caregivers' is analyzed through a randomized controlled trial. Participants were 135 caregivers with high depressive symptomatology who were randomly allocated to the intervention conditions or a control group (CG). Pre-, postintervention, and follow-up measurements assessed depressive symptomatology, anxiety, leisure, dysfunctional thoughts, and experiential avoidance. Depression: Significant effects of interventions compared with CG were found for CBT (p dementia caregivers. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  17. Randomised trial of proton vs. carbon ion radiation therapy in patients with low and intermediate grade chondrosarcoma of the skull base, clinical phase III study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikoghosyan, Anna V; Rauch, Geraldine; Münter, Marc W; Jensen, Alexandra D; Combs, Stephanie E; Kieser, Meinhard; Debus, Jürgen

    2010-01-01

    Low and intermediate grade chondrosarcomas are relative rare bone tumours. About 5-12% of all chondrosarcomas are localized in base of skull region. Low grade chondrosarcoma has a low incidence of distant metastasis but is potentially lethal disease. Therefore, local therapy is of crucial importance in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. Surgical resection is the primary treatment standard. Unfortunately the late diagnosis and diagnosis at the extensive stage are common due to the slow and asymptomatic growth of the lesions. Consequently, complete resection is hindered due to close proximity to critical and hence dose limiting organs such as optic nerves, chiasm and brainstem. Adjuvant or additional radiation therapy is very important for the improvement of local control rates in the primary treatment. Proton therapy is the gold standard in the treatment of skull base chondrosarcomas. However, high-LET (linear energy transfer) beams such as carbon ions theoretically offer advantages by enhanced biologic effectiveness in slow-growing tumours. The study is a prospective randomised active-controlled clinical phase III trial. The trial will be carried out at Heidelberger Ionenstrahl-Therapie (HIT) centre as monocentric trial. Patients with skull base chondrosarcomas will be randomised to either proton or carbon ion radiation therapy. As a standard, patients will undergo non-invasive, rigid immobilization and target volume definition will be carried out based on CT and MRI data. The biologically isoeffective target dose to the PTV (planning target volume) in carbon ion treatment will be 60 Gy E ± 5% and 70 Gy E ± 5% (standard dose) in proton therapy respectively. The 5 year local-progression free survival (LPFS) rate will be analysed as primary end point. Overall survival, progression free and metastasis free survival, patterns of recurrence, local control rate and morbidity are the secondary end points. Up to now it was impossible to compare two different

  18. Effects of kinesiotaping versus non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and physical therapy for treatment of pes anserinus tendino-bursitis: A randomized comparative clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homayouni, Kaynoosh; Foruzi, Shima; Kalhori, Fereshte

    2016-09-01

    Pes anserinus tendino-bursitis is a condition caused by repetitive friction over the bursa or direct trauma to knee joint and it presents with proximal medial tibial pain and swelling. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of kinesiotaping in comparison with naproxen and physical therapy in treatment of pes anserinus tendino-bursitis. In a randomized comparative clinical trial 56 patients with clinical diagnosis of pes anserinus tendino-bursitis were randomly assigned to kinesiotaping and naproxen/physical therapy (28 patients in each group). Kinesiotaping on the tender area in the form of space-correction (lifting) technique was used and repeated for three times with a one-week interval. Another group received naproxen (250mg TID for 10 days) and ten sessions of daily physical therapy. The visual analog scale (VAS) was used for evaluation of pain. The depth of swelling of the area was measured with sonography before and after treatment. Wilcoxon signed ranks test has been used for determining the influence of interventions on pain (VAS) and swelling scores in each group. The ANCOVA (Analysis of covariance) test was applied for comparing the influence of interventions on VAS and swelling scores after adjustment for co-variables. At end of the study, 27 patients remained in the kinesiotaping group and 19 patients in naproxen/physical therapy group. Treatment with kinesiotaping significantly decreased the pain (P=0.0001) and swelling scores (P=0.0001) in comparison with naproxen/physical therapy after adjustment for baseline characteristics. Kinesiotaping was safe without any complications except for a mild local skin irritation in one patient. Kinesiotaping is more effective than naproxen plus physical therapy in reduction of pain and swelling in patients with pes anserinus tendino-bursitis. www.ClinicalTrials.gov identifier is NCT01680263.

  19. Efficacy and tolerability of lodenafil carbonate for oral therapy of erectile dysfunction: a phase III clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glina, Sidney; Fonseca, Gilvan N; Bertero, Eduardo B; Damião, Ronaldo; Rocha, Luíz C A; Jardim, Carlos R F; Cairoli, Carlos E; Teloken, Cláudio; Torres, Luiz O; Faria, Geraldo E; da Silva, Marcelo B; Pagani, Eduardo

    2010-05-01

    This is a phase III, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial on lodenafil carbonate (LC), a novel phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitor developed in Brazil. Expanding information on LC efficacy and safety. International Index of Erectile Function (IIEF) erectile domain, positive answers to the sexual encounter profile (SEP)-2 and SEP-3 questions and incidence of adverse events (AEs). A total of 350 men with erectile dysfunction (ED) of all degrees were randomized to placebo, LC 40 mg or LC 80 mg and followed for 4 weeks. They completed the IIEF and answered the SEP questions 2 and 3 after each intercourse without and with the use of LC. IIEF Erectile Domain scores without and with the use of medication were the following (mean [M] +/- standard deviation [SD]): placebo = 13.9 +/- 5.2 and 14.8 +/- 7.8; LC 40 mg = 13.6 +/- 5.3 and 18.6 +/- 8.0; LC 80 mg = 13.4 +/- 4.9 and 20.6 +/- 7.7 (analysis of variance [ANOVA] P < 0.01). Positive answers to SEP-2 without and with the use of medication were the following (M +/- SD): placebo = 55.3 +/- 43.2% and 52.1 +/- 41.4%; LC 40 mg = 46.4 +/- 44.3% and 63.5 +/- 42.0%; LC 80 mg = 50.2 +/- 40.9% and 80.8 +/- 32.3% (ANOVA P < 0.01). Positive answers to SEP-3 were the following: placebo = 20.2 +/- 32.3% and 29.7 +/- 38.1%; LC 40 mg = 19.6 +/- 34.3% and 50.8 +/- 44.4%; LC 80 mg = 20.8 +/- 33.2% and 66.0 +/- 39.3% (ANOVA P < 0.01). The patients with at least one AE were placebo = 28.7%, LC 40 mg = 40.9%, and LC 80 mg = 49.5%. AEs whose incidence was significantly higher with LC than with placebo included rhinitis, headache, flushing, visual disorder, and dizziness. LC showed a satisfactory efficacy-safety profile for oral therapy of ED.

  20. Clinical characteristics predict benefits from eptifibatide therapy during coronary stenting: insights from the Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor With Integrilin Therapy (ESPRIT) trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puma, Joseph A; Banko, Lesan T; Pieper, Karen S; Sacchi, Terrence J; O'Shea, J Conor; Dery, Jean Pierre; Tcheng, James E

    2006-02-21

    In order to determine a differential benefit from treatment, we compared the long-term outcome of high-risk versus low-risk patients and evaluated survival free from death or myocardial infarction at one year. Newer anticoagulant strategies during percutaneous coronary intervention have necessitated a reanalysis of the role of intravenous GP IIb/IIIa inhibitors. The Enhanced Suppression of the Platelet IIb/IIIa Receptor with Integrilin Therapy trial randomized 2,064 patients undergoing nonurgent coronary stent implantation to eptifibatide or placebo. High-risk characteristics were defined as age >75 years, diabetes, elevated cardiac markers, ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction within 7 days, or unstable angina within 48 h of randomization. Age <5 years, absence of diabetes, and any other reason for admission were considered low risk characterstics. There were 1,018 patients in the high-risk group (50.8% eptifibatide, 49.2% placebo) and 1,045 patients in the low-risk group (50.0% eptifibatide, 50.0% placebo). Baseline demographics were similar in both groups except for more hypertension (63% vs. 55%, respectively), peripheral vascular disease (8.2% vs. 5.2%, respectively), prior stroke (5.5% vs. 3.2%, respectively), and female gender (33% vs. 22%, respectively) in the high-risk than the low-risk group. At one year, the composite end point of death or myocardial infarction occurred in 15.89% of placebo patients and 7.99% of eptifibatide patients in the high-risk group and 9.02% of the placebo and 8.11% of eptifibatide patients in the low-risk group. Although eptifibatide treatment improved outcomes for all patients, preprocedural clinical characteristics can define a subgroup of patients who may derive greatest benefit from its use during coronary stent placement.

  1. Effectiveness of manual therapy compared to usual care by the general practitioner for chronic tension-type headache: design of a randomised clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dekker Joost

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with Chronic Tension Type Headache (CTTH report functional and emotional impairments (loss of workdays, sleep disturbances, emotional well-being and are at risk for overuse of medication. Manual therapy may improve symptoms through mobilisation of the spine, correction of posture, and training of cervical muscles. We present the design of a randomised clinical trial (RCT evaluating the effectiveness of manual therapy (MT compared to usual care by the general practitioner (GP in patients with CTTH. Methods and design Patients are eligible for participation if they present in general practice with CTTH according to the classification of the International Headache Society (IHS. Participants are randomised to either usual GP care according to the national Dutch general practice guidelines for headache, or manual therapy, consisting of mobilisations (high- and low velocity techniques, exercise therapy for the cervical and thoracic spine and postural correction. The primary outcome measures are the number of headache days and use of medication. Secondary outcome measures are severity of headache, functional status, sickness absence, use of other healthcare resources, active cervical range of motion, algometry, endurance of the neckflexor muscles and head posture. Follow-up assessments are conducted after 8 and 26 weeks. Discussion This is a pragmatic trial in which interventions are offered as they are carried out in everyday practice. This increases generalisability of results, but blinding of patients, GPs and therapists is not possible. The results of this trial will contribute to clinical decision making of the GP regarding referral to manual therapy in patients with chronic tension headache.

  2. A randomized controlled trial on the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in patients with prostate cancer during androgen deprivation therapy: rationale and design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thorsen, Lene; Nilsen, Tormod S; Raastad, Truls; Courneya, Kerry S; Skovlund, Eva; Fosså, Sophie D

    2012-01-01

    Studies indicate that strength training has beneficial effects on clinical health outcomes in prostate cancer patients during androgen deprivation therapy. However, randomized controlled trials are needed to scientifically determine the effectiveness of strength training on the muscle cell level. Furthermore, close examination of the feasibility of a high-load strength training program is warranted. The Physical Exercise and Prostate Cancer (PEPC) trial is designed to determine the effectiveness of strength training on clinical and muscle cellular outcomes in non-metastatic prostate cancer patients after high-dose radiotherapy and during ongoing androgen deprivation therapy. Patients receiving androgen deprivation therapy for 9-36 months combined with external high-dose radiotherapy for locally advanced prostate cancer are randomized to an exercise intervention group that receives a 16 week high-load strength training program or a control group that is encouraged to maintain their habitual activity level. In both arms, androgen deprivation therapy is continued until the end of the intervention period. Clinical outcomes are body composition (lean body mass, bone mineral density and fat mass) measured by Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry, serological outcomes, physical functioning (muscle strength and cardio-respiratory fitness) assessed with physical tests and psycho-social functioning (mental health, fatigue and health-related quality of life) assessed by questionnaires. Muscle cellular outcomes are a) muscle fiber size b) regulators of muscle fiber size (number of myonuclei per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells per muscle fiber, number of satellite cells and myonuclei positive for androgen receptors and proteins involved in muscle protein degradation and muscle hypertrophy) and c) regulators of muscle fiber function such as proteins involved in cellular stress and mitochondrial function. Muscle cellular outcomes are measured on muscle cross sections and

  3. Immediate pain relief effect of low level laser therapy for sports injuries: Randomized, double-blind placebo clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takenori, A; Ikuhiro, M; Shogo, U; Hiroe, K; Junji, S; Yasutaka, T; Hiroya, K; Miki, N

    2016-12-01

    To determine the immediate pain relief effect of low-level laser therapy on sports injuries in athletes and degree of pain relief by the therapy. Double-blind, randomized, comparative clinical study. Participants were 32 college athletes with motion pain at a defined site. Participants were randomized into two groups in which the tested or placebo laser therapy was administered to determine pain intensity from painful action before and after laser irradiation, using the Modified Numerical Rating Scale. The post-therapeutic Modified Numerical Rating Scale score was subtracted from the pre-therapeutic Modified Numerical Rating Scale score to determine pain intensity difference, and the rate of pain intensity difference to pre-therapeutic Modified Numerical Rating Scale was calculated as pain relief rate. Low-level laser therapy was effective in 75% of the laser group, whereas it was not effective in the placebo group, indicating a significant difference in favor of the laser group (p<0.001). Pain relief rate was significantly higher in the laser group than in the placebo group (36.94% vs. 8.20%, respectively, p<0.001), with the difference in pain relief rate being 28.74%. Low-level laser therapy provided an immediate pain relief effect, reducing pain by 28.74%. It was effective for pain relief in 75% of participants. Copyright © 2016 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Clinical trials of boron neutron capture therapy [in humans] [at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center][at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallace, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of research records of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy was conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory and Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center using the Code of Federal Regulations, FDA Regulations and Good Clinical Practice Guidelines. Clinical data were collected FR-om subjects' research charts, and differences in conduct of studies at both centers were examined. Records maintained at Brookhaven National Laboratory were not in compliance with regulatory standards. Beth Israel's records followed federal regulations. Deficiencies discovered at both sites are discussed in the reports

  5. How does routinely delivered cognitive-behavioural therapy for gambling disorder compare to "gold standard" clinical trial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, David P; Fairweather-Schmidt, A Kate; Harvey, Peter W; Battersby, Malcolm W

    2018-03-01

    Currently, it is unknown whether treatment outcomes derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of cognitive-behavioural therapy (CBT) for problem gamblers still hold when applied to patients seen in routine practice. Thus, data from an RCT of cognitive therapy versus exposure therapy for problem gambling versus patients of a gambling help service were compared. Assessments of problem gambling severity, psychosocial impairment, and alcohol use were undertaken at baseline and post-treatment and evaluated within a counterfactual framework. Findings showed that the contrast between routine CBT for pokies and horse betting had a significant effect, indicative of a 62% lower gambling urge score if routine CBT recipients had all been horse/track betters opposed to gambling with "pokies." However, the majority of contrasts indicated therapeutic outcomes achieved in routine CBT treatments were of equivalent robustness relative to RCT conditions. The present findings infer routine practice treatment outcomes are as efficacious as those generated in RCT contexts. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Efficacy and safety of fosfomycin plus imipenem as rescue therapy for complicated bacteremia and endocarditis due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus: a multicenter clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Río, Ana; Gasch, Oriol; Moreno, Asunción; Peña, Carmen; Cuquet, Jordi; Soy, Dolors; Mestres, Carlos A; Suárez, Cristina; Pare, Juan C; Tubau, Fe; Garcia de la Mària, Cristina; Marco, Francesc; Carratalà, Jordi; Gatell, José M; Gudiol, Francisco; Miró, José M

    2014-10-15

    There is an urgent need for alternative rescue therapies in invasive infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). We assessed the clinical efficacy and safety of the combination of fosfomycin and imipenem as rescue therapy for MRSA infective endocarditis and complicated bacteremia. The trial was conducted between 2001 and 2010 in 3 Spanish hospitals. Adult patients with complicated MRSA bacteremia or endocarditis requiring rescue therapy were eligible for the study. Treatment with fosfomycin (2 g/6 hours IV) plus imipenem (1 g/6 hours IV) was started and monitored. The primary efficacy endpoints were percentage of sterile blood cultures at 72 hours and clinical success rate assessed at the test-of-cure visit (45 days after the end of therapy). The combination was administered in 12 patients with endocarditis, 2 with vascular graft infection, and 2 with complicated bacteremia. Therapy had previously failed with vancomycin in 9 patients, daptomycin in 2, and sequential antibiotics in 5. Blood cultures were negative 72 hours after the first dose of the combination in all cases. The success rate was 69%, and only 1 of 5 deaths was related to the MRSA infection. Although the combination was safe in most patients (94%), a patient with liver cirrhosis died of multiorgan failure secondary to sodium overload. There were no episodes of breakthrough bacteremia or relapse. Fosfomycin plus imipenem was an effective and safe combination when used as rescue therapy for complicated MRSA bloodstream infections and deserves further clinical evaluation as initial therapy in these infections. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Enhancing CBT for Chronic Insomnia: A Randomised Clinical Trial of Additive Components of Mindfulness or Cognitive Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Mei Yin; Ree, Melissa J; Lee, Christopher W

    2016-09-01

    Although cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) for insomnia has resulted in significant reductions in symptoms, most patients are not classified as good sleepers after treatment. The present study investigated whether additional sessions of cognitive therapy (CT) or mindfulness-based therapy (MBT) could enhance CBT in 64 participants with primary insomnia. All participants were given four sessions of standard CBT as previous research had identified this number of sessions as an optimal balance between therapist guidance and patient independence. Participants were then allocated to further active treatment (four sessions of CT or MBT) or a no further treatment control. The additional treatments resulted in significant improvements beyond CBT on self-report and objective measures of sleep and were well tolerated as evidenced by no dropouts from either treatment. The effect sizes for each of these additional treatments were large and clinically significant. The mean scores on the primary outcome measure, the Insomnia Severity Index, were 5.74 for CT and 6.69 for MBT, which are within the good-sleeper range. Treatment effects were maintained at follow-up. There were no significant differences between CT and MBT on any outcome measure. These results provide encouraging data on how to enhance CBT for treatment of insomnia. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. CBT treatments for insomnia can be enhanced using recent developments in cognitive therapy. CBT treatments for insomnia can be enhanced using mindfulness-based treatments. Both cognitive therapy and mindfulness produce additional clinically significant change. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Clinical trials: bringing research to the bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arvay, C A

    1991-02-01

    Over the years, clinical trials with their structured treatment plans and multicenter involvement have been instrumental in developing new treatments and establishing standard of care therapy. While clinical trials strive to advance medical knowledge, they provide scientifically sound, state of the art care and their use should be increased. The Brain Tumor Cooperative Group, one such NCI-sponsored cooperative group, has been the primary group for the treatment of malignant gliomas. As the field of neuro-oncology expands, the neuroscience nurse needs to develop an understanding of clinical trials and their operation. The nurse is in an optimal position to support medical research and the research participant.

  9. The role of amputation as an outcome measure in cellular therapy for critical limb ischemia: implications for clinical trial design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pearl Gregory J

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Autologous bone marrow-derived stem cells have been ascribed an important therapeutic role in No-Option Critical limb Ischemia (NO-CLI. One primary endpoint for evaluating NO-CLI therapy is major amputation (AMP, which is usually combined with mortality for AMP-free survival (AFS. Only a trial which is double blinded can eliminate physician and patient bias as to the timing and reason for AMP. We examined factors influencing AMP in a prospective double-blinded pilot RCT (2:1 therapy to control of 48 patients treated with site of service obtained bone marrow cells (BMAC as well as a systematic review of the literature. Methods Cells were injected intramuscularly in the CLI limbs as either BMAC or placebo (peripheral blood. Six month AMP rates were compared between the two arms. Both patient and treating team were blinded of the assignment in follow-up examinations. A search of the literature identified 9 NO-CLI trials, the control arms of which were used to determine 6 month AMP rates and the influence of tissue loss. Results Fifteen amputations occurred during the 6 month period, 86.7% of these during the first 4 months. One amputation occurred in a Rutherford 4 patient. The difference in amputation rate between patients with rest pain (5.6% and those with tissue loss (46.7%, irrespective of treatment group, was significant (p = 0.0029. In patients with tissue loss, treatment with BMAC demonstrated a lower amputation rate than placebo (39.1% vs. 71.4%, p = 0.1337. The Kaplan-Meier time to amputation was longer in the BMAC group than in the placebo group (p = 0.067. Projecting these results to a pivotal trial, a bootstrap simulation model showed significant difference in AFS between BMAC and placebo with a power of 95% for a sample size of 210 patients. Meta-analysis of the literature confirmed a difference in amputation rate between patients with tissue loss and rest pain. Conclusions BMAC shows promise in improving AMP

  10. Efficacy of manual and manipulative therapy in the perception of pain and cervical motion in patients with tension-type headache: a randomized, controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espí-López, Gemma V; Gómez-Conesa, Antonia

    2014-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of manipulative and manual therapy treatments with regard to pain perception and neck mobility in patients with tension-type headache. A randomized clinical trial was conducted on 84 adults diagnosed with tension-type headache. Eighty-four subjects were enrolled in this study: 68 women and 16 men. Mean age was 39.76 years, ranging from 18 to 65 years. A total of 57.1% were diagnosed with chronic tension-type headache and 42.9% with tension-type headache. Participants were divided into 3 treatment groups (manual therapy, manipulative therapy, a combination of manual and manipulative therapy) and a control group. Four treatment sessions were administered during 4 weeks, with posttreatment assessment and follow-up at 1 month. Cervical ranges of motion pain perception, and frequency and intensity of headaches were assessed. All 3 treatment groups showed significant improvements in the different dimensions of pain perception. Manual therapy and manipulative treatment improved some cervical ranges of motion. Headache frequency was reduced with manipulative treatment (P treatment reported improvement after the treatment (P treatment and at follow-up with manipulative therapy (P treatment (P treatments, administered both separately and combined together, showed efficacy for patients with tension-type headache with regard to pain perception. As for cervical ranges of motion, treatments produced greater effect when separately administered.

  11. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2007-12-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Intergrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: 249553, 2-Methoxyestradiol; Abatacept, Adalimumab, Adefovir dipivoxil, Agalsidase beta, Albinterferon alfa-2b, Aliskiren fumarate, Alovudine, Amdoxovir, Amlodipine besylate/atorvastatin calcium, Amrubicin hydrochloride, Anakinra, AQ-13, Aripiprazole, AS-1404, Asoprisnil, Atacicept, Atrasentan; Belimumab, Bevacizumab, Bortezomib, Bosentan, Botulinum toxin type B, Brivaracetam; Catumaxomab, Cediranib, Cetuximab, cG250, Ciclesonide, Cinacalcet hydrochloride, Curcumin, Cypher; Darbepoetin alfa, Denosumab, Dihydrexidine; Eicosapentaenoic acid/docosahexaenoic acid, Entecavir, Erlotinib hydrochloride, Escitalopram oxalate, Etoricoxib, Everolimus, Ezetimibe; Febuxostat, Fenspiride hydrochloride, Fondaparinux sodium; Gefitinib, Ghrelin (human), GSK-1562902A; HSV-tk/GCV; Iclaprim, Imatinib mesylate, Imexon, Indacaterol, Insulinotropin, ISIS-112989; L-Alanosine, Lapatinib ditosylate, Laropiprant; Methoxy polyethylene glycol-epoetin-beta, Mipomersen sodium, Motexafin gadolinium; Natalizumab, Nimotuzumab; OSC, Ozarelix; PACAP-38, Paclitaxel nanoparticles, Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein-(1-36), Pasireotide, Pegfilgrastim, Peginterferon alfa-2a, Peginterferon alfa-2b, Pemetrexed disodium, Pertuzumab, Picoplatin, Pimecrolimus, Pitavastatin calcium, Plitidepsin; Ranelic acid distrontium salt, Ranolazine, Recombinant human relaxin H2, Regadenoson, RFB4(dsFv)-PE38, RO-3300074, Rosuvastatin calcium; SIR-Spheres, Solifenacin succinate, Sorafenib, Sunitinib malate; Tadalafil, Talabostat, Taribavirin hydrochloride, Taxus, Temsirolimus, Teriparatide, Tiotropium bromide, Tipifarnib, Tirapazamine, Tocilizumab; UCN-01, Ularitide

  12. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2005-04-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials is a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data in the following tables has been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity. prous.com. This issue focuses on the following selection of drugs: ABX-IL-8, Acclaim, adalimumab, AGI-1067, alagebrium chloride, alemtuzumab, Alequel, Androgel, anti-IL-12 MAb, AOD-9604, aripiprazole, atomoxetine hydrochloride; Biphasic insulin aspart, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B, bovine lactoferrin, brivudine; Cantuzumab mertansine, CB-1954, CDB-4124, CEA-TRICOM, choriogonadotropin alfa, cilansetron, CpG-10101, CpG-7909, CTL-102, CTL-102/CB-1954; DAC:GRF, darbepoetin alfa, davanat-1, decitabine, del-1 Genemedicine, dexanabinol, dextofisopam, dnaJP1, dronedarone hydrochloride, dutasteride; Ecogramostim, eletriptan, emtricitabine, EPI-hNE-4, eplerenone, eplivanserin fumarate, erlotinib hydrochloride, ertapenem sodium, escitalopram oxalate, esomeprazole magnesium, etoricoxib, ezetimibe; Falecalcitriol, fingolimod hydrochloride; Gepirone hydrochloride; HBV-ISS, HSV-2 theracine, human insulin; Imatinib mesylate, Indiplon, insulin glargine, ISAtx-247; L612 HuMAb, levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone, lidocaine/prilocaine, LL-2113AD, lucinactant, LY-156735; Meclinertant, metelimumab, morphine hydrochloride, morphine-6-glucuronide; Natalizumab, nimotuzumab, NX-1207, NYVAC-HIV C; Omalizumab, onercept, osanetant; PABA, palosuran sulfate, parathyroid hormone (human recombinant), parecoxib sodium, PBI-1402, PCK-3145, peginterferon alfa-2a, peginterferon alfa-2b, peginterferon alfa-2b/ribavirin, pemetrexed disodium, pimecrolimus, PINC, pregabalin; Ramelteon, rasagiline mesilate, rasburicase, rimonabant hydrochloride, RO-0098557, rofecoxib, rosiglitazone maleate/metformin hydrochloride; Safinamide mesilate, SHL-749, sitaxsentan sodium, sparfosic acid, SprayGel, squalamine, St. John's Wort

  13. Clinical trials in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiti, Rituparna; M, Raghavendra

    2007-07-01

    The concept of outsourcing for the development and global studies on new drugs has become widely accepted in the pharmaceutical industry due to its cost and uncertainty. India is going to be the most preferred location for contract pharma research and development due to its huge treatment naïve population, human resources, technical skills, adoption/amendment/implementation of rules/laws by regulatory authorities, and changing economic environment. But still 'miles to go' to fulfill the pre-requisites to ensure India's success. In spite of all the pitfalls, the country is ambitious and optimist to attract multinational pharmaceutical companies to conduct their clinical trials in India.

  14. Clinical outcomes in clinical trials of anti-HIV treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reekie, J; Mocroft, A; J, Neaton

    2007-01-01

    Since the introduction of combination antiretroviral therapy, there has been a decrease in both AIDS-defining illnesses and deaths. This decrease meant that performing clinical trials with clinical outcomes in HIV infection became more time consuming and hence costly. Improved understanding...... the infection, so when treatment is started it is currently a lifelong commitment. Is it reasonable then that guidelines are based almost completely on short-term randomized trials and observational studies of surrogate markers, or is there still a need for trials with clinical outcomes?...

  15. Quality-of-life change associated with robotic-assisted therapy to improve hand motor function in patients with subacute stroke: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutner, Nancy G; Zhang, Rebecca; Butler, Andrew J; Wolf, Steven L; Alberts, Jay L

    2010-04-01

    At 6 months poststroke, most patients cannot incorporate their affected hand into daily activities, which in turn is likely to reduce their perceived quality of life. This preliminary study explored change in patient-reported, health-related quality of life associated with robotic-assisted therapy combined with reduced therapist-supervised training. A single-blind, multi-site, randomized clinical trial was conducted. Seventeen individuals who were 3 to 9 months poststroke participated. Sixty hours of therapist-supervised repetitive task practice (RTP) was compared with 30 hours of RTP combined with 30 hours of robotic-assisted therapy. Participants completed the Stroke Impact Scale (SIS) at baseline, immediately postintervention, and 2 months postintervention. Change in SIS score domains was assessed in a mixed model analysis. The combined therapy group had a greater increase in rating of mood from preintervention to postintervention, and the RTP-only group had a greater increase in rating of social participation from preintervention to follow-up. Both groups had statistically significant improvement in activities of daily living and instrumental activities of daily living scores from preintervention to postintervention. Both groups reported significant improvement in hand function postintervention and at follow-up, and the magnitude of these changes suggested clinical significance. The combined therapy group had significant improvements in stroke recovery rating postintervention and at follow-up, which appeared clinically significant; this also was true for stroke recovery rating from preintervention to follow-up in the RTP-only group. LIMITATIONS OUTCOMES: of 30 hours of RTP in the absence of robotic-assisted therapy remain unknown. Robotic-assisted therapy may be an effective alternative or adjunct to the delivery of intensive task practice interventions to enhance hand function recovery in patients with stroke.

  16. The clinical efficacy of reminiscence therapy in patients with mild-to-moderate Alzheimer disease: Study protocol for a randomized parallel-design controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Mo; Lyu, Ji-Hui; Zhang, Yi; Gao, Mao-Long; Li, Wen-Jie; Ma, Xin

    2017-12-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is one of the most common diseases among the older adults. Currently, various nonpharmacological interventions are used for the treatment of AD. Such as reminiscence therapy is being widely used in Western countries. However, it is often used as an empirical application in China; the evidence-based efficacy of reminiscence therapy in AD patients remains to be determined. Therefore, the aim of this research is to assess the effectives of reminiscence therapy for Chinese elderly. This is a randomized parallel-design controlled trial. Mild and moderate AD patients who are in the Beijing Geriatric Hospital, China will be randomized into control and intervention groups (n = 45 for each group). For the intervention group, along with conventional drug therapy, participants will be exposed to a reminiscence therapy of 35 to 45 minutes, 2 times/wk for 12 consecutive weeks. Patients in the control group will undergo conventional drug therapy only. The primary outcome measure will be the differences in Alzheimer disease Assessment Scale-Cognitive Section Score. The secondary outcome measures will be the differences in the Cornell scale for depression in dementia, Neuropsychiatric Inventory score, and Barthel Index scores at baseline, at 4 and 12 weeks of treatment, and 12 weeks after treatment. The protocols have been approved by the ethics committee of Beijing Geriatric Hospital of China (approval no. 2015-010). Findings will be disseminated through presentation at scientific conferences and in academic journals. Chinese Clinical Trial Registry identifier ChiCTR-INR-16009505. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. [Maraviroc: clinical trials results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chidiac, C; Katlama, C; Yeni, P

    2008-03-01

    Just over a decade after identification of chemokine receptors CCR5 and CXCR4 as coreceptors for HIV, maraviroc (Celsentri), the first CCR5 antagonist, has recently obtained its Marketing Authorization in the United States and Europe, for treatment of treatment-experienced adult patients infected with only CCR5-tropic HIV-1 detectable. CCR5 antagonists, after fusion inhibitor enfuvirtide available since 2003, also belong to entry inhibitors. These molecules, unlike previous antiretrovirals, do not target the virus but its target cell by blocking viral penetration. Maraviroc has shown its clinical efficacy in patients failing other antiretroviral classes. Its safety profile was similar to placebo in two large phase III trials. However, careful assessment of both hepatic and immunologic safety of this new therapeutic class is needed. Viral tropism testing has to be investigated before using maraviroc in the clinic, because CCR5 antagonists are not active against CXCR4 viruses. For the moment indicated for the treatment-experienced patient population, maraviroc could in the future benefit to other types of patients, depending on ongoing trials results.

  18. Ankle manual therapy for individuals with post-acute ankle sprains: description of a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fisher Beth E

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ankle sprains are common within the general population and can result in prolonged disablement. Limited talocrural dorsiflexion range of motion (DF ROM is a common consequence of ankle sprain. Limited talocrural DF ROM may contribute to persistent symptoms, disability, and an elevated risk for re-injury. As a result, many health care practitioners use hands-on passive procedures with the intention of improving talocrural joint DF ROM in individuals following ankle sprains. Dosage of passive hands-on procedures involves a continuum of treatment speeds. Recent evidence suggests both slow- and fast-speed treatments may be effective to address disablement following ankle sprains. However, these interventions have yet to be longitudinally compared against a placebo study condition. Methods/Design We developed a randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial designed to test the hypotheses that hands-on treatment procedures administered to individuals following ankle sprains during the post-acute injury period can improve short-, intermediate-, and long-term disablement, as well as reduce the risk for re-injury. Discussion This study is designed to measure the clinical effects of hands-on passive stretching treatment procedures directed to the talocrural joint that vary in treatment speed during the post-acute injury period, compared to hands-on placebo control intervention. Trial Registration http://www.clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT00888498.

  19. Clinical trial: a randomized trial of early endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori testing and empirical therapy for the management of dyspepsia in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duggan, A E; Elliott, C A; Miller, P; Hawkey, C J; Logan, R F A

    2009-01-01

    Early endoscopy, Helicobacter pylori eradication and empirical acid suppression are commonly used dyspepsia management strategies in primary care but have not been directly compared in a single trial. To compare endoscopy, H. pylori test and refer, H. pylori test and treat and empirical acid suppression for dyspepsia in primary care. Patients presenting to their general practitioner with dyspepsia were randomized to endoscopy, H. pylori'test and treat', H. pylori test and endoscope positives, or empirical therapy with symptoms, patient satisfaction, healthcare costs and cost effectiveness at 12 months being the outcomes. At 2 months, the proportion of patients reporting no or minimal dyspeptic symptoms ranged from 74% for those having early endoscopy to 55% for those on empirical therapy (P = 0.009), but at 1 year, there was little difference among the four strategies. Early endoscopy was associated with fewer subsequent consultations for dyspepsia (P = 0.003). 'Test and treat' resulted in fewer endoscopies overall and was most cost-effective over a range of cost assumptions. Empirical therapy resulted in the lowest initial costs, but the highest rate of subsequent endoscopy. Gastro-oesophageal cancers were found in four patients randomized to the H. pylori testing strategies. While early endoscopy offered some advantages 'Test and treat' was the most cost-effective strategy. In older patients, early endoscopy may be an appropriate strategy in view of the greater risk of malignant disease. © 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. The validity and internal structure of the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale: data from a clinical trial of N-acetylcysteine as adjunctive therapy in bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berk, Michael; Dodd, Seetal; Dean, Olivia M; Kohlmann, Kristy; Berk, Lesley; Malhi, Gin S

    2010-10-01

    Berk M, Dodd S, Dean OM, Kohlmann K, Berk L, Malhi GS. The validity and internal structure of the Bipolar Depression Rating Scale: data from a clinical trial of N-acetylcysteine as adjunctive therapy in bipolar disorder. The phenomenology of unipolar and bipolar disorders differ in a number of ways, such as the presence of mixed states and atypical features. Conventional depression rating instruments are designed to capture the characteristics of unipolar depression and have limitations in capturing the breadth of bipolar disorder. The Bipolar Depression Rating Scale (BDRS) was administered together with the Montgomery Asberg Rating Scale (MADRS) and Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) in a double-blind randomised placebo-controlled clinical trial of N-acetyl cysteine for bipolar disorder (N = 75). A factor analysis showed a two-factor solution: depression and mixed symptom clusters. The BDRS has strong internal consistency (Cronbach's alpha = 0.917), the depression cluster showed robust correlation with the MADRS (r = 0.865) and the mixed subscale correlated with the YMRS (r = 0.750). The BDRS has good internal validity and inter-rater reliability and is sensitive to change in the context of a clinical trial.

  1. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of embedded simulation in occupational therapy clinical practice education: study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imms, Christine; Chu, Eli Mang Yee; Guinea, Stephen; Sheppard, Loretta; Froude, Elspeth; Carter, Rob; Darzins, Susan; Ashby, Samantha; Gilbert-Hunt, Susan; Gribble, Nigel; Nicola-Richmond, Kelli; Penman, Merrolee; Gospodarevskaya, Elena; Mathieu, Erin; Symmons, Mark

    2017-07-21

    Clinical placements are a critical component of the training for health professionals such as occupational therapists. However, with growing student enrolments in professional education courses and workload pressures on practitioners, it is increasingly difficult to find sufficient, suitable placements that satisfy program accreditation requirements. The professional accrediting body for occupational therapy in Australia allows up to 200 of the mandatory 1000 clinical placement hours to be completed via simulation activities, but evidence of effectiveness and efficiency for student learning outcomes is lacking. Increasingly placement providers charge a fee to host students, leading educators to consider whether providing an internal program might be a feasible alternative for a portion of placement hours. Economic analysis of the incremental costs and benefits of providing a traditional versus simulated placement is required to inform decision-making. This study is a pragmatic, non-inferiority, single-blind, multicentre, two-group randomised controlled trial (RCT) with an embedded economic analysis. The RCT will compare a block of 40 hours of simulated placement (intervention) with a 40-hour block of traditional placement (comparator), with a focus on student learning outcomes and delivery costs. Six universities will instigate the educational intervention within their respective occupational therapy courses, randomly assigning their cohort of students (1:1 allocation) to the simulated or traditional clinical placements. The primary outcome is achievement of professional behaviours (e.g. communication, clinical reasoning) as assessed by a post-placement written examination. Secondary outcomes include proportions passing the placement assessed using the Student Practice Evaluation Form-Revised, changes in student confidence pre-/post-placement, student and educator evaluation of the placement experience and cost-effectiveness of simulated versus traditional

  2. The effects of topical heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome: a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadpour, Ali; Mohammadian, Batol; Basiri Moghadam, Mehdi; Nematollahi, Mahmoud Reza

    2014-12-01

    To investigate the effects of local heat therapy on chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Chest pain is a very common complaint in patients with acute coronary syndrome. It is managed both pharmacologically and nonpharmacologically. Pharmacological pain management is associated with different side effects. This was a randomised double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial conducted in 2013. A convenience sample of 66 patients with acute coronary syndrome was selected from a coronary care unit of a local teaching hospital affiliated to Gonabad University of Medical Sciences, Gonabad, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to either the experimental or the placebo group. Patients in the experimental and the placebo groups received local heat therapy using a hot pack warmed to 50 and 37 °C, respectively. We assessed chest pain intensity, duration and frequency as well as the need for opioid analgesic therapy both before and after the study. The study instrument consisted of a demographic questionnaire, the McGill Pain Questionnaire, and a data sheet for documenting pain frequency and duration as well as the need for analgesic therapy. The placebo heat therapy did not significantly decrease the intensity, the duration and the frequency of pain episodes. However, pain intensity, duration and frequency in the experimental group decreased significantly after the study. Moreover, the groups differed significantly in terms of the need for opioid analgesic therapy neither before nor after the intervention. Local heat therapy is an effective intervention for preventing and relieving chest pain in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Effective pain management using local heat therapy could help nurses play an important role in providing effective care to patients with acute coronary syndrome and in minimising adverse effects associated with pain medications. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Effects of Improvisational Music Therapy vs Enhanced Standard Care on Symptom Severity Among Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: The TIME-A Randomized Clinical Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bieleninik, Lucja; Geretsegger, Monika; Mössler, Karin; Assmus, Jörg; Thompson, Grace; Gattino, Gustavo; Elefant, Cochavit; Gottfried, Tali; Igliozzi, Roberta; Muratori, Filippo; Suvini, Ferdinando; Kim, Jinah; Crawford, Mike J; Odell-Miller, Helen; Oldfield, Amelia; Casey, Órla; Finnemann, Johanna; Carpente, John; Park, A-La; Grossi, Enzo; Gold, Christian

    2017-08-08

    Music therapy may facilitate skills in areas affected by autism spectrum disorder (ASD), such as social interaction and communication. To evaluate effects of improvisational music therapy on generalized social communication skills of children with ASD. Assessor-blinded, randomized clinical trial, conducted in 9 countries and enrolling children aged 4 to 7 years with ASD. Children were recruited from November 2011 to November 2015, with follow-up between January 2012 and November 2016. Enhanced standard care (n = 182) vs enhanced standard care plus improvisational music therapy (n = 182), allocated in a 1:1 ratio. Enhanced standard care consisted of usual care as locally available plus parent counseling to discuss parents' concerns and provide information about ASD. In improvisational music therapy, trained music therapists sang or played music with each child, attuned and adapted to the child's focus of attention, to help children develop affect sharing and joint attention. The primary outcome was symptom severity over 5 months, based on the Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule (ADOS), social affect domain (range, 0-27; higher scores indicate greater severity; minimal clinically important difference, 1). Prespecified secondary outcomes included parent-rated social responsiveness. All outcomes were also assessed at 2 and 12 months. Among 364 participants randomized (mean age, 5.4 years; 83% boys), 314 (86%) completed the primary end point and 290 (80%) completed the last end point. Over 5 months, participants assigned to music therapy received a median of 19 music therapy, 3 parent counseling, and 36 other therapy sessions, compared with 3 parent counseling and 45 other therapy sessions for those assigned to enhanced standard care. From baseline to 5 months, mean ADOS social affect scores estimated by linear mixed-effects models decreased from 14.08 to 13.23 in the music therapy group and from 13.49 to 12.58 in the standard care group (mean difference, 0

  4. [Clinical trials in nursing journals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Giulio, Paola; Campagna, Sara; Dimonte, Valerio

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are pivotal for the development of nursing knowledge. To describe the clinical trials published in nursing journals in the last two years and propose some general reflections on nursing research. A search with the key-word trial was done on PubMed (2009-2013) on Cancer Nursing, European Journal of Oncology Nursing, International Journal of Nursing Studies, Journal of Advanced Nursing, Journal of Clinical Nursing and Nursing Research. Of 228 trials identified, 104 (45.8%) were published in the last 2 years. Nurses from Asian countries published the larger number of trials. Educational and supportive interventions were the most studied (61/104 trials), followed by clinical interventions (33/104). Samples were limited and most trials are monocentric. A growing number of trials is published, on issues relevant for the nursing profession, however larger samples and multicentric studies would be necessary.

  5. A clinical examination of antibiotics in continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) therapy for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). A prospective randomized controlled trial of BIPM and IPM/CS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamasaki, Shigemichi; Ishikura, Hiroyasu; Kamitani, Takanori

    2011-01-01

    Continuous regional arterial infusion (CRAI) therapy using both protease inhibitors and antibiotics are one of the specific therapeutic methods for severe acute pancreatitis (SAP). As for the administered antibiotics, imipenem/cilastatin sodium (IPM/CS) is generally chosen as a first step, but there are only a few reports comparing IPM/CS with other antibiotics. Therefore, we performed a prospective randomized controlled trial between biapenem (BIPM) and IPM/CS as CRAI antibiotics. Twelve patients with SAP were admitted to our institution during April, 2009 since August, 2006, and were randomized into two groups. They were treated with 120 mg/day of nafamostat mesilate and either 1.2 g/day of BIPM (n=6) or 2.0 g/day of IPM/CS (n=6) for CRAI therapy within 48 hours after the administration. The clinical data, inflammatory markers (WBC, CRP), serum pancreatic enzymes (lipase, tripsin, phospholipase A2, elastase 1 and pancreatic secretory trypsin inhibitor (PSTI) and contrast-enhanced abdominal Computed Tomography findings were compared between the two groups and the adverse effects were monitored. CRAI therapy was performed for seven days. The curative effect of this therapy was evaluated at the beginning of the treatment, the day 7 and the day 14. Our results suggested that BIPM was a non-recessive antibiotic which had an equal effect in CRAI therapy in comparison with IPM/CS. (author)

  6. Treatment of periodontitis in smokers with multiple sessions of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy or systemic antibiotics: A randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoro, Letícia Helena; Assem, Naida Zanini; Longo, Mariéllen; Alves, Márcio Luiz Ferro; Duque, Cristiane; Stipp, Rafael Nobrega; Vizoto, Natália Leal; Garcia, Valdir Gouveia

    2018-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of non-surgical periodontal therapies on smokers with chronic periodontitis, involving multiple adjunctive applications of antimicrobial photodynamic therapy (aPDT), and systemic metronidazole (MTZ) with amoxicillin (AMX). All participants were treated with scaling and root planing (SRP). Seventeen patients received 400 mg of MTZ and 500 mg of AMX three times per day for 7 days (MTZ + AMX). Additionally, 17 patients received a placebo, and 17 patients were treated with three applications of aPDT (immediately, 48 h and 96 h after SRP). Clinical and microbiological examinations were performed at baseline and at 90 and 180 days post-therapy. Subgingival samples were analyzed using real-time polymerase chain reaction. After 180 days, the patients in groups MTZ + AMX and aPDT had significantly lower mean probing depths, more clinical attachment level gains and less bleeding on probing. At 180 days, in the moderate pocket there was a reduction in the levels of Porphyromonas gingivalis and Prevotella nigrescens in the MTZ + AMX group, while group aPDT showed a reduction in Prevotella nigrescens. Furthermore, at 180 days, in the deep pocket a reduction in Porphyromonas gingivalis, Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens was observed in group MTZ + AMX, as well as a reduction in the levels of Prevotella intermedia and Prevotella nigrescens in group aPDT. In smokers with periodontitis, the MTZ + AMX and aPDT treatments significantly improved the effects of SRP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The effect of nonsurgical periodontal therapy on hemoglobin A1c levels in persons with type 2 diabetes and chronic periodontitis: a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretson, Steven P; Hyman, Leslie G; Michalowicz, Bryan S; Schoenfeld, Elinor R; Gelato, Marie C; Hou, Wei; Seaquist, Elizabeth R; Reddy, Michael S; Lewis, Cora E; Oates, Thomas W; Tripathy, Devjit; Katancik, James A; Orlander, Philip R; Paquette, David W; Hanson, Naomi Q; Tsai, Michael Y

    2013-12-18

    Chronic periodontitis, a destructive inflammatory disorder of the supporting structures of the teeth, is prevalent in patients with diabetes. Limited evidence suggests that periodontal therapy may improve glycemic control. To determine if nonsurgical periodontal treatment reduces levels of glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) in persons with type 2 diabetes and moderate to advanced chronic periodontitis. The Diabetes and Periodontal Therapy Trial (DPTT), a 6-month, single-masked, multicenter, randomized clinical trial. Participants had type 2 diabetes, were taking stable doses of medications, had HbA1c levels between 7% and less than 9%, and untreated chronic periodontitis. Five hundred fourteen participants were enrolled between November 2009 and March 2012 from diabetes and dental clinics and communities affiliated with 5 academic medical centers. The treatment group (n = 257) received scaling and root planing plus chlorhexidine oral rinse at baseline and supportive periodontal therapy at 3 and 6 months. The control group (n = 257) received no treatment for 6 months. Difference in change in HbA1c level from baseline between groups at 6 months. Secondary outcomes included changes in probing pocket depths, clinical attachment loss, bleeding on probing, gingival index, fasting glucose level, and Homeostasis Model Assessment (HOMA2) score. Enrollment was stopped early because of futility. At 6 months, mean HbA1c levels in the periodontal therapy group increased 0.17% (SD, 1.0), compared with 0.11% (SD, 1.0) in the control group, with no significant difference between groups based on a linear regression model adjusting for clinical site (mean difference, -0.05% [95% CI, -0.23% to 0.12%]; P = .55). Periodontal measures improved in the treatment group compared with the control group at 6 months, with adjusted between-group differences of 0.28 mm (95% CI, 0.18 to 0.37) for probing depth, 0.25 mm (95% CI, 0.14 to 0.36) for clinical attachment loss, 13.1% (95% CI, 8

  8. Gateways to clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayés, M; Rabasseda, X; Prous, J R

    2006-10-01

    Gateways to Clinical Trials are a guide to the most recent clinical trials in current literature and congresses. The data the following tables have been retrieved from the Clinical Trials Knowledge Area of Prous Science Integrity, the drug discovery and development portal, http://integrity.prous.com. This issues focuses on the following selection of drugs: (-)-Epigallocatechin gallate, (-)-gossypol, 2-deoxyglucose, 3,4-DAP, 7-monohydroxyethylrutoside; Ad5CMV-p53, adalimumab, adefovir dipivoxil, ADH-1, alemtuzumab, aliskiren fumarate, alvocidib hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid hydrochloride, aminolevulinic acid methyl ester, amrubicin hydrochloride, AN-152, anakinra, anecortave acetate, antiasthma herbal medicine intervention, AP-12009, AP-23573, apaziquone, aprinocarsen sodium, AR-C126532, AR-H065522, aripiprazole, armodafinil, arzoxifene hydrochloride, atazanavir sulfate, atilmotin, atomoxetine hydrochloride, atorvastatin, avanafil, azimilide hydrochloride; Bevacizumab, biphasic insulin aspart, BMS-214662, BN-83495, bortezomib, bosentan, botulinum toxin type B; Caspofungin acetate, cetuximab, chrysin, ciclesonide, clevudine, clofarabine, clopidogrel, CNF-1010, CNTO-328, CP-751871, CX-717, Cypher; Dapoxetine hydrochloride, darifenacin hydrobromide, dasatinib, deferasirox, dextofisopam, dextromethorphan/quinidine sulfate, diclofenac, dronedarone hydrochloride, drotrecogin alfa (activated), duloxetine hydrochloride, dutasteride; Edaravone, efaproxiral sodium, emtricitabine, entecavir, eplerenone, epratuzumab, erlotinib hydrochloride, escitalopram oxalate, etoricoxib, ezetimibe, ezetimibe/simvastatin; Finrozole, fipamezole hydrochloride, fondaparinux sodium, fulvestrant; Gabapentin enacarbil, gaboxadol, gefitinib, gestodene, ghrelin (human); Human insulin, human papillomavirus vaccine; Imatinib mesylate, immunoglobulin intravenous (human), indiplon, insulin detemir, insulin glargine, insulin glulisine, intranasal insulin, istradefylline, i.v. gamma

  9. Effects of neuromuscular electrical stimulation, laser therapy and LED therapy on the masticatory system and the impact on sleep variables in cerebral palsy patients: a randomized, five arms clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannasi Lilian

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Few studies demonstrate effectiveness of therapies for oral rehabilitation of patients with cerebral palsy (CP, given the difficulties in chewing, swallowing and speech, besides the intellectual, sensory and social limitations. Due to upper airway obstruction, they are also vulnerable to sleep disorders. This study aims to assess the sleep variables, through polysomnography, and masticatory dynamics, using electromiography, before and after neuromuscular electrical stimulation, associated or not with low power laser (Gallium Arsenide- Aluminun, =780 nm and LED (= 660 nm irradiation in CP patients. Methods/design 50 patients with CP, both gender, aged between 19 and 60 years will be enrolled in this study. The inclusion criteria are: voluntary participation, patient with hemiparesis, quadriparesis or diparetic CP, with ability to understand and respond to verbal commands. The exclusion criteria are: patients undergoing/underwent orthodontic, functional maxillary orthopedic or botulinum toxin treatment. Polysomnographic and surface electromyographic exams on masseter, temporalis and suprahyoid will be carry out in all sample. Questionnaire assessing oral characteristics will be applied. The sample will be divided into 5 treatment groups: Group 1: neuromuscular electrical stimulation; Group 2: laser therapy; Group 3: LED therapy; Group 4: neuromuscular electrical stimulation and laser therapy and Group 5: neuromuscular electrical stimulation and LED therapy. All patients will be treated during 8 consecutive weeks. After treatment, polysomnographic and electromiographic exams will be collected again. Discussion This paper describes a five arm clinical trial assessing the examination of sleep quality and masticatory function in patients with CP under non-invasive therapies. Trial registration The protocol for this study is registered with the Brazilian Registry of Clinical Trials - ReBEC RBR-994XFS Descriptors Cerebral Palsy

  10. Randomized multicenter clinical trial of myofascial physical therapy in women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome and pelvic floor tenderness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    FitzGerald, M P; Payne, C K; Lukacz, E S; Yang, C C; Peters, K M; Chai, T C; Nickel, J C; Hanno, P M; Kreder, K J; Burks, D A; Mayer, R; Kotarinos, R; Fortman, C; Allen, T M; Fraser, L; Mason-Cover, M; Furey, C; Odabachian, L; Sanfield, A; Chu, J; Huestis, K; Tata, G E; Dugan, N; Sheth, H; Bewyer, K; Anaeme, A; Newton, K; Featherstone, W; Halle-Podell, R; Cen, L; Landis, J R; Propert, K J; Foster, H E; Kusek, J W; Nyberg, L M

    2012-06-01

    We determined the efficacy and safety of pelvic floor myofascial physical therapy compared to global therapeutic massage in women with newly symptomatic interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome. A randomized controlled trial of 10 scheduled treatments of myofascial physical therapy vs global therapeutic massage was performed at 11 clinical centers in North America. We recruited women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome with demonstrable pelvic floor tenderness on physical examination and a limitation of no more than 3 years' symptom duration. The primary outcome was the proportion of responders defined as moderately improved or markedly improved in overall symptoms compared to baseline on a 7-point global response assessment scale. Secondary outcomes included ratings for pain, urgency and frequency, the O'Leary-Sant IC Symptom and Problem Index, and reports of adverse events. We compared response rates between treatment arms using the exact conditional version of the Mantel-Haenszel test to control for clustering by clinical center. For secondary efficacy outcomes cross-sectional descriptive statistics and changes from baseline were calculated. A total of 81 women randomized to the 2 treatment groups had similar symptoms at baseline. The global response assessment response rate was 26% in the global therapeutic massage group and 59% in the myofascial physical therapy group (p=0.0012). Pain, urgency and frequency ratings, and O'Leary-Sant IC Symptom and Problem Index decreased in both groups during followup, and were not significantly different between the groups. Pain was the most common adverse event, occurring at similar rates in both groups. No serious adverse events were reported. A significantly higher proportion of women with interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome responded to treatment with myofascial physical therapy than to global therapeutic massage. Myofascial physical therapy may be a beneficial therapy in women with this

  11. Cancer Trials Ireland (ICORG) 06-34: A multi-centre clinical trial using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to reduce the toxicity of palliative radiation for lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Ronan L; Armstrong, John G; Thirion, Pierre; Dunne, Mary; Finn, Marie; Small, Cormac; Byrne, Mary; O'Shea, Carmel; O'Sullivan, Lydia; Shannon, Aoife; Kelly, Emma; Hacking, Dayle J

    2018-05-01

    Cancer Trials Ireland (ICORG) 06-34: A multi-centre clinical trial using three-dimensional conformal radiation therapy to reduce the toxicity of palliative radiation for lung cancer. NCT01176487. Trials of radiation therapy for the palliation of intra-thoracic symptoms from locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) have concentrated on optimising fractionation and dose schedules. In these trials, the rates of oesophagitis induced by this "palliative" therapy have been unacceptably high. In contrast, this non-randomised, single-arm trial was designed to assess if more technically advanced treatment techniques would result in equivalent symptom relief and reduce the side-effect of symptomatic oesophagitis. Thirty-five evaluable patients with symptomatic locally advanced or metastatic NSCLC were treated using a three-dimensional conformal technique (3-DCRT) and standardised dose regimens of 39 Gy in 13 fractions, 20 Gy in 5 fractions or 17 Gy in 2 fractions. Treatment plans sought to minimise oesophageal dose. Oesophagitis was recorded during treatment, at two weeks, one month and three months following radiation therapy and 3-6 monthly thereafter. Mean dose to the irradiated oesophagus was calculated for all treatment plans. Five patients (14%) had experienced grade 2 oesophagitis or dysphagia or both during treatment and 2 other patients had these side effects at the 2-week follow-up. At follow-up of one month after therapy, there was no grade two or higher oesophagitis or dysphagia reported. 22 patients were eligible for assessment of late toxicity. Five of these patients reported oesophagitis or dysphagia (one had grade 3 dysphagia, two had grade 2 oesophagitis, one of whom also had grade 2 dysphagia). Quality of Life (QoL) data at baseline and at 1-month follow up were available for 20 patients. At 1-month post radiation therapy, these patients had slightly less trouble taking a short walk, less shortness of breath, did not feel as weak, had

  12. Clinical trial of neutron capture therapy for brain tumors at New England Medical Center and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamenhof, R.G.A.; Madoc-Jones, H.; Harling, O.K.; Bernard, J.A.

    1986-01-01

    A proposal is submitted that is based on the conclusions of a NCT expert panel recently convened at BNL by the Department of Energy to evaluate the status of NCT and to recommend what preclinical tasks should be accomplished prior to a clinical study being undertaken. The proposal is for two years of preclinical research and preparations, followed in the third year by a pilot clinical trial of ten patients with grade-IV astrocytoma brain tumors, for whom the prognosis with existing treatment modalities is less than a 5% three-year survival rate. Preclinical tasks would include modifying the MIT Nuclear Reactor medical facility to produce an epithermal as well as the existing and highly thermalized neutron treatment beam; characterizing the transport behavior of these beams in both physical and mathematical models of the human head, and developing a treatment planning scheme for NCT; further development of the neutron-induced alpha-autoradiography track-etch method for measuring macro- and micro-distributions of B-10 uptake in tissues and blood; investigations into the B-10 cellular uptake pattern of human tumors; and examination of the nature of endothelial cell vascular damage in B-10-containing animals undergoing irradiation with neutrons. With the successful completion of the above preclinical tasks we feel we will be in a position to embark in the third year on a pilot clinical evaluation

  13. Intravenous artesunate plus Artemisnin based Combination Therapy (ACT) or intravenous quinine plus ACT for treatment of severe malaria in Ugandan children: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Achan, Jane; Lamorde, Mohammed; Karera-Gonahasa, Carine; Kiragga, Agnes N; Mayanja-Kizza, Harriet; Kiwanuka, Noah; Nsobya, Sam; Talisuna, Ambrose O; Merry, Concepta

    2017-12-28

    Severe malaria is a medical emergency associated with high mortality. Adequate treatment requires initial parenteral therapy for fast parasite clearance followed by longer acting oral antimalarial drugs for cure and prevention of recrudescence. In a randomized controlled clinical trial, we evaluated the 42-day parasitological outcomes of severe malaria treatment with intravenous artesunate (AS) or intravenous quinine (QNN) followed by oral artemisinin based combination therapy (ACT) in children living in a high malaria transmission setting in Eastern Uganda. We enrolled 300 participants and all were included in the intention to treat analysis. Baseline characteristics were similar across treatment arms. The median and interquartile range for number of days from baseline to parasite clearance was significantly lower among participants who received intravenous AS (2 (1-2) vs 3 (2-3), P malaria symptoms. In this high transmission setting, we observed adequate initial treatment outcomes followed by very high rates of malaria re-infection post severe malaria treatment. The impact of recurrent antimalarial treatment on the long term efficacy of antimalarial regimens needs to be investigated and surveillance mechanisms for resistance markers established since recurrent malaria infections are likely to be exposed to sub-therapeutic drug concentrations. More strategies for prevention of recurrent malaria infections in the most at risk populations are needed. The study was registered with the Pan African Clinical Trial Registry ( PACTR201110000321348 ).

  14. Radiotherapeutic management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). An overview based on the clinical trials of the radiation therapy oncology group (RTOG)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.F.; Byhardt, R.W.

    1995-01-01

    Recent clinical trials clarified the role of radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The evolution of this research is illustrated by a systemic succession of studies conducted during the last twenty years by the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group (RTOG). This article reviews past and present RTOG research efforts in NSCLC. For unresectable NSCLS, major research themes have included radiation dose intensification using both standard and altered fractionation (hyperfractionation or accelerated fraction RT), treatment intensification using combined modality RT and chemotherapy (CT), as well as noncytotoxic adjuvants to RT. These trials have shown that treatment intensification can yield improved survival with acceptable toxicity. Local control and survival was improved with induction CT followed by standard RT to 60 Gy. Current studies will evaluate the timing and sequencing of CT and RT and the combination of CT with altered fractionation RT. Hypoxic cell sensitizers and nonspecific immune stimulants, two noncytotoxic adjuvants to RT, have shown no survival benefit. Biologic response modifiers, including recombinant interferon-beta, will also be evaluated as adjuvants to standard RT, based on interferon-beta radiosensitization observed in the laboratory and clinical investigations suggesting improved survival. Overall, RTOG studies have demonstrated small, but definite, incremental improvements in treatment outcome in NSCLS and provide a solid foundation on which to develop future investigations. (N.K.) 51 refs

  15. Cytokine and clinical response to Saccharomyces boulardii therapy in diarrhea-dominant irritable bowel syndrome: a randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, Zaigham; Yakoob, Javed; Jafri, Wasim; Ahmad, Zubair; Azam, Zahid; Usman, Muhammad W; Shamim, Sara; Islam, Muhammad

    2014-06-01

    This preliminary study aimed to investigate the effects of the probiotic Saccharomyces boulardii on proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines in patients with diarrhea-dominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). The other objectives were to document any clinical improvement as judged by symptoms, quality of life, and histology. This was a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled trial in which S. boulardii, 750 mg/day, or placebo was administered for 6 weeks in IBS-D patients, in addition to ispaghula husk standard treatment. Thirty-seven patients received S. boulardii and 35 patients received the placebo. As compared with placebo, the S. boulardii group showed a significant decrease in blood and tissue levels of proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-8 (IL-8) and tumor necrosis factor-α (PS. boulardii group. Although baseline histological findings were mild, an improvement was observed in the probiotic group in the lymphocyte and neutrophil infiltrates (P=0.017 and 0.018), epithelial mitosis (P=0.003), and intraepithelial lymphocytes (P=0.024). No serious adverse events were found in either group. S. boulardii with ispaghula husk was superior to placebo with ispaghula husk in improving the cytokine profile, histology, and quality of life of patients with IBS-D. These preliminary results need to be confirmed in a well-powered trial.

  16. Economic evaluation of antibiotic therapy versus appendicectomy for the treatment of uncomplicated acute appendicitis from the APPAC randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sippola, S; Grönroos, J; Tuominen, R; Paajanen, H; Rautio, T; Nordström, P; Aarnio, M; Rantanen, T; Hurme, S; Salminen, P

    2017-09-01

    An increasing amount of evidence supports antibiotic therapy for treating uncomplicated acute appendicitis. The objective of this study was to compare the costs of antibiotics alone versus appendicectomy in treating uncomplicated acute appendicitis within the randomized controlled APPAC (APPendicitis ACuta) trial. The APPAC multicentre, non-inferiority RCT was conducted on patients with CT-confirmed uncomplicated acute appendicitis. Patients were assigned randomly to appendicectomy or antibiotic treatment. All costs were recorded, whether generated by the initial visit and subsequent treatment or possible recurrent appendicitis during the 1-year follow-up. The cost estimates were based on cost levels for the year 2012. Some 273 patients were assigned to the appendicectomy group and 257 to antibiotic treatment. Most patients randomized to antibiotic treatment did not require appendicectomy during the 1-year follow-up. In the operative group, overall societal costs (€5989·2, 95 per cent c.i. 5787·3 to 6191·1) were 1·6 times higher (€2244·8, 1940·5 to 2549·1) than those in the antibiotic group (€3744·4, 3514·6 to 3974·2). In both groups, productivity losses represented a slightly higher proportion of overall societal costs than all treatment costs together, with diagnostics and medicines having a minor role. Those in the operative group were prescribed significantly more sick leave than those in the antibiotic group (mean(s.d.) 17·0(8·3) (95 per cent c.i. 16·0 to 18·0) versus 9·2(6·9) (8·3 to 10·0) days respectively; P antibiotic therapy for uncomplicated appendicitis incurred lower costs than those who had surgery. © 2017 BJS Society Ltd Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Clinical differences between younger and older adults with HIV/AIDS starting antiretroviral therapy in Uganda and Zimbabwe: a secondary analysis of the DART trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sujal M Parikh

    Full Text Available Clinical and immunological data about HIV in older adults from low and middle income countries is scarce. We aimed to describe differences between younger and older adults with HIV starting antiretroviral therapy in two low-income African countries.HIV clinics in Uganda and Zimbabwe.Secondary exploratory cross-sectional analysis of the DART randomized controlled trial.Clinical and laboratory characteristics were compared between adults aged 18-49 years (younger and ≥ 50 years (older, using two exploratory multivariable logistic regression models, one with HIV viral load (measured in a subset pre-ART and one without.A total of 3316 eligible participants enrolled in DART were available for analysis; 219 (7% were ≥ 50 years and 1160 (35% were male. Across the two adjusted regression models, older adults had significantly higher systolic blood pressure, lower creatinine clearance and were consistently less likely to be females compared to younger adults with HIV. Paradoxically, the models separately suggested that older adults had statistically significant (but not clinically important higher CD4+ cell counts and higher plasma HIV-1 viral copies at initiation. Crude associations between older age and higher baseline hemoglobin, body mass index, diastolic blood pressure and lower WHO clinical stage were not sustained in the adjusted analysis.Our study found clinical and immunological differences between younger and older adults, in a cohort of Africans starting antiretroviral therapy. Further investigations should explore how these differences could be used to ensure equity in service delivery and affect outcomes of antiretroviral therapy.

  18. Clinical trials and gender medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassese, Mariarita; Zuber, Veronica

    2011-01-01

    Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22%) which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa) which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  19. Clinical trials and gender medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariarita Cassese

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Women use more medicines than men because they fall ill more often and suffer more from chronic diseases, but also because women pay more attention to their health and have more consciousness and care about themselves. Although medicines can have different effects on women and men, women still represent a small percentage in the first phases of trials (22% which are essential to verify drugs dosage, side effects, and safety. Even though women are more present in trials, studies results are not presented with a gender approach. This situation is due to educational, social, ethical and economical factors. The scientific research must increase feminine presence in clinical trials in order to be equal and correct, and all the key stakeholder should be involved in this process. We still have a long way to cover and it doesn't concern only women but also children and old people. The aim is to have a medicine not only illness-focused but patient-focused: a medicine able to take into consideration all the patient characteristics and so to produce a really personalized therapy. What above described is part of the reasons why in 2005 was founded the National Observatory for Women's Health (Osservatorio Nazionale sulla Salute della Donna, ONDa which promotes a gender health awareness and culture in Italy, at all the levels of the civil and scientific society.

  20. Ultrasonography and clinical outcome comparison of extracorporeal shock wave therapy and corticosteroid injections for chronic plantar fasciitis: A randomized controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Ta-Wei; Ma, Hsiao-Li; Lee, Meng-Shiunn; Chen, Po-Ming; Ku, Ming-Chou

    2018-01-01

    Objectives: Extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) and corticosteroid injection (CSI) are treatment options for plantar fasciitis. Their clinical outcome comparison remains a debate. Also, the thickness changes of the plantar fascia on objective evaluation under the medium energy ESWT and CSI therapy are elusive. Methods: A total of 97 patients with chronic plantar fasciitis were enrolled in the randomized prospective trial. Forty-seven patients received extracorporeal shock wave therapy (ESWT), and fifty patients received corticosteroid injection (CSI). The thickness of the plantar fascia was evaluated respectively before ESWT and CSI, and at the 4th and 12th week after ESWT and CSI by ultrasonography. Pain level and clinical outcomes were recorded using visual analogue scale (VAS) and 100-points scoring systems. Correlation analysis was performed between the thickness change and clinical outcome. Results: Under ultrasonography, we observed more increase of plantar fascia thickness of ESWT group than CSI group at 4th week (p=0.048). VAS of plantar fasciitis patients receiving ESWT was lower than those who received corticosteroid injection (0.001 and pplantar fascia thickness at 4th week was positively correlated with the decrease of VAS score at 12th week follow-up (R=0.302, P=0.039). Conclusions: At 4th week after treatment, the thickness of plantar fascia increased. Then it decreased gradually, but not to the baseline at 12th week. On the pain level outcome at 12th week, extracorporeal shockwave therapy (ESWT) was more efficient than corticosteroid injection (CSI) on chronic plantar fasciitis. The more change of plantar fascia after ESWT, the more efficient on clinical outcome. PMID:29504578